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Sample records for computed tomography reconstructions

  1. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... applications. This thesis takes a systematic approach toward establishing quantitative understanding of conditions for sparse reconstruction to work well in CT. A general framework for analyzing sparse reconstruction methods in CT is introduced and two sets of computational tools are proposed: 1...... contributions to a general set of computational characterization tools. Thus, the thesis contributions help advance sparse reconstruction methods toward routine use in...

  2. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  3. Speeding up image reconstruction in computed tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique for imaging cross-sections of an object using X-ray measurements taken from different angles. In last decades a significant progress has happened there: today advanced algorithms allow fast image reconstruction and obtaining high-quality images even with missing or dirty data, modern detectors provide high resolution without increasing radiation dose, and high-performance multi-core computing devices are there to help us solving such tasks even faster. I will start with CT basics, then briefly present existing classes of reconstruction algorithms and their differences. After that I will proceed to employing distinctive architectural features of modern multi-core devices (CPUs and GPUs) and popular program interfaces (OpenMP, MPI, CUDA, OpenCL) for developing effective parallel realizations of image reconstruction algorithms. Decreasing full reconstruction time from long hours up to minutes or even seconds has a revolutionary impact in diagnostic medicine and industria...

  4. Computed tomography by reconstruction. Brain CT scanning. I. Basic physics, equipment, normal aspects, artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiras, J.; Palmieri, P.; Saudinos, J.; Salamon, G.

    1980-01-01

    The authors describe the physical basis, apparatus, normal images, and artefacts of computed tomography by reconstruction. Radio-anatomical sections enable clear comprehension of the computed tomography images. Other methods using computer reconstruction are outlined: tomography by Compton effect, tomography by positrons, tomography by gamma emission, tomography by protons, tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance [fr

  5. Iterative concurrent reconstruction algorithms for emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.K.; Hasegawa, B.H.; Lang, T.F.

    1994-01-01

    Direct reconstruction techniques, such as those based on filtered backprojection, are typically used for emission computed tomography (ECT), even though it has been argued that iterative reconstruction methods may produce better clinical images. The major disadvantage of iterative reconstruction algorithms, and a significant reason for their lack of clinical acceptance, is their computational burden. We outline a new class of ''concurrent'' iterative reconstruction techniques for ECT in which the reconstruction process is reorganized such that a significant fraction of the computational processing occurs concurrently with the acquisition of ECT projection data. These new algorithms use the 10-30 min required for acquisition of a typical SPECT scan to iteratively process the available projection data, significantly reducing the requirements for post-acquisition processing. These algorithms are tested on SPECT projection data from a Hoffman brain phantom acquired with a 2 x 10 5 counts in 64 views each having 64 projections. The SPECT images are reconstructed as 64 x 64 tomograms, starting with six angular views. Other angular views are added to the reconstruction process sequentially, in a manner that reflects their availability for a typical acquisition protocol. The results suggest that if T s of concurrent processing are used, the reconstruction processing time required after completion of the data acquisition can be reduced by at least 1/3 T s. (Author)

  6. Development of computed tomography system and image reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Azaman Ahmad; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography is one of the most advanced and powerful nondestructive inspection techniques, which is currently used in many different industries. In several CT systems, detection has been by combination of an X-ray image intensifier and charge -coupled device (CCD) camera or by using line array detector. The recent development of X-ray flat panel detector has made fast CT imaging feasible and practical. Therefore this paper explained the arrangement of a new detection system which is using the existing high resolution (127 μm pixel size) flat panel detector in MINT and the image reconstruction technique developed. The aim of the project is to develop a prototype flat panel detector based CT imaging system for NDE. The prototype consisted of an X-ray tube, a flat panel detector system, a rotation table and a computer system to control the sample motion and image acquisition. Hence this project is divided to two major tasks, firstly to develop image reconstruction algorithm and secondly to integrate X-ray imaging components into one CT system. The image reconstruction algorithm using filtered back-projection method is developed and compared to other techniques. The MATLAB program is the tools used for the simulations and computations for this project. (Author)

  7. Continuous analog of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique for computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kiyoko; Yamaguchi, Yusaku; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Kojima, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a hybrid dynamical system as a continuous analog to the block-iterative multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (BI-MART), which is a well-known iterative image reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography. The hybrid system is described by a switched nonlinear system with a piecewise smooth vector field or differential equation and, for consistent inverse problems, the convergence of non-negatively constrained solutions to a globally stable equilibrium is guaranteed by the Lyapunov theorem. Namely, we can prove theoretically that a weighted Kullback-Leibler divergence measure can be a common Lyapunov function for the switched system. We show that discretizing the differential equation by using the first-order approximation (Euler's method) based on the geometric multiplicative calculus leads to the same iterative formula of the BI-MART with the scaling parameter as a time-step of numerical discretization. The present paper is the first to reveal that a kind of iterative image reconstruction algorithm is constructed by the discretization of a continuous-time dynamical system for solving tomographic inverse problems. Iterative algorithms with not only the Euler method but also the Runge-Kutta methods of lower-orders applied for discretizing the continuous-time system can be used for image reconstruction. A numerical example showing the characteristics of the discretized iterative methods is presented.

  8. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  9. Model-based image reconstruction in X-ray computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech Bartosz

    2006-01-01

    The thesis investigates the applications of iterative, statistical reconstruction (SR) algorithms in X-ray Computed Tomography. Emphasis is put on various aspects of system modeling in statistical reconstruction. Fundamental issues such as effects of object discretization and algorithm

  10. Iterative reconstruction techniques for computed tomography Part 1: Technical principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Jong, Pim A. de; Leiner, Tim; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R.; Heer, Linda M. de; Budde, Ricardo P.J.

    2013-01-01

    To explain the technical principles of and differences between commercially available iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms for computed tomography (CT) in non-mathematical terms for radiologists and clinicians. Technical details of the different proprietary IR techniques were distilled from available scientific articles and manufacturers' white papers and were verified by the manufacturers. Clinical results were obtained from a literature search spanning January 2006 to January 2012, including only original research papers concerning IR for CT. IR for CT iteratively reduces noise and artefacts in either image space or raw data, or both. Reported dose reductions ranged from 23 % to 76 % compared to locally used default filtered back-projection (FBP) settings, with similar noise, artefacts, subjective, and objective image quality. IR has the potential to allow reducing the radiation dose while preserving image quality. Disadvantages of IR include blotchy image appearance and longer computational time. Future studies need to address differences between IR algorithms for clinical low-dose CT. circle Iterative reconstruction technology for CT is presented in non-mathematical terms. (orig.)

  11. Reconstructed frontal and coronal cuts in computed tomography of the trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fochem, K.; Klumair, J.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison between the original coronally cuts and the reconstructed coronal cuts yielded basic information on the loss of quality by computed reconstruction of images. As for the trunk, only comparisons between the conventional linear tomography and computed frontal of trunk cuts are possible. A few examples will demonstrate that despite a considerable loss of quality, computed frontal cuts will supply additional information in certain cases. It is also shown that the reconstructed frontal cuts cannot replace conventional tomography. (orig.) [de

  12. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  13. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, David C.; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  14. Incomplete projection reconstruction of computed tomography based on the modified discrete algebraic reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Gao, Zongzhao; Yang, YaFei

    2018-02-01

    Based on the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), this study aims to address and test a new improved algorithm applied to incomplete projection data to generate a high quality reconstruction image by reducing the artifacts and noise in computed tomography. For the incomplete projections, an augmented Lagrangian based on compressed sensing is first used in the initial reconstruction for segmentation of the DART to get higher contrast graphics for boundary and non-boundary pixels. Then, the block matching 3D filtering operator was used to suppress the noise and to improve the gray distribution of the reconstructed image. Finally, simulation studies on the polychromatic spectrum were performed to test the performance of the new algorithm. Study results show a significant improvement in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and average gradients (AGs) of the images reconstructed from incomplete data. The SNRs and AGs of the new images reconstructed by DART-ALBM were on average 30%-40% and 10% higher than the images reconstructed by DART algorithms. Since the improved DART-ALBM algorithm has a better robustness to limited-view reconstruction, which not only makes the edge of the image clear but also makes the gray distribution of non-boundary pixels better, it has the potential to improve image quality from incomplete projections or sparse projections.

  15. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  16. Direct iterative reconstruction of computed tomography trajectories (DIRECTT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, A.; Hentschel, M.P.; Schors, J.

    2004-01-01

    The direct reconstruction approach employs an iterative procedure by selection of and angular averaging over projected trajectory data of volume elements. This avoids the blur effects of the classical Fourier method due to the sampling theorem. But longer computing time is required. The reconstructed tomographic images reveal at least the spatial resolution of the radiation detector. Any set of projection angles may be selected for the measurements. Limited rotation of the object yields still good reconstruction of details. Projections of a partial region of the object can be reconstructed without additional artifacts thus reducing the overall radiation dose. Noisy signal data from low dose irradiation have low impact on spatial resolution. The image quality is monitored during all iteration steps and is pre-selected according to the specific requirements. DIRECTT can be applied independently from the measurement equipment in addition to conventional reconstruction or as a refinement filter. (author)

  17. A multiresolution approach to iterative reconstruction algorithms in X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Yoni; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2010-09-01

    In computed tomography, the application of iterative reconstruction methods in practical situations is impeded by their high computational demands. Especially in high resolution X-ray computed tomography, where reconstruction volumes contain a high number of volume elements (several giga voxels), this computational burden prevents their actual breakthrough. Besides the large amount of calculations, iterative algorithms require the entire volume to be kept in memory during reconstruction, which quickly becomes cumbersome for large data sets. To overcome this obstacle, we present a novel multiresolution reconstruction, which greatly reduces the required amount of memory without significantly affecting the reconstructed image quality. It is shown that, combined with an efficient implementation on a graphical processing unit, the multiresolution approach enables the application of iterative algorithms in the reconstruction of large volumes at an acceptable speed using only limited resources.

  18. Registration-based Reconstruction of Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Poulsen, Per Rugaard

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for reconstruction of four-dimensional (4D) cone beam computed tomography from an undersampled set of X-ray projections. The novelty of the proposed method lies in utilizing optical flow based registration to facilitate that each temporal phase is reconstructed from the full...

  19. Image reconstruction from projections and its application in emission computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuba, Attila; Csernay, Laszlo

    1989-01-01

    Computer tomography is an imaging technique for producing cross sectional images by reconstruction from projections. Its two main branches are called transmission and emission computer tomography, TCT and ECT, resp. After an overview of the theory and practice of TCT and ECT, the first Hungarian ECT type MB 9300 SPECT consisting of a gamma camera and Ketronic Medax N computer is described, and its applications to radiological patient observations are discussed briefly. (R.P.) 28 refs.; 4 figs

  20. Principles of image reconstruction in X-ray computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwierz, G.; Haerer, W.; Ruehrnschopf, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The presented geometrical interpretation elucidates the convergence behavior of the classical iteration technique in X-ray computer tomography. The filter techniques nowadays used in preference are derived from a concept of linear system theory which excels due to its particular clarity. The one-dimensional form of the filtering is of decisive importance for immediate image reproduction as realized by both Siemens systems, the SIRETOM 2000 head scanner and the SOMATOM whole-body machine, as such unique to date for whole-body machines. The equivalence of discrete and continuous filtering when dealing with frequency-band-limited projections is proved. (orig.) [de

  1. A general class of preconditioners for statistical iterative reconstruction of emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinn, G.; Huang, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    A major drawback of statistical iterative image reconstruction for emission computed tomography is its high computational cost. The ill-posed nature of tomography leads to slow convergence for standard gradient-based iterative approaches such as the steepest descent or the conjugate gradient algorithm. In this paper new theory and methods for a class of preconditioners are developed for accelerating the convergence rate of iterative reconstruction. To demonstrate the potential of this class of preconditioners, a preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) iterative algorithm for weighted least squares reconstruction (WLS) was formulated for emission tomography. Using simulated positron emission tomography (PET) data of the Hoffman brain phantom, it was shown that the convergence rate of the PCG can reduce the number of iterations of the standard conjugate gradient algorithm by a factor of 2--8 times depending on the convergence criterion

  2. Automatic Identification and Reconstruction of the Right Phrenic Nerve on Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Bamps, Kobe; Cuypers, Céline; Polmans, Pieter; Claesen, Luc; Koopman, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    An automatic computer algorithm was successfully constructed, enabling identification and reconstruction of the right phrenic nerve on high resolution coronary computed tomography scans. This could lead to a substantial reduction in the incidence of phrenic nerve paralysis during pulmonary vein isolation using ballon techniques.

  3. New possibilities of three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomography scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.; Tarjan, Z.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan reconstructions provide impressive and illustrative images of various parts of the human body. Such images are reconstructed from a series of basic CT scans by dedicated software. The state of the art in 3D computed tomography is demonstrated with emphasis on the imaging of soft tissues. Examples are presented of imaging the craniofacial and maxillofacial complex, central nervous system, cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal and urogenital systems, and respiratory system, and their potential in clinical practice is discussed. Although contributing no new essential diagnostic information against conventional CT scans, 3D scans can help in spatial orientation. 11 figs., 25 refs

  4. First experiences with model based iterative reconstructions influence on quantitative plaque volume and intensity measurements in coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Broersen, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and the model- based IR (Veo) reconstruction algorithm in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) im- ages on quantitative measurements in coronary arteries for plaque volumes and intensities. Methods...

  5. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  6. The effect of iterative reconstruction on computed tomography assessment of emphysema, air trapping and airway dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mets, Onno M.; Willemink, Martin J.; de Kort, Freek P. L.; Mol, Christian P.; Leiner, Tim; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Prokop, Mathias; de Jong, Pim A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR) on quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, air trapping, and airway wall and lumen dimensions, compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). Inspiratory and expiratory chest CTs of 75 patients (37 male, 38 female;

  7. General surface reconstruction for cone-beam multislice spiral computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Laigao; Liang Yun; Heuscher, Dominic J.

    2003-01-01

    A new family of cone-beam reconstruction algorithm, the General Surface Reconstruction (GSR), is proposed and formulated in this paper for multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. It provides a general framework to allow the reconstruction of planar or nonplanar surfaces on a set of rebinned short-scan parallel beam projection data. An iterative surface formation method is proposed as an example to show the possibility to form nonplanar reconstruction surfaces to minimize the adverse effect between the collected cone-beam projection data and the reconstruction surfaces. The improvement in accuracy of the nonplanar surfaces over planar surfaces in the two-dimensional approximate cone-beam reconstructions is mathematically proved and demonstrated using numerical simulations. The proposed GSR algorithm is evaluated by the computer simulation of cone-beam spiral scanning geometry and various mathematical phantoms. The results demonstrate that the GSR algorithm generates much better image quality compared to conventional multislice reconstruction algorithms. For a table speed up to 100 mm per rotation, GSR demonstrates good image quality for both the low-contrast ball phantom and thorax phantom. All other performance parameters are comparable to the single-slice 180 deg. LI (linear interpolation) algorithm, which is considered the 'gold standard'. GSR also achieves high computing efficiency and good temporal resolution, making it an attractive alternative for the reconstruction of next generation multislice spiral CT data

  8. Modelling the physics in iterative reconstruction for transmission computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyts, Johan; De Man, Bruno; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in iterative reconstruction (IR) as a key tool to improve quality and increase applicability of X-ray CT imaging. IR has the ability to significantly reduce patient dose, it provides the flexibility to reconstruct images from arbitrary X-ray system geometries and it allows to include detailed models of photon transport and detection physics, to accurately correct for a wide variety of image degrading effects. This paper reviews discretisation issues and modelling of finite spatial resolution, Compton scatter in the scanned object, data noise and the energy spectrum. Widespread implementation of IR with highly accurate model-based correction, however, still requires significant effort. In addition, new hardware will provide new opportunities and challenges to improve CT with new modelling. PMID:23739261

  9. The use of cone beam computed tomography in the postoperative assessment of orbital wall fracture reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Kim; Cheng, Andrew; Goss, Alastair; Donovan, David

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the standard in postoperative evaluation of orbital wall fracture reconstruction, but cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers potential advantages including reduced radiation dose and cost. The purpose of this study is to examine objectively the image quality of CBCT in the postoperative evaluation of orbital fracture reconstruction, its radiation dose, and cost compared with CT. Four consecutive patients with orbital wall fractures in whom surgery was indicated underwent orbital reconstruction with radio-opaque grafts (bone, titanium-reinforced polyethylene, and titanium plate) and were assessed postoperatively with orbital CBCT. CBCT was evaluated for its ability to provide objective information regarding the adequacy of orbital reconstruction, radiation dose, and cost. In all patients, CBCT was feasible and provided hard tissue image quality comparable to CT with significantly reduced radiation dose and cost. However, it has poorer soft tissue resolution, which limits its ability to identify the extraocular muscles, their relationship to the reconstructive graft, and potential muscle entrapment. CBCT is a viable alternative to CT in the routine postoperative evaluation of orbital fracture reconstruction. However, in the patient who develops gaze restriction postoperatively, conventional CT is preferred over CBCT for its superior soft tissue resolution to exclude extraocular muscle entrapment.

  10. Electro-optical system for the high speed reconstruction of computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresp, V.

    1989-01-01

    An electro-optical system for the high-speed reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) images has been built and studied. The system is capable of reconstructing high-contrast and high-resolution images at video rate (30 images per second), which is more than two orders of magnitude faster than the reconstruction rate achieved by special purpose digital computers used in commercial CT systems. The filtered back-projection algorithm which was implemented in the reconstruction system requires the filtering of all projections with a prescribed filter function. A space-integrating acousto-optical convolver, a surface acoustic wave filter and a digital finite-impulse response filter were used for this purpose and their performances were compared. The second part of the reconstruction, the back projection of the filtered projections, is computationally very expensive. An optical back projector has been built which maps the filtered projections onto the two-dimensional image space using an anamorphic lens system and a prism image rotator. The reconstructed image is viewed by a video camera, routed through a real-time image-enhancement system, and displayed on a TV monitor. The system reconstructs parallel-beam projection data, and in a modified version, is also capable of reconstructing fan-beam projection data. This extension is important since the latter are the kind of projection data actually acquired in high-speed X-ray CT scanners. The reconstruction system was tested by reconstructing precomputed projection data of phantom images. These were stored in a special purpose projection memory and transmitted to the reconstruction system as an electronic signal. In this way, a projection measurement system that acquires projections sequentially was simulated

  11. Combining Acceleration Techniques for Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, image quality in low-dose computed tomography has been greatly improved by various compressive sensing- (CS-) based reconstruction methods. However, these methods have some disadvantages including high computational cost and slow convergence rate. Many different speed-up techniques for CS-based reconstruction algorithms have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a fast reconstruction framework that combines a CS-based reconstruction algorithm with several speed-up techniques. First, total difference minimization (TDM) was implemented using the soft-threshold filtering (STF). Second, we combined TDM-STF with the ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm for accelerating the convergence. To further speed up the convergence of the proposed method, we applied the power factor and the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm to OSTR and TDM-STF, respectively. Results obtained from simulation and phantom studies showed that many speed-up techniques could be combined to greatly improve the convergence speed of a CS-based reconstruction algorithm. More importantly, the increased computation time (≤10%) was minor as compared to the acceleration provided by the proposed method. In this paper, we have presented a CS-based reconstruction framework that combines several acceleration techniques. Both simulation and phantom studies provide evidence that the proposed method has the potential to satisfy the requirement of fast image reconstruction in practical CT.

  12. Convex optimization problem prototyping for image reconstruction in computed tomography with the Chambolle–Pock algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    The primal–dual optimization algorithm developed in Chambolle and Pock (CP) (2011 J. Math. Imag. Vis. 40 1–26) is applied to various convex optimization problems of interest in computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction. This algorithm allows for rapid prototyping of optimization problems...... for the purpose of designing iterative image reconstruction algorithms for CT. The primal–dual algorithm is briefly summarized in this paper, and its potential for prototyping is demonstrated by explicitly deriving CP algorithm instances for many optimization problems relevant to CT. An example application...

  13. Image reconstruction using three-dimensional compound Gauss-Markov random field in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shuichi; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Saito, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new reconstruction algorithm based on MAP (maximum a posteriori probability) estimation principle for emission tomography. To improve noise suppression properties of the conventional ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) algorithm, direct three-dimensional reconstruction that utilizes intensity correlations between adjacent transaxial slices is introduced. Moreover, to avoid oversmoothing of edges, a priori knowledge of RI (radioisotope) distribution is represented by using a doubly-stochastic image model called the compound Gauss-Markov random field. The a posteriori probability is maximized by using the iterative GEM (generalized EM) algorithm. Computer simulation results are shown to demonstrate validity of the proposed algorithm. (author)

  14. An ART iterative reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhentian; Zhang Li; Huang Zhifeng; Kang Kejun; Chen Zhiqiang; Fang Qiaoguang; Zhu Peiping

    2009-01-01

    X-ray diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) has extremely high sensitivity for weakly absorbing low-Z samples in medical and biological fields. In this paper, we propose an Algebra Reconstruction Technique (ART) iterative reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI-CT). An Ordered Subsets (OS) technique is used to accelerate the ART reconstruction. Few-view reconstruction is also studied, and a partial differential equation (PDE) type filter which has the ability of edge-preserving and denoising is used to improve the image quality and eliminate the artifacts. The proposed algorithm is validated with both the numerical simulations and the experiment at the Beijing synchrotron radiation facility (BSRF). (authors)

  15. A reconstruction algorithm for coherent scatter computed tomography based on filtered back-projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevendaal, U. van; Schlomka, J.-P.; Harding, A.; Grass, M.

    2003-01-01

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter form factor of the investigated object. Reconstruction from coherently scattered x-rays is commonly done using algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART). In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on filtered back-projection. For the first time, a three-dimensional (3D) filtered back-projection technique using curved 3D back-projection lines is applied to two-dimensional coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm is tested with simulated projection data as well as with projection data acquired with a demonstrator setup similar to a multi-line CT scanner geometry. While yielding comparable image quality as ART reconstruction, the modified 3D filtered back-projection algorithm is about two orders of magnitude faster. In contrast to iterative reconstruction schemes, it has the advantage that subfield-of-view reconstruction becomes feasible. This allows a selective reconstruction of the coherent-scatter form factor for a region of interest. The proposed modified 3D filtered back-projection algorithm is a powerful reconstruction technique to be implemented in a CSCT scanning system. This method gives coherent scatter CT the potential of becoming a competitive modality for medical imaging or nondestructive testing

  16. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D. [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  17. Computed tomography depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Gonca; Courtier, Jesse L.; Phelps, Andrew; Marcovici, Peter A.; MacKenzie, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is extremely important in characterizing blood vessel anatomy and vascular lesions in children. Recent advances in CT reconstruction technology hold promise for improved image quality and also reductions in radiation dose. This report evaluates potential improvements in image quality for the depiction of small pediatric vessels with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo trademark), a technique developed to improve image quality and reduce noise. To evaluate Veo trademark as an improved method when compared to adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR trademark) for the depiction of small vessels on pediatric CT. Seventeen patients (mean age: 3.4 years, range: 2 days to 10.0 years; 6 girls, 11 boys) underwent contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest and abdomen in this HIPAA compliant and institutional review board approved study. Raw data were reconstructed into separate image datasets using Veo trademark and ASIR trademark algorithms (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Four blinded radiologists subjectively evaluated image quality. The pulmonary, hepatic, splenic and renal arteries were evaluated for the length and number of branches depicted. Datasets were compared with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Readers stated a preference for Veo trademark over ASIR trademark images when subjectively evaluating image quality criteria for vessel definition, image noise and resolution of small anatomical structures. The mean image noise in the aorta and fat was significantly less for Veo trademark vs. ASIR trademark reconstructed images. Quantitative measurements of mean vessel lengths and number of branches vessels delineated were significantly different for Veo trademark and ASIR trademark images. Veo trademark consistently showed more of the vessel anatomy: longer vessel length and more branching vessels. When compared to the more established adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm, model

  18. BPF-type region-of-interest reconstruction for parallel translational computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwen; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Shaoyu; Liu, Fenglin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present and test a new ultra-low-cost linear scan based tomography architecture. Similar to linear tomosynthesis, the source and detector are translated in opposite directions and the data acquisition system targets on a region-of-interest (ROI) to acquire data for image reconstruction. This kind of tomographic architecture was named parallel translational computed tomography (PTCT). In previous studies, filtered backprojection (FBP)-type algorithms were developed to reconstruct images from PTCT. However, the reconstructed ROI images from truncated projections have severe truncation artefact. In order to overcome this limitation, we in this study proposed two backprojection filtering (BPF)-type algorithms named MP-BPF and MZ-BPF to reconstruct ROI images from truncated PTCT data. A weight function is constructed to deal with data redundancy for multi-linear translations modes. Extensive numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the proposed MP-BPF and MZ-BPF algorithms for PTCT in fan-beam geometry. Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate that the proposed BPF-type algorithms cannot only more accurately reconstruct ROI images from truncated projections but also generate high-quality images for the entire image support in some circumstances.

  19. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV bw ) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV bw , background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake

  20. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org [Division of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Shulkin, Barry L. [Nuclear Medicine and Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  1. An algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Schleede, Simone; Tan, Renbo; Chen, Liyuan; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Gifford, Martin; Loewen, Rod; Ruth, Ronald; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2013-09-01

    Iterative reconstruction has a wide spectrum of proven advantages in the field of conventional X-ray absorption-based computed tomography (CT). In this paper, we report on an algebraic iterative reconstruction technique for grating-based differential phase-contrast CT (DPC-CT). Due to the differential nature of DPC-CT projections, a differential operator and a smoothing operator are added to the iterative reconstruction, compared to the one commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured at a two-grating interferometer setup. Since the algorithm is easy to implement and allows for the extension to various regularization possibilities, we expect a significant impact of the method for improving future medical and industrial DPC-CT applications. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Projection matrix acquisition for cone-beam computed tomography iterative reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Zhang, Dinghua; Huang, Kuidong; Shi, Wenlong; Zhang, Caixin; Gao, Zongzhao

    2017-02-01

    Projection matrix is an essential and time-consuming part in computed tomography (CT) iterative reconstruction. In this article a novel calculation algorithm of three-dimensional (3D) projection matrix is proposed to quickly acquire the matrix for cone-beam CT (CBCT). The CT data needed to be reconstructed is considered as consisting of the three orthogonal sets of equally spaced and parallel planes, rather than the individual voxels. After getting the intersections the rays with the surfaces of the voxels, the coordinate points and vertex is compared to obtain the index value that the ray traversed. Without considering ray-slope to voxel, it just need comparing the position of two points. Finally, the computer simulation is used to verify the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  3. Influence of the Pixel Sizes of Reference Computed Tomography on Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction Using Conjugate-gradient Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kyohei; Sakimoto, Shota; Fujii, Susumu; Ida, Tomonobu; Moriyama, Shigeru

    The frame-of-reference using computed-tomography (CT) coordinate system on single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction is one of the advanced characteristics of the xSPECT reconstruction system. The aim of this study was to reveal the influence of the high-resolution frame-of-reference on the xSPECT reconstruction. 99m Tc line-source phantom and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) image quality phantom were scanned using the SPECT/CT system. xSPECT reconstructions were performed with the reference CT images in different sizes of the display field-of-view (DFOV) and pixel. The pixel sizes of the reconstructed xSPECT images were close to 2.4 mm, which is acquired as originally projection data, even if the reference CT resolution was varied. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the line-source, absolute recovery coefficient, and background variability of image quality phantom were independent on the sizes of DFOV in the reference CT images. The results of this study revealed that the image quality of the reconstructed xSPECT images is not influenced by the resolution of frame-of-reference on SPECT reconstruction.

