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Sample records for computing bulk radiative

  1. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Habing, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  2. Radiation effects in bulk and nanostructured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrom, E.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding radiation effects in silicon (Si) is of great technological importance. The material, being the basis of modern semiconductor electronics and photonics, is subjected to radiation already at the processing stage, and in many applications throughout the lifetime of the manufactured component. Despite decades of research, many fundamental questions on the subject are still not satisfactorily answered, and new ones arise constantly as device fabrication shifts towards the nanoscale. In this study, methods of computational physics are harnessed to tackle basic questions on the radiation response of bulk and nanostructured Si systems, as well as to explain atomic-scale phenomena underlying existing experimental results. Empirical potentials and quantum mechanical models are coupled with molecular dynamics simulations to model the response of Si to irradiation and to characterize the created crystal damage. The threshold displacement energy, i.e., the smallest recoil energy required to create a lattice defect, is determined in Si bulk and nanowires, in the latter system also as a function of mechanical strain. It is found that commonly used values for this quantity are drastically underestimated. Strain on the nanowire causes the threshold energy to drop, with an effect on defect production that is significantly higher than in an another nanostructure with similar dimensions, the carbon nanotube. Simulating ion irradiation of Si nanowires reveals that the large surface area to volume ratio of the nanostructure causes up to a three-fold enhancement in defect production as compared to bulk Si. Amorphous defect clusters created by energetic neutron bombardment are predicted, on the basis of their electronic structure and abundance, to cause a deleterious phenomenon called type inversion in Si strip detectors in high-energy physics experiments. The thinning of Si lamellae using a focused ion beam is studied in conjunction with experiment to unravel the cause for

  3. Disinfection ultraviolet radiation bulk food products

    OpenAIRE

    Семенов, А. А.

    2014-01-01

    В работе представлены результаты обеззараживания сыпучих пищевых продуктов ультрафиолетовым излучением. Предложена технология бактерицидного обеззараживания сыпучих продуктов с размером частиц до 50 мкм. Проведены необходимые расчеты, связанные с дозой облучения, с временем пребывания частиц в зоне облучения и необходимой дозой инактивации в зависимости от вида бактерий. Considered the results of bulk food products disinfection by ultraviolet radiation. The technology bactericidal disinfec...

  4. Surface and Bulk Nanostructuring of Polymers Using Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güven, O.; Barsbay, M.; Ateş,; Akbulut, M. [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation has long been known tobe a powerful tool in modifying and controlled the properties, forms and eventually end-uses of polymeric materials for a variety of applications. Industrial applications are full of successful examples of macro scale, bulk property modifications by radiation. Extremely short wavelength of ionizing radiation however, makes it an important and useful tool in creating very small size structures in polymers.

  5. Surface and Bulk Nanostructuring of Polymers Using Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güven, O.; Barsbay, M.; Ateş; Akbulut, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has long been known tobe a powerful tool in modifying and controlled the properties, forms and eventually end-uses of polymeric materials for a variety of applications. Industrial applications are full of successful examples of macro scale, bulk property modifications by radiation. Extremely short wavelength of ionizing radiation however, makes it an important and useful tool in creating very small size structures in polymers

  6. Radiation-hard silicon gate bulk CMOS cell family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbon, C.F.; Habing, D.H.; Flores, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    A radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate CMOS technology and a topologically simple, high-performance dual-port cell family utilizing this process have been demonstrated. Additional circuits, including a random logic circuit containing 4800 transistors on a 236 x 236 mil die, are presently being designed and processed. Finally, a joint design-process effort is underway to redesign the cell family in reduced design rules; this results in a factor of 2.5 cell size reduction and a factor of 3 decrease in chip interconnect area. Cell performance is correspondingly improved

  7. Radiation-hardened bulk Si-gate CMOS microprocessor family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricker, R.E.; Dingwall, A.G.F.; Cohen, S.; Adams, J.R.; Slemmer, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    RCA and Sandia Laboratories jointly developed a radiation-hardened bulk Si-gate CMOS technology which is used to fabricate the CDP-1800 series microprocessor family. Total dose hardness of 1 x 10 6 rads (Si) and transient upset hardness of 5 x 10 8 rads (Si)/sec with no latch up at any transient level was achieved. Radiation-hardened parts manufactured to date include the CDP-1802 microprocessor, the CDP-1834 ROM, the CDP-1852 8-bit I/O port, the CDP-1856 N-bit 1 of 8 decoder, and the TCC-244 256 x 4 Static RAM. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first section, the basic fundamentals of the non-hardened C 2 L technology used for the CDP-1800 series microprocessor parts is discussed along with the primary reasons for hardening this technology. The second section discusses the major changes in the fabrication sequence that are required to produce radiation-hardened devices. The final section details the electrical performance characteristics of the hardened devices as well as the effects of radiation on device performance. Also included in this section is a discussion of the TCC-244 256 x 4 Static RAM designed jointly by RCA and Sandia Laboratories for this application

  8. Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2011-01-01

    We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by (D + 1)-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the 'greybody' factors. For intermediate values of D (3 ≤ D ∼ > 1, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much shorter than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with D >> 1, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

  9. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher

  10. Regular Bulk Solutions in Brane-Worlds with Inhomogeneous Dust and Generalized Dark Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Roldão da; Kuerten, A. M.; Herrera-Aguilar, A.

    2015-01-01

    From the dynamics of a brane-world with matter fields present in the bulk, the bulk metric and the black string solution near the brane are generalized, when both the dynamics of inhomogeneous dust/generalized dark radiation on the brane-world and inhomogeneous dark radiation in the bulk as well are considered as exact dynamical collapse solutions. Based on the analysis on the inhomogeneous static exterior of a collapsing sphere of homogeneous dark radiation on the brane, the associated black string warped horizon is studied, as well as the 5D bulk metric near the brane. Moreover, the black string and the bulk are shown to be more regular upon time evolution, for suitable values for the dark radiation parameter in the model, by analyzing the soft physical singularities

  11. Computer applications in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, P.R.; Moores, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer applications in general and diagnostic radiology in particular are becoming more widespread. Their application to the field of radiation protection in medical imaging, including quality control initiatives, is similarly becoming more widespread. Advances in computer technology have enabled departments of diagnostic radiology to have access to powerful yet affordable personal computers. The application of databases, expert systems and computer-based learning is under way. The executive information systems for the management of dose and QA data that are under way at IRS are discussed. An important consideration in developing these pragmatic software tools has been the range of computer literacy within the end user group. Using interfaces have been specifically designed to reflect the requirements of many end users who will have little or no computer knowledge. (Author)

  12. Radiation induced electrical degradation in crystalline Al2O3: a bulk effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Xiangfu; Chen, Y.; Evans, B.D.; Gonzalez, R.; Sellers, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Kesternich et al. and Jung et al. have recently raised serious questions as to whether past investigations of permanent radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED) of ceramics were actually monitoring bulk effects, as claimed. Their evidence to the contrary appears compelling. The present investigation provides evidence that bulk damage does exist and is in the form of dislocations. Discussions are focussed on some aspects of the controversy between evidence for RIED, as reported in the past, and evidence for radiation enhanced surface contaminations. ((orig.))

  13. Lithium niobate bulk crystallization promoted by CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N. M.; Costa, F. M.; Nogueira, R. N.; Graça, M. P. F.

    2012-09-01

    The crystallization induced by laser radiation is a very promising technique to promote glass/ceramic transformation, being already used to produce crystalline patterns on glass surfaces. In this work, a SiO2-Li2O-Nb2O5 glass, prepared by the sol-gel route, was submitted to CO2 laser radiation and conventional heat-treatments in order to induce the LiNbO3 crystallization. The structure and morphology of the samples prepared by both routes was analyzed as a function of exposure time, radiation power and heat-treatment temperatures by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The results reveal a correlation between the crystallization degree of LiNbO3 particles and glass matrix with the heat treatment type and experimental parameters. An heat-treatment at 650 °C/4 h was necessary to induce crystallization in heat treatments samples while 4 W/500 s was enough for laser radiation ones, corresponding a reduction time processing of ˜14 000 s.

  14. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  15. Efficient femtosecond mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersivewave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Guo, Hairun; Bache, Morten

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate efficient mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersive wave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal. Femtosecond mid-IR pulses centering from 2.8–2.92 µm are generated using the single pump wavelengths from 1.25–1.45 µm.......We experimentally demonstrate efficient mid-infrared pulse generation by dispersive wave radiation in bulk lithium niobate crystal. Femtosecond mid-IR pulses centering from 2.8–2.92 µm are generated using the single pump wavelengths from 1.25–1.45 µm....

  16. Process controls for radiation hardened aluminum gate bulk silicon CMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, B.L.

    1975-01-01

    Optimized dry oxides have recently yielded notable improvements in CMOS radiation-hardness. By following the proper procedures and recipes, it is now possible to produce devices which will function satisfactorily after exposure to a total ionizing dose in excess of 10 6 RADS (Si). This paper is concerned with the controls required on processing parameters once the optimized process is defined. In this process, the pre-irradiation electrical parameters must be closely controlled to insure that devices will function after irradiation. In particular, the specifications on n- and p-channel threshold voltages require tight control of fixed oxide charge, surface-state density, oxide thickness, and substrate and p-well surface concentrations. In order to achieve the above level of radiation hardness, certain processing procedures and parameters must also be closely controlled. Higher levels of cleanliness are required in the hardened process than are commonly required for commercial CMOS since, for hardened dry oxides, no impurity gettering can be employed during or after oxidation. Without such gettering, an unclean oxide is unacceptable due to bias-temperature instability. Correct pre-oxidation cleaning, residual surface damage removal, proper oxidation and annealing temperatures and times, and the correct metal sintering cycle are all important in determining device hardness. In a reproducible, hardened process, each of these processing steps must be closely controlled. (U.S.)

  17. Occupational radiation risks in conveyance of bulk phosphate and potash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grof, Y.; Even, O.; Schlesinger, T.; Margaliot, M.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of occupational ionizing radiation risks encountered in the conveyance and storage of Phosphates and Potash as loose cargo got very minor attention from the national health and occupational safety authorities in the world. In Israel, the Phosphates include an average 100- 150 ppm of Uranium in equilibrium with its daughters, while in Phosphates produced in most other countries the inaction reaches regularly only few ppm up to 50 ppm. Because of the high content of the Uranium in the Phosphate in Israel we must take into consideration the radiological implications involved in the handling of this mineral. The radiological implications of handling Potash are less significant but can not be neglected as we demonstrate bellow In this presentation we will estimate the occupational radiological risks involved in the storing and transportation of Phosphate and Potash. Note, that the main risk in working with Phosphate and Potash is the risk from the dust itself (authors)

  18. Occupational radiation risks in conveyance of bulk phosphate and potash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grof, Y; Even, O; Schlesinger, T; Margaliot, M [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1996-12-01

    The issue of occupational ionizing radiation risks encountered in the conveyance and storage of Phosphates and Potash as loose cargo got very minor attention from the national health and occupational safety authorities in the world. In Israel, the Phosphates include an average 100- 150 ppm of Uranium in equilibrium with its daughters, while in Phosphates produced in most other countries the inaction reaches regularly only few ppm up to 50 ppm. Because of the high content of the Uranium in the Phosphate in Israel we must take into consideration the radiological implications involved in the handling of this mineral. The radiological implications of handling Potash are less significant but can not be neglected as we demonstrate bellow In this presentation we will estimate the occupational radiological risks involved in the storing and transportation of Phosphate and Potash. Note, that the main risk in working with Phosphate and Potash is the risk from the dust itself (authors).

  19. Efficiency and attenuation correction factors determination in gamma spectrometric assay of bulk samples using self radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Kh.

    2009-02-01

    Gamma spectrometry forms the most important and capable tool for measuring radioactive materials. Determination of the efficiency and attenuation correction factors is the most tedious problem in the gamma spectrometric assay of bulk samples. A new experimental and easy method for these correction factors determination using self radiation was proposed in this work. An experimental study of the correlation between self attenuation correction factor and sample thickness and its practical application was also introduced. The work was performed on NORM and uranyl nitrate bulk sample. The results of proposed methods agreed with those of traditional ones.(author)

  20. Sum-frequency nonlinear Cherenkov radiation generated on the boundary of bulk medium crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Cao, Jianjun; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zheng, Yuanlin; Ren, Huaijin; Deng, Xuewei; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated experimentally a method to generate the sum-frequency Nonlinear Cherenkov radiation (NCR) on the boundary of bulk medium by using two synchronized laser beam with wavelength of 1300 nm and 800 nm. It is also an evidence that the polarization wave is always confined to the boundary. Critical conditions of surface sum-frequency NCR under normal and anomalous dispersion condition is discussed.

  1. Testing of bulk radiation damage of n-in-p silicon sensors for very high radiation environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hara, K.; Affolder, A.A.; Allport, P.P.; Bates, R.; Betancourt, C.; Böhm, Jan; Brown, H.; Buttar, C.; Carter, J. R.; Casse, G.; Mikeštíková, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 636, č. 1 (2011), "S83"-"S89" ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : p-bulk silicon * microstrip * charge collection * radiation damage Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nima.2010.04.090

  2. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gerhard, E-mail: jungge@uni-mainz.de; Schmid, Friederike, E-mail: friederike.schmid@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-28

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions — one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid.

  3. Automatic computation of radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, J.; Ishikawa, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Kato, K.; Nakazawa, N.; Kaneko, T.

    1997-01-01

    Automated systems are reviewed focusing on their general structure and requirement specific to the calculation of radiative corrections. Detailed description of the system and its performance is presented taking GRACE as a concrete example. (author)

  4. Computed tomography in radiation therapy planning: Thoracic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, H.G.; Zingas, A.; Haghbin, M.; Mondalek, P.; Smereka, R.

    1983-01-01

    With the explosive spread of computed tomographic (CT) scanning throughout the United States, one of the main applications has been in patients who are treated for cancer by surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. For the radiation oncologist, the desire to provide local tumor control and avoid geographic misses to achieve an expected prolongation of survival has led to the use of large radiation fields in the treatment of intrathoracic cancer, including bronchogenic carcinoma, cancer of the esophagus, and other malignant tumors. The optimal radiation therapy plan is a balance between local tumor control and the necessity to preserve normal structures by the use of directed and limited fields for bulk disease. CT scanning has been employed to accurately demonstrate the extent of tumor as well as to determine the isodose distribution of radiation, including the spatial distribution of radiation portals in single planar and three-dimensional aspects as well as consideration of tissue inhomogeneities. The accurate planning of the distribution of therapeutic irradiation includes both the tumor-bearing target volume and the critical normal tissues. This chapter provides information regarding these aspects of the application of CT scanning to radiation therapy for bronchogenic carcinoma and carcinoma of the esophagus

  5. Symbolic math for computation of radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suman, Vitisha; Datta, D.; Sarkar, P.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation transport calculations for shielding studies in the field of accelerator technology often involve intensive numerical computations. Traditionally, radiation transport equation is solved using finite difference scheme or advanced finite element method with respect to specific initial and boundary conditions suitable for the geometry of the problem. All these computations need CPU intensive computer codes for accurate calculation of scalar and angular fluxes. Computation using symbols of the analytical expression representing the transport equation as objects is an enhanced numerical technique in which the computation is completely algorithm and data oriented. Algorithm on the basis of symbolic math architecture is developed using Symbolic math toolbox of MATLAB software. Present paper describes the symbolic math algorithm and its application as a case study in which shielding calculation of rectangular slab geometry is studied for a line source of specific activity. Study of application of symbolic math in this domain evolves a new paradigm compared to the existing computer code such as DORT. (author)

  6. Computer-controlled radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    A computer-controlled radiation monitoring system was designed and installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (10 MV tandem accelerator from High Voltage Engineering Corporation). The system continuously monitors the photon and neutron radiation environment associated with the facility and automatically suspends accelerator operation if preset radiation levels are exceeded. The system has proved reliable real-time radiation monitoring over the past five years, and has been a valuable tool for maintaining personnel exposure as low as reasonably achievable

  7. Radiation management computer system for Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Kei; Yasutomo, Katsumi; Sudou, Takayuki; Yamashita, Masahiro; Hayata, Kenichi; Ueda, Hajime; Hosokawa, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    Radiation management of nuclear power research institutes, nuclear power stations and other such facilities are strictly managed under Japanese laws and management policies. Recently, the momentous issues of more accurate radiation dose management and increased work efficiency has been discussed. Up to now, Fuji Electric Company has supplied a large number of Radiation Management Systems to nuclear power stations and related nuclear facilities. We introduce the new radiation management computer system with adopted WWW technique for Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, MONJU Fast Breeder Reactor (MONJU). (author)

  8. Computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, R.P.; Guo, P.; Ao, Q.

    1996-01-01

    Computational methods have been used with considerable success to complement radiation measurements in solving a wide range of industrial problems. The almost exponential growth of computer capability and applications in the last few years leads to a open-quotes black boxclose quotes mentality for radiation measurement applications. If a black box is defined as any radiation measurement device that is capable of measuring the parameters of interest when a wide range of operating and sample conditions may occur, then the development of computational methods for industrial radiation measurement applications should now be focused on the black box approach and the deduction of properties of interest from the response with acceptable accuracy and reasonable efficiency. Nowadays, increasingly better understanding of radiation physical processes, more accurate and complete fundamental physical data, and more advanced modeling and software/hardware techniques have made it possible to make giant strides in that direction with new ideas implemented with computer software. The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR) at North Carolina State University has been working on a variety of projects in the area of radiation analyzers and gauges for accomplishing this for quite some time, and they are discussed here with emphasis on current accomplishments

  9. Fission fragment simulation of fusion neutron radiation effects on bulk mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Mitchell, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Stuart, R.N.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    This research demonstrates the feasibility of using homogeneously-generated fission fragments to simulate high-fluence fusion neutron damage in niobium tensile specimens. This technique makes it possible to measure radiation effects on bulk mechanical properties at high damage states, using conveniently short irradiation times. The primary knock-on spectrum for a fusion reactor is very similar to that produced by fission fragments, and nearly the same ratio of gas atoms to displaced atoms is produced in niobium. The damage from fission fragments is compared to that from fusion neutrons and fission reactor neutrons in terms of experimentally measured yield strength increase, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, and calculated damage energies

  10. Computer simulations of supercooled polymer melts in the bulk and in confined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baschnagel, J; Varnik, F

    2005-01-01

    We survey results of computer simulations for the structure and dynamics of supercooled polymer melts and films. Our survey is mainly concerned with features of a coarse grained polymer model-a bead-spring model-in the temperature regime above the critical glass temperature T c of the ideal mode-coupling theory (MCT). We divide our discussion into two parts: a part devoted to bulk properties and a part dealing with thin films. The discussion of the bulk properties focuses on two aspects: a comparison of the simulation results with MCT and an analysis of dynamic heterogeneities. We explain in detail how the analyses are performed and what results may be obtained, and we critically assess their strengths and weaknesses. In discussing the application of MCT we also present first results of a quantitative comparison which does not rely on fits, but exploits static input from the simulation to predict the relaxation dynamics. The second part of this review is devoted to extensions of the simulations from the bulk to thin films. We explore in detail the influence of the boundary condition, imposed by smooth or rough walls, on the structure and dynamics of the polymer melt. Geometric confinement is found to shift the glass transition temperature T g (or T c in our case) relative to the bulk. We compare our and other simulation results for the T g shift with experimental data, briefly survey some theoretical ideas for explaining these shifts and discuss related simulation work on the glass transition of confined liquids. Finally, we also present some technical details of how to perform fits to MCT and give a brief introduction to another approach to the glass transition based on the potential energy landscape of a liquid. (topical review)

  11. Investigation into Cloud Computing for More Robust Automated Bulk Image Geoprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard B.; Smoot, James C.; Underwood, Lauren; Armstrong, C. Duane

    2012-01-01

    Geospatial resource assessments frequently require timely geospatial data processing that involves large multivariate remote sensing data sets. In particular, for disasters, response requires rapid access to large data volumes, substantial storage space and high performance processing capability. The processing and distribution of this data into usable information products requires a processing pipeline that can efficiently manage the required storage, computing utilities, and data handling requirements. In recent years, with the availability of cloud computing technology, cloud processing platforms have made available a powerful new computing infrastructure resource that can meet this need. To assess the utility of this resource, this project investigates cloud computing platforms for bulk, automated geoprocessing capabilities with respect to data handling and application development requirements. This presentation is of work being conducted by Applied Sciences Program Office at NASA-Stennis Space Center. A prototypical set of image manipulation and transformation processes that incorporate sample Unmanned Airborne System data were developed to create value-added products and tested for implementation on the "cloud". This project outlines the steps involved in creating and testing of open source software developed process code on a local prototype platform, and then transitioning this code with associated environment requirements into an analogous, but memory and processor enhanced cloud platform. A data processing cloud was used to store both standard digital camera panchromatic and multi-band image data, which were subsequently subjected to standard image processing functions such as NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), NDMI (Normalized Difference Moisture Index), band stacking, reprojection, and other similar type data processes. Cloud infrastructure service providers were evaluated by taking these locally tested processing functions, and then

  12. Electrical resistance behavior with gamma radiation dose in bulk carbon nanostrutured samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lage, J.; Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Desdin, L. F.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Leyva, D.; Toledo, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effects of 60 Co gamma radiation on the electrical resistance and V-I characteristic of bulk carbon nano structured samples obtained by electric arc discharge in water method. Images of pristine samples obtained with scanning electron, and the results in graphical form of the electrical characterization of irradiated samples are presented in the text. It was observed that the electrical resistance vs. dose behavior shows an initial increment reaching the maximum at approximately 135 kGy, followed by a drop of the resistance values. These behaviors are associated with the progressive generation of radiation induced defects in the sample, whose number increases to reach saturation at 135 kGy. From this dose, defects could lead to cross-links between different nano structures present in the sample conducting to a gradually drop in electrical resistance. The measured V-I curves show that, increasing exposure to the 60 Co gamma radiation, the electrical properties of the studied samples transit from a semiconductor towards a predominantly metallic behavior. These results were compared with those obtained for a sample of graphite powder irradiated under the same conditions. (Author)

  13. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN BULK TUNGSTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-09-22

    We used our recently developed lattice based OKMC code; KSOME [1] to carryout simulations of radiation damage in bulk W. We study the effect of dimensionality of self interstitial atom (SIA) diffusion i.e. 1D versus 3D on the defect accumulation during irradiation with a primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy of 100 keV at 300 K for the dose rates of 10-5 and 10-6 dpa/s. As expected 3D SIA diffusion significantly reduces damage accumulation due to increased probability of recombination events. In addition, dose rate, over the limited range examined here, appears to have no effect in both cases of SIA diffusion.

  14. Simulation of bulk aerosol direct radiative effects and its climatic feedbacks in South Africa using RegCM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, M.; Botai, J.; Sivakumar, V.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Rautenbach, C. J. deW.; Moja, Shadung J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, 12 year runs of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) have been used to analyze the bulk aerosol radiative effects and its climatic feedbacks in South Africa. Due to the geographical locations where the aerosol potential source regions are situated and the regional dynamics, the South African aerosol spatial-distribution has a unique feature. Across the west and southwest areas, desert dust particles are dominant. However, sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are primarily distributed over the east and northern regions of the country. Analysis of the Radiative Effects (RE) shows that in South Africa the bulk aerosols play a role in reducing the net radiation absorbed by the surface via enhancing the net radiative heating in the atmosphere. Hence, across all seasons, the bulk aerosol-radiation-climate interaction induced statistically significant positive feedback on the net atmospheric heating rate. Over the western and central parts of South Africa, the overall radiative feedbacks of bulk aerosol predominantly induces statistically significant Cloud Cover (CC) enhancements. Whereas, over the east and southeast coastal areas, it induces minimum reductions in CC. The CC enhancement and RE of aerosols jointly induce radiative cooling at the surface which in turn results in the reduction of Surface Temperature (ST: up to -1 K) and Surface Sensible Heat Flux (SSHF: up to -24 W/m2). The ST and SSHF decreases cause a weakening of the convectively driven turbulences and surface buoyancy fluxes which lead to the reduction of the boundary layer height, surface pressure enhancement and dynamical changes. Throughout the year, the maximum values of direct and semi-direct effects of bulk aerosol were found in areas of South Africa which are dominated by desert dust particles. This signals the need for a strategic regional plan on how to reduce the dust production and monitoring of the dust dispersion as well as it initiate the need of further research on different

  15. Subthreshold radiation-induced processes in the bulk and on surfaces and interfaces of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, N.

    1998-01-01

    A review is given on the processes induced under irradiation by electronic encounters and by elastic encounters below the knock-on threshold. It is pointed out that electronic encounters cause bond scission that results in defect formation and sputtering in a variety of materials. The conditions for generation of permanent radiation-induced process as a consequence of electronic encounters are critically examined. Two critical issues are localization of electronic excitation energy and energetics. Self-trapping of excitons is one way of localization; otherwise defects are involved in localization and therefore in radiation-induced processes (RIP) by electronic excitation. Arguments on energetics indicate presence of linear and nonlinear electronic process with respect to the density of excitation. The registration of energetic heavy-ion tracks is explained in terms of non-linear electronic processes. The difference in the processes in the bulk, on surfaces and at interfaces is critically discussed. The possible contribution of subthreshold elastic encounters to thermodynamically driven interface reaction is also discussed. (orig.)

  16. Computational analysis of the atomic size effect in bulk metallic glasses and their liquid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokotin, V.; Hermann, H.

    2008-01-01

    The atomic size effect and its consequences for the ability of multicomponent liquid alloys to form bulk metallic glasses are analyzed in terms of the generalized Bernal's model for liquids, following the hypothesis that maximum density in the liquid state improves the glass-forming ability. The maximum density that can be achieved in the liquid state is studied in the 2(N-1) dimensional parameter space of N-component systems. Computer simulations reveal that the size ratio of largest to smallest atoms are most relevant for achieving the maximum packing for N = 3-5, whereas the number of components plays a minor role. At small size ratio, the maximum packing density can be achieved by different atomic size distributions, whereas for medium size ratios the maximum density is always correlated to a concave size distribution. The relationship of the results to Miracle's efficient cluster packing model is also discussed

  17. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.) [de

  18. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C.

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors)

  19. Apparatus for measuring moisture in moving bulk material using a lithium-7 radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashe, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A nucleonic device is described for measuring the moisture content of bulk materials using a radioisotopic fast-neutron source such as lithium-7 admixed with an alpha-particle emitter such as americium-241 as a means of minimizing the thickness of the layer of bulk material required proximate to the moisture sensor for a neutron-reflection moisture gauge for proper operation of said gauge. Minimization of the required thickness of the bulk material permits use of a neutron-reflection moisture gauge for measurements of bulk materials on lightly-loaded belts and other types of conveyors where measurements have previously been impracticable

  20. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  1. Measurements of computed tomography radiation scatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Every, B.; Petty, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of scattered radiation from a computed tomography (CT) scanner in a clinical situation and compares the results with those obtained from a CT performance phantom and with data obtained from CT manufacturers. The results are presented as iso-dose contours. There are significant differences between the data obtained and that supplied by manufacturers, both in the shape of the iso-dose contours and in the nominal values. The observed scatter in a clinical situation (for an abdominal scan) varied between 3% and 430% of the manufacturers' stated values, with a marked reduction in scatter noted a the head and feet of the patient. These differences appear to be due to the fact that manufacturers use CT phantoms to obtain scatter data and these phantoms do not provide the same scatter absorption geometry as patients. CT scatter was observed to increase as scan field size and slice thickness increased, whilst there was little change in scatter with changes in gantry tilt and table slew. Using the iso-dose contours, the orientation of the CT scanner can be optimised with regard to the location and shielding requirements of doors and windows. Additionally, the positioning of staff who must remain in the room during scanning can be optimised to minimise their exposure. It is estimated that the data presented allows for realistic radiation protection assessments to be made. 13 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  2. Radiation hardness of silicon detectors manufactured on epitaxial material and FZ bulk enriched with oxygen, carbon, tin and platinum

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzin, A; Glaser, M; Lemeilleur, F; Talamonti, R; Watts, S; Zanet, A

    1999-01-01

    Recent results on the radiation hardness of silicon detectors fabricated on epitaxial and float zone bulk silicon enriched by various impurities, such as carbon, oxygen, tin and platinum are reported. A new methodology of measurements of electrical properties of the devices has been utilized in the experiment. It has been shown that in the case of irradiation by protons, oxygen enriched silicon has better radiation hardness than standard float zone silicon. The carbon enriched silicon detectors, on the other hand, exhibited significantly inferior radiation hardness compared to standard detectors. This study shows for the first time, a violation of the widely used normalization technique of the various particle irradiations by NIEL coefficients. The study has been carried out in the framework of the RD48 (ROSE) collaboration, which studies the radiation hardening of silicon detectors. (5 refs).

  3. Computer aided in-flight radiation scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitzer, C.; Kloesch, W.

    1989-01-01

    The equipment consists of a radiation detecting instrument, a flight prospection probe and a portable PC. It is aimed at detection of ground radiation sources from a flying airplane, e.g. in case of radiation accident. 3 figs

  4. Computing in radiation protection and health physics - 10 years further

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R.; Greif, N.; Struwe, H.; Wissmann, F.

    2008-01-01

    Computing influences radiation protection and health physics more extensively as ever before. The good old data processing and main frame computing has changed towards information technology in a wider sense. Technologies and operating systems out of workplace computing have amended microprocessor technology in measuring devices. The boundaries between them are constantly in a state of flux. The use of the world wide web has become indispensable. No radiation protection expert could still manage without a workplace computer. Measuring networks, radiation protection information systems, data bases, computer simulation and other challenging applications form the image of today. (orig.)

  5. Concept and computation of radiation dose at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Computational dosimetry, a subdiscipline of computational physics devoted to radiation metrology, is determination of absorbed dose and other dose related quantities by numbers. Computations are done separately both for external and internal dosimetry. The methodology used in external beam dosimetry is necessarily a combination of experimental radiation dosimetry and theoretical dose computation since it is not feasible to plan any physical dose measurements from inside a living human body

  6. Available computer codes and data for radiation transport analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), sponsored and supported by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA), is a technical institute serving the radiation transport and shielding community. It acquires, selects, stores, retrieves, evaluates, analyzes, synthesizes, and disseminates information on shielding and ionizing radiation transport. The major activities include: (1) operating a computer-based information system and answering inquiries on radiation analysis, (2) collecting, checking out, packaging, and distributing large computer codes, and evaluated and processed data libraries. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  7. CW frequency doubling of 1029 nm radiation using single pass bulk and waveguide PPLN crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiodo, N.; Du Burck, F.; Hrabina, Jan; Candela, Y.; Wallerand, J. P.; Acef, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 311, 15 January (2013), s. 239-244 ISSN 0030-4018 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : IR laser * second harmonic generation * waveguide and bulk crystals * periodically poled lithium niobate * 1029 nm wavelength Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.542, year: 2013

  8. Augmented therapy of extensive Hodgkin's disease: radiation to bulk disease or prolongation of induction chemotherapy did not improve survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafla, S.; Coleman, M.; Propert, K.; Glicksman, A.; Peterson, B.; Nissen, N.; Brunner, K.; Kaufmann, T.; Holland, J.; Anderson, J.; Gottlieb, A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective, randomized trial in extensive, untreated Hodgkin's disease was undertaken to assess the potential benefit of augmented therapy (12 months chemotherapy or radiation to 'bulk' disease) compared to standard, six months chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred fifty-eight patients, mostly stage IV, were randomized to four treatment regimens consisting of 6 cycles of CCNU, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone (CVPP); 12 cycles of CVPP; 6 cycles of CVPP followed by 25 Gray (Gy) radiotherapy; or 3 cycles CVPP, 25 Gy radiotherapy, and 3 cycles CVPP. Results: Complete remissions were achieved in 65% of all patients. A 58% overall 5 year survival was obtained. Relapses in irradiated areas of bulk disease occurred in only 6% of responding patients. There was, however, no statistical difference in response frequency, disease free survival or overall survival amongst the four regimens. Elderly patients responded less frequently. Conclusion: While radiotherapy provided control of local (bulk) disease, no impact on overall survival was apparent. Likewise doubling the duration of chemotherapy did not improve response or survival. Augmentation of therapy with either radiotherapy or more chemotherapy in this study was of no benefit when compared to the standard six months of treatment

  9. Computing in an academic radiation therapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, C.F.; Houdek, P.V.; Fayos, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    The authors conceptualized the different computer functions in radiotherapy as follows: 1) treatment planning and dosimetry, 2) data and word processing, 3) radiotherapy information system (data bank), 4) statistical analysis, 5) data acquisition and equipment control, 6) telecommunication, and 7) financial management. They successfully implemented the concept of distributed computing using multiple mini and personal computers. The authors' computer practice supports data and word processing, graphics, communication, automated data acquisition and control, and portable computing. The computers are linked together into a local computer network which permits sharing of information, peripherals, and unique programs among our systems, while preserving the individual function and identity of each machine. Furthermore, the architecture of our network allows direct access to any other computer network providing them with inexpensive use of the most modern and sophisticated software and hardware resources

  10. Computer modelling of statistical properties of SASE FEL radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes an approach to computer modelling of statistical properties of the radiation from self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL). The present approach allows one to calculate the following statistical properties of the SASE FEL radiation: time and spectral field correlation functions, distribution of the fluctuations of the instantaneous radiation power, distribution of the energy in the electron bunch, distribution of the radiation energy after monochromator installed at the FEL amplifier exit and the radiation spectrum. All numerical results presented in the paper have been calculated for the 70 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility being under construction at DESY

  11. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T. [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Textile Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Üncü, I. S. [Suleyman Demirel University, Technological Fac. Electrical-Electronic Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Kılıncarslan, S., E-mail: seref@tef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Engineering Fac. Civil Eng. Dep., Isparta (Turkey); Akkurt, I. [Suleyman Demirel University, Art and Science Fac., Physics Dep., Isparta (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  12. Computer simulation of auroral kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.S.; Tajima, T.; Lee, L.C.; Wu, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    We study the generation of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) using relativistic, electromagnetic, particle simulations. The AKR source region is modeled by two electron populations in the simulation: a cold (200 eV) Maxwellian component and a hot (5-20 keV) population possessing a loss-cone feature. The loss cone distribution is found to be unstable to the cyclotron maser instability. The fast extraordinary (X-mode) waves dominate the radiation and saturate when resonant particles diffuse into the loss-cone via turbulent scattering of the particles by the amplified X-mode radiation

  13. Measurements and TCAD Simulations of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects

    CERN Document Server

    F. Moscatelli; G. M. Bilei; A. Morozzi; G.-F. Dalla Betta; R. Mendicino; M. Boscardin; N. Zorzi; L. Servoli; P. Maccagnani

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose the application of a radiation damage model based on the introduction of deep level traps/recombination centers suitable for device level numerical simulation of radiation detectors at very high fluences (e.g. 1÷2×1016 1-MeV equivalent neutrons per square centimeter) combined with a surface damage model developed by using experimental parameters extracted from measurements from gamma irradiated p-type dedicated test structures.

  14. Radiation Tolerant, FPGA-based SmallSat Computer System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to mature the technology readiness of a radiation tolerant smallsat computer system for a subsequent orbital flight demonstration. The...

  15. Silicene-terminated surface of calcium and strontium disilicides: properties and comparison with bulk structures by computational methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázda, Petr; Mutombo, Pingo; Ondráček, Martin; Corrêa, Cinthia Antunes; Kopeček, Jaromír; Palatinus, Lukáš

    2018-05-01

    The bulk and surface structures of calcium and strontium disilicides are investigated by computational methods using density functional theory. The investigated structures are R6, R3 and P1-CaSi2 and P1-SrSi2. The investigated properties are the cleavage energy at the silicene sheet, buckling of the bulk and surface silicene layers, charge transfer from calcium to silicon, band structure of bulk and surface-terminated structures and adsorption energies on H atoms and H2 molecules on the silicene-terminated surface of the R3 phase. The cleavage energy at the silicene surface is low in all cases. Structures P1-CaSi2 and R3-CaSi2 contain silicene sheets with different coordination to Ca, while R6-CaSi2 contains both types of the sheets. It is shown that the properties of the two types of silicene-like sheets in R6-CaSi2 are similar to those of the corresponding sheets in P1-CaSi2 and R3-CaSi2, and the thermodynamically stable R6 phase is a good candidate for experimental investigation of silicene-terminated surface in calcium disilicide.

  16. Radiation levels from computer monitor screens within Benue State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of possible presence of soft X-ray levels from Computer Screens at distances of 0.5m and 1.0m was carried out within Benue State University, Makurdi, using ten different monitor models. Radiation measurement was carried out using a portable digital radiation meter, INSPECTOR 06250 (SE international Inc.

  17. Ab-initio Computation of the Electronic, transport, and Bulk Properties of Calcium Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbolle, Augustine; Banjara, Dipendra; Malozovsky, Yuriy; Franklin, Lashounda; Bagayoko, Diola

    We report results from ab-initio, self-consistent, local Density approximation (LDA) calculations of electronic and related properties of calcium oxide (CaO) in the rock salt structure. We employed the Ceperley and Alder LDA potential and the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) formalism. Our calculations are non-relativistic. We implemented the LCAO formalism following the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams (BZW) method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). The BZW-EF method involves a methodical search for the optimal basis set that yields the absolute minima of the occupied energies, as required by density functional theory (DFT). Our calculated, indirect band gap of 6.91eV, from towards the L point, is in excellent agreement with experimental value of 6.93-7.7eV, at room temperature (RT). We have also calculated the total (DOS) and partial (pDOS) densities of states as well as the bulk modulus. Our calculated bulk modulus is in excellent agreement with experiment. Work funded in part by the US Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) (Award No.DE-NA0002630), the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Award No, 1503226), LaSPACE, and LONI-SUBR.

  18. Comparison of bulk and epitaxial 4H-SiC detectors for radiation hard particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, T; Bruzzi, M; Cunningham, W; Mathieson, K; Moll, M; Nelson, T; Nilsson, H E; Pintillie, I; Rahman, M; Reynolds, L; Sciortino, S; Sellin, P J; Strachan, H; Svensson, B G; Vaitkus, J

    2003-01-01

    Measurements and simulations have been carried out using bulk and epitaxial SiC detectors. Samples were irradiated to fluences of around 10**1**4 hardrons/cm**2. Material of thickness 40um gave a charge collection efficiency of 100% dropping to around 60% at 100mum thickness. Detailed MEDICI simulations incorporated the main defect levels in SiC, the vanadium center, Z-center and a mid-gap level as measured by deep level transient spectroscopy and other techniques. Calculated recombination currents and charge collection efficiencies at varying fluences were comparable to experimental data. The study suggests that SiC detectors will operate up to fluences around 10 **1**6/cm**2 as required by future particle physics experiments.

  19. Evaluation of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage of Silicon Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Mikeštíková, Marcela; Št'astný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of different types of end-cap miniature n + -in- p strip sensors, ATLAS12A, were evaluated in Institute of Physics in Prague before and after proton and gamma irradiation. We report here on the bulk damage aspects, including the increase of leakage current and evaluation of the full depletion voltage and the surface damage, including the decrease of inter-strip resistance, changes in inter-strip capacitance and the effectiveness of punch-through protection structure. It was verified that different geometries of end-cap sensors do not influence their stability; the sensors should provide acceptable strip isolation and n ew gate PTP structure functions well even at the highest tested proton fluence 2× 10 15 n eq / cm 2

  20. COMPUTATIONAL MODEL TAHANAN KAPAL UNTUK MENENTUKAN KEBUTUHAN DAYA KAPAL BULK CARRIER 8664 DWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Sugianto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Faktor utama dalam menentukan daya mesin kapal adalah tahanan kapal. Umumnya, tahanan kapal dihitung menggunakan percobaan model pada towing tank. Namun biaya yang diperlukan sangat besar. Penelitian ini bertujuan menentukan tahanan total kapal dan memperkiraan kebutuhan daya mesin kapal bulk carrier 8664 DWT. Kapal dimodelkan menggunakan software perkapalan, kemudian perhitungan tahanan kapal dan kebutuhan daya kapal dilakukan. Selain itu dilakukan validasi hasil dengan perhitungan matematis Holtrop dan analisa perbandingan hasil dengan penelitian sebelumnya. Hasil analisa untuk kecepatan dinas maksimal 14 knots menunjukan tahanan total kapal adalah 286. 75 kN dan kebutuhan dayanya adalah 2950.31 kW. Sedangkan dengan perhitungan matematis Holtrop dihasilkan tahanan total 256.59 kN, ini terdapat selisih 10.52% dengan hasil permodelan komputer.Kata kunci: tahanan, model, daya, kapal

  1. Pentacene–fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cell: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Anup [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Sarkar, Sunandan [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Dept. of Physical Chemistry, Palacký University, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Pal, Sougata [Department of Chemistry, University of Gour Banga, Malda 732103 (India); Sarkar, Pranab, E-mail: pranab.sarkar@visva-bharati.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2015-06-12

    We perform DFT/TDDFT calculations to study the optoelectronic properties of some pentacene-based organic molecules and their derivatives, which can serve as donor moiety when blended with fullerene acceptors in the bulk-heterojunction solar cell model. We are motivated by a recent experiment in which an unoptimized device was shown to have a good photovoltaic performance and we aim to further improve the efficiency of this device. We try to optimize the photovoltaic properties on the basis of a quantum-mechanical calculation of the frontier energy levels and of the absorption properties of individual molecules and of the molecule–fullerine composite. - Highlights: • Optoelectronic properties of pentacene–fullerene nanocomposites are presented. • Photovoltaic properties of the nanocomposites are predicted. • DFT/TDDFT results are in well agreement with available experimental results. • Calculated results give a direction for optimizing device performance.

  2. Radiation enhanced conduction in insulators: computer modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.J.

    1986-10-01

    The report describes the implementation of the Klaffky-Rose-Goland-Dienes [Phys. Rev. B.21 3610,1980] model of radiation-enhanced conduction and describes the codes used. The approach is demonstrated for the data for alumina of Pells, Buckley, Hill and Murphy [AERE R.11715, 1985]. (author)

  3. Lithium niobate bulk crystallization promoted by CO{sub 2} laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, N.M., E-mail: nmferreira@ua.pt [i3N - Aveiro, Physics Department, Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Costa, F.M. [i3N - Aveiro, Physics Department, Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Nogueira, R.N. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Graca, M.P.F. [i3N - Aveiro, Physics Department, Aveiro University, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallization of LiNbO{sub 3} nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} matrix by CO{sub 2} laser irradiation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples heat-treated at 650 Degree-Sign C (4 h) and laser treated (4 W/500 s) show similar morphology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glass-ceramics produced by laser process requires a very low processing time. - Abstract: The crystallization induced by laser radiation is a very promising technique to promote glass/ceramic transformation, being already used to produce crystalline patterns on glass surfaces. In this work, a SiO{sub 2}-Li{sub 2}O-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass, prepared by the sol-gel route, was submitted to CO{sub 2} laser radiation and conventional heat-treatments in order to induce the LiNbO{sub 3} crystallization. The structure and morphology of the samples prepared by both routes was analyzed as a function of exposure time, radiation power and heat-treatment temperatures by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The results reveal a correlation between the crystallization degree of LiNbO{sub 3} particles and glass matrix with the heat treatment type and experimental parameters. An heat-treatment at 650 Degree-Sign C/4 h was necessary to induce crystallization in heat treatments samples while 4 W/500 s was enough for laser radiation ones, corresponding a reduction time processing of {approx}14 000 s.

  4. Role of electrode metallization in the performance of bulk semi-insulating InP radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatko, B.; Dubecky, F.; Prochazkova, O.; Necas, V.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the study of three different electrode metallizations with the aim to form a Schottky barrier contact. Electrode geometry corresponds to the requirements of digital radiography systems. As substrates bulk Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) SI InP wafers doped with Fe and Fe+Zn are used. Results of this study show that no one of the used metallization performs as a blocking contact. However, detectors with Ti/Pt/Au metallization attained a relatively good energy resolution of 7.0 keV in full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and the charge collection efficiency (CCE) higher than 83% for 122 keV γ-photons at 255 K. The development of SI InP radiation detectors and in particular their electrode technology is discussed in the light of observed results

  5. Radiation studies on resistive bulk-micromegas chambers at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Camerlingo, Maria Teresa; Farina, Edoardo; Iengo, Paolo; Longo, Luigi; Samarati, Jerome; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Wotschack, Joerg

    2018-01-01

    With the growing diffusion of resistive Micromegas detectors in HEP experiments the study of long-term aging behaviour is becoming more and more relevant. Two resistive bulk-Micromegas detectors were installed in May 2015 at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility and exposed to an intense gamma irradiation with the aim to study the detector behavior under high irradiation and the long-term aging. The detectors have an active area of 10 × 10 cm 2 , readout strip pitch of 400 μ m , amplification gap of 128 μ m and drift gap of 5 mm. The desired accumulated charge of more than 0.2 C/cm 2 has been reached for both chambers, equivalent to 10 years of HL-LHC operation. The efficiency, amplification, and resolution of the Micromegas after this long-term irradiation period is compared with the performance of a non irradiated detector. In addition, the latest results of the measured particle rate as a function of the amplification voltage is presented and compared with those obtained in 2015.

  6. Computational methods in several fields of radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, Herwig G.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Radiation dosimetry has to cope with a wide spectrum of applications and requirements in time and size. The ubiquitous presence of various radiation fields or radionuclides in the human home, working, urban or agricultural environment can lead to various dosimetric tasks starting from radioecology, retrospective and predictive dosimetry, personal dosimetry, up to measurements of radionuclide concentrations in environmental and food product and, finally in persons and their excreta. In all these fields measurements and computational models for the interpretation or understanding of observations are employed explicitly or implicitly. In this lecture some examples of own computational models will be given from the various dosimetric fields, including a) Radioecology (e.g. with the code systems based on ECOSYS, which was developed far before the Chernobyl reactor accident, and tested thoroughly afterwards), b) Internal dosimetry (improved metabolism models based on our own data), c) External dosimetry (with the new ICRU-ICRP-Voxelphantom developed by our lab), d) Radiation therapy (with GEANT IV as applied to mixed reactor radiation incident on individualized voxel phantoms), e) Some aspects of nanodosimetric track structure computations (not dealt with in the other presentation of this author). Finally, some general remarks will be made on the high explicit or implicit importance of computational models in radiation protection and other research field dealing with large systems, as well as on good scientific practices which should generally be followed when developing and applying such computational models

  7. Development of Computer Program for Analysis of Irregular Non Homogenous Radiation Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang Rozali; Nina Kusumah; Hendro Tjahjono; Darlis

    2003-01-01

    A computer program for radiation shielding analysis has been developed to obtain radiation attenuation calculation in non-homogenous radiation shielding and irregular geometry. By determining radiation source strength, geometrical shape of radiation source, location, dimension and geometrical shape of radiation shielding, radiation level of a point at certain position from radiation source can be calculated. By using a computer program, calculation result of radiation distribution analysis can be obtained for some analytical points simultaneously. (author)

  8. Bulk and brane decay of a (4+n)-dimensional Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: Scalar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanti, P.; Grain, J.; Barrau, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we extend the idea that the spectrum of Hawking radiation can reveal valuable information on a number of parameters that characterize a particular black hole background--such as the dimensionality of spacetime and the value of coupling constants--to gain information on another important aspect: the curvature of spacetime. We investigate the emission of Hawking radiation from a D-dimensional Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole emitted in the form of scalar fields, and employ both analytical and numerical techniques to calculate greybody factors and differential energy emission rates on the brane and in the bulk. The energy emission rate of the black hole is significantly enhanced in the high-energy regime with the number of spacelike dimensions. On the other hand, in the low-energy part of the spectrum, it is the cosmological constant that leaves a clear footprint, through a characteristic, constant emission rate of ultrasoft quanta determined by the values of black hole and cosmological horizons. Our results are applicable to 'small' black holes arising in theories with an arbitrary number and size of extra dimensions, as well as to pure 4-dimensional primordial black holes, embedded in a de Sitter spacetime

  9. Computational radiation chemistry: the emergence of a new field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartczak, W.M.; Kroh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the computer experiment as an information source, which is complementary to the ''real'' experiment in radiation chemistry, is discussed. The discussion is followed by a brief review of some of the simulation techniques, which have been recently applied to the problems of radiation chemistry: ion recombination in spurs and tracks of ionization, electron tunnelling in low-temperature glasses, electron localization in disordered media. (author)

  10. Using computer-based training to facilitate radiation protection review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    In a national laboratory setting, it is necessary to provide radiation protection overview and training to diverse parts of the laboratory population. This includes employees at research reactors, accelerators, waste facilities, radiochemical isotope processing, and analytical laboratories, among others. In addition, our own radiation protection and monitoring staffs must be trained. To assist in the implementation of this full range of training, ORNL has purchased prepackaged computer-based training in health physics and technical mathematics with training modules that can be selected from many topics. By selection of specific modules, appropriate radiation protection review packages can be determined to meet many individual program needs. Because our radiation protection personnel must have some previous radiation protection experience or the equivalent of an associate's degree in radiation protection for entry level, the computer-based training will serve primarily as review of major principles. Others may need very specific prior training to make the computer-based training effective in their work situations. 4 refs

  11. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  12. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-01

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  13. Investigations into radiation damages of reactor materials by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronnikov, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Data on the state of works in European countries in the field of computerized simulation of radiation damages of reactor materials under the context of the international projects ITEM (European Database for Multiscale Modelling) and SIRENA (Simulation of Radiation Effects in Zr-Nb alloys) - computerized simulation of stress corrosion when contact of Zr-Nb alloys with iodine are presented. Computer codes for the simulation of radiation effects in reactor materials were developed. European Database for Multiscale Modelling (EDAM) was organized using the results of the investigations provided in the ITEM project [ru

  14. Project Management of a personnel radiation records computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labenski, T.