  4. The Influence of Reconstruction Kernel on Bone Mineral and Strength Estimates Using Quantitative Computed Tomography and Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Andrew S; Edwards, W Brent; Boyd, Steven K

    2017-10-17

    Quantitative computed tomography has been posed as an alternative imaging modality to investigate osteoporosis. We examined the influence of computed tomography convolution back-projection reconstruction kernels on the analysis of bone quantity and estimated mechanical properties in the proximal femur. Eighteen computed tomography scans of the proximal femur were reconstructed using both a standard smoothing reconstruction kernel and a bone-sharpening reconstruction kernel. Following phantom-based density calibration, we calculated typical bone quantity outcomes of integral volumetric bone mineral density, bone volume, and bone mineral content. Additionally, we performed finite element analysis in a standard sideways fall on the hip loading configuration. Significant differences for all outcome measures, except integral bone volume, were observed between the 2 reconstruction kernels. Volumetric bone mineral density measured using images reconstructed by the standard kernel was significantly lower (6.7%, p kernel. Furthermore, the whole-bone stiffness and the failure load measured in images reconstructed by the standard kernel were significantly lower (16.5%, p kernel. These data suggest that for future quantitative computed tomography studies, a standardized reconstruction kernel will maximize reproducibility, independent of the use of a quantitative calibration phantom. Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Indentation in the Right Ventricle by an Incomplete Pericardium on 3-Dimensional Reconstructed Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Ju Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with an indentation in the right ventricle caused by an incomplete pericardium on preoperative 3-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography. She was to undergo surgery for a partial atrioventricular septal defect and secundum atrial septal defect. Preoperative electrocardiography revealed occasional premature ventricular beats. We found the absence of the left side of the pericardium intraoperatively, and this absence caused strangulation of the diaphragmatic surface of the right ventricle. After correcting the lesion, the patient’s rhythm disturbances improved.

  6. Adaptive tight frame based medical image reconstruction: a proof-of-concept study for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Weifeng; Cai, Jian-Feng; Gao, Hao

    2013-01-01

    A popular approach for medical image reconstruction has been through the sparsity regularization, assuming the targeted image can be well approximated by sparse coefficients under some properly designed system. The wavelet tight frame is such a widely used system due to its capability for sparsely approximating piecewise-smooth functions, such as medical images. However, using a fixed system may not always be optimal for reconstructing a variety of diversified images. Recently, the method based on the adaptive over-complete dictionary that is specific to structures of the targeted images has demonstrated its superiority for image processing. This work is to develop the adaptive wavelet tight frame method image reconstruction. The proposed scheme first constructs the adaptive wavelet tight frame that is task specific, and then reconstructs the image of interest by solving an l 1 -regularized minimization problem using the constructed adaptive tight frame system. The proof-of-concept study is performed for computed tomography (CT), and the simulation results suggest that the adaptive tight frame method improves the reconstructed CT image quality from the traditional tight frame method. (paper)

  7. Three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction for operative planning in robotic segmentectomy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Julien; Peillon, Christophe; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Baste, Jean-Marc

    2018-01-01

    The objective of our pilot study was to assess if three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction performed by Visible Patient™ could be helpful for the operative planning, efficiency and safety of robot-assisted segmentectomy. Between 2014 and 2015, 3D reconstructions were provided by the Visible Patient™ online service and used for the operative planning of robotic segmentectomy. To obtain 3D reconstruction, the surgeon uploaded the anonymized computed tomography (CT) image of the patient to the secured Visible Patient™ server and then downloaded the model after completion. Nine segmentectomies were performed between 2014 and 2015 using a pre-operative 3D model. All 3D reconstructions met our expectations: anatomical accuracy (bronchi, arteries, veins, tumor, and the thoracic wall with intercostal spaces), accurate delimitation of each segment in the lobe of interest, margin resection, free space rotation, portability (smartphone, tablet) and time saving technique. We have shown that operative planning by 3D CT using Visible Patient™ reconstruction is useful in our practice of robot-assisted segmentectomy. The main disadvantage is the high cost. Its impact on reducing complications and improving surgical efficiency is the object of an ongoing study.

  8. X-ray dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography using advanced iterative reconstruction algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peigang Ning

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This work aims to explore the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithms in reducing computed tomography (CT radiation dosages in abdominal imaging. METHODS: CT scans on a standard male phantom were performed at different tube currents. Images at the different tube currents were reconstructed with the filtered back-projection (FBP, 50% ASiR and MBIR algorithms and compared. The CT value, image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs of the reconstructed abdominal images were measured. Volumetric CT dose indexes (CTDIvol were recorded. RESULTS: At different tube currents, 50% ASiR and MBIR significantly reduced image noise and increased the CNR when compared with FBP. The minimal tube current values required by FBP, 50% ASiR, and MBIR to achieve acceptable image quality using this phantom were 200, 140, and 80 mA, respectively. At the identical image quality, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced the radiation dose by 35.9% and 59.9% respectively when compared with FBP. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques are able to reduce image noise and increase image CNRs. Compared with FBP, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced radiation doses by 35.9% and 59.9%, respectively.

  9. Normalizing computed tomography data reconstructed with different filter kernels: effect on emphysema quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo-Estrella, Leticia; Prokop, Mathias; Lynch, David A.; Stinson, Douglas; Zach, Jordan; Judy, Philip F.; Ginneken, Bram van; Rikxoort, Eva M. van

    2016-01-01

    To propose and evaluate a method to reduce variability in emphysema quantification among different computed tomography (CT) reconstructions by normalizing CT data reconstructed with varying kernels. We included 369 subjects from the COPDGene study. For each subject, spirometry and a chest CT reconstructed with two kernels were obtained using two different scanners. Normalization was performed by frequency band decomposition with hierarchical unsharp masking to standardize the energy in each band to a reference value. Emphysema scores (ES), the percentage of lung voxels below -950 HU, were computed before and after normalization. Bland-Altman analysis and correlation between ES and spirometry before and after normalization were compared. Two mixed cohorts, containing data from all scanners and kernels, were created to simulate heterogeneous acquisition parameters. The average difference in ES between kernels decreased for the scans obtained with both scanners after normalization (7.7 ± 2.7 to 0.3 ± 0.7; 7.2 ± 3.8 to -0.1 ± 0.5). Correlation coefficients between ES and FEV 1 , and FEV 1 /FVC increased significantly for the mixed cohorts. Normalization of chest CT data reduces variation in emphysema quantification due to reconstruction filters and improves correlation between ES and spirometry. (orig.)

  10. Normalizing computed tomography data reconstructed with different filter kernels: effect on emphysema quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo-Estrella, Leticia; Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein 10 (route 767), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (766) (Netherlands); Lynch, David A.; Stinson, Douglas; Zach, Jordan [National Jewish Health, Denver, CO (United States); Judy, Philip F. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ginneken, Bram van; Rikxoort, Eva M. van [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein 10 (route 767), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (766) (Netherlands); Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    To propose and evaluate a method to reduce variability in emphysema quantification among different computed tomography (CT) reconstructions by normalizing CT data reconstructed with varying kernels. We included 369 subjects from the COPDGene study. For each subject, spirometry and a chest CT reconstructed with two kernels were obtained using two different scanners. Normalization was performed by frequency band decomposition with hierarchical unsharp masking to standardize the energy in each band to a reference value. Emphysema scores (ES), the percentage of lung voxels below -950 HU, were computed before and after normalization. Bland-Altman analysis and correlation between ES and spirometry before and after normalization were compared. Two mixed cohorts, containing data from all scanners and kernels, were created to simulate heterogeneous acquisition parameters. The average difference in ES between kernels decreased for the scans obtained with both scanners after normalization (7.7 ± 2.7 to 0.3 ± 0.7; 7.2 ± 3.8 to -0.1 ± 0.5). Correlation coefficients between ES and FEV{sub 1}, and FEV{sub 1}/FVC increased significantly for the mixed cohorts. Normalization of chest CT data reduces variation in emphysema quantification due to reconstruction filters and improves correlation between ES and spirometry. (orig.)

  11. Reconstruction of sparse-view X-ray computed tomography using adaptive iterative algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Lin, Weikai; Jin, Mingwu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose two reconstruction algorithms for sparse-view X-ray computed tomography (CT). Treating the reconstruction problems as data fidelity constrained total variation (TV) minimization, both algorithms adapt the alternate two-stage strategy: projection onto convex sets (POCS) for data fidelity and non-negativity constraints and steepest descent for TV minimization. The novelty of this work is to determine iterative parameters automatically from data, thus avoiding tedious manual parameter tuning. In TV minimization, the step sizes of steepest descent are adaptively adjusted according to the difference from POCS update in either the projection domain or the image domain, while the step size of algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) in POCS is determined based on the data noise level. In addition, projection errors are used to compare with the error bound to decide whether to perform ART so as to reduce computational costs. The performance of the proposed methods is studied and evaluated using both simulated and physical phantom data. Our methods with automatic parameter tuning achieve similar, if not better, reconstruction performance compared to a representative two-stage algorithm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstruction of the refractive index gradient by x-ray diffraction enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Junyue [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu Peiping [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan Qingxi [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang Wanxia [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shu Hang [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen Bo [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Hu Tiandou [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2006-07-21

    The computed tomography technique cannot easily be extended to diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) because, while from DEI we may extract the refractive index gradient in one dimension, from the conventional CT reconstruction algorithm we may reconstruct only a scalar quantity. However, recently we showed that changing the direction of the scan axis, and collecting a set of data related to the three-dimensional distribution of the refractive index gradient of the sample, a CT image was obtained. The algorithm we used is based on the conventional CT algorithm but with a specific pre-processing of the projection data. The mathematical framework of the procedure and a simple CT experiment are presented and discussed.

  13. Reconstruction of the refractive index gradient by x-ray diffraction enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junyue; Zhu Peiping; Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Shu Hang; Chen Bo; Hu Tiandou; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    The computed tomography technique cannot easily be extended to diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) because, while from DEI we may extract the refractive index gradient in one dimension, from the conventional CT reconstruction algorithm we may reconstruct only a scalar quantity. However, recently we showed that changing the direction of the scan axis, and collecting a set of data related to the three-dimensional distribution of the refractive index gradient of the sample, a CT image was obtained. The algorithm we used is based on the conventional CT algorithm but with a specific pre-processing of the projection data. The mathematical framework of the procedure and a simple CT experiment are presented and discussed

  14. Influence of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction on coronary plaque analysis in coronary computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, Helle; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Dijkstra, Jouke; Gerke, Oke; Thygesen, Jesper; Egstrup, Kenneth; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    The purpose of this study was to study the effect of iterative reconstruction (IR) software on quantitative plaque measurements in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Thirty patients with a three clinical risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) had one CCTA performed. Images were reconstructed using FBP, 30% and 60% adaptive statistical IR (ASIR). Coronary plaque analysis was performed as per patient and per vessel (LM, LAD, CX and RCA) measurements. Lumen and vessel volumes and plaque burden measurements were based on automatic detected contours in each reconstruction. Lumen and plaque intensity measurements and HU based plaque characterization were based on corrected contours copied to each reconstruction. No significant changes between FBP and 30% ASIR were found except for lumen- (-2.53 HU) and plaque intensities (-1.28 HU). Between FBP and 60% ASIR the change in total volume showed an increase of 0.94%, 4.36% and 2.01% for lumen, plaque and vessel, respectively. The change in total plaque burden between FBP and 60% ASIR was 0.76%. Lumen and plaque intensities decreased between FBP and 60% ASIR with -9.90 HU and -1.97 HU, respectively. The total plaque component volume changes were all small with a maximum change of -1.13% of necrotic core between FBP and 60% ASIR. Quantitative plaque measurements only showed modest differences between FBP and the 60% ASIR level. Differences were increased lumen-, vessel- and plaque volumes, decreased lumen- and plaque intensities and a small percentage change in the individual plaque component volumes. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ℓ0 Gradient Minimization Based Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yu

    Full Text Available In medical and industrial applications of computed tomography (CT imaging, limited by the scanning environment and the risk of excessive X-ray radiation exposure imposed to the patients, reconstructing high quality CT images from limited projection data has become a hot topic. X-ray imaging in limited scanning angular range is an effective imaging modality to reduce the radiation dose to the patients. As the projection data available in this modality are incomplete, limited-angle CT image reconstruction is actually an ill-posed inverse problem. To solve the problem, image reconstructed by conventional filtered back projection (FBP algorithm frequently results in conspicuous streak artifacts and gradual changed artifacts nearby edges. Image reconstruction based on total variation minimization (TVM can significantly reduce streak artifacts in few-view CT, but it suffers from the gradual changed artifacts nearby edges in limited-angle CT. To suppress this kind of artifacts, we develop an image reconstruction algorithm based on ℓ0 gradient minimization for limited-angle CT in this paper. The ℓ0-norm of the image gradient is taken as the regularization function in the framework of developed reconstruction model. We transformed the optimization problem into a few optimization sub-problems and then, solved these sub-problems in the manner of alternating iteration. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the efficiency and the feasibility of the developed algorithm. From the statistical analysis results of the performance evaluations peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR and normalized root mean square distance (NRMSD, it shows that there are significant statistical differences between different algorithms from different scanning angular ranges (p<0.0001. From the experimental results, it also indicates that the developed algorithm outperforms classical reconstruction algorithms in suppressing the streak artifacts and the gradual changed

  16. WE-FG-207B-02: Material Reconstruction for Spectral Computed Tomography with Detector Response Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J; Gao, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Different from the conventional computed tomography (CT), spectral CT based on energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is able to provide the unprecedented material composition. However, an important missing piece for accurate spectral CT is to incorporate the detector response function (DRF), which is distorted by factors such as pulse pileup and charge-sharing. In this work, we propose material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF. Methods: The polyenergetic X-ray forward model takes the DRF into account for accurate material reconstruction. Two image reconstruction methods are proposed: a direct method based on the nonlinear data fidelity from DRF-based forward model; a linear-data-fidelity based method that relies on the spectral rebinning so that the corresponding DRF matrix is invertible. Then the image reconstruction problem is regularized with the isotropic TV term and solved by alternating direction method of multipliers. Results: The simulation results suggest that the proposed methods provided more accurate material compositions than the standard method without DRF. Moreover, the proposed method with linear data fidelity had improved reconstruction quality from the proposed method with nonlinear data fidelity. Conclusion: We have proposed material reconstruction methods for spectral CT with DRF, whichprovided more accurate material compositions than the standard methods without DRF. Moreover, the proposed method with linear data fidelity had improved reconstruction quality from the proposed method with nonlinear data fidelity. Jiulong Liu and Hao Gao were partially supported by the NSFC (#11405105), the 973 Program (#2015CB856000), and the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program (#14PJ1404500).

  17. Sagittal reconstruction computed tomography in metrizamide cisternography. Useful diagnostic procedure for malformations in craniovertebral junction and posterior fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, H.; Okita, N.; Fujii, T.; Yoshioka, M.; Saito, H. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    We studied the sagittal reconstruction technique in computed tomography with metrizamide. Ten ml of metrizamide, 170 mg iodine/ml in concentration, were injected by lumbar puncture. After diffusion of the injected metrizamide, axial computed tomograms were taken by thin slice width (5 mm) with overlapped technique. Then electrical sagittal reconstruction was carried out by optioned software. Injection of metrizamide, non-ionic water soluble contrast media, made clear contrasts among bone, brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid with computed tomography. Sagittal reconstruction technique could reveal more precise details and accurate anatomical relations than ordinary axial computed tomography. This technique was applied on 3 cases (Arnold-Chiari malformation, large cisterna magna and partial agenesis cerebellar vermis), which demonstrated a useful diagnostic procedure for abnormalities of craniovertebral junction and posterior fossa. The adverse reactions of metrizamide were negligible in our series.

  18. Computed Tomography Image Quality Evaluation of a New Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm in the Abdomen (Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-V) a Comparison With Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction, Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction, and Filtered Back Projection Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenberger, Martin H; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Gupta, Shiva; Liu, Xinming; Yap, Ramon Q; Sun, Jia; Tamm, Eric P; Jensen, Corey T

    The purpose of this study was to compare abdominopelvic computed tomography images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V (ASIR-V) with model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0), ASIR, and filtered back projection (FBP). Abdominopelvic computed tomography scans for 36 patients (26 males and 10 females) were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR (80%), Veo 3.0, and ASIR-V (30%, 60%, 90%). Mean ± SD patient age was 32 ± 10 years with mean ± SD body mass index of 26.9 ± 4.4 kg/m. Images were reviewed by 2 independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion. Hounsfield unit, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values were calculated for each reconstruction algorithm for further comparison. Phantom evaluation of low-contrast detectability (LCD) and high-contrast resolution was performed. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30%, ASIR-V 60%, and ASIR 80% were generally superior qualitatively compared with ASIR-V 90%, Veo 3.0, and FBP (P ASIR-V 60% with respective CNR values of 5.54 ± 2.39, 8.78 ± 3.15, and 3.49 ± 1.77 (P ASIR 80% had the best and worst spatial resolution, respectively. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V 30% and ASIR-V 60% provided the best combination of qualitative and quantitative performance. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction 80% was equivalent qualitatively, but demonstrated inferior spatial resolution and LCD.

  19. High performance graphics processor based computed tomography reconstruction algorithms for nuclear and other large scale applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Edward S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Orr, Laurel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, Kyle R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a fast computed tomography (CT) reconstruction algorithm based on graphics processing units (GPU) that achieves significant improvement over traditional central processing unit (CPU) based implementations. The main challenge in developing a CT algorithm that is capable of handling very large datasets is parallelizing the algorithm in such a way that data transfer does not hinder performance of the reconstruction algorithm. General Purpose Graphics Processing (GPGPU) is a new technology that the Science and Technology (S&T) community is starting to adopt in many fields where CPU-based computing is the norm. GPGPU programming requires a new approach to algorithm development that utilizes massively multi-threaded environments. Multi-threaded algorithms in general are difficult to optimize since performance bottlenecks occur that are non-existent in single-threaded algorithms such as memory latencies. If an efficient GPU-based CT reconstruction algorithm can be developed; computational times could be improved by a factor of 20. Additionally, cost benefits will be realized as commodity graphics hardware could potentially replace expensive supercomputers and high-end workstations. This project will take advantage of the CUDA programming environment and attempt to parallelize the task in such a way that multiple slices of the reconstruction volume are computed simultaneously. This work will also take advantage of the GPU memory by utilizing asynchronous memory transfers, GPU texture memory, and (when possible) pinned host memory so that the memory transfer bottleneck inherent to GPGPU is amortized. Additionally, this work will take advantage of GPU-specific hardware (i.e. fast texture memory, pixel-pipelines, hardware interpolators, and varying memory hierarchy) that will allow for additional performance improvements.

  20. Influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, Helle; Thygesen, Jesper; Gerke, Oke; Egstrup, Kenneth; Waaler, Dag; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    2016-12-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) requires high spatial and temporal resolution, increased low contrast resolution for the assessment of coronary artery stenosis, plaque detection, and/or non-coronary pathology. Therefore, new reconstruction algorithms, particularly iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques, have been developed in an attempt to improve image quality with no cost in radiation exposure. To evaluate whether adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) enhances perceived image quality in CCTA compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Thirty patients underwent CCTA due to suspected coronary artery disease. Images were reconstructed using FBP, 30% ASIR, and 60% ASIR. Ninety image sets were evaluated by five observers using the subjective visual grading analysis (VGA) and assessed by proportional odds modeling. Objective quality assessment (contrast, noise, and the contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]) was analyzed with linear mixed effects modeling on log-transformed data. The need for ethical approval was waived by the local ethics committee as the study only involved anonymously collected clinical data. VGA showed significant improvements in sharpness by comparing FBP with ASIR, resulting in odds ratios of 1.54 for 30% ASIR and 1.89 for 60% ASIR ( P  = 0.004). The objective measures showed significant differences between FBP and 60% ASIR ( P  < 0.0001) for noise, with an estimated ratio of 0.82, and for CNR, with an estimated ratio of 1.26. ASIR improved the subjective image quality of parameter sharpness and, objectively, reduced noise and increased CNR.

  1. The effect of iterative reconstruction on computed tomography assessment of emphysema, air trapping and airway dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mets, Onno M.; Willemink, Martin J.; Kort, Freek P.L. de; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de [UMC Utrecht, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, GA, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [Groningen University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Nijmegen University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    To determine the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR) on quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, air trapping, and airway wall and lumen dimensions, compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). Inspiratory and expiratory chest CTs of 75 patients (37 male, 38 female; mean age 64.0 {+-} 5.7 years) were reconstructed using FBP and IR. CT emphysema, CT air trapping and airway dimensions of a segmental bronchus were quantified using several commonly used quantification methods. The two algorithms were compared using the concordance correlation coefficient (p{sub c}) and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Only the E/I-ratio{sub MLD} as a measure of CT air trapping and airway dimensions showed no significant differences between the algorithms, whereas all CT emphysema and the other CT air trapping measures were significantly different at IR when compared to FBP (P < 0.001). The evaluated IR algorithm significantly influences quantitative CT measures in the assessment of emphysema and air trapping. However, the E/I-ratio{sub MLD} as a measure of CT air trapping, as well as the airway measurements, is unaffected by this reconstruction method. Quantitative CT of the lungs should be performed with careful attention to the CT protocol, especially when iterative reconstruction is introduced. (orig.)

  2. The effect of iterative reconstruction on computed tomography assessment of emphysema, air trapping and airway dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mets, Onno M.; Willemink, Martin J.; Kort, Freek P.L. de; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de; Mol, Christian P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Prokop, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    To determine the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR) on quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, air trapping, and airway wall and lumen dimensions, compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). Inspiratory and expiratory chest CTs of 75 patients (37 male, 38 female; mean age 64.0 ± 5.7 years) were reconstructed using FBP and IR. CT emphysema, CT air trapping and airway dimensions of a segmental bronchus were quantified using several commonly used quantification methods. The two algorithms were compared using the concordance correlation coefficient (p c ) and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Only the E/I-ratio MLD as a measure of CT air trapping and airway dimensions showed no significant differences between the algorithms, whereas all CT emphysema and the other CT air trapping measures were significantly different at IR when compared to FBP (P MLD as a measure of CT air trapping, as well as the airway measurements, is unaffected by this reconstruction method. Quantitative CT of the lungs should be performed with careful attention to the CT protocol, especially when iterative reconstruction is introduced. (orig.)

  3. Cochlear implant-related three-dimensional characteristics determined by micro-computed tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yusu; Dai, Peidong; Dai, Chunfu; Li, Huawei

    2017-01-01

    To explore the structural characteristics of the cochlea in three-dimensional (3D) detail using 3D micro-computed tomography (mCT) image reconstruction of the osseous labyrinth, with the aim of improving the structural design of electrodes, the selection of stimulation sites, and the effectiveness of cochlear implantation. Three temporal bones were selected from among adult donors' temporal bone specimens. A micro-CT apparatus (GE eXplore) was used to scan three specimens with a voxel resolution of 45 μm. We obtained about 460 slices/specimen, which produced abundant data. The osseous labyrinth images of three specimens were reconstructed from mCT. The cochlea and its spiral characteristics were measured precisely using Able Software 3D-DOCTOR. The 3D images of the osseous labyrinth, including the cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals, were reconstructed. The 3D models of the cochlea showed the spatial relationships and surface structural characteristics. Quantitative data concerning the cochlea and its spiral structural characteristics were analyzed with regard to cochlear implantation. The 3D reconstruction of mCT images clearly displayed the detailed spiral structural characteristics of the osseous labyrinth. Quantitative data regarding the cochlea and its spiral structural characteristics could help to improve electrode structural design, signal processing, and the effectiveness of cochlear implantation. Clin. Anat. 30:39-43, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Analysis of iterative region-of-interest image reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Kraemer, David N.; Roth, Erin G.; Ullberg, Christer; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. One of the challenges for iterative image reconstruction (IIR) is that such algorithms solve an imaging model implicitly, requiring a complete representation of the scanned subject within the viewing domain of the scanner. This requirement can place a prohibitively high computational burden for IIR applied to x-ray computed tomography (CT), especially when high-resolution tomographic volumes are required. In this work, we aim to develop an IIR algorithm for direct region-of-interest (ROI) image reconstruction. The proposed class of IIR algorithms is based on an optimization problem that incorporates a data fidelity term, which compares a derivative of the estimated data with the available projection data. In order to characterize this optimization problem, we apply it to computer-simulated two-dimensional fan-beam CT data, using both ideal noiseless data and realistic data containing a level of noise comparable to that of the breast CT application. The proposed method is demonstrated for both complete field-of-view and ROI imaging. To demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed ROI imaging method, it is applied to actual CT scanner data. PMID:25685824

  5. Analysis of iterative region-of-interest image reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Kraemer, David N; Roth, Erin G; Ullberg, Christer; Reiser, Ingrid S; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-10-03

    One of the challenges for iterative image reconstruction (IIR) is that such algorithms solve an imaging model implicitly, requiring a complete representation of the scanned subject within the viewing domain of the scanner. This requirement can place a prohibitively high computational burden for IIR applied to x-ray computed tomography (CT), especially when high-resolution tomographic volumes are required. In this work, we aim to develop an IIR algorithm for direct region-of-interest (ROI) image reconstruction. The proposed class of IIR algorithms is based on an optimization problem that incorporates a data fidelity term, which compares a derivative of the estimated data with the available projection data. In order to characterize this optimization problem, we apply it to computer-simulated two-dimensional fan-beam CT data, using both ideal noiseless data and realistic data containing a level of noise comparable to that of the breast CT application. The proposed method is demonstrated for both complete field-of-view and ROI imaging. To demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed ROI imaging method, it is applied to actual CT scanner data.

  6. Colon dissection: a new three-dimensional reconstruction tool for computed tomography colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettgen, R.; Fischbach, F.; Plotkin, M.; Herzog, H.; Freund, T.; Schroeder, R. J.; Felix, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) colonography in the detection of polyps by comparing the 3D reconstruction tool 'colon dissection' and endoluminal view (virtual colonoscopy) with axial 2D reconstructions. Material and Methods: Forty-eight patients (22 M, 26 F, mean age 57±21) were studied after intra-anal air insufflation in the supine and prone positions using a 16-slice helical CT (16x0.625 mm, pitch 1.7; detector rotation time 0.5 s; 160 mAs und 120 kV) and conventional colonoscopy. Two radiologists blinded to the results of the conventional colonoscopy analyzed the 3D reconstruction in virtual-endoscopy mode, in colon-dissection mode, and axial 2D slices. Results: Conventional colonoscopy revealed a total of 35 polyps in 15 patients; 33 polyps were disclosed by CT methods. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting colon polyps were 94% and 94%, respectively, when using the 'colon dissection', 89% and 94% when using 'virtual endoscopy', and 62% and 100% when using axial 2D reconstruction. Sensitivity in relation to the diameter of colon polyps with 'colon dissection', 'virtual colonoscopy', and axial 2D-slices was: polyps with a diameter >5.0 mm, 100%, 100%, and 71%, respectively; polyps with a diameter of between 3 and 4.9 mm, 92%, 85%, and 46%; and polyps with a diameter <3 mm, 89%, 78%, and 56%. The difference between 'virtual endoscopy' and 'colon dissection' in diagnosing polyps up to 4.9 mm in diameter was statistically significant. Conclusion: 3D reconstruction software 'colon dissection' improves sensitivity of CT colonography compared with the endoluminal view

  7. Full field image reconstruction is suitable for high-pitch dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Allmendinger, Thomas; Sedlmair, Martin; Tamm, Miriam; Reinartz, Sebastian D; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The field of view (FOV) in high-pitch dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) is limited by the size of the second detector. The goal of this study was to develop and evaluate a full FOV image reconstruction technique for high-pitch DSCT. For reconstruction beyond the FOV of the second detector, raw data of the second system were extended to the full dimensions of the first system, using the partly existing data of the first system in combination with a very smooth transition weight function. During the weighted filtered backprojection, the data of the second system were applied with an additional weighting factor. This method was tested for different pitch values from 1.5 to 3.5 on a simulated phantom and on 25 high-pitch DSCT data sets acquired at pitch values of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.8, and 3.0. Images were reconstructed with FOV sizes of 260 × 260 and 500 × 500 mm. Image quality was assessed by 2 radiologists using a 5-point Likert scale and analyzed with repeated-measure analysis of variance. In phantom and patient data, full FOV image quality depended on pitch. Where complete projection data from both tube-detector systems were available, image quality was unaffected by pitch changes. Full FOV image quality was not compromised at pitch values of 1.6 and remained fully diagnostic up to a pitch of 2.0. At higher pitch values, there was an increasing difference in image quality between limited and full FOV images (P = 0.0097). With this new image reconstruction technique, full FOV image reconstruction can be used up to a pitch of 2.0.

  8. Improved iterative image reconstruction algorithm for the exterior problem of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yumeng; Zeng, Li

    2017-01-01

    In industrial applications that are limited by the angle of a fan-beam and the length of a detector, the exterior problem of computed tomography (CT) uses only the projection data that correspond to the external annulus of the objects to reconstruct an image. Because the reconstructions are not affected by the projection data that correspond to the interior of the objects, the exterior problem is widely applied to detect cracks in the outer wall of large-sized objects, such as in-service pipelines. However, image reconstruction in the exterior problem is still a challenging problem due to truncated projection data and beam-hardening, both of which can lead to distortions and artifacts. Thus, developing an effective algorithm and adopting a scanning trajectory suited for the exterior problem may be valuable. In this study, an improved iterative algorithm that combines total variation minimization (TVM) with a region scalable fitting (RSF) model was developed for a unilateral off-centered scanning trajectory and can be utilized to inspect large-sized objects for defects. Experiments involving simulated phantoms and real projection data were conducted to validate the practicality of our algorithm. Furthermore, comparative experiments show that our algorithm outperforms others in suppressing the artifacts caused by truncated projection data and beam-hardening.

  9. Using additive manufacturing in accuracy evaluation of reconstructions from computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erin J; Anstey, Joseph A; Venne, Gabriel; Ellis, Randy E

    2013-05-01

    Bone models derived from patient imaging and fabricated using additive manufacturing technology have many potential uses including surgical planning, training, and research. This study evaluated the accuracy of bone surface reconstruction of two diarthrodial joints, the hip and shoulder, from computed tomography. Image segmentation of the tomographic series was used to develop a three-dimensional virtual model, which was fabricated using fused deposition modelling. Laser scanning was used to compare cadaver bones, printed models, and intermediate segmentations. The overall bone reconstruction process had a reproducibility of 0.3 ± 0.4 mm. Production of the model had an accuracy of 0.1 ± 0.1 mm, while the segmentation had an accuracy of 0.3 ± 0.4 mm, indicating that segmentation accuracy was the key factor in reconstruction. Generally, the shape of the articular surfaces was reproduced accurately, with poorer accuracy near the periphery of the articular surfaces, particularly in regions with periosteum covering and where osteophytes were apparent.

  10. Block matching sparsity regularization-based image reconstruction for incomplete projection data in computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ailong; Li, Lei; Zheng, Zhizhong; Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Hu, Guoen; Yan, Bin

    2018-02-01

    In medical imaging many conventional regularization methods, such as total variation or total generalized variation, impose strong prior assumptions which can only account for very limited classes of images. A more reasonable sparse representation frame for images is still badly needed. Visually understandable images contain meaningful patterns, and combinations or collections of these patterns can be utilized to form some sparse and redundant representations which promise to facilitate image reconstructions. In this work, we propose and study block matching sparsity regularization (BMSR) and devise an optimization program using BMSR for computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction for an incomplete projection set. The program is built as a constrained optimization, minimizing the L1-norm of the coefficients of the image in the transformed domain subject to data observation and positivity of the image itself. To solve the program efficiently, a practical method based on the proximal point algorithm is developed and analyzed. In order to accelerate the convergence rate, a practical strategy for tuning the BMSR parameter is proposed and applied. The experimental results for various settings, including real CT scanning, have verified the proposed reconstruction method showing promising capabilities over conventional regularization.

  11. A theoretically exact reconstruction algorithm for helical cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Sun Yi; Zhu Peiping

    2013-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) reconstruction problems are usually solved by using parallel-, fan- or cone-beam algorithms. For rod-shaped objects, the x-ray beams cannot recover all the slices of the sample at the same time. Thus, if a rod-shaped sample is required to be reconstructed by the above algorithms, one should alternately perform translation and rotation on this sample, which leads to lower efficiency. The helical cone-beam CT may significantly improve scanning efficiency for rod-shaped objects over other algorithms. In this paper, we propose a theoretically exact filter-backprojection algorithm for helical cone-beam DPC-CT, which can be applied to reconstruct the refractive index decrement distribution of the samples directly from two-dimensional differential phase-contrast images. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the proposed algorithm. Our work provides a potential solution for inspecting the rod-shaped samples using DPC-CT, which may be applicable with the evolution of DPC-CT equipments. (paper)

  12. Improved iterative image reconstruction algorithm for the exterior problem of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yumeng [Chongqing University, College of Mathematics and Statistics, Chongqing 401331 (China); Chongqing University, ICT Research Center, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of the Education Ministry of China, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zeng, Li, E-mail: drlizeng@cqu.edu.cn [Chongqing University, College of Mathematics and Statistics, Chongqing 401331 (China); Chongqing University, ICT Research Center, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of the Education Ministry of China, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2017-01-11

    In industrial applications that are limited by the angle of a fan-beam and the length of a detector, the exterior problem of computed tomography (CT) uses only the projection data that correspond to the external annulus of the objects to reconstruct an image. Because the reconstructions are not affected by the projection data that correspond to the interior of the objects, the exterior problem is widely applied to detect cracks in the outer wall of large-sized objects, such as in-service pipelines. However, image reconstruction in the exterior problem is still a challenging problem due to truncated projection data and beam-hardening, both of which can lead to distortions and artifacts. Thus, developing an effective algorithm and adopting a scanning trajectory suited for the exterior problem may be valuable. In this study, an improved iterative algorithm that combines total variation minimization (TVM) with a region scalable fitting (RSF) model was developed for a unilateral off-centered scanning trajectory and can be utilized to inspect large-sized objects for defects. Experiments involving simulated phantoms and real projection data were conducted to validate the practicality of our algorithm. Furthermore, comparative experiments show that our algorithm outperforms others in suppressing the artifacts caused by truncated projection data and beam-hardening.

  13. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: Hardware setup, reconstruction methods and first clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmeke, Hartmut; Hopp, Torsten; Zapf, Michael; Kaiser, Clemens; Ruiter, Nicole V.

    2017-11-01

    A promising candidate for improved imaging of breast cancer is ultrasound computer tomography (USCT). Current experimental USCT systems are still focused in elevation dimension resulting in a large slice thickness, limited depth of field, loss of out-of-plane reflections, and a large number of movement steps to acquire a stack of images. 3D USCT emitting and receiving spherical wave fronts overcomes these limitations. We built an optimized 3D USCT, realizing for the first time the full benefits of a 3D system. The point spread function could be shown to be nearly isotropic in 3D, to have very low spatial variability and fit the predicted values. The contrast of the phantom images is very satisfactory in spite of imaging with a sparse aperture. The resolution and imaged details of the reflectivity reconstruction are comparable to a 3 T MRI volume. Important for the obtained resolution are the simultaneously obtained results of the transmission tomography. The KIT 3D USCT was then tested in a pilot study on ten patients. The primary goals of the pilot study were to test the USCT device, the data acquisition protocols, the image reconstruction methods and the image fusion techniques in a clinical environment. The study was conducted successfully; the data acquisition could be carried out for all patients with an average imaging time of six minutes per breast. The reconstructions provide promising images. Overlaid volumes of the modalities show qualitative and quantitative information at a glance. This paper gives a summary of the involved techniques, methods, and first results.

  14. Effect of radiation dose and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on image quality of pulmonary computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Jiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Inano, Sachiko; Terasaki, Mariko; Akai, Hiroyuki; Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of dose and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on image quality of pulmonary computed tomography (CT). Inflated and fixed porcine lungs were scanned with a 64-slice CT system at 10, 20, 40 and 400 mAs. Using automatic exposure control, 40 mAs was chosen as standard dose. Scan data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and ASIR. Image pairs were obtained by factorial combination of images at a selected level. Using a 21-point scale, three experienced radiologists independently rated differences in quality between adjacently displayed paired images for image noise, image sharpness and conspicuity of tiny nodules. A subjective quality score (SQS) for each image was computed based on Anderson's functional measurement theory. The standard deviation was recorded as a quantitative noise measurement. At all doses examined, SQSs improved with ASIR for all evaluation items. No significant differences were noted between the SQSs for 40%-ASIR images obtained at 20 mAs and those for FBP images at 40 mAs. Compared to the FBP algorithm, ASIR for lung CT can enable an approximately 50% dose reduction from the standard dose while preserving visualization of small structures. (author)

  15. Influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Precht

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA requires high spatial and temporal resolution, increased low contrast resolution for the assessment of coronary artery stenosis, plaque detection, and/or non-coronary pathology. Therefore, new reconstruction algorithms, particularly iterative reconstruction (IR techniques, have been developed in an attempt to improve image quality with no cost in radiation exposure. Purpose To evaluate whether adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR enhances perceived image quality in CCTA compared to filtered back projection (FBP. Material and Methods Thirty patients underwent CCTA due to suspected coronary artery disease. Images were reconstructed using FBP, 30% ASIR, and 60% ASIR. Ninety image sets were evaluated by five observers using the subjective visual grading analysis (VGA and assessed by proportional odds modeling. Objective quality assessment (contrast, noise, and the contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR] was analyzed with linear mixed effects modeling on log-transformed data. The need for ethical approval was waived by the local ethics committee as the study only involved anonymously collected clinical data. Results VGA showed significant improvements in sharpness by comparing FBP with ASIR, resulting in odds ratios of 1.54 for 30% ASIR and 1.89 for 60% ASIR (P = 0.004. The objective measures showed significant differences between FBP and 60% ASIR (P < 0.0001 for noise, with an estimated ratio of 0.82, and for CNR, with an estimated ratio of 1.26. Conclusion ASIR improved the subjective image quality of parameter sharpness and, objectively, reduced noise and increased CNR.

  16. Four-dimensional volume-of-interest reconstruction for cone-beam computed tomography-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moiz; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu

    2011-10-01

    Data sufficiency are a major problem in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) on linear accelerator-integrated scanners for image-guided radiotherapy. Scan times must be in the range of 4-6 min to avoid undersampling artifacts. Various image reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to accommodate undersampled data acquisitions, but these algorithms are computationally expensive, may require long reconstruction times, and may require algorithm parameters to be optimized. The authors present a novel reconstruction method, 4D volume-of-interest (4D-VOI) reconstruction which suppresses undersampling artifacts and resolves lung tumor motion for undersampled 1-min scans. The 4D-VOI reconstruction is much less computationally expensive than other 4D-CBCT algorithms. The 4D-VOI method uses respiration-correlated projection data to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) image inside a VOI containing the moving tumor, and uncorrelated projection data to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) image outside the VOI. Anatomical motion is resolved inside the VOI and blurred outside the VOI. The authors acquired a 1-min. scan of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing a moving water-filled sphere. The authors also used previously acquired 1-min scans for two lung cancer patients who had received CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The same raw data were used to test and compare the 4D-VOI reconstruction with the standard 4D reconstruction and the McKinnon-Bates (MB) reconstruction algorithms. Both the 4D-VOI and the MB reconstructions suppress nearly all the streak artifacts compared with the standard 4D reconstruction, but the 4D-VOI has 3-8 times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than the MB reconstruction. In the dynamic chest phantom study, the 4D-VOI and the standard 4D reconstructions both resolved a moving sphere with an 18 mm displacement. The 4D-VOI reconstruction shows a motion blur of only 3 mm, whereas the MB reconstruction shows a motion blur of 13 mm

  17. Bayesian Multi-Energy Computed Tomography reconstruction approaches based on decomposition models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Caifang

    2013-01-01

    Multi-Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) makes it possible to get multiple fractions of basis materials without segmentation. In medical application, one is the soft-tissue equivalent water fraction and the other is the hard-matter equivalent bone fraction. Practical MECT measurements are usually obtained with polychromatic X-ray beams. Existing reconstruction approaches based on linear forward models without counting the beam poly-chromaticity fail to estimate the correct decomposition fractions and result in Beam-Hardening Artifacts (BHA). The existing BHA correction approaches either need to refer to calibration measurements or suffer from the noise amplification caused by the negative-log pre-processing and the water and bone separation problem. To overcome these problems, statistical DECT reconstruction approaches based on non-linear forward models counting the beam poly-chromaticity show great potential for giving accurate fraction images.This work proposes a full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach which allows the reconstruction of high quality fraction images from ordinary polychromatic measurements. This approach is based on a Gaussian noise model with unknown variance assigned directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Referring to Bayesian inferences, the decomposition fractions and observation variance are estimated by using the joint Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) estimation method. Subject to an adaptive prior model assigned to the variance, the joint estimation problem is then simplified into a single estimation problem. It transforms the joint MAP estimation problem into a minimization problem with a non-quadratic cost function. To solve it, the use of a monotone Conjugate Gradient (CG) algorithm with suboptimal descent steps is proposed.The performances of the proposed approach are analyzed with both simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed Bayesian approach is robust to noise and materials. It is also

  18. X-ray computed tomography reconstruction on non-standard trajectories for robotized inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banjak, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of computed tomography (CT) is large and rapidly increasing with typical areas of use in the aerospace, automotive and transport industry. To support this growth of CT in the industrial field, the identified requirements concern firstly software development to improve the reconstruction algorithms and secondly the automation of the inspection process. Indeed, the use of robots gives more flexibility in the acquisition trajectory and allows the control of large and complex objects, which cannot be inspected using classical CT systems. In this context of new CT trend, a robotic platform has been installed at CEA LIST to better understand and solve specific challenges linked to the robotization of the CT process. The considered system integrates two robots that move the X-ray generator and detector. This thesis aims at achieving this new development. In particular, the objective is to develop and implement analytical and iterative reconstruction algorithms adapted to such robotized trajectories. The main focus of this thesis is concerned with helical-like scanning trajectories. We consider two main problems that could occur during acquisition process: truncated and limited-angle data. We present in this work experimental results for reconstruction on such non-standard trajectories. CIVA software is used to simulate these complex inspections and our developed algorithms are integrated as reconstruction tools. This thesis contains three parts. In the first part, we introduce the basic principles of CT and we present an overview of existing analytical and iterative algorithms for non-standard trajectories. In the second part, we modify the approximate helical FDK algorithm to deal with transversely truncated data and we propose a modified FDK algorithm adapted to reverse helical trajectory with the scan range less than 360 degrees. For iterative reconstruction, we propose two algebraic methods named SART-FISTA-TV and DART

  19. Hemodynamic evaluation of vascular reconstructive surgery for childhood moyamoya disease using single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takikawa, Shugo; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Mitsumori, Kenji; Tsuru, Mitsuo

    1990-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of vascular reconstructive surgery for childhood moyamoya disease, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 31 hemispheres of 16 patients was examined by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using the {sup 133}Xe inhalation method. Results were divided into two groups; 17 hemispheres with superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis (A(+) group) and 14 hemispheres without anastomosis (A(-) group). The mean hemispheric CBF (mCBF) and regional CBF (rCBF) in the frontal, temporal, occipital, and basal ganglia regions were calculated. Pre- and postoperative SPECT on the 10 hemispheres of the A(+) group showed an increase in mCBF in 6 hemispheres, the disappearance of the low perfusion area (LPA) in all 5 hemispheres where LPA was present before surgery, and an improvement in rCBF distribution (an increase in rCBF in the frontal and temporal lobes and a decrease in the basal ganglia). This suggests that vascular reconstruction is greatly effective in treating this disease. A comparison between the A(+) group and the A(-) group by postoperative SPECT, as well as the clinical outcomes and the postoperative findings of electroencephalography and angiography, revealed that the A(+) group was superior to the A(-) group in the frequency of LPA (12% and 43%, respectively) and rCBF in the frontal region where STA-MCA anastomosis was usually performed. These results indicate that STA-MCA anastomosis with indirect synangiosis is the most effective treatment of childhood moyamoya disease. (author).

  20. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for volume-rendered computed tomography portovenography. Improvement of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Izuru; Hanaoka, Shohei; Akahane, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) is a reconstruction technique for computed tomography (CT) that reduces image noise. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether ASIR improves the quality of volume-rendered (VR) CT portovenography. Institutional review board approval, with waived consent, was obtained. A total of 19 patients (12 men, 7 women; mean age 69.0 years; range 25-82 years) suspected of having liver lesions underwent three-phase enhanced CT. VR image sets were prepared with both the conventional method and ASIR. The required time to make VR images was recorded. Two radiologists performed independent qualitative evaluations of the image sets. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for statistical analysis. Contrast-noise ratios (CNRs) of the portal and hepatic vein were also evaluated. Overall image quality was significantly improved by ASIR (P<0.0001 and P=0.0155 for each radiologist). ASIR enhanced CNRs of the portal and hepatic vein significantly (P<0.0001). The time required to create VR images was significantly shorter with ASIR (84.7 vs. 117.1 s; P=0.014). ASIR enhances CNRs and improves image quality in VR CT portovenography. It also shortens the time required to create liver VR CT portovenographs. (author)

  1. Iterative reconstruction for quantitative computed tomography analysis of emphysema: consistent results using different tube currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashiro T

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneo Yamashiro,1 Tetsuhiro Miyara,1 Osamu Honda,2 Noriyuki Tomiyama,2 Yoshiharu Ohno,3 Satoshi Noma,4 Sadayuki Murayama1 On behalf of the ACTIve Study Group 1Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa, Japan; 2Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, Tenri Hospital, Tenri, Nara, Japan Purpose: To assess the advantages of iterative reconstruction for quantitative computed tomography (CT analysis of pulmonary emphysema. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients with pulmonary emphysema underwent chest CT imaging using identical scanners with three different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to CT images using Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D and a conventional filtered-back projection mode. Thus, six scans with and without AIDR3D were generated per patient. All other scanning and reconstruction settings were fixed. The percent low attenuation area (LAA%; < -950 Hounsfield units and the lung density 15th percentile were automatically measured using a commercial workstation. Comparisons of LAA% and 15th percentile results between scans with and without using AIDR3D were made by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Associations between body weight and measurement errors among these scans were evaluated by Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: Overall, scan series without AIDR3D had higher LAA% and lower 15th percentile values than those with AIDR3D at each tube current (P<0.0001. For scan series without AIDR3D, lower tube currents resulted in higher LAA% values and lower 15th percentiles. The extent of emphysema was significantly different between each pair among scans when not using AIDR3D (LAA%, P<0.0001; 15th percentile, P<0.01, but was not

  2. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  3. A local region of interest image reconstruction via filtered backprojection for fan-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2007-01-01

    Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has been experimentally implemented using a conventional source combined with several gratings. Images were reconstructed using a parallel-beam reconstruction formula. However, parallel-beam reconstruction formulae are not directly applicable for a large image object where the parallel-beam approximation fails. In this note, we present a new image reconstruction formula for fan-beam DPC-CT. There are two major features in this algorithm: (1) it enables the reconstruction of a local region of interest (ROI) using data acquired from an angular interval shorter than 180 0 + fan angle and (2) it still preserves the filtered backprojection structure. Numerical simulations have been conducted to validate the image reconstruction algorithm. (note)

  4. The effects of computed tomography with iterative reconstruction on solid pulmonary nodule volume quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Willemink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR on pulmonary nodule volumetry with chest computed tomography (CT. METHODS: Twenty patients (12 women and 8 men, mean age 61.9, range 32-87 underwent evaluation of pulmonary nodules with a 64-slice CT-scanner. Data were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP and IR (Philips Healthcare, iDose(4-levels 2, 4 and 6 at similar radiation dose. Volumetric nodule measurements were performed with semi-automatic software on thin slice reconstructions. Only solid pulmonary nodules were measured, no additional selection criteria were used for the nature of nodules. For intra-observer and inter-observer variability, measurements were performed once by one observer and twice by another observer. Algorithms were compared using the concordance correlation-coefficient (pc and Friedman-test, and post-hoc analysis with the Wilcoxon-signed ranks-test with Bonferroni-correction (significance-level p<0.017. RESULTS: Seventy-eight nodules were present including 56 small nodules (volume<200 mm(3, diameter<8 mm and 22 large nodules (volume≥200 mm(3, diameter≥8 mm. No significant differences in measured pulmonary nodule volumes between FBP, iDose(4-levels 2, 4 and 6 were found in both small nodules and large nodules. FBP and iDose(4-levels 2, 4 and 6 were correlated with pc-values of 0.98 or higher for both small and large nodules. Pc-values of intra-observer and inter-observer variability were 0.98 or higher. CONCLUSIONS: Measurements of solid pulmonary nodule volume measured with standard-FBP were comparable with IR, regardless of the IR-level and no significant differences between measured volumes of both small and large solid nodules were found.

  5. Influence of Sinogram-Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction on Computed Tomography-Based Lung Volumetry and Quantification of Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Hilty, Regina; Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh; Weder, Walter; Alkadhi, Hatem; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) on quantification of lung volume and pulmonary emphysema in low-dose chest computed tomography compared with filtered back projection (FBP). Enhanced or nonenhanced low-dose chest computed tomography was performed in 20 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (group A) and in 20 patients without lung disease (group B). Data sets were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strength levels 3 to 5. Two readers semiautomatically evaluated lung volumes and automatically quantified pulmonary emphysema, and another assessed image quality. Radiation dose parameters were recorded. Lung volume between FBP and SAFIRE 3 to 5 was not significantly different among both groups (all P > 0.05). When compared with those of FBP, total emphysema volume was significantly lower among reconstructions with SAFIRE 4 and 5 (mean difference, 0.56 and 0.79 L; all P emphysema is affected at higher strength levels.

  6. Comparison of the accuracy of 3-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography and micro-computed tomography reconstructions by using different voxel sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Delphine; Peters, Ove A; Galibourg, Antoine; Dumoncel, Jean; Esclassan, Rémi; Kahn, Jean-Luc; Sixou, Michel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data are, in principle, metrically exact. However, clinicians need to consider the precision of measurements of dental morphology as well as other hard tissue structures. CBCT spatial resolution, and thus image reconstruction quality, is restricted by the acquisition voxel size. The aim of this study was to assess geometric discrepancies among 3-dimensional CBCT reconstructions relative to the micro-CT reference. A total of 37 permanent teeth from 9 mandibles were scanned with CBCT 9500 and 9000 3D and micro-CT. After semiautomatic segmentation, reconstructions were obtained from CBCT acquisitions (voxel sizes 76, 200, and 300 μm) and from micro-CT (voxel size 41 μm). All reconstructions were positioned in the same plane by image registration. The topography of the geometric discrepancies was displayed by using a color map allowing the maximum differences to be located. The maximum differences were mainly found at the cervical margins and on the cusp tips or incisal edges. Geometric reconstruction discrepancies were significant at 300-μm resolution (P = .01, Wilcoxon test). To study hard tissue morphology, CBCT acquisitions require voxel sizes smaller than 300 μm. This experimental study will have to be complemented by studies in vivo that consider the conditions of clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automated computation of femoral angles in dogs from three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions: Comparison with manual techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, F; Nicetto, T; Banzato, T; Savio, G; Drigo, M; Meneghello, R; Concheri, G; Isola, M

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to test a novel three-dimensional (3D) automated computer-aided design (CAD) method (aCAD) for the computation of femoral angles in dogs from 3D reconstructions of computed tomography (CT) images. The repeatability and reproducibility of three manual radiography, manual CT reconstructions and the aCAD method for the measurement of three femoral angles were evaluated: (1) anatomical lateral distal femoral angle (aLDFA); (2) femoral neck angle (FNA); and (3) femoral torsion angle (FTA). Femoral angles of 22 femurs obtained from 16 cadavers were measured by three blinded observers. Measurements were repeated three times by each observer for each diagnostic technique. Femoral angle measurements were analysed using a mixed effects linear model for repeated measures to determine the levels of intra-observer agreement (repeatability) and inter-observer agreement (reproducibility). Repeatability and reproducibility of measurements using the aCAD method were excellent (intra-class coefficients, ICCs≥0.98) for all three angles assessed. Manual radiography and CT exhibited excellent agreement for the aLDFA measurement (ICCs≥0.90). However, FNA repeatability and reproducibility were poor (ICCscomputation of the 3D aCAD method provided the highest repeatability and reproducibility among the tested methodologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of a computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm by image quality evaluations with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, O.; Bossi, L.; Garabello, D.; Davini, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the consequences on dose and image quality of the choices of different combinations of NI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) percentage, the image quality parameters of GE CT equipment. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate the chest and upper abdomen of a standard weight patient. Images were acquired with tube current modulation and different values of noise index, in the range 10–22 for a slice thickness of 5 mm and a tube voltage of 120 kV. For each selected noise index, several image series were reconstructed using different percentages of ASIR (0, 40, 50, 60, 70, 100). Quantitative noise was assessed at different phantom locations. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose length products (DLP) were recorded. Three radiologists reviewed the images in a blinded and randomized manner and assessed the subjective image quality by comparing the image series with the one acquired with the reference protocol (noise index 14, ASIR 40%). The perceived noise, contrast, edge sharpness and overall quality were graded on a scale from −2 (much worse) to +2 (much better). Results: A repeatable trend of noise reduction versus the percentage of ASIR was observed for different noise levels and phantom locations. The different combinations of noise index and percentage of ASIR to obtain a desired dose reduction were assessed. The subjective image quality evaluation evidenced a possible dose reduction between 24 and 40% as a consequence of an increment of ASIR percentage to 50 or 70%, respectively. Conclusion: These results highlighted that the same patient dose reduction can be obtained with several combinations of noise index and percentages of ASIR, providing a model with which to choose these acquisition parameters in future optimization studies, with the aim of reducing patient dose by maintaining image quality in diagnostic levels.