    1984-01-01

    Project Management techniques have been used to develop a data base management information system to provide storage and retrieval of personnel radiation and Health Physics records. The system is currently being developed on a Hewlett Packard 1000 Series E Computer with provisions to include plant radiation survey information, radiation work permit information, inventory management for Health Physics supplies and instrumentation, and control of personnel access to radiological controlled areas. The methodologies used to manage the overall project are presented along with selection and management of software vendors

  15. Accurate and efficient computation of synchrotron radiation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, Allan J.

    2000-01-01

    We consider the computation of three functions which appear in the theory of synchrotron radiation. These are F(x)=x∫x∞K 5/3 (y) dy))F p (x)=xK 2/3 (x) and G p (x)=x 1/3 K 1/3 (x), where K ν denotes a modified Bessel function. Chebyshev series coefficients are given which enable the functions to be computed with an accuracy of up to 15 sig. figures

  16. High contrast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Yuji; Takeda, Tohoru; Akatsuka, Takao; Maeda, Tomokazu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Uchida, Akira; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kazama, Masahiro; Wu, Jin; Ando, Masami

    1995-02-01

    This article describes a new monochromatic x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation with applications in biomedical diagnosis which is currently under development. The system is designed to provide clear images and to detect contrast materials at low concentration for the quantitative functional evaluation of organs in correspondence with their anatomical structures. In this system, with x-ray energy changing from 30 to 52 keV, images can be obtained to detect various contrast materials (iodine, barium, and gadolinium), and K-edge energy subtraction is applied. Herein, the features of the new system designed to enhance the advantages of SR are reported. With the introduction of a double-crystal monochromator, the high-order x-ray contamination is eliminated. The newly designed CCD detector with a wide dynamic range of 60 000:1 has a spatial resolution of 200 μm. The resulting image quality, which is expected to show improved contrast and spatial resolution, is currently under investigation.

  17. Computed temperature profile in materials exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Tso Chin; Choong, Yap Siew; Seon, Chan Kam

    1987-06-01

    Computed temperature profiles are presented for the materials of lead, steel, concrete and water in curved shells, when they are exposed to gamma radiation. The results are based on the usual simplified theory of thermal conduction with an exponential heat source.

  18. Computational hybrid anthropometric paediatric phantom library for internal radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    for children demonstrated that they follow the same trend when correlated with age. The constructed hybrid computational phantom library opens up the prospect of comprehensive radiation dosimetry calculations and risk assessment for the paediatric population of different age groups and diverse anthropometric...

  19. Computer simulation of heating of biological tissue during laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojanic, S.; Sreckovic, M.

    1995-01-01

    Computer model is based on an implicit finite difference scheme to solve the diffusion equation for light distribution and the bio-heat equation. A practical application of the model is to calculate the temperature distributions during thermal coagulation of prostate by radiative heating. (author)

  20. Radiation dosimetry of computed tomography x-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.; Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the development and application of the methods employed in National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) surveys of computed tomography x-ray scanners (CT scanners). It includes descriptions of the phantoms and equipment used, discussion of the various dose parameters measured, the principles of the various dosimetry systems employed and some indication of the doses to occupationally exposed personnel

  1. Radiation and pregnancy: a self-teaching computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pratik; Rehani, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Two self-interacting computer programs have been developed. The first program which consists of fifteen topics apprises the users with broad spectrum of radiation risks to the unborn during pregnancy and the status of various views in this regard. Another program estimates the dose to uterus in sixteen radiological examinations depending upon the radiographic parameters used. The dose to uterus and hence to the fetus calculated by computer program in different radiographic views have been found to be in agreement with that reported in NRPB-R200 survey report. The two programs combined provide a better understanding of the rather confusing situation regarding dilemma about termination of pregnancy following inadvertent radiation exposure, apprehension about radiation effect in the minds of prescribing doctor and patients, dose estimation and advice to pregnant workers and like. (author). 10 refs

  2. Los Alamos radiation transport code system on desktop computing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, J.F.; Brinkley, F.W.; Clark, B.A.; West, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Los Alamos Radiation Transport Code System (LARTCS) consists of state-of-the-art Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes and data libraries. These codes were originally developed many years ago and have undergone continual improvement. With a large initial effort and continued vigilance, the codes are easily portable from one type of hardware to another. The performance of scientific work-stations (SWS) has evolved to the point that such platforms can be used routinely to perform sophisticated radiation transport calculations. As the personal computer (PC) performance approaches that of the SWS, the hardware options for desk-top radiation transport calculations expands considerably. The current status of the radiation transport codes within the LARTCS is described: MCNP, SABRINA, LAHET, ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, and ONELD. Specifically, the authors discuss hardware systems on which the codes run and present code performance comparisons for various machines

  3. Systematic review on physician's knowledge about radiation doses and radiation risks of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krille, Lucian; Hammer, Gael P.; Merzenich, Hiltrud; Zeeb, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    Background: The frequent use of computed tomography is a major cause of the increasing medical radiation exposure of the general population. Consequently, dose reduction and radiation protection is a topic of scientific and public concern. Aim: We evaluated the available literature on physicians' knowledge regarding radiation dosages and risks due to computed tomography. Methods: A systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane and PRISMA statements was performed using eight databases. 3091 references were found. Only primary studies assessing physicians' knowledge about computed tomography were included. Results: 14 relevant articles were identified, all focussing on dose estimations for CT. Overall, the surveys showed moderate to low knowledge among physicians concerning radiation doses and the involved health risks. However, the surveys varied considerably in conduct and quality. For some countries, more than one survey was available. There was no general trend in knowledge in any country except a slight improvement of knowledge on health risks and radiation doses in two consecutive local German surveys. Conclusions: Knowledge gaps concerning radiation doses and associated health risks among physicians are evident from published research. However, knowledge on radiation doses cannot be interpreted as reliable indicator for good medical practice.

  4. Computational Investigation of Soot and Radiation in Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalit, Harshad

    This study delves into computational modeling of soot and infrared radiation for turbulent reacting flows, detailed understanding of both of which is paramount in the design of cleaner engines and pollution control. In the first part of the study, the concept of Stochastic Time and Space Series Analysis (STASS) as a numerical tool to compute time dependent statistics of radiation intensity is introduced for a turbulent premixed flame. In the absence of high fidelity codes for large eddy simulation or direct numerical simulation of turbulent flames, the utility of STASS for radiation imaging of reacting flows to understand the flame structure is assessed by generating images of infrared radiation in spectral bands dominated by radiation from gas phase carbon dioxide and water vapor using an assumed PDF method. The study elucidates the need for time dependent computation of radiation intensity for validation with experiments and the need for accounting for turbulence radiation interactions for correctly predicting radiation intensity and consequently the flame temperature and NOx in a reacting fluid flow. Comparison of single point statistics of infrared radiation intensity with measurements show that STASS can not only predict the flame structure but also estimate the dynamics of thermochemical scalars in the flame with reasonable accuracy. While a time series is used to generate realizations of thermochemical scalars in the first part of the study, in the second part, instantaneous realizations of resolved scale temperature, CO2 and H2O mole fractions and soot volume fractions are extracted from a large eddy simulation (LES) to carry out quantitative imaging of radiation intensity (QIRI) for a turbulent soot generating ethylene diffusion flame. A primary motivation of the study is to establish QIRI as a computational tool for validation of soot models, especially in the absence of conventional flow field and measured scalar data for sooting flames. Realizations of

  5. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.; Kodeli, I.; Menard, St.; Bouchet, J.L.; Renard, F.; Martin, E.; Blazy, L.; Voros, S.; Bochud, F.; Laedermann, J.P.; Beaugelin, K.; Makovicka, L.; Quiot, A.; Vermeersch, F.; Roche, H.; Perrin, M.C.; Laye, F.; Bardies, M.; Struelens, L.; Vanhavere, F.; Gschwind, R.; Fernandez, F.; Quesne, B.; Fritsch, P.; Lamart, St.; Crovisier, Ph.; Leservot, A.; Antoni, R.; Huet, Ch.; Thiam, Ch.; Donadille, L.; Monfort, M.; Diop, Ch.; Ricard, M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations

  6. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Jaiki

    2006-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  7. Bulk density of an alfisol under cultivation systems in a long-term experiment evaluated with gamma ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberg, Adilson Luis; Silva, Thiago Rech da; Pauletto, Eloy Antonio; Pinto, Luiz Fernando Spinelli; Lima, Ana Claudia Rodrigues de; Timm, Luis Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The sustainability of irrigated rice (Oryza sativa L.) in lowland soils is based on the use of crop rotation and succession, which are essential for the control of red and black rice. The effects on the soil properties deserve studies, particularly on soil compaction. The objective of this study was to identify compacted layers in an albaqualf under different cultivation and tillage systems, by evaluating the soil bulk density (Ds) with Gamma Ray Computed Tomography (TC). The analysis was carried out in a long-term experiment, from 1985 to 2004, at an experimental station of EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Capao do Leao, RS, Brazil, in a random block design with seven treatments, with four replications (T1 - one year rice with conventional tillage followed by two years fallow; T2 - continuous rice under conventional tillage; T4 - rice and soybean (Glycine Max L.) rotation under conventional tillage; T5 - rice, soybean and corn (Zea maize L.) rotation under conventional tillage; T6 - rice under no-tillage in the summer in succession to rye-grass (Lolium multiflorum L.) in the winter; T7 - rice under no-tillage and soybean under conventional tillage rotation; T8 - control: uncultivated soil). The Gamma Ray Computed Tomography method did not identify compacted soil layers under no tillage rice in succession to rye-grass; two fallow years in the irrigated rice production system did not prevent the formation of a compacted layer at the soil surface; and in the rice, soybean and corn rotation under conventional tillage two compacted layers were identified (0.0 to 1.5 cm and 11 to 14 cm), indicating that they may restrict the agricultural production in this cultivation system on Albaqualf soils. (author)

  8. Radiation exposure of infants and children in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.; Stieve, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation exposure of infants and small children with Computed Tomography is different in several aspects from that of adults undergoing an identical examination. The surface dose at radiation entrance is higher in children because of a smaller body diameter for the same dose rate at the tube. The critical organ dose in the directly irradiated area is higher in children than in adults. The exposure of organs outside the examined area is also higher in children -because of short intervals- than in adults. The absorbed energy, i.e. integral dose, however, is lower in children than in adults because of the lesser volume. The differences between conventional procedures and Computed Tomography, are greater in children than in adults. Here, CT shows higher values than conventional explorations. As a result of the low number of examinations with CT, the contribution towards a genetically significant dose is currently, at least, relatively small [fr

  9. Computer codes for problems of isotope and radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remer, M.

    1986-12-01

    A survey is given of computer codes for problems in isotope and radiation research. Altogether 44 codes are described as titles with abstracts. 17 of them are in the INIS scope and are processed individually. The subjects are indicated in the chapter headings: 1) analysis of tracer experiments, 2) spectrum calculations, 3) calculations of ion and electron trajectories, 4) evaluation of gamma irradiation plants, and 5) general software

  10. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, M.K.A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D.A; Bakar, K.A.; Haron, M.R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI w ), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDI w , DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts. - Highlights: • We investigate radiation doses received by patients from CT scan examinations. • We compare data with current national diagnostic reference levels and other references. • Radiation doses from CT were influenced by CT parameter, scanning techniques and patient characteristics.

  11. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  12. Health promotion and computer science in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennarola, R.; Porzio, G.; Pennarola, E.; Cavaliere, L.

    2008-01-01

    An automatic system of clinical-diagnostic information aimed at radiological protection and sanitary prevention has been applied to workers exposed to ionising radiation at the University of Naples Federico II over the last 5 years. The medical surveillance has been carried out in 247 workers on duty at 29 scientific Departments and 30 laboratories of Naples University Federico II exposed to radiation sources which were constituted by a particle accelerator, Rx Diffractometer, electronic microscope and radionuclides of low energy ( 32 P, 35 S, 7 Be, 3 H, 125 I, 14 P, 14 C, 33 Y, 241 Am, 55 Fe, 109 Cd, 57 Co, 88 Y, 226 Rn, 133 Ba, 137 Cs, 60 Co, 210 Pb, 109 Cd, 22 Na). For every person exposed a computerized case sheet was elaborated recording clinical, biological, dosimetric and other preventive data (anlage, smoking, alcohol, drugs, toxics). In case of localized radiation risk, computerized capillaroscopic monitoring of the regions of the skin exposed to radiation was carried out. The results of the research show that the absorbed doses in the workers have generally been under effective dose limit for public exposure (1 mSv/y). The clinical and biological data have shown the healthiness of the workers exposed to ionising radiation. Also the capillaroscopic examinations in the localized expositions of the skin have generally given good perfusion of the exposed tissues, integrating the health concept. The statistical and computer method with computer developed graphics has proved useful in particular risk conditions (i.e. hematic alterations, functions of the emunctory organs, etc.).This research has highlighted the role of medical surveillance in developing health promotion criteria and intervention planning through a complete real-time control of data. (author)

  13. Automated Computer-Based Facility for Measurement of Near-Field Structure of Microwave Radiators and Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Shantnu R.;; Pavlasek, Tomas J. F.;; Muresan, Letitia V.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic facility for measuring the three-dimensional structure of the near fields of microwave radiators and scatterers is described. The amplitude and phase for different polarization components can be recorded in analog and digital form using a microprocessor-based system. The stored data...... are transferred to a large high-speed computer for bulk processing and for the production of isophot and equiphase contour maps or profiles. The performance of the system is demonstrated through results for a single conical horn, for interacting rectangular horns, for multiple cylindrical scatterers...

  14. MQRAD, a computer code for synchrotron radiation from quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Teruhisa.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code, MQRAD, is developed for the calculation of the synchrotron radiation from the particles passing through quadrupole magnets at the straight section of the electron-positron colliding machine. This code computes the distributions of photon numbers and photon energies at any given points on the beam orbit. In this code, elements such as the quadrupole magnets and the drift spaces can be divided into many sub-elements in order to obtain the results with good accuracy. The synchrotron radiation produced by inserted quadrupole magnets at the interaction region of the electron-positron collider is one of the main background sources to the detector. The masking system against the synchrotron radiation at TRISTAN is very important because of the relatively high beam energy and the long straight section, which are 30 GeV and 100 meters, respectively. MQRAD has been used to design the masking system of the TOPAZ detector and the result is presented here as an example. (author)

  15. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  16. Computing radiation dose to reactor pressure vessel and internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Within the next twenty years many of the nuclear reactors currently in service will reach their design lifetime. One of the key factors affecting decisions on license extensions will be the ability to confidently predict the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and core structural components which have been subjected to many years of cumulative radiation exposure. This report gives an overview of the most recent scientific literature and current methodologies for computational dosimetry in the OECD/NEA Member countries. Discussion is extended to consider some related issues of materials science, such as the metals, and limitations of the models in current use. Proposals are made for further work. (author)

  17. Advanced Computational Methods for Thermal Radiative Heat Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tencer, John; Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Larsen, Marvin E.; Hogan, Roy E.,

    2016-10-01

    Participating media radiation (PMR) in weapon safety calculations for abnormal thermal environments are too costly to do routinely. This cost may be s ubstantially reduced by applying reduced order modeling (ROM) techniques. The application of ROM to PMR is a new and unique approach for this class of problems. This approach was investigated by the authors and shown to provide significant reductions in the computational expense associated with typical PMR simulations. Once this technology is migrated into production heat transfer analysis codes this capability will enable the routine use of PMR heat transfer in higher - fidelity simulations of weapon resp onse in fire environments.

  18. A computer simulation model to compute the radiation transfer of mountainous regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuguang; Zhao, Feng; Song, Rui

    2011-11-01

    In mountainous regions, the radiometric signal recorded at the sensor depends on a number of factors such as sun angle, atmospheric conditions, surface cover type, and topography. In this paper, a computer simulation model of radiation transfer is designed and evaluated. This model implements the Monte Carlo ray-tracing techniques and is specifically dedicated to the study of light propagation in mountainous regions. The radiative processes between sun light and the objects within the mountainous region are realized by using forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing methods. The performance of the model is evaluated through detailed comparisons with the well-established 3D computer simulation model: RGM (Radiosity-Graphics combined Model) based on the same scenes and identical spectral parameters, which shows good agreements between these two models' results. By using the newly developed computer model, series of typical mountainous scenes are generated to analyze the physical mechanism of mountainous radiation transfer. The results show that the effects of the adjacent slopes are important for deep valleys and they particularly affect shadowed pixels, and the topographic effect needs to be considered in mountainous terrain before accurate inferences from remotely sensed data can be made.

  19. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Haron, M. R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDIw, DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts.

  20. Computer system of radiation control at PNC Tokai Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Masashi; Ebana, Minoru; Seki, Akio

    1984-01-01

    In the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), the operation of the fuel reprocessing plant started in January, 1981, the high level radioactive substance research facility (CPF) was completed in 1982, and the plutonium conversion technique development facility started the actual operation in September, 1983. In this situation, PNC introduced computer systems for radiation control to increase efficiency and to save labor: concretely computer systems were introduced for the continuous monitoring system in CPF in September, 1982, and for the plutonium conversion technique development facility in April, 1983. In this review, radiation control items in CPF are shown. The stationary monitors for continuous monitoring are employed for area monitors and exhaust monitors, while off-line input processing is adopted for batch measurement every week, such as iodine with an off-gas monitor. Batch data processing includes routine smear survey for working environment and shield wall survey. Other area monitors are criticality alarm systems which are designed with 2 out of 3 redundancy. In the second half of the review, the data processing system is described on each item of hardware and software, system configuration, data acquisition and demand input, processing, alarm functions, data recording and CRT display. In the review, also the system evaluation and future problems are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. First principles calculation of point defects and mobility degradation in bulk AlSb for radiation detection application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordi, V; Aberg, D; Erhart, P; Wu, K J

    2007-01-01

    The development of high resolution, room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors requires the introduction of materials with increased carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product, while having a band gap in the 1.4-2.2 eV range. AlSb is a promising material for this application. However, systematic improvements in the material quality are necessary to achieve an adequate μτ product. We are using a combination of simulation and experiment to develop a fundamental understanding of the factors which affect detector material quality. First principles calculations are used to study the microscopic mechanisms of mobility degradation from point defects and to calculate the intrinsic limit of mobility from phonon scattering. We use density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the formation energies of native and impurity point defects, to determine their equilibrium concentrations as a function of temperature and charge state. Perturbation theory via the Born approximation is coupled with Boltzmann transport theory to calculate the contribution toward mobility degradation of each type of point defect, using DFT-computed carrier scattering rates. A comparison is made to measured carrier concentrations and mobilities from AlSb crystals grown in our lab. We find our predictions in good quantitative agreement with experiment, allowing optimized annealing conditions to be deduced. A major result is the determination of oxygen impurity as a severe mobility killer, despite the ability of oxygen to compensation dope AlSb and reduce the net carrier concentration. In this case, increased resistivity is not a good indicator of improved material performance, due to the concomitant sharp reduction in μτ

  2. Errors in measuring absorbed radiation and computing crop radiation use efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, K.P.; Daughtry, C.S.T.; Wiegand, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation use efficiency (RUE) is often a crucial component of crop growth models that relate dry matter production to energy received by the crop. RUE is a ratio that has units g J -1 , if defined as phytomass per unit of energy received, and units J J -1 , if defined as the energy content of phytomass per unit of energy received. Both the numerator and denominator in computation of RUE can vary with experimental assumptions and methodologies. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect that different methods of measuring the numerator and denominator have on the RUE of corn (Zea mays L.) and to illustrate this variation with experimental data. Computational methods examined included (i) direct measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed (f A ), (ii) estimates of f A derived from leaf area index (LAI), and (iii) estimates of f A derived from spectral vegetation indices. Direct measurements of absorbed PAR from planting to physiological maturity of corn were consistently greater than the indirect estimates based on green LAI or the spectral vegetation indices. Consequently, the RUE calculated using directly measured absorbed PAR was lower than the RUE calculated using the indirect measures of absorbed PAR. For crops that contain senesced vegetation, green LAI and the spectral vegetation indices provide appropriate estimates of the fraction of PAR absorbed by a crop canopy and, thus, accurate estimates of crop radiation use efficiency

  3. The radiation protective devices for interventional procedures using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiroji; Chabatake, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Tamura, Sakio

    2002-01-01

    A scattered dose and a surface dose from phantom measurements during interventional procedures with computed tomography (IVR-CT) were evaluated. To reduce the personnel exposure in IVR-CT, the new protective devices were developed and its effect evaluated. Two radiation protection devices were experimentally made using a lead vinyl sheet with lead equivalent 0.125 mmPb. The first device is a lead curtain which shields the space of CT-gantry and phantom for the CT examination. The second device is a lead drape which shields on the phantom surface adjacent to the scanning plane for the CT-fluoroscopy. Scattered dose and phantom surface dose were measured with an abdominal phantom during Cine-CT (130 kV, 150 mA, 5 seconds, 10 mm section thickness). They were measured by using ionization chamber dosimeter. They were measured with and without a lead curtain and a lead drape. Scattered dose rate was measured at distance of 50-150 cm from the scanning plane. And, surface dose was measured at distance of 4-21 cm from the scanning plane on the phantom. On operator's standing position, scattered dose rates were from 8.4 to 11.6 μGy/sec at CT examination. The lead curtain and the lead drape reduced scattered dose rate at distance of 50 cm from the scanning plane by 66% and 58.3% respectively. Surface dose rate were 118 μGy/sec at distance of 5 cm from the scanning plane at CT-fluoroscopy. The lead drape reduced the surface dose by 60.5%. High scattered exposure to personnel may occur during interventional procedures using CT. They were considerably reduced during CT-arteriography by attaching the lead curtain in CT equipment. And they were substantially reduced during CT-fluoroscopy by placing the lead drape adjacent to the scanning plane, in addition, operator's hand would be protected from unnecessary radiation scattered by phantom. It was suggested that the scattered exposure to personnel could be sufficiently reduced by using radiation protection devices in IVR-CT. The

  4. Internal radiation dose calculations with the INREM II computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Killough, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code, INREM II, was developed to calculate the internal radiation dose equivalent to organs of man which results from the intake of a radionuclide by inhalation or ingestion. Deposition and removal of radioactivity from the respiratory tract is represented by the Internal Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group Lung Model. A four-segment catenary model of the gastrointestinal tract is used to estimate movement of radioactive material that is ingested, or swallowed after being cleared from the respiratory tract. Retention of radioactivity in other organs is specified by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions. The formation and decay of radioactive daughters is treated explicitly, with each radionuclide in the decay chain having its own uptake and retention parameters, as supplied by the user. The dose equivalent to a target organ is computed as the sum of contributions from each source organ in which radioactivity is assumed to be situated. This calculation utilizes a matrix of dosimetric S-factors (rem/μCi-day) supplied by the user for the particular choice of source and target organs. Output permits the evaluation of components of dose from cross-irradiations when penetrating radiations are present. INREM II has been utilized with current radioactive decay data and metabolic models to produce extensive tabulations of dose conversion factors for a reference adult for approximately 150 radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of light-water-reactor fuel cycles. These dose conversion factors represent the 50-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of a given radionuclide for 22target organs including contributions from specified source organs and surplus activity in the rest of the body. These tabulations are particularly significant in their consistent use of contemporary models and data and in the detail of documentation

  5. Methods of computer experiment in gamma-radiation technologies using new radiation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bratchenko, M I; Rozhkov, V V

    2001-01-01

    Presented id the methodology of computer modeling application for physical substantiation of new irradiation technologies and irradiators design work flow. Modeling tasks for irradiation technologies are structured along with computerized methods of their solution and appropriate types of software. Comparative analysis of available packages for Monte-Carlo modeling of electromagnetic processes in media is done concerning their application to irradiation technologies problems. The results of codes approbation and preliminary data on gamma-radiation absorbed dose distributions for nuclides of conventional sources and prospective Europium-based gamma-sources are presented.

  6. Computer controlled vacuum control system for synchrotron radiation beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, S.M.; Wang, C.; Yang, J.

    1983-01-01

    The increasing number and complexity of vacuum control systems at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory has resulted in the need to computerize its operations in order to lower costs and increase efficiency of operation. Status signals are transmitted through digital and analog serial data links which use microprocessors to monitor vacuum status continuously. Each microprocessor has a unique address and up to 256 can be connected to the host computer over a single RS232 data line. A FORTRAN program on the host computer will request status messages and send control messages via only one RS232 line per beam line, signal the operator when a fault condition occurs, take automatic corrective actions, warn of impending valve failure, and keep a running log of all changes in vacuum status for later recall. Wiring costs are thus greatly reduced and more status conditions can be monitored without adding excessively to the complexity of the system. Operators can then obtain status reports at various locations in the lab quickly without having to read a large number of meter and LED's

  7. Computer Modeling of Radiation Portal Monitors for Homeland Security Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagh, Richard T.; Kouzes, Richard T.; McConn, Ronald J.; Robinson, Sean M.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) are currently being used at our nation's borders to detect potential nuclear threats. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), realistic computer models of RPMs are being developed to simulate the screening of vehicles and cargo. Detailed models of the detection equipment, vehicles, cargo containers, cargos, and radioactive sources are being used to determine the optimal configuration of detectors. These models can also be used to support work to optimize alarming algorithms so that they maximize sensitivity for items of interest while minimizing nuisance alarms triggered by legitimate radioactive material in the commerce stream. Proposed next-generation equipment is also being modeled to quantify performance and capability improvements to detect potential nuclear threats. A discussion of the methodology used to perform computer modeling for RPMs will be provided. In addition, the efforts to validate models used to perform these scenario analyses will be described. Finally, areas where improved modeling capability is needed will be discussed as a guide to future development efforts

  8. Computational hybrid anthropometric paediatric phantom library for internal radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid computational phantoms combine voxel-based and simplified equation-based modelling approaches to provide unique advantages and more realism for the construction of anthropomorphic models. In this work, a methodology and C++ code are developed to generate hybrid computational phantoms covering statistical distributions of body morphometry in the paediatric population. The paediatric phantoms of the Virtual Population Series (IT’IS Foundation, Switzerland) were modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body mass, body length, standing height and sitting height/stature ratio, determined from reference databases of the National Centre for Health Statistics and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The phantoms were selected as representative anchor phantoms for the newborn, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 years-old children, and were subsequently remodelled to create 1100 female and male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th body morphometries. Evaluation was performed qualitatively using 3D visualization and quantitatively by analysing internal organ masses. Overall, the newly generated phantoms appear very reasonable and representative of the main characteristics of the paediatric population at various ages and for different genders, body sizes and sitting stature ratios. The mass of internal organs increases with height and body mass. The comparison of organ masses of the heart, kidney, liver, lung and spleen with published autopsy and ICRP reference data for children demonstrated that they follow the same trend when correlated with age. The constructed hybrid computational phantom library opens up the prospect of comprehensive radiation dosimetry calculations and risk assessment for the paediatric population of different age groups and diverse anthropometric parameters.

  9. Computational Modeling of Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Radiation Dose Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Daniel L.; Debeb, Bisrat G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thames, Howard D. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A., E-mail: wwoodward@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Research Program and Clinic, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) involves giving radiation to the entire brain with the goals of reducing the incidence of brain metastasis and improving overall survival. Experimentally, we have demonstrated that PCI prevents brain metastases in a breast cancer mouse model. We developed a computational model to expand on and aid in the interpretation of our experimental results. Methods and Materials: MATLAB was used to develop a computational model of brain metastasis and PCI in mice. Model input parameters were optimized such that the model output would match the experimental number of metastases per mouse from the unirradiated group. An independent in vivo–limiting dilution experiment was performed to validate the model. The effect of whole brain irradiation at different measurement points after tumor cells were injected was evaluated in terms of the incidence, number of metastases, and tumor burden and was then compared with the corresponding experimental data. Results: In the optimized model, the correlation between the number of metastases per mouse and the experimental fits was >95. Our attempt to validate the model with a limiting dilution assay produced 99.9% correlation with respect to the incidence of metastases. The model accurately predicted the effect of whole-brain irradiation given 3 weeks after cell injection but substantially underestimated its effect when delivered 5 days after cell injection. The model further demonstrated that delaying whole-brain irradiation until the development of gross disease introduces a dose threshold that must be reached before a reduction in incidence can be realized. Conclusions: Our computational model of mouse brain metastasis and PCI correlated strongly with our experiments with unirradiated mice. The results further suggest that early treatment of subclinical disease is more effective than irradiating established disease.

  10. Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation: contact versus non-contact enamel ablation and sonic-activated bulk composite placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckova, M; Kasparova, M; Dostalova, T; Jelinkova, H; Sulc, J; Nemec, M; Fibrich, M; Bradna, P; Miyagi, M

    2013-01-01

    Laser radiation can be used for effective caries removal and cavity preparation without significant thermal effects, collateral damage of tooth structure, or patient discomfort. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of tissue after contact or non-contact Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation ablation. The second goal was to increase the sealing ability of hard dental tissues using sonic-activated bulk filling material with change in viscosity during processing. The artificial caries was prepared in intact teeth to simulate a demineralized surface and then the Er:YAG or CTH:YAG laser radiation was applied. The enamel artificial caries was gently removed by the laser radiation and sonic-activated composite fillings were inserted. A stereomicroscope and then a scanning electron microscope were used to evaluate the enamel surface. Er:YAG contact mode ablation in enamel was quick and precise; the cavity was smooth with a keyhole shaped prism and rod relief arrangement without a smear layer. The sonic-activated filling material was consistently regularly distributed; no cracks or microleakage in the enamel were observed. CTH:YAG irradiation was able to clean but not ablate the enamel surface; in contact and also in non-contact mode there was evidence of melting and fusing of the enamel. (paper)

  11. Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation: contact versus non-contact enamel ablation and sonic-activated bulk composite placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckova, M.; Kasparova, M.; Dostalova, T.; Jelinkova, H.; Sulc, J.; Nemec, M.; Fibrich, M.; Bradna, P.; Miyagi, M.

    2013-05-01

    Laser radiation can be used for effective caries removal and cavity preparation without significant thermal effects, collateral damage of tooth structure, or patient discomfort. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of tissue after contact or non-contact Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation ablation. The second goal was to increase the sealing ability of hard dental tissues using sonic-activated bulk filling material with change in viscosity during processing. The artificial caries was prepared in intact teeth to simulate a demineralized surface and then the Er:YAG or CTH:YAG laser radiation was applied. The enamel artificial caries was gently removed by the laser radiation and sonic-activated composite fillings were inserted. A stereomicroscope and then a scanning electron microscope were used to evaluate the enamel surface. Er:YAG contact mode ablation in enamel was quick and precise; the cavity was smooth with a keyhole shaped prism and rod relief arrangement without a smear layer. The sonic-activated filling material was consistently regularly distributed; no cracks or microleakage in the enamel were observed. CTH:YAG irradiation was able to clean but not ablate the enamel surface; in contact and also in non-contact mode there was evidence of melting and fusing of the enamel.

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.; Walker, R.P.; Durham, P.J.; Ridley, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  13. The situation of computer utilization in radiation therapy in Japan and other countries and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onai, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    The uses of computers in radiation therapy are various, such as radiation dose calculation, clinical history management, radiotherapeutical instrument automation and biological model. To grasp the situation in this field, a survey by questionnaire was carried out internationally at the time of the 7th International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy held in Kawasaki and Tokyo in September, 1980. The surveyed nations totaled 21 including Japan; the number of facilities answered were 203 in Japan and 111 in other countries, and the period concerned is December, 1979, to September, 1980. The results of the survey are described as follows: areas of use of computers in hospitals, computer utilization in radiation department, computer uses in radiation therapy, and evaluation of radiotherapeutical computer uses and problems. (J.P.N.)

  14. Role of electrode metallization in the performance of bulk semi-insulating InP radiation detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zat´ko, B.; Dubecky, F.; Procházková, Olga; Nečas, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 576, č. 1 (2007), s. 98-102 ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors - IWORID/8./. Pisa, 02.07.2006-06.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/06/0153 Grant - others:Slovak Grant Agency for Science(SK) 2/7170/27 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : semiconductor technology * radiation detection * indium compounds * Schottky barriers Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.114, year: 2007

  15. Automatic data acquisition system of environmental radiation monitor with a personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Tohru; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1984-05-01

    The automatic data acquisition system of environmental radiation monitor was developed in a low price by using a PET personal computer. The count pulses from eight monitors settled at four site boundaries were transmitted to a radiation control room by a signal transmission device and analyzed by the computer via 12 channel scaler and PET-CAMAC Interface for graphic display and printing. (author)

  16. Calculation of radiation dose received in computed tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abed Elseed, Eslam Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) examinations play an important role in the health care of the population. These examination may involve significant irradiation of the patient and probably represent the largest man-made source of radiation exposure for the population. This study was performed to assess the effective dose (ED) received in brain CT examination ( base of skull and cerebrum) and to analyze effective dose distributions among radiological departments under study. The study was performed at Elnileen Medical Center, coverage one CT unit and a sample of 51 patients (25 cerebrum sample and 26 base of skull sample). The following parameters were recorded age, weight, height body mass index (BMI) derived from weight (kg) and height ( m) and exposure factor and CTDI voi , DLP value. The effective dose was measured for brain CT examination. The ED values were calculated from the obtained DLP values using AAPM report No 96 calculation methods. The results of ED values calculated showed that patient exposure were within the normal range of exposure. The mean ED values calculated were 0.35±0.15 for base of skull of brain CT examinations and 0.70±0.32 for cerebrum of brain CT examination, respectively. Further studies are recommended with more number of pa.(Author)

  17. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of Ca and Pb impurities on the bulk optical strength of ultrapure NaCl and KCl crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, An V.; Voszka, R.; Kovalev, Valerii I.; Faĭzullov, F. S.; Janszky, J.

    1987-06-01

    A significant increase (by a factor of about 3) of the bulk damage threshold in the case of interaction of CO2 laser radiation pulses with ultrapure NaCl and KCl crystals grown in a reactive atmosphere was observed on introduction of divalent metal ions Ca and Pb in concentrations of 10-5-10-6 mol/mol. Impurities were introduced in concentrations of 10-8-10-3 and 2×10-7-10-4 mol/mol into the melts of KCl and NaCl, respectively. The concentration of other impurities (including OH) did not exceed ~10-6 mol/mol. A physical model was developed to account for the observed dependence on the basis of an analogy between a system of colloidal particles and F centers in a crystal and a liquid-vapor system.

  19. From Interfaces to Bulk: Experimental-Computational Studies Across Time and Length Scales of Multi-Functional Ionic Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perahia, Dvora [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Grest, Gary S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Neutron experiments coupled with computational components have resulted in unprecedented understanding of the factors that impact the behavior of ionic structured polymers. Additionally, new computational tools to study macromolecules, were developed. In parallel, this DOE funding have enabled the education of the next generation of material researchers who are able to take the advantage neutron tools offer to the understanding and design of advanced materials. Our research has provided unprecedented insight into one of the major factors that limits the use of ionizable polymers, combining the macroscopic view obtained from the experimental techniques with molecular insight extracted from computational studies leading to transformative knowledge that will impact the design of nano-structured, materials. With the focus on model systems, of broad interest to the scientific community and to industry, the research addressed challenges that cut across a large number of polymers, independent of the specific chemical structure or the transported species.

  20. The use of computer in the biological dosimetry of radiation injury with lymphocyte micronucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Benrong; Yao Buo

    1994-01-01

    A new approach for determining by computer the radiation dosage in early diagnosis of radiation injury was presented, with a purpose to widen its practical application. A set of programs designed in Clanguage for computing and drawing was compiled. The technical details discussed here can be used for compiling other kinds of practical programs. It is a valuable attempt in improving the efficiency of the computer-aid clinical diagnosis

  1. Tumor bulk as a prognostic factor for the management of localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a survey of the Japan lymphoma radiation therapy group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Isobe, Kouichi; Hirota, Saeko; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasai, Keisuke; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors that specifically predict survival rates of patients with localized aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Methods and Materials: The survey was carried out at 25 radiation oncology institutions in Japan in 1998. The 5-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival rates (OAS) were calculated, and univariate and multivariate analyses were done to identify which of the following factors, namely, gender, age, performance status (PS), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, Stage (I vs. II), tumor bulk (maximum diameter), and treatment, were significant from the viewpoint of prognosis. Results: A total of 1141 patients with Stage I and II NHL were treated by the Japanese Lymphoma Radiation Therapy Group between 1988 and 1992. Of them, 787 patients, who were treated using definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for intermediate- and high-grade lymphomas in working formulation, constituted the core of this study. Primary tumors arose mainly from extranodal organs (71%) in the head and neck (Waldeyer's ring: 36% and sinonasal cavities: 9%). The factors associated with poorer prognosis were age over 60 years old (p < 0.0001), radiation therapy alone (p < 0.0001), PS = 2-4 (p = 0.0011), (sex male, p = 0.0078), a bulky tumor more than 6 cm in maximum diameter (p 0.0088), elevated LDH (p = 0.0117), and stage II (p = 0.0642). A median dose of 42 Gy was delivered mainly to the involved fields. Short-course chemotherapy was provided in 549 (70%) patients. The 5-year OAS and EFS rates for all patients were 71% and 67%, respectively. According to the stage-modified International Prognostic Index, the 5-year EFS of the patients with risk factors from 0 to 1 was 76%, 61% for patients with two risk factors, and 26% for patients with three or more risk factors. Conclusion: Extranodal presentation, especially Waldeyer's ring and sinonasal cavities, is encountered more frequently in Japan than in Western countries. Tumor bulk is

  2. Transport Imaging of Spatial Distribution of Mobility-Lifetime (Micro Tau) Product in Bulk Semiconductors for Nuclear Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    reproducibility for currents of 3×10-10 A, and 6×10-10 A. An operating current of 1×10-10 A shows higher variations in the distribution beginning at...York: John Wiley & Sons, 2000. [21] A. Owens and A. Peacock , “Compound semiconductor radiation detectors,” Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A, vol. 531, pp. 18...A. G. Kozorezov, J. K. Wigmore, A. Owens, R. den Hartog, A. Peacock , and H. A. Al-Jawari, “Resolution degradation of semiconductor detectors due to

  3. Calculation of the Doppler broadening of the electron-positron annihilation radiation in defect-free bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, V. J.; Alatalo, M.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K. G.; Kruseman, A. C.; Mijnarends, P. E.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a calculation of the Doppler broadening of the positron-electron annihilation radiation and positron lifetimes in a large number of elemental defect-free materials are presented. A simple scheme based on the method of superimposed atoms is used for these calculations. Calculated values of the Doppler broadening are compared with experimental data for a number of elemental materials, and qualitative agreement is obtained. These results provide a database which can be used for characterizing materials and identifying impurity-vacancy complexes. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. A computer aided treatment event recognition system in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Junyi; Mart, Christopher; Bayouth, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an automated system to safeguard radiation therapy treatments by analyzing electronic treatment records and reporting treatment events. Methods: CATERS (Computer Aided Treatment Event Recognition System) was developed to detect treatment events by retrieving and analyzing electronic treatment records. CATERS is designed to make the treatment monitoring process more efficient by automating the search of the electronic record for possible deviations from physician's intention, such as logical inconsistencies as well as aberrant treatment parameters (e.g., beam energy, dose, table position, prescription change, treatment overrides, etc). Over a 5 month period (July 2012–November 2012), physicists were assisted by the CATERS software in conducting normal weekly chart checks with the aims of (a) determining the relative frequency of particular events in the authors’ clinic and (b) incorporating these checks into the CATERS. During this study period, 491 patients were treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for a total of 7692 fractions. Results: All treatment records from the 5 month analysis period were evaluated using all the checks incorporated into CATERS after the training period. About 553 events were detected as being exceptions, although none of them had significant dosimetric impact on patient treatments. These events included every known event type that was discovered during the trial period. A frequency analysis of the events showed that the top three types of detected events were couch position override (3.2%), extra cone beam imaging (1.85%), and significant couch position deviation (1.31%). The significant couch deviation is defined as the number of treatments where couch vertical exceeded two times standard deviation of all couch verticals, or couch lateral/longitudinal exceeded three times standard deviation of all couch laterals and longitudinals. On average, the application takes about 1 s per patient when

  5. A computer aided treatment event recognition system in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Junyi, E-mail: junyi-xia@uiowa.edu; Mart, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Bayouth, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, K4/B55, Madison, Wisconsin 53792-0600 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated system to safeguard radiation therapy treatments by analyzing electronic treatment records and reporting treatment events. Methods: CATERS (Computer Aided Treatment Event Recognition System) was developed to detect treatment events by retrieving and analyzing electronic treatment records. CATERS is designed to make the treatment monitoring process more efficient by automating the search of the electronic record for possible deviations from physician's intention, such as logical inconsistencies as well as aberrant treatment parameters (e.g., beam energy, dose, table position, prescription change, treatment overrides, etc). Over a 5 month period (July 2012–November 2012), physicists were assisted by the CATERS software in conducting normal weekly chart checks with the aims of (a) determining the relative frequency of particular events in the authors’ clinic and (b) incorporating these checks into the CATERS. During this study period, 491 patients were treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for a total of 7692 fractions. Results: All treatment records from the 5 month analysis period were evaluated using all the checks incorporated into CATERS after the training period. About 553 events were detected as being exceptions, although none of them had significant dosimetric impact on patient treatments. These events included every known event type that was discovered during the trial period. A frequency analysis of the events showed that the top three types of detected events were couch position override (3.2%), extra cone beam imaging (1.85%), and significant couch position deviation (1.31%). The significant couch deviation is defined as the number of treatments where couch vertical exceeded two times standard deviation of all couch verticals, or couch lateral/longitudinal exceeded three times standard deviation of all couch laterals and longitudinals. On average, the application takes about 1 s per patient when

  6. Developmental morphology of cover crop species exhibit contrasting behaviour to changes in soil bulk density, revealed by X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr-Hersey, Jasmine E; Mooney, Sacha J; Bengough, A Glyn; Mairhofer, Stefan; Ritz, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Plant roots growing through soil typically encounter considerable structural heterogeneity, and local variations in soil dry bulk density. The way the in situ architecture of root systems of different species respond to such heterogeneity is poorly understood due to challenges in visualising roots growing in soil. The objective of this study was to visualise and quantify the impact of abrupt changes in soil bulk density on the roots of three cover crop species with contrasting inherent root morphologies, viz. tillage radish (Raphanus sativus), vetch (Vicia sativa) and black oat (Avena strigosa). The species were grown in soil columns containing a two-layer compaction treatment featuring a 1.2 g cm-3 (uncompacted) zone overlaying a 1.4 g cm-3 (compacted) zone. Three-dimensional visualisations of the root architecture were generated via X-ray computed tomography, and an automated root-segmentation imaging algorithm. Three classes of behaviour were manifest as a result of roots encountering the compacted interface, directly related to the species. For radish, there was switch from a single tap-root to multiple perpendicular roots which penetrated the compacted zone, whilst for vetch primary roots were diverted more horizontally with limited lateral growth at less acute angles. Black oat roots penetrated the compacted zone with no apparent deviation. Smaller root volume, surface area and lateral growth were consistently observed in the compacted zone in comparison to the uncompacted zone across all species. The rapid transition in soil bulk density had a large effect on root morphology that differed greatly between species, with major implications for how these cover crops will modify and interact with soil structure.

  7. Radiation Shielding Information Center: a source of computer codes and data for fusion neutronics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), established in 1962 to collect, package, analyze, and disseminate information, computer codes, and data in the area of radiation transport related to fission, is now being utilized to support fusion neutronics technology. The major activities include: (1) answering technical inquiries on radiation transport problems, (2) collecting, packaging, testing, and disseminating computing technology and data libraries, and (3) reviewing literature and operating a computer-based information retrieval system containing material pertinent to radiation transport analysis. The computer codes emphasize methods for solving the Boltzmann equation such as the discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques, both of which are widely used in fusion neutronics. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  8. Computer Based Radiation Protection- A New Cd-Rom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geringer, T.; Bammer, M.; Ablber, M.

    2004-01-01

    Within the next few years, there'll be a lot of new challenges required from radiation protection. According to EU regulation[1] and the new austrian radiation protection law [2] regular additional training are requested. Patients protection in diagnostic and therapeutic usage of ionising radiation gains also more and more importance.[3] Not really surprisingly, the general population is definitely highly aware of the risks coming with the usage of radionuclides and x-rays in medicine. Furthermore, the nuclear power plant in Temelin, near the austrian border initiated a lively discussion about risks, necessity and use of ionising radiation in medicine and industry. It turned out to be a really hard job handling these topics in public. A brilliant didactics based on independent information and viewpoints was required. ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, represented by the department of medical technical applications and the radiation protection academy, developed an interactive CD-ROM covering several applications: Basics on radiation protection for medical and technical personnel ; preparation for a radiation protection training. Repetition of the main topics for graduates of a radiation protection training. Basics on radiation protection and emergency management for medical staff as well as for the general public. (Author)

  9. Computational methodology for the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR): cross-section and validation. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.F.; Williams, M.L.

    1986-03-01

    A neutronics library suitable for low-enrichment uranium (LEU) and high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fueled cores for both the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) is documented herein. The library is obtained from version V of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-V) and contains 223 nuclides weighted over a variety of region-dependent neutron spectra. Self-shielding and zone-weighting effects are incorporated with 227-group calculations for several reactor-core configurations. Libraries are archived for both transport and diffusion theory seven-group calculations. Complete listings of processing details are included so that libraries with different specifications can be easily obtained. Results from validation calculations indicate that the neutronics libraries obtained from this effort are suitable for neutronics computations for the ORR and BSR. 12 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs

  10. Computer modelling of radiation-induced bystander effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostunov, Igor K.; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects are now well established consequences of exposure of living cells to ionising radiation. It has been observed that cells not directly hit by radiation tracks may still exhibit radiation effects. We present a quantitative modelling of the radiation-induced bystander effect based on a diffusion model of spreading the bystander signal. The model assumes the bystander factor to be a protein of low molecular weight, given out by the hit cell, diffusing in the medium and reacting with non-hit cells. The model calculations successfully predict the results of cell survival in an irradiated conditioned medium. The model predicts the shape of dose-effect relationship for cell survival and oncogenic transformation induced by broad-beam and micro-beam irradiation by alpha-particles. (author)

  11. A history of slide rules for blackbody radiation computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Stewart, Sean M.

    2012-10-01

    During the Second World War the importance of utilizing detection devices capable of operating in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum was firmly established. Up until that time, laboriously constructed tables for blackbody radiation needed to be used in calculations involving the amount of radiation radiated within a given spectral region or for other related radiometric quantities. To rapidly achieve reasonably accurate calculations of such radiometric quantities, a blackbody radiation calculator was devised in slide rule form first in Germany in 1944 and soon after in England and the United States. In the immediate decades after its introduction, the radiation slide rule was widely adopted and recognized as a useful and important tool for engineers and scientists working in the infrared field. It reached its pinnacle in the United States in 1970 in a rule introduced by Electro Optical Industries, Inc. With the onset in the latter half of the 1970s of affordable, hand-held electronic calculators, the impending demise of the radiation slide rule was evident. No longer the calculational device of choice, the radiation slide rule all but disappeared within a few short years. Although today blackbody radiation calculations can be readily accomplished using anything from a programmable pocket calculator upwards, with each device making use of a wide variety of numerical approximations to the integral of Planck's function, radiation slide rules were in the early decades of infrared technology the definitive "workhorse" for those involved in infrared systems design and engineering. This paper presents a historical development of radiation slide rules with many versions being discussed.