  9. Accuracy of linear measurement using cone-beam computed tomography at different reconstruction angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikneshan, Nikneshan; Aval, Shadi Hamidi; Bakhshalian, Neema; Shahab, Shahriyar; Mohammadpour, Mahdis; SarikhanI, Soodeh

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of changing the orientation of a reconstructed image on the accuracy of linear measurements using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-two titanium pins were inserted in seven dry sheep mandibles. The length of these pins was measured using a digital caliper with readability of 0.01 mm. Mandibles were radiographed using a CBCT device. When the CBCT images were reconstructed, the orientation of slices was adjusted to parallel (i.e., 0 degrees), +10 degrees, +12 degrees, -12 degrees, and -10 degrees with respect to the occlusal plane. The length of the pins was measured by three radiologists, and the accuracy of these measurements was reported using descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The differences in radiographic measurements ranged from -0.64 to +0.06 at the orientation of -12 degrees, -0.66 to -0.11 at -10 degrees, -0.51 to +0.19 at 0 degrees, -0.64 to +0.08 at +10 degrees, and -0.64 to +0.1 at +12 degrees. The mean absolute values of the errors were greater at negative orientations than at the parallel position or at positive orientations. The observers underestimated most of the variables by 0.5-0.1 mm (83.6%). In the second set of observations, the reproducibility at all orientations was greater than 0.9. Changing the slice orientation in the range of -12 degrees to +12 degrees reduced the accuracy of linear measurements obtained using CBCT. However, the error value was smaller than 0.5 mm and was, therefore, clinically acceptable.

  10. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos; Almeida, Solange Maria

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  11. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores, E-mail: bastosluana@ymail.com [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral e Maxilofacial; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Camaragibe, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral; Almeida, Solange Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral

    2013-11-15

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  12. Characterization of a computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm by image quality evaluations with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, O., E-mail: orampado@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Bossi, L., E-mail: laura-bossi@hotmail.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Garabello, D., E-mail: dgarabello@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Radiodiagnostica DEA, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Davini, O., E-mail: odavini@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Radiodiagnostica DEA, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Ropolo, R., E-mail: rropolo@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the consequences on dose and image quality of the choices of different combinations of NI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) percentage, the image quality parameters of GE CT equipment. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate the chest and upper abdomen of a standard weight patient. Images were acquired with tube current modulation and different values of noise index, in the range 10-22 for a slice thickness of 5 mm and a tube voltage of 120 kV. For each selected noise index, several image series were reconstructed using different percentages of ASIR (0, 40, 50, 60, 70, 100). Quantitative noise was assessed at different phantom locations. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose length products (DLP) were recorded. Three radiologists reviewed the images in a blinded and randomized manner and assessed the subjective image quality by comparing the image series with the one acquired with the reference protocol (noise index 14, ASIR 40%). The perceived noise, contrast, edge sharpness and overall quality were graded on a scale from -2 (much worse) to +2 (much better). Results: A repeatable trend of noise reduction versus the percentage of ASIR was observed for different noise levels and phantom locations. The different combinations of noise index and percentage of ASIR to obtain a desired dose reduction were assessed. The subjective image quality evaluation evidenced a possible dose reduction between 24 and 40% as a consequence of an increment of ASIR percentage to 50 or 70%, respectively. Conclusion: These results highlighted that the same patient dose reduction can be obtained with several combinations of noise index and percentages of ASIR, providing a model with which to choose these acquisition parameters in future optimization studies, with the aim of reducing patient dose by maintaining image quality in diagnostic levels.

  13. Iterative reconstruction for x-ray computed tomography using prior-image induced nonlocal regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Bian, Zhaoying; Feng, Qianjin; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan

    2014-09-01

    Repeated X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans are often required in several specific applications such as perfusion imaging, image-guided biopsy needle, image-guided intervention, and radiotherapy with noticeable benefits. However, the associated cumulative radiation dose significantly increases as comparison with that used in the conventional CT scan, which has raised major concerns in patients. In this study, to realize radiation dose reduction by reducing the X-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) in repeated CT scans, we propose a prior-image induced nonlocal (PINL) regularization for statistical iterative reconstruction via the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria, which we refer to as "PWLS-PINL". Specifically, the PINL regularization utilizes the redundant information in the prior image and the weighted least-squares term considers a data-dependent variance estimation, aiming to improve current low-dose image quality. Subsequently, a modified iterative successive overrelaxation algorithm is adopted to optimize the associative objective function. Experimental results on both phantom and patient data show that the present PWLS-PINL method can achieve promising gains over the other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, low-contrast object detection, and edge detail preservation.

  14. Polychromatic Iterative Statistical Material Image Reconstruction for Photon-Counting Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Weidinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a dedicated statistical algorithm to perform a direct reconstruction of material-decomposed images from data acquired with photon-counting detectors (PCDs in computed tomography. It is based on local approximations (surrogates of the negative logarithmic Poisson probability function. Exploiting the convexity of this function allows for parallel updates of all image pixels. Parallel updates can compensate for the rather slow convergence that is intrinsic to statistical algorithms. We investigate the accuracy of the algorithm for ideal photon-counting detectors. Complementarily, we apply the algorithm to simulation data of a realistic PCD with its spectral resolution limited by K-escape, charge sharing, and pulse-pileup. For data from both an ideal and realistic PCD, the proposed algorithm is able to correct beam-hardening artifacts and quantitatively determine the material fractions of the chosen basis materials. Via regularization we were able to achieve a reduction of image noise for the realistic PCD that is up to 90% lower compared to material images form a linear, image-based material decomposition using FBP images. Additionally, we find a dependence of the algorithms convergence speed on the threshold selection within the PCD.

  15. A reconstruction method for cone-beam differential x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Velroyen, Astrid; Tan, Renbo; Zhang, Junwei; Chen, Liyuan; Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-09-10

    Most existing differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) approaches are based on three kinds of scanning geometries, described by parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam. Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution, cone-beam DPC-CT has attracted significant interest. In this paper, we report a reconstruction method based on a back-projection filtration (BPF) algorithm for cone-beam DPC-CT. Due to the differential nature of phase contrast projections, the algorithm restrains from differentiation of the projection data prior to back-projection, unlike BPF algorithms commonly used for absorption-based CT data. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a micro-focus x-ray tube source. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can deal with several classes of truncated cone-beam datasets. We believe that this feature is of particular interest for future medical cone-beam phase-contrast CT imaging applications.

  16. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.; Davis, J.; Morgan, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray or gamma-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that produces two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without the need to physically section it. CT is also known by the acronym CAT, for computerised axial tomography. This review article presents a brief historical perspective on CT, its current status and the underlying physics. The mathematical fundamentals of computed tomography are developed for the simplest transmission CT modality. A description of CT scanner instrumentation is provided with an emphasis on radiation sources and systems. Examples of CT images are shown indicating the range of materials that can be scanned and the spatial and contrast resolutions that may be achieved. Attention is also given to the occurrence, interpretation and minimisation of various image artefacts that may arise. A final brief section is devoted to the principles and potential of a range of more recently developed tomographic modalities including diffraction CT, positron emission CT and seismic tomography. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs

  17. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, M.; Resnick, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has matured into a reliable and prominent tool for study of the muscoloskeletal system. When it was introduced in 1973, it was unique in many ways and posed a challenge to interpretation. It is in these unique features, however, that its advantages lie in comparison with conventional techniques. These advantages will be described in a spectrum of important applications in orthopedics and rheumatology

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  19. Illustrated computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    This book provides the following information: basic aspects of computed tomography; atlas of computed tomography of the normal adult; clinical application of computed tomography; and radiotherapy planning and computed tomography

  20. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography: intraindividual comparison of image quality of full-dose standard and half-dose iterative reconstructions with dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias S; Wüst, Wolfgang; Brand, Michael; Stahl, Christian; Allmendinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the image quality of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in half-dose (HD) datasets compared with full-dose (FD) and HD filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction in abdominal computed tomography (CT). To acquire data with FD and HD simultaneously, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was performed with a dual-source CT system, both tubes operating at 120 kV, 100 ref.mAs, and pitch 0.8. Three different image datasets were reconstructed from the raw data: Standard FD images applying FBP which served as reference, HD images applying FBP and HD images applying IRIS. For the HD data sets, only data from 1 tube detector-system was used. Quantitative image quality analysis was performed by measuring image noise in tissue and air. Qualitative image quality was evaluated according to the European Guidelines on Quality criteria for CT. Additional assessment of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and edge sharpness was performed. : Image noise in soft tissue was substantially decreased in HD-IRIS (-3.4 HU, -22%) and increased in HD-FBP (+6.2 HU, +39%) images when compared with the reference (mean noise, 15.9 HU). No significant differences between the FD-FBP and HD-IRIS images were found for the visually sharp anatomic reproduction, overall diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.923), lesion conspicuity (P = 0.592), and edge sharpness (P = 0.589), while HD-FBP was rated inferior. Streak artifacts and beam hardening was significantly more prominent in HD-FBP while HD-IRIS images exhibited a slightly different noise pattern. Direct intrapatient comparison of standard FD body protocols and HD-IRIS reconstruction suggest that the latest iterative reconstruction algorithms allow for approximately 50% dose reduction without deterioration of the high image quality necessary for confident diagnosis.

  1. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melli, Seyed Ali, E-mail: sem649@mail.usask.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wahid, Khan A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Babyn, Paul [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Montgomery, James [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Snead, Elisabeth [Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); El-Gayed, Ali [College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey [College of Agriculture and Bioresources, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Wesolowski, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas–Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  2. Three-Dimensional Image Fusion of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography for Computer-Assisted Planning of Maxillectomy of Recurrent Maxillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Defect Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Chuan-Bin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Peng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe new technology assisted by 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for computer planning of a maxillectomy of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma and defect reconstruction. Treatment of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma usually includes tumor resection and free flap reconstruction. FDG-PET/CT provided images of regions of abnormal glucose uptake and thus showed metabolic tumor volume to guide tumor resection. CECT data were used to create 3D reconstructed images of vessels to show the vascular diameters and locations, so that the most suitable vein and artery could be selected during anastomosis of the free flap. The data from preoperative maxillofacial CECT scans and FDG-PET/CT imaging were imported into the navigation system (iPlan 3.0; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany). Three-dimensional image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was accomplished using Brainlab software according to the position of the 2 skulls simulated in the CECT image and PET/CT image, respectively. After verification of the image fusion accuracy, the 3D reconstruction images of the metabolic tumor, vessels, and other critical structures could be visualized within the same coordinate system. These sagittal, coronal, axial, and 3D reconstruction images were used to determine the virtual osteotomy sites and reconstruction plan, which was provided to the surgeon and used for surgical navigation. The average shift of the 3D image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was less than 1 mm. This technique, by clearly showing the metabolic tumor volume and the most suitable vessels for anastomosis, facilitated resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. We used 3D image fusion of FDG-PET/CT and CECT to successfully accomplish resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma

  3. Preliminary Study on the Enhancement of Reconstruction Speed for Emission Computed Tomography Using Parallel Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Soo Mee; Kang, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong Soo; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-01-01

    Conventional image reconstruction uses simplified physical models of projection. However, real physics, for example 3D reconstruction, takes too long time to process all the data in clinic and is unable in a common reconstruction machine because of the large memory for complex physical models. We suggest the realistic distributed memory model of fast-reconstruction using parallel processing on personal computers to enable large-scale technologies. The preliminary tests for the possibility on virtual machines and various performance test on commercial super computer, Tachyon were performed. Expectation maximization algorithm with common 2D projection and realistic 3D line of response were tested. Since the process time was getting slower (max 6 times) after a certain iteration, optimization for compiler was performed to maximize the efficiency of parallelization. Parallel processing of a program on multiple computers was available on Linux with MPICH and NFS. We verified that differences between parallel processed image and single processed image at the same iterations were under the significant digits of floating point number, about 6 bit. Double processors showed good efficiency (1.96 times) of parallel computing. Delay phenomenon was solved by vectorization method using SSE. Through the study, realistic parallel computing system in clinic was established to be able to reconstruct by plenty of memory using the realistic physical models which was impossible to simplify

  4. NCT-ART - a neutron computer tomography code based on the algebraic reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, A.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code is presented, which calculates two-dimensional cuts of material assemblies from a number of neutron radiographic projections. Mathematically, the reconstruction is performed by an iterative solution of a system of linear equations. If the system is fully determined, clear pictures are obtained. Even for an underdetermined system (low number of projections) reasonable pictures are reconstructed, but then picture artefacts and convergence problems occur increasingly. (orig.) With 37 figs [de

  5. Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-V Versus Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction: Impact on Dose Reduction and Image Quality in Body Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Marco; Marchisio, Filippo; Fronda, Marco; Rampado, Osvaldo; Faletti, Riccardo; Bergamasco, Laura; Ropolo, Roberto; Fonio, Paolo

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on dose reduction and image quality of the new iterative reconstruction technique: adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR-V). Fifty consecutive oncologic patients acted as case controls undergoing during their follow-up a computed tomography scan both with ASIR and ASIR-V. Each study was analyzed in a double-blinded fashion by 2 radiologists. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. Computed tomography scanner radiation output was 38% (29%-45%) lower (P ASIR-V examinations than for the ASIR ones. The quantitative image noise was significantly lower (P ASIR-V. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V had a higher performance for the subjective image noise (P = 0.01 for 5 mm and P = 0.009 for 1.25 mm), the other parameters (image sharpness, diagnostic acceptability, and overall image quality) being similar (P > 0.05). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V is a new iterative reconstruction technique that has the potential to provide image quality equal to or greater than ASIR, with a dose reduction around 40%.

  6. Performances of new reconstruction algorithms for CT-TDLAS (computer tomography-tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Min-Gyu; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Doh, Deog-Hee; Cho, Gyeong-Rae

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The measured data were successfully used for generating absorption spectra. • Four different reconstruction algorithms, ART, MART, SART and SMART were evaluated. • The calculation speed of convergence by the SMART algorithm was the fastest. • SMART was the most reliable algorithm for reconstructing the multiple signals. - Abstract: Recent advent of the tunable lasers made to measure simultaneous temperature and concentration fields of the gases. CT-TDLAS (computed tomography-tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) is one the leading techniques for the measurements of temperature and concentration fields of the gases. In CT-TDLAS, the accuracies of the measurement results are strongly dependent upon the reconstruction algorithms. In this study, four different reconstruction algorithms have been tested numerically using experimental data sets measured by thermocouples for combustion fields. Three reconstruction algorithms, MART (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique) algorithm, SART (simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique) algorithm and SMART (simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique) algorithm, are newly proposed for CT-TDLAS in this study. The calculation results obtained by the three algorithms have been compared with previous algorithm, ART (algebraic reconstruction technique) algorithm. Phantom data sets have been generated by the use of thermocouples data obtained in an actual experiment. The data of the Harvard HITRAN table in which the thermo-dynamical properties and the light spectrum of the H_2O are listed were used for the numerical test. The reconstructed temperature and concentration fields were compared with the original HITRAN data, through which the constructed methods are validated. The performances of the four reconstruction algorithms were demonstrated. This method is expected to enhance the practicality of CT-TDLAS.

  7. Accuracy assessment of three-dimensional surface reconstructions of teeth from cone beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Rawi, B.; Hassan, B.; Vandenberge, B.; Jacobs, R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models of the dentition obtained from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming increasingly more popular in dentistry. A recent trend is to replace the traditional dental casts with digital CBCT models for diagnosis, treatment planning and simulation. The

  8. A pseudo-discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (PDART) prior image-based suppression of high density artifacts in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Rizza; Park, Miran; Wi, Sunhee; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-12-21

    We propose a hybrid metal artifact reduction (MAR) approach for computed tomography (CT) that is computationally more efficient than a fully iterative reconstruction method, but at the same time achieves superior image quality to the interpolation-based in-painting techniques. Our proposed MAR method, an image-based artifact subtraction approach, utilizes an intermediate prior image reconstructed via PDART to recover the background information underlying the high density objects. For comparison, prior images generated by total-variation minimization (TVM) algorithm, as a realization of fully iterative approach, were also utilized as intermediate images. From the simulation and real experimental results, it has been shown that PDART drastically accelerates the reconstruction to an acceptable quality of prior images. Incorporating PDART-reconstructed prior images in the proposed MAR scheme achieved higher quality images than those by a conventional in-painting method. Furthermore, the results were comparable to the fully iterative MAR that uses high-quality TVM prior images. - Highlights: • An accelerated reconstruction method, PDART, is proposed for exterior problems. • With a few iterations, soft prior image was reconstructed from the exterior data. • PDART framework has enabled an efficient hybrid metal artifact reduction in CT.

  9. Level-set reconstruction algorithm for ultrafast limited-angle X-ray computed tomography of two-phase flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieberle, M; Hampel, U

    2015-06-13

    Tomographic image reconstruction is based on recovering an object distribution from its projections, which have been acquired from all angular views around the object. If the angular range is limited to less than 180° of parallel projections, typical reconstruction artefacts arise when using standard algorithms. To compensate for this, specialized algorithms using a priori information about the object need to be applied. The application behind this work is ultrafast limited-angle X-ray computed tomography of two-phase flows. Here, only a binary distribution of the two phases needs to be reconstructed, which reduces the complexity of the inverse problem. To solve it, a new reconstruction algorithm (LSR) based on the level-set method is proposed. It includes one force function term accounting for matching the projection data and one incorporating a curvature-dependent smoothing of the phase boundary. The algorithm has been validated using simulated as well as measured projections of known structures, and its performance has been compared to the algebraic reconstruction technique and a binary derivative of it. The validation as well as the application of the level-set reconstruction on a dynamic two-phase flow demonstrated its applicability and its advantages over other reconstruction algorithms. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. A new method for measuring temporal resolution in electrocardiogram-gated reconstruction image with area-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Takeshi; Takagi, Masachika; Kato, Ryohei; Anno, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Masanao; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Katada, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and construct a phantom for using motion artifact in the electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated reconstruction image. In addition, the temporal resolution under various conditions was estimated. A stepping motor was used to move the phantom over an arc in a reciprocating manner. The program for controlling the stepping motor permitted the stationary period and the heart rate to be adjusted as desired. Images of the phantom were obtained using a 320-row area-detector computed tomography (ADCT) system under various conditions using the ECG-gated reconstruction method. For estimation, the reconstruction phase was continuously changed and the motion artifacts were quantitatively assessed. The temporal resolution was calculated from the number of motion-free images. Changes in the temporal resolution according to heart rate, rotation time, the number of reconstruction segments and acquisition position in z-axis were also investigated. The measured temporal resolution of ECG-gated half reconstruction is 180 ms, which is in good agreement with the nominal temporal resolution of 175 ms. The measured temporal resolution of ECG-gated segmental reconstruction is in good agreement with the nominal temporal resolution in most cases. The estimated temporal resolution improved to approach the nominal temporal resolution as the number of reconstruction segments was increased. Temporal resolution in changing acquisition position is equal. This study shows that we could design a new phantom for estimating temporal resolution. (author)

  11. The application of three-dimensional reconstruction technology in industrial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Aidong; Sun Lingxia; Zhou Ying; Ye Yunchang

    2009-01-01

    It's an important research aspect in domestic ICT field, that the 3-D visualization of continuous ICT images reconstructed by 3-D reconstruction technology. The contour lines are joint by triangles in the course of 3-D reconstructions of the continuous equidistant ICT images. After the stereo images of the scanned objects are displayed, some special functions including inspections of the objects from different angles and orientations, nondestructive measurement of some 3-D parameters and so on will be carried out just by operating the computer. The inspectors can get more detailed structural information by the reconstructed images. So in this way the convenience and veracity of the non-detection have been promoted. (authors)

  12. Computed tomography imaging with the Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm: dependence of image quality on the blending level of reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Patrizio; Giannelli, Marco; Fantacci, Maria Evelina; Caramella, Davide

    2018-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a useful and widely employed imaging technique, which represents the largest source of population exposure to ionizing radiation in industrialized countries. Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) is an iterative reconstruction algorithm with the potential to allow reduction of radiation exposure while preserving diagnostic information. The aim of this phantom study was to assess the performance of ASIR, in terms of a number of image quality indices, when different reconstruction blending levels are employed. CT images of the Catphan-504 phantom were reconstructed using conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) and ASIR with reconstruction blending levels of 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100%. Noise, noise power spectrum (NPS), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) were estimated for different scanning parameters and contrast objects. Noise decreased and CNR increased non-linearly up to 50 and 100%, respectively, with increasing blending level of reconstruction. Also, ASIR has proven to modify the NPS curve shape. The MTF of ASIR reconstructed images depended on tube load/contrast and decreased with increasing blending level of reconstruction. In particular, for low radiation exposure and low contrast acquisitions, ASIR showed lower performance than FBP, in terms of spatial resolution for all blending levels of reconstruction. CT image quality varies substantially with the blending level of reconstruction. ASIR has the potential to reduce noise whilst maintaining diagnostic information in low radiation exposure CT imaging. Given the opposite variation of CNR and spatial resolution with the blending level of reconstruction, it is recommended to use an optimal value of this parameter for each specific clinical application.

  13. Multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography for diagnosis of scaphoid waist fracture union: a prospective cohort analysis of accuracy and precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, P.F.W.; Brouwers, L.; Gottgens, K.W.A.; Poeze, M.; Brink, P.R.G. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery and Traumasurgery, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Zee, D. van der; Stadler, A.; Weijers, R. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    To examine reliability and validity concerning union of scaphoid fractures determined by multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography randomized at 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. We used Fleiss' kappa to measure the opinions of three observers reviewing 44 sets of computed tomographic scans of 44 conservatively treated scaphoid waist fractures. We calculated kappa for the extent of consolidation (0-24 %, 25-49 %, 50-74 %, or 75-100 %) on the transverse, sagittal and coronal views. We also calculated kappa for no union, partial union, and union, and grouped the results for 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. As the reference standard for union, CT scans were performed at a minimum of 6 months after injury to determine validity. Overall inter-observer agreement was found to be moderate ({kappa} = 0.576). No union ({kappa} = 0.791), partial union ({kappa} = 0.502), and union ({kappa} = 0.683) showed substantial, moderate, and substantial agreement, respectively. The average sensitivity of multiplanar reconstruction CT for diagnosing union of scaphoid waist fractures was 73 %. The average specificity was 80 %. Our results suggest that multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography is a reliable and accurate method for diagnosing union or nonunion of scaphoid fractures. However, inter-observer agreement was lower with respect to partial union. (orig.)

  14. Multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography for diagnosis of scaphoid waist fracture union: a prospective cohort analysis of accuracy and precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannemann, P.F.W.; Brouwers, L.; Gottgens, K.W.A.; Poeze, M.; Brink, P.R.G.; Zee, D. van der; Stadler, A.; Weijers, R.

    2013-01-01

    To examine reliability and validity concerning union of scaphoid fractures determined by multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography randomized at 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. We used Fleiss' kappa to measure the opinions of three observers reviewing 44 sets of computed tomographic scans of 44 conservatively treated scaphoid waist fractures. We calculated kappa for the extent of consolidation (0-24 %, 25-49 %, 50-74 %, or 75-100 %) on the transverse, sagittal and coronal views. We also calculated kappa for no union, partial union, and union, and grouped the results for 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. As the reference standard for union, CT scans were performed at a minimum of 6 months after injury to determine validity. Overall inter-observer agreement was found to be moderate (κ = 0.576). No union (κ = 0.791), partial union (κ = 0.502), and union (κ = 0.683) showed substantial, moderate, and substantial agreement, respectively. The average sensitivity of multiplanar reconstruction CT for diagnosing union of scaphoid waist fractures was 73 %. The average specificity was 80 %. Our results suggest that multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography is a reliable and accurate method for diagnosing union or nonunion of scaphoid fractures. However, inter-observer agreement was lower with respect to partial union. (orig.)

  15. Multidetector-row computed tomography coronary angiography. Optimization of image reconstruction phase according to the heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Takazakura, Ryutaro; Nitta, Norihisa; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ushio, Noritoshi; Matsuo, Shinro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Horie, Minoru

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the image reconstruction phase of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography according to the heart rate is crucial. Scan data were reconstructed for 10 different phases in 58 sequential patients who under went 8-row cardiac MDCT. The obtained images were scored and compared in terms of motion artifacts and visibility of the vessels, and moreover, electrocardiogram (ECG) record-based evaluations were added for clarification of the temporal relationships among these 10 phases. In the cases with lower heart rates ( 65 beats/mm), they were obtained in the late systolic period. As the heart rate increased, the optimal image reconstruction phase changed from mid diastole to late systole. However, it is recommended to try to decrease the heart rate of patients before data acquisition. (author)

  16. A comparative study of electrocardiogram multi-segment reconstruction and dual source computed tomography using a computer controlled coronary phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Higashide, Ryo; Kunitomo, Hirosi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are two main methods for improving temporal resolution of coronary computed tomography (CT): electrocardiogram-gated multi-segment reconstruction (EMR) and dual source scanning using dual source CT (DSCT). We developed a motion phantom system for image quality assessment of cardiac CT to evaluate these two methods. This phantom system was designed to move an object at arbitrary speeds during a desired phase range in cyclic motion. By using this system, we obtained coronary CT mode images for motion objects like coronary arteries. We investigated the difference in motion artifacts between EMR and the DSCT using a 3-mm-diameter acrylic rod resembling the coronary artery. EMR was evaluated using 16-row multi-slice CT (16MSCT). To evaluate the image quality, we examined the degree of motion artifacts by analyzing the profiles around the rod and the displacement of a peak pixel in the rod image. In the 16MSCT, remarkable increases of artifacts and displacement were caused by the EMR. In contrast, the DSCT presented excellent images with fewer artifacts. The results showed the validity of DSCT to improve true temporal resolution. (author)

  17. Fast parallel algorithm for three-dimensional distance-driven model in iterative computed tomography reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian-Lin; Li Lei; Wang Lin-Yuan; Cai Ai-Long; Xi Xiao-Qi; Zhang Han-Ming; Li Jian-Xin; Yan Bin

    2015-01-01

    The projection matrix model is used to describe the physical relationship between reconstructed object and projection. Such a model has a strong influence on projection and backprojection, two vital operations in iterative computed tomographic reconstruction. The distance-driven model (DDM) is a state-of-the-art technology that simulates forward and back projections. This model has a low computational complexity and a relatively high spatial resolution; however, it includes only a few methods in a parallel operation with a matched model scheme. This study introduces a fast and parallelizable algorithm to improve the traditional DDM for computing the parallel projection and backprojection operations. Our proposed model has been implemented on a GPU (graphic processing unit) platform and has achieved satisfactory computational efficiency with no approximation. The runtime for the projection and backprojection operations with our model is approximately 4.5 s and 10.5 s per loop, respectively, with an image size of 256×256×256 and 360 projections with a size of 512×512. We compare several general algorithms that have been proposed for maximizing GPU efficiency by using the unmatched projection/backprojection models in a parallel computation. The imaging resolution is not sacrificed and remains accurate during computed tomographic reconstruction. (paper)

  18. Suppression of intensity transition artifacts in statistical x-ray computer tomography reconstruction through Radon inversion initialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J.

    2004-01-01

    Statistical reconstruction (SR) methods provide a general and flexible framework for obtaining tomographic images from projections. For several applications SR has been shown to outperform analytical algorithms in terms of resolution-noise trade-off achieved in the reconstructions. A disadvantage of SR is the long computational time required to obtain the reconstructions, in particular when large data sets characteristic for x-ray computer tomography (CT) are involved. As was shown recently, by combining statistical methods with block iterative acceleration schemes [e.g., like in the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm], the reconstruction time for x-ray CT applications can be reduced by about two orders of magnitude. There are, however, some factors lengthening the reconstruction process that hamper both accelerated and standard statistical algorithms to similar degree. In this simulation study based on monoenergetic and scatter-free projection data, we demonstrate that one of these factors is the extremely high number of iterations needed to remove artifacts that can appear around high-contrast structures. We also show (using the OSC method) that these artifacts can be adequately suppressed if statistical reconstruction is initialized with images generated by means of Radon inversion algorithms like filtered back projection (FBP). This allows the reconstruction time to be shortened by even as much as one order of magnitude. Although the initialization of the statistical algorithm with FBP image introduces some additional noise into the first iteration of OSC reconstruction, the resolution-noise trade-off and the contrast-to-noise ratio of final images are not markedly compromised

  19. 3D algebraic iterative reconstruction for cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications.

  20. Computer tomography of the neurocranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liliequist, B; Forssell, A

    1976-07-01

    The experience with computer tomography of the neurocranium in 300 patients submitted for computer tomography of the brain is reported. The more appropriate projections which may be obtained with the second generation of scanners in combination with an elaborated reconstruction technique seem to constitute a replacement of conventional skull films.

  1. Motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR): Application to four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Justin C.; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Sung Ho; Liu, Zhaowei; Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Utilization of respiratory correlated four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has enabled verification of internal target motion and volume immediately prior to treatment. However, with current standard CBCT scan, 4DCBCT poses challenge for reconstruction due to the fact that multiple phase binning leads to insufficient number of projection data to reconstruct and thus cause streaking artifacts. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel 4DCBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR), that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase resolution 4DCBCT images with no more than the imaging dose as well as projections used in a standard free breathing 3DCBCT (FB-3DCBCT) scan.Methods: The unknown 4DCBCT volume at each phase was mathematically modeled as a combination of FB-3DCBCT and phase-specific update vector which has an associated motion-map matrix. The motion-map matrix, which is the key innovation of the MCIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes voxels that are moving from stationary ones. This 4DCBCT model was then reconstructed with compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework such that the voxels with high motion would be aggressively updated by the phase-wise sorted projections and the voxels with less motion would be minimally updated to preserve the FB-3DCBCT. To evaluate the performance of our proposed MCIR algorithm, we evaluated both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The results were then compared with the (1) clinical FB-3DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, (2) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, and (3) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the well-known prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS).Results: Examination of the MCIR algorithm showed that high phase-resolved 4DCBCT with sets of up to 20 phases using a typical FB-3DCBCT scan could be reconstructed without compromising the image quality. Moreover, in comparison with

  2. Motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR): Application to four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Justin C. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kim, Jin Sung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho [Department of Medical Physics, Asan Medical Center, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Zhaowei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Song, Bongyong; Song, William Y. [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Utilization of respiratory correlated four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4DCBCT) has enabled verification of internal target motion and volume immediately prior to treatment. However, with current standard CBCT scan, 4DCBCT poses challenge for reconstruction due to the fact that multiple phase binning leads to insufficient number of projection data to reconstruct and thus cause streaking artifacts. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel 4DCBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR), that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase resolution 4DCBCT images with no more than the imaging dose as well as projections used in a standard free breathing 3DCBCT (FB-3DCBCT) scan.Methods: The unknown 4DCBCT volume at each phase was mathematically modeled as a combination of FB-3DCBCT and phase-specific update vector which has an associated motion-map matrix. The motion-map matrix, which is the key innovation of the MCIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes voxels that are moving from stationary ones. This 4DCBCT model was then reconstructed with compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction framework such that the voxels with high motion would be aggressively updated by the phase-wise sorted projections and the voxels with less motion would be minimally updated to preserve the FB-3DCBCT. To evaluate the performance of our proposed MCIR algorithm, we evaluated both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The results were then compared with the (1) clinical FB-3DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, (2) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the FDK, and (3) 4DCBCT reconstructed using the well-known prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS).Results: Examination of the MCIR algorithm showed that high phase-resolved 4DCBCT with sets of up to 20 phases using a typical FB-3DCBCT scan could be reconstructed without compromising the image quality. Moreover, in comparison with

  3. Computed tomography device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhashi, A.

    1985-01-01

    A computed tomography device comprising a subtraction unit which obtains differential data strings representing the difference between each time-serial projection data string of a group of projection data strings corresponding to a prospective reconstruction image generated by projection data strings acquired by a data acquisition system, a convolution unit which convolves each time-serial projection data string of the group of projection data strings corresponding to the prospective reconstruction image, and a back-projection unit which back-projects the convolved data strings

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction and modeling of middle ear biomechanics by high-resolution computed tomography and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Fone; Chen, Peir-Rong; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Tien-Chen

    2006-05-01

    To present a systematic and practical approach that uses high-resolution computed tomography to derive models of the middle ear for finite element analysis. This prospective study included 31 subjects with normal hearing and no previous otologic disorders. Temporal bone images obtained from 15 right ears and 16 left ears were used for evaluation and reconstruction. High-resolution computed tomography of temporal bone was performed using simultaneous acquisition of 16 sections with a collimated slice thickness of 0.625 mm. All images were transferred to an Amira visualization system for three-dimensional reconstruction. The created three-dimensional model was translated into two commercial modeling packages, Patran and ANSYS, for finite element analysis. The characteristic dimensions of the model were measured and compared with previously published histologic section data. This result confirms that the geometric model created by the proposed method is accurate except that the tympanic membrane is thicker than when measured by the histologic section method. No obvious difference in the geometrical dimension between right and left ossicles was found (P > .05). The three-dimensional model created by finite element method and predicted umbo and stapes displacements are close to the bounds of the experimental curves of Nishihara's, Huber's, Gan's, and Sun's data across the frequency range of 100 to 8000 Hz. The model includes a description of the geometry of the middle ear components and dynamic equations of vibration. The proposed method is quick, practical, low-cost, and, most importantly, noninvasive as compared with histologic section methods.

  5. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel-Jost, V.

    2006-11-01

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  6. Reconstruction for interior region-of-interest inverse geometry computed tomography: preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The inverse geometry computed tomography (IGCT) composed of multiple source and small size detector has several merits such as reduction of scatter effect and large volumetric imaging within one rotation without cone-beam artifact, compared to conventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). By using this multi-source characteristics, we intend to present a selective and multiple interior region-of-interest (ROI) imaging method by using a designed source on-off sequence of IGCT. ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance for radiotherapy. ROI-IGCT showed comparable image quality and has the capability to provide multi ROI image within a rotation. Projection of ROI-IGCT is performed by selective irradiation, hence unnecessary imaging dose to non-interest region can be reduced. In this regard, it seems to be useful for diagnostic or image guidance for radiotherapy.

  7. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bradley J; Klose, Alexander D; Le, Carl H; Longo, Valerie A; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36+/-0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed.

  8. Investigation of vessel visibility of iterative reconstruction method in coronary computed tomography angiography using simulated vessel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Uto, Fumiaki; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hara, Takanori; Urikura, Atsushi; Hoshino, Takashi; Miura, Youhei; Terakawa, Syouichi

    2012-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods can reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images, which are expected to contribute to the reduction of patient dose CT examinations. The purpose of this study was to investigate impact of an iterative reconstruction method (iDose 4 , Philips Healthcare) on vessel visibility in coronary CT angiography (CTA) by using phantom studies. A simulated phantom was scanned by a CT system (iCT, Philips Healthcare), and the axial images were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and given a level of 1 to 7 (L1-L7) of the iterative reconstruction (IR). The vessel visibility was evaluated by a quantitative analysis using profiles across a 1.5-mm diameter simulated vessel as well as visual evaluation for multi planar reformation (MPR) images and volume rendering (VR) images in terms of the normalized-rank method with analysis of variance. The peak CT value of the profiles decreased with IR level and full width at half maximum of the profile also decreased with the IR level. For normalized-rank method, there was no statistical difference between FBP and L1 (20% dose reduction) for both MPR and VR images. The IR levels higher than L1 sacrificed the spatial resolution for the 1.5-mm simulated vessel, and their visual vessel visibilities were significantly inferior to that of the FBP. (author)

  9. Favorable noise uniformity properties of Fourier-based interpolation and reconstruction approaches in single-slice helical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Riviere, Patrick J.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2002-01-01

    Volumes reconstructed by standard methods from single-slice helical computed tomography (CT) data have been shown to have noise levels that are highly nonuniform relative to those in conventional CT. These noise nonuniformities can affect low-contrast object detectability and have also been identified as the cause of the zebra artifacts that plague maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of such volumes. While these spatially variant noise levels have their root in the peculiarities of the helical scan geometry, there is also a strong dependence on the interpolation and reconstruction algorithms employed. In this paper, we seek to develop image reconstruction strategies that eliminate or reduce, at its source, the nonuniformity of noise levels in helical CT relative to that in conventional CT. We pursue two approaches, independently and in concert. We argue, and verify, that Fourier-based longitudinal interpolation approaches lead to more uniform noise ratios than do the standard 360LI and 180LI approaches. We also demonstrate that a Fourier-based fan-to-parallel rebinning algorithm, used as an alternative to fanbeam filtered backprojection for slice reconstruction, also leads to more uniform noise ratios, even when making use of the 180LI and 360LI interpolation approaches

  10. [Impact to Z-score Mapping of Hyperacute Stroke Images by Computed Tomography in Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shota; Sakaguchi, Kenta; Hosono, Makoto; Ishii, Kazunari; Murakami, Takamichi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a hybrid-type iterative reconstruction method on Z-score mapping of hyperacute stroke in unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images. We used a hybrid-type iterative reconstruction [adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)] implemented in a CT system (Optima CT660 Pro advance, GE Healthcare). With 15 normal brain cases, we reconstructed CT images with a filtered back projection (FBP) and ASiR with a blending factor of 100% (ASiR100%). Two standardized normal brain data were created from normal databases of FBP images (FBP-NDB) and ASiR100% images (ASiR-NDB), and standard deviation (SD) values in basal ganglia were measured. The Z-score mapping was performed for 12 hyperacute stroke cases by using FBP-NDB and ASiR-NDB, and compared Z-score value on hyperacute stroke area and normal area between FBP-NDB and ASiR-NDB. By using ASiR-NDB, the SD value of standardized brain was decreased by 16%. The Z-score value of ASiR-NDB on hyperacute stroke area was significantly higher than FBP-NDB (pASiR100% for Z-score mapping had potential to improve the accuracy of Z-score mapping.

  11. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512 3 to 8192 3 voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H t (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections

  12. LBP-based penalized weighted least-squares approach to low-dose cone-beam computed tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Wang, Huafeng; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Xianfeng; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has attracted growing interest of researchers in image reconstruction. The mAs level of the X-ray tube current, in practical application of CBCT, is mitigated in order to reduce the CBCT dose. The lowering of the X-ray tube current, however, results in the degradation of image quality. Thus, low-dose CBCT image reconstruction is in effect a noise problem. To acquire clinically acceptable quality of image, and keep the X-ray tube current as low as achievable in the meanwhile, some penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS)-based image reconstruction algorithms have been developed. One representative strategy in previous work is to model the prior information for solution regularization using an anisotropic penalty term. To enhance the edge preserving and noise suppressing in a finer scale, a novel algorithm combining the local binary pattern (LBP) with penalized weighted leastsquares (PWLS), called LBP-PWLS-based image reconstruction algorithm, is proposed in this work. The proposed LBP-PWLS-based algorithm adaptively encourages strong diffusion on the local spot/flat region around a voxel and less diffusion on edge/corner ones by adjusting the penalty for cost function, after the LBP is utilized to detect the region around the voxel as spot, flat and edge ones. The LBP-PWLS-based reconstruction algorithm was evaluated using the sinogram data acquired by a clinical CT scanner from the CatPhan® 600 phantom. Experimental results on the noiseresolution tradeoff measurement and other quantitative measurements demonstrated its feasibility and effectiveness in edge preserving and noise suppressing in comparison with a previous PWLS reconstruction algorithm.

  13. Algebraic reconstruction techniques for spectral reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, Bernhard; Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) necessitates solving the diffusion equation, which is nonlinear with respect to the parameters that have to be reconstructed. Currently applied solving methods are based on the linearization of the equation. For spectral three-dimensional reconstruction, the emerging equation system is too large for direct inversion, but the application of iterative methods is feasible. Computational effort and speed of convergence of these iterative methods are crucial since they determine the computation time of the reconstruction. In this paper, the iterative methods algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and conjugated gradients (CGs) as well as a new modified ART method are investigated for spectral DOT reconstruction. The aim of the modified ART scheme is to speed up the convergence by considering the specific conditions of spectral reconstruction. As a result, it converges much faster to favorable results than conventional ART and CG methods

  14. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; Peterson, T.E.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented especially of the ball bearing races used in the rotation. (U.K.)

  15. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.T.; Hein, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. The tracks are supported on rollers which carry the substantial weight. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  16. Mathematics of Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, William Grant

    A review of the applications of the Radon transform is presented, with emphasis on emission computed tomography and transmission computed tomography. The theory of the 2D and 3D Radon transforms, and the effects of attenuation for emission computed tomography are presented. The algebraic iterative methods, their importance and limitations are reviewed. Analytic solutions of the 2D problem the convolution and frequency filtering methods based on linear shift invariant theory, and the solution of the circular harmonic decomposition by integral transform theory--are reviewed. The relation between the invisible kernels, the inverse circular harmonic transform, and the consistency conditions are demonstrated. The discussion and review are extended to the 3D problem-convolution, frequency filtering, spherical harmonic transform solutions, and consistency conditions. The Cormack algorithm based on reconstruction with Zernike polynomials is reviewed. An analogous algorithm and set of reconstruction polynomials is developed for the spherical harmonic transform. The relations between the consistency conditions, boundary conditions and orthogonal basis functions for the 2D projection harmonics are delineated and extended to the 3D case. The equivalence of the inverse circular harmonic transform, the inverse Radon transform, and the inverse Cormack transform is presented. The use of the number of nodes of a projection harmonic as a filter is discussed. Numerical methods for the efficient implementation of angular harmonic algorithms based on orthogonal functions and stable recursion are presented. The derivation of a lower bound for the signal-to-noise ratio of the Cormack algorithm is derived.

  17. Optimization of pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (pinhole SPECT) reconstruction; Optimisation de la reconstruction en tomographie d'emission monophotonique avec colimateur stenope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel-Jost, V

    2006-11-15

    In SPECT small animal imaging, it is highly recommended to accurately model the response of the detector in order to improve the low spatial resolution. The volume to reconstruct is thus obtained both by back-projecting and de-convolving the projections. We chose iterative methods, which permit one to solve the inverse problem independently from the model's complexity. We describe in this work a Gaussian model of point spread function (PSF) whose position, width and maximum are computed according to physical and geometrical parameters. Then we use the rotation symmetry to replace the computation of P projection operators, each one corresponding to one position of the detector around the object, by the computation of only one of them. This is achieved by choosing an appropriate polar discretization, for which we control the angular density of voxels to avoid over-sampling the center of the field of view. Finally, we propose a new family of algorithms, the so-called frequency adapted algorithms, which enable to optimize the reconstruction of a given band in the frequency domain on both the speed of convergence and the quality of the image. (author)

  18. Kymogram detection and kymogram-correlated image reconstruction from subsecond spiral computed tomography scans of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachelriess, Marc; Sennst, Dirk-Alexander; Maxlmoser, Wolfgang; Kalender, Willi A.

    2002-01-01

    Subsecond single-slice, multi-slice or cone-beam spiral computed tomography (SSCT, MSCT, CBCT) offer great potential for improving heart imaging. Together with the newly developed phase-correlated cardiac reconstruction algorithms 180 deg. MCD and 180 deg. MCI [Med. Phys. 27, 1881-1902 (2000)] or related algorithms provided by the CT manufacturers, high image quality can be achieved. These algorithms require information about the cardiac motion, i.e., typically the simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram (ECG), to synchronize the reconstruction with the cardiac motion. Neither data acquired without ECG information (standard patients) nor acquisitions with corrupted ECG information can be handled adequately. We developed a method to extract the appropriate information about cardiac motion directly from the measured raw data (projection data). The so-called kymogram function is a measure of the cardiac motion as a function of time t or as a function of the projection angle α. In contrast to the ECG which is a global measure of the heart's electric excitation, the kymogram is a local measure of the heart motion at the z-position z(α) at projection angle α. The patient's local heart rate as well as the necessary synchronization information to be used with phase-correlated algorithms can be extracted from the kymogram by using a series of signal processing steps. The kymogram information is shown to be adequate to substitute the ECG information. Computer simulations with simulated ECG and patient measurements with simultaneously acquired ECG were carried out for a multislice scanner providing M=4 slices to evaluate these new approaches. Both the ECG function and the kymogram function were used for reconstruction. Both were highly correlated regarding the periodicity information used for reconstruction. In 21 out of 25 consecutive cases the kymogram approach was equivalent to the ECG-correlated reconstruction; only minor differences in image quality between both

  19. The impact of iterative reconstruction in low-dose computed tomography on the evaluation of diffuse interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Ju; Chung, Myung Jin; Shin, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Radiology nd Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction (IR) on the assessment of diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) using CT. An American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom (module 4 to assess spatial resolution) was scanned with 10-100 effective mAs at 120 kVp. The images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with blending ratios of 0%, 30%, 70% and 100%, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), and their spatial resolution was objectively assessed by the line pair structure method. The patient study was based on retrospective interpretation of prospectively acquired data, and it was approved by the institutional review board. Chest CT scans of 23 patients (mean age 64 years) were performed at 120 kVp using 1) standard dose protocol applying 142-275 mA with dose modulation (high-resolution computed tomography [HRCT]) and 2) low-dose protocol applying 20 mA (low dose CT, LDCT). HRCT images were reconstructed with FBP, and LDCT images were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Matching images were randomized and independently reviewed by chest radiologists. Subjective assessment of disease presence and radiological diagnosis was made on a 10-point scale. In addition, semi-quantitative results were compared for the extent of abnormalities estimated to the nearest 5% of parenchymal involvement. In the phantom study, ASIR was comparable to FBP in terms of spatial resolution. However, for MBIR, the spatial resolution was greatly decreased under 10 mA. In the patient study, the detection of the presence of disease was not significantly different. The values for area under the curve for detection of DILD by HRCT, FBP, ASIR, and MBIR were as follows: 0.978, 0.979, 0.972, and 0.963. LDCT images reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR tended to underestimate reticular or honeycombing opacities (-2.8%, -4.1%, and -5.3%, respectively) and overestimate ground glass opacities (+4.6%, +8.9%, and

  20. Priori mask guided image reconstruction (p-MGIR) for ultra-low dose cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C.; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren L.; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the compressed sensing (CS) based iterative reconstruction method has received attention because of its ability to reconstruct cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with good quality using sparsely sampled or noisy projections, thus enabling dose reduction. However, some challenges remain. In particular, there is always a tradeoff between image resolution and noise/streak artifact reduction based on the amount of regularization weighting that is applied uniformly across the CBCT volume. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel low-dose CBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called priori mask guided image reconstruction (p-MGIR) that allows reconstruction of high-quality low-dose CBCT images while preserving the image resolution. In p-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume was mathematically modeled as a combination of two regions: (1) where anatomical structures are complex, and (2) where intensities are relatively uniform. The priori mask, which is the key concept of the p-MGIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes between the two separate CBCT regions where the resolution needs to be preserved and where streak or noise needs to be suppressed. We then alternately updated each part of image by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively, where one minimization was focused on preserving the edge information of the first part while the other concentrated on the removal of noise/artifacts from the latter part. To evaluate the performance of the p-MGIR algorithm, a numerical head-and-neck phantom, a Catphan 600 physical phantom, and a clinical head-and-neck cancer case were used for analysis. The results were compared with the standard Feldkamp-Davis-Kress as well as conventional CS-based algorithms. Examination of the p-MGIR algorithm showed that high-quality low-dose CBCT images can be reconstructed without compromising the image resolution. For both phantom and the patient cases, the p-MGIR is able to achieve a clinically

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  2. Three-dimensional SPECT [single photon emission computed tomography] reconstruction of combined cone beam and parallel beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.; Jianying Li; Huili Wang; Coleman, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using cone beam (CB) collimation exhibits increased sensitivity compared with acquisition geometries using parallel (P) hole collimation. However, CB collimation has a smaller field-of-view which may result in truncated projections and image artifacts. A primary objective of this work is to investigate maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) methods to reconstruct simultaneously acquired parallel and cone beam (P and CB) SPECT data. Simultaneous P and CB acquisition can be performed with commercially available triple camera systems by using two cone-beam collimators and a single parallel-hole collimator. The loss in overall sensitivity (relative to the use of three CB collimators) is about 15 to 20%. The authors have developed three methods to combine P and CB data using modified ML-EM algorithms. (author)

  3. Adaptive-weighted total variation minimization for sparse data toward low-dose x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-12-07

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, piecewise-smooth x-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing notable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several notable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full-width at half-maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm.

  4. Impact of a New Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR)-V Algorithm on Image Quality in Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontone, Gianluca; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Andreini, Daniele; Guaricci, Andrea I; Guglielmo, Marco; Baggiano, Andrea; Fazzari, Fabio; Mushtaq, Saima; Conte, Edoardo; Annoni, Andrea; Formenti, Alberto; Mancini, Elisabetta; Verdecchia, Massimo; Campari, Alessandro; Martini, Chiara; Gatti, Marco; Fusini, Laura; Bonfanti, Lorenzo; Consiglio, Elisa; Rabbat, Mark G; Bartorelli, Antonio L; Pepi, Mauro

    2018-03-27

    A new postprocessing algorithm named adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)-V has been recently introduced. The aim of this article was to analyze the impact of ASIR-V algorithm on signal, noise, and image quality of coronary computed tomography angiography. Fifty consecutive patients underwent clinically indicated coronary computed tomography angiography (Revolution CT; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). Images were reconstructed using filtered back projection and ASIR-V 0%, and a combination of filtered back projection and ASIR-V 20%-80% and ASIR-V 100%. Image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated for left main coronary artery (LM), left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA) and were compared between the different postprocessing algorithms used. Similarly a four-point Likert image quality score of coronary segments was graded for each dataset and compared. A cutoff value of P ASIR-V 0%, ASIR-V 100% demonstrated a significant reduction of image noise in all coronaries (P ASIR-V 0%, SNR was significantly higher with ASIR-V 60% in LM (P ASIR-V 0%, CNR for ASIR-V ≥60% was significantly improved in LM (P ASIR-V ≥80%. ASIR-V 60% had significantly better Likert image quality scores compared to ASIR-V 0% in segment-, vessel-, and patient-based analyses (P ASIR-V 60% provides the optimal balance between image noise, SNR, CNR, and image quality. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Fluoroscopy dose reduction of computed tomography guided chest interventional radiology using real-time iterative reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Mihara, Yoshiyuki; Ino, Kenji; Sato, Jiro

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction to patients and radiologists in computed tomography (CT) guided examinations for the thoracic region using CT fluoroscopy. Image quality evaluation of the real-time filtered back-projection (RT-FBP) images and the real-time adaptive iterative dose reduction (RT-AIDR) images was carried out on noise and artifacts that were considered to affect the CT fluoroscopy. The image standard deviation was improved in the fluoroscopy setting with less than 30 mA on 120 kV. With regard to the evaluation of artifact visibility and the amount generated by the needle attached to the chest phantom, there was no significant difference between the RT-FBP images with 120 kV, 20 mA and the RT-AIDR images with low-dose conditions (greater than 80 kV, 30 mA and less than 120 kV, 20 mA). The results suggest that it is possible to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 34% at the maximum using RT-AIDR while maintaining image quality equivalent to the RT-FBP images with 120 V, 20 mA.

  6. Pediatric 320-row cardiac computed tomography using electrocardiogram-gated model-based full iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirota, Go; Maeda, Eriko; Namiki, Yoko; Bari, Razibul; Abe, Osamu [The University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ino, Kenji [The University of Tokyo Hospital, Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan); Torigoe, Rumiko [Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    Full iterative reconstruction algorithm is available, but its diagnostic quality in pediatric cardiac CT is unknown. To compare the imaging quality of two algorithms, full and hybrid iterative reconstruction, in pediatric cardiac CT. We included 49 children with congenital cardiac anomalies who underwent cardiac CT. We compared quality of images reconstructed using the two algorithms (full and hybrid iterative reconstruction) based on a 3-point scale for the delineation of the following anatomical structures: atrial septum, ventricular septum, right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta, aortic arch including the patent ductus arteriosus, descending aorta, right coronary artery and left main trunk. We evaluated beam-hardening artifacts from contrast-enhancement material using a 3-point scale, and we evaluated the overall image quality using a 5-point scale. We also compared image noise, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio between the algorithms. The overall image quality was significantly higher with full iterative reconstruction than with hybrid iterative reconstruction (3.67±0.79 vs. 3.31±0.89, P=0.0072). The evaluation scores for most of the gross structures were higher with full iterative reconstruction than with hybrid iterative reconstruction. There was no significant difference between full and hybrid iterative reconstruction for the presence of beam-hardening artifacts. Image noise was significantly lower in full iterative reconstruction, while signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher in full iterative reconstruction. The diagnostic quality was superior in images with cardiac CT reconstructed with electrocardiogram-gated full iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric 320-row cardiac computed tomography using electrocardiogram-gated model-based full iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirota, Go; Maeda, Eriko; Namiki, Yoko; Bari, Razibul; Abe, Osamu; Ino, Kenji; Torigoe, Rumiko

    2017-01-01

    Full iterative reconstruction algorithm is available, but its diagnostic quality in pediatric cardiac CT is unknown. To compare the imaging quality of two algorithms, full and hybrid iterative reconstruction, in pediatric cardiac CT. We included 49 children with congenital cardiac anomalies who underwent cardiac CT. We compared quality of images reconstructed using the two algorithms (full and hybrid iterative reconstruction) based on a 3-point scale for the delineation of the following anatomical structures: atrial septum, ventricular septum, right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta, aortic arch including the patent ductus arteriosus, descending aorta, right coronary artery and left main trunk. We evaluated beam-hardening artifacts from contrast-enhancement material using a 3-point scale, and we evaluated the overall image quality using a 5-point scale. We also compared image noise, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio between the algorithms. The overall image quality was significantly higher with full iterative reconstruction than with hybrid iterative reconstruction (3.67±0.79 vs. 3.31±0.89, P=0.0072). The evaluation scores for most of the gross structures were higher with full iterative reconstruction than with hybrid iterative reconstruction. There was no significant difference between full and hybrid iterative reconstruction for the presence of beam-hardening artifacts. Image noise was significantly lower in full iterative reconstruction, while signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher in full iterative reconstruction. The diagnostic quality was superior in images with cardiac CT reconstructed with electrocardiogram-gated full iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  8. First experiences with model based iterative reconstructions influence on quantitative plaque volume and intensity measurements in coronary computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precht, H.; Kitslaar, P.H.; Broersen, A.; Gerke, O.; Dijkstra, J.; Thygesen, J.; Egstrup, K.; Lambrechtsen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and the model-based IR (Veo) reconstruction algorithm in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) images on quantitative measurements in coronary arteries for plaque volumes and intensities. Methods: Three patients had three independent dose reduced CCTA performed and reconstructed with 30% ASIR (CTDI vol at 6.7 mGy), 60% ASIR (CTDI vol 4.3 mGy) and Veo (CTDI vol at 1.9 mGy). Coronary plaque analysis was performed for each measured CCTA volumes, plaque burden and intensities. Results: Plaque volume and plaque burden show a decreasing tendency from ASIR to Veo as median volume for ASIR is 314 mm 3 and 337 mm 3 –252 mm 3 for Veo and plaque burden is 42% and 44% for ASIR to 39% for Veo. The lumen and vessel volume decrease slightly from 30% ASIR to 60% ASIR with 498 mm 3 –391 mm 3 for lumen volume and vessel volume from 939 mm 3 to 830 mm 3 . The intensities did not change overall between the different reconstructions for either lumen or plaque. Conclusion: We found a tendency of decreasing plaque volumes and plaque burden but no change in intensities with the use of low dose Veo CCTA (1.9 mGy) compared to dose reduced ASIR CCTA (6.7 mGy & 4.3 mGy), although more studies are warranted. - Highlights: • Veo decrease plaque volumes and plaque burden using low-dose CCTA. • Moving from ASIR 30%, ASIR 60% to Veo did not appear to influence the plaque intensities. • Studies including larger sample size are needed to investigate the effect on plaque.