  12. Methods and compositions for protection of cells and tissues from computed tomography radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, David J.

    2018-01-30

    Described are methods for preventing or inhibiting genomic instability and in cells affected by diagnostic radiology procedures employing ionizing radiation. Embodiments include methods of preventing or inhibiting genomic instability and in cells affected by computed tomography (CT) radiation. Subjects receiving ionizing radiation may be those persons suspected of having cancer, or cancer patients having received or currently receiving cancer therapy, and or those patients having received previous ionizing radiation, including those who are approaching or have exceeded the recommended total radiation dose for a person.

  13. Computer simulation of ionizing radiation burnout in power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavarz, A.A.; Fischer, T.A.; Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Hawkins, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    The transient response of a power MOSFET device to ionizing radiation was examined using the BAMBI device simulator. The radiation rate threshold for burnout was determined for several different cases. The burnout mechanism was attributed to current-induced avalanche. The effects of the applied drain-source voltage and the base width of the parasitic bipolar device on the threshold level were modeled. It was found that the radiation rate threshold is lower at higher drain-source voltages or narrower bases. 8 refs., 17 figs

  14. Multi-detector computed tomography radiation doses in the follow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-09

    May 9, 2014 ... The associated ionising radiation has raised concern as it is the dominant ... more radiosensitive because of a higher rate of cell division in the former and ... South Africa has not yet developed DRLs with which we could.

  15. A computer system for occupational radiation exposure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized occupational radiation exposure information system has been developed to maintain records for contractors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The system also allows indexing and retrieval of three million documents from microfilm, thus significantly reducing storage needs and costs. The users are linked by display terminals to the data base permitting them instant access to dosemetry and other radiation exposure information. Personnel dosemeter and bioassay results, radiation training, respirator fittings, skin contaminations and other radiation occurrence records are included in the data base. The system yields immediate analysis of radiological exposures for operating management and health physics personnel, thereby releasing personnel to use their time more effectively

  16. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries.

  17. Calculation of radiation losses in cylinder symmetric high pressure discharges by means of a digital computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriessen, F.J.; Boerman, W.; Holtz, I.F.E.M.

    1973-08-01

    Computer calculations have been made of radiative energy losses in a cylindrically symmetric high pressure discharge. The calculations show that the radiation losses which occur in discharges at pressures of a few atmospheres and central temperatures of about 20000degK when compared with the electrical energy supplied, are only of importance in the neighbourhood of the centre of discharge

  18. A computer based learning program for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenzel, T.; Kruell, A.; Schmidt, R.

    1999-01-01

    Many textbooks about radiation therapy for the education of medical, technical and scientific staff are available. But they are restricted to transfer of knowledge via text and figures. On the other hand movies and animated pictures can give you a more realistic impression of the procedures and technical equipment of a radiation therapy department. Therefore, an interactive multimedia teaching program was developed at the Universitaets-Krankenhaus Eppendorf for the department of radiation therapy. The electronic textbook runs under 'MS Windows 3.1 trademark ' (with multimedia extensions) and 'MS Windows 95 trademark ', contains eight chapters and can be used without any preliminary knowledge. The program has been tested by medical personnel, nurses, physicists and physicians and was generally welcome. The program was designed for people with different levels of education to reach as many users as possible. It was not created to replace textbooks but was designed for their supplement. (orig.) [de

  19. Shutdown and degradation: Space computers for nuclear application, verification of radiation hardness. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, E.; Gerber, V.; Schreyer, P.

    1995-01-01

    (1) Employment of those radiation hard electronics which are already known in military and space applications. (2) The experience in space-flight shall be used to investigate nuclear technology areas, for example, by using space electronics to prove the range of applications in nuclear radiating environments. (3) Reproduction of a computer developed for telecommunication satellites; proof of radiation hardness by radiation tests. (4) At 328 Krad (Si) first failure of radiation tolerant devices with 100 Krad (Si) hardness guaranteed. (5) Using radiation hard devices of the same type you can expect applications at doses of greater than 1 Mrad (Si). Electronic systems applicable for radiation categories D, C and lower part of B for manipulators, vehicles, underwater robotics. (orig.) [de

  20. Modelling terahertz radiation absorption and reflection with computational phantoms of skin and associated appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilagosh, Zoltan; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Wood, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational phantoms aid the analysis of THz radiation interaction with human skin. The presented computational phantoms have accurate anatomical layering and electromagnetic properties. A novel "large sheet" simulation technique is used allowing for a realistic representation of lateral absorption and reflection of in-vivo measurements. Simulations carried out to date have indicated that hair follicles act as THz propagation channels and confirms the possible role of melanin, both in nevi and skin pigmentation, to act as a significant absorber of THz radiation. A novel freezing technique has promise in increasing the depth of skin penetration of THz radiation to aid diagnostic imaging.

  1. A COTS-based single board radiation-hardened computer for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, S.; Hillman, R.; Layton, P.; Krawzsenek, D.

    1999-01-01

    There is great community interest in the ability to use COTS (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf) technology in radiation environments. Space Electronics, Inc. has developed a high performance COTS-based radiation hardened computer. COTS approaches were selected for both hardware and software. Through parts testing, selection and packaging, all requirements have been met without parts or process development. Reliability, total ionizing dose and single event performance are attractive. The characteristics, performance and radiation resistance of the single board computer will be presented. (authors)

  2. Thermal computations for electronics conductive, radiative, and convective air cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary mechanisms of heat flowConductionApplication example: Silicon chip resistance calculationConvectionApplication example: Chassis panel cooled by natural convectionRadiationApplication example: Chassis panel cooled only by radiation 7Illustrative example: Simple thermal network model for a heat sinked power transistorIllustrative example: Thermal network circuit for a printed circuit boardCompact component modelsIllustrative example: Pressure and thermal circuits for a forced air cooled enclosureIllustrative example: A single chip package on a printed circuit board-the proble

  3. A general method for computing the total solar radiation force on complex spacecraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, F. K.

    1981-01-01

    The method circumvents many of the existing difficulties in computational logic presently encountered in the direct analytical or numerical evaluation of the appropriate surface integral. It may be applied to complex spacecraft structures for computing the total force arising from either specular or diffuse reflection or even from non-Lambertian reflection and re-radiation.

  4. Computer aided methods in radiation protection. Hungarian-Austrian-Yugoslavian health physicists' meeting. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, I.

    1985-10-01

    There are 59 papers, mainly on 1. Application of computers and computer codes for processing of large amounts of data from personnel dosimetry. 2. Mathematical models and calculations of processes related to radiation protection e.g. dose distributions and radionuclide migration. The papers are published in summary form only. (G.Q.)

  5. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, J. I.

    This investigation uses symbolic computation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular, integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and combined mode energy transport. This technical report summarizes the research conducted during the first nine months of the present investigation. The use of Chebyshev polynomials augmented with symbolic computation has clearly been demonstrated in problems involving radiative (or neutron) transport, and mixed-mode energy transport. Theoretical issues related to convergence, errors, and accuracy have also been pursued. Three manuscripts have resulted from the funded research. These manuscripts have been submitted to archival journals. At the present time, an investigation involving a conductive and radiative medium is underway. The mathematical formulation leads to a system of nonlinear, weakly-singular integral equations involving the unknown temperature and various Legendre moments of the radiative intensity in a participating medium. Some preliminary results are presented illustrating the direction of the proposed research.

  6. GPU-based high-performance computing for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Ziegenhein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in radiotherapy therapy demand high computation powers to solve challenging problems in a timely fashion in a clinical environment. The graphics processing unit (GPU), as an emerging high-performance computing platform, has been introduced to radiotherapy. It is particularly attractive due to its high computational power, small size, and low cost for facility deployment and maintenance. Over the past few years, GPU-based high-performance computing in radiotherapy has experienced rapid developments. A tremendous amount of study has been conducted, in which large acceleration factors compared with the conventional CPU platform have been observed. In this paper, we will first give a brief introduction to the GPU hardware structure and programming model. We will then review the current applications of GPU in major imaging-related and therapy-related problems encountered in radiotherapy. A comparison of GPU with other platforms will also be presented. (topical review)

  7. Microcomputers, desk calculators and process computers for use in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgkhardt, B.; Nolte, G.; Schollmeier, W.; Rau, G.

    1983-01-01

    The goals achievable, or to be pursued, in radiation protection measurement and evaluation by using computers are explained. As there is a large variety of computers available offering a likewise large variety, of performances, use of a computer is justified even for minor measuring and evaluation tasks. The subdivision into: Microcomputers as an installed part of measuring equipment; measuring and evaluation systems with desk calculators; measuring and evaluation systems with process computers is done to explain the importance and extent of the measuring or evaluation tasks and the computing devices suitable for the various purposes. The special requirements to be met in order to fulfill the different tasks are discussed, both in terms of hardware and software and in terms of skill and knowledge of the personnel, and are illustrated by an example showing the usefulness of computers in radiation protection. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Radiation interlocks - The choice between conventional hard-wired logic and computer-based systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, K.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the past few years, the use of computers in radiation safety systems has become more widespread. This is not surprising given the ubiquitous nature of computers in the modern technological world. But is a computer a good choice for the central logic element of a personnel safety system? Recent accidents at computer controlled medical accelerators would indicate that extreme care must be exercised if malfunctions are to be avoided. The Department of Energy (DOE) has recently established a sub-committee to formulate recommendations on the use of computers in safety systems for accelerators. This paper reviews the status of the committee's recommendations, and describes radiation protection interlock systems as applied to both accelerators and to irradiation facilities. Comparisons are made between the conventional (relay) approach and designs using computers

  9. Radiation interlocks: The choice between conventional hard-wired logic and computer-based systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crook, K.F.

    1986-11-01

    During the past few years, the use of computers in radiation safety systems has become more widespread. This is not surprising given the ubiquitous nature of computers in the modern technological world. But is a computer a good choice for the central logic element of a personnel safety system. Recent accidents at computer controlled medical accelerators would indicate that extreme care must be exercised if malfunctions are to be avoided. The Department of Energy has recently established a sub-committee to formulate recommendations on the use of computers in safety systems for accelerators. This paper will review the status of the committee's recommendations, and describe radiation protection interlock systems as applied to both accelerators and to irradiation facilities. Comparisons are made between the conventional relay approach and designs using computers. 6 refs., 6 figs

  10. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  11. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  12. Using a progress computer for the direct acquisition and processing of radiation protection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.G.; Borchardt, K.D.; Hacke, J.; Kirschfeld, K.E.; Kluppak, B.

    1976-01-01

    A process computer will be used in the Hahn-Meitner-Institute to rationalize radiation protection measures. Appr. 150 transmitters are to be connected with this computer. Especially the radiation measuring devices of a nuclear reactor, of hot cells, and of a heavy ion accelerator, as well as the emission- and environment monitoring systems will be connected. The advantages of this method are described: central data acquisition, central alarm and stoppage information, data processing of certain measurement values, possibility of quick disturbance analysis. Furthermore the authors report about the preparations already finished, particularly about data transmission of digital and analog values to the computer. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Line-Enhanced Deformable Registration of Pulmonary Computed Tomography Images Before and After Radiation Therapy With Radiation-Induced Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensakovic, William F.; Maxim, Peter; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Xing, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The deformable registration of pulmonary computed tomography images before and after radiation therapy is challenging due to anatomic changes from radiation fibrosis. We hypothesize that a line-enhanced registration algorithm can reduce landmark error over the entire lung, including the irradiated regions, when compared to an intensity-based deformable registration algorithm. Materials: Two intensity-based B-spline deformable registration algorithms of pre-radiation therapy and post-radiation therapy images were compared. The first was a control intensity–based algorithm that utilized computed tomography images without modification. The second was a line enhancement algorithm that incorporated a Hessian-based line enhancement filter prior to deformable image registration. Registrations were evaluated based on the landmark error between user-identified landmark pairs and the overlap ratio. Results: Twenty-one patients with pre-radiation therapy and post-radiation therapy scans were included. The median time interval between scans was 1.2 years (range: 0.3-3.3 years). Median landmark errors for the line enhancement algorithm were significantly lower than those for the control algorithm over the entire lung (1.67 vs 1.83 mm; P 5 Gy (2.25 vs 3.31; P 5 Gy dose interval demonstrated a significant inverse relationship with post-radiation therapy fibrosis enhancement after line enhancement filtration (Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.48; P = .03). Conclusion: The line enhancement registration algorithm is a promising method for registering images before and after radiation therapy. PMID:29343206

  14. European questionnaire on the use of computer programmes in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdrini, G.; Tanner, R.; Terrisol, M.

    1999-01-01

    Because of a potential reduction of necessary experimental efforts, the combination of measurements and supplementing calculations, also in the field of radiation dosimetry, may allow time and money to be saved if computational methods are used which are well suited to reproduce experimental data in a satisfactory quality. The dramatic increase in computing power in recent years now permits the use of computational tools for dosimetry also in routine applications. Many institutions dealing with radiation protection, however, have small groups which, in addition to their routine work, often cannot afford to specialise in the field of computational dosimetry. This means that not only experts but increasingly also casual users employ complicated computational tools such as general-purpose transport codes. This massive use of computer programmes in radiation protection and dosimetry applications motivated the Concerted Action Investigation and Quality Assurance of Numerical Methods in Radiation Protection Dosimetry of the 4th framework programme of the European Commission to prepare, distribute and evaluate a questionnaire on the use of such codes. A significant number of scientists from nearly all the countries of the European Community (and some countries outside Europe) contributed to the questionnaire, that allowed to obtain a satisfactory overview of the state of the art in this field. The results obtained from the questionnaire and summarised in the present Report are felt to be indicative of the situation of using sophisticated computer codes within the European Community although the group of participating scientist may not be a representative sample in a strict statistical sense [it

  15. Computer aided radiation protection system at Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, J.; Saruta, J.; Yonezawa, R.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation control for workers and workforce has been carried out strictly and effectively taking into account ALARA principle at Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) which has treated about 860 tons of irradiated fuels by now since 1977. The outline of radiation control method at TRP has already been described. This paper briefly describes our experiences and the capabilities of Radiological Information Management System (RIMS) for the safety operation of TRP, followed by radiation exposure control and activity discharge control as examples. By operating the RIMS, the conditions of workplace such as dose equivalent rate and air-contamination are easily and rapidly grasped to take prompt countermeasures for radiological protection, localization and elimination of contamination, and also the past experience data are properly applied to new radiological works to reduce exposures associated with routine and special repetitive maintenance operations at TRP. Finally, authors would like to emphasize that the form and system for radiological control of reprocessing plant has been established throughout our 15-year-experience at TRP. (author)

  16. Computation of cosmic radiation spectra and application to aircrew dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Song Jae

    2002-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code FLUKA- 99, secondary cosmic radiation energy spectra and intensities of neutrons, protons, photons, electrons, and muons were calculated for different geographical latitude and longitude at the commercial jet's altitudes ranging from 27000 ft to 41000 ft. The Badhwar's proton model was used to construct the primary cosmic radiation spectrum and effect of the vertical cutoff rigidity was considered after spectra similar to those given in literature were resulted. By applying the effective dose conversion factors, a calculation tool for aircrew doses was developed. According to the resulting dose rate distribution, effective dose rate over North pole region is around three times of that over equator region due to the geomagnetical shielding effect. Illustrative assessments of aircrew doses were made for four distinctive routes of Korean airliners : Seoul - New York (USA), London (UK), Sydney (Australia) and Mumbai(India). The effective doses to aircrew incurred from a round trip were 0.047, 0.055, 0.018, and 0.018μSv, respectively. If aircrew work 500 hour s a year at the cruise altitude of a international airline, the individual dose would reach 2 mSv which is about the same size as the average annual dose of workers at a nuclear power plant

  17. Computation of radiation from wire antennas on conducting bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, N. Christian; Hansen, Jesper; Jensen, Niels E.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical formulation, in terms of combined magnetic and electric field integral equations, is presented for the class of electromagnetic problems in which one or more wire antennas are connected to a conducting body of arbitrary shape. The formulation is suitable for numerical computation...... provided that the overall dimensions of the structure are not large compared to the wavelength. A computer program is described, and test runs on various configurations involving a cylindrical body with one or more straight wires are presented. The results obtained agree well with experimental data....

  18. Computer program for source distribution process in radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kassiri, H.; Abdul Ghani, B.

    2007-08-01

    Computer simulation for dose distribution using Visual Basic has been done according to the arrangement and activities of Co-60 sources. This program provides dose distribution in treated products depending on the product density and desired dose. The program is useful for optimization of sources distribution during loading process. there is good agreement between calculated data for the program and experimental data.(Author)

  19. Problems of radiation protection linked to the computers omnipresence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The common point between the serious radiation accidents was in relation with an error of the time of treatment and the introduction of a new procedure. The introduction of filters to modify the beams constitutes an other factor of risk. It exists a risk that the increasing of the complexity leads to a lack of the human control on the process and then accidents can happen, essentially because an insufficient understanding of the user and/or to a lack of resources. (N.C.)

  20. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach

  1. Long Term Solar Radiation Forecast Using Computational Intelligence Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The point prediction quality is closely related to the model that explains the dynamic of the observed process. Sometimes the model can be obtained by simple algebraic equations but, in the majority of the physical systems, the relevant reality is too hard to model with simple ordinary differential or difference equations. This is the case of systems with nonlinear or nonstationary behaviour which require more complex models. The discrete time-series problem, obtained by sampling the solar radiation, can be framed in this type of situation. By observing the collected data it is possible to distinguish multiple regimes. Additionally, due to atmospheric disturbances such as clouds, the temporal structure between samples is complex and is best described by nonlinear models. This paper reports the solar radiation prediction by using hybrid model that combines support vector regression paradigm and Markov chains. The hybrid model performance is compared with the one obtained by using other methods like autoregressive (AR filters, Markov AR models, and artificial neural networks. The results obtained suggests an increasing prediction performance of the hybrid model regarding both the prediction error and dynamic behaviour.

  2. Radiation spectroanalysis controlled and processed by a mini-computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minogashira, T; Shiokawa, Y; Suzuki, S [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Iron, Steel and Other Metals

    1975-06-01

    The principle of radiation spectroanalysis with minicomputer-controlled multi-channel analyzer system is explained. In the first part, the fundamental features of minicomputers are generally discussed with particular emphasis upon the combination with various I/O devices. In the second part, the MCA(multi-channel spectrum analyzer) system controlled by a minicomputer is explained from the aspects of both hardware and software. As for the hardware, the roles of ADC, console typewriter, paper tape I/O system, cathode ray tubes, X-Y recorder, and other auxiliary memories such as magnetic tapes and drums are discussed. As for the software, the function of system monitor is explained together with its block chart and individual software packages. The third part is devoted to the explanation of the mathematical methods for analyzing ..gamma..-radiation spectra. These include the smoothing of spectra with appropriate weighting coefficients, fitting with polynomials, and the detection of peaks by first derivative method. Some examples of spectroanalysis by these mathematical methods are presented. Recent works performed by other authors including many Japanese are also referred.

  3. Computation of the radiation Q of dielectric-loaded electrically small antennas in integral equation formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2016-01-01

    A new technique for estimating the impedance frequency bandwidth of electrically small antennas loaded with magneto-dielectric material from a single-frequency simulation in a surface integral equation solver is presented. The estimate is based on the inverse of the radiation Q computed using newly...... derived expressions for the stored energy and the radiated power of arbitrary coupled electric and magnetic currents in free space....

  4. State of Theory and Computer Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents opinions based on the presentations and discussions at a Workshop on Theory and Computer Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics held in August 2002 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA, USA. The workshop was focused on the current state-of-the-art of theory, modeling and simulation of radiation effects in oxide ceramics, directions for future breakthroughs, and creating a close integration with experiment

  5. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aourag, H.; Guittom, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. DOE contractor radiation safety CBT [computer based training] course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company developed a generic Radiation Worker safety CBT course for Department of Energy contractors. Task analysis concentrated on actual and potential tasks and included visits to fourteen different contractor sites. Team Design and Prototype verification formed the major portion of the development phase. Lesson entry was accomplished using the WISE author system from WICAT Systems, Inc. The course features graded task simulations for both Pretest and Final; fourteen Topics in five Lessons, each Topic keyed to ''Critical Acts'' and Questions in the Pretest and Final; Automatic, Intensive, and Manual modes of instruction available for each Lesson; Practical Problems and Sample Questions associated with each Topic; and provisions for local configuration in several areas. The course is deliverable on IBM PC compatible equipment. 2 refs

  7. Radiation damage in amorphous solids - a computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, T.K.; Li, J.C.M.

    1984-01-01

    It is known for crystalline materials that injection of high energy atoms introduces point defects. The nature of defects is not known for amorphous solids. So a molecular dynamic simulation of radiation damage in an amorphous metal was carried out. An amorphous structure of 685 atoms with periodic boundary conditions in all 3 dimensions was equilibrated first. Then one atom on the surface was given a high initial velocity so it was injected inward. Radial temperature distribution around the line of injection was calculated as a function of time. Void distribution and its evolution with time in the direction of injection was calculated by counting the atomic centers in thin slabs perpendicular to the line of injection. The swelling of the whole solid was calculated also. Some results are compared with experiments

  8. PUMN: part I of the WINERY radiation damage computer simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuspa, J.P.; Edwards, D.R.; Tsoulfanidis, N.

    1976-01-01

    Results of computer work to simulate the response of crystalline materials to radiation are presented. To organize this and future work into a long range program of investigation, the WINERY Radiation Damage Computer Simulation System is proposed. The WINERY system is designed to solve the entire radiation damage problem from the incident radiation to the property changes which occur in the material, using a set of interrelated computer programs. One portion of the system, the PUMN program, has been used to obtain important radiation damage results with Fe 3 Al crystal. PUMN simulates the response of the atoms in a crystal to a knock-on atom. It yields the damage configuration of the crystal by considering the dynamic interaction of all the atoms of the computational cell, up to 1000 atoms. The PUMN program provides the WINERY system with results for the number of displacements, N/sub d/, due to knock-on atoms with various energies. The values of N/sub d/ for Fe 3 Al were obtained at two different energies, 100 and 500 eV, for a variety of initial directions. These values are to be used to form a table of results for use in WINERY

  9. Computer image analysis of etched tracks from ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanford, George E.

    1994-01-01

    I proposed to continue a cooperative research project with Dr. David S. McKay concerning image analysis of tracks. Last summer we showed that we could measure track densities using the Oxford Instruments eXL computer and software that is attached to an ISI scanning electron microscope (SEM) located in building 31 at JSC. To reduce the dependence on JSC equipment, we proposed to transfer the SEM images to UHCL for analysis. Last summer we developed techniques to use digitized scanning electron micrographs and computer image analysis programs to measure track densities in lunar soil grains. Tracks were formed by highly ionizing solar energetic particles and cosmic rays during near surface exposure on the Moon. The track densities are related to the exposure conditions (depth and time). Distributions of the number of grains as a function of their track densities can reveal the modality of soil maturation. As part of a consortium effort to better understand the maturation of lunar soil and its relation to its infrared reflectance properties, we worked on lunar samples 67701,205 and 61221,134. These samples were etched for a shorter time (6 hours) than last summer's sample and this difference has presented problems for establishing the correct analysis conditions. We used computer counting and measurement of area to obtain preliminary track densities and a track density distribution that we could interpret for sample 67701,205. This sample is a submature soil consisting of approximately 85 percent mature soil mixed with approximately 15 percent immature, but not pristine, soil.

  10. Cost effective distributed computing for Monte Carlo radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.; Webb, D.V.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: An inexpensive computing facility has been established for performing repetitive Monte Carlo simulations with the BEAM and EGS4/EGSnrc codes of linear accelerator beams, for calculating effective dose from diagnostic imaging procedures and of ion chambers and phantoms used for the Australian high energy absorbed dose standards. The facility currently consists of 3 dual-processor 450 MHz processor PCs linked by a high speed LAN. The 3 PCs can be accessed either locally from a single keyboard/monitor/mouse combination using a SwitchView controller or remotely via a computer network from PCs with suitable communications software (e.g. Telnet, Kermit etc). All 3 PCs are identically configured to have the Red Hat Linux 6.0 operating system. A Fortran compiler and the BEAM and EGS4/EGSnrc codes are available on the 3 PCs. The preparation of sequences of jobs utilising the Monte Carlo codes is simplified using load-distributing software (enFuzion 6.0 marketed by TurboLinux Inc, formerly Cluster from Active Tools) which efficiently distributes the computing load amongst all 6 processors. We describe 3 applications of the system - (a) energy spectra from radiotherapy sources, (b) mean mass-energy absorption coefficients and stopping powers for absolute absorbed dose standards and (c) dosimetry for diagnostic procedures; (a) and (b) are based on the transport codes BEAM and FLURZnrc while (c) is a Fortran/EGS code developed at ARPANSA. Efficiency gains ranged from 3 for (c) to close to the theoretical maximum of 6 for (a) and (b), with the gain depending on the amount of 'bookkeeping' to begin each task and the time taken to complete a single task. We have found the use of a load-balancing batch processing system with many PCs to be an economical way of achieving greater productivity for Monte Carlo calculations or of any computer intensive task requiring many runs with different parameters. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and

  11. Code system to compute radiation dose in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Davis, J.L.; Tang, J.S.; Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo photon transport code and a code using Monte Carlo integration of a point kernel have been revised to incorporate human phantom models for an adult female, juveniles of various ages, and a pregnant female at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, in addition to the adult male used earlier. An analysis code has been developed for deriving recommended values of specific absorbed fractions of photon energy. The computer code system and calculational method are described, emphasizing recent improvements in methods

  12. Study and application of Dot 3.5 computer code in radiation shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.C.; Mendonca, A.G.; Maiorino, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The application of nuclear transportation code S sub(N), Dot 3.5, to radiation shielding problems is revised. Aiming to study the better available option (convergence scheme, calculation mode), of DOT 3.5 computer code to be applied in radiation shielding problems, a standard model from 'Argonne Code Center' was selected and a combination of several calculation options to evaluate the accuracy of the results and the computational time was used, for then to select the more efficient option. To illustrate the versatility and efficacy in the application of the code for tipical shielding problems, the streaming neutrons calculation along a sodium coolant channel is ilustrated. (E.G.) [pt

  13. The computer code system for reactor radiation shielding in design of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunhuai; Fu Shouxin; Liu Guilian

    1995-01-01

    The computer code system used in reactor radiation shielding design of nuclear power plant includes the source term codes, discrete ordinate transport codes, Monte Carlo and Albedo Monte Carlo codes, kernel integration codes, optimization code, temperature field code, skyshine code, coupling calculation codes and some processing codes for data libraries. This computer code system has more satisfactory variety of codes and complete sets of data library. It is widely used in reactor radiation shielding design and safety analysis of nuclear power plant and other nuclear facilities

  14. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  15. Dose-rate effects on the bulk etch-rate of CR-39 track detector exposed to low-LET radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Oda, K; Ikeda, T; Honda, Y; Tagawa, S

    1999-01-01

    The effect of gamma-rays and pulsed electrons has been investigated on the bulk etch rate of CR-39 detector at doses up to 100 kGy under various dose-rate between 0.0044 and 35.0 Gy/s. The bulk etch rate increased exponentially with the dose at every examined dose-rates. It was reveled to be strongly depend on the dose-rate: the bulk etch rate was decreased with increasing dose-rate at the same total dose. A primitive model was proposed to explain the dose-rate effect in which oxygen dissolved was assumed to dominate the damage formation process.

  16. Ductile crack initiation and propagation assessed via in situ synchrotron radiation-computed laminography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgeneyer, T.F.; Helfen, L.; Sinclair, I.; Proudhon, H.; Xu, F.; Baumbach, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ductile crack initiation and propagation within a naturally aged aluminium alloy sheet has been observed in situ via synchrotron radiation-computed laminography, a technique specifically adapted to three-dimensional imaging of thin objects that are laterally extended. Voids and intermetallic particles, and their subsequent evolution during ductile crack extension at different associated levels of stress triaxiality, were clearly observed within fracture coupons of a reasonable engineering length-scale, overcoming the conventional sample size limitation of computed tomography at high resolutions.

  17. Direct Computation of Sound Radiation by Jet Flow Using Large-scale Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankbadi, R. R.; Shih, S. H.; Hixon, D. R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    Jet noise is directly predicted using large-scale equations. The computational domain is extended in order to directly capture the radiated field. As in conventional large-eddy-simulations, the effect of the unresolved scales on the resolved ones is accounted for. Special attention is given to boundary treatment to avoid spurious modes that can render the computed fluctuations totally unacceptable. Results are presented for a supersonic jet at Mach number 2.1.

  18. The development of computed tomography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Akatsuka, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    Many types of monochromatic X-ray CT with synchrotron radiation (SR-CT) is being developed in the biomedical fields because of its' sufficient X-ray flux and tunability of energy spectrum. We introduce a SR-CT system to reveal the fine structures of small animal, and to detect a tracer material for functional evaluation of the organs. In the high spatial resolution SR-CT, the detailed structures of skull of live rat was demonstrated 36-μm spatial resolution with 36-μ-m slice thickness. In the high contrast SR-CT, phantom examination with contrast material (iodine) was performed. The 448 μg/ml iodine contrast material was identified. Image quality was not sufficient because of insufficient dynamic range of our sensor 'IP', insufficient dynamic range of our sensor 'IP', small number of projection, scatter contamination and 99 keV contamination (8%). Remarkable improvement is expected by using solid state detector, increasing scan projection, decrease the scatter reduction, and so on. (author)

  19. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Fuji computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCutcheon, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the technical details of Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) and its use as it relates to managing pediatric dose for X-ray examinations. Since its introduction in 1983, Fuji (Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.) has developed an extensive set of menu selections with default processing algorithms and corresponding display processing parameters modified for all pediatric exam types. Continued development of imaging plate technology, FCR reader design and image processing have all contributed to improving image quality and creating the opportunity to lower the dose required for pediatric exams. Fuji continues to advance CR and electronic imaging technologies; some of these developments, that may enable lower dose examinations for pediatric imaging in the future, are also described in this paper. (orig.)

  20. Beam standardization of X radiation in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The ionization chamber used in dosimetric procedures in computed tomography beams (CT), is a cylindrical chamber, unsealed, with the sensitive length between 10 and 15 cm, named pencil ionization chamber. Because the doses involved in CT procedures are higher s than those in the procedures in radiology, it is very important to ensure the appropriate calibration of pencil ionization chambers and thus the accuracy of Dosimetric procedures. Recently, only the Calibration Laboratory, from Institute de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, had standards fields of conventional radiodiagnostic, but not arrived to include the energy range used in CT. In this work, will be shown the results obtained in standard field of radiodiagnostic - all qualities of radiodiagnostic of series RQR (direct beam) and RQA (attenuated beam) described in IEC 61267 norm - in an industrial X-ray equipment of the Calibration Laboratory. The recommended qualities for the calibration of TC chambers are the qualities RQA9 and RQR9. The other qualities will be used for calibration of other radiodiagnostic dosimeters and also for a larger study of the energy dependence of the pencil ionization chambers

  1. Excess lifetime cancer mortality risk attributable to radiation exposure from computed tomography examinations in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chodick, Gabriel; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Shalev, Varda; Ron, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The use of computed tomography in Israel has been growing rapidly during recent decades. The major drawback of this important technology is the exposure to ionizing radiation, especially among children who have increased organ radiosensitivity and a long lifetime to potentially develop

  2. Computer codes for tasks in the fields of isotope and radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, K.; Gebhardt, O.

    1978-11-01

    Concise descriptions of computer codes developed for solving problems in the fields of isotope and radiation research at the Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung (ZfI) are compiled. In part two the structure of the ZfI program library MABIF is outlined and a complete list of all codes available is given

  3. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-01-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules

  4. The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries. An important activity of RSICC is its participation in international efforts on computational and experimental benchmarks. An example is the Shielding Integral Benchmarks Archival Database (SINBAD), which includes shielding benchmarks for fission, fusion and accelerators. RSICC is funded by the United States Department of Energy, Department of Homeland Security and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  5. Use of a radiation therapy treatment planning computer in a hospital health physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    An onsite treatment planning computer has become state of the art in the care of radiation therapy patients, but in most installations the computer is used for therapy planning a diminutive amount of the day. At St. Mary's Hospital, arrangements have been negotiated for part time use of the treatment planning computer for health physics purposes. Computerized Medical Systems, Inc. (CMS) produces the Modulex radiotherapy planning system which is programmed in MUMPS, a user oriented language specially adapted for handling text string information. St. Mary's Hospital's CMS computer has currently been programmed to assist in data collection and write-up of diagnostic x-ray surveys, meter calibrations, and wipe/leak tests. The computer is setup to provide timely reminders of tests and surveys, and billing for consultation work. Programs are currently being developed for radionuclide inventories. Use of a therapy planning computer for health physics purposes can enhance the radiation safety program and provide additional grounds for the acquisition of such a computer system

  6. WE-B-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Planning II: Cloud Computing in RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K; Kagadis, G; Xing, L; McNutt, T

    2014-01-01

    As defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cloud computing is “a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.” Despite the omnipresent role of computers in radiotherapy, cloud computing has yet to achieve widespread adoption in clinical or research applications, though the transition to such “on-demand” access is underway. As this transition proceeds, new opportunities for aggregate studies and efficient use of computational resources are set against new challenges in patient privacy protection, data integrity, and management of clinical informatics systems. In this Session, current and future applications of cloud computing and distributed computational resources will be discussed in the context of medical imaging, radiotherapy research, and clinical radiation oncology applications. Learning Objectives: Understand basic concepts of cloud computing. Understand how cloud computing could be used for medical imaging applications. Understand how cloud computing could be employed for radiotherapy research.4. Understand how clinical radiotherapy software applications would function in the cloud

  7. WE-B-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Planning II: Cloud Computing in RT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, K [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Kagadis, G [University Patras, Rion - Patras (Greece); Xing, L [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Severna Park, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    As defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, cloud computing is “a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction.” Despite the omnipresent role of computers in radiotherapy, cloud computing has yet to achieve widespread adoption in clinical or research applications, though the transition to such “on-demand” access is underway. As this transition proceeds, new opportunities for aggregate studies and efficient use of computational resources are set against new challenges in patient privacy protection, data integrity, and management of clinical informatics systems. In this Session, current and future applications of cloud computing and distributed computational resources will be discussed in the context of medical imaging, radiotherapy research, and clinical radiation oncology applications. Learning Objectives: Understand basic concepts of cloud computing. Understand how cloud computing could be used for medical imaging applications. Understand how cloud computing could be employed for radiotherapy research.4. Understand how clinical radiotherapy software applications would function in the cloud.

  8. Cost-effective computational method for radiation heat transfer in semi-crystalline polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztepe, Sinan; Gilblas, Rémi; de Almeida, Olivier; Le Maoult, Yannick; Schmidt, Fabrice

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces a cost-effective numerical model for infrared (IR) heating of semi-crystalline polymers. For the numerical and experimental studies presented here semi-crystalline polyethylene (PE) was used. The optical properties of PE were experimentally analyzed under varying temperature and the obtained results were used as input in the numerical studies. The model was built based on optically homogeneous medium assumption whereas the strong variation in the thermo-optical properties of semi-crystalline PE under heating was taken into account. Thus, the change in the amount radiative energy absorbed by the PE medium was introduced in the model induced by its temperature-dependent thermo-optical properties. The computational study was carried out considering an iterative closed-loop computation, where the absorbed radiation was computed using an in-house developed radiation heat transfer algorithm -RAYHEAT- and the computed results was transferred into the commercial software -COMSOL Multiphysics- for solving transient heat transfer problem to predict temperature field. The predicted temperature field was used to iterate the thermo-optical properties of PE that varies under heating. In order to analyze the accuracy of the numerical model experimental analyses were carried out performing IR-thermographic measurements during the heating of the PE plate. The applicability of the model in terms of computational cost, number of numerical input and accuracy was highlighted.

  9. CT dosimetry computer codes: Their influence on radiation dose estimates and the necessity for their revision under new ICRP radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. P.; Lee, J.; Bolch, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry computer codes have been most commonly used due to their user friendliness, but with little consideration for potential uncertainty in estimated organ dose and their underlying limitations. Generally, radiation doses calculated with different CT dosimetry computer codes were comparable, although relatively large differences were observed for some specific organs or tissues. The largest difference in radiation doses calculated using different computer codes was observed for Siemens Sensation CT scanners. Radiation doses varied with patient age and sex. Younger patients and adult females receive a higher radiation dose in general than adult males for the same CT technique factors. There are a number of limitations of current CT dosimetry computer codes. These include unrealistic modelling of the human anatomy, a limited number of organs and tissues for dose calculation, inability to alter patient height and weight, and non-applicability to new CT technologies. Therefore, further studies are needed to overcome these limitations and to improve CT dosimetry. (authors)

  10. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  11. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-06-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm.

  12. Verification of Radiation Isocenter on Linac Beam 6 MV using Computed Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irsal, Muhammad; Hidayanto, Eko; Sutanto, Heri

    2017-01-01

    Radiation isocenter is more important part of quality assurance for the linear accelerator (Linac) due to radiation isocenter is a main location in irradiation radiotherapy, isocenter can shift when the gantry and collimator rotation. In general, the radiation isocenter verification using a special film. This research was conducted radiation isocenter verification using computed radiography with digital image processing techniques. Image acquisition was done using the modalities of Linac 6 MV with star shot method is star-shaped beam due to rotation of the collimator, gantry and couch. Then do the delineation on each beam to determine the centroid and beam diameter. By the results of verification of radiation isocenter performed on collimator and the couch, it shows that the size diameter for rotational collimator is 0.632 mm and 0.458 mm for the couch. Based on AAPM report 40 about the size of the Linac radiation isocenter diameter used in this study is still in good condition and worth to be operated because the value of the radiation isocenter diameter is below 2 mm. (paper)

  13. Radiation doses from radiation sources of neutrons and photons by different computer calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, F.; Lippolis, G.; Bruno, S.G.

    1995-12-01

    In the present paper the calculation technique aspects of dose rate from neutron and photon radiation sources are covered with reference both to the basic theoretical modeling of the MERCURE-4, XSDRNPM-S and MCNP-3A codes and from practical point of view performing safety analyses of irradiation risk of two transportation casks. The input data set of these calculations -regarding the CEN 10/200 HLW container and dry PWR spent fuel assemblies shipping cask- is frequently commented as for as connecting points of input data and understanding theoric background are concerned

  14. Readjustment of abdominal computed tomography protocols in a university hospital: impact on radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Bekhor, Daniel; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: ricardo.romano@unifesp.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi [Fleury Medicina e Saude, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Objective: To assess the reduction of estimated radiation dose in abdominal computed tomography following the implementation of new scan protocols on the basis of clinical suspicion and of adjusted images acquisition parameters. Materials and Methods: Retrospective and prospective review of reports on radiation dose from abdominal CT scans performed three months before (group A - 551 studies) and three months after (group B - 788 studies) implementation of new scan protocols proposed as a function of clinical indications. Also, the images acquisition parameters were adjusted to reduce the radiation dose at each scan phase. The groups were compared for mean number of acquisition phases, mean CTDI{sub vol} per phase, mean DLP per phase, and mean DLP per scan. Results: A significant reduction was observed for group B as regards all the analyzed aspects, as follows: 33.9%, 25.0%, 27.0% and 52.5%, respectively for number of acquisition phases, CTDI{sub vol} per phase, DLP per phase and DLP per scan (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The rational use of abdominal computed tomography scan phases based on the clinical suspicion in conjunction with the adjusted images acquisition parameters allows for a 50% reduction in the radiation dose from abdominal computed tomography scans. (author)

  15. PUMN: a radiation damage simulation computer program for the WINERY system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuspa, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The WINERY Radiation Damage Computer Simulation System will attempt to solve the entire radiation damage problem from the incident radiation to the property changes which occur in the material, using a set of interrelated computer programs. Computer simulation may be indispensable to the study of the radiation damage to materials in breeder and fusion reactors. WINERY is introduced with this work, and one portion of the system, the PUMN program, is developed and used to obtain important radiation damage results with Fe 3 Al crystal. PUMN is a program which simulates the response of the atoms in a crystal to a knock-on atom. It yields the damage configuration of the crystal by considering the dynamic interaction of all the atoms of the computational cell, up to 1000 atoms. The trajectories of the atoms are calculated using the Nordsieck Method, which has a prediction step based upon Taylor series expansions of the position and its first five time derivatives, and has a correction sequence which uses coefficients which have been optimized for efficiency and accuracy. Other features, such as restart files, automatic time step control, and crystal extension, make PUMN a versatile program which can simulate cases of relatively high knock-on energy, at least up to 500 eV. The PUMN program provides the WINERY system with results for the number of displacements, N/sub d/, due to knock-on atoms with various energies. This study dealt exclusively with Fe 3 Al. The values of N/sub d/ for Fe 3 Al were obtained at two different energies, 100 eV and 500 eV, for a variety of initial directions

  16. Computed Tomography Number Changes Observed During Computed Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Mei; Yang, Cungeng; Chen, Xiaojian; Xu, Shouping; Moraru, Ion; Lang, Jinyi; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected. Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes

  17. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Kevin L.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.; McNutt, Todd R.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy

  18. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); McNutt, Todd R. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  19. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kevin L; Kagadis, George C; McNutt, Todd R; Moiseenko, Vitali; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  20. Quality assurance for computed-tomography simulators and the computed-tomography-simulation process: Report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 66

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutic, Sasa; Palta, Jatinder R.; Butker, Elizabeth K.; Das, Indra J.; Huq, M. Saiful; Loo, Leh-Nien Dick; Salter, Bill J.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Van Dyk, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This document presents recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for quality assurance of computed-tomography- (CT) simulators and CT-simulation process. This report was prepared by Task Group No. 66 of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. It was approved by the Radiation Therapy Committee and by the AAPM Science Council

  1. The application of computer and automatic technology in dose measurement of neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu; Li Chenglin; Luo Yisheng; Guo Yong; Chen Di; Xiaojiang

    1999-01-01

    Generally the dose measurement of neutron radiation requires three electrometers, two bias, three workers in the same time. To improve the accuracy and efficiency of measurement, a Model 6517A electrometer that accommodate Model 6521 scanner cards and a portable computer are used to make up of a automatic measurement system. Corresponding software is developed and used to control it. Because of the application of computer and automatic technology, this system can not only measure dose rate automatically, but also make data's calculating, saving, querying, printing and comparing ease

  2. Three-dimensional monochromatic x-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tsuneo; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji; Tokumori, Kenji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Uyama, Chikao

    1998-08-01

    We describe a technique of 3D computed tomography (3D CT) using monochromatic x rays generated by synchrotron radiation, which performs a direct reconstruction of a 3D volume image of an object from its cone-beam projections. For the development, we propose a practical scanning orbit of the x-ray source to obtain complete 3D information on an object, and its corresponding 3D image reconstruction algorithm. The validity and usefulness of the proposed scanning orbit and reconstruction algorithm were confirmed by computer simulation studies. Based on these investigations, we have developed a prototype 3D monochromatic x-ray CT using synchrotron radiation, which provides exact 3D reconstruction and material-selective imaging by using the K-edge energy subtraction technique.

  3. Abstracts of digital computer code packages. Assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center. [Radiation transport codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, B.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Anthony, C.M.; Comolander, H.E.; Hendrickson, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    The term ''code package'' is used to describe a miscellaneous grouping of materials which, when interpreted in connection with a digital computer, enables the scientist--user to solve technical problems in the area for which the material was designed. In general, a ''code package'' consists of written material--reports, instructions, flow charts, listings of data, and other useful material and IBM card decks (or, more often, a reel of magnetic tape) on which the source decks, sample problem input (including libraries of data) and the BCD/EBCDIC output listing from the sample problem are written. In addition to the main code, and any available auxiliary routines are also included. The abstract format was chosen to give to a potential code user several criteria for deciding whether or not he wishes to request the code package. (RWR)

  4. Ultrasound appearance of radiation-induced hepatic injury. Correlation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garra, B.S.; Shawker, T.H.; Chang, R.; Kaplan, K.; White, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrasound findings in three cases of radiation-induced hepatic injury are described and compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Fatty infiltration of the liver was present in two of the cases in which concurrent chemotherapy was being administered. On ultrasound B-scans, the regions of radiation injury were hypoechoic relative to the remainder of the liver. This finding was more obvious in the patients with fatty livers. CT scans on the patients with fatty infiltrated livers showed higher attenuation in the irradiated region than in unexposed liver. In the patient where no fatty infiltration was present, the radiated section of liver had lower attenuation consistent with previous reports. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decreased signal in the exposed areas on T1 weighted images

  5. Computation of coupled surface radiation and natural convection in an inclined form cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amraqui, Samir; Mezrhab, Ahmed; Abid, Cherifa

    2011-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with computation of the radiation-natural convection interactions in an inclined form cavity. The cavity contains two symmetrically identical isothermal blocks and is vented by two opening located in a vertical median axis at the top and the bottom parts of the cavity. Calculations are made by using a finite volume method and an efficient numerical procedure is introduced for calculating the view factors, with shadow effects included. Effects of Rayleigh number Ra and inclination angle φ are investigated for Pr = 0.71 in presence and in absence of the radiation exchange. Results are reported in terms of isotherms, streamlines, local and average Nusselt numbers and mass flow rate. In light of the obtained results, we can conclude that the heat transfer decreases with increasing φ. In addition, the increase of Ra and the taking into account of the radiation exchange produce a considerable increase in the heat transfer.

  6. Assessment of BSRN radiation records for the computation of monthly means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, A.; Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.; Dutton, E. G.; Long, C. N.; Zhang, T.

    2011-02-01

    The integrity of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) radiation monthly averages are assessed by investigating the impact on monthly means due to the frequency of data gaps caused by missing or discarded high time resolution data. The monthly statistics, especially means, are considered to be important and useful values for climate research, model performance evaluations and for assessing the quality of satellite (time- and space-averaged) data products. The study investigates the spread in different algorithms that have been applied for the computation of monthly means from 1-min values. The paper reveals that the computation of monthly means from 1-min observations distinctly depends on the method utilized to account for the missing data. The intra-method difference generally increases with an increasing fraction of missing data. We found that a substantial fraction of the radiation fluxes observed at BSRN sites is either missing or flagged as questionable. The percentage of missing data is 4.4%, 13.0%, and 6.5% for global radiation, direct shortwave radiation, and downwelling longwave radiation, respectively. Most flagged data in the shortwave are due to nighttime instrumental noise and can reasonably be set to zero after correcting for thermal offsets in the daytime data. The study demonstrates that the handling of flagged data clearly impacts on monthly mean estimates obtained with different methods. We showed that the spread of monthly shortwave fluxes is generally clearly higher than for downwelling longwave radiation. Overall, BSRN observations provide sufficient accuracy and completeness for reliable estimates of monthly mean values. However, the value of future data could be further increased by reducing the frequency of data gaps and the number of outliers. It is shown that two independent methods for accounting for the diurnal and seasonal variations in the missing data permit consistent monthly means to within less than 1 W m-2 in most cases

  7. A development of computer code for evaluating internal radiation dose through ingestion and inhalation pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Chang Woo; Choi, Yong Ho; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kook Chan; Kim, Sang Bok; Kim, Jin Kyu

    1991-07-01

    The computer codes were developed to evaluate internal radiation dose when radioactive isotopes released from nuclear facilities are taken through ingestion and inhalation pathways. Food chain models and relevant data base representing the agricultural and social environment of Korea are set up. An equilibrium model-KFOOD, which can deal with routine releases from a nuclear facility and a dynamic model-ECOREA, which is suitable for the description of acute radioactivity release following nuclear accident. (Author)

  8. Auditory bones obtained by synchrotron radiation computed tomography at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, E.; Sugiyama, H.; Maksimenko, A.

    2005-01-01

    A series tomograms and 3D reconstructions of the inner structure of the human auditory bone were obtained for the first time by employing absorption X-ray computed tomography using a synchrotron radiation. The experiment was performed at the very long transport channel beam line BL29XUL, where X-ray were available at 1000m from the source point. This method is great worth to making anatomically auditory structure observations without bursting the specimens. (author)

  9. Investigation and computer modeling of radiation and thermal decomposition of polystyrene scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhno, Tamara V.; Pustovit, Sergey V.; Borisenko, Artem Y.; Senchishin, Vitaliy G.; Barashkov, Nikolay N.