  9. Reconstructions in ultrasound modulated optical tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Allmaras, Moritz; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a mathematical model for ultrasound modulated optical tomography and present a simple reconstruction scheme for recovering the spatially varying optical absorption coefficient from scanning measurements with narrowly focused ultrasound signals. Computational results for this model show that the reconstruction of sharp features of the absorption coefficient is possible. A formal linearization of the model leads to an equation with a Fredholm operator, which explains the stability observed in our numerical experiments. © de Gruyter 2011.

  10. Method for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    1980-01-01

    In transversal computer tomography apparatus, in which the positioning zone in which the patient can be positioned is larger than the scanning zone in which a body slice can be scanned, reconstruction errors are liable to occur. These errors are caused by incomplete irradiation of the body during examination. They become manifest not only as an incorrect image of the area not irradiated, but also have an adverse effect on the image of the other, completely irradiated areas. The invention enables reduction of these errors

  11. Noninvasive coronary artery imaging by multislice spiral computed tomography. A novel approach for a retrospectively ECG-gated reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yuichi; Kanmatsuse, Katsuo; Inoue Fumio

    2003-01-01

    Although the excellent spatial resolution of multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) enables the coronary arteries to be visualized, its limited temporal resolution results in poor image reproducibility because of cardiac motion artifact (CMA) and hence limits its widespread clinical use. A novel retrospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated reconstruction method has been developed to minimize CMA. In 88 consecutive patients, the scan data were reconstructed using 2 retrospectively ECG-gated reconstruction methods. Method 1: the end of the reconstruction window (250 ms) was positioned at the peak of the P wave on ECG, which corresponded to the end of the slow filling phase during diastole immediately before atrial contraction. Method 2 (conventional method): relative retrospective gating with 50% referred to the R-R interval was performed so that the beginning of the reconstruction window (250 ms) was positioned at the halfway point between the R-R intervals of the heart cycle. The quality of the coronary artery images was evaluated according to the presence or absence of CMA. The assessment was applied to the left main coronary artery (LMCA), the left anterior descending artery (LAD, segments no.6, no.7, and no.8), the left circumflex artery (LCx, segments no.11 and no.13) and the right coronary artery (RCA, segments no.1, no.2 and no.3). The first diagonal artery (no.9-1), the obtuse marginal artery (no.12-1), the posterior descending artery (no.4-PD), the atrioventricular node branch (no.4-AV) and the first right ventricular branch (RV) were also evaluated. Of the 88 patients, 85 were eligible for image evaluation. Method 1 allowed visualization of the major coronary arteries without CMA in the majority of patients. The left coronary artery (LCA) system (segments no.5-7, no.11 and no.13) and the proximal portion of the RCA were visualized in more than 94% of patients. Artifact-free visualization of the distal portion of the LAD (segment no.8) and RCA (no.4

  12. A full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach based on the material decomposition model applied in dual-energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, C.; Rodet, T.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.; Legoupil, S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) makes it possible to get two fractions of basis materials without segmentation. One is the soft-tissue equivalent water fraction and the other is the hard-matter equivalent bone fraction. Practical DECT measurements are usually obtained with polychromatic x-ray beams. Existing reconstruction approaches based on linear forward models without counting the beam polychromaticity fail to estimate the correct decomposition fractions and result in beam-hardening artifacts (BHA). The existing BHA correction approaches either need to refer to calibration measurements or suffer from the noise amplification caused by the negative-log preprocessing and the ill-conditioned water and bone separation problem. To overcome these problems, statistical DECT reconstruction approaches based on nonlinear forward models counting the beam polychromaticity show great potential for giving accurate fraction images.Methods: This work proposes a full-spectral Bayesian reconstruction approach which allows the reconstruction of high quality fraction images from ordinary polychromatic measurements. This approach is based on a Gaussian noise model with unknown variance assigned directly to the projections without taking negative-log. Referring to Bayesian inferences, the decomposition fractions and observation variance are estimated by using the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation method. Subject to an adaptive prior model assigned to the variance, the joint estimation problem is then simplified into a single estimation problem. It transforms the joint MAP estimation problem into a minimization problem with a nonquadratic cost function. To solve it, the use of a monotone conjugate gradient algorithm with suboptimal descent steps is proposed.Results: The performance of the proposed approach is analyzed with both simulated and experimental data. The results show that the proposed Bayesian approach is robust to noise and materials. It is also

  13. Initial phantom study comparing image quality in computed tomography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and new adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction v.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyungjae; Kwon, Heejin; Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyoung; Yoon, Seongkuk; Kang, Myungjin; Ha, Dongho; Lee, Jinhwa; Kang, Eunju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the image quality of a novel advanced iterative reconstruction (IR) method called as "adaptive statistical IR V" (ASIR-V) by comparing the image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution from those of filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) on computed tomography (CT) phantom image. We performed CT scans at 5 different tube currents (50, 70, 100, 150, and 200 mA) using 3 types of CT phantoms. Scanned images were subsequently reconstructed in 7 different scan settings, such as FBP, and 3 levels of ASIR and ASIR-V (30%, 50%, and 70%). The image noise was measured in the first study using body phantom. The CNR was measured in the second study using contrast phantom and the spatial resolutions were measured in the third study using a high-resolution phantom. We compared the image noise, CNR, and spatial resolution among the 7 reconstructed image scan settings to determine whether noise reduction, high CNR, and high spatial resolution could be achieved at ASIR-V. At quantitative analysis of the first and second studies, it showed that the images reconstructed using ASIR-V had reduced image noise and improved CNR compared with those of FBP and ASIR (P ASIR-V had significantly improved spatial resolution than those of FBP and ASIR (P ASIR-V provides a significant reduction in image noise and a significant improvement in CNR as well as spatial resolution. Therefore, this technique has the potential to reduce the radiation dose further without compromising image quality.

  14. Computed Tomography Image Origin Identification Based on Original Sensor Pattern Noise and 3-D Image Reconstruction Algorithm Footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuping; Bouslimi, Dalel; Yang, Guanyu; Shu, Huazhong; Coatrieux, Gouenou

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we focus on the "blind" identification of the computed tomography (CT) scanner that has produced a CT image. To do so, we propose a set of noise features derived from the image chain acquisition and which can be used as CT-scanner footprint. Basically, we propose two approaches. The first one aims at identifying a CT scanner based on an original sensor pattern noise (OSPN) that is intrinsic to the X-ray detectors. The second one identifies an acquisition system based on the way this noise is modified by its three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction algorithm. As these reconstruction algorithms are manufacturer dependent and kept secret, our features are used as input to train a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier to discriminate acquisition systems. Experiments conducted on images issued from 15 different CT-scanner models of 4 distinct manufacturers demonstrate that our system identifies the origin of one CT image with a detection rate of at least 94% and that it achieves better performance than sensor pattern noise (SPN) based strategy proposed for general public camera devices.

  15. Is targeted reconstruction necessary for evaluating contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography using a liquid crystal display monitor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Oshima, Hidekazu; Kitase, Masanori; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hara, Masaki; Ohashi, Kazuya

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether 20-cm field-of-view (FOV) targeted reconstruction (TR) on contrast-enhanced (CE) chest computed tomography (CT) might improve the diagnostic value compared with simple zooming (SZ) from whole-thorax FOV images using a 2 million (2M)-pixel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor. We prospectively evaluated 44 patients. SZ images were magnified from a FOV of 26-34 cm (mean 29.7 cm). Parameters were 512 x 512 matrix and 3 mm thickness and interval. Images were reconstructed using a soft-tissue kernel. Three radiologists evaluated contour, spiculation, notch, pleural tag, invasion, and internal characteristics of the lesions using 5-scale scores. We also performed a phantom study to evaluate the spatial resolution of images. The diagnostic value of the TR images was similar to that of the SZ images, with the findings identified in 88%-100% of the cases. Artifacts from highdensity structures deteriorated the image quality in six (14%), and the SZ images were judged to be preferable in five of them. In the phantom study, there was little difference in spatial resolution between the two images. The SZ images from whole-thorax FOV on CE chest CT were similar in quality to TR images using a 2M-pixel LCD monitor. (author)

  16. Constrained Total Generalized p-Variation Minimization for Few-View X-Ray Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanming; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Cai, Ailong; Hu, Guoen

    2016-01-01

    Total generalized variation (TGV)-based computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction, which utilizes high-order image derivatives, is superior to total variation-based methods in terms of the preservation of edge information and the suppression of unfavorable staircase effects. However, conventional TGV regularization employs l1-based form, which is not the most direct method for maximizing sparsity prior. In this study, we propose a total generalized p-variation (TGpV) regularization model to improve the sparsity exploitation of TGV and offer efficient solutions to few-view CT image reconstruction problems. To solve the nonconvex optimization problem of the TGpV minimization model, we then present an efficient iterative algorithm based on the alternating minimization of augmented Lagrangian function. All of the resulting subproblems decoupled by variable splitting admit explicit solutions by applying alternating minimization method and generalized p-shrinkage mapping. In addition, approximate solutions that can be easily performed and quickly calculated through fast Fourier transform are derived using the proximal point method to reduce the cost of inner subproblems. The accuracy and efficiency of the simulated and real data are qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated to validate the efficiency and feasibility of the proposed method. Overall, the proposed method exhibits reasonable performance and outperforms the original TGV-based method when applied to few-view problems.

  17. A study of the image quality of computed tomography adaptive statistical iterative reconstructed brain images using subjective and objective methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangat, J.; Morgan, J.; Benson, E.; Baath, M.; Lewis, M.; Reilly, A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent reintroduction of iterative reconstruction in computed tomography has facilitated the realisation of major dose saving. The aim of this article was to investigate the possibility of achieving further savings at a site with well-established Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR TM ) (GE Healthcare) brain protocols. An adult patient study was conducted with observers making visual grading assessments using image quality criteria, which were compared with the frequency domain metrics, noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function. Subjective image quality equivalency was found in the 40-70% ASiR TM range, leading to the proposal of ranges for the objective metrics defining acceptable image quality. Based on the findings of both the patient-based and objective studies of the ASiR TM /tube-current combinations tested, 60%/305 mA was found to fall within all, but one, of these ranges. Therefore, it is recommended that an ASiR TM level of 60%, with a noise index of 12.20, is a viable alternative to the currently used protocol featuring a 40% ASiR TM level and a noise index of 11.20, potentially representing a 16% dose saving. (authors)

  18. What is Computed Tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging What is Computed Tomography? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Chest X ray Image back to top Computed Tomography (CT) Although also based on the variable absorption ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  20. Evaluation of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction Application in Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction of Spinal Instrumentation: A Single Saudi Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir Monir

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the commercially available orthopedic metal artifact reduction (OMAR) technique in postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) reconstruction studies after spinal instrumentation and to investigate its clinical application. One hundred and twenty (120) patients with spinal metallic implants were included in the study. All had 3DCT reconstruction examinations using the OMAR software after obtaining the informed consents and approval of the Institution Ethical Committee. The degree of the artifacts, the related muscular density, the clearness of intermuscular fat planes, and definition of the adjacent vertebrae were qualitatively evaluated. The diagnostic satisfaction and quality of the 3D reconstruction images were thoroughly assessed. The majority (96.7%) of 3DCT reconstruction images performed were considered satisfactory to excellent for diagnosis. Only 3.3% of the reconstructed images had rendered unacceptable diagnostic quality. OMAR can effectively reduce metallic artifacts in patients with spinal instrumentation with highly diagnostic 3DCT reconstruction images.

  1. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on computed tomographic (CT) scanning which has improved computer-assisted imaging modalities for radiologic diagnosis. The advantage of this modality is its ability to image thin cross-sectional planes of the body, thus uncovering density information in three dimensions without tissue superposition problems. Because this enables vastly superior imaging of soft tissues in the brain and body, CT scanning was immediately successful and continues to grow in importance as improvements are made in speed, resolution, and cost efficiency. CT scanners are used for general purposes, and the more advanced machines are generally preferred in large hospitals, where volume and variety of usage justifies the cost. For imaging in the abdomen, a scanner with a rapid speed is preferred because peristalsis, involuntary motion of the diaphram, and even cardiac motion are present and can significantly degrade image quality. When contrast media is used in imaging to demonstrate scanner, immediate review of images, and multiformat hardcopy production. A second console is reserved for the radiologist to read images and perform the several types of image analysis that are available. Since CT images contain quantitative information in terms of density values and contours of organs, quantitation of volumes, areas, and masses is possible. This is accomplished with region-of- interest methods, which involve the electronic outlining of the selected region of the television display monitor with a trackball-controlled cursor. In addition, various image- processing options, such as edge enhancement (for viewing fine details of edges) or smoothing filters (for enhancing the detectability of low-contrast lesions) are useful tools

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  3. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emission Computed Tomography is a technique used for producing single or multiple cross-sectional images of the distribution of radionuclide labelled agents in vivo. The techniques of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are described with particular regard to the function of the detectors used to produce images and the computer techniques used to build up images. (UK)

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  6. Skeletal imaging following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament: in vivo comparison of fluoroscopy, radiography, and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osti, Michael; Benedetto, Karl Peter [Academic Hospital Feldkirch, Department for Trauma Surgery and Sports Traumatology, Feldkirch (Austria); Krawinkel, Alessa [Academic Hospital Feldkirch, Department for Radiology, Feldkirch (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Intra- and postoperative validation of anatomic footprint replication in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction can be conducted using fluoroscopy, radiography, or computed tomography (CT) scans. However, effectiveness and exposure to radiation of these imaging modalities are unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of fluoroscopy, radiography, and CT in detecting femoral and tibial tunnel positions following an all-inside reconstruction of the PCL ligament in vivo. The study design was a retrospective case series. Intraoperative fluoroscopic images, postoperative radiographs, and CT scans were obtained in 50 consecutive patients following single-bundle PCL reconstruction. The centers of the tibial and femoral tunnel apertures were identified and correlated to measurement grid systems. The results of fluoroscopic, radiographic, and CT measurements were compared to each other and accumulated radiation dosages were calculated. Comparing the imaging groups, no statistically significant difference could be detected for the reference of the femoral tunnel to the intercondylar depth and height, for the reference of the tibial tunnel to the mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau and for the superoinferior distance of the tibial tunnel entry to the tibial plateau and to the former physis line. Effective doses resulting from fluoroscopic, radiographic, and CT exposure averaged 2.9 mSv, standard deviation (±SD) 4.1 mSv, to 1.3 ± 0.8 mSv and to 3.6 ± 1.0 mSv, respectively. Fluoroscopy, radiography, and CT yield approximately equal effectiveness in detecting parameters used for quality validation intra- and postoperatively. An accumulating exposure to radiation must be considered. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of an advanced monoenergetic reconstruction technique in dual-energy computed tomography of head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Moritz H.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Kraft, Johannes; Bauer, Ralf W.; Kaup, Moritz; Dewes, Patricia; Bucher, Andreas M.; Burck, Iris; Lehnert, Thomas; Kerl, J.M.; Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wagenblast, Jens [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wichmann, Julian L. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    To define optimal keV settings for advanced monoenergetic (Mono+) dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). DECT data of 44 patients (34 men, mean age 55.5 ± 16.0 years) with histopathologically confirmed SCC were reconstructed as 40, 55, 70 keV Mono + and M0.3 (30 % 80 kV) linearly blended series. Attenuation of tumour, sternocleidomastoid muscle, internal jugular vein, submandibular gland, and noise were measured. Three radiologists with >3 years of experience subjectively assessed image quality, lesion delineation, image sharpness, and noise. The highest lesion attenuation was shown for 40 keV series (248.1 ± 94.1 HU), followed by 55 keV (150.2 ± 55.5 HU; P = 0.001). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at 40 keV (19.09 ± 13.84) was significantly superior to all other reconstructions (55 keV, 10.25 ± 9.11; 70 keV, 7.68 ± 6.31; M0.3, 5.49 ± 3.28; all P < 0.005). Subjective image quality was highest for 55 keV images (4.53; κ = 0.38, P = 0.003), followed by 40 keV (4.14; κ = 0.43, P < 0.001) and 70 keV reconstructions (4.06; κ = 0.32, P = 0.005), all superior (P < 0.004) to linear blending M0.3 (3.81; κ = 0.280, P = 0.056). Mono + DECT at low keV levels significantly improves CNR and subjective image quality in patients with head and neck SCC, as tumour CNR peaks at 40 keV, and 55 keV images are preferred by observers. (orig.)

  8. Computed laminography and reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que Jiemin; Cao Daquan; Zhao Wei; Tang Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Computed laminography (CL) is an alternative to computed tomography if large objects are to be inspected with high resolution. This is especially true for planar objects. In this paper, we set up a new scanning geometry for CL, and study the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for CL imaging. We compare the results of ART with variant weighted functions by computer simulation with a digital phantom. It proves that ART algorithm is a good choice for the CL system. (authors)

  9. Reduction of radiation exposure and improvement of image quality with BMI-adapted prospective cardiac computed tomography and iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosch, Waldemar; Stiller, Wolfram; Mueller, Dirk; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Welzel, Johanna; Dadrich, Monika; Buss, Sebastian J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Kauczor, Hans U.; Katus, Hugo A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocols and iterative reconstruction algorithms (iDose) on patient radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective ECG-triggered 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: Image quality and radiation exposure were systematically analyzed in 100 patients. 60 Patients underwent prospective ECG-triggered CCTA using a non-tailored protocol and served as a ‘control’ group (Group 1: 120 kV, 200 mA s). 40 Consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent prospective CCTA, using BMI-adapted tube voltage and standard (Group 2: 100/120 kV, 100–200 mA s) versus reduced tube current (Group 3: 100/120 kV, 75–150 mA s). Iterative reconstructions were provided with different iDose levels and were compared to filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructions. Image quality was assessed in consensus of 2 experienced observers and using a 5-grade scale (1 = best to 5 = worse), and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR) were quantified. Results: CCTA was performed without adverse events in all patients (n = 100, heart rate of 47–87 bpm and BMI of 19–38 kg/m 2 ). Patients examined using the non-tailored protocol in Group 1 had the highest radiation exposure (3.2 ± 0.4 mSv), followed by Group 2 (1.7 ± 0.7 mSv) and Group 3 (1.2 ± 0.6 mSv) (radiation savings of 47% and 63%, respectively, p < 0.001). Iterative reconstructions provided increased SNR and CNR, particularly when higher iDose level 5 was applied with Multi-Frequency reconstruction (iDose5 MFR) (14.1 ± 4.6 versus 21.2 ± 7.3 for SNR and 12.0 ± 4.2 versus 18.1 ± 6.6 for CNR, for FBP versus iDose5 MFR, respectively, p < 0.001). The combination of BMI adaptation with iterative reconstruction reduced radiation exposure and simultaneously improved image quality (subjective image quality of 1.4 ± 0.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.5 for Group 2 reconstructed using iDose5 MFR versus

  10. Preoperative (3-dimensional) computed tomography lung reconstruction before anatomic segmentectomy or lobectomy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ernest G; Landreneau, James R; Schuchert, Matthew J; Odell, David D; Gu, Suicheng; Pu, Jiantao; Luketich, James D; Landreneau, Rodney J

    2015-09-01

    Accurate cancer localization and negative resection margins are necessary for successful segmentectomy. In this study, we evaluate a newly developed software package that permits automated segmentation of the pulmonary parenchyma, allowing 3-dimensional assessment of tumor size, location, and estimates of surgical margins. A pilot study using a newly developed 3-dimensional computed tomography analytic software package was performed to retrospectively evaluate preoperative computed tomography images of patients who underwent segmentectomy (n = 36) or lobectomy (n = 15) for stage 1 non-small cell lung cancer. The software accomplishes an automated reconstruction of anatomic pulmonary segments of the lung based on bronchial arborization. Estimates of anticipated surgical margins and pulmonary segmental volume were made on the basis of 3-dimensional reconstruction. Autosegmentation was achieved in 72.7% (32/44) of preoperative computed tomography images with slice thicknesses of 3 mm or less. Reasons for segmentation failure included local severe emphysema or pneumonitis, and lower computed tomography resolution. Tumor segmental localization was achieved in all autosegmented studies. The 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis provided a positive predictive value of 87% in predicting a marginal clearance greater than 1 cm and a 75% positive predictive value in predicting a margin to tumor diameter ratio greater than 1 in relation to the surgical pathology assessment. This preoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis of segmental anatomy can confirm the tumor location within an anatomic segment and aid in predicting surgical margins. This 3-dimensional computed tomography information may assist in the preoperative assessment regarding the suitability of segmentectomy for peripheral lung cancers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Influence of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction on coronary plaque analysis in coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    performed. Images were reconstructed using FBP, 30% and 60% adaptive statistical IR (ASIR). Coronary plaque analysis was performed as per patient and per vessel (LM, LAD, CX and RCA) measurements. Lumen and vessel volumes and plaque burden measurements were based on automatic detected contours in each...... reconstruction. Lumen and plaque intensity measurements and HU based plaque characterization were based on corrected contours copied to each reconstruction. RESULTS: No significant changes between FBP and 30% ASIR were found except for lumen- (-2.53 HU) and plaque intensities (-1.28 HU). Between FBP and 60% ASIR...... the change in total volume showed an increase of 0.94%, 4.36% and 2.01% for lumen, plaque and vessel, respectively. The change in total plaque burden between FBP and 60% ASIR was 0.76%. Lumen and plaque intensities decreased between FBP and 60% ASIR with -9.90 HU and -1.97 HU, respectively. The total plaque...

  12. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of radiation dose and image quality of computed tomography images using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Fahad Ahmed; Mail, Noor; Shamy, Abdulrahman M; Suliman, Alghamdi; Saoudi, Abdelhamid

    2016-05-08

    Image quality is a key issue in radiology, particularly in a clinical setting where it is important to achieve accurate diagnoses while minimizing radiation dose. Some computed tomography (CT) manufacturers have introduced algorithms that claim significant dose reduction. In this study, we assessed CT image quality produced by two reconstruction algorithms provided with GE Healthcare's Discovery 690 Elite positron emission tomography (PET) CT scanner. Image quality was measured for images obtained at various doses with both conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithms. A stan-dard CT dose index (CTDI) phantom and a pencil ionization chamber were used to measure the CT dose at 120 kVp and an exposure of 260 mAs. Image quality was assessed using two phantoms. CT images of both phantoms were acquired at tube voltage (kV) of 120 with exposures ranging from 25 mAs to 400 mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP and ASIR ranging from 10% to 100%, then analyzed for noise, low-contrast detectability, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and modulation transfer function (MTF). Noise was 4.6 HU in water phantom images acquired at 260 mAs/FBP 120 kV and 130 mAs/50% ASIR 120 kV. The large objects (fre-quency ASIR, compared to 260 mAs/FBP. The application of ASIR for small objects (frequency >7 lp/cm) showed poor visibility compared to FBP at 260 mAs and even worse for images acquired at less than 130 mAs. ASIR blending more than 50% at low dose tends to reduce contrast of small objects (frequency >7 lp/cm). We concluded that dose reduction and ASIR should be applied with close attention if the objects to be detected or diagnosed are small (frequency > 7 lp/cm). Further investigations are required to correlate the small objects (frequency > 7 lp/cm) to patient anatomy and clinical diagnosis.

  13. An Implementation of Parallel and Networked Computing Schemes for the Real-Time Image Reconstruction Based on Electrical Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sook Hee

    2001-02-01

    This thesis implements and analyzes the parallel and networked computing libraries based on the multiprocessor computer architecture as well as networked computers, aiming at improving the computation speed of ET(Electrical Tomography) system which requires enormous CPU time in reconstructing the unknown internal state of the target object. As an instance of the typical tomography technology, ET partitions the cross-section of the target object into the tiny elements and calculates the resistivity of them with signal values measured at the boundary electrodes surrounding the surface of the object after injecting the predetermined current pattern through the object. The number of elements is determined considering the trade-off between the accuracy of the reconstructed image and the computation time. As the elements become more finer, the number of element increases, and the system can get the better image. However, the reconstruction time increases polynomially with the number of partitioned elements since the procedure consists of a number of time consuming matrix operations such as multiplication, inverse, pseudo inverse, Jacobian and so on. Consequently, the demand for improving computation speed via multiple processor grows indispensably. Moreover, currently released PCs can be stuffed with up to 4 CPUs interconnected to the shared memory while some operating systems enable the application process to benefit from such computer by allocating the threaded job to each CPU, resulting in concurrent processing. In addition, a networked computing or cluster computing environment is commonly available to almost every computer which contains communication protocol and is connected to local or global network. After partitioning the given job(numerical operation), each CPU or computer calculates the partial result independently, and the results are merged via common memory to produce the final result. It is desirable to adopt the commonly used library such as Matlab to

  14. Gantry for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelman, A.L.; O'Dell, W.R.; Brook, R.F.; Hein, P.W.; Brandt, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A novel design of gantry for use in computed tomography is described in detail. In the new gantry, curved tracks are mounted to the laterally spaced apart sides of the frame which rotates and carries the detector and X-ray source. This permits the frame to be tilted either side of vertical enabling angular slices of body layers to be viewed and allows simplification of the algorithm which the computer uses for image reconstruction. A failsafe, solenoid brake is described which can lock the shaft against rotation. The gantry also contains a hoist mechanism which aids maintenance of the heavy X-ray tube and/or detector arrays. Explicit engineering details are presented. (U.K.)

  15. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Bony Nasolacrimal Canal by Automated Segmentation of Computed Tomography Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Jañez-Garcia

    Full Text Available To apply a fully automated method to quantify the 3D structure of the bony nasolacrimal canal (NLC from CT scans whereby the size and main morphometric characteristics of the canal can be determined.Cross-sectional study.36 eyes of 18 healthy individuals.Using software designed to detect the boundaries of the NLC on CT images, 36 NLC reconstructions were prepared. These reconstructions were then used to calculate NLC volume. The NLC axis in each case was determined according to a polygonal model and to 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree polynomials. From these models, NLC sectional areas and length were determined. For each variable, descriptive statistics and normality tests (Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk were established.Time for segmentation, NLC volume, axis, sectional areas and length.Mean processing time was around 30 seconds for segmenting each canal. All the variables generated were normally distributed. Measurements obtained using the four models polygonal, 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree polynomial, respectively, were: mean canal length 14.74, 14.3, 14.80, and 15.03 mm; mean sectional area 15.15, 11.77, 11.43, and 11.56 mm2; minimum sectional area 8.69, 7.62, 7.40, and 7.19 mm2; and mean depth of minimum sectional area (craniocaudal 7.85, 7.71, 8.19, and 8.08 mm.The method proposed automatically reconstructs the NLC on CT scans. Using these reconstructions, morphometric measurements can be calculated from NLC axis estimates based on polygonal and 2nd, 3rd and 4th polynomial models.

  16. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  17. Impact of iterative reconstructions on objective and subjective emphysema assessment with computed tomography: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Steve P.; Gariani, Joanna; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Botsikas, Diomidis; Becker, Christoph D.; Montet, Xavier [Geneva University Hospitals, Division of Radiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Information Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Adler, Dan [Geneva University Hospitals, Division of Pneumology, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Karenovics, Wolfram [Geneva University Hospitals, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    To prospectively evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on pulmonary emphysema assessment as compared to filtered back projection (FBP). One hundred ten unenhanced chest CT examinations were obtained on two different scanners. Image reconstructions from a single acquisition were done with different levels of IR and compared with FBP on the basis of the emphysema index (EI), lung volume and voxel densities. Objective emphysema assessment was performed with 3D software provided by each manufacturer. Subjective assessment of emphysema was performed as a blinded evaluation. Quantitative and subjective values were compared using repeated ANOVA analysis, Bland-Altman analysis and Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W). Lung volumes are stable on both units, throughout all IR levels (P ≥ 0.057). EI significantly decreases on both units with the use of any level of IR (P < 0.001). The highest levels of IR are responsible for a decrease of 33-36 % of EI. Significant differences in minimal lung density are found between the different algorithms (P < 0.003). Intra- and inter-reader concordance for emphysema characterisation is generally good (W ≥ 0.77 and W ≥ 0.86, respectively). Both commercially available IR algorithms used in this study significantly changed EI but did not alter visual assessment compared to standard FBP reconstruction at identical radiation exposure. (orig.)

  18. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  19. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-12-07

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm 'the common mask guided image reconstruction' (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and 'well' solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the algorithm

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of tunnel diameters prior to revision ACL reconstruction: a comparison to computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Bjoern Holger; Gulkin, Daniel; Guelke, Joachim; Gebhard, Florian [University of Ulm, Center of Surgery, Department for Orthopedic Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ulm (Germany); Merz, Cornelia; Huth, Jochen; Mauch, Frieder [Sportklinik Stuttgart GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Revision ACL reconstruction is becoming more frequent because of a 10% rate of re-ruptures and insufficiencies. Currently, computed tomography (CT) represents the gold standard in detecting and measuring the tunnels of the initial ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare measurement results of CT and thin-sliced MRI sequences, which were modified to a high soft tissue-bone contrast. Prior to an ACL revision surgery, 16 consecutive patients had an MRI in addition to the standard CT scan. A dedicated 0.25-T Esaote G-Scan (Esaote Biomedica, Cologne, Germany) with a Turbo 3D T1 sequence was used for MRI. Tunnel diameters were measured at 11 defined points of interest. For the statistical evaluation, the Mann-Whitney U test for connected samples was used. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was additionally calculated. All measured diameters showed significant to highly significant correlations between both diagnostic tools (r = 0.7-0.98). In addition, there was no significant difference (p > 0.5) between the two techniques. Almost all diameters showed nearly perfect intraobserver reliability (ICC 0.8-0.97). Interobserver reliability showed an ICC of 0.91/0.92 for only one diameter in MRI and CT. Prior to ACL revision surgery, bone tunnel measurements can be done using a 3D T1-MRI sequence in low-field MRI. MRI measurements show the same accuracy as CT scans. Preoperative radiation exposure in mainly young patients could be reduced. Also the costs of an additional CT scan could be saved. (orig.)

  1. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography is regarded by many as a complicated union of sophisticated x-ray equipment and computer technology. This book overcomes these complexities. The rigid technicalities of the machinery and the clinical aspects of computed tomography are discussed including the preparation of patients, both physically and mentally, for scanning. Furthermore, the author also explains how to set up and run a computed tomography department, including advice on how the room should be designed

  2. Three-dimensional prediction of the human eyeball and canthi for craniofacial reconstruction using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Rok; Lee, Kyung-Min; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik

    2016-04-01

    An anatomical relationship between the hard and soft tissues of the face is mandatory for facial reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the positions of the eyeball and canthi three-dimensionally from the relationships between the facial hard and soft tissues using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT scan data of 100 living subjects were used to obtain the measurements of facial hard and soft tissues. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were carried out using the hard tissue measurements in the orbit, nasal bone, nasal cavity and maxillary canine to predict the most probable positions of the eyeball and canthi within the orbit. Orbital width, orbital height, and orbital depth were strong predictors of the eyeball and canthi position. Intercanine width was also a predictor of the mediolateral position of the eyeball. Statistically significant regression models for the positions of the eyeball and canthi could be derived from the measurements of orbit and maxillary canine. These results suggest that CBCT data can be useful in predicting the positions of the eyeball and canthi three-dimensionally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the biliary tract using spiral computed tomography. Three-dimensional cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gon, Masanori; Ogura, Norihiro; Uetsuji, Shouji; Ueyama, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    In this study, 310 patients with benign biliary diseases, 20 with gallbladder cancer, and 8 with biliary tract carcinoma underwent spiral CT (SCT) scanning at cholangiography. Depiction rate of the shape of the conjunction site of the gallbladder and biliary tract was 27.5% by conventional intravenous cholangiography (DIC), 92.5% by ERC, and 90.0% by DIC-SCT. Abnormal cystic duct course was admitted in 14.1%. Multiplanar reconstruction by DIC-SCT enabled identification of the common bile duct and intrahepatic bile duct stone. Three-dimensional reconstruction of DIC-SCT was effective in evaluating obstruction of the anastomosis or passing condition of after hepatico-jejunostomy. Two-dimensional SCT images through PTCD tube enabled degree of hepatic invasion in bile duct cancer, and three-dimensional images were useful in grasping the morphology of the bile duct branches near the obstruction site. DIC-SCT is therefore considered a useful procedure as non-invasive examination of bile duct lesions. (S.Y.)

  4. Computed tomography of the patellofemoral alignment after arthroscopic reconstruction following patella dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R.J.; Hidajat, N.; Maeurer, J.; Felix, R.; Weiler, A.; Hoeher, J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic impact of different CT-based measurements to analyze the patellofemoral alignment after arthroscopic reconstruction in patients with patella dislocation. Materials and Methods: In 18 patients with dislocation of the patella, CT of the patellofemoral joint was performed after arthroscopic reconstruction. Various methods recommended in the literature were used to analyze the structure and the alignment of the patellofemoral joint with a relaxed quadriceps muscle. Axial CT scans were taken in four different knee flexion angles (15 , 30 , 45 , 60 ). Results: After arthroscopic stabilization in patients with patella dislocation, only the lateral patellofemoral angle (15 and 30 knee flexion) and the congruence angle (15 knee flexion) showed significant differences between the CT-measurements in the normal and the operated group. The differences of the remaining mean values were not significant due to a high standard deviation. With increasing flexion of the knee, the differences between the normal and the dislocation group almost disappeared. Only the lateral patellofemoral angle, the patella tilt and the lateral patella shift revealed differences between the normal and the group with recurrent dislocation in every degree of knee flexion. With increasing knee flexion above 30 and especially at 60 , the majority of the measured values returned to the normal range. Conclusions: For CT-measurements of the patellofemoral joint after arthroscopic stabilization, the patellofemoral angle and the congruence angle seemed to be most useful. The measurements of the patellofemoral joint should be taken in various degrees of knee flexion. (orig.) [de

  5. Segmentation-free statistical image reconstruction for polyenergetic x-ray computed tomography with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbakri, Idris A; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a statistical image reconstruction method for x-ray CT that is based on a physical model that accounts for the polyenergetic x-ray source spectrum and the measurement nonlinearities caused by energy-dependent attenuation. Unlike our earlier work, the proposed algorithm does not require pre-segmentation of the object into the various tissue classes (e.g., bone and soft tissue) and allows mixed pixels. The attenuation coefficient of each voxel is modelled as the product of its unknown density and a weighted sum of energy-dependent mass attenuation coefficients. We formulate a penalized-likelihood function for this polyenergetic model and develop an iterative algorithm for estimating the unknown density of each voxel. Applying this method to simulated x-ray CT measurements of objects containing both bone and soft tissue yields images with significantly reduced beam hardening artefacts relative to conventional beam hardening correction methods. We also apply the method to real data acquired from a phantom containing various concentrations of potassium phosphate solution. The algorithm reconstructs an image with accurate density values for the different concentrations, demonstrating its potential for quantitative CT applications

  6. Segmentation-free statistical image reconstruction for polyenergetic x-ray computed tomography with experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris A, Elbakri; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2003-08-07

    This paper describes a statistical image reconstruction method for x-ray CT that is based on a physical model that accounts for the polyenergetic x-ray source spectrum and the measurement nonlinearities caused by energy-dependent attenuation. Unlike our earlier work, the proposed algorithm does not require pre-segmentation of the object into the various tissue classes (e.g., bone and soft tissue) and allows mixed pixels. The attenuation coefficient of each voxel is modelled as the product of its unknown density and a weighted sum of energy-dependent mass attenuation coefficients. We formulate a penalized-likelihood function for this polyenergetic model and develop an iterative algorithm for estimating the unknown density of each voxel. Applying this method to simulated x-ray CT measurements of objects containing both bone and soft tissue yields images with significantly reduced beam hardening artefacts relative to conventional beam hardening correction methods. We also apply the method to real data acquired from a phantom containing various concentrations of potassium phosphate solution. The algorithm reconstructs an image with accurate density values for the different concentrations, demonstrating its potential for quantitative CT applications.

  7. Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Pan Xiaochuan

    2008-01-01

    An iterative algorithm, based on recent work in compressive sensing, is developed for volume image reconstruction from a circular cone-beam scan. The algorithm minimizes the total variation (TV) of the image subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data is within a specified tolerance of the available data and that the values of the volume image are non-negative. The constraints are enforced by the use of projection onto convex sets (POCS) and the TV objective is minimized by steepest descent with an adaptive step-size. The algorithm is referred to as adaptive-steepest-descent-POCS (ASD-POCS). It appears to be robust against cone-beam artifacts, and may be particularly useful when the angular range is limited or when the angular sampling rate is low. The ASD-POCS algorithm is tested with the Defrise disk and jaw computerized phantoms. Some comparisons are performed with the POCS and expectation-maximization (EM) algorithms. Although the algorithm is presented in the context of circular cone-beam image reconstruction, it can also be applied to scanning geometries involving other x-ray source trajectories

  8. An introduction to emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes salient features of the theory and an examination of practical considerations for someone who is using or introducing tomography, selecting equipment for it or wishing to develop a clinical application. Emphasis is on gamma camera tomography. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: emission computed and gamma camera tomography and the relationship to other medical imaging techniques, the tomographic reconstruction technique theory, rotating gamma camera tomography, attenuation correction and quantitative reconstruction, other single photon tomographic techniques, positron tomography, image display, clinical application of single photon and positron tomography, and commercial systems for SPECT. Substantial bibliography. (U.K.)

  9. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Justin C; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm ‘the common mask guided image reconstruction’ (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and ‘well’ solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the

  10. Quantitation of the reconstruction quality of a four-dimensional computed tomography process for lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wei; Parikh, Parag J.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Mutic, Sasa; Singh, Anurag K.; Christensen, Gary E.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Low, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) technique for mapping breathing motion in radiotherapy treatment planning. A multislice CT scanner (1.5 mm slices) operated in cine mode was used to acquire 12 contiguous slices in each couch position for 15 consecutive scans (0.5 s rotation, 0.25 s between scans) while the patient underwent simultaneous quantitative spirometry measurements to provide a sorting metric. The spirometry-sorted scans were used to reconstruct a 4D data set. A critical factor for 4D CT is quantifying the reconstructed data set quality which we measure by correlating the metric used relative to internal-object motion. For this study, the internal air content within the lung was used as a surrogate for internal motion measurements. Thresholding and image morphological operations were applied to delineate the air-containing tissues (lungs, trachea) from each CT slice. The Hounsfield values were converted to the internal air content (V). The relationship between the air content and spirometer-measured tidal volume (ν) was found to be quite linear throughout the lungs and was used to estimate the overall accuracy and precision of tidal volume-sorted 4D CT. Inspection of the CT-scan air content as a function of tidal volume showed excellent correlations (typically r>0.99) throughout the lung volume. Because of the discovered linear relationship, the ratio of internal air content to tidal volume was indicative of the fraction of air change in each couch position. Theoretically, due to air density differences within the lung and in room, the sum of these ratios would equal 1.11. For 12 patients, the mean value was 1.08±0.06, indicating the high quality of spirometry-based image sorting. The residual of a first-order fit between ν and V was used to estimate the process precision. For all patients, the precision was better than 8%, with a mean value of 5.1%±1.9%. This quantitative analysis highlights the value of using spirometry

  11. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mory, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.mory@philips.com [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo [Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk [Philips Research, Röntgenstrasse 24–26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, 12605 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Rit, Simon [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard, 28 rue Laënnec, F-69373 Lyon (France); Peyrin, Françoise [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); X-ray Imaging Group, European Synchrotron, Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, 28 Avenue du Doyen Jean Lépine, 69500 Bron (France)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  12. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection

  13. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  14. The dental cavities of equine cheek teeth: three-dimensional reconstructions based on high resolution micro-computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopke Susan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies reported on the very complex morphology of the pulp system in equine cheek teeth. The continuous production of secondary dentine leads to distinct age-related changes of the endodontic cavity. Detailed anatomical knowledge of the dental cavities in all ages is required to explain the aetiopathology of typical equine endodontic diseases. Furthermore, data on mandibular and maxillary pulp systems is in high demand to provide a basis for the development of endodontic therapies. However, until now examination of the pulp cavity has been based on either sectioned teeth or clinical computed tomography. More precise results were expected by using micro-computed tomography with a resolution of about 0.1 mm and three-dimensional reconstructions based on previous greyscale analyses and histological verification. The aim of the present study was to describe the physiological configurations of the pulp system within a wide spectrum of tooth ages. Results Maxillary teeth: All morphological constituents of the endodontic cavity were present in teeth between 4 and 16 years: Triadan 06s displayed six pulp horns and five root canals, Triadan 07-10s five pulp horns and four root canals and Triadan 11s seven pulp horns and four to six root canals. A common pulp chamber was most frequent in teeth ≤5 years, but was found even in a tooth of 9 years. A large variety of pulp configurations was observed within 2.5 and 16 years post eruption, but most commonly a separation into mesial and distal pulp compartments was seen. Maxillary cheek teeth showed up to four separate pulp compartments but the frequency of two, three and four pulp compartments was not related to tooth age (P > 0.05. In Triadan 06s, pulp horn 6 was always connected to pulp horns 1 and 3 and root canal I. In Triadan 11s, pulp horns 7 and 8 were present in variable constitutions. Mandibular teeth: A common pulp chamber was present in teeth up to 15 years, but most

  15. Three-dimensional computed tomography of the reconstructed lower urinary tract: technique and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, R.; Frede, T.; Eder, R.; Recheis, W.; Knapp, R.; zur Nedden, D.; Stenzl, A.; Bartsch, G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study in 54 patients was to improve the visualization of the anatomy and postoperative changes in the pelvic topography after bilateral ureteroileal urethrostomy, using surface rendering of electron beam CT (EBCT) data for the 3D display. Fifty-four patients (39 men and 15 women) were scanned with an EBCT unit between 3 and 110 months after performing orthotopic ureteroileal urethrostomy (''Hemi-Kock'') or ureteroileal rectosigmoidostomy. Various parameters and spatial viewing points were used in the 3D reconstruction, which was performed interactively on external workstations with commercially available software. The anti-reflux nipple was visualized as a distinct structure in all patients. In 8 patients with an interval of more than 12 months between surgery and CT, the pouch had developed an ovoid shape almost indistinguishable from the original bladder. The segmented data sets were partly animated to display the anatomy as virtual endoscopy. Three-dimensional depiction and virtual endoscopy of the neobladder using EBCT are a new way of imaging the postoperative anatomy. Its clinical efficacy in the diagnosis of inconclusive postoperative morbidity, especially voiding problems, and planning of necessary therapy have to be the subject of further evaluation. (orig.)

  16. Mathematical foundations of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.T.; Keinert, F.

    1985-01-01

    Along with a review of some of the mathematical foundations of computed tomography, the article contains new results on derivation of reconstruction formulas in a general setting encompassing all standard formulas; discussion and examples of the role of the point spread function with recipes for producing suitable ones; formulas for, and examples of, the reconstruction of certain functions of the attenuation coefficient, e.g., sharpened versions of it, some of them with the property that reconstruction at a point requires only the attenuation along rays meeting a small neighborhood of the point

  17. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Binder Ronald K; Leipsic Jonathon; Wood David; Moore Teri; Toggweiler Stefan; Willson Alex; Gurvitch Ronen; Freeman Melanie; Webb John G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3 dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. METHODS AND RES...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  19. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; Gullberg, G.T.; Huesman, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter is devoted to the methods of computer assisted tomography for determination of the three-dimensional distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the human body. The major applications of emission computed tomography are in biological research and medical diagnostic procedures. The objectives of these procedures are to make quantitative measurements of in vivo biochemical and hemodynamic functions

  20. Image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Gerke, Oke; Thygesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) technology is rapidly evolving and software solution developed to optimize image quality and/or lower radiation dose. Purpose To investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at different radiation doses in coronary CT...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  3. Accelerating an Ordered-Subset Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction with a Power Factor and Total Variation Minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in low-dose X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in many fields, including dentistry, guided radiotherapy and small animal imaging. Despite reducing the radiation dose, low-dose CBCT has not gained widespread acceptance in routine clinical practice. In addition to performing more evaluation studies, developing a fast and high-quality reconstruction algorithm is required. In this work, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that accelerates ordered-subsets (OS) reconstruction using a power factor. Furthermore, we combine it with the total-variation (TV) minimization method. Both simulation and phantom studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can accelerate conventional OS methods, greatly increase the convergence speed in early iterations. Moreover, applying the TV minimization to the power acceleration scheme can further improve the image quality while preserving the fast convergence rate.

  4. Computer tomography in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.

    1981-01-01

    The principles of design and the action of computer tomography which was applied also for the diagnosis of nose, ear and throat diseases are discussed. Computer tomography makes possible visualization of the structures of the nose, nasal sinuses and facial skeleton in transverse and eoronal planes. The method enables an accurate evaluation of the position and size of neoplasms in these regions and differentiation of inflammatory exudates against malignant masses. In otology computer tomography is used particularly in the diagnosis of pontocerebellar angle tumours and otogenic brain abscesses. Computer tomography of the larynx and pharynx provides new diagnostic data owing to the possibility of obtaining transverse sections and visualization of cartilage. Computer tomograms of some cases are presented. (author)

  5. Comparison of Conventional Versus Spiral Computed Tomography with Three Dimensional Reconstruction in Chronic Otitis Media with Ossicular Chain Destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghibi, Saeed; Seifirad, Sirous; Adami Dehkordi, Mahboobeh; Einolghozati, Sasan; Ghaffarian Eidgahi Moghadam, Nafiseh; Akhavan Rezayat, Amir; Seifirad, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Chronic otitis media (COM) can be treated with tympanoplasty with or without mastoidectomy. In patients who have undergone middle ear surgery, three-dimensional spiral computed tomography (CT) scan plays an important role in optimizing surgical planning. This study was performed to compare the findings of three-dimensional reconstructed spiral and conventional CT scan of ossicular chain study in patients with COM. Fifty patients enrolled in the study underwent plane and three dimensional CT scan (PHILIPS-MX 8000). Ossicles changes, mastoid cavity, tympanic cavity, and presence of cholesteatoma were evaluated. Results of the two methods were then compared and interpreted by a radiologist, recorded in questionnaires, and analyzed. Logistic regression test and Kappa coefficient of agreement were used for statistical analyses. Sixty two ears with COM were found in physical examination. A significant difference was observed between the findings of the two methods in ossicle erosion (11.3% in conventional CT vs. 37.1% in spiral CT, P = 0.0001), decrease of mastoid air cells (82.3% in conventional CT vs. 93.5% in spiral CT, P = 0.001), and tympanic cavity opacity (12.9% in conventional CT vs. 40.3% in spiral CT, P=0.0001). No significant difference was observed between the findings of the two methods in ossicle destruction (6.5% conventional CT vs. 56.4% in spiral CT, P = 0.125), and presence of cholesteatoma (3.2% in conventional CT vs. 42% in spiral CT, P = 0.172). In this study, spiral CT scan demonstrated ossicle dislocation in 9.6%, decrease of mastoid air cells in 4.8%, and decrease of volume in the tympanic cavity in 1.6%; whereas, none of these findings were reported in the patients' conventional CT scans. Spiral-CT scan is superior to conventional CT in the diagnosis of lesions in COM before operation. It can be used for detailed evaluation of ossicular chain in such patients

  6. Reconstruction method for fluorescent X-ray computed tomography by least-squares method using singular value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, T.; Akiba, M.; Takeda, T.; Kazama, M.; Hoshino, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Akatsuka, T.; Itai, Y.

    1997-02-01

    We describe a new attenuation correction method for fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) applied to image nonradioactive contrast materials in vivo. The principle of the FXCT imaging is that of computed tomography of the first generation. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation from the BLNE-5A bending-magnet beam line of Tristan Accumulation Ring in KEK, Japan, we studied phantoms with the FXCT method, and we succeeded in delineating a 4-mm-diameter channel filled with a 500 /spl mu/g I/ml iodine solution in a 20-mm-diameter acrylic cylindrical phantom. However, to detect smaller iodine concentrations, attenuation correction is needed. We present a correction method based on the equation representing the measurement process. The discretized equation system is solved by the least-squares method using the singular value decomposition. The attenuation correction method is applied to the projections by the Monte Carlo simulation and the experiment to confirm its effectiveness.

  7. Image reconstruction. Application to transverse axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, Florent.

    1977-09-01

    A method of computerized tridimensional image reconstruction from their projection, especially in the computerized transverse axial tomography is suggested. First, the different techniques actually developped and presented in the literature are analyzed. Then, the equipment used is briefly described. The reconstruction algorithm developped is presented. This algorithm is based on the convolution method, well adapted to the real conditions of exploitation. It is an extension of SHEPP and LOGAN's algorithm. A correction of the self absorption and of the detector's response is proposed. Finally, the first results obtained which are satisfactory are given. The simplicity of the method which does not need a too long computation time makes possible the implementation of the algorithm on a mini-computer [fr

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... white on the x-ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography ( ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

  17. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, D.

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  18. Computed tomography intravenous cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, S.; Murray, W.; Wilson, P.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for direct visualization of the bile ducts include bile duct dilatation demonstrated by ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scanning, where the cause of the bile duct dilatation is uncertain or where the anatomy of bile duct obstruction needs further clarification. Another indication is right upper quadrant pain, particularly in a post-cholecystectomy patient, where choledocholithiasis is suspected. A possible new indication is pre-operative evaluation prior to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The bile ducts are usually studied by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), or, less commonly, trans-hepatic cholangiography. The old technique of intravenous cholangiography has fallen into disrepute because of inconsistent bile-duct opacification. The advent of spiral CT scanning has renewed interest in intravenous cholangiography. The CT technique is very sensitive to the contrast agent in the bile ducts, and angiographic and three-dimensional reconstructions of the biliary tree can readily be obtained using the CT intravenous cholangiogram technique (CT IVC). Seven patients have been studied using this CT IVC technique, between February 1995 and June 1996, and are the subject of the present report. Eight further studies have since been performed. The results suggest that CT IVC could replace ERCP as the primary means of direct cholangiography, where pancreatic duct visualization is not required. (authors)

  19. Quantitative tomography simulations and reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martz, H.E.; Aufderheide, M.B.; Goodman, D.; Schach von Wittenau, A.; Logan, C.; Hall, J.; Jackson, J.; Slone, D.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray, neutron and proton transmission radiography and computed tomography (CT) are important diagnostic tools that are at the heart of LLNL's effort to meet the goals of the DOE's Advanced Radiography Campaign. This campaign seeks to improve radiographic simulation and analysis so that radiography can be a useful quantitative diagnostic tool for stockpile stewardship. Current radiographic accuracy does not allow satisfactory separation of experimental effects from the true features of an object's tomographically reconstructed image. This can lead to difficult and sometimes incorrect interpretation of the results. By improving our ability to simulate the whole radiographic and CT system, it will be possible to examine the contribution of system components to various experimental effects, with the goal of removing or reducing them. In this project, we are merging this simulation capability with a maximum-likelihood (constrained-conjugate-gradient-CCG) reconstruction technique yielding a physics-based, forward-model image-reconstruction code. In addition, we seek to improve the accuracy of computed tomography from transmission radiographs by studying what physics is needed in the forward model. During FY 2000, an improved version of the LLNL ray-tracing code called HADES has been coupled with a recently developed LLNL CT algorithm known as CCG. The problem of image reconstruction is expressed as a large matrix equation relating a model for the object being reconstructed to its projections (radiographs). Using a constrained-conjugate-gradient search algorithm, a maximum likelihood solution is sought. This search continues until the difference between the input measured radiographs or projections and the simulated or calculated projections is satisfactorily small

  20. 3D fast reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egger, M.L.; Scheurer, A. Hermann; Joseph, C.; Morel, C.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of long reconstruction times in positron emission tomography (PET) has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstructions in a few minutes per frame : on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementation of computationally less intensive algorithms

  1. Effectiveness of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for 64-Slice Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography in Patients With a Reduced Iodine Load: Comparison With Standard Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Won; Lee, Geewon; Lee, Nam Kyung; Moon, Jin Il; Ju, Yun Hye; Suh, Young Ju; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography (DE-CTPA) with a reduced iodine load. One hundred forty patients referred for chest CT were randomly divided into a DE-CTPA group with a reduced iodine load or a standard CTPA group. Quantitative and qualitative image qualities of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images with filtered back projection (VMS-FBP) and those with 50% ASIR (VMS-ASIR) in the DE-CTPA group were compared. Image qualities of VMS-ASIR images in the DE-CTPA group and ASIR images in the standard CTPA group were also compared. All quantitative and qualitative indices, except attenuation value of pulmonary artery in the VMS-ASIR subgroup, were superior to those in the VMS-FBP subgroup (all P ASIR images were superior to those of ASIR images in the standard CTPA group (P ASIR images of the DE-CTPA group than in ASIR images of the standard CTPA group (P = 0.001). The ASIR technique tends to improve the image quality of VMS imaging. Dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography with ASIR can reduce contrast medium volume and produce images of comparable quality with those of standard CTPA.