    2003-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation and computer modeling of radiation and thermal decomposition of luminescent polystyrene compositions. It has been shown, that the stability of the optical properties of luminescent polymer composition depends on its material structure. On the basis of quantum-chemical calculation has been obtained the possible products of PS gamma-radiolysis and the effect of formation of fragments with conjugated double bonds and products with quinone structure has been investigated.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography using lower doses of radiation for patients with Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Craig, Orla

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic resonance and ultrasonography have increasing roles in the initial diagnosis of Crohn\\'s disease, but computed tomography (CT) with positive oral contrast agents is most frequently used to identify those with acute extramural complications. However, CT involves exposure of patients to radiation. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT (at a dose comparable to that used to obtain an abdominal radiograph) with conventional-dose CT in patients with active Crohn\\'s disease.

  11. A Chinese Visible Human-based computational female pelvic phantom for radiation dosimetry simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, H.; Jinlu, S.; Shaoxiang, Z.; Qing, H.; Li-wen, T.; Chengjun, G.; Tang, X.; Jiang, S. B.; Xiano-lin, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate voxel phantom is needed for dosimetric simulation in radiation therapy for malignant tumors in female pelvic region. However, most of the existing voxel phantoms are constructed on the basis of Caucasian or non-Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A computational framework for constructing female pelvic voxel phantom for radiation dosimetry was performed based on Chinese Visible Human datasets. First, several organs within pelvic region were segmented from Chinese Visible Human datasets. Then, polygonization and voxelization were performed based on the segmented organs and a 3D computational phantom is built in the form of a set of voxel arrays. Results: The generated phantom can be converted and loaded into treatment planning system for radiation dosimetry calculation. From the observed dosimetric results of those organs and structures, we can evaluate their absorbed dose and implement some simulation studies. Conclusion: A voxel female pelvic phantom was developed from Chinese Visible Human datasets. It can be utilized for dosimetry evaluation and planning simulation, which would be very helpful to improve the clinical performance and reduce the radiation toxicity on organ at risk.

  12. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean scores of CT technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques.

  13. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, M K A; Hashim, S; Bahruddin, N A; Ang, W C; Salehhon, N; Bradley, D A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean scores of CT technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques. (paper)

  14. Toxicity of TiO2, in nanoparticle or bulk form to freshwater and marine microalgae under visible light and UV-A radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra, M; Moreno-Garrido, I; Yeste, M P; Gatica, J M; Blasco, J

    2017-08-01

    Use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) has become a part of our daily life and the high environmental concentrations predicted to accumulate in aquatic ecosystems are cause for concern. Although TiO 2 has only limited reactivity, at the nanoscale level its physico-chemical properties and toxicity are different compared with bulk material. Phytoplankton is a key trophic level in fresh and marine ecosystems, and the toxicity provoked by these nanoparticles can affect the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Two microalgae species, one freshwater (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and the other marine (Phaeodactylum tricornutum), have been selected for testing the toxicity of TiO 2 in NP and conventional bulk form and, given its photo-catalytic properties, the effect of UV-A was also checked. Growth inhibition, quantum yield reduction, increase of intracellular ROS production, membrane cell damage and production of exo-polymeric substances (EPS) were selected as variables to measure. TiO 2 NPs and bulk TiO 2 show a relationship between the size of agglomerates and time in freshwater and saltwater, but not in ultrapure water. Under two treatments, UV-A (6 h per day) and no UV-A exposure, NPs triggered stronger cytotoxic responses than bulk material. TiO 2 NPs were also associated with greater production of reactive oxygen species and damage to membrane. However, microalgae exposed to TiO 2 NPs and bulk TiO 2 under UV-A were found to be more sensitive than in the visible light condition. The marine species (P. tricornutum) was more sensitive than the freshwater species, and higher Ti internalization was measured. Exopolymeric substances (EPS) were released from microalgae in the culture media, in the presence of TiO 2 in both forms. This may be a possible defense mechanism by these cells, which would enhance processes of homoagglomeration and settling, and thus reduce bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Matthew R; Geyer, John W; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Aris, John P [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shifrin, Roger Y, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-08-07

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations

  16. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Matthew R; Geyer, John W; Bolch, Wesley; Aris, John P; Shifrin, Roger Y

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations in

  17. Radiation dose of cone-beam computed tomography compared to conventional radiographs in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Luca; Patcas, Raphael; Peltomäki, Timo; Schätzle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine radiation doses of different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan modes in comparison to a conventional set of orthodontic radiographs (COR) by means of phantom dosimetry. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips (3 × 1 × 1 mm) were used on an adult male tissue-equivalent phantom to record the distribution of the absorbed radiation dose. Three different scanning modes (i.e., portrait, normal landscape, and fast scan landscape) were compared to CORs [i.e., conventional lateral (LC) and posteroanterior (PA) cephalograms and digital panoramic radiograph (OPG)]. The following radiation levels were measured: 131.7, 91, and 77 μSv in the portrait, normal landscape, and fast landscape modes, respectively. The overall effective dose for a COR was 35.81 μSv (PA: 8.90 μSv; OPG: 21.87 μSv; LC: 5.03 μSv). Although one CBCT scan may replace all CORs, one set of CORs still entails 2-4 times less radiation than one CBCT. Depending on the scan mode, the radiation dose of a CBCT is about 3-6 times an OPG, 8-14 times a PA, and 15-26 times a lateral LC. Finally, in order to fully reconstruct cephalograms including the cranial base and other important structures, the CBCT portrait mode must be chosen, rendering the difference in radiation exposure even clearer (131.7 vs. 35.81 μSv). Shielding radiation-sensitive organs can reduce the effective dose considerably. CBCT should not be recommended for use in all orthodontic patients as a substitute for a conventional set of radiographs. In CBCT, reducing the height of the field of view and shielding the thyroid are advisable methods and must be implemented to lower the exposure dose.

  18. Development and validation of Monte Carlo dose computations for contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautrin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy (SSRT) is an innovative technique based on localized dose-enhancement effects obtained by reinforced photoelectric absorption in the tumor. Medium energy monochromatic X-rays (50 - 100 keV) are used for irradiating tumors previously loaded with a high-Z element. Clinical trials of SSRT are being prepared at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), an iodinated contrast agent will be used. In order to compute the energy deposited in the patient (dose), a dedicated treatment planning system (TPS) has been developed for the clinical trials, based on the ISOgray TPS. This work focuses on the SSRT specific modifications of the TPS, especially to the PENELOPE-based Monte Carlo dose engine. The TPS uses a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of medium energy polarized photons to compute the deposited energy in the patient. Simulations are performed considering the synchrotron source, the modeled beamline geometry and finally the patient. Specific materials were also implemented in the voxelized geometry of the patient, to consider iodine concentrations in the tumor. The computation process has been optimized and parallelized. Finally a specific computation of absolute doses and associated irradiation times (instead of monitor units) was implemented. The dedicated TPS was validated with depth dose curves, dose profiles and absolute dose measurements performed at the ESRF in a water tank and solid water phantoms with or without bone slabs. (author) [fr

  19. INSREC: Computational System for Quantitative Analysis of Radiation Effects Covering All Radiation Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Hoon Shin; Young Wook Lee; Young Ho Cho; Hyun Seok Ko; SukHoon Kim; YoungMin Kim; Chang Sun Kang

    2006-01-01

    In the nuclear energy field, there are so many difficult things that even people who are working in this field are not much familiar with, such as, Dose evaluation, Dose management, etc. Thus, so many efforts have been done to achieve the knowledge and data for understanding. Although some data had been achieved, the applications of these data to necessary cases were more difficult job. Moreover, the type of Dose evaluation program until now was 'Console type' which is not easy enough to use for the beginners. To overcome the above causes of difficulties, the window-based integrated program and database management were developed in our research lab. The program, called as INSREC, consists of four sub-programs as follow; INSREC-NOM, INSREC-ACT, INSREC-MED, and INSREC-EXI. In ICONE 11 conference, INSREC-program(ICONE-36203) which can evaluates on/off-site dose of nuclear power plant in normal operation was introduced. Upgraded INSREC-program which will be presented in ICONE 14 conference has three additional codes comparing with pre-presented INSREC-program. Those subprograms can evaluate on/off-site Dose of nuclear power plant in accident cases. And they also have the functions of 'Dose evaluation and management' in the hospital and provide the 'Expert system' based on knowledge related to nuclear energy/radiation field. The INSREC-NOM, one of subprograms, is composed of 'Source term evaluation program', 'Atmospheric diffusion factor evaluation program', 'Off-site dose evaluation program', and 'On-site database program'. The INSREC-ACT is composed of 'On/Off-site dose evaluation program' and 'Result analysis program' and the INSREC-MED is composed of 'Workers/patients dose database program' and 'Dose evaluation program for treatment room'. The final one, INSREC-EXI, is composed of 'Database searching program based on artificial intelligence', 'Instruction program,' and 'FAQ/Q and A boards'. Each program was developed by using of Visual C++, Microsoft Access mainly

  20. A new computational method for simulation of charge transport in semiconductor radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holban, I.

    1993-01-01

    An effective computational method for simulation of charge transport in semiconductor radiation detectors is the purpose of the present work. Basic equations for analysis include (1) Poisson's equations, (2) continuity equation for electrons and holes, (3) rate equations for deep levels, (4) current equation for electrons and holes and (5) boundary conditions. The system of equations is discretized and equidistant space and time grids is brought. The nonlinearity of the problem is overcome by using Newton-Raphson iteration scheme. Instead of solving a nonlinear boundary problem we resolve a linear matrix equation. Our computation procedure becomes very efficient using a sparse matrix. The computed program allows to calculate the charge collection efficiency and transient response for arbitrary electric fields when trapping and detrapping effects are present. The earlier literature results are reproduced. (Author)

  1. An efficient method for computing the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1981-01-01

    Chou and Arking (1980) have developed a fast but accurate method for computing the IR cooling rate due to water vapor. Using a similar approach, the considered investigation develops a method for computing the heating rates due to the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in the wavelength range from 4 to 8.3 micrometers. The validity of the method is verified by comparison with line-by-line calculations. An outline is provided of an efficient method for transmittance and flux computations based upon actual line parameters. High speed is achieved by employing a one-parameter scaling approximation to convert an inhomogeneous path into an equivalent homogeneous path at suitably chosen reference conditions.

  2. Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy with quasi-monochromatic computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Gregor; Mensing, Tristan; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Pietsch, Hubertus; Huetter, Joachim; Cibik, Levent; Gerlach, Martin; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Wedell, Reiner; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wust, Peter; Luedemann, Lutz [TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, Charite Medical Centre, 13353 Berlin (Germany); TRG Diagnostic Imaging, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Applied Photonics e.V., 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, Charite Medical Centre, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy is a bimodal therapy, consisting of the administration of highly radiation-absorbing substances into the tumor area and localized regional irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays. Irradiation can be performed by a modified computed tomography (CT) unit equipped with an additional x-ray optical module which converts the polychromatic, fan-shaped CT beam into a monochromatized and focused beam for energy-tuned photoelectric-enhanced radiotherapy. A dedicated x-ray optical module designed for spatial collimation, focusing, and monochromatization was mounted at the exit of the x-ray tube of a clinical CT unit. Spectrally resolved measurements of the resulting beam were performed using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation. The spatial photon fluence was determined by film dosimetry. Depth-dose measurements were performed and compared to the polychromatic CT and a therapeutic 6 MV beam. The spatial dose distribution in phantoms using a rotating radiation source (quasi-monochromatic CT and 6 MV, respectively) was investigated by gel dosimetry. The photoelectric dose enhancement for an iodine fraction of 1% in tissue was calculated and verified experimentally. The x-ray optical module selectively filters the energy of the tungsten K{alpha} emission line with an FWHM of 5 keV. The relative photon fluence distribution demonstrates the focusing characteristic of the x-ray optical module. A beam width of about 3 mm was determined at the isocenter of the CT gantry. The depth-dose measurements resulted in a half-depth value of approximately 36 mm for the CT beams (quasi-monochromatic, polychromatic) compared to 154 mm for the 6 MV beam. The rotation of the radiation source leads to a steep dose gradient at the center of rotation; the gel dosimetry yields an entrance-to-peak dose ratio of 1:10.8 for the quasi-monochromatic CT and 1:37.3 for a 6 MV beam of the same size. The photoelectric dose enhancement

  3. Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy with quasi-monochromatic computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregor; Mensing, Tristan; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Rüdiger; Pietsch, Hubertus; Hütter, Joachim; Cibik, Levent; Gerlach, Martin; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Wedell, Reiner; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wust, Peter; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy is a bimodal therapy, consisting of the administration of highly radiation-absorbing substances into the tumor area and localized regional irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays. Irradiation can be performed by a modified computed tomography (CT) unit equipped with an additional x-ray optical module which converts the polychromatic, fan-shaped CT beam into a monochromatized and focused beam for energy-tuned photoelectric-enhanced radiotherapy. A dedicated x-ray optical module designed for spatial collimation, focusing, and monochromatization was mounted at the exit of the x-ray tube of a clinical CT unit. Spectrally resolved measurements of the resulting beam were performed using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation. The spatial photon fluence was determined by film dosimetry. Depth-dose measurements were performed and compared to the polychromatic CT and a therapeutic 6 MV beam. The spatial dose distribution in phantoms using a rotating radiation source (quasimonochromatic CT and 6 MV, respectively) was investigated by gel dosimetry. The photoelectric dose enhancement for an iodine fraction of 1% in tissue was calculated and verified experimentally. The x-ray optical module selectively filters the energy of the tungsten Kalpha emission line with an FWHM of 5 keV. The relative photon fluence distribution demonstrates the focusing characteristic of the x-ray optical module. A beam width of about 3 mm was determined at the isocenter of the CT gantry. The depth-dose measurements resulted in a half-depth value of approximately 36 mm for the CT beams (quasi-monochromatic, polychromatic) compared to 154 mm for the 6 MV beam. The rotation of the radiation source leads to a steep dose gradient at the center of rotation; the gel dosimetry yields an entrance-to-peak dose ratio of 1:10.8 for the quasi-monochromatic CT and 1:37.3 for a 6 MV beam of the same size. The photoelectric dose enhancement

  4. Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy with quasi-monochromatic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Gregor; Mensing, Tristan; Golfier, Sven; Lawaczeck, Ruediger; Pietsch, Hubertus; Huetter, Joachim; Cibik, Levent; Gerlach, Martin; Krumrey, Michael; Fratzscher, Daniel; Arkadiev, Vladimir; Wedell, Reiner; Haschke, Michael; Langhoff, Norbert; Wust, Peter; Luedemann, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    Photoelectric-enhanced radiation therapy is a bimodal therapy, consisting of the administration of highly radiation-absorbing substances into the tumor area and localized regional irradiation with orthovoltage x-rays. Irradiation can be performed by a modified computed tomography (CT) unit equipped with an additional x-ray optical module which converts the polychromatic, fan-shaped CT beam into a monochromatized and focused beam for energy-tuned photoelectric-enhanced radiotherapy. A dedicated x-ray optical module designed for spatial collimation, focusing, and monochromatization was mounted at the exit of the x-ray tube of a clinical CT unit. Spectrally resolved measurements of the resulting beam were performed using an energy-dispersive detection system calibrated by synchrotron radiation. The spatial photon fluence was determined by film dosimetry. Depth-dose measurements were performed and compared to the polychromatic CT and a therapeutic 6 MV beam. The spatial dose distribution in phantoms using a rotating radiation source (quasi-monochromatic CT and 6 MV, respectively) was investigated by gel dosimetry. The photoelectric dose enhancement for an iodine fraction of 1% in tissue was calculated and verified experimentally. The x-ray optical module selectively filters the energy of the tungsten Kα emission line with an FWHM of 5 keV. The relative photon fluence distribution demonstrates the focusing characteristic of the x-ray optical module. A beam width of about 3 mm was determined at the isocenter of the CT gantry. The depth-dose measurements resulted in a half-depth value of approximately 36 mm for the CT beams (quasi-monochromatic, polychromatic) compared to 154 mm for the 6 MV beam. The rotation of the radiation source leads to a steep dose gradient at the center of rotation; the gel dosimetry yields an entrance-to-peak dose ratio of 1:10.8 for the quasi-monochromatic CT and 1:37.3 for a 6 MV beam of the same size. The photoelectric dose enhancement factor

  5. WE-DE-202-00: Connecting Radiation Physics with Computational Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  6. WE-DE-202-00: Connecting Radiation Physics with Computational Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  7. EUMENES, a computer software for managing the radiation safety program information at an institutional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Valdes Ramos, Maryzury; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina; Gonzalez Rodriguez, Niurka; Vergara Gil, Alex

    2008-01-01

    The correct application of national and international regulations in the field of Radiological Safety requires the implementation of Radiation Safety Programs appropriate to the developed practice. These Programs demand the preparation and keeping of an important number of records and data, the compliance with working schedules, systematic quality controls, audits, delivery of information to the Regulatory Authority, the execution of radiological assessments, etc. Therefore, it is unquestionable the necessity and importance of having a computer tool to support the management of the information related to the Radiation Safety Program in any institution. The present work describes a computer program that allows the efficient management of these data. Its design was based on the IAEA International Basic Safety Standards recommendations and on the requirements of the Cuban national standards, with the objective of being flexible enough to be applied in most of the institutions using ionizing radiations. The most important records of Radiation Safety Programs were incorporated and reports can be generated by the users. An additional tools-module allows the user to access to a radionuclide data library, and to carry out different calculations of interest in radiological protection. The program has been developed in Borland Delphi and manages Microsoft Access databases. It is a user friendly code that aims to support the optimization of Radiation Safety Programs. The program contributes to save resources and time, as the generated information is electronically kept and transmitted. The code has different security access levels according to the user responsibility at the institution and also provides for the analysis of the introduced data, in a quick and efficient way, as well as to notice deadlines, the exceeding of reference levels and situations that require attention. (author)

  8. Bulk oil clauses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, N.

    1993-01-01

    The Institute Bulk Oil Clauses produced by the London market and the American SP-13c Clauses are examined in detail in this article. The duration and perils covered are discussed, and exclusions, adjustment clause 15 of the Institute Bulk Oil Clauses, Institute War Clauses (Cargo), and Institute Strikes Clauses (Bulk Oil) are outlined. (UK)

  9. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  10. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laspas, Fotios; Tsantioti, Dimitra; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John

    2011-04-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR ≤65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure.

  11. Ecological effects of ionizing radiation on population and ecosystem: a computational model ecosystem study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Masahiro; Fuma, Shoichi; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Miyamoto, Kiriko; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Zenichiro

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystem is a self-sustaining system of complexity, and their responses to the impacts are synergistic and subjected to the demographic stochasticity of the species, environmental stochasticity and randomness. Environmental fate and effects of radiation has ranged from observable DNA damage of the cell to the fare on tissues, individual, population, community and ecosystems. The quantitative, systematic individual-based model, SIM-COSM was developed to simulate impacts of radiation exposure and other toxicants on an aquatic microbial ecosystem (microcosm). The microcosm consists of heterotroph ciliate protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila B) as a consumer, autotroph flagellate algae (Euglena gracilis Z) as a producer and saprotroph bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5) as a decomposer. The symbiosis among microbes is self-organized by realizing material cycle and sustained for more than 2 years after inoculation. The system can not afford to lose any one of the microbes to maintain its sustainability. Experimental ecotoxicological tests for (a) gamma radiation, (b) Manganese ions and (c) Gadolinium are summarized. Population dynamics of microbes in Microcosm and its computer simulations by SIM-COSM are shown together in a figure. Population dynamics in Microcosm and SIM-COSM exposed to 500 Gy of gamma-radiation at 50 days after inoculation are shown also in a figure. To take the effects on the interactions between species and environment into account, one option is to put the ecotoxicity tests as experimental micro ecosystem study and theoretical model ecosystem analysis. (M. Suetake)

  12. Reliability of real-time computing with radiation data feedback at accidental release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deme, S.; Feher, I.; Lang, E.

    1990-01-01

    At the first workshop in 1985 we reported on the real-time dose computing method used at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant and on the telemetric system developed for the normalization of the computed data. At present, the computing method normalized for the telemetric data represents the primary information for deciding on any necessary counter measures in case of a nuclear reactor accident. In this connection we analyzed the reliability of the results obtained in this manner. The points of the analysis were: how the results are influenced by the choice of certain parameters that cannot be determined by direct methods and how the improperly chosen diffusion parameters would distort the determination of environmental radiation parameters normalized on the basis of the measurements ( 131 I activity concentration, gamma dose rate) at points lying at a given distance from the measuring stations. A further source of errors may be that, when determining the level of gamma radiation, the radionuclide doses in the cloud and on the ground surface are measured together by the environmental monitoring stations, whereas these doses appear separately in the computations. At the Paks NPP it is the time integral of the aiborne activity concentration of vapour form 131 I which is determined. This quantity includes neither the other physical and chemical forms of 131 I nor the other isotopes of radioiodine. We gave numerical examples for the uncertainties due to the above factors. As a result, we arrived at the conclusions that there is a need to decide on accident-related measures based on the computing method that the dose uncertainties may reach one order of magnitude for points lying far from the monitoring stations. Different measures are discussed to make the uncertainties significantly lower

  13. Computer-assisted planning and dosimetry for radiation treatment of head and neck cancer in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yomi, J.; Ngniah, A.; Kingue, S.; Muna, W.F.T.; Durosinmi-Etti, F.A.

    1995-01-01

    This evaluation was part of a multicenter, multinational study sponsored by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (Vienna) to investigate a simple, reliable computer-assisted planning and dosimetry system for radiation treatment of head and neck cancers in developing countries. Over a 13-month period (April 1992-April 1993), 120 patients with histologically-proven head or neck cancer were included in the evaluation. In each patient, planning and dosimetry were done both manually and using the computer-assisted system. The manual and computerized systems were compared on the basis of accuracy of determination of the outer contour, target volume, and critical organs; volume inequality resolution; structure heterogeneity correction; selection of the number, angle, and size of beams; treatment time calculation; availability of dosimetry predictions; and duration and cost of the procedure. Results demonstrated that the computer-assisted procedure was superior over the manual procedure, despite less than optimal software. The accuracy provided by the completely computerized procedure is indispensable for Level II radiation therapy, which is particularly useful in tumors of the sensitive, complex structures in the head and neck. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  14. Histomorphometric quantification of human pathological bones from synchrotron radiation 3D computed microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Liebert P.; Braz, Delson

    2011-01-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify pathological samples of human bone. Samples of human bones were cut into small blocks (8 mm x 8 mm x 10 mm) with a precision saw and then imaged. The computed microtomographies were obtained at SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Italy). The obtained 3D images yielded excellent resolution and details of intra-trabecular bone structures, including marrow present inside trabeculae. Histomorphometric quantification was compared to literature as well. (author)

  15. EDISTR: a computer program to obtain a nuclear decay data base for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, L.T.

    1980-01-01

    This report provides documentation for the computer program EDISTR. EDISTR uses basic radioactive decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File developed and maintained by the Nuclear Data Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as input, and calculates the mean energies and absolute intensities of all principal radiations associated with the radioactive decay of a nuclide. The program is intended to provide a physical data base for internal dosimetry calculations. The principal calculations performed by EDISTR are the determination of (1) the average energy of beta particles in a beta transition, (2) the beta spectrum as function of energy, (3) the energies and intensities of x-rays and Auger electrons generated by radioactive decay processes, (4) the bremsstrahlung spectra accompanying beta decay and monoenergetic Auger and internal conversion electrons, and (5) the radiations accompanying spontaneous fission. This report discusses the theoretical and empirical methods used in EDISTR and also practical aspects of the computer implementation of the theory. Detailed instructions for preparing input data for the computer program are included, along with examples and discussion of the output data generated by EDISTR

  16. Sink strengths of dislocations taking into account bulk recombination effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of the rate theory to describe radiation damage processes is closely associated with the calculation of the various sink strengths. In this connection the effect of bulk recombination is usually neglected, because of the complexity of the problem. For this reason we present in this paper, for the first time, by means of the rigorous elastic-field model of a dislocation embedded in a lossy continuum, analytic expressions for the diffusion flux of irradiation-induced point defects into a dislocation, taking into account the elastic interaction, additional sinks and higher order bulk recombination effects. The resulting self-consistent formulae for the dislocation sink strengths clearly demonstrate the importance of the bulk recombination for the micro-structures of irradiated materials. In conjunction with the Harwell computer code VS5 it became clear that this new dislocation bias also leads to a change in the macrostructural observables. The order of magnitude of this effect emphasizes that neglecting bulk recombination as a general principle is not justified

  17. Simulation of radiation effects on three-dimensional computer optical memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovitch, M.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    1997-01-01

    A model was developed to simulate the effects of heavy charged-particle (HCP) radiation on the information stored in three-dimensional computer optical memories. The model is based on (i) the HCP track radial dose distribution, (ii) the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature in the track, (iii) the matrix-specific radiation-induced changes that will affect the response, and (iv) the kinetics of transition of photochromic molecules from the colored to the colorless isomeric form (bit flip). It is shown that information stored in a volume of several nanometers radius around the particle close-quote s track axis may be lost. The magnitude of the effect is dependent on the particle close-quote s track structure. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. The use of mobile computed tomography in intensive care: regulatory compliance and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G C; Rowles, N P; Loader, R; Foy, R T; Barua, N; Williams, A; Palmer, J D

    2009-01-01

    The use of mobile head computed tomography (CT) equipment in intensive care is of benefit to unstable patients with brain injury. However, ionising radiation in a ward environment presents difficulties due to the necessity to restrict the exposure to staff and members of the public according to regulation 8(1-2) of the Ionising Radiation Regulations 1999. The methodology for enabling the use of a mobile head CT unit in an open ward area is discussed and a practical solution given. This required the reduction in scatter doses through the installation of extra internal and external shielding, and a further reduction in annual scatter dose by restricting the use of the equipment based on a simulation of the annual ward workload.

  19. Segmentation of Synchrotron Radiation micro-Computed Tomography Images using Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneses, Anderson A.M. [Federal University of Western Para (Brazil); Physics Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Giusti, Alessandro [IDSIA (Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence), University of Lugano (Switzerland); Almeida, Andre P. de, E-mail: apalmeid@gmail.com [Physics Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson [Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos E. de [Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Barroso, Regina C. [Physics Institute, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray micro-Computed Tomography (SR-{mu}CT) is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images, such as the phase contrast effect. The Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm represents state-of-art segmentation algorithm, presenting an enormous potential of application in SR-{mu}CT imaging. We describe the application of the algorithm EMvGC with swap move for the segmentation of bone images acquired at the ELETTRA Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of Wistar rats' ribs are investigated with Synchrotron Radiation {mu}CT imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present work is part of a research on the effects of radiotherapy on the thoracic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts algorithm for segmentation is described.

  20. Utilization of a computer using programless language for radiation protection management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuko, Syozi; Kasahara, Shigeru

    1985-01-01

    The practice of radiation management is different for each laboratory both in point of view and in the form of recording. Therefore, the computer program for the radiation management, especially for the management of radioisotopes is required to meet many amendments. In this standpoint, we have developed a ''programless language'' or ''programless software'' and have used in our work for several years. As the result of our experience, we have found that the programless language is quite satisfactory for the management of radioisotopes and that it has an advantage in some aspects over conventional programs. It is thought that this ''programless language'' is effective not only for our own works, but also applicable to other radioisotope laboratories. (author)

  1. Simulation of radiation effects on three-dimensional computer optical memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovitch, M.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    1997-01-01

    A model was developed to simulate the effects of heavy charged-particle (HCP) radiation on the information stored in three-dimensional computer optical memories. The model is based on (i) the HCP track radial dose distribution, (ii) the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature in the track, (iii) the matrix-specific radiation-induced changes that will affect the response, and (iv) the kinetics of transition of photochromic molecules from the colored to the colorless isomeric form (bit flip). It is shown that information stored in a volume of several nanometers radius around the particle's track axis may be lost. The magnitude of the effect is dependent on the particle's track structure.

  2. Practical application of computer program Panthere for workers' radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlier, Pierre; Michoux, Xavier; Lereculey, Clement

    2014-01-01

    The civil engineering operations to strengthen the raft of Fessenheim's nuclear plant were carried out by EDF. This technical modification has two principles objectives: 1) to increase the thickness of the reactor pit's concrete and 2) to create a new spreading area for corium (by creating a penetration through the wall of the reactor pit). Behind the complex technical operations two radioprotection issues were studied using the computer program 'PANTHERE': 1) Workers' radiation protection during the execution of the work (because of high dose rates in the reactor pit) and 2) operators' radiation protection after the execution of the work. Results contributed to decrease personal and collective dosimetry of operations and to model and design a biological shield to protect workers during Fessenheim reactor operation. (authors)

  3. Segmentation of Synchrotron Radiation micro-Computed Tomography Images using Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneses, Anderson A.M.; Giusti, Alessandro; Almeida, André P. de; Nogueira, Liebert; Braz, Delson; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Barroso, Regina C.

    2012-01-01

    The research on applications of segmentation algorithms to Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray micro-Computed Tomography (SR-μCT) is an open problem, due to the interesting and well-known characteristics of SR images, such as the phase contrast effect. The Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts (EMvGC) algorithm represents state-of-art segmentation algorithm, presenting an enormous potential of application in SR-μCT imaging. We describe the application of the algorithm EMvGC with swap move for the segmentation of bone images acquired at the ELETTRA Laboratory (Trieste, Italy). - Highlights: ► Microstructures of Wistar rats' ribs are investigated with Synchrotron Radiation μCT imaging. ► The present work is part of a research on the effects of radiotherapy on the thoracic region. ► Application of the Energy Minimization via Graph Cuts algorithm for segmentation is described.

  4. Computer modeling characterization, and applications of Gallium Arsenide Gunn diodes in radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El- Basit, Wafaa Abd; El-Ghanam, Safaa Mohamed; Kamh, Sanaa Abd El-Tawab [Electronics Research Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain-Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Maksood, Ashraf Mosleh; Soliman, Fouad Abd El-Moniem Saad [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-10-15

    The present paper reports on a trial to shed further light on the characterization, applications, and operation of radar speed guns or Gunn diodes on different radiation environments of neutron or γ fields. To this end, theoretical and experimental investigations of microwave oscillating system for outer-space applications were carried out. Radiation effects on the transient parameters and electrical properties of the proposed devices have been studied in detail with the application of computer programming. Also, the oscillation parameters, power characteristics, and bias current were plotted under the influence of different γ and neutron irradiation levels. Finally, shelf or oven annealing processes were shown to be satisfactory techniques to recover the initial characteristics of the irradiated devices.

  5. Two-parametric model of electron beam in computational dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazurik, V.M.; Lazurik, V.T.; Popov, G.; Zimek, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulation of irradiation process of various materials with electron beam (EB) can be applied to correct and control the performances of radiation processing installations. Electron beam energy measurements methods are described in the international standards. The obtained results of measurements can be extended by implementation computational dosimetry. Authors have developed the computational method for determination of EB energy on the base of two-parametric fitting of semi-empirical model for the depth dose distribution initiated by mono-energetic electron beam. The analysis of number experiments show that described method can effectively consider random displacements arising from the use of aluminum wedge with a continuous strip of dosimetric film and minimize the magnitude uncertainty value of the electron energy evaluation, calculated from the experimental data. Two-parametric fitting method is proposed for determination of the electron beam model parameters. These model parameters are as follow: E 0 – energy mono-energetic and mono-directional electron source, X 0 – the thickness of the aluminum layer, located in front of irradiated object. That allows obtain baseline data related to the characteristic of the electron beam, which can be later on applied for computer modeling of the irradiation process. Model parameters which are defined in the international standards (like E p – the most probably energy and R p – practical range) can be linked with characteristics of two-parametric model (E 0 , X 0 ), which allows to simulate the electron irradiation process. The obtained data from semi-empirical model were checked together with the set of experimental results. The proposed two-parametric model for electron beam energy evaluation and estimation of accuracy for computational dosimetry methods on the base of developed model are discussed. - Highlights: • Experimental and computational methods of electron energy evaluation. • Development

  6. MULTI2D - a computer code for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ramírez, J.

    2009-06-01

    Simulation of radiation hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions is developed, having in mind, in particular, target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement energy (IFE) and the interpretation of related experiments. Intense radiation pulses by laser or particle beams heat high-Z target configurations of different geometries and lead to a regime which is optically thick in some regions and optically thin in others. A diffusion description is inadequate in this situation. A new numerical code has been developed which describes hydrodynamics in two spatial dimensions (cylindrical R-Z geometry) and radiation transport along rays in three dimensions with the 4 π solid angle discretized in direction. Matter moves on a non-structured mesh composed of trilateral and quadrilateral elements. Radiation flux of a given direction enters on two (one) sides of a triangle and leaves on the opposite side(s) in proportion to the viewing angles depending on the geometry. This scheme allows to propagate sharply edged beams without ray tracing, though at the price of some lateral diffusion. The algorithm treats correctly both the optically thin and optically thick regimes. A symmetric semi-implicit (SSI) method is used to guarantee numerical stability. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI2D Catalogue identifier: AECV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 151 098 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 889 622 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: PC (32 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 2 Mbytes Word size: 32 bits Classification: 19.7 External routines: X-window standard library (libX11.so) and corresponding heading files (X11/*.h) are

  7. European questionnaire on the use of computer programmes in radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualdrini, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Grosswendt, B.; Siebert, B.R.L. [Braunschweig (Germany); Tanner, R. [NRPB, Dosimetry Development Group, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom); Terrisol, M. [CPAT, Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    1999-07-01

    Because of a potential reduction of necessary experimental efforts, the combination of measurements and supplementing calculations, also in the field of radiation dosimetry, may allow time and money to be saved if computational methods are used which are well suited to reproduce experimental data in a satisfactory quality. The dramatic increase in computing power in recent years now permits the use of computational tools for dosimetry also in routine applications. Many institutions dealing with radiation protection, however, have small groups which, in addition to their routine work, often cannot afford to specialise in the field of computational dosimetry. This means that not only experts but increasingly also casual users employ complicated computational tools such as general-purpose transport codes. This massive use of computer programmes in radiation protection and dosimetry applications motivated the Concerted Action Investigation and Quality Assurance of Numerical Methods in Radiation Protection Dosimetry of the 4. framework programme of the European Commission to prepare, distribute and evaluate a questionnaire on the use of such codes. A significant number of scientists from nearly all the countries of the European Community (and some countries outside Europe) contributed to the questionnaire, that allowed to obtain a satisfactory overview of the state of the art in this field. The results obtained from the questionnaire and summarised in the present Report are felt to be indicative of the situation of using sophisticated computer codes within the European Community although the group of participating scientist may not be a representative sample in a strict statistical sense. [Italian] A causa della progressiva diminuzione dell'impegno sperimentale, la combinazione di misure e valutazioni numeriche supplementari puo' consentire, anche nel campo della dosimetria delle radiazioni, risparmi di tempo e risorse purche' sia garantito l

  8. A computer database system to calculate staff radiation doses and maintain records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clewer, P.

    1985-01-01

    A database has been produced to record the personal dose records of all employees monitored for radiation exposure in the Wessex Health Region. Currently there are more than 2000 personnel in 115 departments but the capacity of the database allows for expansion. The computer is interfaced to a densitometer for film badge reading. The hardware used by the database, which is based on a popular microcomputer, is described, as are the various programs that make up the software. The advantages over the manual card index system that it replaces are discussed. (author)

  9. Collection and analysis of environmental radiation data using a desktop computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogolak, C.V.

    1982-04-01

    A portable instrumentation sytem using a Hewlett-Packard HP-9825 desktop computer for the collection and analysis of environmental radiation data is described. Procedures for the transmission of data between the HP-9825 and various nuclear counters are given together with a description of the necessary hardware and software. Complete programs for the analysis of Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectra, high pressure ionization chamber monitor data, 86 Kr monitor data and air filter sample alpha particle activity measurements are presented. Some utility programs, intended to increase system flexibility, are included

  10. Reliability of real-time computing with radiation data feedback at accidental release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deme, S.; Feher, I.; Lang, E.

    1989-07-01

    At present, the computing method normalized for the telemetric data represents the primary information for deciding on any necessary countermeasures in case of a nuclear reactor accident. The reliability of the results, however, are influenced by the choice of certain parameters that can not be determined by direct methods. Improperly chosen diffusion parameters would distort the determination of environmental radiation parameters normalized on the basis of the measurements ( 131 I activity concentration, gamma dose rate) at points lying at a given distance from the measuring stations. Numerical examples for the uncertainties due to the above factors are analyzed. (author) 4 refs.; 14 figs

  11. COMPUTATIONAL FLOW MODELLING OF FORMULA-SAE SIDEPODS FOR OPTIMUM RADIATOR HEAT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. DE SILVA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Formula SAE vehicles, over the program’s history have showcased a myriad of aerodynamic packages, each claiming specific quantitative and qualitative features. This paper attempts to critique differing aerodynamic sidepod designs and their effect upon radiator heat management. Various features from inlet size, sidepod shape and size, presence of an undertray, suspension cover, gills and chimneys are analysed for their effects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analyses are performed in the FLUENT environment, with the aid of GAMBIT meshing software and SolidWorks modelling.

  12. Computer simulation of threshold radiation damage in rutile, TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulation methods have been used to study threshold radiation damage structures in rutile. It was found Ti ions have threshold energies much larger than O ions. Basal plane displacements for oxygen were shown to be complex, and focuson behaviour was only found at energies several times the threshold energy. Oxygen ions do not have simple interstitials or vacancies, but rather a three-ion crowdion and divacancy-interstitial combination were found, respectively. Threshold energies were found to be highly dependent on crystallographic direction, being as low as 10 eV in one instance, but often much higher. Oxygen ions were seen to defocus along the c-axis. (author)

  13. Feasibility of dual-energy computed tomography in radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Heesoon; Shin, Han-Back; Cho, Sungkoo; Cho, Junsang; Han, Youngyih

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the noise level, effective atomic number ( Z eff), accuracy of the computed tomography (CT) number, and the CT number to the relative electron density EDconversion curve were estimated for virtual monochromatic energy and polychromatic energy. These values were compared to the theoretically predicted values to investigate the feasibility of the use of dual-energy CT in routine radiation therapy planning. The accuracies of the parameters were within the range of acceptability. These results can serve as a stepping stone toward the routine use of dual-energy CT in radiotherapy planning.

  14. Computer simulation for synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescent microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Biao; Yu Xiaohan; Xu Hongjie

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation based fluorescent microtomography (SR-XFMT) is a nondestructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen with high spatial resolution and sensitivity, and will be an optional experimental technique at SSRF hard X-ray micro-focusing beamline now under construction. In this paper, the principles and developments of SR-XFMT are briefly introduced. Computer simulation of SR-XFMT experiment is performed. The image of the simulated sample is reconstructed using Filtered Back Projection (FBP), Algebraic Reconstruction Techniques (ART) and modified FBP with absorption correction. The qualities of the reconstructed images are analyzed and compared. The validity of these reconstruction techniques is discussed. (authors)

  15. STRAY - An interactive program for the computation of stray radiation in infrared telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair Dinger, Ann

    1987-01-01

    The STRAY program to model the amount of stray radiation reaching the focal plane of a well-baffled telescope is described. The STRAY telescope model is addressed, including the aperture shade, barrel baffle, optics, mirror sectioning and chopping, and off-axis points in focal plane. The possible illumination paths are shown, and calculation options using STRAY are discussed. The stored data and computational aspects of STRAY are addressed. STRAY is compared to the MINI-APART model, and applications of STRAY are described.

  16. The PEREGRINE TM program: using physics and computer simulation to improve radiation therapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siantar, Christine L. Hartmann [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moses, Edward I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    When using radiation to treat cancer, doctors rely on physics and computer technology to predict where radiation dose will by deposited in the patient. The accuracy of computerized treatment planning plays a critical role in the ultimate success or failure of the radiation treatment. Inaccurate dose calculations can result in either insufficient radiation for cure, or excessive radiation to nearby healthy tissue, which can reduce the patient's quality of life. This article describes how advanced physics, computer, and engineering techniques originally developed for nuclear weapons and high energy physics research are being used to predict radiation dose in cancer patients. Results for radiation therapy planning, achieved in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) PEREGRINE program, show that these tools can give doctors new insights into their patients' treatments by providing substantially more accurate dose distributions than have been available in the past. It is believed that greater accuracy in radiation therapy treatment planning will save lives by improving doctors' ability to target radiation to the tumor and reduce suffering by reducing the incidence of radiation-induced complications.

  17. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art.

  18. Development of the computer code to monitor gamma radiation in the nuclear facility environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad, Y. R.; Pudjiyanto, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Computer codes for gamma radiation monitoring in the vicinity of nuclear facility which have been developed could be introduced to the commercial potable gamma analyzer. The crucial stage of the first year activity was succeeded ; that is the codes have been tested to transfer data file (pulse high distribution) from Micro NOMAD gamma spectrometer (ORTEC product) and the convert them into dosimetry and physics quantities. Those computer codes are called as GABATAN (Gamma Analyzer of Batan) and NAGABAT (Natural Gamma Analyzer of Batan). GABATAN code can isable to used at various nuclear facilities for analyzing gamma field up to 9 MeV, while NAGABAT could be used for analyzing the contribution of natural gamma rays to the exposure rate in the certain location

  19. Radiation defects in Te-implanted germanium. Electron microscopy and computer simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalitzova, M.G.; Karpuzov, D.S.; Pashov, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Direct observation of radiation damage induced by heavy ion implantation in crystalline germanium by means of high-resolution electron microscopy is reported. The dark-field lattice imaging mode is used, under conditions suitable for object-like imaging. Conventional TEM is used for estimating the efficiency of creating visibly damaged regions. Heavy ion damage clusters with three types of inner structure are observed: with near-perfect crystalline cores, and with metastable and stable amorphous cores. The MARLOWE computer code is used to simulate the atomic collision cascades and to obtain the lateral spread distributions of point defects created. A comparison of high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) with computer simulation results shows encouraging agreement for the average cluster dimensions and for the lateral spread of vacancies and interstitials. (author)

  20. Abstracts of digital computer code packages assembled by the Radiation Shielding Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, B.J.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This publication, ORNL/RSIC-13, Volumes I to III Revised, has resulted from an internal audit of the first 168 packages of computing technology in the Computer Codes Collection (CCC) of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC). It replaces the earlier three documents published as single volumes between 1966 to 1972. A significant number of the early code packages were considered to be obsolete and were removed from the collection in the audit process and the CCC numbers were not reassigned. Others not currently being used by the nuclear R and D community were retained in the collection to preserve technology not replaced by newer methods, or were considered of potential value for reference purposes. Much of the early technology, however, has improved through developer/RSIC/user interaction and continues at the forefront of the advancing state-of-the-art

  1. Rad World -- computer-animated video radiation and hazardous waste-management science curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Rad World computer-animated video and curriculum materials were developed through a grant from the Waste-management Education and Research Consortium. The package, which includes a computer-animated video, hands-on activities, and multidisciplinary lessons concerning radiation and hazardous-waste management, was created to approach these subjects in an informative, yet entertaining, manner. The lessons and video, designed to supplement studies of energy and physical science at the middle school and high school level, also implement quality and consistent science education as outlined by the New Mexico Science Standards and Benchmarks (1995). Consistent with the curriculum standards and benchmarks, the curriculum includes library research, collaborative learning, hands-on-science, and discovery learning. Pre- and post-tests are included

  2. Computation of the glandular radiation dose in digital tomosynthesis of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Vedantham, Srinivasan; D'Orsi, Carl; Karellas, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Tomosynthesis of the breast is currently a topic of intense interest as a logical next step in the evolution of digital mammography. This study reports on the computation of glandular radiation dose in digital tomosynthesis of the breast. Previously, glandular dose estimations in tomosynthesis have been performed using data from studies of radiation dose in conventional planar mammography. This study evaluates, using Monte Carlo methods, the normalized glandular dose (D g N) to the breast during a tomosynthesis study, and characterizes its dependence on breast size, tissue composition, and x-ray spectrum. The conditions during digital tomosynthesis imaging of the breast were simulated using a computer program based on the Geant4 toolkit. With the use of simulated breasts of varying size, thickness and tissue composition, the D g N to the breast tissue was computed for varying x-ray spectra and tomosynthesis projection angle. Tomosynthesis projections centered about both the cranio-caudal (CC) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO) views were simulated. For each projection angle, the ratio of the glandular dose for that projection to the glandular dose for the zero degree projection was computed. This ratio was denoted the relative glandular dose (RGD) coefficient, and its variation under different imaging parameters was analyzed. Within mammographic energies, the RGD was found to have a weak dependence on glandular fraction and x-ray spectrum for both views. A substantial dependence on breast size and thickness was found for the MLO view, and to a lesser extent for the CC view. Although RGD values deviate substantially from unity as a function of projection angle, the RGD averaged over all projections in a complete tomosynthesis study varies from 0.91 to 1.01. The RGD results were fit to mathematical functions and the resulting equations are provided

  3. The Role of the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) is an information analysis center that collects, archives, evaluates, synthesizes and distributes information, data and codes that are used in various nuclear technology applications. RSICC retains more than 2,000 packages that have been provided by contributors from various agencies. RSICC’s customers obtain access to such computing codes (source and/or executable versions) and processed nuclear data files to promote on-going research, to help ensure nuclear and radiological safety, and to advance nuclear technology. The role of such information analysis centers is critical for supporting and sustaining nuclear education and training programmes both domestically and internationally, as the majority of RSICC’s customers are students attending U.S. universities. RSICC also supports and promotes workshops and seminars in nuclear science and technology to further the use and/or development of computational tools and data. Additionally, RSICC operates a secure CLOUD computing system to provide access to sensitive export-controlled modeling and simulation (M&S) tools that support both domestic and international activities. This presentation will provide a general review of RSICC’s activities, services, and systems that support knowledge management and education and training in the nuclear field. (author

  4. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  5. 3D histomorphometric quantification of trabecular bones by computed microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Barroso, R C; Oliveira, L F; Pinheiro, C J G; Dreossi, D; Tromba, G

    2010-12-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-invasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify the bone structure at different skeletal sites as well as to investigate the effects of bone diseases on quantitative understanding of bone architecture. The images were obtained at Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility, Italy. Concerning the obtained results for normal and pathological bones from same skeletal sites and individuals, from our results, a certain declining bone volume fraction was achieved. The results obtained could be used in forming the basis for comparison of the bone microarchitecture and can be a valuable tool for predicting bone fragility. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-02-21

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes.

  7. Estimation of radiation exposure from lung cancer screening program with low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jun, Jae Kwan [Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that screening with Low-dose Computed Tomography (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer mortality in a high-risk population. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) gave a B recommendation for annual LDCT screening for individuals at high-risk. With the promising results, Korea developed lung cancer screening guideline and is planning a pilot study for implementation of national lung cancer screening. With widespread adoption of lung cancer screening with LDCT, there are concerns about harms of screening, including high false-positive rates and radiation exposure. Over the 3 rounds of screening in the NLST, 96.4% of positive results were false-positives. Although the initial screening is performed at low dose, subsequent diagnostic examinations following positive results additively contribute to patient's lifetime exposure. As with implementing a large-scale screening program, there is a lack of established risk assessment about the effect of radiation exposure from long-term screening program. Thus, the purpose of this study was to estimate cumulative radiation exposure of annual LDCT lung cancer screening program over 20-year period.

  8. Nationwide radiation dose survey of computed tomography for fetal skeletal dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sawai, Hideaki [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo (Japan); Murotsuki, Jun [Miyagi Children' s Hospital, Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Fetal and Developmental Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Horiuchi, Tetsuya [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Course of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, computed tomography (CT) has been used to diagnose fetal skeletal dysplasia. However, no surveys have been conducted to determine the radiation exposure dose and the diagnostic reference level (DRL). To collect CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) data from domestic hospitals implementing fetal skeletal 3-D CT and to establish DRLs for Japan. Scan data of 125 cases of 20 protocols from 16 hospitals were analyzed. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum values of CTDIvol and DLP were determined. The time-dependent change in radiation dose setting in hospitals with three or more cases with scans was also examined. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum CTDIvol values were 2.1, 3.7, 7.7, 11.3 and 23.1 mGy, respectively, and these values for DLP were 69.0, 122.3, 276.8, 382.6 and 1025.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Six of the 12 institutions reduced the dose setting during the implementation period. The DRLs of CTDIvol and DLP for fetal CT were 11.3 mGy and 382.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Institutions implementing fetal CT should use these established DRLs as the standard and make an effort to reduce radiation exposure by voluntarily decreasing the dose. (orig.)

  9. Temperature-based estimation of global solar radiation using soft computing methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Kasra; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Danesh, Amir Seyed; Abdullah, Mohd Shahidan; Zamani, Mazdak

    2016-07-01

    Precise knowledge of solar radiation is indeed essential in different technological and scientific applications of solar energy. Temperature-based estimation of global solar radiation would be appealing owing to broad availability of measured air temperatures. In this study, the potentials of soft computing techniques are evaluated to estimate daily horizontal global solar radiation (DHGSR) from measured maximum, minimum, and average air temperatures ( T max, T min, and T avg) in an Iranian city. For this purpose, a comparative evaluation between three methodologies of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), radial basis function support vector regression (SVR-rbf), and polynomial basis function support vector regression (SVR-poly) is performed. Five combinations of T max, T min, and T avg are served as inputs to develop ANFIS, SVR-rbf, and SVR-poly models. The attained results show that all ANFIS, SVR-rbf, and SVR-poly models provide favorable accuracy. Based upon all techniques, the higher accuracies are achieved by models (5) using T max- T min and T max as inputs. According to the statistical results, SVR-rbf outperforms SVR-poly and ANFIS. For SVR-rbf (5), the mean absolute bias error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient are 1.1931 MJ/m2, 2.0716 MJ/m2, and 0.9380, respectively. The survey results approve that SVR-rbf can be used efficiently to estimate DHGSR from air temperatures.

  10. Computer aided dosimetry and verification of exposure to radiation. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, D.; Stodilka, R.Z.; Leach, K.E.; Prud'homme-Lalonde, L.

    2002-06-01

    In the timeframe following the September 11th attacks on the United States, increased emphasis has been placed on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) preparedness. Of prime importance is rapid field assessment of potential radiation exposure to Canadian Forces field personnel. This work set up a framework for generating an 'expert' computer system for aiding and assisting field personnel in determining the extent of radiation insult to military personnel. Data was gathered by review of the available literature, discussions with medical and health physics personnel having hands-on experience dealing with radiation accident victims, and from experience of the principal investigator. Flow charts and generic data fusion algorithms were developed. Relationships between known exposure parameters, patient interview and history, clinical symptoms, clinical work-ups, physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry, and dose reconstruction as critical data indicators were investigated. The data obtained was examined in terms of information theory. A main goal was to determine how best to generate an adaptive model (i.e. when more data becomes available, how is the prediction improved). Consideration was given to determination of predictive algorithms for health outcome. In addition, the concept of coding an expert medical treatment advisor system was developed. (author)

  11. Computer aided dosimetry and verification of exposure to radiation. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, D. [SAIC Canada (Canada); Stodilka, R.Z.; Leach, K.E.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L. [Defence R and D Canada (DRDC), Radiation Effects Group, Space Systems and Technology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-06-15

    In the timeframe following the September 11th attacks on the United States, increased emphasis has been placed on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) preparedness. Of prime importance is rapid field assessment of potential radiation exposure to Canadian Forces field personnel. This work set up a framework for generating an 'expert' computer system for aiding and assisting field personnel in determining the extent of radiation insult to military personnel. Data was gathered by review of the available literature, discussions with medical and health physics personnel having hands-on experience dealing with radiation accident victims, and from experience of the principal investigator. Flow charts and generic data fusion algorithms were developed. Relationships between known exposure parameters, patient interview and history, clinical symptoms, clinical work-ups, physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry, and dose reconstruction as critical data indicators were investigated. The data obtained was examined in terms of information theory. A main goal was to determine how best to generate an adaptive model (i.e. when more data becomes available, how is the prediction improved). Consideration was given to determination of predictive algorithms for health outcome. In addition, the concept of coding an expert medical treatment advisor system was developed. (author)

  12. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  13. Full-field digital mammography versus computed radiology mammography: comparison in image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongxia; Song Shaojuan; Liu Chuanya; Qi Hengtao; Qin Weichang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences in image quality and radiation dose between full- field digital mammography (FFDM) system and compute radiology mammography (CRM) system. Methods: The ALVIM mammographic phantom was exposed by FFDM system with automatic exposure control (AEC) and then exposed by CRM system with the unique imaging plank on the same condition. The FFDM system applied the same kV value and the different mAs values (14, 16, 18, 22 and 24 mAs), and the emission skin dose (ESD) and the average gland dose (AGD) were recorded for the above-mentioned exposure factors. All images were read by five experienced radiologists under the same condition and judged based on 5-point scales. And then receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn and the probability (P det ) values were calculated. The data were statistically processed with ANOVA. Results: The P det values of calcifications and lesion lump were higher with FFDM system than with CRM system at the same dose (1.36 mGy). Especially, for microcalcifications and lesion lump, the largest difference of the P det value was 0.215, and that of lesion lump was 0.245. In comparison with CRM system, the radiation dose of FFDM system could be reduced at the same P det value. The ESD value was reduced by 26%, and the ACD value was reduced by 41%. When the mAs value exceed AEC value, the P det value almost had no change, though the radiation dose was increased. Conclusions: The detection rates of microcalcifications and lesion lump with FFDM system are proven to be superior to CRM system at the same dose. The radiation dose of FFDM system was less than CRM system for the same image quality. (authors)

  14. Reduction of radiation exposure and image quality using dose reduction tool on computed tomography fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakabe, Daisuke; Tochihara, Syuichi; Ono, Michiaki; Tokuda, Masaki; Kai, Noriyuki; Nakato, Kengo; Hashida, Masahiro; Funama, Yoshinori; Murazaki, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to measure the reduction rate of radiation dose and variability of image noise using the angular beam modulation (ABM) on computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy. The Alderson-Rando phantom and the homemade phantom were used in our study. These phantoms were scanned at on-center and off-center positions at -12 cm along y-axis with and without ABM technique. Regarding the technique, the x-ray tube is turned off in a 100-degree angle sector at the center of 12 o'clock, 10 o'clock, and 2 o'clock positions during CT fluoroscopy. CT fluoroscopic images were obtained with tube voltages, 120 kV; tube current-time product per reconstructed image, 30 mAs; rotation time, 0.5 s/rot; slice thickness, 4.8 mm; and reconstruction kernel B30s in each scanning. After CT scanning, radiation exposure and image noise were measured and the image artifacts were evaluated with and without the technique. The reduction rate for radiation exposure was 75-80% with and without the technique at on-center position regardless of each angle position. In the case of the off-center position at -12 cm, the reduction rate was 50% with and without the technique. In contrast, image noise remained constant with and without the technique. Visual inspection for image artifacts almost have the same scores with and without the technique and no statistical significance was found in both techniques (p>0.05). ABM is an appropriate tool for reducing radiation exposure and maintaining image-noise and artifacts during CT fluoroscopy. (author)

  15. Correlation of radiation dose and heart rate in dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Kehagias, Dimitrios; Andreou, John; Tsantioti, Dimitra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) has been widely used since the introduction of 64-slice scanners and dual-source CT technology, but the relatively high radiation dose remains a major concern. Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure and heart rate (HR), in dual-source CTCA. Material and Methods: Data from 218 CTCA examinations, performed with a dual-source 64-slices scanner, were statistically evaluated. Effective radiation dose, expressed in mSv, was calculated as the product of the dose-length product (DLP) times a conversion coefficient for the chest (mSv = DLPx0.017). Heart rate range and mean heart rate, expressed in beats per minute (bpm) of each individual during CTCA, were also provided by the system. Statistical analysis of effective dose and heart rate data was performed by using Pearson correlation coefficient and two-sample t-test. Results: Mean HR and effective dose were found to have a borderline positive relationship. Individuals with a mean HR >65 bpm observed to receive a statistically significant higher effective dose as compared to those with a mean HR =65 bpm. Moreover, a strong correlation between effective dose and variability of HR of more than 20 bpm was observed. Conclusion: Dual-source CT scanners are considered to have the capability to provide diagnostic examinations even with high HR and arrhythmias. However, it is desirable to keep the mean heart rate below 65 bpm and heart rate fluctuation less than 20 bpm in order to reduce the radiation exposure

  16. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part II: Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedick, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer

  17. Knowledge management: Role of the the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Timothy

    2017-09-01

    The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is an information analysis center that collects, archives, evaluates, synthesizes and distributes information, data and codes that are used in various nuclear technology applications. RSICC retains more than 2,000 software packages that have been provided by code developers from various federal and international agencies. RSICC's customers (scientists, engineers, and students from around the world) obtain access to such computing codes (source and/or executable versions) and processed nuclear data files to promote on-going research, to ensure nuclear and radiological safety, and to advance nuclear technology. The role of such information analysis centers is critical for supporting and sustaining nuclear education and training programs both domestically and internationally, as the majority of RSICC's customers are students attending U.S. universities. Additionally, RSICC operates a secure CLOUD computing system to provide access to sensitive export-controlled modeling and simulation (M&S) tools that support both domestic and international activities. This presentation will provide a general review of RSICC's activities, services, and systems that support knowledge management and education and training in the nuclear field.

  18. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yik Siang Pang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD study of a natural gas combustion burner focusing on the effect of combustion, thermal radiation and turbulence models on the temperature and chemical species concentration fields. The combustion was modelled using the finite rate/eddy dissipation (FR/EDM and partially premixed flame models. Detailed chemistry kinetics CHEMKIN GRI-MECH 3.0 consisting of 325 reactions was employed to model the methane combustion. Discrete ordinates (DO and spherical harmonics (P1 model were employed to predict the thermal radiation. The gas absorption coefficient dependence on the wavelength is resolved by the weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM. Turbulence flow was simulated using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS based models. The findings showed that a combination of partially premixed flame, P1 and standard k-ε (SKE gave the most accurate prediction with an average deviation of around 7.8% of combustion temperature and 15.5% for reactant composition (methane and oxygen. The results show the multi-step chemistry in the partially premixed model is more accurate than the two-step FR/EDM. Meanwhile, inclusion of thermal radiation has a minor effect on the heat transfer and species concentration. SKE turbulence model yielded better prediction compared to the realizable k-ε (RKE and renormalized k-ε (RNG. The CFD simulation presented in this work may serve as a useful tool to evaluate a performance of a natural gas combustor. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 26th July 2017; Revised: 9th October 2017; Accepted: 30th October 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Pang, Y.S., Law, W.P., Pung, K.Q., Gimbun, J. (2018. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Turbulence, Radiation, and Combustion Models for Natural Gas Combustion Burner. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 155-169 (doi:10.9767/bcrec

  19. Assessment of radiation exposure on a dual-source computed tomography-scanner performing coronary computed tomography-angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, S.; Herzog, P.; Johnson, T.; Boehm, H.; Nikolaou, K.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The radiation exposure of a dual-source-64-channel multi-detector-computed-tomography-scanner (Somatom-Defintion, Siemens, Germany) was assessed in a phantom-study performing coronary-CT-angiography (CTCA) in comparison to patients' data randomly selected from routine scanning. Methods: 240 CT-acquisitions of a computed tomography dose index (CTDI)-phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were performed using a synthetically generated Electrocardiography (ECG)-signal with variable heart rates (30-180 beats per minute (bpm)). 120 measurements were acquired using continuous tube-output; 120 measurements were performed using ECG-synchronized tube-modulation. The pulsing window was set at minimum duration at 65% of the cardiac cycle between 30 and 75 bpm. From 90-180 bpm the pulsing window was set at 30-70% of the cardiac cycle. Automated pitch adaptation was always used. A comparison between phantom CTDI and two patient groups' CTDI corresponding to the two pulsing groups was performed. Results: Without ECG-tube-modulation CDTI-values were affected by heart-rate-changes resulting in 85.7 mGray (mGy) at 30 and 45 bpm, 65.5 mGy/60 bpm, 54.7 mGy/75 bpm, 46.5 mGy/90 bpm, 34.2 mGy/120 bpm, 27.0 mGy/150 bpm and 22.1 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 14.5 mSievert (mSv) at 30/45 bpm and 3.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Using ECG-tube-modulation these CTDI-values resulted: 32.6 mGy/30 bpm, 36.6 mGy/45 bpm, 31.4 mGy/60 bpm, 26.8 mGy/75 bpm, 23.7 mGy/90 bpm, 19.4 mGy/120 bpm, 17.2 mGy/150 bpm and 15.6 mGy/180 bpm equal to effective doses between 5.5 mSv at 30 bpm and 2.6 mSv at 180 bpm. Significant CTDI-differences were found between patients with lower/moderate and higher heart rates in comparison to the phantom CTDI-results. Conclusions: Dual source CTCA is particularly dose efficient at high heart rates when automated pitch adaptation, especially in combination with ECG-based tube-modulation is used. However in clinical routine scanning for patients with higher heart rates

  20. Computer-aided beam arrangement based on similar cases in radiation treatment-planning databases for stereotactic lung radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magome, Taiki; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided method for determination of beam arrangements based on similar cases in a radiotherapy treatment-planning database for stereotactic lung radiation therapy. Similar-case-based beam arrangements were automatically determined based on the following two steps. First, the five most similar cases were searched, based on geometrical features related to the location, size and shape of the planning target volume, lung and spinal cord. Second, five beam arrangements of an objective case were automatically determined by registering five similar cases with the objective case, with respect to lung regions, by means of a linear registration technique. For evaluation of the beam arrangements five treatment plans were manually created by applying the beam arrangements determined in the second step to the objective case. The most usable beam arrangement was selected by sorting the five treatment plans based on eight plan evaluation indices, including the D95, mean lung dose and spinal cord maximum dose. We applied the proposed method to 10 test cases, by using an RTP database of 81 cases with lung cancer, and compared the eight plan evaluation indices between the original treatment plan and the corresponding most usable similar-case-based treatment plan. As a result, the proposed method may provide usable beam arrangements, which have no statistically significant differences from the original beam arrangements (P>0.05) in terms of the eight plan evaluation indices. Therefore, the proposed method could be employed as an educational tool for less experienced treatment planners. (author)

  1. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  2. Preliminary Study on Hybrid Computational Phantom for Radiation Dosimetry Based on Subdivision Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Hwi; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2007-01-01

    The anthropomorphic computational phantoms are classified into two groups. One group is the stylized phantoms, or MIRD phantoms, which are based on mathematical representations of the anatomical structures. The shapes and positions of the organs and tissues in these phantoms can be adjusted by changing the coefficients of the equations in use. The other group is the voxel phantoms, which are based on tomographic images of a real person such as CT, MR and serially sectioned color slice images from a cadaver. Obviously, the voxel phantoms represent the anatomical structures of a human body much more realistically than the stylized phantoms. A realistic representation of anatomical structure is very important for an accurate calculation of radiation dose in the human body. Consequently, the ICRP recently has decided to use the voxel phantoms for the forthcoming update of the dose conversion coefficients. However, the voxel phantoms also have some limitations: (1) The topology and dimensions of the organs and tissues in a voxel model are extremely difficult to change, and (2) The thin organs, such as oral mucosa and skin, cannot be realistically modeled unless the voxel resolution is prohibitively high. Recently, a new approach has been implemented by several investigators. The investigators converted their voxel phantoms to hybrid computational phantoms based on NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surface, which is smooth and deformable. It is claimed that these new phantoms have the flexibility of the stylized phantom along with the realistic representations of the anatomical structures. The topology and dimensions of the anatomical structures can be easily changed as necessary. Thin organs can be modeled without affecting computational speed or memory requirement. The hybrid phantoms can be also used for 4-D Monte Carlo simulations. In this preliminary study, the external shape of a voxel phantom (i.e., skin), HDRK-Man, was converted to a hybrid computational

  3. Computer simulation of the interaction between an extended dislocation and radiation defects in the fcc lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, E.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsutsumi, T.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between an extended dislocation and a radiation-induced defect, especially, a self-interstitial atom (SIA), has been investigated in the model fcc lattice by computer simulation technique. An SIA was absorbed into the core of one of the two partial dislocations of the extended screw dislocation as a crowdion which extends along the dislocation line. Under the applied shear stress this crowdion acted as a pinning point, resulting in irradiation hardening. On the other hand, an SIA was absorbed at the jog site of the extended edge dislocation (at one of the two jog sites on two partial dislocations) and after some relaxation the total jog was shifted to one atomic distance through the spreading out of the strain due to an SIA from one partial side to the other side. (orig.)

  4. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Kim, Bom Soo; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  5. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    The key objectives of this study are to investigate, both computationally and experimentally, which forms, compositions, and layerings of hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen containing materials will offer the greatest shielding in the most structurally robust combination against galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), secondary neutrons, and solar energetic particles (SEP). The objectives and expected significance of this research are to develop a space radiation shielding materials system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and that also has high strength for load bearing primary structures. Such a materials system does not yet exist. The boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) can theoretically be processed into structural BNNT and used for load bearing structures. Furthermore, the BNNT can be incorporated into high hydrogen polymers and the combination used as matrix reinforcement for structural composites. BNNT's molecular structure is attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation. There are two methods or techniques for introducing hydrogen into BNNT: (1) hydrogen storage in BNNT, and (2) hydrogenation of BNNT (hydrogenated BNNT). In the hydrogen storage method, nanotubes are favored to store hydrogen over particles and sheets because they have much larger surface areas and higher hydrogen binding energy. The carbon nanotube (CNT) and BNNT have been studied as potentially outstanding hydrogen storage materials since 1997. Our study of hydrogen storage in BNNT - as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrogen gas concentration - will be performed with a hydrogen storage chamber equipped with a hydrogen generator. The second method of introducing hydrogen into BNNT is hydrogenation of BNNT, where hydrogen is covalently bonded onto boron, nitrogen, or both. Hydrogenation of BN and BNNT has been studied theoretically. Hyper-hydrogenated BNNT has been theoretically predicted with hydrogen coverage up to 100% of the individual atoms. This is a higher hydrogen content

  6. Radiation doses to patients receiving computed tomography examinations in British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, J.E.; Bilawich, A.-M.; Mayo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the diagnostic reference levels and effective radiation dose to patients from routine computed tomography (CT) examinations in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The patient weight, height and computed tomography dose index or dose linear product (DLP) were recorded on study sheets for 1070 patients who were referred for clinically indicated routine CT examinations at 18 radiology departments in British Columbia. Sixteen of the scanners were multidetector row scanners. The average patient dose varied from hospital to hospital. The largest range was found for CT of the abdomen, for which the dose varied from 3.6 to 26.5 (average 10.1) mSv. For head CT, the range was 1.7 to 4.9 (average 2.8) mSv; for chest CT, it was 3.8 to 26 (average 9.3) mSv; for pelvis CT, it was 3.5 to 15.5 (average 9.0) mSv; and for abdomen/pelvis CT, it was 7.3 to 31.5 (average 16.3) mSv. Reference dose values were calculated for each exam. These DLP values are as follows: head, 1300 mGy cm; chest, 600 mGy cm; abdomen, 920 mGy cm; pelvis, 650 mGy cm; and abdomen/pelvis, 1100 mGy cm. Among hospitals, there was considerable variation in the DLP and patient radiation dose for a specific exam. Reference doses and patient doses were higher than those found in similar recent surveys carried out in the United Kingdom and the European Union. Patient doses were similar to those found in a recent survey in Germany. (author)

  7. The cellular environment in computer simulations of radiation-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V.V.; Hamm, R.N.; Waker, A.J.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks were modeled for 660 keV photon radiation and scavenger capacity mimicking the cellular environment. Atomistic representation of DNA in B form with a first hydration shell was utilized to model direct and indirect damage. Monte Carlo generated electron tracks were used to model energy deposition in matter and to derive initial spatial distributions of species which appear in the medium following radiolysis. Diffusion of species was followed with time, and their reactions with DNA and each other were modeled in an encounter-controlled manner. Three methods to account for hydroxyl radical diffusion in cellular environment were tested: assumed exponential survival, time-limited modeling and modeling of reactions between hydroxyl radicals and scavengers in an encounter-controlled manner. Although the method based on modeling scavenging in an encounter-controlled manner is more precise, it requires substantially more computer resources than either the exponential or time-limiting method. Scavenger concentrations of 0.5 and 0.15 M were considered using exponential and encounter-controlled methods with reaction rate set at 3x10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s-1. Diffusion length and strand break yields, predicted by these two methods for the same scavenger molarity, were different by 20%-30%. The method based on limiting time of chemistry follow-up to 10 -9 s leads to DNA damage and radical diffusion estimates similar to 0.5 M scavenger concentration in the other two methods. The difference observed in predictions made by the methods considered could be tolerated in computer simulations of DNA damage. (author)

  8. The cellular environment in computer simulations of radiation-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseenko, V.V.; Waker, A.J.; Prestwich, W.V.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA single- and double-strand breaks were modeled for 660 keV photon radiation and scavenger capacity mimicking the cellular environment. Atomistic representation of DNA in B form with a first hydration shell was utilized to model direct and indirect damage. Monte Carlo generated electron tracks were used to model energy deposition in matter and to derive initial spatial distributions of species which appear in the medium following radiolysis. Diffusion of species was followed with time, and their reactions with DNA and each other were modeled in an encounter-controlled manner. Three methods to account for hydroxyl radical diffusion in a cellular environment were tested: assumed exponential survival, time-limited modeling and modeling of reactions between hydroxyl radicals and scavengers in an encounter-controlled manner. Although the method based on modeling scavenging in an encounter-controlled manner is more precise, it requires substantially more computer resources than either the exponential or time-limiting method. Scavenger concentrations of 0.5 and 0.15 M were considered using exponential and encounter-controlled methods with reaction rate set at 3 x 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Diffusion length and strand break yields, predicted by these two methods for the same scavenger molarity, were different by 20%-30%. The method based on limiting time of chemistry follow-up to 10 -9 s leads to DNA damage and radical diffusion estimates similar to 0.5 M scavenger concentration in the other two methods. The difference observed in predictions made by the methods considered could be tolerated in computer simulations of DNA damage. (orig.)

  9. Development of point Kernel radiation shielding analysis computer program implementing recent nuclear data and graphic user interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.; Lee, S.; Chung, C.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for safe and efficient use of radiation and radioactive work activity along with shielding analysis as a result the number of nuclear and conventional facilities using radiation or radioisotope rises. Most Korean industries and research institutes including Korea Power Engineering Company (KOPEC) have been using foreign computer programs for radiation shielding analysis. Korean nuclear regulations have introduced new laws regarding the dose limits and radiological guides as prescribed in the ICRP 60. Thus, the radiation facilities should be designed and operated to comply with these new regulations. In addition, the previous point kernel shielding computer code utilizes antiquated nuclear data (mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc) which were developed in 1950∼1960. Subsequently, the various nuclear data such mass attenuation coefficient, buildup factor, etc. have been updated during the past few decades. KOPEC's strategic directive is to become a self-sufficient and independent nuclear design technology company, thus KOPEC decided to develop a new radiation shielding computer program that included the latest regulatory requirements and updated nuclear data. This new code was designed by KOPEC with developmental cooperation with Hanyang University, Department of Nuclear Engineering. VisualShield is designed with a graphical user interface to allow even users unfamiliar to radiation shielding theory to proficiently prepare input data sets and analyzing output results

  10. Impact of heart rate and rhythm on radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luecke, Christian, E-mail: neep@gmx.de [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany); Andres, Claudia; Foldyna, Borek [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany); Nagel, Hans Dieter [Wissenschaft and Technik für die Radiologie, Buchhholz i.d.N (Germany); Hoffmann, Janine; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Gutberlet, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas [University of Leipzig – Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Strümpellstrasse 39, D-04289, Leipzig (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different heart rates and arrhythmias on scanner performance, image acquisition and applied radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography (pCT). Materials and methods: An ECG simulator (EKG Phantom 320, Müller and Sebastiani Elektronik GmbH, Munich, Germany) was used to generate different heart rhythms and arrhythmias: sinus rhythm (SR) at 45, 60, 75, 90 and 120/min, supraventricular arrhythmias (e.g. sinus arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation) and ventricular arrhythmias (e.g. ventricular extrasystoles), pacemaker-ECGs, ST-changes and technical artifacts. The analysis of the image acquisition process was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT (Brilliance, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, USA). A prospectively triggered scan protocol as used for routine was applied (120 kV; 150 mA s; 0.4 s rotation and exposure time per scan; image acquisition predominantly in end-diastole at 75% R-R-interval, in arrythmias with a mean heart rate above 80/min in systole at 45% of the R-R-interval; FOV 25 cm). The mean dose length product (DLP) and its percentage increase from baseline (SR at 60/min) were determined. Result: Radiation exposure can increase significantly when the heart rhythm deviates from sinus rhythm. ECG-changes leading to a significant DLP increase (p < 0.05) were bifocal pacemaker (61%), pacemaker dysfunction (22%), SVES (20%), ventricular salvo (20%), and atrial fibrillation (14%). Significantly (p < 0.05) prolonged scan time (>8 s) could be observed in bifocal pacemaker (12.8 s), pacemaker dysfunction (10.7 s), atrial fibrillation (10.3 s) and sinus arrhythmia (9.3 s). Conclusion: In prospectively ECG triggered CT, heart rate and rhythm can provoke different types of scanner performance, which can significantly alter radiation exposure and scan time. These results might have an important implication for indication, informed consent and contrast agent injection protocols.

  11. Impact of heart rate and rhythm on radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke, Christian; Andres, Claudia; Foldyna, Borek; Nagel, Hans Dieter; Hoffmann, Janine; Grothoff, Matthias; Nitzsche, Stefan; Gutberlet, Matthias; Lehmkuhl, Lukas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of different heart rates and arrhythmias on scanner performance, image acquisition and applied radiation exposure in prospectively ECG triggered computed tomography (pCT). Materials and methods: An ECG simulator (EKG Phantom 320, Müller and Sebastiani Elektronik GmbH, Munich, Germany) was used to generate different heart rhythms and arrhythmias: sinus rhythm (SR) at 45, 60, 75, 90 and 120/min, supraventricular arrhythmias (e.g. sinus arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation) and ventricular arrhythmias (e.g. ventricular extrasystoles), pacemaker-ECGs, ST-changes and technical artifacts. The analysis of the image acquisition process was performed on a 64-row multidetector CT (Brilliance, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, USA). A prospectively triggered scan protocol as used for routine was applied (120 kV; 150 mA s; 0.4 s rotation and exposure time per scan; image acquisition predominantly in end-diastole at 75% R-R-interval, in arrythmias with a mean heart rate above 80/min in systole at 45% of the R-R-interval; FOV 25 cm). The mean dose length product (DLP) and its percentage increase from baseline (SR at 60/min) were determined. Result: Radiation exposure can increase significantly when the heart rhythm deviates from sinus rhythm. ECG-changes leading to a significant DLP increase (p 8 s) could be observed in bifocal pacemaker (12.8 s), pacemaker dysfunction (10.7 s), atrial fibrillation (10.3 s) and sinus arrhythmia (9.3 s). Conclusion: In prospectively ECG triggered CT, heart rate and rhythm can provoke different types of scanner performance, which can significantly alter radiation exposure and scan time. These results might have an important implication for indication, informed consent and contrast agent injection protocols

  12. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. IPN No. 5160, 07760 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  13. Computed tomography to diagnose coronary artery disease: A reduction in radiation dose increases applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, O.; Morgan-Hughes, G.; Iyengar, S.; Strain, W.; Loader, R.; Shore, A.; Roobottom, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the effects of dose-saving algorithms on the radiation dose in an established computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) clinical service. Materials and methods: A 3 year retrospective analysis of all patients attending for a clinically indicated CTCA was performed. The effective dose was calculated using a cardiac-specific conversion factor [0.028 mSv(mGy·cm) −1 ]. Patients were stratified by the advent of new scanning technology and dose-saving protocols. Results: Between September 2007 and August 2010, 1736 examinations were performed. In the first 6 months, 150 examinations were performed with a mean effective dose of 29.6 mSv (99% CI 26.6–33 mSv). In March 2008 prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating was installed; reducing the effective dose to 13.6 mSv (99% CI 12.5–14.9 mSv). In March 2009, the scanner parameters were set to a minimal exposure time and 100 kV in patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <30. This reduced the mean dose to 7.4 mSv (99% CI 6.8–8 mSv). For the final six months the mean radiation dose for a cardiac scan was 5.9 mSv (99% CI 5.4–6.5 mSv) this figure incorporates all examinations performed irrespective of the protocol used. Conclusion: With the implementation of evidence-based protocols, the effective dose from cardiac CT has significantly reduced. As CTCA services develop dose-saving algorithms should be adopted to keep the radiation dose as low as reasonably practical

  14. A new shielding calculation method for X-ray computed tomography regarding scattered radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Noto, Kimiya; Shohji, Tomokazu; Ogawa, Yasuyoshi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Kida, Tetsuo; Sasanuma, Kazutoshi; Katsunuma, Yasushi; Nakano, Takurou; Horitsugi, Genki; Hosono, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a more appropriate shielding calculation method for computed tomography (CT) in comparison with the Japanese conventional (JC) method and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP)-dose length product (DLP) method. Scattered dose distributions were measured in a CT room with 18 scanners (16 scanners in the case of the JC method) for one week during routine clinical use. The radiation doses were calculated for the same period using the JC and NCRP-DLP methods. The mean (NCRP-DLP-calculated dose)/(measured dose) ratios in each direction ranged from 1.7 ± 0.6 to 55 ± 24 (mean ± standard deviation). The NCRP-DLP method underestimated the dose at 3.4% in fewer shielding directions without the gantry and a subject, and the minimum (NCRP-DLP-calculated dose)/(measured dose) ratio was 0.6. The reduction factors were 0.036 ± 0.014 and 0.24 ± 0.061 for the gantry and couch directions, respectively. The (JC-calculated dose)/(measured dose) ratios ranged from 11 ± 8.7 to 404 ± 340. The air kerma scatter factor κ is expected to be twice as high as that calculated with the NCRP-DLP method and the reduction factors are expected to be 0.1 and 0.4 for the gantry and couch directions, respectively. We, therefore, propose a more appropriate method, the Japanese-DLP method, which resolves the issues of possible underestimation of the scattered radiation and overestimation of the reduction factors in the gantry and couch directions.

  15. Computed Tomography Appearance of Early Radiation Injury to the Lung: Correlation With Clinical and Dosimetric Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Peter; Welsh, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically assess the spectrum of radiologic changes in the lung after radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the cases of 146 patients treated with radical radiotherapy at our institution. All patients had computed tomography (CT) scans performed 3 months after completion of therapy. Radiographic appearances were categorized using a standard grading system. The association of these abnormalities with pretreatment factors and clinical radiation pneumonitis (RP) was investigated. Results: New intrapulmonary abnormalities were seen in 92 patients (63%). These were ground-glass opacity in 16 (11%), patchy consolidation in 19 (13%), and diffuse consolidation in 57 (39%). Twenty-five patients (17%) developed clinical symptoms of RP. Although 80% of the patients with RP had areas of consolidation seen on the posttreatment CT scan, the majority (74%) of patients with such radiographic changes were asymptomatic. For patients with lung infiltrates, the minimum isodose encompassing the volume of radiologic abnormality was usually ≥27 Gy. Traditional dose-volume metrics, pulmonary function tests, and the coadministration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) were all strongly correlated with the presence of radiologic injury on univariate analysis (p ≤ 0.002). There was also an inverse correlation between prior smoking history and CT scan changes (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, dosimetric parameters and the use of ACE-I retained significance (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there is substantial interindividual variation in lung radiosensitivity. ACE-I prevented the radiologic changes seen after high-dose radiation therapy, and their role as radioprotectants warrants further investigation.

  16. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric coronary computed tomography: assessment of effective dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Calmon, Raphael; Boddaert, Nathalie; Khraiche, Diala; Bonnet, Damien; Raimondi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of different protocols on radiation dose and image quality for paediatric coronary computed tomography (cCT). From January-2012 to June-2014, 140 children who underwent cCT on a 64-slice scanner were included. Two consecutive changes in imaging protocols were performed: 1) the use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR); 2) the optimization of acquisition parameters. Effective dose (ED) was calculated by conversion of the dose-length product. Image quality was assessed as excellent, good or with significant artefacts. Patients were divided in three age groups: 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years. The use of ASIR combined to the adjustment of scan settings allowed a reduction in the median ED of 58 %, 82 % and 85 % in 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years group, respectively (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.1 ± 0.7 mSv, 5.5 ± 1.6 vs 1 ± 1.9 mSv and 5.3 ± 5.0 vs 0.8 ± 2.0 mSv, all p < 0,05). Prospective protocol was used in 51 % of children. The reduction in radiation dose was not associated with reduction in diagnostic image quality as assessed by the frequency of coronary segments with excellent or good image quality (88 %). cCT can be obtained at very low radiation doses in children using ASIR, and prospective acquisition with optimized imaging parameters. (orig.)

  17. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G.; Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  18. Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1981-08-01

    RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium

  19. Eurotherm Conference No. 105: Computational Thermal Radiation in Participating Media V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafi, Mouna El; Fournier, Richard; Lemonnier, Denis; Lybaert, Paul; Selçuk, Nevin

    2016-01-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is based on papers presented at the Eurotherm Conference 105: Computational Thermal Radiation in Participating Media V, which was held in Albi, France on 1-3 April 2015. This seminar was the fifth in a series after Nancy, France (Eurotherm Seminar 95, April 2012), Mons, Belgium (Eurotherm Seminar 73, April 2003), Poitiers, France (Eurotherm Seminar 78, April 2006) and Lisbon, Portugal (Eurotherm Seminar 83, April 2009). Around 40 contributions were received during the conference preparation that have been submitted to oral presentations. A selection process based on two peer-reviews of the full papers finally resulted in the acceptance of 36 for oral presentations (including 2 plenary lectures). These 2 plenary lectures and 10 other papers have been selected for a special issue in a journal related to radiative heat transfer and will not be presented in this volume. The conference was attended by almost 60 scientists from 15 different countries: Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Sweden, Tunisia, Turkey and USA. (paper)

  20. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Dinakaran, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the computer code system RADHEAT-V4 by analysing benchmark problems on radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1990-11-01

    A computer code system RADHEAT-V4 has been developed for safety evaluation on radiation shielding of nuclear fuel facilities. To evaluate the performance of the code system, 18 benchmark problem were selected and analysed. Evaluated radiations are neutron and gamma-ray. Benchmark problems consist of penetration, streaming and skyshine. The computed results show more accurate than those by the Sn codes ANISN and DOT3.5 or the Monte Carlo code MORSE. Big core memory and many times I/O are, however, required for RADHEAT-V4. (author)

  2. Implementation and display of Computer Aided Design (CAD) models in Monte Carlo radiation transport and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An Xwindow application capable of importing geometric information directly from two Computer Aided Design (CAD) based formats for use in radiation transport and shielding analyses is being developed at ORNL. The application permits the user to graphically view the geometric models imported from the two formats for verification and debugging. Previous models, specifically formatted for the radiation transport and shielding codes can also be imported. Required extensions to the existing combinatorial geometry analysis routines are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options and features which will be implemented in the application are presented. The use of the application as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is also discussed

  3. Large area bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  4. Fluorescent X-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation for imaging nonradioactive tracer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiba, Masahiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Uchida, Akira; Akatsuka, Takao [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Electrical and Information of Engineering; Takeda, Tohoru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Itai, Yuji

    1997-09-01

    We describe a system of fluorescent X-ray computed tomography using synchrotron radiation (SR-FXCT) to image nonradioactive contrast materials. The system operates on the basis of computed tomography (CT) scanned by the pencil beam. In the previous experiment, we have imaged an acrylic cylindrical phantom with cross-shaped channel, filled with a diluted iodine-based tracer material of 200 {mu}g/ml. This research is aimed to improve image quality, to select the optimum energy of the incident X-ray, to confirm quantitative evaluation of the image, and to demonstrate FXCT image for living body. First, we simulated output energy profile by the Monte Carlo simulation and confirmed to predetermine the incident X-ray energy at 37 keV, in order to separate the fluorescent photons from background scattering components. Next, the imaging experiment was performed by using conventional CT algorithm under the optimum parameter at the Tristan Accumulation Ring, KEK, Japan. An acrylic phantom containing five paraxial channels of 5 and 4 mm in diameter, could be imaged; where each channel was respectively filled with diluted iodine-based contrast materials of 50, 100, 200 and 500 {mu}g/ml. From the reconstructed image, we confirmed quantitativity in the FXCT image. Finally, a rat`s brain was imaged in vitro by FXCT and monochromatic transmission CT. The comparison between these results showed that the iodine-rich region in the FXCT image corresponded with that in the monochromatic transmission CT image. (author)

  5. Simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We present two simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy in inflationary models; one method uses a time-dependent transfer function, the other methods uses an approximate gravity-mode function which is a simple combination of the lowest order spherical Bessel functions. We compare the CBR anisotropy tensor multipole spectrum computed using our methods with the previous result of the highly accurate numerical method, the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote method. Our time-dependent transfer function is more accurate than the time-independent transfer function found by Turner, White, and Lindsey; however, we find that the transfer function method is only good for l approx-lt 120. Using our approximate gravity-wave mode function, we obtain much better accuracy; the tensor multipole spectrum we find differs by less than 2% for l approx-lt 50, less than 10% for l approx-lt 120, and less than 20% for l≤300 from the open-quote open-quote Boltzmann close-quote close-quote result. Our approximate graviton mode function should be quite useful in studying tensor perturbations from inflationary models. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  6. Computation of Aerodynamic Noise Radiated from Ducted Tail Rotor Using Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed aerodynamic performance of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD technique. The general governing equations of turbulent flow around ducted tail rotor are given and directly solved by using finite volume discretization and Runge-Kutta time integration. The calculations of the lift characteristics of the ducted tail rotor can be obtained. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combining computational aeroacoustic with boundary element method (BEM has been proposed. The computational steps include the following: firstly, the unsteady flow around rotor is calculated using the CFD method to get the noise source information; secondly, the radiate sound pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy Curle equation in the frequency domain; lastly, the scattering effect of the duct wall on the propagation of the sound wave is presented using an acoustic thin-body BEM. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels are compared with the known technique for validation. The sound pressure directivity and scattering effect are shown to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the method.

  7. Application of personal computer to development of entrance management system for radiating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Hirai, Shouji

    1989-01-01

    The report describes a system for managing the entrance and exit of personnel to radiating facilities. A personal computer is applied to its development. Major features of the system is outlined first. The computer is connected to the gate and two magnetic card readers provided at the gate. The gate, which is installed at the entrance to a room under control, opens only for those who have a valid card. The entrance-exit management program developed is described next. The following three files are used: ID master file (random file of the magnetic card number, name, qualification, etc., of each card carrier), entrance-exit management file (random file of time of entrance/exit, etc., updated everyday), and entrance-exit record file (sequential file of card number, name, date, etc.), which are stored on floppy disks. A display is provided to show various lists including a list of workers currently in the room and a list of workers who left the room at earlier times of the day. This system is useful for entrance management of a relatively small facility. Though small in required cost, it requires only a few operators to perform effective personnel management. (N.K.)

  8. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  9. Whole-heart 320-row computed tomography. Reduction of radiation dose via prior coronary calcium scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, E.; Dewey, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: The whole heart can be scanned in one rotation using 320-row coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), which covers up to 16 cm. Since most hearts are smaller, the total radiation dose may be reduced by adjusting the CCTA range to the individual heart size defined on a low-dose calcium scan (CACS). Materials and Methods: Forty-five patients with suspected coronary artery disease (13 women, 32 men; mean 61 {+-} 10 years) underwent CCTA preceded by low-dose CACS on a 320-row scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba; 0.35 s gantry rotation, 120 kV, 350 - 450 mA) with 16-cm z-axis coverage (120 kV, 150 mA). The subsequent CCTA was performed over an adjusted scan range calculated as the individual heart size on CACS ({+-} 1 cm above and below). The total radiation dose of 16-cm CACS and the individually adjusted CCTA was compared with that of a calculated single CCTA using full 16-cm z-axis coverage. Results: CCTA could be performed with a reduced scan length in the z-axis in all patients. None of the scans had to be performed over the whole range of 16 cm. The adjusted scan length was 14 cm in 2 patients, 12.8 cm in 3 patients, and 12 cm in 40 patients. The effective CCTA scan range was 12.1 {+-} 0.5 cm based on mean individual heart sizes of 9.6 {+-} 1.1 cm. The mean total effective radiation dose of the entire cardiac CT examination (individually adapted CCTA and CACS) was significantly smaller than the exposure calculated for 16-cm CCTA without CACS (8.5 {+-} 4.7 vs. 9.1 {+-} 6.0 mSv, p = 0.006). The dose reduction was most relevant in patients with heart rates above 65 beats/min (n = 10) in whom 2 or 3 heartbeats were necessary for CCTA (17.7 {+-} 6.5 vs. 21.1 {+-} 8.4 mSv, p = 0.001). Conclusion: 320-row CCTA with an individually adjusted scan range based on prior CACS significantly reduces the radiation exposure compared with full 16-cm CCTA. (orig.)

  10. The UF family of reference hybrid phantoms for computational radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hurtado, Jorge; Pafundi, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2010-01-01

    Computational human phantoms are computer models used to obtain dose distributions within the human body exposed to internal or external radiation sources. In addition, they are increasingly used to develop detector efficiencies for in vivo whole-body counters. Two classes of computational human phantoms have been widely utilized for dosimetry calculation: stylized and voxel phantoms that describe human anatomy through mathematical surface equations and 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Stylized phantoms are flexible in that changes to organ position and shape are possible given avoidance of region overlap, while voxel phantoms are typically fixed to a given patient anatomy, yet can be proportionally scaled to match individuals of larger or smaller stature, but of equivalent organ anatomy. Voxel phantoms provide much better anatomical realism as compared to stylized phantoms which are intrinsically limited by mathematical surface equations. To address the drawbacks of these phantoms, hybrid phantoms based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces have been introduced wherein anthropomorphic flexibility and anatomic realism are both preserved. Researchers at the University of Florida have introduced a series of hybrid phantoms representing the ICRP Publication 89 reference newborn, 15 year, and adult male and female. In this study, six additional phantoms are added to the UF family of hybrid phantoms-those of the reference 1 year, 5 year and 10 year child. Head and torso CT images of patients whose ages were close to the targeted ages were obtained under approved protocols. Major organs and tissues were segmented from these images using an image processing software, 3D-DOCTOR(TM). NURBS and polygon mesh surfaces were then used to model individual organs and tissues after importing the segmented organ models to the 3D NURBS modeling software, Rhinoceros(TM). The phantoms were matched to four reference datasets: (1) standard anthropometric data, (2) reference

  11. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A.; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18x7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186±8 mm and 147±8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209±40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of ∼60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is ∼20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors

  12. Time-dependent uptake, distribution and biotransformation of chromium(VI) in individual and bulk human lung cells : application of synchrotron radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, H. H.; Levina, A.; Dillon, C. T.; Mulyani, I.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Lay, P.

    2005-03-01

    Chromium(VI) is a human carcinogen, primarily affecting the respiratory tract probably via active transport into cells, followed by the reduction to Cr(III) with the formation of DNA-damaging intermediates. Distribution of Cr and endogenous elements within A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells, following treatment with Cr(VI) (100 (micro)M, 20 min or 4 h) were studied by synchrotron-radiation-induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) of single freeze-dried cells. After the 20-min treatment, Cr was confined to a small area of the cytoplasm and strongly co-localized with S, Cl, K, and Ca. After the 4-h treatment, Cr was distributed throughout the cell, with higher concentrations in the nucleus and the cytoplasmic membrane. This time-dependence corresponded to ∼100% or 0% clonogenic survival of the cells following the 20-min or 4-h treatments, respectively, and could potentially be explained by a new cellular protective mechanism. Such processes may also be important in reducing the potential hazards of Cr(III) dietary supplements, for which there is emerging evidence that they exert their anti-diabetic effects via biological oxidation to Cr(VI). The predominance of Cr(III) was confirmed by micro-XANES spectroscopy of intracellular Cr hotspots. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS, using freeze-dried cells after the 0-4-h treatments) was used to gain insight into the chemical structures of Cr(III) complexes formed during the intracellular reduction of Cr(VI). The polynuclear nature of such complexes (probably with a combination of carboxylato and hydroxo bridging groups and O-donor atoms of small peptides or proteins) was established by XAFS data analyses

  13. High-pitch spiral computed tomography: effect on image quality and radiation dose in pediatric chest computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lell, Michael M; May, Matthias; Deak, Paul; Alibek, Sedat; Kuefner, Michael; Kuettner, Axel; Köhler, Henrik; Achenbach, Stephan; Uder, Michael; Radkow, Tanja

    2011-02-01

    computed tomography (CT) is considered the method of choice in thoracic imaging for a variety of indications. Sedation is usually necessary to enable CT and to avoid deterioration of image quality because of patient movement in small children. We evaluated a new, subsecond high-pitch scan mode (HPM), which obviates the need of sedation and to hold the breath. a total of 60 patients were included in this study. 30 patients (mean age, 14 ± 17 month; range, 0-55 month) were examined with a dual source CT system in an HPM. Scan parameters were as follows: pitch = 3.0, 128 × 0.6 mm slice acquisition, 0.28 seconds gantry rotation time, ref. mAs adapted to the body weight (50-100 mAs) at 80 kV. Images were reconstructed with a slice thickness of 0.75 mm. None of the children was sedated for the CT examination and no breathing instructions were given. Image quality was assessed focusing on motion artifacts and delineation of the vascular structures and lung parenchyma. Thirty patients (mean age, 15 ± 17 month; range, 0-55 month) were examined under sedation on 2 different CT systems (10-slice CT, n = 18; 64-slice CT, n = 13 patients) in conventional pitch mode (CPM). Dose values were calculated from the dose length product provided in the patient protocol/dose reports, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess dose distribution for CPM and HPM. all scans were performed without complications. Image quality was superior with HPM, because of a significant reduction in motion artifacts, as compared to CPM with 10- and 64-slice CT. In the control group, artifacts were encountered at the level of the diaphragm (n = 30; 100%), the borders of the heart (n = 30; 100%), and the ribs (n = 20; 67%) and spine (n = 6; 20%), whereas motion artifacts were detected in the HPM-group only in 6 patients in the lung parenchyma next to the diaphragm or the heart (P detector width and pitch-value. high-pitch chest CT is a robust method to provide highest image quality making sedation

  14. Development of application program and building database to increase facilities for using the radiation effect assessment computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun Seok Ko; Young Min Kim; Suk-Hoon Kim; Dong Hoon Shin; Chang-Sun Kang

    2005-01-01

    The current radiation effect assessment system is required the skillful technique about the application for various code and high level of special knowledge classified by field. Therefore, as a matter of fact, it is very difficult for the radiation users' who don't have enough special knowledge to assess or recognize the radiation effect properly. For this, we already have developed the five Computer codes(windows-based), that is the radiation effect assessment system, in radiation utilizing field including the nuclear power generation. It needs the computer program that non-specialist can use the five computer codes to have already developed with ease. So, we embodied the A.I-based specialist system that can infer the assessment system by itself, according to the characteristic of given problem. The specialist program can guide users, search data, inquire of administrator directly. Conceptually, with circumstance which user to apply the five computer code may encounter actually, we embodied to consider aspects as follows. First, the accessibility of concept and data to need must be improved. Second, the acquirement of reference theory and use of corresponding computer code must be easy. Third, Q and A function needed for solution of user's question out of consideration previously. Finally, the database must be renewed continuously. Actually, to express this necessity, we develop the client program to organize reference data, to build the access methodology(query) about organized data, to load the visible expression function of searched data. And It is embodied the instruction method(effective theory acquirement procedure and methodology) to acquire the theory referring the five computer codes. It is developed the data structure access program(DBMS) to renew continuously data with ease. For Q and A function, it is embodied the Q and A board within client program because the user of client program can search the content of question and answer. (authors)

  15. Probing the effects of the ester functional group, alkyl side chain length and anions on the bulk nanostructure of ionic liquids: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraee, Mostafa; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-14

    The effects of ester addition on nanostructural properties of biodegradable ILs composed of 1-alkoxycarbonyl-3-alkyl-imidazolium cations ([C1COOCnC1im](+), n = 1, 2, 4) combined with [Br](-), [NO3](-), [BF4](-), [PF6](-), [TfO](-), and [Tf2N](-) were explored by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis at 400 K. Various thermodynamic properties of these ILs were extensively computed in our earlier work (Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 2015, 54, 11678-11700). Nano-scale segregation analysis demonstrates the formation of a small spherical island-like hydrocarbon within the continuous ionic domain for ILs with short alkyl side chain ([C1COOC1C1im]), and a sponge-like nanostructure for the compound with long alkyl side chain ([C1COOC4C1im]). Ester-functionalized ILs with ethyl side chain ([C1COOC2C1im]) are the turning point between two different morphologies. Non-polar channels were observed for [C1COOC4C1im] ILs composed of smaller anions such as [Br] and [NO3], whereas clustering organization was found for the other anions. Formation of the spherical micelle-like nanostructure was seen for lengthened cations. Finally, the incorporation of an ester group into the alkyl side chain of the cation leads to stronger segregation between charged and uncharged networks, which consequently increased the possibility of self-assembly and micelle formation.

  16. SU-F-J-178: A Computer Simulation Model Observer for Task-Based Image Quality Assessment in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolly, S; Mutic, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Yu, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, image quality in radiation therapy is assessed subjectively or by utilizing physically-based metrics. Some model observers exist for task-based medical image quality assessment, but almost exclusively for diagnostic imaging tasks. As opposed to disease diagnosis, the task for image observers in radiation therapy is to utilize the available images to design and deliver a radiation dose which maximizes patient disease control while minimizing normal tissue damage. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a new computer simulation model observer to enable task-based image quality assessment in radiation therapy. Methods: A modular computer simulation framework was developed to resemble the radiotherapy observer by simulating an end-to-end radiation therapy treatment. Given images and the ground-truth organ boundaries from a numerical phantom as inputs, the framework simulates an external beam radiation therapy treatment and quantifies patient treatment outcomes using the previously defined therapeutic operating characteristic (TOC) curve. As a preliminary demonstration, TOC curves were calculated for various CT acquisition and reconstruction parameters, with the goal of assessing and optimizing simulation CT image quality for radiation therapy. Sources of randomness and bias within the system were analyzed. Results: The relationship between CT imaging dose and patient treatment outcome was objectively quantified in terms of a singular value, the area under the TOC (AUTOC) curve. The AUTOC decreases more rapidly for low-dose imaging protocols. AUTOC variation introduced by the dose optimization algorithm was approximately 0.02%, at the 95% confidence interval. Conclusion: A model observer has been developed and implemented to assess image quality based on radiation therapy treatment efficacy. It enables objective determination of appropriate imaging parameter values (e.g. imaging dose). Framework flexibility allows for incorporation

  17. 10th International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids - COSIRES 2010. Abstracts and Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    COSIRES 2010 is the 10 th International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids. This series of conferences addresses the development and application of advanced computer modeling techniques to the study of phenomena taking place during interaction of energetic particles and clusters (from several eV to some MeV) with solids. Due to the continuous development of new theoretical methodologies and permanent increase of computer power this research field is growing fast. The application of computer simulations leads to a better understanding of basic microscopic processes taking place during and after irradiation. Fundamental understanding of such processes is often not accessible by experimental methods since they occur on very small time and length scales. However, computer simulation techniques are not only used for investigations of basic phenomena but also increasingly applied in the development of modern industrial technologies. Conference topics include, but are not limited to: I) Computer modeling of following phenomena: · Sputtering; · Formation and evolution of radiation defects in materials; · Radiation responses of structural materials important for nuclear and fusion industry; · Irradiation-induced evolution of surface topography and ripple formation; · Ion beam synthesis of thin films and nanostructures; · Ion-, electron and photon-induced physical and chemical effects at surfaces, interfaces and nanostructures; · Irradiation-induced charge redistribution, electron excitation and electron-phonon interactions II) Development of new computer modeling protocols and interatomic potentials for investigation of radiation effects. The conference follows previous meetings that were held in Berlin/Germany (1992), Santa Barbara/USA (1994), Guildford/UK (1996), Okayama/Japan (1998), State College/USA (2000), Dresden/Germany (2002), Helsinki/Finland (2004), Richland/USA (2006) and finally in Beijing/China (2008). Current meeting is

  18. 10th International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids - COSIRES 2010. Abstracts and Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    COSIRES 2010 is the 10{sup th} International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids. This series of conferences addresses the development and application of advanced computer modeling techniques to the study of phenomena taking place during interaction of energetic particles and clusters (from several eV to some MeV) with solids. Due to the continuous development of new theoretical methodologies and permanent increase of computer power this research field is growing fast. The application of computer simulations leads to a better understanding of basic microscopic processes taking place during and after irradiation. Fundamental understanding of such processes is often not accessible by experimental methods since they occur on very small time and length scales. However, computer simulation techniques are not only used for investigations of basic phenomena but also increasingly applied in the development of modern industrial technologies. Conference topics include, but are not limited to: I) Computer modeling of following phenomena: {center_dot} Sputtering; {center_dot} Formation and evolution of radiation defects in materials; {center_dot} Radiation responses of structural materials important for nuclear and fusion industry; {center_dot} Irradiation-induced evolution of surface topography and ripple formation; {center_dot} Ion beam synthesis of thin films and nanostructures; {center_dot} Ion-, electron and photon-induced physical and chemical effects at surfaces, interfaces and nanostructures; {center_dot} Irradiation-induced charge redistribution, electron excitation and electron-phonon interactions II) Development of new computer modeling protocols and interatomic potentials for investigation of radiation effects. The conference follows previous meetings that were held in Berlin/Germany (1992), Santa Barbara/USA (1994), Guildford/UK (1996), Okayama/Japan (1998), State College/USA (2000), Dresden/Germany (2002), Helsinki/Finland (2004

  19. Effect of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules : Intra-individual comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Harder, Annemarie M.; Willemink, Martin J.; Van Hamersvelt, Robbert W.; Vonken, Evert-Jan P A; Milles, Julien; Schilham, Arnold M R; Lammers, Jan Willem; De Jong, Pim A.; Leiner, Tim; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of radiation dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) on the performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) for pulmonary nodules. Methods In this prospective study twenty-five patients were included who were scanned for pulmonary nodule follow-up. Image

  20. About using of the high-speed modular computing structures in the systems of radiation express analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermalitski, F A

    1996-12-31

    In accordance with parallel processing conception the original method for definition of the stream intensity of Poisson group is proposed, which is able to use for radiation express analysis. Within the framework of this method the parallel measure-calculating procedure is created and the high-speed modular computing system is designed for its implementation. 5 refs.

  1. RADCHARM++: A C++ routine to compute the electromagnetic radiation generated by relativistic charged particles in crystals and complex structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandiera, Laura; Bagli, Enrico; Guidi, Vincenzo [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Tikhomirov, Victor V. [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-07-15

    The analytical theories of coherent bremsstrahlung and channeling radiation well describe the process of radiation generation in crystals under some special cases. However, the treatment of complex situations requires the usage of a more general approach. In this report we present a C++ routine, named RADCHARM++, to compute the electromagnetic radiation emitted by electrons and positrons in crystals and complex structures. In the RADCHARM++ routine, the model for the computation of e.m. radiation generation is based on the direct integration of the quasiclassical formula of Baier and Katkov. This approach allows one taking into account real trajectories, and thereby the contribution of incoherent scattering. Such contribution can be very important in many cases, for instance for electron channeling. The generality of the Baier–Katkov operator method permits one to simulate the electromagnetic radiation emitted by electrons/positrons in very different cases, e.g., in straight, bent and periodically bent crystals, and for different beam energy ranges, from sub-GeV to TeV and above. The RADCHARM++ routine has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code DYNECHARM++, which solves the classical equation of motion of charged particles traveling through a crystal under the continuum potential approximation. The code has proved to reproduce the results of experiments performed at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI) with 855 MeV electrons and has been used to predict the radiation spectrum generated by the same electron beam in a bent crystal.

  2. Microdefects in an as-grown Czochralski silicon crystal studied by synchrotron radiation section topography with aid of computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Satoshi; Aoki, Yoshirou; Okitsu, Kouhei; Sugita, Yoshimitsu; Kawata, Hiroshi; Abe, Takao

    1998-01-01

    Grown-in microdefects of a Czochralski (CZ) silicon crystal grown at a slow growth rate were studied by section topography using high energy synchrotron radiation. Images of the microdefects in the section topographs were analyzed quantitatively using computer simulation based on the Takagi-Taupin type dynamical diffraction theory of X-rays, and reproduced successfully by the simulation when the microdefects were assumed to be spherical strain centers. Sizes and positions of the microdefects were able to be determined by detailed comparison between the experiments and the computer simulations. The validity of the computer simulation in an analysis of the section topographs is discussed. (author)

  3. Quantification of radiation absorbed dose and DNA damages in subjects undergoing computer tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagaraj, Karthik; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Tamizh Selvan, G.; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jose, M.T.; Ozhimuthu, Annalakshmi; Panneer Selvam, S.; Pattan, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are extensively used in medical field for imaging, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy. Irrespective of the application, the procedures deliver a significant amount of dose to the subject, while undergoing the procedure, which vary from imaging (low dose in the order mGy) and therapy (high doses in the order of several Gy). Of the various imaging modalities, the computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to diagnose many health alignments, in all age groups. Though the personals involved in performing the procedures are monitored for the levels of exposure, it is uncommon to monitor the patient after the examination, as the benefits outweigh the risk. However an enhanced concern on the risk associated due to the exposure of low dose X-radiation in CT has been reported. Therefore, we aim to quantify the absorbed dose to the eye, thyroid and forehead using thermo luminescence dosimeter of Lithium Manganese Borate doped with Terbium (LMB:Tb) in subjects undergoing CT examination (n= 27), as a methodology to investigate the effects of low dose ionizing radiation. Further, the DNA damages was measured using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assay, from the blood samples obtained from the study subjects before and after the procedures. The overall measured organ dose ranged between 1.92 and 520.14 mGy for eye, 0.84 and 210.33 mGy for forehead and 1.79-185 mGy for thyroid, with an average of 128.86 1 137.16, 78.25 1 69.02 and 48.86 1 63.60 respectively. The DNA damages measured using CA and MN assay, showed an extreme statistically significant (p<0.0001) increase in CA and significant increase (p<0.001) in MN frequency in post exposure when compared to that of unexposed control. The significance of the estimated dose and the DNA damages will be discussed. (author)

  4. Computed tomography imaging parameters for inhomogeneity correction in radiation treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra J Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern treatment planning systems provide accurate dosimetry in heterogeneous media (such as a patient' body with the help of tissue characterization based on computed tomography (CT number. However, CT number depends on the type of scanner, tube voltage, field of view (FOV, reconstruction algorithm including artifact reduction and processing filters. The impact of these parameters on CT to electron density (ED conversion had been subject of investigation for treatment planning in various clinical situations. This is usually performed with a tissue characterization phantom with various density plugs acquired with different tube voltages (kilovoltage peak, FOV reconstruction and different scanners to generate CT number to ED tables. This article provides an overview of inhomogeneity correction in the context of CT scanning and a new evaluation tool, difference volume dose-volume histogram (DVH, dV-DVH. It has been concluded that scanner and CT parameters are important for tissue characterizations, but changes in ED are minimal and only pronounced for higher density materials. For lungs, changes in CT number are minimal among scanners and CT parameters. Dosimetric differences for lung and prostate cases are usually insignificant (<2% in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and < 5% for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT with CT parameters. It could be concluded that CT number variability is dependent on acquisition parameters, but its dosimetric impact is pronounced only in high-density media and possibly in IMRT. In view of such small dosimetric changes in low-density medium, the acquisition of additional CT data for financially difficult clinics and countries may not be warranted.

  5. Radiation doses in pediatric computed tomography procedures: challenges facing new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotelo, E.; Padilla, M.; Dibarboure, L.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that in recent years an increasing number of radiologists and radiological technologists have been applying radiation dose optimization techniques in paediatric Computed Tomography (CT) examinations, dual and multi -slice CT (MSCT) scanners present a new challenge in Radiation Protection (RP). While on one hand these scanners are provided with Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) devices, dose reduction modes and dose estimation software, on the other hand Quality Control (QC) tests and CT Kerma Index (C) measurements and patient dose estimation present specific difficulties and require changes or adaptations of traditional QC protocols. This implies a major challenge in most developing countries where Quality Assurance Programmes (QAP) have not been implemented yet and there is a shortage in the number of medical physicists This paper analyses clinical and technical protocols as well as patient doses in 204 CT body procedures performed in 154 children. The investigation was carried out in a paediatric reference hospital of Uruguay, where are performed an average of 450 paediatric CT examinations per month in a sole CT dual scanner. Besides, C VOL reported from the scanner display was registered in order to be related with the same dosimetric quantity derived from technical parameters and C values published on tables. Results showed that not all the radiologists applied the same protocol in similar clinical situations delivering unnecessary patient dose with no significant differences in image quality. Moreover, it was found that dose reduction modes represent a drawback in order to estimate patient dose when mA changes according to tissue attenuation, in most cases in each rotation. The study concluded on the importance of QAP that must include education on RP of radiologists and technologists, as well as in the need of medical physicists to perform QC tests and patient dose estimations and measurements. (author)

  6. Computer-assisted selection of coplanar beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugachev, A.; Xing, L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2001-09-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the incident beam orientations are often determined by a trial and error search. The conventional beam's-eye view (BEV) tool becomes less helpful in IMRT because it is frequently required that beams go through organs at risk (OARs) in order to achieve a compromise between the dosimetric objectives of the planning target volume (PTV) and the OARs. In this paper, we report a beam's-eye view dosimetrics (BEVD) technique to assist in the selection of beam orientations in IMRT. In our method, each beam portal is divided into a grid of beamlets. A score function is introduced to measure the 'goodness' of each beamlet at a given gantry angle. The score is determined by the maximum PTV dose deliverable by the beamlet without exceeding the tolerance doses of the OARs and normal tissue located in the path of the beamlet. The overall score of the gantry angle is given by a sum of the scores of all beamlets. For a given patient, the score function is evaluated for each possible beam orientation. The directions with the highest scores are then selected as the candidates for beam placement. This procedure is similar to the BEV approach used in conventional radiation therapy, except that the evaluation by a human is replaced by a score function to take into account the intensity modulation. This technique allows one to select beam orientations without the excessive computing overhead of computer optimization of beam orientation. It also provides useful insight into the problem of selection of beam orientation and is especially valuable for complicated cases where the PTV is surrounded by several sensitive structures and where it is difficult to select a set of 'good' beam orientations. Several two-dimensional (2D) model cases were used to test the proposed technique. The plans obtained using the BEVD-selected beam orientations were compared with the plans obtained using equiangular spaced beams. For

  7. Radiation dose management for pediatric cardiac computed tomography: a report from the Image Gently 'Have-A-Heart' campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigsby, Cynthia K; McKenney, Sarah E; Hill, Kevin D; Chelliah, Anjali; Einstein, Andrew J; Han, B Kelly; Robinson, Joshua D; Sammet, Christina L; Slesnick, Timothy C; Frush, Donald P

    2018-01-01

    Children with congenital or acquired heart disease can be exposed to relatively high lifetime cumulative doses of ionizing radiation from necessary medical imaging procedures including radiography, fluoroscopic procedures including diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterizations, electrophysiology examinations, cardiac computed tomography (CT) studies, and nuclear cardiology examinations. Despite the clinical necessity of these imaging studies, the related ionizing radiation exposure could pose an increased lifetime attributable cancer risk. The Image Gently "Have-A-Heart" campaign is promoting the appropriate use of medical imaging studies in children with congenital or acquired heart disease while minimizing radiation exposure. The focus of this manuscript is to provide a comprehensive review of radiation dose management and CT performance in children with congenital or acquired heart disease.

  8. Comparative analysis of different approaches to the computation of long-wave radiation balance of water air systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovskii, K.; Nourani, Y.; Monte, L.

    1999-01-01

    In the present paper, the net long-wave radiation balance of the water-air environmental systems is analysed on the base of several semi-empirical approaches. Various theoretical models of infrared atmospheric radiation are reviewed. Factors, affecting their behavior are considered. Special attention is paid to physical conditions under which those models are applicable. Atmospheric and net infrared radiation fluxes are computed and compared under clear and cloudy sky. Results are presented in graphical form. Conclusions are made on the applicability of models considered for evaluating infrared radiation fluxes in environmental conditions of Central Italy. On the base of present analysis Anderson's model is chosen for future calculations of heat budget of lakes in Central Italy [it

  9. Potential of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Retrospective Heart Dosimetry After Breast Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, Alexandra, E-mail: alexandra.moignier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Derreumaux, Sylvie; Broggio, David; Beurrier, Julien [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Chea, Michel; Boisserie, Gilbert [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie Salpetriere, Service de Radiotherapie, Paris (France); Franck, Didier; Aubert, Bernard [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Mazeron, Jean-Jacques [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie Salpetriere, Service de Radiotherapie, Paris (France)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Current retrospective cardiovascular dosimetry studies are based on a representative patient or simple mathematic phantoms. Here, a process of patient modeling was developed to personalize the anatomy of the thorax and to include a heart model with coronary arteries. Methods and Materials: The patient models were hybrid computational phantoms (HCPs) with an inserted detailed heart model. A computed tomography (CT) acquisition (pseudo-CT) was derived from HCP and imported into a treatment planning system where treatment conditions were reproduced. Six current patients were selected: 3 were modeled from their CT images (A patients) and the others were modelled from 2 orthogonal radiographs (B patients). The method performance and limitation were investigated by quantitative comparison between the initial CT and the pseudo-CT, namely, the morphology and the dose calculation were compared. For the B patients, a comparison with 2 kinds of representative patients was also conducted. Finally, dose assessment was focused on the whole coronary artery tree and the left anterior descending coronary. Results: When 3-dimensional anatomic information was available, the dose calculations performed on the initial CT and the pseudo-CT were in good agreement. For the B patients, comparison of doses derived from HCP and representative patients showed that the HCP doses were either better or equivalent. In the left breast radiation therapy context and for the studied cases, coronary mean doses were at least 5-fold higher than heart mean doses. Conclusions: For retrospective dose studies, it is suggested that HCP offers a better surrogate, in terms of dose accuracy, than representative patients. The use of a detailed heart model eliminates the problem of identifying the coronaries on the patient's CT.

  10. Reduced radiation exposure to the mammary glands in thoracic computed tomography using organ-based tube-current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munechika, Jiro; Ohgiya, Yoshimitsu; Gokan, Takehiko; Hashimoto, Toshi; Iwai, Tsugunori

    2013-01-01

    Organ-based tube-current modulation has been used to reduce radiation exposure to specific organs. However, there are no reports yet published on reducing radiation exposure in clinical cases. In this study, we assessed the reduction in radiation exposure to the mammary glands during thoracic computed tomography (CT) using X-CARE. In a phantom experiment, the use of X-CARE reduced radiation exposure at the midline of the precordial region by a maximum of 45.1%. In our corresponding clinical study, CT was performed using X-CARE in 15 patients, and without X-CARE in another 15. Compared to the non-X-CARE group, radiation exposure was reduced in the X-CARE group at the midline of the precordial region by 22.3% (P 0.05). X-CARE thus reduced radiation exposure at the midline of the precordial region and allowed us to obtain consistent CT values without increasing noise. However, this study revealed increases in radiation exposure at the lateral sides of the breasts. It is conceivable that patients' breasts were laterally displaced by gravity under the standard thoracic imaging conditions. Further studies that consider factors such as body size and adjustment of imaging conditions may be needed in the future. (author)

  11. Computed tomographic analysis of vegetable during far infrared radiation drying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneechot, P.; Tojo, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2006-01-01

    Far Infrared Radiation (FIR) technology is widely used in the automotive industry to cure painted finishes during manufacturing. FIR drying is used not only in manufacturing but also in agricultural processing such as rice drying. At the present time, FIR drying technology has rarely been used for fruits and vegetables except in research laboratories. In this study, FIR drying and hot air convection drying were compared with respect to energy consumption and time requirement. The internal changes of the agricultural product were also observed during the FIR drying process. A Computed Tomographic (CT) scanner was employed for the observation of the tested material, carrot, and was used to analyze the structural deformation and the internal moisture distribution of the test material. CT data and the hardness of the sample were recorded at regular intervals during the drying experiment. For 200, 400 and 600W FIR drying, the maximum drying rates were 173, 459 and 724%d.b./hr respectively, and the required drying times were 26, 12 and 4.5 hours, respectively. The structure of the carrot sample shrank in accordance with the reduction of moisture content in 200W FIR drying as well as in hot air drying, whereas in 400W and 600W FIR drying the sample was dried without so much deformation

  12. Use of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Radiation Treatment Planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Berberoğlu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy (RT plays an important role in the treatment of lung cancer. Accurate diagnosis and staging are crucial in the delivery of RT with curative intent. Target miss can be prevented by accurate determination of tumor contours during RT planning. Currently, tumor contours are determined manually by computed tomography (CT during RT planning. This method leads to differences in delineation of tumor volume between users. Given the change in RT tools and methods due to rapidly developing technology, it is now more significant to accurately delineate the tumor tissue. F18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (F18 FDG PET/CT has been established as an accurate method in correctly staging and detecting tumor dissemination in lung cancer. Since it provides both anatomic and biologic information, F18 FDG PET decreases interuser variability in tumor delineation. For instance, tumor volumes may be decreased as atelectasis and malignant tissue can be more accurately differentiated, as well as better evaluation of benign and malignant lymph nodes given the difference in FDG uptake. Using F18 FDG PET/CT, the radiation dose can be escalated without serious adverse effects in lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated the contribution of F18 FDG PET/CT for RT planning in lung cancer.

  13. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  14. XVII International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy (ICCR 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Editorial Dear colleagues, From a professional perspective there is nothing quite as enjoyable as attending a good conference with colleagues that share not only interest for the same topic but also a similar vision for their field of work. Proceedings cannot replace the direct contact and lively conversations between participants who are at the same time at the same place sharing ideas and discussion. However, proceedings complement the actual conference by 1. giving the ideas, research findings and debates which characterise the conference lasting presence 2. giving participants an opportunity to refresh their memory about issues they would like to follow up on and 3. providing an opportunity for others who were not able to attend the meeting to share in the thoughts and issues discussed at the conference. For the proceedings of the International Conferences on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy (ICCR) all this has been important in the past as the high citation rates for ICCR proceedings show. We hope that also the present proceedings will appeal to participants and others who are interested in cancer and ways to treat patients affected by it. It is exciting to note that what sounded like a small niche field (''Computers in Radiation Therapy'') has become a very broad forum to discuss all aspects of cancer diagnosis and therapy. Of particular interest for the 17th ICCR have been data and how to collect, organise and use it effectively. This is relevant for most areas in medicine and we believe that radiation therapy with its focus on evidence based practice and measurable and standardised activities has an important and possibly leading role to play. The 100 manuscripts combined in the present proceedings can hopefully contribute to this. The proceedings are organised into five different streams which reflect the foci of the conference: • Dose Calculation • Imaging for treatment planning and Motion Management • Treatment planning and optimisation

  15. Superductile bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.F.; Ruan, F.; Yang, Y.Q.; Chen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<2%) at room temperature. We report a newly developed Pd-Si binary bulk metallic glass, which exhibits a uniform plastic deformation and a large plastic engineering strain of 82% and a plastic true strain of 170%, together with initial strain hardening, slight strain softening and final strain hardening characteristics. The uniform shear deformation and the ultrahigh plasticity are mainly attributed to strain hardening, which results from the nanoscale inhomogeneity due to liquid phase separation. The formed nanoscale inhomogeneity will hinder, deflect, and bifurcate the propagation of shear bands

  16. The computer system for registration and dosimetric control of inhabitants, cosmonauts and pilots from the different radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, L.A.; Koniaev, S.V.; Mikheenko, S.G.; Rusin, S.V.; Sidorin, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    Cosmonauts, pilots and inhabitants living near the nuclear power plants or nuclear facilities are particular group of risk. To estimate the radiation risk for this limited part of population the Computer System was developed. The main purpose of this System is registration, account, storage, processing, analysis, forecasting and control both doses and radiation risks for each person. Both experimental and calculated data are used in the Computer System. The experimental data are used in case of estimation of doses received by cosmonauts during space flight and by pilots during the flight in atmosphere. The System allows to calculate the doses for each person from any type of medical procedures including the X-ray diagnostic examinations and radioisotopic diagnostics. The Computer System also allows to calculate the radiation exposure of inhabitants living near nuclear facilities both in case of normal exploitation and different kind of accidents. The annual dose distribution from different types of radiation sources are given. It was shown that doses from medical irradiation are comparable or sometime higher than the doses from space flight, air flight or nuclear accident. (author)

  17. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of the proposed research are to develop a space radiation shielding material system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and also has high...

  18. Nuclides.net: An integrated environment for computations on radionuclides and their radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galy, J.; Magill, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclides.net computational package is of direct interest in the fields of environment monitoring and nuclear forensics. The 'integrated environment' is a suite of computer programs ranging from a powerful user-friendly interface, which allows the user to navigate the nuclide chart and explore the properties of nuclides, to various computational modules for decay calculations, dosimetry and shielding calculations, etc. The main emphasis in Nuclides.net is on nuclear science applications, such as health physics, radioprotection and radiochemistry, rather than nuclear data for which excellent sources already exist. In contrast to the CD-based Nuclides 2000 predecessor, Nuclides.net applications run over the internet on a web server. The user interface to these applications is via a web browser. Information submitted by the user is sent to the appropriate applications resident on the web server. The results of the calculations are returned to the user, again via the browser. The product is aimed at both students and professionals for reference data on radionuclides and computations based on this data using the latest internet technology. It is particularly suitable for educational purposes in the nuclear industry, health physics and radiation protection, nuclear and radiochemistry, nuclear physics, astrophysics, etc. The Nuclides.net software suite contains the following modules/features: a) A new user interface to view the nuclide charts (with zoom features). Additional nuclide charts are based on spin, parity, binding energy etc. b) There are five main applications: (1) 'Decay Engine' for decay calculations of numbers, masses, activities, dose rates, etc. of parent and daughters. (2) 'Dosimetry and Shielding' module allows the calculation of dose rates from both unshielded and shielded point sources. A choice of 10 shield materials is available. (3) 'Virtual Nuclides' allows the user to do decay and dosimetry and shielding calculations on mixtures of

  19. Bulk analysis using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsaru, M.; Holmes, R.J.; Mathew, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Bulk analysis techniques developed for the mining industry are reviewed. Using penetrating neutron and #betta#-radiations, measurements are obtained directly from a large volume of sample (3-30 kg) #betta#-techniques were used to determine the grade of iron ore and to detect shale on conveyor belts. Thermal neutron irradiation was developed for the simultaneous determination of iron and aluminium in iron ore on a conveyor belt. Thermal-neutron activation analysis includes the determination of alumina in bauxite, and manganese and alumina in manganese ore. Fast neutron activation analysis is used to determine silicon in iron ores, and alumina and silica in bauxite. Fast and thermal neutron activation has been used to determine the soil in shredded sugar cane. (U.K.)

  20. Computer codes in nuclear safety, radiation transport and dosimetry; Les codes de calcul en radioprotection, radiophysique et dosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J M; Kodeli, I; Menard, St; Bouchet, J L; Renard, F; Martin, E; Blazy, L; Voros, S; Bochud, F; Laedermann, J P; Beaugelin, K; Makovicka, L; Quiot, A; Vermeersch, F; Roche, H; Perrin, M C; Laye, F; Bardies, M; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Gschwind, R; Fernandez, F; Quesne, B; Fritsch, P; Lamart, St; Crovisier, Ph; Leservot, A; Antoni, R; Huet, Ch; Thiam, Ch; Donadille, L; Monfort, M; Diop, Ch; Ricard, M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to describe the present state of computer codes dedicated to radiation transport or radiation source assessment or dosimetry. The presentations have been parted into 2 sessions: 1) methodology and 2) uses in industrial or medical or research domains. It appears that 2 different calculation strategies are prevailing, both are based on preliminary Monte-Carlo calculations with data storage. First, quick simulations made from a database of particle histories built though a previous Monte-Carlo simulation and secondly, a neuronal approach involving a learning platform generated through a previous Monte-Carlo simulation. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  1. QALMA: A computational toolkit for the analysis of quality protocols for medical linear accelerators in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mushfiqur; Lei, Yu; Kalantzis, Georgios

    2018-01-01

    Quality Assurance (QA) for medical linear accelerator (linac) is one of the primary concerns in external beam radiation Therapy. Continued advancements in clinical accelerators and computer control technology make the QA procedures more complex and time consuming which often, adequate software accompanied with specific phantoms is required. To ameliorate that matter, we introduce QALMA (Quality Assurance for Linac with MATLAB), a MALAB toolkit which aims to simplify the quantitative analysis of QA for linac which includes Star-Shot analysis, Picket Fence test, Winston-Lutz test, Multileaf Collimator (MLC) log file analysis and verification of light & radiation field coincidence test.

  2. Auctioning Bulk Mobile Messages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Meij (Simon); L-F. Pau (Louis-François); H.W.G.M. van Heck (Eric)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe search for enablers of continued growth of SMS traffic, as well as the take-off of the more diversified MMS message contents, open up for enterprises the potential of bulk use of mobile messaging , instead of essentially one-by-one use. In parallel, such enterprises or value added

  3. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  4. Ferromagnetic bulk glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akihisa; Makino, Akihiro; Mizushima, Takao

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the review on the formation, thermal stability and magnetic properties of the Fe-based bulk glassy alloys in as-cast bulk and melt-spun ribbon forms. A large supercooled liquid region over 50 K before crystallization was obtained in Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si), Fe-(Cr, Mo, Nb)-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B) and (Fe, Co, Ni)-Zr-M-B (M=Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) systems and bulk glassy alloys were produced in a thickness range below 2 mm for the Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) system and 6 mm for the Fe-Co-(Zr, Nb, Ta)-(Mo, W)-B system by copper-mold casting. The ring-shaped glassy Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) alloys exhibit much better soft magnetic properties as compared with the ring-shaped alloy made from the melt-spun ribbon because of the formation of the unique domain structure. The good combination of high glass-forming ability and good soft magnetic properties indicates the possibility of future development as a new bulk glassy magnetic material

  5. Computational lymphatic node models in pediatric and adult hybrid phantoms for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lamart, Stephanie; Moroz, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    We developed models of lymphatic nodes for six pediatric and two adult hybrid computational phantoms to calculate the lymphatic node dose estimates from external and internal radiation exposures. We derived the number of lymphatic nodes from the recommendations in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 23 and 89 at 16 cluster locations for the lymphatic nodes: extrathoracic, cervical, thoracic (upper and lower), breast (left and right), mesentery (left and right), axillary (left and right), cubital (left and right), inguinal (left and right) and popliteal (left and right), for different ages (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old and adult). We modeled each lymphatic node within the voxel format of the hybrid phantoms by assuming that all nodes have identical size derived from published data except narrow cluster sites. The lymph nodes were generated by the following algorithm: (1) selection of the lymph node site among the 16 cluster sites; (2) random sampling of the location of the lymph node within a spherical space centered at the chosen cluster site; (3) creation of the sphere or ovoid of tissue representing the node based on lymphatic node characteristics defined in ICRP Publications 23 and 89. We created lymph nodes until the pre-defined number of lymphatic nodes at the selected cluster site was reached. This algorithm was applied to pediatric (newborn, 1-, 5-and 10-year-old male, and 15-year-old males) and adult male and female ICRP-compliant hybrid phantoms after voxelization. To assess the performance of our models for internal dosimetry, we calculated dose conversion coefficients, called S values, for selected organs and tissues with Iodine-131 distributed in six lymphatic node cluster sites using MCNPX2.6, a well validated Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Our analysis of the calculations indicates that the S values were significantly affected by the location of the lymph node clusters and that the values increased for

  6. Computing the complex : Dusty plasmas in the presence of magnetic fields and UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, V.

    2007-12-01

    the void towards the outside of the discharge. The void thus requires electron-impact ionizations inside the void. The electrons gain the energy for these ionizations inside the dust cloud surrounding the void, however. We show that a growing electron temperature gradient is responsible for the transport of electron energy from the surrounding dust cloud into the void. An axial magnetic field in the discharge magnetizes the electrons. This changes the ambipolar flux of ions through the bulk of the discharge. The ion drag force changes, resulting in a differently shaped void and faster void formation. Experiments in a direct current discharge, show a response of both dust and plasma in the E?B direction, when a magnetic field is applied. The dust response consists of two phases: an initial fast phase, and a later, slow phase. Using a Particle-In-Cell plus Monte Carlo model, we show that the dust charge can be reduced by adding a flux of ultraviolet radiation. A source of ultraviolet light can thus serve as a tool to manipulate dusty plasmas, but might also be important for the coagulation of dust particles around young stars and planet formation in general.

  7. Effectiveness of Bismuth Shield to Reduce Eye Lens Radiation Dose Using the Photoluminescence Dosimetry in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mi Young; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kwon, Soo Il

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the eye radiation dose when performing routine multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). We also evaluated dose reduction and the effect on image quality of using a bismuth eye shield when performing head MDCT. Examinations were performed with a 64MDCT scanner. To compare the shielded/unshielded lens dose, the examination was performed with and without bismuth shielding in anthropomorphic phantom. To determine the average lens radiation dose, we imaged an anthropomorphic phantom into which calibrated photoluminescence glass dosimeter (PLD) were placed to measure the dose to lens. The phantom was imaged using the same protocol. Radiation doses to the lens with and without the lens shielding were measured and compared using the Student t test. In the qualitative evaluation of the MDCT scans, all were considered to be of diagnostic quality. We did not see any differences in quality between the shielded and unshielded brain. The mean radiation doses to the eye with the shield and to those without the shield were 21.54 versus 10.46 mGy, respectively. The lens shield enabled a 51.3% decrease in radiation dose to the lens. Bismuth in-plane shielding for routine eye and head MDCT decreased radiation dose to the lens without qualitative changes in image quality. The other radiosensitive superficial organs specifically must be protected with shielding.

  8. Phase space analysis for anisotropic universe with nonlinear bulk viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Mumtaz, Saadia

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss phase space analysis of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe model by taking a noninteracting mixture of dust like and viscous radiation like fluid whose viscous pressure satisfies a nonlinear version of the Israel-Stewart transport equation. An autonomous system of equations is established by defining normalized dimensionless variables. In order to investigate stability of the system, we evaluate corresponding critical points for different values of the parameters. We also compute power-law scale factor whose behavior indicates different phases of the universe model. It is found that our analysis does not provide a complete immune from fine-tuning because the exponentially expanding solution occurs only for a particular range of parameters. We conclude that stable solutions exist in the presence of nonlinear model for bulk viscosity with different choices of the constant parameter m for anisotropic universe.

  9. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  10. Impact of intravenous contrast used in computed tomography on radiation dose to carotid arteries and thyroid in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Victor Ho Fun, E-mail: vhflee@hku.hk; Ng, Sherry Chor Yi; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Lam, Ka On; Leung, To Wai

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if intravenous contrast injection affected the radiation doses to carotid arteries and thyroid during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Thirty consecutive patients with NPC underwent plain computed tomography (CT) followed by repeated scanning after contrast injection. Carotid arteries (common, external, internal), thyroid, target volumes, and other organs-at-risk (OARs), as well as IMRT planning, were based on contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images. All these structures and the IMRT plans were then copied and transferred to the non–contrast-enhanced CT (NCE-CT) images, and dose calculation without optimization was performed again. The radiation doses to the carotid arteries and the thyroid based on CE-CT and NCE-CT were then compared. Based on CE-CT, no statistical differences, despite minute numeric decreases, were noted in all dosimetric parameters (minimum, maximum, mean, median, D05, and D01) of the target volumes, the OARs, the carotid arteries, and the thyroid compared with NCE-CT. Our results suggested that compared with NCE-CT planning, CE-CT scanning should be performed during IMRT for better target and OAR delineation, without discernible change in radiation doses.

  11. PREFACE: Eurotherm Conference No. 95: Computational Thermal Radiation in Participating Media IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Pascal; Lacroix, David; Lemonnier, Denis; Lybaert, Paul; Selçuk, Nevin

    2012-06-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is based on papers presented at the Eurotherm Conference 95: Computational Thermal Radiation in Participating Media IV, which was held in Nancy, France, on 18-20 April 2012. This seminar was the fourth in a series after Mons, Belgium (Eurotherm Seminar 73, April 2003), Poitiers, France (Eurotherm Seminar 78, April 2006) and Lisbon, Portugal (Eurotherm Seminar 83, April 2009). Around 70 contributions were received during the conference preparation, including submissions for oral and poster presentations. A first selection process based on abstracts and a second based on two peer-reviews of the full papers finally resulted in the acceptance of 38 contributions from oral presentations and 11 from poster presentations. The conference was attended by almost 80 scientists from 17 different countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, India, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Tunisia, Turkey and USA. The 30 contributions presented in this volume relate to the following main topics: Radiative transfer in complex media Applications, combustion and high temperatures Inverse methods New developments for RTE solution Gas radiation modeling Particles, droplets and dispersed systems Monte Carlo methods The conference organizers gratefully acknowledge the members of the scientific committee and the experts who carried out the reviews of the papers, and the local organizing committee for their preparation of the conference. Also acknowledged are the support by the LEMTA, the Société Française de Thermique, ICHMT, the sponsorship of CNRS and the Lorraine Region, and the financial contributions of the Université de Lorraine, FLIR, Baccarat and the city of Nancy. Conference Chairs P BouletLEMTA, Nancy, France D LemonnierInstitut P', Poitiers, France N SelçukMiddle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey P LybaertFaculté Polytechnique de Mons, Belgium International

  12. Computed tomography as a source of electron density information for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrzynski, Witold; Slusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Bulski, Wojciech; Zielinska-Dabrowska, Sylwia; Wachowicz, Marta; Kukolowicz, Pawel F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) systems of various designs as a source of electron density (ρ el ) data for treatment planning of radiation therapy. Material and methods: dependence of CT numbers on relative electron density of tissue-equivalent materials (HU-ρ el relationship) was measured for several general-purpose CT systems (single-slice, multislice, wide-bore multislice), for radiotherapy simulators with a single-slice CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) options, as well as for linear accelerators with kV and MV CBCT systems. Electron density phantoms of four sizes were used. Measurement data were compared with the standard HU-ρ el relationships predefined in two commercial treatment-planning systems (TPS). Results: the HU-ρ el relationships obtained with all of the general-purpose CT scanners operating at voltages close to 120 kV were very similar to each other and close to those predefined in TPS. Some dependency of HU values on tube voltage was observed for bone-equivalent materials. For a given tube voltage, differences in results obtained for different phantoms were larger than those obtained for different CT scanners. For radiotherapy simulators and for kV CBCT systems, the information on ρ el was much less precise because of poor uniformity of images. For MV CBCT, the results were significantly different than for kV systems due to the differing energy spectrum of the beam. Conclusion: the HU-ρ el relationships predefined in TPS can be used for general-purpose CT systems operating at voltages close to 120 kV. For nontypical imaging systems (e.g., CBCT), the relationship can be significantly different and, therefore, it should always be measured and carefully analyzed before using CT data for treatment planning. (orig.)

  13. White Paper of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance on Dual-Energy CT, Part 2: Radiation Dose and Iodine Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, W Dennis; Shuman, William P; Siegel, Marilyn J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Boll, Daniel T; Bolus, David N; De Cecco, Carlo N; Kaza, Ravi K; Morgan, Desiree E; Schoepf, U Joseph; Vrtiska, Terri J; Yeh, Benjamin M; Berland, Lincoln L

    This is the second of a series of 4 white papers that represent Expert Consensus Documents developed by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance through its task force on dual-energy computed tomography. This paper, part 2, addresses radiation dose and iodine sensitivity in dual-energy computed tomography.

  14. Computing the spectrum of black hole radiation in the presence of high frequency dispersion: an analytical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Corley, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for computing the spectrum of black hole radiation of a scalar field satisfying a wave equation with high frequency dispersion. The method involves a combination of Laplace transform and WKB techniques for finding approximate solutions to ordinary differential equations. The modified wave equation is obtained by adding a higher order derivative term suppressed by powers of a fundamental momentum scale $k_0$ to the ordinary wave equation. Depending on the sign of this new t...

  15. Estimation of the radiation exposure of a chest pain protocol with ECG-gating in dual-source computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Luetkhoff, Marie H.; Thomas, Christoph; Werner, Matthias; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Reimann, Anja; Kopp, Andreas F.; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin; Buchgeister, Markus; Burgstahler, Christof

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate radiation exposure of a chest pain protocol with ECG-gated dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). An Alderson Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for dose measurements. Exposure was performed on a dual-source computed tomography system with a standard protocol for chest pain evaluation (120 kV, 320 mAs/rot) with different simulated heart rates (HRs). The dose of a standard chest CT examination (120 kV, 160 mAs) was also measured. Effective dose of the chest pain protocol was 19.3/21.9 mSv (male/female, HR 60), 17.9/20.4 mSv (male/female, HR 80) and 14.7/16.7 mSv (male/female, HR 100). Effective dose of a standard chest examination was 6.3 mSv (males) and 7.2 mSv (females). Radiation dose of the chest pain protocol increases significantly with a lower heart rate for both males (p = 0.040) and females (p = 0.044). The average radiation dose of a standard chest CT examination is about 36.5% that of a CT examination performed for chest pain. Using DSCT, the evaluated chest pain protocol revealed a higher radiation exposure compared with standard chest CT. Furthermore, HRs markedly influenced the dose exposure when using the ECG-gated chest pain protocol. (orig.)

  16. A k-distribution-based radiation code and its computational optimization for an atmospheric general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2008-01-01

    The gas absorption process scheme in the broadband radiative transfer code 'mstrn8', which is used to calculate atmospheric radiative transfer efficiently in a general circulation model, is improved. Three major improvements are made. The first is an update of the database of line absorption parameters and the continuum absorption model. The second is a change to the definition of the selection rule for gas absorption used to choose which absorption bands to include. The last is an upgrade of the optimization method used to decrease the number of quadrature points used for numerical integration in the correlated k-distribution approach, thereby realizing higher computational efficiency without losing accuracy. The new radiation package termed 'mstrnX' computes radiation fluxes and heating rates with errors less than 0.6 W/m 2 and 0.3 K/day, respectively, through the troposphere and the lower stratosphere for any standard AFGL atmospheres. A serious cold bias problem of an atmospheric general circulation model using the ancestor code 'mstrn8' is almost solved by the upgrade to 'mstrnX'

  17. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, Mikhail [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Niita, Koji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  18. Radiation transport and shielding information, computer codes, and nuclear data for use in CTR neutronics research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are being utilized in support of fusion reactor technology. The major activities of RSIC include the operation of a computer-based information storage and retrieval system, the collection, packaging, and distribution of large computer codes, and the compilation and dissemination of processed and evaluated data libraries, with particular emphasis on neutron and gamma-ray cross-section data. The Center has acquired thirteen years of experience in serving fission reactor, weapons, and accelerator shielding research communities, and the extension of its technical base to fusion reactor research represents a logical progression. RSIC is currently working with fusion reactor researchers and contractors in computer code development to provide tested radiation transport and shielding codes and data library packages. Of significant interest to the CTR community are the 100 energy group neutron and 21 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data package (DLC-37) for neutronics studies, a comprehensive 171 energy group neutron and 36 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data base with retrieval programs, including resonance self-shielding, that are tailored to CTR application, and a data base for the generation of energy-dependent atomic displacement and gas production cross sections and heavy-particle-recoil spectra for estimating radiation damage to CTR structural components

  19. Development and design of a computer-assisted information management system for radiation safety management at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riches, C.G.; Riordan, F.J.; Robb, D.; Grieb, C.; Pence, G.; O'Brien, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Office (RSO) at the University of Washington (UW) found that it needed a computerized information system to help manage the campus radiation safety program and to help provide the records necessary to show compliance with regulations and license requirements. The John L. Locke Computer Center at the UW had just developed the GLAMOR system to aid information entry and query for their computer when the RSO turned to them for assistance. The module that was developed provided a mechanism for controlling and monitoring radioactive materials on campus. This became one part of a multi-faceted system that registers users, employees, sealed sources and radiation-producing machines. The system is designed to be interactive, for immediate information recall, and powerful enough to provide routine and special reports on compliance status. The RSO information system is designed to be flexible and can easily incorporate additional features. Some future features include an interactive SNM control program, an interface to the information system currently being developed for the occupational safety and health program and an interface to the database provided by the commercial film badge service used by the University. Development of this program lead the RSO to appreciate the usefulness of having health physics professionals on the staff who were also knowledgeable about computers and who could develop programs and reports necessary to their activities

  20. Computational Modeling of Medical Images of Brain Tumor Patients for Optimized Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael

    In brain tumor radiation therapy, the aim is to maximize the delivered radiation dose to the targeted tumor and at the same time minimize the dose to sensitive healthy structures – so-called organs-at-risk (OARs). When planning a radiation therapy session, the tumor and the OARs therefore need...... to be delineated on medical images of the patient’s head, to be able to optimize a radiation dose plan. In clinical practice, the delineation is performed manually with limited assistance from automatic procedures, which is both time-consuming and typically suffers from poor reproducibility. There is, therefore...

  1. Characterisation of bulk solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. McGlinchey [Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Industrial Bulk Solids Handling

    2005-07-01

    Handling of powders and bulk solids is a critical industrial technology across a broad spectrum of industries, including minerals processing. With contributions from leading authors in their respective fields, this book provides the reader with a sound understanding of the techniques, importance and application of particulate materials characterisation. It covers the fundamental characteristics of individual particles and bulk particulate materials, and includes discussion of a wide range of measurement techniques, and the use of material characteristics in design and industrial practice. Contents: Characterising particle properties; Powder mechanics and rheology; Characterisation for hopper and stockpile design; Fluidization behaviour; Characterisation for pneumatic conveyor design; Explosiblility; 'Designer' particle characteristics; Current industrial practice; and Future trends. 130 ills.

  2. Toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yong Hum; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei

    2013-09-21

    To exploit the potential dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), an in-depth approach is required to provide efficient computing methods. This needs to incorporate clinically related organ specific constraints, Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, and large-scale plan optimization. This paper describes our first steps toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment (CCE). The Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) with a master node (named m2.xlarge containing 17.1 GB of memory, two virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each, 420 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform) is used as the backbone of cloud computing for dose calculation and plan optimization. The master node is able to scale the workers on an 'on-demand' basis. MC dose calculation is employed to generate accurate beamlet dose kernels by parallel tasks. The intensity modulation optimization uses total-variation regularization (TVR) and generates piecewise constant fluence maps for each initial beam direction in a distributed manner over the CCE. The optimized fluence maps are segmented into deliverable apertures. The shape of each aperture is iteratively rectified to be a sequence of arcs using the manufacture's constraints. The output plan file from the EC2 is sent to the simple storage service. Three de-identified clinical cancer treatment plans have been studied for evaluating the performance of the new planning platform with 6 MV flattening filter free beams (40 × 40 cm(2)) from the Varian TrueBeam(TM) STx linear accelerator. A CCE leads to speed-ups of up to 14-fold for both dose kernel calculations and plan optimizations in the head and neck, lung, and prostate cancer cases considered in this study. The proposed system relies on a CCE that is able to provide an infrastructure for parallel and distributed computing. The resultant plans from the cloud computing are

  3. Toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Yong Hum; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2013-01-01

    To exploit the potential dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), an in-depth approach is required to provide efficient computing methods. This needs to incorporate clinically related organ specific constraints, Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, and large-scale plan optimization. This paper describes our first steps toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment (CCE). The Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) with a master node (named m2.xlarge containing 17.1 GB of memory, two virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each, 420 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform) is used as the backbone of cloud computing for dose calculation and plan optimization. The master node is able to scale the workers on an ‘on-demand’ basis. MC dose calculation is employed to generate accurate beamlet dose kernels by parallel tasks. The intensity modulation optimization uses total-variation regularization (TVR) and generates piecewise constant fluence maps for each initial beam direction in a distributed manner over the CCE. The optimized fluence maps are segmented into deliverable apertures. The shape of each aperture is iteratively rectified to be a sequence of arcs using the manufacture’s constraints. The output plan file from the EC2 is sent to the simple storage service. Three de-identified clinical cancer treatment plans have been studied for evaluating the performance of the new planning platform with 6 MV flattening filter free beams (40 × 40 cm 2 ) from the Varian TrueBeam TM STx linear accelerator. A CCE leads to speed-ups of up to 14-fold for both dose kernel calculations and plan optimizations in the head and neck, lung, and prostate cancer cases considered in this study. The proposed system relies on a CCE that is able to provide an infrastructure for parallel and distributed computing. The resultant plans from the cloud computing are

  4. Micromegas in a bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giomataris, I.; De Oliveira, R.; Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Charpak, G.; Colas, P.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer, E.; Giganon, A.; Rebourgeard, Ph.; Salin, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way to manufacture the bulk Micromegas detector. A simple process based on the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology is employed to produce the entire sensitive detector. Such a fabrication process could be extended to very large area detectors made by the industry. The low cost fabrication together with the robustness of the electrode materials will make it attractive for several applications ranging from particle physics and astrophysics to medicine

  5. Damage observation in a high-manganese austenitic TWIP steel by synchrotron radiation computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorthios, J.; Nguyen, F.; Gourgues, A.-F.; Morgeneyer, T.F.; Cugy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Internal damage below the fracture surface of a multiaxial specimen made of twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel was observed by three-dimensional X-ray microtomography as very elongated 'primary' voids. Specific tools for the local damage analysis were developed. A gradient in void volume fraction was measured from the fracture surface down to the bulk of the scanned volume (from ∼0.06% to 90% in area fraction), indicating strongly localized final fracture.

  6. Second international conference on computer simulation of radiation effects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubia, T.D. de la; Gilmer, G.H.

    1994-01-01

    A total of 102 abstracts are included, arranged under the following headings: interatomic potentials and theoretical methods, displacement cascades and radiation effects in metals, radiation effects in semiconductors, sputtering and surface processes, cluster-solid interactions, highly charged ions and inelastic effects, and posters (A and B)

  7. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes Augusto da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and methods: previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results: in none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/ year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion: in the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. (author)

  8. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  9. Estimating the effective radiation dose imparted to patients by intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jeffrey; Karellas, Andrew; Street, John; Eck, Jason C; Lapinsky, Anthony; Connolly, Patrick J; Dipaola, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    Observational. To estimate the radiation dose imparted to patients during typical thoracolumbar spinal surgical scenarios. Minimally invasive techniques continue to become more common in spine surgery. Computer-assisted navigation systems coupled with intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CT) represent one such method used to aid in instrumented spinal procedures. Some studies indicate that cone-beam CT technology delivers a relatively low dose of radiation to patients compared with other x-ray-based imaging modalities. The goal of this study was to estimate the radiation exposure to the patient imparted during typical posterior thoracolumbar instrumented spinal procedures, using intraoperative cone-beam CT and to place these values in the context of standard CT doses. Cone-beam CT scans were obtained using Medtronic O-arm (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Thermoluminescence dosimeters were placed in a linear array on a foam-plastic thoracolumbar spine model centered above the radiation source for O-arm presets of lumbar scans for small or large patients. In-air dosimeter measurements were converted to skin surface measurements, using published conversion factors. Dose-length product was calculated from these values. Effective dose was estimated using published effective dose to dose-length product conversion factors. Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the small-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans (1-31 mSv). Calculated dosages for many full-length procedures using the large-patient setting fell within the range of published effective doses of abdominal CT scans when the number of scans did not exceed 3. We have demonstrated that single cone-beam CT scans and most full-length posterior instrumented spinal procedures using O-arm in standard mode would likely impart a radiation dose within the range of those imparted by a single standard CT scan of the abdomen. Radiation dose increases

  10. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  11. Bulk-memory processor for data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.O.; McMillan, D.E.; Sunier, J.W.; Meier, M.; Poore, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    To meet the diverse needs and data rate requirements at the Van de Graaff and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facilities, a bulk memory system has been implemented which includes a fast and flexible processor. This bulk memory processor (BMP) utilizes bit slice and microcode techniques and features a 24 bit wide internal architecture allowing direct addressing of up to 16 megawords of memory and histogramming up to 16 million counts per channel without overflow. The BMP is interfaced to the MOSTEK MK 8000 bulk memory system and to the standard MODCOMP computer I/O bus. Coding for the BMP both at the microcode level and with macro instructions is supported. The generalized data acquisition system has been extended to support the BMP in a manner transparent to the user

  12. Computer simulation of radiation damage in NaCl using a kinetic rate reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Sodium chloride and other alkali halides are known to be very susceptible to radiation damage in the halogen sublattice when exposed to ionizing radiation. The formation of radiation damage in NaCl has generated interest because of the relevance of this damage to the disposal of radioactive waste in rock salt formations. In order to estimate the long-term behaviour of a rock salt repository, an accurate theory describing the major processes of radiation damage in NaCl is required. The model presented in this paper is an extended version of the Jain-Lidiard model; its extensions comprise the effect of impurities and the colloid nucleation stage on the formation of radiation damage. The new model has been tested against various experimental data obtained from the literature and accounts for several well known aspects of radiation damage in alkali halides which were not covered by the original Jain-Lidiard model. The new model thus may be expected to provide more reliable predictions for the build-up of radiation damage in a rock salt nuclear waste repository. (Author)

  13. A hybrid computational approach to estimate solar global radiation: An empirical evidence from Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, Elham Sadat; Ramiyani, Sara Saeidi; Sarvar, Rahim; Moud, Hashem Izadi; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative hybrid approach for the estimation of the solar global radiation. New prediction equations were developed for the global radiation using an integrated search method of genetic programming (GP) and simulated annealing (SA), called GP/SA. The solar radiation was formulated in terms of several climatological and meteorological parameters. Comprehensive databases containing monthly data collected for 6 years in two cities of Iran were used to develop GP/SA-based models. Separate models were established for each city. The generalization of the models was verified using a separate testing database. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the contribution of the parameters affecting the solar radiation. The derived models make accurate predictions of the solar global radiation and notably outperform the existing models. -- Highlights: ► A hybrid approach is presented for the estimation of the solar global radiation. ► The proposed method integrates the capabilities of GP and SA. ► Several climatological and meteorological parameters are included in the analysis. ► The GP/SA models make accurate predictions of the solar global radiation.

  14. Radiation transport and shielding information, computer codes, and nuclear data for use in CTR neutronics research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Maskewitz, B.F.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are being utilized in support of fusion reactor technology. The major activities of RSIC include the operation of a computer-based information storage and retrieval system, the collection, packaging, and distribution of large computer codes, and the compilation and dissemination of processed and evaluated data libraries, with particular emphasis on neutron and gamma-ray cross-section data. The Center has acquired thirteen years of experience in serving fission reactor, weapons, and accelerator shielding research communities, and the extension of its technical base to fusion reactor research represents a logical progression. RSIC is currently working with fusion reactor researchers and contractors in computer code development to provide tested radiation transport and shielding codes and data library packages. Of significant interest to the CTR community are the 100 energy group neutron and 21 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data package (DLC-37) for neutronics studies, a comprehensive 171 energy group neutron and 36 energy group gamma-ray coupled cross-section data base with retrieval programs, including resonance self-shielding, that are tailored to CTR application, and a data base for the generation of energy-dependent atomic displacement and gas production cross sections and heavy-particle-recoil spectra for estimating radiation damage to CTR structural components. Since 1964, the Center has been involved in the international exchange of information, encouraged and supported by both government and interagency agreements; and to achieve an equally viable and successful program in fusion research, the reciprocal exchange of CTR data and computing technology is encouraged and welcomed

  15. Estimation of MONIN-OBUKHOV length using richardson and bulk richardson number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essa, K.S.M.

    2000-01-01

    The 1996 NOVA atmospheric boundary layer data from North Carolina are used in 30 minute's averages for five days. Because of missing data of friction velocity (u) and sensible heat flux (H), it is urgent to calculate (u*)and (H) using the equations of logarithmic wind speed and net radiation (Briggs [7]), which are considered in this work. It is found that the correlation between the predicted and observed values of (u*) and (H) is 0.88 and 0.86 respectively. A comparison is made of the Monin-Obukhov length scale (L) estimated using Richardson number (R i ) and bulk Richardson number (Ri b ) with L-value computed using formula of (L), it is found that the agreement between the predicted and observed values of (L) is better in the case (L)is estimated from the bulk Richardson number (Ri b ), rather than from the gradient Richarson number(R j )

  16. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  17. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  18. Radiation dose measurements during kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography imaging in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Radiation dose to the eye, breast, and the surface of the pelvis have been arrived at during CBCT. The doses measured on patients agreed closely with those measured on humanoid phantom and with published values.

  19. A simulation model for the actual, long wave and net solar radiation computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, B.; Stoilov, A.; Lyubomirov, L.

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to present a calculating procedure for the components of the radiation balance - actual, long-wave and net radiation calculation, using the sunshine duration and the standard meteorological information, through a previously prepared program product.To calculate the actual solar radiation using the total cloudiness only, an empirical regression model has been developed. The results of the coefficient of correlation R(0.75-0.88), respectively for the spring and summer periods (March-May; June-August) show the adequacy of the chosen model. The verification of the model on the independent experimental material prove that the approach that authors suggested, can be successfully applied to the calculation of the actual radiation of the current place

  20. Quality Assurance Challenges for Motion-Adaptive Radiation Therapy: Gating, Breath Holding, and Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B.; Wolfgang, John; Mageras, Gig S.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, quality assurance (QA) for motion-adaptive radiation therapy involves various challenges because of the added temporal dimension. Here we discuss those challenges for three specific techniques related to motion-adaptive therapy: namely respiratory gating, breath holding, and four-dimensional computed tomography. Similar to the introduction of any other new technologies in clinical practice, typical QA measures should be taken for these techniques also, including initial testing of equipment and clinical procedures, as well as frequent QA examinations during the early stage of implementation. Here, rather than covering every QA aspect in depth, we focus on some major QA challenges. The biggest QA challenge for gating and breath holding is how to ensure treatment accuracy when internal target position is predicted using external surrogates. Recommended QA measures for each component of treatment, including simulation, planning, patient positioning, and treatment delivery and verification, are discussed. For four-dimensional computed tomography, some major QA challenges have also been discussed

  1. Computer Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Hybrid-Stabilized Argon–Water Electric Arc

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeništa, Jiří; Takana, H.; Nishiyama, H.; Křenek, Petr; Bartlová, M.; Aubrecht, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 11 (2011), s. 2892-2893 ISSN 0093-3813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Divergence of radiation flux * hybrid-stabilized electric arc * mass flow rate * partial characteristics * radiation flux Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.174, year: 2011 http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=27

  2. The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC): Showcasing Mathematical and Computational Physics in a Critical Atmospheric Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2001-05-01

    The Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes (I3RC) is an on-going initiative involving an international group of over 30 researchers engaged in the numerical modeling of three-dimensional radiative transfer as applied to clouds. Because of their strong variability and extreme opacity, clouds are indeed a major source of uncertainty in the Earth's local radiation budget (at GCM grid scales). Also 3D effects (at satellite pixel scales) invalidate the standard plane-parallel assumption made in the routine of cloud-property remote sensing at NASA and NOAA. Accordingly, the test-cases used in I3RC are based on inputs and outputs which relate to cloud effects in atmospheric heating rates and in real-world remote sensing geometries. The main objectives of I3RC are to (1) enable participants to improve their models, (2) publish results as a community, (3) archive source code, and (4) educate. We will survey the status of I3RC and its plans for the near future with a special emphasis on the mathematical models and computational approaches. We will also describe some of the prime applications of I3RC's efforts in climate models, cloud-resolving models, and remote-sensing observations of clouds, or that of the surface in their presence. In all these application areas, computational efficiency is the main concern and not accuracy. One of I3RC's main goals is to document the performance of as wide a variety as possible of three-dimensional radiative transfer models for a small but representative number of ``cases.'' However, it is dominated by modelers working at the level of linear transport theory (i.e., they solve the radiative transfer equation) and an overwhelming majority of these participants use slow-but-robust Monte Carlo techniques. This means that only a small portion of the efficiency vs. accuracy vs. flexibility domain is currently populated by I3RC participants. To balance this natural clustering the present authors have organized a systematic outreach towards

  3. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  4. Bulk viscosity in 2SC quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark G; Schmitt, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The bulk viscosity of three-flavour colour-superconducting quark matter originating from the nonleptonic process u + s ↔ u + d is computed. It is assumed that up and down quarks form Cooper pairs while the strange quark remains unpaired (2SC phase). A general derivation of the rate of strangeness production is presented, involving contributions from a multitude of different subprocesses, including subprocesses that involve different numbers of gapped quarks as well as creation and annihilation of particles in the condensate. The rate is then used to compute the bulk viscosity as a function of the temperature, for an external oscillation frequency typical of a compact star r-mode. We find that, for temperatures far below the critical temperature T c for 2SC pairing, the bulk viscosity of colour-superconducting quark matter is suppressed relative to that of unpaired quark matter, but for T ∼> T c /30 the colour-superconducting quark matter has a higher bulk viscosity. This is potentially relevant for the suppression of r-mode instabilities early in the life of a compact star

  5. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = radiography (P radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run.

  6. A simplified computer code based on point Kernel theory for calculating radiation dose in packages of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A study on radiation dose control in packages of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, hospitals and industries, such as sources of Ra-226, Co-60, Ir-192 and Cs-137, is presented. The MAPA and MAPAM computer codes, based on point Kernel theory for calculating doses of several source-shielding type configurations, aiming to assure the safe transport conditions for these sources, was developed. The validation of the code for point sources, using the values provided by NCRP, for the thickness of lead and concrete shieldings, limiting the dose at 100 Mrem/hr for several distances from the source to the detector, was carried out. The validation for non point sources was carried out, measuring experimentally radiation dose from packages developed by Brazilian CNEN/S.P. for removing the sources. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. COXPRO-II: a computer program for calculating radiation and conduction heat transfer in irradiated fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, C.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the computer program COXPRO-II, which was written for performing thermal analyses of irradiated fuel assemblies in a gaseous environment with no forced cooling. The heat transfer modes within the fuel pin bundle are radiation exchange among fuel pin surfaces and conduction by the stagnant gas. The array of parallel cylindrical fuel pins may be enclosed by a metal wrapper or shroud. Heat is dissipated from the outer surface of the fuel pin assembly by radiation and convection. Both equilateral triangle and square fuel pin arrays can be analyzed. Steady-state and unsteady-state conditions are included. Temperatures predicted by the COXPRO-II code have been validated by comparing them with experimental measurements. Temperature predictions compare favorably to temperature measurements in pressurized water reactor (PWR) and liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) simulated, electrically heated fuel assemblies. Also, temperature comparisons are made on an actual irradiated Fast-Flux Test Facility (FFTF) LMFBR fuel assembly

  8. Reduction of radiation doses in leg lengthening procedures by means of audit and computed tomography scanogram techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowski, C.A.J.; Sprigg, A.; Underwood, A.C.

    1994-01-01

    Children with congenital bone dysplasias may benefit from leg lengthening procedures. Such procedures, by necessity, require frequent and regular imaging. It is necessary to minimize the total radiation dose to these patients, and particularly the dose to the gonads. In the present study, the films of 13 patients who had completed leg lengthening procedures were reviewed. The number of films was assessed together with the use of appropriate gonad shielding. In a second part of the study, thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements of radiation doses to a phantom were made for both plain radiographs (with and without gonad protection) and computed tomography (CT) scanograms. The results show that audit plays an important role in assessing radiographic practice with respect to accurate placement of gonad protection and confirm that a significant dose reduction can be accomplished by careful use of this lead shielding. Dose reduction can also be achieved by using alternative radiographic techniques such as CT scanograms. (author)

  9. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  10. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  11. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Ryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Kim, Joshua P.; Zheng, Weili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0

  12. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Ryan G.; Kim, Joshua P.; Zheng, Weili; Chetty, Indrin J.; Glide-Hurst, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0

  13. Radiation doses to the eye lenses in computed tomography of the orbit and the petrous bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Zanella, F.E.; Ewen, K.; Koeln Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Standard CT examinations of the orbit and the petrous bone were simulated with a tissue-equivalent human skull phantom on a Somatom DR 2 scanner. The orientation of the scan planes and the scan parameters including thickness, number of slices and mAs were varied according to the assumed diagnostic problems. The total radiation doses in the region of the eye lenses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. If the globes are located within the X-ray field, the total radiation doses received by the lenses increased with the number and the thickness of the slices and the mAs. The highest radiation doses were found in contiguous thinsection scans of the orbit in axial (52 mGy) or direct coronal (47 mGy) orientation. In cases where the globes were located outside the X-ray field, the radiation doses received by the eye lenses could be reduced by a factor of 16, resulting in only 3.1-3.4 mGy for a complete axial study of the inner ear. Recommendations are given how to reduce the radiation exposure to the eye lenses without loss of diagnostical information. (orig.)

  14. Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S; D' Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

    2002-02-26

    The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of

  15. Bulk muscles, loose cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-10-17

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Prediction of the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy using computational intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehlaghi, Vahab; Taghipour, Mostafa; Haghparast, Abbas; Roshani, Gholam Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas; Shayesteh, Sajjad Pashootan; Adineh-Vand, Ayoub; Karimi, Gholam Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are investigated to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy. In the proposed models, the input parameters are field size (S), off-axis distance, and relative dose (D/D 0 ), and the output is the thickness of the compensator. The obtained results show that the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are useful, reliable, and cheap tools to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

  17. Five Years of a Computer Based New Training Program in Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shachar, B.; Tshuva, M.; Fitussi, I.; Ankri, D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the main goals of the Department of Human Resources Development is to give employees fundamental knowledge, refreshing know-how and increasing safety awareness. In this regard safety deals with risks in operating nuclear facilities, including radiation, industrial risks and fire. Israeli Work Supervision (informing and training employees, 1992) (1) and work safety regulations (industrial safety and health for ionization radiation employees) state the need for training by the employer at least once a year. The employer also must take means to verify that the employees actually understand what they were trained for

  18. Computer simulation of radiation damage in HTGR elements and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Shilyaev, B.A.; Yamnitskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of mathematical simulation of radiation damages in material and items of HTGR is considered. A system-program complex IMITATOR, intended for imitation of neutron damages by means of charged particle beams, is used. Account of material composite structure and certain geometry of items permits to calculate fields of primary radiation damages and introductions of reaction products in composite fuel elements, microfuel elements, their shells, composite absorbing elements on the base of boron carbide, structural steels and alloys. A good correspondence of calculation and experimental burn-out of absorbing elements is obtained, application of absorbing element as medium for imitation experiments is grounded [ru

  19. Prediction of the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy using computational intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehlaghi, Vahab; Taghipour, Mostafa; Haghparast, Abbas [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roshani, Gholam Hossein [School of Energy, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei, Abbas [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shayesteh, Sajjad Pashootan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Adineh-Vand, Ayoub [Department of Computer Engineering, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, Gholam Reza, E-mail: ghkarimi@razi.ac.ir [Department of Electrical Engineering, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are investigated to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy. In the proposed models, the input parameters are field size (S), off-axis distance, and relative dose (D/D{sub 0}), and the output is the thickness of the compensator. The obtained results show that the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are useful, reliable, and cheap tools to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  20. Physics study of microbeam radiation therapy with PSI-version of Monte Carlo code GEANT as a new computational tool

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanek, J; Laissue, J A; Lyubimova, N; Di Michiel, F; Slatkin, D N

    2000-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a currently experimental method of radiotherapy which is mediated by an array of parallel microbeams of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X-rays. Suitably selected, nominally supralethal doses of X-rays delivered to parallel microslices of tumor-bearing tissues in rats can be either palliative or curative while causing little or no serious damage to contiguous normal tissues. Although the pathogenesis of MRT-mediated tumor regression is not understood, as in all radiotherapy such understanding will be based ultimately on our understanding of the relationships among the following three factors: (1) microdosimetry, (2) damage to normal tissues, and (3) therapeutic efficacy. Although physical microdosimetry is feasible, published information on MRT microdosimetry to date is computational. This report describes Monte Carlo-based computational MRT microdosimetry using photon and/or electron scattering and photoionization cross-section data in the 1 e V through 100 GeV range distrib...

  1. A computationally efficient P_1 radiation model for modern combustion systems utilizing pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Gautham

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The P_1 radiation model was interfaced with high performance linear solvers. • Pre-conditioned conjugate gradient (PC CG) method improved convergence by 50% • PC CG was more than 30 times faster than classical iterative methods. • The time to solution scaled linearly with increase in problem size employing PC CG. • Employing WSGGM with P_1 model compared reasonably well against benchmark data. - Abstract: The iterative convergence of the P_1 radiation model can be slow in optically thin scenarios when employing classical iterative methods. In order to remedy this shortcoming, an in-house P_1 radiation model was interfaced with high performance, scalable, linear solver libraries. Next, the accuracies of P_1 radiation model calculations was assessed by comparing its predictions against discrete ordinates (DO) model calculations for prototypical problems representative of modern combustion systems. Corresponding benchmark results were also included for comparison. Utilizing Pre-Conditioners (PC) to the Conjugate Gradients (CG) method, the convergence time of the P_1 radiation model reduced by a factor of 30 for modest problem sizes and a factor of 70 for larger sized problems when compared against classical Gauss Seidel sweeps. Further, PC provided 50% computational savings compared to employing CG in a standalone mode. The P_1 model calculation times were about 25–30% of the DO model calculation time. The time to solution also scaled linearly with an increase in problem size. The weighted sum of gray gases model employed in this study in conjunction with the P_1 model provided good agreement against benchmark data with L_2 error norms (defined relative to corresponding DO calculations) improving when isotropic intensities were prevalent.

  2. Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to Speed up Radiative Transfer (RT) Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natraj, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Multiple scattering RT calculations time-consuming. Need a speed improvement of about 1000 (for OCO)! Solution: Make use of redundancies in spectra. Correlated-k (Lacis and Wang, Lacis and Oinas, Goody et al, Fu and Liou) Problem: Assume that spectral variation of atmospheric optical properties spatially correlated at all points along optical path. High accuracy (HI) and 2-stream (2S) calculations have high correlation. Single scattering (SS) computations highly scenario-dependent, but not time consuming. Perform SS and 2S calculations at every wavelength. Perform small number of HI computations. Need to compute correction factor B at every wavelength.

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  4. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Technical report, 15 August 1992--14 August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation uses symbolic computation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular, integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and combined mode energy transport. This technical report summarizes the research conducted during the first nine months of the present investigation. The use of Chebyshev polynomials augmented with symbolic computation has clearly been demonstrated in problems involving radiative (or neutron) transport, and mixed-mode energy transport. Theoretical issues related to convergence, errors, and accuracy have also been pursued. Three manuscripts have resulted from the funded research. These manuscripts have been submitted to archival journals. At the present time, an investigation involving a conductive and radiative medium is underway. The mathematical formulation leads to a system of nonlinear, weakly-singular integral equations involving the unknown temperature and various Legendre moments of the radiative intensity in a participating medium. Some preliminary results are presented illustrating the direction of the proposed research

  5. Computer simulation of the spatial distribution of optical radiation arising from knocked-out excited particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokov, S.P.; Gritsyna, V.V.; Koval', A.G.; Kovtunenko, Yu.I.; Shevchenko, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    The new approach for the explanation of the spatial distribution of the optical radiation arising from knocked-out excited particles is given. Calculated and experimental data for Al (λ=396.1 nm) and Mg (λ=383.8 nm) knocked-out by Ar + (20 keV) beam from MgAl 2 O 4 surface are compared [ru

  6. Measuring radiation environment in LHC or anywhere else, on your computer screen with Medipix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijne, Erik H.M., E-mail: erik.heijne@cern.ch [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Ballabriga Sune, Rafael; Campbell, Michael [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Leroy, Claude [Université de Montréal (Canada); Llopart, Xavier [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Martin, Jean-Pierre [Université de Montréal (Canada); Pospisil, Stanislav; Solc, Jaroslav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Soueid, Paul [Université de Montréal (Canada); Suk, Michal [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Tlustos, Lukas [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland); Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Wong, Winnie [CERN, CH1211 Geneva23 (Switzerland)

    2013-01-21

    The Medipix family of chips use on-pixel pulse processing front-ends, digitization and counters to produce images of radiation. The devices have been derived from developments for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics experiments at CERN. With the miniaturization of the associated readout system a new method of dosimetry becomes accessible, where single radiation quanta are detected and imaged. Several examples of dose measurements at highly differing dose rates are presented here: monitoring of background radiation on earth, in a flying airplane and in the ATLAS experiment at LHC. During proton collision runs as well as during the stops of the accelerator the dose can be measured, including characterization of different types of radiation. Thanks to the noiseless method of quantum imaging dosimetry, a large dynamic range can be achieved, employing only this single device. The dose rate extends from recording only a few quanta in hours, up to hundreds of quanta recorded in a fraction of a ms. With complementary methods for the analysis of the exposed image frames, one can cover 14 orders of magnitude.

  7. A comparative study for image quality and radiation dose of a cone beam computed tomography scanner and a multislice computed tomography scanner for paranasal sinus imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Jens; Zanca, Federica; Canning, John; Pauwels, Ruben; Hermans, Robert

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of a state of the art cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system and a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) system in patients with sinonasal poliposis. In this retrospective study two radiologists evaluated 57 patients with sinonasal poliposis who underwent a CBCT or MSCT sinus examination, along with a control group of 90 patients with normal radiological findings. Tissue doses were measured using a phantom model with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Overall image quality in CBCT was scored significantly higher than in MSCT in patients with normal radiologic findings (p-value: 0.00001). In patients with sinonasal poliposis, MSCT scored significantly higher than CBCT (p-value: 0.00001). The average effective dose for MSCT was 42% higher compared to CBCT (108 μSv vs 63 μSv). CBCT and MSCT are both suited for the evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important structures of the paranasal sinuses can be better delineated with MSCT, whereas in patients without sinonasal poliposis, CBCT turns out to define the important structures of the sinonasal region better. However, given the lower radiation dose, CBCT can be considered for the evaluation of the sinonasal structures in patients with sinonasal poliposis. • CBCT and MSCT are both suited for evaluation of sinonasal poliposis. • Effective dose for MSCT was 42% higher compared to CBCT. • In patients with sinonasal poliposis, clinically important anatomical structures are better delineated with MSCT. • In patients with normal radiological findings, clinically important anatomical structures are better delineated with CBCT.

  8. Radiation dose in cone-beam computed tomography: myth or reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi, Medhini

    2013-01-01

    In the growing inventory of clinical computed tomography technologies, cone-beam X-ray computed tomography is a relatively recent instalment. It is an advancement in computed tomography imaging which is designed to provide relatively low-dose high-spatial-resolution visualization of high contrast structures in the head and neck and other anatomic areas. Comparatively low dosing requirements and relatively compact design has led to intense interest in surgical planning and intra-operative cone-beam computed tomography applications, particularly in head and neck, and also in spinal, thoracic, abdominal and orthopaedic procedures. The use of this emerging imaging technology, which has potential applications for imaging of high-contrast structures in the head and neck as well as dentomaxillofacial regions, has been the subject of criticism as well as acclaim. This paper envisages to discuss the state-of-the-art of the technique. (author)

  9. The Time Course of Dynamic Computed Tomographic Appearance of Radiation Injury to the Cirrhotic Liver Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Kimura

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the dynamic computed tomographic (CT appearance of focal radiation injury to cirrhotic liver tissue around the tumor following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Seventy-seven patients with 92 HCCs were observed for >6 months. Sixty-four and 13 patients belonged to Child-Pugh class A and B, respectively. The median SBRT dose was 48 Gy/4fr. Dynamic CT scans were performed in non-enhanced, arterial, portal, and venous phases. The median follow-up period was 18 months. Dynamic CT appearances were classified into 3 types: type 1, hyperdensity in all enhanced phases; type 2, hypodensity in arterial and portal phases; type 3, isodensity in all enhanced phases. Half of the type 2 or 3 appearances significantly changed to type 1, particularly in patients belonging to Child-Pugh class A. After 3-6 months, Child-Pugh class B was a significant factor in type 3 patients. Thus, dynamic CT appearances were classified into 3 patterns and significantly changed over time into the enhancement group (type 1 in most patients belonging to Child-Pugh class A. Child-Pugh class B was a significant factor in the non-enhancement group (type 3.

  10. INTDOS: a computer code for estimating internal radiation dose using recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-09-01

    INTDOS is a user-oriented computer code designed to calculate estimates of internal radiation dose commitment resulting from the acute inhalation intake of various radionuclides. It is designed so that users unfamiliar with the details of such can obtain results by answering a few questions regarding the exposure case. The user must identify the radionuclide name, solubility class, particle size, time since exposure, and the measured lung burden. INTDOS calculates the fractions of the lung burden remaining at time, t, postexposure considering the solubility class and particle size information. From the fraction remaining in the lung at time, t, the quantity inhaled is estimated. Radioactive decay is accounted for in the estimate. Finally, effective committed dose equivalents to various organs and tissues of the body are calculated using inhalation committed dose factors presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This computer code was written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer and is written in Fortran IV. A flow chart and example calculations are discussed in detail to aid the user who is unfamiliar with computer operations

  11. NURBS-based 3-d anthropomorphic computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models used in the evaluation of absorbed dose distributions within the human body. Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilised for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (equation-based) and (2) voxel (image-based) phantoms describing human anatomy through the use of mathematical surface equations and 3-D voxel matrices, respectively. However, stylized phantoms have limitations in defining realistic organ contours and positioning as compared to voxel phantoms, which are themselves based on medical images of human subjects. In turn, voxel phantoms that have been developed through medical image segmentation have limitations in describing organs that are presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography image. The present paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of these existing classes of computational phantoms and introduces a hybrid approach to a computational phantom construction based on non-uniform rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface animation technology that takes advantage of the most desirable features of the former two phantom types. (authors)

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  15. Improving the bulk data transfer experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

    2008-05-07

    Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

  16. Quantifying morphological parameters of the terminal branching units in a mouse lung by phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongeun Hwang

    Full Text Available An effective technique of phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography was established for the quantitative analysis of the microstructures in the respiratory zone of a mouse lung. Heitzman's method was adopted for the whole-lung sample preparation, and Canny's edge detector was used for locating the air-tissue boundaries. This technique revealed detailed morphology of the respiratory zone components, including terminal bronchioles and alveolar sacs, with sufficiently high resolution of 1.74 µm isotropic voxel size. The technique enabled visual inspection of the respiratory zone components and comprehension of their relative positions in three dimensions. To check the method's feasibility for quantitative imaging, morphological parameters such as diameter, surface area and volume were measured and analyzed for sixteen randomly selected terminal branching units, each consisting of a terminal bronchiole and a pair of succeeding alveolar sacs. The four types of asymmetry ratios concerning alveolar sac mouth diameter, alveolar sac surface area, and alveolar sac volume are measured. This is the first ever finding of the asymmetry ratio for the terminal bronchioles and alveolar sacs, and it is noteworthy that an appreciable degree of branching asymmetry was observed among the alveolar sacs at the terminal end of the airway tree, despite the number of samples was small yet. The series of efficient techniques developed and confirmed in this study, from sample preparation to quantification, is expected to contribute to a wider and exacter application of phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography to a variety of studies.

  17. Prostate contouring uncertainty in megavoltage computed tomography images acquired with a helical tomotherapy unit during image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William Y.; Chiu, Bernard; Bauman, Glenn S.; Lock, Michael; Rodrigues, George; Ash, Robert; Lewis, Craig; Fenster, Aaron; Battista, Jerry J.; Van Dyk, Jake

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the image-guidance capabilities of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT), this article compares the interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty in kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) used for radiotherapy planning with MVCT acquired with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Five prostate-cancer patients were evaluated. Each patient underwent a KVCT and an MVCT study, a total of 10 CT studies. For interobserver variability analysis, four radiation oncologists, one physicist, and two radiation therapists (seven observers in total) contoured the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) in the 10 studies. The intraobserver variability was assessed by asking all observers to repeat the contouring of 1 patient's KVCT and MVCT studies. Quantitative analysis of contour variations was performed by use of volumes and radial distances. Results: The interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty was larger in MVCT compared with KVCT. Observers consistently segmented larger volumes on MVCT where the ratio of average prostate and SV volumes was 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. On average (interobserver and intraobserver), the local delineation variability, in terms of standard deviations [Δσ = √(σ 2 MVCT - σ 2 KVCT )], increased by 0.32 cm from KVCT to MVCT. Conclusions: Although MVCT was inferior to KVCT for prostate delineation, the application of MVCT in prostate radiotherapy remains useful

  18. A simple method to compute the change in earth-atmosphere radiative balance due to a stratospheric aerosol layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoble, J.; Tanre, D.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Herman, M.

    1982-01-01

    A computer code was developed in terms of a three-layer model for the earth-atmosphere system, using a two-stream approximation for the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis was limited to variable atmosphere loading by solar radiation over an unperturbed section of the atmosphere. The scattering atmosphere above a Lambertian ground layer was considered in order to derive the planar albedo and the spherical albedo. Attention was given to the influence of the aerosol optical thickness in the stratosphere, the single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor, and the sublayer albedo. Calculations were performed of the zonal albedo and the planetary radiation balance, taking into account a stratospheric aerosol layer containing H2SO4 droplets and volcanic ash. The resulting ground temperature disturbance was computed using a Budyko (1969) climate model. Local decreases in the albedo in the summer were observed in high latitudes, implying a heating effect of the aerosol. An accompanying energy loss of 23-27 W/sq m was projected, which translates to surface temperature decreases of either 1.1 and 0.45 C, respectively, for background and volcanic aerosols.

  19. Microfabricated Bulk Piezoelectric Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Oliver M.

    Piezoelectric voltage transformers (PTs) can be used to transform an input voltage into a different, required output voltage needed in electronic and electro- mechanical systems, among other varied uses. On the macro scale, they have been commercialized in electronics powering consumer laptop liquid crystal displays, and compete with an older, more prevalent technology, inductive electromagnetic volt- age transformers (EMTs). The present work investigates PTs on smaller size scales that are currently in the academic research sphere, with an eye towards applications including micro-robotics and other small-scale electronic and electromechanical sys- tems. PTs and EMTs are compared on the basis of power and energy density, with PTs trending towards higher values of power and energy density, comparatively, indicating their suitability for small-scale systems. Among PT topologies, bulk disc-type PTs, operating in their fundamental radial extension mode, and free-free beam PTs, operating in their fundamental length extensional mode, are good can- didates for microfabrication and are considered here. Analytical modeling based on the Extended Hamilton Method is used to predict device performance and integrate mechanical tethering as a boundary condition. This model differs from previous PT models in that the electric enthalpy is used to derive constituent equations of motion with Hamilton's Method, and therefore this approach is also more generally applica- ble to other piezoelectric systems outside of the present work. Prototype devices are microfabricated using a two mask process consisting of traditional photolithography combined with micropowder blasting, and are tested with various output electri- cal loads. 4mm diameter tethered disc PTs on the order of .002cm. 3 , two orders smaller than the bulk PT literature, had the followingperformance: a prototype with electrode area ratio (input area / output area) = 1 had peak gain of 2.3 (+/- 0.1), efficiency of 33 (+/- 0

  20. Computational Modeling of Radiation Phenomenon in SiC for Nuclear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyunseok

    Silicon carbide (SiC) material has been investigated for promising nuclear materials owing to its superior thermo-mechanical properties, and low neutron cross-section. While the interest in SiC has been increasing, the lack of fundamental understanding in many radiation phenomena is an important issue. More specifically, these phenomena in SiC include the fission gas transport, radiation induced defects and its evolution, radiation effects on the mechanical stability, matrix brittleness of SiC composites, and low thermal conductivities of SiC composites. To better design SiC and SiC composite materials for various nuclear applications, understanding each phenomenon and its significance under specific reactor conditions is important. In this thesis, we used various modeling approaches to understand the fundamental radiation phenomena in SiC for nuclear applications in three aspects: (a) fission product diffusion through SiC, (b) optimization of thermodynamic stable self-interstitial atom clusters, (c) interface effect in SiC composite and their change upon radiation. In (a) fission product transport work, we proposed that Ag/Cs diffusion in high energy grain boundaries may be the upper boundary in unirradiated SiC at relevant temperature, and radiation enhanced diffusion is responsible for fast diffusion measured in post-irradiated fuel particles. For (b) the self-interstitial cluster work, thermodynamically stable clusters are identified as a function of cluster size, shape, and compositions using a genetic algorithm. We found that there are compositional and configurational transitions for stable clusters as the cluster size increases. For (c) the interface effect in SiC composite, we investigated recently proposed interface, which is CNT reinforced SiC composite. The analytical model suggests that CNT/SiC composites have attractive mechanical and thermal properties, and these fortify the argument that SiC composites are good candidate materials for the cladding

  1. Intraarticular Sacroiliac Joint Injection Under Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Technical Note to Reduce Procedural Time and Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Nam Chull

    2016-01-01

    PurposeA technique for computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided intraarticular (IA) sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection was devised to limit procedural time and radiation dose.MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective analysis and waived the requirement for informed consent. Overall, 36 consecutive diagnostic or therapeutic IA SIJ injections (unilateral, 20; bilateral, 16) performed in 34 patients (female, 18; male, 16) with a mean age of 45.5 years (range 20–76 years) under CTF guidance were analyzed, assessing technical success (i.e., IA contrast spread), procedural time, and radiation dose.ResultsAll injections were successful from a technical perspective and were free of serious complications. Respective median procedural times and effective doses of SIJ injection were as follows: unilateral, 5.28 min (range 3.58–8.00 min) and 0.11 millisievert (mSv; range 0.07–0.24 mSv); and bilateral, 6.72 min (range 4.17–21.17 min) and 0.11 mSv (range 0.09–0.51 mSv).ConclusionsGiven the high rate of technical success achieved in limited time duration and with little radiation exposure, CTF-guided IA SIJ injection is a practical and low-risk procedure.

  2. Intraarticular Sacroiliac Joint Injection Under Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Technical Note to Reduce Procedural Time and Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Nam Chull, E-mail: pncspine@gmail.com [Arumdaun Wooldul Spine Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeA technique for computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided intraarticular (IA) sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection was devised to limit procedural time and radiation dose.MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective analysis and waived the requirement for informed consent. Overall, 36 consecutive diagnostic or therapeutic IA SIJ injections (unilateral, 20; bilateral, 16) performed in 34 patients (female, 18; male, 16) with a mean age of 45.5 years (range 20–76 years) under CTF guidance were analyzed, assessing technical success (i.e., IA contrast spread), procedural time, and radiation dose.ResultsAll injections were successful from a technical perspective and were free of serious complications. Respective median procedural times and effective doses of SIJ injection were as follows: unilateral, 5.28 min (range 3.58–8.00 min) and 0.11 millisievert (mSv; range 0.07–0.24 mSv); and bilateral, 6.72 min (range 4.17–21.17 min) and 0.11 mSv (range 0.09–0.51 mSv).ConclusionsGiven the high rate of technical success achieved in limited time duration and with little radiation exposure, CTF-guided IA SIJ injection is a practical and low-risk procedure.

  3. WE-AB-303-09: Rapid Projection Computations for On-Board Digital Tomosynthesis in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X; Pitsianis, N; Yin, FF; Ren, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate fast and accurate iterative volumetric image reconstruction from limited-angle on-board projections. Methods: Intrafraction motion hinders the clinical applicability of modern radiotherapy techniques, such as lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The LIVE system may impact clinical practice by recovering volumetric information via Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS), thus entailing low time and radiation dose for image acquisition during treatment. The DTS is estimated as a deformation of prior CT via iterative registration with on-board images; this shifts the challenge to the computational domain, owing largely to repeated projection computations across iterations. We address this issue by composing efficient digital projection operators from their constituent parts. This allows us to separate the static (projection geometry) and dynamic (volume/image data) parts of projection operations by means of pre-computations, enabling fast on-board processing, while also relaxing constraints on underlying numerical models (e.g. regridding interpolation kernels). Further decoupling the projectors into simpler ones ensures the incurred memory overhead remains low, within the capacity of a single GPU. These operators depend only on the treatment plan and may be reused across iterations and patients. The dynamic processing load is kept to a minimum and maps well to the GPU computational model. Results: We have integrated efficient, pre-computable modules for volumetric ray-casting and FDK-based back-projection with the LIVE processing pipeline. Our results show a 60x acceleration of the DTS computations, compared to the previous version, using a single GPU; presently, reconstruction is attained within a couple of minutes. The present implementation allows for significant flexibility in terms of the numerical and operational projection model; we are investigating the benefit of further optimizations and accurate digital projection sub

  4. WE-AB-303-09: Rapid Projection Computations for On-Board Digital Tomosynthesis in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliopoulos, AS; Sun, X [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Pitsianis, N [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Yin, FF; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To facilitate fast and accurate iterative volumetric image reconstruction from limited-angle on-board projections. Methods: Intrafraction motion hinders the clinical applicability of modern radiotherapy techniques, such as lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The LIVE system may impact clinical practice by recovering volumetric information via Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS), thus entailing low time and radiation dose for image acquisition during treatment. The DTS is estimated as a deformation of prior CT via iterative registration with on-board images; this shifts the challenge to the computational domain, owing largely to repeated projection computations across iterations. We address this issue by composing efficient digital projection operators from their constituent parts. This allows us to separate the static (projection geometry) and dynamic (volume/image data) parts of projection operations by means of pre-computations, enabling fast on-board processing, while also relaxing constraints on underlying numerical models (e.g. regridding interpolation kernels). Further decoupling the projectors into simpler ones ensures the incurred memory overhead remains low, within the capacity of a single GPU. These operators depend only on the treatment plan and may be reused across iterations and patients. The dynamic processing load is kept to a minimum and maps well to the GPU computational model. Results: We have integrated efficient, pre-computable modules for volumetric ray-casting and FDK-based back-projection with the LIVE processing pipeline. Our results show a 60x acceleration of the DTS computations, compared to the previous version, using a single GPU; presently, reconstruction is attained within a couple of minutes. The present implementation allows for significant flexibility in terms of the numerical and operational projection model; we are investigating the benefit of further optimizations and accurate digital projection sub

  5. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  6. Radiation and environmental data analysis computer (REDAC) hardware, software band analysis procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The REDAC was conceived originally as a tape verifier for the Radiation and Environmental Data Acquisition Recorder (REDAR). From that simple beginning in 1971, the REDAC has evolved into a family of systems used for complete analysis of data obtained by the REDAR and other acquisition systems. Portable or mobile REDACs are deployed to support checkout and analysis tasks in the field. Laboratory systems are additionally used for software development, physics investigations, data base management and graphics. System configurations range from man-portable systems to a large laboratory-based system which supports time-shared analysis and development tasks. Custom operating software allows the analyst to process data either interactively or by batch procedures. Analysis packages are provided for numerous necessary functions. All these analysis procedures can be performed even on the smallest man-portable REDAC. Examples of the multi-isotope stripping and radiation isopleth mapping are presented. Techniques utilized for these operations are also presented

  7. The history and principles of optical computed tomography for scanning 3-D radiation dosimeters: 2008 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Surrey (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The current status of optical CT for 3-D radiation dosimetry is reviewed. The technique is first placed in its historical context, pointing out the relationship with other methods of optical imaging and showing how optical-CT has emerged independently in several different fields and under different names. The theoretical background of the method is described briefly and this provides the foundation for an explanation of the different types of scanner. The relative advantages and disadvantages of instruments based on scanned lasers and pixelated (area) detectors are presented. The latest generation of 'fast laser scanners' is described and the review is concluded with a discussion of the different radiation-sensitive materials used as samples in optical CT.

  8. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis With Novel Computed Tomography–Based Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S., E-mail: jsniedzielski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Yang, Jinzhong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Briere, Tina M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Terminlogy Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade 0, 45 Grade 2, and 16 Grade 3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics' performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of 19 expansion metrics had receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with area under the curve values of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade 2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade 3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions: Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian value and 98.6 mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade 3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced

  9. Computational Electromagnetic Studies for Low-Frequency Compensation of the Reflector Impulse-radiating Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    like the “winner”. Now the time domain characteris- tics are compared for a full understanding of the antenna performance. The boresight impulse...radio frequency distinct native attributes 121 TD time domain TDR time domain reflectometry TEM transverse electromagnetic TRP total radiated power UHF...cies. These undesirable backlobes have never been hypothesized, predicted or mea- sured, likely due in part to their alignment outside the primary

  10. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis With Novel Computed Tomography–Based Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S.; Yang, Jinzhong; Stingo, Francesco; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel R.; Briere, Tina M.; Liao, Zhongxing; Court, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Terminlogy Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade 0, 45 Grade 2, and 16 Grade 3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics' performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of 19 expansion metrics had receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with area under the curve values of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade 2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade 3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions: Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian value and 98.6 mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade 3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  12. Radiation doses to patients in computed tomography including a ready reckoner for dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szendroe, G.; Axelsson, B.; Leitz, W.

    1995-11-01

    The radiation burden from CT-examinations is still growing in most countries and has reached a considerable part of the total from medical diagnostic x-ray procedures. Efforts for avoiding excess radiation doses are therefore especially well motivated within this field. A survey of CT-examination techniques practised in Sweden showed that standard settings for the exposure variables are used for the vast majority of examinations. Virtually no adjustments to the patient's differences in anatomy have been performed - even for infants and children on average the same settings have been used. The adjustment of the exposure variables to the individual anatomy offers a large potential of dose savings. Amongst the imaging parameters, a change of the radiation dose will primarily influence the noise. As a starting point it is assumed that, irrespective of the patient's anatomy, the same level of noise can be accepted for a certain diagnostic task. To a large extent the noise level is determined by the number of photons that are registered in the detector. Hence, for different patient size and anatomy, the exposure should be adjusted so that the same transmitted photon fluence is achieved. An appendix with a ready reckoner for dose estimation for CT-scanners used in Sweden is attached. 7 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  13. Virtual computed tomography colonoscopy: artifacts, image quality and radiation dose load in a cadaver study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, P.; Stoehr, B.; Giacomuzzi, S.M.; Bodner, G.; Jaschke, W.; Nedden, D. zur; Klingler, A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the interdependency of spatial resolution, image reconstruction artifacts, and radiation doses in virtual CT colonoscopy by comparing various CT scanning protocols. A pig's colon with several artificial polypoid lesions was imaged after air insufflation with helical CT scanning using 1-, 3-, and 5-mm collimation, and pitch values varying from 1.0 to 3.0. Virtual endoscopic images and ''fly through'' sequences were calculated on a Sun Sparc 20 workstation (Navigator Software, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.). Several reconstruction artifacts as well as overall image quality were evaluated by three independent reviewers. In addition, radiation doses for the different CT protocols were measured as multiple-scan average dose using a 10-cm ion chamber and a standard Plexiglass body phantom. Generally, image quality and reconstruction artifacts were less affected by pitch values than by beam collimation. Thus, narrow beam collimation at higher pitch values (e. g. 3 mm/2.0) seems to be a reasonable compromise between quality of virtual endoscopic images and radiation dose load. (orig.)

  14. SIMON [Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator] combines radiation hardness with computer power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    SIMON - the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator - has been under development at the US Department of Energy's (DoE's) Savannah River Laboratory for four years. The robot's on-board intelligence units are designed to be radiation-resistant, making it able to function for extended periods within a remotely operated facility. In its current form, SIMON is being developed by the laboratory's Robotics Group for use in the site's production reactors, but it can be adapted for use in any nuclear facility, including commercial reactors. The challenge for Savannah River Laboratory engineers was to eliminate the need for human inspection of certain components. To do this, they designed a robot that could do three things for reactor operators: measure radiation; measure temperature; and provide televised views inside the reactor facility. To be useful, the robot has to be extremely mobile, and its components had to be able to survive months without maintenance in the radiation, temperature and humidity encountered in nuclear facilities. The robot also had to be cost-effective. (author)

  15. Evaluation of patients radiation dose from computed tomography during lower peripheral angiography procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlafallah, Leena Ahmed Ali

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient radiation doses in lower peripheral angiography CT examinations in Sudan. Survey was conducted in four major hospitals which almost carry out lower peripheral angiography procedures in Sudan at the time of study. All hospitals were equipped with 64 slices multi detectors CT from Toshiba (Japan). The total number of patients was 74. Information on patient's genders and ages, exposure technique factors and radiation dose were collected. The procedures performed in multi phases, up to five phases covering part of the abdomen region, which can make patients exposure reasonably high. CTDI values in the different phases ranged between (13-30) mGy. The total DLP in the four hospitals were 6888.75, 5065.05, 6608.88 and 5754.9 mGy.cm. This study provided first survey for patient dose during lower peripheral angiography procedures in Sudan. Taking into account that the CT machines were similar: the variation between patient's DLP and CTDI values in the different hospitals indicated the need of optimization of radiation protection. Staff training and awareness on factors affecting patient dose are essential.(Author)

  16. Formulation and practice of standards for radiation protection of γ-ray industrial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Rifeng; Wang Jue; Chen Weimin; Li Ping

    2009-01-01

    There are many differences between industrial CT and industrial radiography, such as imaging principle, inspection time, radiation dose and the requirements for operators etc. The national standards for radiation protection of industrial detection are not applicable to the requirements of protection and safety for γ-ray industrial CT to some extent now. In order to standardize the production and use for γ-ray industrial CT, protect the safety of operators and the public, and to promote the popularization and application of γ-ray industrial CT, it is significant to establish the national standards for radiation protection of γ-ray industrial CT as soon as possible. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the contents of this standard, and specify some important terms. Then there is a brief discussion on the existing problems during establishing such standards. At last, the paper summarize the practice of the standards passed over the past one year, which provides practicable experience for the further implementation. (authors)

  17. MRT-lattice Boltzmann computations of natural convection and volumetric radiation in a tilted square enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moufekkir, F.; Moussaoui, M.A.; Mezrhab, A. [Laboratoire de Mecanique and Energetique, Faculte des sciences, Departement de physique 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Lemonnier, D. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-ENSMA-Univ. Poitiers, ENSMA, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil cedex (France); Naji, H. [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); Laboratoire Genie Civil and geo-Environnement - LGCgE- EA 4515, UArtois/FSA Bethune, F-62400 Bethune (France)

    2012-04-15

    A numerical analysis is carried out for natural convection while in an asymmetrically heated square cavity containing an absorbing emitting medium. The numerical approach adopted uses a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann method (HTLBM) in which the mass and momentum conservation equations are solved by using multiple relaxation time (MRT) model and the energy equation is solved separately by using the finite difference method (FDM). In addition, the radiative transfer equation (RTE) is treated by the discrete ordinates method (DOM) using the S8 quadrature to evaluate the source term of the energy equation. The effects of parameters such as the Rayleigh number Ra, the optical thickness {tau} and the inclination angle {phi}, are studied numerically to assess their impact on the flow and temperature distribution. The results presented in terms of isotherms, streamlines and averaged Nusselt number, show that in the absence of the radiation, the temperature and the flow fields are centro-symmetric and the cavity core is thermally stratified. However, radiation causes an overall increase in temperature and velocity gradients along both thermally active walls

  18. An Accurate Method for Computing the Absorption of Solar Radiation by Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method is based upon molecular line parameters and makes use of a far wing scaling approximation and k distribution approach previously applied to the computation of the infrared cooling rate due to water vapor. Taking into account the wave number dependence of the incident solar flux, the solar heating rate is computed for the entire water vapor spectrum and for individual absorption bands. The accuracy of the method is tested against line by line calculations. The method introduces a maximum error of 0.06 C/day. The method has the additional advantage over previous methods in that it can be applied to any portion of the spectral region containing the water vapor bands. The integrated absorptances and line intensities computed from the molecular line parameters were compared with laboratory measurements. The comparison reveals that, among the three different sources, absorptance is the largest for the laboratory measurements.

  19. Computer graphic displays for microscopists assisting in evaluating radiation-damaged cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, P.H.; Olson, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    Computer analysis of digitized images of cells and tissues has developed into a highly refined methodology. In particular, the nuclear chromatin has numerous features that allow reliable recognition and classification of cells. This was hardly a surprise to cytopathologists, since chromatin texture and staining properties have always provided valuable clues for visual diagnosis. However, two aspects of computer assessment came as a surprise. First, there was the consistency with which chromatin distribution patterns express the state of the cell, its differentiation, and the sensitivity with which a change in the cell's environment is reflected in the chromatin. Second, chromatin texture provides highly discriminating, objectively measurable features that are not perceived by human visual assessment. Numerous studies have shown that computer assessment is capable of making clear-cut discriminations in cases where human cytodiagnostic evaluation is not effective

  20. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  1. Program system for computation of the terrestrial gamma-radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkegaard, P.; Loevborg, L.

    1979-02-01

    A system of computer programs intended for solution of the plane one-dimensional photon transport equation in the case of two adjacent media is described, and user's guides for the programs are given. One medium represents a natural ground with uniformly distributed potassium, uranium, and thorium gamma-ray emitters. The other medium is usually air with no radioactive contaminants. The solution method is the double-P 1 approximation with logarithmic energy spacing. The complete data-processing system GB contains the transport-theory code GAMP1, the code GFX for computation of scalar flux and dose rate, and a number of auxiliary programs and data files. (author)

  2. Comparison of adult and child radiation equivalent doses from 2 dental cone-beam computed tomography units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Najjar, Anas; Colosi, Dan; Dauer, Lawrence T; Prins, Robert; Patchell, Gayle; Branets, Iryna; Goren, Arthur D; Faber, Richard D

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans, there has been a transition toward these scans' replacing traditional radiographs for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Children represent a significant proportion of orthodontic patients. Similar CBCT exposure settings are predicted to result in higher equivalent doses to the head and neck organs in children than in adults. The purpose of this study was to measure the difference in equivalent organ doses from different scanners under similar settings in children compared with adults. Two phantom heads were used, representing a 33-year-old woman and a 5-year-old boy. Optically stimulated dosimeters were placed at 8 key head and neck organs, and equivalent doses to these organs were calculated after scanning. The manufacturers' predefined exposure settings were used. One scanner had a pediatric preset option; the other did not. Scanning the child's phantom head with the adult settings resulted in significantly higher equivalent radiation doses to children compared with adults, ranging from a 117% average ratio of equivalent dose to 341%. Readings at the cervical spine level were decreased significantly, down to 30% of the adult equivalent dose. When the pediatric preset was used for the scans, there was a decrease in the ratio of equivalent dose to the child mandible and thyroid. CBCT scans with adult settings on both phantom heads resulted in higher radiation doses to the head and neck organs in the child compared with the adult. In practice, this might result in excessive radiation to children scanned with default adult settings. Collimation should be used when possible to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. While CBCT scans offer a valuable tool, use of CBCT scans should be justified on a specific case-by-case basis. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  5. Computation of thyroid doses and carcinogenic radiation risks to patients undergoing neck CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huda, W.; Spampinato, M. V.; Tipnis, S. V.; Magill, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how differences in patient anatomy and CT technical factors in neck CT impact on thyroid doses and the corresponding carcinogenic risks. The CTDI vol and dose-length product used in 11 consecutive neck CT studies, as well as data on automatic exposure control (AEC) tube current variation(s) from the image DICOM header, were recorded. For each CT image that included the thyroid, the mass equivalent water cylinder was estimated based on the patient cross-sectional area and average relative attenuation coefficient (Hounsfield unit, HU). Patient thyroid doses were estimated by accounting for radiation intensity at the location of the patient's thyroid, patient size and the scan length. Thyroid doses were used to estimate thyroid cancer risks as a function of patient demographics using risk factors in BEIR VII. The length of the thyroid glands ranged from 21 to 54 mm with an average length of 42±12 mm. Water cylinder diameters corresponding to the central slice through the patient thyroid ranged from 18 to 32 cm with a mean of 25±5 cm. The average CTDI vol (32-cm phantom) used to perform these scans was 26±6 mGy, but the use of an AEC increased the tube current by an average of 44 % at the thyroid mid-point. Thyroid doses ranged from 29 to 80 mGy, with an average of 55±19 mGy. A 20-y-old female receiving the highest thyroid dose of 80 mGy would have a thyroid cancer risk of nearly 0.1 %, but radiation risks decreased very rapidly with increasing patient age. The key factors that affect thyroid doses in neck CT examinations are the radiation intensity at the thyroid location and the size of the patient. The corresponding patient thyroid cancer risk is markedly influenced by patient sex and age. (authors)

  6. Radiation dose reduction in a neonatal intensive care unit in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frayre, A.S.; Torres, P.; Gaona, E.; Rivera, T.; Franco, J.; Molina, N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by chest x-rays in neonatal care with thermoluminescent dosimetry and to determine the level of exposure where the quantum noise level does not affect the diagnostic image quality in order to reduce the dose to neonates. In pediatric radiology, especially the prematurely born children are highly sensitive to the radiation because of the highly mitotic state of their cells; in general, the sensitivity of a tissue to radiation is directly proportional to its rate of proliferation. The sample consisted of 208 neonatal chest x-rays of 12 neonates admitted and treated in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). All the neonates were preterm in the range of 28–34 weeks, with a mean of 30.8 weeks. Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) values for chest x-rays are higher than the DRL of 50 μGy proposed by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In order to reduce the dose to neonates, the optimum image quality was achieved by determining the level of ESD where level noise does not affect the diagnostic image quality. The optimum ESD was estimated for additional 20 chest x-rays increasing kVp and reducing mAs until quantum noise affects image quality. - Highlights: ► Entrance surface doses (ESD) in neonates were measured. ► Doses measured in neonates examinations were higher than those reported by literature. ► Reference levels in neonatal studies are required. ► Radiation protection optimization was proposed.

  7. Bulk velocity extraction for nano-scale Newtonian flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenfei, E-mail: zwenfei@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Mechanical Reliability for Heavy Equipments and Large Structures of Hebei Province, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Sun, Hongyu [Key Laboratory of Mechanical Reliability for Heavy Equipments and Large Structures of Hebei Province, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2012-04-16

    The conventional velocity extraction algorithm in MDS method has difficulty to determine the small flow velocity. This study proposes a new method to calculate the bulk velocity in nano-flows. Based on the Newton's law of viscosity, according to the calculated viscosities and shear stresses, the flow velocity can be obtained by numerical integration. This new method can overcome the difficulty existed in the conventional MDS method and improve the stability of the computational process. Numerical results show that this method is effective for the extraction of bulk velocity, no matter the bulk velocity is large or small. -- Highlights: ► Proposed a new method to calculate the bulk velocity in nano-flows. ► It is effective for the extraction of small bulk velocity. ► The accuracy, convergence and stability of the new method is good.

  8. Bulk velocity extraction for nano-scale Newtonian flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenfei; Sun, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    The conventional velocity extraction algorithm in MDS method has difficulty to determine the small flow velocity. This study proposes a new method to calculate the bulk velocity in nano-flows. Based on the Newton's law of viscosity, according to the calculated viscosities and shear stresses, the flow velocity can be obtained by numerical integration. This new method can overcome the difficulty existed in the conventional MDS method and improve the stability of the computational process. Numerical results show that this method is effective for the extraction of bulk velocity, no matter the bulk velocity is large or small. -- Highlights: ► Proposed a new method to calculate the bulk velocity in nano-flows. ► It is effective for the extraction of small bulk velocity. ► The accuracy, convergence and stability of the new method is good.

  9. A rapid, computational approach for assessing interfraction esophageal motion for use in stereotactic body radiation therapy planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Cardenas, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a rapid computational method for quantifying interfraction motion of the esophagus in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy on a magnetic resonance (MR guided radiation therapy system. Methods and materials: Patients who underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy had simulation computed tomography (CT and on-treatment MR scans performed. The esophagus was contoured on each scan. CT contours were transferred to MR volumes via rigid registration. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine files containing contour points were exported to MATLAB. In-plane CT and MR contour points were spline interpolated, yielding boundaries with centroid positions, CCT and CMR. MR contour points lying outside of the CT contour were extracted. For each such point, BMR(j, a segment from CCT intersecting BMR(j, was produced; its intersection with the CT contour, BCT(i, was calculated. The length of the segment Sij, between BCT(i and BMR(j, was found. The orientation θ was calculated from Sij vector components:θ = arctan[(Sijy / (Sijx]A set of segments {Sij} was produced for each slice and binned by quadrant with 0° < θ ≤ 90°, 90° < θ ≤ 180°, 180° < θ ≤ 270°, and 270° < θ ≤ 360° for the left anterior, right anterior, right posterior, and left posterior quadrants, respectively. Slices were binned into upper, middle, and lower esophageal (LE segments. Results: Seven patients, each having 3 MR scans, were evaluated, yielding 1629 axial slices and 84,716 measurements. The LE segment exhibited the greatest magnitude of motion. The mean LE measurements in the left anterior, left posterior, right anterior, and right posterior were 5.2 ± 0.07 mm, 6.0 ± 0.09 mm, 4.8 ± 0.08 mm, and 5.1 ± 0.08 mm, respectively. There was considerable interpatient variability. Conclusions: The LE segment exhibited the greatest magnitude of mobility compared with the

  10. Image Registration of Cone-Beam Computer Tomography and Preprocedural Computer Tomography Aids in Localization of Adrenal Veins and Decreasing Radiation Dose in Adrenal Vein Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busser, Wendy M. H., E-mail: wendy.busser@radboudumc.nl; Arntz, Mark J.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Deinum, Jaap [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of General Internal Medicine (Netherlands); Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lange, Frank de; Schultze Kool, Leo J. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeWe assessed whether image registration of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) images indicating the locations of the adrenal veins can aid in increasing the success rate of first-attempts adrenal vein sampling (AVS) and therefore decreasing patient radiation dose.Materials and Methods CBCT scans were acquired in the interventional suite (Philips Allura Xper FD20) and rigidly registered to the vertebra in previously acquired CE-CT. Adrenal vein locations were marked on the CT image and superimposed with live fluoroscopy and digital-subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide the AVS. Seventeen first attempts at AVS were performed with image registration and retrospectively compared with 15 first attempts without image registration performed earlier by the same 2 interventional radiologists. First-attempt AVS was considered successful when both adrenal vein samples showed representative cortisol levels. Sampling time, dose-area product (DAP), number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time, and skin dose were recorded.ResultsWithout image registration, the first attempt at sampling was successful in 8 of 15 procedures indicating a success rate of 53.3 %. This increased to 76.5 % (13 of 17) by adding CBCT and CE-CT image registration to AVS procedures (p = 0.266). DAP values (p = 0.001) and DSA runs (p = 0.026) decreased significantly by adding image registration guidance. Sampling and fluoroscopy times and skin dose showed no significant changes.ConclusionGuidance based on registration of CBCT and previously acquired diagnostic CE-CT can aid in enhancing localization of the adrenal veins thereby increasing the success rate of first-attempt AVS with a significant decrease in the number of used DSA runs and, consequently, radiation dose required.

  11. The radiation spectroanalysis controlled and processed by a mini-computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minogashira, Toshiaki; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Shin

    1975-01-01

    The principle of radiation spectroanalysis with minicomputer-controlled multi-channel analyzer system is explained. In the first part, the fundamental features of minicomputers are generally discussed with particular emphasis upon the combination with various I/O devices. In the second part, the MCA(multi-channel spectrum analyzer) system controlled by a minicomputer is explained from the aspects of both hardware and software. As for the hardware, the roles of ADC, console typewriter, paper tape I/O system, cathode ray tubes, X-Y recorder, and other auxiliary memories such as magnetic tapes and drums are discussed. As for the software, the function of system monitor is explained together with its block chart and individual software packages. The third part is devoted to the explanation of the mathematical methods for analyzing γ-radiation spectra. These include the smoothing of spectra with appropriate weighting coefficients, fitting with polynomials, and the detection of peaks by first derivative method. Some examples of spectroanalysis by these mathematical methods are presented. Recent works performed by other authors including many Japanese are also referred. (Aoki, K.)

  12. A radiosity-based model to compute the radiation transfer of soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Li, Yuguang

    2011-11-01

    A good understanding of interactions of electromagnetic radiation with soil surface is important for a further improvement of remote sensing methods. In this paper, a radiosity-based analytical model for soil Directional Reflectance Factor's (DRF) distributions was developed and evaluated. The model was specifically dedicated to the study of radiation transfer for the soil surface under tillage practices. The soil was abstracted as two dimensional U-shaped or V-shaped geometric structures with periodic macroscopic variations. The roughness of the simulated surfaces was expressed as a ratio of the height to the width for the U and V-shaped structures. The assumption was made that the shadowing of soil surface, simulated by U or V-shaped grooves, has a greater influence on the soil reflectance distribution than the scattering properties of basic soil particles of silt and clay. Another assumption was that the soil is a perfectly diffuse reflector at a microscopic level, which is a prerequisite for the application of the radiosity method. This radiosity-based analytical model was evaluated by a forward Monte Carlo ray-tracing model under the same structural scenes and identical spectral parameters. The statistics of these two models' BRF fitting results for several soil structures under the same conditions showed the good agreements. By using the model, the physical mechanism of the soil bidirectional reflectance pattern was revealed.

  13. Radiation dose reduction in a neonatal intensive care unit in computed radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayre, A S; Torres, P; Gaona, E; Rivera, T; Franco, J; Molina, N

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by chest x-rays in neonatal care with thermoluminescent dosimetry and to determine the level of exposure where the quantum noise level does not affect the diagnostic image quality in order to reduce the dose to neonates. In pediatric radiology, especially the prematurely born children are highly sensitive to the radiation because of the highly mitotic state of their cells; in general, the sensitivity of a tissue to radiation is directly proportional to its rate of proliferation. The sample consisted of 208 neonatal chest x-rays of 12 neonates admitted and treated in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). All the neonates were preterm in the range of 28-34 weeks, with a mean of 30.8 weeks. Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) values for chest x-rays are higher than the DRL of 50 μGy proposed by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In order to reduce the dose to neonates, the optimum image quality was achieved by determining the level of ESD where level noise does not affect the diagnostic image quality. The optimum ESD was estimated for additional 20 chest x-rays increasing kVp and reducing mAs until quantum noise affects image quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SKYSHIN: A computer code for calculating radiation dose over a barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.L.; Boland, J.R.; Dickman, P.T.

    1986-11-01

    SKYSHIN is a computer code for calculating the radioactive dose (mrem), when there is a barrier between the point source and the receptor. The two geometrical configurations considered are: the source and receptor separated by a rectangular wall, and the source at the bottom of a cylindrical hole in the ground. Each gamma ray traveling over the barrier is assumed to be scattered at a single point. The dose to a receptor from such paths is numerically integrated for the total dose, with symmetry used to reduce the triple integral to a double integral. The buildup factor used along a straight line through air is based on published data, and extrapolated in a stable way to low energy levels. This buildup factor was validated by comparing calculated and experimental line-of-sight doses. The entire code shows good agreement to limited field data. The code runs on a CDC or on a Vax computer, and could be modified easily for others

  15. The LLNL Multiuser Tandem Laboratory computer-controlled radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homann, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The Physics Department of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently constructed a Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (MTL) to perform a variety of basic and applied measurement programs. The laboratory and its research equipment were constructed with support from a consortium of LLNL Divisions, Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, and the University of California. Primary design goals for the facility were inexpensive construction and operation, high beam quality at a large number of experimental stations, and versatility in adapting to new experimental needs. To accomplish these goals, our main design decisions were to place the accelerator in an unshielded structure, to make use of reconfigured cyclotrons as effective switching magnets, and to rely on computer control systems for both radiological protection and highly reproducible and well-characterized accelerator operation. This paper addresses the radiological control computer system

  16. A new software tool for computing Earth's atmospheric transmission of near- and far-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a new software tool, ATRAN, which computes the transmittance of Earth's atmosphere at near- and far-infrared wavelengths. We compare the capabilities of this program with others currently available and demonstrate its utility for observational data calibration and reduction. The program employs current water-vapor and ozone models to produce fast and accurate transmittance spectra for wavelengths ranging from 0.8 microns to 10 mm.

  17. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1985-November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1986-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Radiological Research Laboratory of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University. The bulk of the research of the Laboratory involves basic and fundamental aims, not confined to radiotherapy. Research carried out in the Laboratory covers the determination of microdosimetry quantities, computer simulation of particle tracks, determination of oncogenic transformation, and the transfection of DNA into cells. The Hallmark of the Laboratory is the interaction between physics and biology

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  5. Radiation Dose to the Lens of the Eye from Computed Tomography Scans of the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januzis, Natalie Ann

    While it is well known that exposure to radiation can result in cataract formation, questions still remain about the presence of a dose threshold in radiation cataractogenesis. Since the exposure history from diagnostic CT exams is well documented in a patient's medical record, the population of patients chronically exposed to radiation from head CT exams may be an interesting area to explore for further research in this area. However, there are some challenges in estimating lens dose from head CT exams. An accurate lens dosimetry model would have to account for differences in imaging protocols, differences in head size, and the use of any dose reduction methods. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method to estimate radiation dose to the lens of the eye for patients receiving CT scans of the head. This research is comprised of a physics component, in which a lens dosimetry model was derived for head CT, and a clinical component, which involved the application of that dosimetry model to patient data. The physics component includes experiments related to the physical measurement of the radiation dose to the lens by various types of dosimeters placed within anthropomorphic phantoms. These dosimeters include high-sensitivity MOSFETs, TLDs, and radiochromic film. The six anthropomorphic phantoms used in these experiments range in age from newborn to adult. First, the lens dose from five clinically relevant head CT protocols was measured in the anthropomorphic phantoms with MOSFET dosimeters on two state-of-the-art CT scanners. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), which is a standard CT output index, was compared to the measured lens doses. Phantom age-specific CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factors were derived using linear regression analysis. Since head size can vary among individuals of the same age, a method was derived to estimate the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor using the effective head diameter. These conversion

  6. Assessment of radiation doses to adult patients in computed tomography procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabashi, Kabashi Hommeda Yosif

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess radiation dose and estimate the effective dose in three different detectors of CT scanners (64 slices, 16 slices and dual slice) for routine CT investigation. A total of 60 patients were examined in this study. 20 patients for dual slice (10 patient for chest and 10 for abdomen, 20 patient for sixteen slices (10 for chest and 10 for abdomen ) and 20 for sixty four slices (10 for chest and 10 for abdomen). The mean dose values for CT chest for sixteen slices were DLP 152.4±56,76 mGy.cm, CTDIvo1 4.53±1.47 mGy ED 2.13±0.974 mSv, while for dual slice the mean values were DLP is 167±55,51 mGy.cm. CTDIvo1 5.02±1.41 mGy ED 2.3±0.77 mSv, while the mean dose values for sixty four slice were DLP 567±43.63 mGy.cm,CTDIvo1 15.08±0.252 ED 7.9±0.61 mSv and for CT abdomen the mean dose values for sixteen slices were DLP 306.6±43.63 mGy.cm, CTDIvo1 6.45±3.31 mGy ED 4.59±1.83 mSv, while for dual slice the mean dose values were DLP 208±78.46 mGy.cm, CTDIvo1 27±1.46 mGy ED 3.12±1.18 mSv, while for sixty four slices the mean dose values were DLP 694.6±28.44 mGy.cm, CTDIvol 121.56±0.250 mGy ED 10.42±0.43 mSv dual slice delivered the least radiation dose while 16 and 64 slice scanners delivered the highest radiation dose. CT dose optimization protocol is not implemented in all departments. (author)

  7. Computed tomography for light materials using a monochromatic X-ray beam produced by parametric X-ray radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Y., E-mail: yahayak@lebra.nihon-u.ac.jp [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Hayakawa, K.; Inagaki, M. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Kaneda, T. [Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Sakaecho-Nishi 2-870-1, Matsudo 271-8587 (Japan); Nakao, K.; Nogami, K. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Sakae, T. [Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Sakaecho-Nishi 2-870-1, Matsudo 271-8587 (Japan); Sakai, T.; Sato, I. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba 305-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application, Nihon University, Narashinodai 7-24-1, Funabashi 274-8501 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) for light materials such as soft biological tissues was performed using a monochromatic X-ray beam provided by a parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) source at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA) of Nihon University. Using a high-efficiency flat panel detector (FPD), each projection image for CT was taken with exposure times of 5 or 10 s, and 60–360 projection images in each run were obtained with total measurement time of 5 min to 1 h. CT images were obtained from the projection images using the conventional calculation method. The typical tomograms obtained had sharp outlines, which are likely attributable to the propagation-based phase contrast.

  8. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Kavitha; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Shepherd, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications

  9. Effect of supply voltage and body-biasing on single-event transient pulse quenching in bulk fin field-effect-transistor process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jun-Ting; Chen Shu-Ming; Chen Jian-Jun; Huang Peng-Cheng; Song Rui-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Charge sharing is becoming an important topic as the feature size scales down in fin field-effect-transistor (FinFET) technology. However, the studies of charge sharing induced single-event transient (SET) pulse quenching with bulk FinFET are reported seldomly. Using three-dimensional technology computer aided design (3DTCAD) mixed-mode simulations, the effects of supply voltage and body-biasing on SET pulse quenching are investigated for the first time in bulk FinFET process. Research results indicate that due to an enhanced charge sharing effect, the propagating SET pulse width decreases with reducing supply voltage. Moreover, compared with reverse body-biasing (RBB), the circuit with forward body-biasing (FBB) is vulnerable to charge sharing and can effectively mitigate the propagating SET pulse width up to 53% at least. This can provide guidance for radiation-hardened bulk FinFET technology especially in low power and high performance applications. (paper)

  10. Evaluation of spent fuel isotopics, radiation spectra and decay heat using the scale computational system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Hermann, O.W.; Ryman, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    In order to be a self-sufficient system for transport/storage cask shielding and heat transfer analysis, the SCALE system developers included modules to evaluate spent fuel radiation spectra and decay heat. The primary module developed for these analyses is ORIGEN-S which is an updated verision of the original ORIGEN code. The COUPLE module was also developed to enable ORIGEN-S to easily utilize multigroup cross sections and neutron flux data during a depletion analysis. Finally, the SAS2 control module was developed for automating the depletion and decay via ORIGEN-S while using burnup-dependent neutronic data based on a user-specified fuel assembly and reactor history. The ORIGEN-S data libraries available for depletion and decay have also been significantly updated from that developed with the original ORIGEN code

  11. Computer simulation of radiation-induced nanostructure formation in amorphous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.-D.; Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro; Wang, Lumin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 3D simulations based on a theoretical model were developed to investigate radiation-induced nanostructure formation in amorphous materials. Model variables include vacancy production and recombination rates, ion sputtering effects, and redeposition of sputtered atoms. In addition, a phase field model was developed to predict vacancy diffusion as a function of free energies of mixing and interfacial energies. The distribution profile of the vacancy production rate along the depth of an irradiated matrix was considered as a near Gaussian approximation according to Monte-Carlo TRIM code calculations. Dynamic processes responsible for nanostructure evolution were simulated by updating the vacancy concentration profile over time. Simulated morphologies include cellular nanoholes, nanowalls, nanovoids, and nanofibers, with the resultant morphology dependant upon the incident ion species and ion fluence. These simulated morphologies are consistent with experimental observations achieved under comparable experimental conditions. Our model provides a distinct numerical approach to accurately predicting morphological results for ion-irradiation-induced nanostructures.

  12. Computer aided periodical and regulated service tests on radiation measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandner, W.; Lin, R.; Rothhaupt, W.

    1994-01-01

    Measuring systems for radioactive radiation, which must be registered by official order, have to be tested periodically according to laid down rules (WKP). A strategy for a test-device was drawn up for a flexible adaption of the procedure to individual requests, but also for a standardization of the logical interface to the measuring system. Especially the interaction of testing and normal measuring procedures is clearly defined and transparent; the original functional parts of the measuring run are used during the test as far as possible. Adapation to individual requirements is controlled by ASCII-Files, so that the program code remains unchanged. The functional possibilities are extensive also for the inspections by customers and authorities. Due to the nearly automatical run of the procedure, including printout of the results, the tests are always comparable. The standard was checked by some actual projects, basede on SYSTEM 7000 (Thermo Instrument Systems GmbH) and PC runing under DOS. (orig.) [de

  13. Anatomical database generation for radiation transport modeling from computed tomography (CT) scan data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margle, S.M.; Tinnel, E.P.; Till, L.E.; Eckerman, K.F.; Durfee, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Geometric models of the anatomy are used routinely in calculations of the radiation dose in organs and tissues of the body. Development of such models has been hampered by lack of detailed anatomical information on children, and models themselves have been limited to quadratic conic sections. This summary reviews the development of an image processing workstation used to extract anatomical information from routine diagnostic CT procedure. A standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer has been augmented with an automatically loading 9-track magnetic tape drive, an 8-bit 1024 x 1024 pixel graphics adapter/monitor/film recording package, a mouse/trackball assembly, dual 20 MB removable cartridge media, a 72 MB disk drive, and a printer. Software utilized by the workstation includes a Geographic Information System (modified for manipulation of CT images), CAD software, imaging software, and various modules to ease data transfer among the software packages. 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moding, Everett J.; Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi; Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan; Ghaghada, Ketan; Johnson, G. Allan; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P 2 =0.53) and dextran accumulation (R 2 =0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment

  15. Dual-Energy Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Radiation-Induced Vascular Changes in Primary Mouse Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moding, Everett J. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Clark, Darin P.; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Yifan; Ma, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ghaghada, Ketan [The Edward B. Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Houston, Texas (United States); Johnson, G. Allan [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Badea, Cristian T., E-mail: cristian.badea@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of radiation therapy on primary tumor vasculature using dual-energy (DE) micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Primary sarcomas were generated with mutant Kras and p53. Unirradiated tumors were compared with tumors irradiated with 20 Gy. A liposomal-iodinated contrast agent was administered 1 day after treatment, and mice were imaged immediately after injection (day 1) and 3 days later (day 4) with DE micro-CT. CT-derived tumor sizes were used to assess tumor growth. After DE decomposition, iodine maps were used to assess tumor fractional blood volume (FBV) at day 1 and tumor vascular permeability at day 4. For comparison, tumor vascularity and vascular permeability were also evaluated histologically by use of CD31 immunofluorescence and fluorescently-labeled dextrans. Results: Radiation treatment significantly decreased tumor growth from day 1 to day 4 (P<.05). There was a positive correlation between CT measurement of tumor FBV on day 1 and extravasated iodine on day 4 with microvascular density (MVD) on day 4 (R{sup 2}=0.53) and dextran accumulation (R{sup 2}=0.63) on day 4, respectively. Despite no change in MVD measured by histology, tumor FBV significantly increased after irradiation as measured by DE micro-CT (0.070 vs 0.091, P<.05). Both dextran and liposomal-iodine accumulation in tumors increased significantly after irradiation, with dextran fractional area increasing 5.2-fold and liposomal-iodine concentration increasing 4.0-fold. Conclusions: DE micro-CT is an effective tool for noninvasive assessment of vascular changes in primary tumors. Tumor blood volume and vascular permeability increased after a single therapeutic dose of radiation treatment.

  16. A computation ANN model for quantifying the global solar radiation: A case study of Al-Aqabah-Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolgasem, I M; Alghoul, M A; Ruslan, M H; Chan, H Y; Khrit, N G; Sopian, K

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a computation model is developed to predict the global solar radiation (GSR) in Aqaba city based on the data recorded with association of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The data used in this work are global solar radiation (GSR), sunshine duration, maximum and minimum air temperature and relative humidity. These data are available from Jordanian meteorological station over a period of two years. The quality of GSR forecasting is compared by using different Learning Algorithms. The decision of changing the ANN architecture is essentially based on the predicted results to obtain the best ANN model for monthly and seasonal GSR. Different configurations patterns were tested using available observed data. It was found that the model using mainly sunshine duration and air temperature as inputs gives accurate results. The ANN model efficiency and the mean square error values show that the prediction model is accurate. It is found that the effect of the three learning algorithms on the accuracy of the prediction model at the training and testing stages for each time scale is mostly within the same accuracy range. (paper)

  17. [Effective Techniques to Reduce Radiation Exposure to Medical Staff during Assist of X-ray Computed Tomography Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Ryuichi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Miyachi, Yusuke; Tateishi, Satoshi; Uno, Yoshinori; Amakawa, Kazutoshi; Ohura, Hiroki; Orita, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    Medical staffs like radiological technologists, doctors, and nurses are at an increased risk of exposure to radiation while assisting the patient in a position or monitor contrast medium injection during computed tomography (CT). However, methods to protect medical staff from radiation exposure and protocols for using radiological protection equipment have not been standardized and differ among hospitals. In this study, the distribution of scattered X-rays in a CT room was measured by placing electronic personal dosimeters in locations where medical staff stands beside the CT scanner gantry while assisting the patient and the exposure dose was measured. Moreover, we evaluated non-uniform exposure and revealed effective techniques to reduce the exposure dose to medical staff during CT. The dose of the scattered X-rays was the lowest at the gantry and at the examination table during both head and abdominal CT. The dose was the highest at the trunk of the upper body of the operator corresponding to a height of 130 cm during head CT and at the head corresponding to a height of 150 cm during abdominal CT. The maximum dose to the crystalline lens was approximately 600 μSv during head CT. We found that the use of volumetric CT scanning and X-ray protective goggles, and face direction toward the gantry reduced the exposure dose, particularly to the crystalline lens, for which lower equivalent dose during CT scan has been recently recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 118.

  18. A Monte Carlo study of the energy spectra and transmission characteristics of scattered radiation from x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platten, David John

    2014-06-01

    Existing data used to calculate the barrier transmission of scattered radiation from computed tomography (CT) are based on primary beam CT energy spectra. This study uses the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system and Epp user code to determine the energy spectra of CT scatter from four different primary CT beams passing through an ICRP 110 male reference phantom. Each scatter spectrum was used as a broad-beam x-ray source in transmission simulations through seventeen thicknesses of lead (0.00-3.50 mm). A fit of transmission data to lead thickness was performed to obtain α, β and γ parameters for each spectrum. The mean energy of the scatter spectra were up to 12.3 keV lower than that of the primary spectrum. For 120 kVp scatter beams the transmission through lead was at least 50% less than predicted by existing data for thicknesses of 1.5 mm and greater; at least 30% less transmission was seen for 140 kVp scatter beams. This work has shown that the mean energy and half-value layer of CT scatter spectra are lower than those of the corresponding primary beam. The transmission of CT scatter radiation through lead is lower than that calculated with currently available data. Using the data from this work will result in less lead shielding being required for CT scanner installations.

  19. Computer-based nuclear radiation detection and instrumentation teaching laboratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, W.H.; He, Q.

    1993-01-01

    The integration of computers into the University of Florida's Nuclear Engineering Sciences teaching laboratories is based on the innovative use of MacIntosh 2 microcomputers, IEEE-488 (GPIB) communication and control bus system and protocol, compatible modular nuclear instrumentation (NIM) and test equipment, LabVIEW graphics and applications software, with locally prepared, interactive, menu-driven, HyperCard based multi-exercise laboratory instruction sets and procedures. Results thus far have been highly successful with the majority of the laboratory exercises having been implemented

  20. Densidade de um planossolo sob sistemas de cultivo avaliada por meio da tomografia computadorizada de raios gama Bulk density of an alfisol under cultivation systems in a long-term experiment evaluated with gamma ray computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Luís Bamberg

    2009-10-01

    lowland soils is based on the use of crop rotation and succession, which are essential for the control of red and black rice. The effects on the soil properties deserve studies, particularly on soil compaction. The objective of this study was to identify compacted layers in an Albaqualf under different cultivation and tillage systems, by evaluating the soil bulk density (Ds with Gamma Ray Computed Tomography (TC. The analysis was carried out in a long-term experiment, from 1985 to 2004, at an experimental station of Embrapa Clima Temperado, Capão do Leão, RS, Brazil, in a random block design with seven treatments, with four replications (T1 - one year rice with conventional tillage followed by two years fallow; T2 - continuous rice under conventional tillage; T4 - rice and soybean (Glycine Max L. rotation under conventional tillage; T5 - rice, soybean and corn (Zea maize L. rotation under conventional tillage; T6 - rice under no-tillage in the summer in succession to rye-grass (Lolium multiflorum L. in the winter; T7 - rice under no-tillage and soybean under conventional tillage rotation; T8 - control: uncultivated soil. The Gamma Ray Computed Tomography method did not identify compacted soil layers under no-tillage rice in succession to rye-grass; two fallow years in the irrigated rice production system did not prevent the formation of a compacted layer at the soil surface; and in the rice, soybean and corn rotation under conventional tillage two compacted layers were identified (0.0 to 1.5 cm and 11 to 14 cm, indicating that they may restrict the agricultural production in this cultivation system on Albaqualf soils.

  1. Fluorescent x-ray computed tomography with synchrotron radiation using fan collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Akiba, Masahiro; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Kazama, Masahiro; Hoshino, Atsunori; Watanabe, Yuuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Akatsuka, Takao; Itai, Yuji

    1996-04-01

    We describe a new system of fluorescent x-ray computed tomography applied to image nonradioactive contrast materials in vivo. The system operates on the basis of computed tomography (CT) of the first generation. The experiment was also simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The research was carried out at the BLNE-5A bending-magnet beam line of the Tristan Accumulation Ring in Kek, Japan. An acrylic cylindrical phantom containing five paraxial channels of 5 and 4 mm diameters was imaged. The channels were filled with a diluted iodine-based contrast material, with iodine concentrations of 2 mg/ml and 500 (mu) g/ml. Spectra obtained with the system's high purity germanium (HPGe) detector separated clearly the K(alpha ) and K(beta 1) x-ray fluorescent lines, and the Compton scattering. CT images were reconstructed from projections generated by integrating the counts in these spectral lines. The method had adequate sensitivity and detection power, as shown by the experiment and predicted by the simulations, to show the iodine content of the phantom channels, which corresponded to 1 and 4 (mu) g iodine content per pixel in the reconstructed images.

  2. MILDOS - a computer program for calculating environmental radiation doses from uranium recovery operations. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Bander, T.J.

    1981-04-01

    MILDOS is a Fortran Computer Code which calculates the dose commitments received by individuals and the general population within an 80 kilometer radius of an operating uranium recovery facility. In addition air and ground concentrations are presented for individual locations, as well as for a generalized population grid. Extra-regional population doses resulting from transport of radon and export of agricultural produce are also displayed. The transport of radiological emissions from point and area sources is predicted by using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model. Mechanisms such as radioactive decay, plume depletion by deposition, ingrowth of daughter products and resuspension of deposited radionuclides are included in the transport model. Alterations in operation throughout the facility's lifetime can be accounted for in the input stream. The pathways considered are: inhalation; external exposure from ground shine and cloud immersion; and ingestion of vegetables, meat and milk. Dose commitments are calculated primarily on the basis of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Predictive 40 CFR 190 and 10 CFR 20 compliances are also performed. This computer code is designed primarily for uranium milling facilities and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes

  3. Effect of radiation dose and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on image quality of pulmonary computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Jiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Inano, Sachiko; Terasaki, Mariko; Akai, Hiroyuki; Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of dose and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on image quality of pulmonary computed tomography (CT). Inflated and fixed porcine lungs were scanned with a 64-slice CT system at 10, 20, 40 and 400 mAs. Using automatic exposure control, 40 mAs was chosen as standard dose. Scan data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and ASIR. Image pairs were obtained by factorial combination of images at a selected level. Using a 21-point scale, three experienced radiologists independently rated differences in quality between adjacently displayed paired images for image noise, image sharpness and conspicuity of tiny nodules. A subjective quality score (SQS) for each image was computed based on Anderson's functional measurement theory. The standard deviation was recorded as a quantitative noise measurement. At all doses examined, SQSs improved with ASIR for all evaluation items. No significant differences were noted between the SQSs for 40%-ASIR images obtained at 20 mAs and those for FBP images at 40 mAs. Compared to the FBP algorithm, ASIR for lung CT can enable an approximately 50% dose reduction from the standard dose while preserving visualization of small structures. (author)

  4. Computed and conventional chest radiography: a comparison of image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramli, K.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Ng, K-H.; Hussain, A.F.; Mahmud, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality and entrance skin dose (ESD) for film-screen and computed chest radiography. Analysis of the image quality and dose on chest radiography was carried out on a conventional X-ray unit using film-screen, storage phosphor plates and selenium drum direct chest radiography. For each receptor, ESD was measured in 60 patients using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Images were printed on 35 x 43 cm films. Image quality was assessed subjectively by evaluation of anatomic features and estimation of the image quality, following the guidelines established by the protocols of the Commission of the European Communities. There was no statistically significant difference noted between the computed and conventional images (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P>0.05). Imaging of the mediastinum and peripheral lung structures were better visualized with the storage phosphor and selenium drum technique than with the film-screen combination. The patients' mean ESD for chest radiography using the storage phosphor, film-screen combination and selenium drum was 0.20, 0.20 and 0.25 mGy, respectively, with no statistically significant difference with P > 0.05 (χ 2 tests) Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  5. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  12. Prospective Electrocardiogram-Gated Multidetector Row Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography. Analysis of Quality Image and Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, P.; Capunay, C.; Deviggiano, A.; Tajer, C.D.; Vallejos, J.; Goldsmit, A.; Garcia, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography coronary angiography (MDCT-CA) has become a useful diagnostic tool for the direct quantification of coronary stenosis, for identifying coronary anomalies and for the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite its clinical value has been questioned due to the effective radiation dose (ERD) received by each patient, radiation exposure is similar to other studies. However, different strategies are permanently tested in order to reduce the ERD maintaining adequate and diagnostic image quality. Objectives: To determine the image quality and effective radiation dose (ERD) of prospective electrocardiogram-gated multidetector row computed tomography coronary angiography (PMDCTCA) (the x-ray beam is turned on for only a short portion of diastole) compared to retrospective ECG gating (RMDCTCA) (the x-ray beam is turned on throughout the cardiac cycle) and a preliminary approach of its diagnostic accuracy compared to digital invasive coronary angiography (CA). Material and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease and sinus rhythm were evaluated with PMDCT-CA and compared to a control group who underwent RMDCTCA. Image quality was analyzed by two reviewers. Interobserver concordance and ERD were determined. The diagnostic accuracy of PMDCT-CA compared to CA to detect coronary artery stenosis > 50% was assessed in 30 patients. Results: There were no significant differences in the image quality between both groups. Agreement between the reviewers for segment image quality scores was k = 0.92. Mean ERD was 3.5 mSv for PMDCT-CA compared to 9.7 and 12.9 mSv for RMDCT-CA with and without tube current modulation, respectively. Individual analysis including all segments showed that the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PMDCT-CA for the detection of coronary stenosis were 94.74%, 81.82%, 90% and 90%, respectively. Conclusion: Our initial experience

  13. Computed neutron response of spherical moderator-detector systems for radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhairyawan, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    Neutrons of energies below 500 keV are important from the point of view of radiation protection of personnel working around reactors. However, as no neutron sources are available at lower energies, no measured values of neutron energy response are available between thermal and 0.5 MeV (but for Sb-Be source at 24 keV). The response functions in this range are, therefore, arrived at theoretically. After giving a comprehensive review of the work done in the field of response of moderated neutron detectors, a Monte Carlo method developed for this purpose is described and used to calculate energy response functions of the two spherical moderator-detector systems, namely, one using a central BF 3 counter and the other using 6 LiI(Eu) scintillator of 0.490 dia crystal. The polythene sphere diameter ranged from 2'' to 12''. The results obtained follow the trend predicted by other calculations and experiments, but are a definite improvement over them, because the most recent data on cross sections and angular distribution are used and the opacity of the detector i.e. the presence and size of the detector within the moderator is taken into account in the present calculations. The reasons for the discrepancies in the present results and those obtained earlier by other methods are discussed. The response of the Leake counter arrived at by the present method agrees very well with experimental calibration. (M.G.B.)

  14. Longitudinal assessment of carotid atherosclerosis after Radiation Therapy using Computed Tomography: A case control Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzidei, Michele [Rome Univ. ' ' La Sapienza' ' (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Suri, Jasjit S.; Piga, Mario [AtheroPoint TM LLC, Roseville, CA (United States). Monitoring and Diagnostic Div.; Global Biomedical Technologies, Inc., CA (United States). Point of Care Devices; Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (United States). Electrical Engineering Dept.; Saba, Luca [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Vascular Surgery; Laddeo, Giancarlo [New York Univ. Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Argiolas, Giovanni Maria [Azienda Ospedaliera Brotzu, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Raz, Eytan [Rome Univ. ' ' La Sapienza' ' (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; New York Univ. Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2016-01-15

    To study the carotid artery plaque composition and its volume changes in a group of patients at baseline and 2 years after head and neck radiation therapy treatment (HNXRT). In this retrospective study, 62 patients (41 males; mean age 63 years; range 52-81) who underwent HNXRT and 40 patients (24 males; mean age 65) who underwent surgical resection of neoplasm and did not undergo HNXRT were assessed, with 2-year follow-up. The carotid artery plaque volumes, as well as the volume of the sub-components (fatty-mixed-calcified), were semiautomatically quantified. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were used to test the hypothesis. In the HNXRT group, there was a statistically significant increase in the total volume of the carotid artery plaques (from 533 to 746 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.001), in the fatty plaques (103 vs. 202 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.001) and mixed plaque component volume (328 vs. 419 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.034). A statistically significant variation (from 21.8 % to 27.6 %) in the percentage of the fatty tissue was found. of this preliminary study suggest that HNXRT promotes increased carotid artery plaque volume, particularly the fatty plaque component. (orig.)

  15. Optimising the neutron environment of Radiation Portal Monitors: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Mark R., E-mail: mark.gilbert@ccfe.ac.uk [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Ghani, Zamir [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); McMillan, John E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hicks building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Packer, Lee W. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    Efficient and reliable detection of radiological or nuclear threats is a crucial part of national and international efforts to prevent terrorist activities. Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs), which are deployed worldwide, are intended to interdict smuggled fissile material by detecting emissions of neutrons and gamma rays. However, considering the range and variety of threat sources, vehicular and shielding scenarios, and that only a small signature is present, it is important that the design of the RPMs allows these signatures to be accurately differentiated from the environmental background. Using Monte-Carlo neutron-transport simulations of a model {sup 3}He detector system we have conducted a parameter study to identify the optimum combination of detector shielding, moderation, and collimation that maximises the sensitivity of neutron-sensitive RPMs. These structures, which could be simply and cost-effectively added to existing RPMs, can improve the detector response by more than a factor of two relative to an unmodified, bare design. Furthermore, optimisation of the air gap surrounding the helium tubes also improves detector efficiency.

  16. Computing diffuse fraction of global horizontal solar radiation: A model comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervishi, Sokol; Mahdavi, Ardeshir

    2012-06-01

    For simulation-based prediction of buildings' energy use or expected gains from building-integrated solar energy systems, information on both direct and diffuse component of solar radiation is necessary. Available measured data are, however, typically restricted to global horizontal irradiance. There have been thus many efforts in the past to develop algorithms for the derivation of the diffuse fraction of solar irradiance. In this context, the present paper compares eight models for estimating diffuse fraction of irradiance based on a database of measured irradiance from Vienna, Austria. These models generally involve mathematical formulations with multiple coefficients whose values are typically valid for a specific location. Subsequent to a first comparison of these eight models, three better performing models were selected for a more detailed analysis. Thereby, the coefficients of the models were modified to account for Vienna data. The results suggest that some models can provide relatively reliable estimations of the diffuse fractions of the global irradiance. The calibration procedure could only slightly improve the models' performance.

  17. AITRAC: Augmented Interactive Transient Radiation Analysis by Computer. User's information manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    AITRAC is a program designed for on-line, interactive, DC, and transient analysis of electronic circuits. The program solves linear and nonlinear simultaneous equations which characterize the mathematical models used to predict circuit response. The program features 100 external node--200 branch capability; conversional, free-format input language; built-in junction, FET, MOS, and switch models; sparse matrix algorithm with extended-precision H matrix and T vector calculations, for fast and accurate execution; linear transconductances: beta, GM, MU, ZM; accurate and fast radiation effects analysis; special interface for user-defined equations; selective control of multiple outputs; graphical outputs in wide and narrow formats; and on-line parameter modification capability. The user describes the problem by entering the circuit topology and part parameters. The program then automatically generates and solves the circuit equations, providing the user with printed or plotted output. The circuit topology and/or part values may then be changed by the user, and a new analysis, requested. Circuit descriptions may be saved on disk files for storage and later use. The program contains built-in standard models for resistors, voltage and current sources, capacitors, inductors including mutual couplings, switches, junction diodes and transistors, FETS, and MOS devices. Nonstandard models may be constructed from standard models or by using the special equations interface. Time functions may be described by straight-line segments or by sine, damped sine, and exponential functions. 42 figures, 1 table

  18. Off-site radiation exposure review project: computer-aided surface interpolation and graphical display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, T.A. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents the implementation of an iterative procedure that solves the following bivariate interpolation problem: Given N distinct points in the plane (x/sub i/, y/sub i/) and N real numbers Z/sub i/, construct a function F(x,y) that satisfies F(x/sub i/, y/sub i/) = Z/sub i/, for i = 1, ..., N. This problem can be interpreted as fitting a surface through N points in three dimensional space. The application of primary concern to the Offsite Radiation Exposure Review Project is the characterization of the radionuclide activity resulting from nuclear tests. Samples of activity were measured at various locations. The location of the sample point is represented by (x/sub i/, y/sub i/), and the magnitude of the reading is represented by Z/sub i/. The method presented in this report is constructed to be efficient on large data sets, stable on the large variations of the Z/sub i/ magnitudes, and capable of smoothly filling in areas that are void of data. This globally defined icode was initiateminednitial shock but to two later eriological invaders are Staphylococcus albus, Beta-hemolytic Streptococcus e to the same general semiclassical treatment

  19. An artificial-vision responsive to patient motions during computer controlled radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalend, A.M.; Shimoga, K.; Kanade, T.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Automated precision radiotherapy using multiple conformal and modulated beams, requires monitoring of patient movements during irradiation. Immobilizers relying on patient cooperating in cradles have somewhat reduced positional uncertainties, but others including breathing are largely unknown. We built an artificial vision (AV) device for real-time vision of patient movements, their tracking and quantification. Method and Materials: The Artificial Vision System's 'acuity' and 'reflex' were evaluated in terms of imaged skin spatial resolutions and temporal dispersions measured using a mannequin and a fiduciated harmonic oscillator placed at 100cm isocenter. The device traced skin motion even in poorly lighted rooms without use of explicit skin fiduciation, or using standard radiotherapy skin tattoos. Results: The AV system tracked human skin at vision rates approaching 30Hz and sensitivity of 2mm. It succes