  2. Reproducibility and quantitativity of oblique-angle reconstruction in single photon emission computed tomography using Tl-201 myocardial phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunko, Hisashi; Nanbu, Ichiro; Seki, Hiroyasu

    1984-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to evaluate reproducibility and quantitativity of oblique-angle reconstruction of myocardial phantom SPECT. Myocardial phantom with transmural and subendcardial defects, and off-axis phantom with wall thickness changing continuously from 0 to 23 mm were used. Sixty projection data in every 6 0 were aquired using dual-camera (ZLC) with high resolution collimators connected to Scintipac-2400 computer system. Oblique-angle reconstructed images were obtained by indicating the long axis of the phantom manually in the transaxial and vertical long axial tomograms. Reproducibility and quantitativity were evaluated by creating circumferential profile (CFP) of the finally reconstructed short axial images. Inter- and intra-operater reproducibility of relative counting ratio were less than 6.7% (C.V.) and 3.3% (C.V.), respectively. Both inter- and intraoperater reproducibility of absolute counts were better than that of counting ratio (less than 5.1% (C.V.) and 2.9% (C.V.), respectively). Variation of defect location in the reconstructed image and between the slices were less than 1 sampling interval of CFP (6 0 ) and 0.6 slice, respectively. Quantitativity of counts in the reconstructed images was poor in the transmulal defect, but was fair in the subendocardial defect. Counting ratio was greatly affected by wall thickness. Temporal quantitatibity or linearity of the counts in sequential SPECTs was good in non-defect area, especially when wall thickness was greater than 70% (16 mm) of maximum. In conclusion, three-dimensional oblique-angle reconstruction in Tl-201 myocardial SPECT could be applicable to relative and temporal quantitation of local myocardial activity other than defect area for the quantitative evaluation of Tl-201 myocardial wash-out. (J.P.N.)

  3. Metal-induced streak artifact reduction using iterative reconstruction algorithms in x-ray computed tomography image of the dentoalveolar region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jian; Hayakawa, Yoshihiko; Kannenberg, Sven; Kober, Cornelia

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to reduce metal-induced streak artifact on oral and maxillofacial x-ray computed tomography (CT) images by developing the fast statistical image reconstruction system using iterative reconstruction algorithms. Adjacent CT images often depict similar anatomical structures in thin slices. So, first, images were reconstructed using the same projection data of an artifact-free image. Second, images were processed by the successive iterative restoration method where projection data were generated from reconstructed image in sequence. Besides the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm, the ordered subset-expectation maximization algorithm (OS-EM) was examined. Also, small region of interest (ROI) setting and reverse processing were applied for improving performance. Both algorithms reduced artifacts instead of slightly decreasing gray levels. The OS-EM and small ROI reduced the processing duration without apparent detriments. Sequential and reverse processing did not show apparent effects. Two alternatives in iterative reconstruction methods were effective for artifact reduction. The OS-EM algorithm and small ROI setting improved the performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bone tunnel change develops within two weeks of double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring autograft: A comparison of different postoperative immobilization periods using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Adachi, Nobuo; Ishifuro, Minoru; Nakamae, Atsuo; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone tunnel changes following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction during the early postoperative period using computed tomography (CT), and to understand the impact of postoperative immobilization on these changes. Twenty patients who underwent double-bundle ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendon autografts were included. We subcategorized patients into two groups: patients who underwent isolated ACL reconstruction and had three days of knee immobilization (Group A, n=10); and patients with concomitant meniscus injuries who underwent ACL reconstruction and meniscus repair simultaneously (Group B, n=10) had their knees immobilized for two weeks after surgery. Bone tunnel enlargement was evaluated using CT imaging at one to three days, two weeks, one month, three months and six months after surgery. The cross-sectional area of the femoral and tibial tunnels was measured, and enlargement rate was calculated. The tunnel center location at two weeks after surgery was also evaluated. The mean cross-sectional area adjacent to the joint space of the femoral and tibial tunnels significantly increased immediately after surgery, especially in the first month (P0.01). There was no significant difference in tunnel enlargement rate between group A and B. Tunnel center location changed even in the first two weeks. Bone tunnel enlargement following double-bundle ACL reconstruction occurred at an earlier time point after surgery than anticipated. Postoperative immobilization could not prevent bone tunnel enlargement, but might prevent tunnel migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D reconstruction of emergency cranial computed tomography scans as a tool in clinical forensic radiology after survived blunt head trauma--report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassberger, M; Gehl, A; Püschel, K; Turk, E E

    2011-04-15

    When requested to evaluate surviving victims of blunt head trauma the forensic expert has to draw mainly on medical documentation from the time of hospital admission. In many cases these consist of written clinical records, radiographs and in some cases photographic documentation of the injuries. We report two cases of survived severe blunt head trauma where CT images, which had primarily been obtained for clinical diagnostic purposes, were used for forensic assessment. 3D reconstructions of the clinical CT-images yielded valuable information regarding the sequence, number and direction of the impacts to the head, their gross morphology and the inflicting weapon. We conclude that computed tomography and related imaging methods, along with their 3D reconstruction capabilities, provide a useful tool to approach questions in clinical forensic casework. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of algebraic and analytical approaches to the formulation of the statistical model-based reconstruction problem for X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cierniak, Robert; Lorent, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of this paper is to investigate properties of our originally formulated statistical model-based iterative approach applied to the image reconstruction from projections problem which are related to its conditioning, and, in this manner, to prove a superiority of this approach over ones recently used by other authors. The reconstruction algorithm based on this conception uses a maximum likelihood estimation with an objective adjusted to the probability distribution of measured signals obtained from an X-ray computed tomography system with parallel beam geometry. The analysis and experimental results presented here show that our analytical approach outperforms the referential algebraic methodology which is explored widely in the literature and exploited in various commercial implementations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mid-Ventilation Concept for Mobile Pulmonary Tumors: Internal Tumor Trajectory Versus Selective Reconstruction of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Frames Based on External Breathing Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of direct reconstruction of mid-ventilation and peak-phase four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) frames based on the external breathing signal. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 15 pulmonary targets, a respiration-correlated CT study (4D CT) was acquired for treatment planning. After retrospective time-based sorting of raw projection data and reconstruction of eight CT frames equally distributed over the breathing cycle, mean tumor position (P mean ), mid-ventilation frame, and breathing motion were evaluated based on the internal tumor trajectory. Analysis of the external breathing signal (pressure sensor around abdomen) with amplitude-based sorting of projections was performed for direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases of the breathing cycle. Results: On the basis of the eight 4D CT frames equally spaced in time, tumor motion was largest in the craniocaudal direction, with 12 ± 7 mm on average. Tumor motion between the two frames reconstructed at peak phases was not different in the craniocaudal and anterior-posterior directions but was systematically smaller in the left-right direction by 1 mm on average. The 3-dimensional distance between P mean and the tumor position in the mid-ventilation frame based on the internal tumor trajectory was 1.2 ± 1 mm. Reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame at the mean amplitude position of the external breathing signal resulted in tumor positions 2.0 ± 1.1 mm distant from P mean . Breathing-induced motion artifacts in mid-ventilation frames caused negligible changes in tumor volume and shape. Conclusions: Direct reconstruction of the mid-ventilation frame and frames at peak phases based on the external breathing signal was reliable. This makes the reconstruction of only three 4D CT frames sufficient for application of the mid-ventilation technique in clinical practice.

  8. A Novel Pairwise Comparison-Based Method to Determine Radiation Dose Reduction Potentials of Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms, Exemplified Through Circle of Willis Computed Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmann, Stephan; Kammerer, Ferdinand; Brand, Michael; Allmendinger, Thomas; May, Matthias S; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M; Kramer, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dose reduction potential of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms in computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the circle of Willis using a novel method of evaluating the quality of radiation dose-reduced images. This study relied on ReconCT, a proprietary reconstruction software that allows simulating CT scans acquired with reduced radiation dose based on the raw data of true scans. To evaluate the performance of ReconCT in this regard, a phantom study was performed to compare the image noise of true and simulated scans within simulated vessels of a head phantom. That followed, 10 patients scheduled for CTA of the circle of Willis were scanned according to our institute's standard protocol (100 kV, 145 reference mAs). Subsequently, CTA images of these patients were reconstructed as either a full-dose weighted filtered back projection or with radiation dose reductions down to 10% of the full-dose level and Sinogram-Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) with either strength 3 or 5. Images were marked with arrows pointing on vessels of different sizes, and image pairs were presented to observers. Five readers assessed image quality with 2-alternative forced choice comparisons. In the phantom study, no significant differences were observed between the noise levels of simulated and true scans in filtered back projection, SAFIRE 3, and SAFIRE 5 reconstructions.The dose reduction potential for patient scans showed a strong dependence on IR strength as well as on the size of the vessel of interest. Thus, the potential radiation dose reductions ranged from 84.4% for the evaluation of great vessels reconstructed with SAFIRE 5 to 40.9% for the evaluation of small vessels reconstructed with SAFIRE 3. This study provides a novel image quality evaluation method based on 2-alternative forced choice comparisons. In CTA of the circle of Willis, higher IR strengths and greater vessel sizes allowed higher degrees of radiation dose

  9. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, L.D.; Ritman, E.L.; Robb, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  10. Computed Tomography Imaging of a Hip Prosthesis Using Iterative Model-Based Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Metal Artefact Reduction: A Quantitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenberg, Ruud H H; Boomsma, Martijn F; van Osch, Jochen A C; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Milles, Julien; Edens, Mireille A; Streekstra, Geert J; Slump, Cornelis H; Maas, Mario

    To quantify the combined use of iterative model-based reconstruction (IMR) and orthopaedic metal artefact reduction (O-MAR) in reducing metal artefacts and improving image quality in a total hip arthroplasty phantom. Scans acquired at several dose levels and kVps were reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP), iterative reconstruction (iDose) and IMR, with and without O-MAR. Computed tomography (CT) numbers, noise levels, signal-to-noise-ratios and contrast-to-noise-ratios were analysed. Iterative model-based reconstruction results in overall improved image quality compared to iDose and FBP (P < 0.001). Orthopaedic metal artefact reduction is most effective in reducing severe metal artefacts improving CT number accuracy by 50%, 60%, and 63% (P < 0.05) and reducing noise by 1%, 62%, and 85% (P < 0.001) whereas improving signal-to-noise-ratios by 27%, 47%, and 46% (P < 0.001) and contrast-to-noise-ratios by 16%, 25%, and 19% (P < 0.001) with FBP, iDose, and IMR, respectively. The combined use of IMR and O-MAR strongly improves overall image quality and strongly reduces metal artefacts in the CT imaging of a total hip arthroplasty phantom.

  11. Effects of pure and hybrid iterative reconstruction algorithms on high-resolution computed tomography in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Masaki; Sato, Jiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Mise, Yoko; Sumida, Kaoru; Abe, Osamu

    2017-08-01

    To compare image quality characteristics of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease using three different reconstruction methods: model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and filtered back projection (FBP). Eighty-nine consecutive patients with interstitial lung disease underwent standard-of-care chest CT with 64-row multi-detector CT. HRCT images were reconstructed in 0.625-mm contiguous axial slices using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Two radiologists independently assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, streak artifacts, and visualization of normal and pathologic structures. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Spatial resolution was assessed by measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF). MBIR offered significantly lower objective image noise (22.24±4.53, PASIR (39.76±7.41) and FBP (51.91±9.71). MTF (spatial resolution) was increased using MBIR compared with ASIR and FBP. MBIR showed improvements in visualization of normal and pathologic structures over ASIR and FBP, while ASIR was rated quite similarly to FBP. MBIR significantly improved subjective image noise (PASIR and FBP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain perfusion imaging using a Reconstruction-of-Difference (RoD) approach for cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mow, M.; Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Koliatsos, V.; Aygun, N.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To improve the timely detection and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage or ischemic stroke, recent efforts include the development of cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems for perfusion imaging and new approaches to estimate perfusion parameters despite slow rotation speeds compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems. This work describes development of a brain perfusion CBCT method using a reconstruction of difference (RoD) approach to enable perfusion imaging on a newly developed CBCT head scanner prototype. Methods: A new reconstruction approach using RoD with a penalized-likelihood framework was developed to image the temporal dynamics of vascular enhancement. A digital perfusion simulation was developed to give a realistic representation of brain anatomy, artifacts, noise, scanner characteristics, and hemo-dynamic properties. This simulation includes a digital brain phantom, time-attenuation curves and noise parameters, a novel forward projection method for improved computational efficiency, and perfusion parameter calculation. Results: Our results show the feasibility of estimating perfusion parameters from a set of images reconstructed from slow scans, sparse data sets, and arc length scans as short as 60 degrees. The RoD framework significantly reduces noise and time-varying artifacts from inconsistent projections. Proper regularization and the use of overlapping reconstructed arcs can potentially further decrease bias and increase temporal resolution, respectively. Conclusions: A digital brain perfusion simulation with RoD imaging approach has been developed and supports the feasibility of using a CBCT head scanner for perfusion imaging. Future work will include testing with data acquired using a 3D-printed perfusion phantom currently and translation to preclinical and clinical studies.

  13. Image reconstruction with shift-variant filtration and its implication for noise and resolution properties in fan-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Xiaochuan; Yu Lifeng

    2003-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the fan-beam filtered backprojection (FFBP) algorithm is used widely for image reconstruction. It is known that the FFBP algorithm can significantly amplify data noise and aliasing artifacts in situations where the focal lengths are comparable to or smaller than the size of the field of measurement (FOM). In this work, we propose an algorithm that is less susceptible to data noise, aliasing, and other data inconsistencies than is the FFBP algorithm while retaining the favorable resolution properties of the FFBP algorithm. In an attempt to evaluate the noise properties in reconstructed images, we derive analytic expressions for image variances obtained by use of the FFBP algorithm and the proposed algorithm. Computer simulation studies are conducted for quantitative evaluation of the spatial resolution and noise properties of images reconstructed by use of the algorithms. Numerical results of these studies confirm the favorable spatial resolution and noise properties of the proposed algorithm and verify the validity of the theoretically predicted image variances. The proposed algorithm and the derived analytic expressions for image variances can have practical implications for both estimation and detection/classification tasks making use of CT images, and they can readily be generalized to other fan-beam geometries

  14. Computed tomography of the chest with model-based iterative reconstruction using a radiation exposure similar to chest X-ray examination: preliminary observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neroladaki, Angeliki; Botsikas, Diomidis; Boudabbous, Sana; Becker, Christoph D.; Montet, Xavier [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic image quality of ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (ULD-CT) obtained with a radiation dose comparable to chest radiography and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in comparison with standard dose diagnostic CT (SDD-CT) or low-dose diagnostic CT (LDD-CT) reconstructed with FBP alone. Unenhanced chest CT images of 42 patients acquired with ULD-CT were compared with images obtained with SDD-CT or LDD-CT in the same examination. Noise measurements and image quality, based on conspicuity of chest lesions on all CT data sets were assessed on a five-point scale. The radiation dose of ULD-CT was 0.16 {+-} 0.006 mSv compared with 11.2 {+-} 2.7 mSv for SDD-CT (P < 0.0001) and 2.7 {+-} 0.9 mSv for LDD-CT. Image quality of ULD-CT increased significantly when using MBIR compared with FBP or ASIR (P < 0.001). ULD-CT reconstructed with MBIR enabled to detect as many non-calcified pulmonary nodules as seen on SDD-CT or LDD-CT. However, image quality of ULD-CT was clearly inferior for characterisation of ground glass opacities or emphysema. Model-based iterative reconstruction allows detection of pulmonary nodules with ULD-CT with radiation exposure in the range of a posterior to anterior (PA) and lateral chest X-ray. (orig.)

  15. Knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction technique in computed tomography of lumbar spine lowers radiation dose and improves tissue differentiation for patients with lower back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Cheng Hui [Department of Medical Imaging, Pojen General Hopsital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chung-Jung, E-mail: bcjlin@me.com [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Yi-You; Chen, Ying-Chou; Sheu, Ming-Huei; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chiu, Chen Fen [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Knowledge-based IMR improves tissue differentiation in CT of L-spine better than hybrid IR (iDose{sup 4}). • Higher strength IMR improves image qualities of the IVD and IVF in spinal stenosis. • IMR provides diagnostic lower dose CT of L-spine. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic confidence of reduced-dose computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine (L-spine) reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR). Materials and methods: Prospectively, group A consisted of 55 patients imaged with standard acquisition reconstructed with filtered back-projection. Group B consisted of 58 patients imaged with half tube current, reconstructed with hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose{sup 4}) in Group B1 and knowledge-based IMR in Group B2. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of different regions, the contrast-to-noise ratio between the intervetebral disc (IVD) and dural sac (D-D CNR), and subjective image quality of different regions were compared. Higher strength IMR was also compared in spinal stenosis cases. Results: The SNR of the psoas muscle and D-D CNR were significantly higher in the IMR group. Except for the facet joint, subjective image quality of other regions including IVD, intervertebral foramen (IVF), dural sac, peridural fat, ligmentum flavum, and overall diagnostic acceptability were best for the IMR group. Diagnostic confidence of narrowing IVF and IVD was good (kappa = 0.58–0.85). Higher strength IMR delineated IVD better in spinal stenosis cases. Conclusion: Lower dose CT of L-spine reconstructed with IMR demonstrates better tissue differentiation than iDose{sup 4} and standard dose CT with FBP.

  16. Knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction technique in computed tomography of lumbar spine lowers radiation dose and improves tissue differentiation for patients with lower back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Cheng Hui; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chiou, Yi-You; Chen, Ying-Chou; Sheu, Ming-Huei; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chiu, Chen Fen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Knowledge-based IMR improves tissue differentiation in CT of L-spine better than hybrid IR (iDose 4 ). • Higher strength IMR improves image qualities of the IVD and IVF in spinal stenosis. • IMR provides diagnostic lower dose CT of L-spine. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the image quality and diagnostic confidence of reduced-dose computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine (L-spine) reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR). Materials and methods: Prospectively, group A consisted of 55 patients imaged with standard acquisition reconstructed with filtered back-projection. Group B consisted of 58 patients imaged with half tube current, reconstructed with hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose 4 ) in Group B1 and knowledge-based IMR in Group B2. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of different regions, the contrast-to-noise ratio between the intervetebral disc (IVD) and dural sac (D-D CNR), and subjective image quality of different regions were compared. Higher strength IMR was also compared in spinal stenosis cases. Results: The SNR of the psoas muscle and D-D CNR were significantly higher in the IMR group. Except for the facet joint, subjective image quality of other regions including IVD, intervertebral foramen (IVF), dural sac, peridural fat, ligmentum flavum, and overall diagnostic acceptability were best for the IMR group. Diagnostic confidence of narrowing IVF and IVD was good (kappa = 0.58–0.85). Higher strength IMR delineated IVD better in spinal stenosis cases. Conclusion: Lower dose CT of L-spine reconstructed with IMR demonstrates better tissue differentiation than iDose 4 and standard dose CT with FBP.

  17. Strategies of reconstruction algorithms for computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garderet, P.

    1984-10-01

    Image reconstruction from projections has progressively spread out over all fields of medical imaging. As the mathematical aspects of the problem become more and more comprehensively explored a great variety of numerical solutions have been developed best suited to such-and-such imaging medical application and taking into account the physical phenomena related to data collection (a priori properties for signal and noise). The purpose of that survey is to present the general mathematical frame and the fundamental assumptions of various strategies; Fourier methods approximate explicit deterministic inversion formula for the Radon transform. Algebraic reconstruction techniques set up an a priori discrete model through a series expansion approach of the solution. The numerical system to be solved is huge when a fine grid of pixels is to be reconstructed; iterative solutions may then be found. Recently some least square procedures have been shown to be tractable which avoid the use of iterative methods. Finally maximum like hood approach incorporates accurately the Poisson nature of photon noise and are well adapted to emission computed tomography. The various strategies will be analysed from both aspects of theoretical assumptions needed for suitable use and of computing facilities, actual performance and cost. In the end we take a glimpse of the extension of the algorithms from two dimensional imaging to fully three dimensional volume analysis in preparation of the future medical imaging technologies

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related ...

  2. Computed tomography in traumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.; Jend, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    This volume offers a critical review and assessment of new avenues opened up by computed tomography in traumatology. Over 200 illustrations, including numerous CT scans, aid the physician engaged emergency care and postoperative treatment of accident victims. Technical prerequisites, special techniques of investigation, pathomorphology of organ changes conditioned by trauma, diagnostic leading symptoms and signs, and diagnostics of iatrogenic injuries and lesions are presented

  3. Computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, T.W.; Blake, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to computed tomography and is particularly concerned with determining the CT numbers of zones of interest in an image displayed on a cathode ray tube which zones lie in the so-called level or center of the gray scale window. (author)

  4. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  7. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is directed towards giving radiographers an introduction to and basic knowledge of computerized tomography. The technical section discusses gantries and x-ray production, computer and disc drive image display, storage, artefacts quality assurance and design of departments. The clinical section includes patient preparation, radiotherapy planning, and interpretation of images from various areas of the anatomy. (U.K.)

  8. Task-Driven Optimization of Fluence Field and Regularization for Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Grace J; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a joint optimization of dynamic fluence field modulation (FFM) and regularization in quadratic penalized-likelihood reconstruction that maximizes a task-based imaging performance metric. We adopted a task-driven imaging framework for prospective designs of the imaging parameters. A maxi-min objective function was adopted to maximize the minimum detectability index ( ) throughout the image. The optimization algorithm alternates between FFM (represented by low-dimensional basis functions) and local regularization (including the regularization strength and directional penalty weights). The task-driven approach was compared with three FFM strategies commonly proposed for FBP reconstruction (as well as a task-driven TCM strategy) for a discrimination task in an abdomen phantom. The task-driven FFM assigned more fluence to less attenuating anteroposterior views and yielded approximately constant fluence behind the object. The optimal regularization was almost uniform throughout image. Furthermore, the task-driven FFM strategy redistribute fluence across detector elements in order to prescribe more fluence to the more attenuating central region of the phantom. Compared with all strategies, the task-driven FFM strategy not only improved minimum by at least 17.8%, but yielded higher over a large area inside the object. The optimal FFM was highly dependent on the amount of regularization, indicating the importance of a joint optimization. Sample reconstructions of simulated data generally support the performance estimates based on computed . The improvements in detectability show the potential of the task-driven imaging framework to improve imaging performance at a fixed dose, or, equivalently, to provide a similar level of performance at reduced dose.

  9. Three-Dimensional Imaging and Numerical Reconstruction of Graphite/Epoxy Composite Microstructure Based on Ultra-High Resolution X-Ray Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, M. W.; Riccio, M. L.; Whitacre, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study aimed at high-resolution 3D imaging, visualization, and numerical reconstruction of fiber-reinforced polymer microstructures at the fiber length scale is presented. To this end, a sample of graphite/epoxy composite was imaged at sub-micron resolution using a 3D X-ray computed tomography microscope. Next, a novel segmentation algorithm was developed, based on concepts adopted from computer vision and multi-target tracking, to detect and estimate, with high accuracy, the position of individual fibers in a volume of the imaged composite. In the current implementation, the segmentation algorithm was based on Global Nearest Neighbor data-association architecture, a Kalman filter estimator, and several novel algorithms for virtualfiber stitching, smoothing, and overlap removal. The segmentation algorithm was used on a sub-volume of the imaged composite, detecting 508 individual fibers. The segmentation data were qualitatively compared to the tomographic data, demonstrating high accuracy of the numerical reconstruction. Moreover, the data were used to quantify a) the relative distribution of individual-fiber cross sections within the imaged sub-volume, and b) the local fiber misorientation relative to the global fiber axis. Finally, the segmentation data were converted using commercially available finite element (FE) software to generate a detailed FE mesh of the composite volume. The methodology described herein demonstrates the feasibility of realizing an FE-based, virtual-testing framework for graphite/fiber composites at the constituent level.

  10. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  11. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  13. Noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease by multislice spiral computed tomography using a new retrospectively ECG-gated image reconstruction technique. Comparison with angiographic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Kato, Masahiko [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Surugadai Hospital] [and others

    2003-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the accuracy of multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) in detecting coronary artery disease, compared with coronary angiography (CAG), using a new retrospectively ECG-gated reconstruction method that reduced cardiac motion artifact. The study group comprised 54 consecutive patients undergoing MSCT and CAG. MSCT was performed using a SOMATOM Volume Zoom (4-detector-row, Siemens, Germany) with slice thickness 1.0 mm, pitch 1.5 (table feed: 1.5 mm per rotation) and gantry rotation time 500 ms. Metoprolol (20-60 mg) was administered orally prior to MSCT imaging. ECG-gated image reconstruction was performed with the reconstruction window (250 ms) positioned immediately before atrial contraction in order to reduce the cardiac motion artifact caused by the abrupt diastolic ventricular movement occurring during the rapid filling and atrial contraction periods. Following inspection of the volume rendering images, multiplanar reconstruction images and axial images of the left main coronary artery (LMCA), left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA) were obtained and evaluated for luminal narrowing. The results were compared with those obtained by CAG. Of 216 coronary arteries, 206 (95.4%) were assessable; 10 arteries were excluded from the analysis because of severe calcification (n=4), stents (n=3) or insufficient contrast enhancement (n=3). The sensitivity to detect coronary stenoses {>=}50% was 93.5% and the specificity to define luminal narrowing <50% was 97.2%. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 93.5% and 97.2%, respectively. The sensitivity was still satisfactory (80.6%) even when non-assessable arteries were included in the analysis. The new retrospectively ECG-gated reconstruction method for MSCT has excellent diagnostic accuracy in detecting significant coronary artery stenoses. (author)

  14. Use of computed tomography slices 3D-reconstruction as a powerful tool to improve manufacturing processes on aeroengine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellan, C.; Dastarac, D.

    2000-01-01

    TURBOMECA has been using computed tomography for several years as an inner-health analysis powerful tool for engine components. From 2D slices of the examined part, detailed information about lacks or inclusions could easily be extracted. But, measurements on internal features were quickly required because no other NDT methods were able to do it. CT has thus logically become a powerful 2D dimensional measuring tool. Recently, with new software and the latest computers able to deal with huge files, CT has become a powerful 3D digitization tool and now, TOMO ADOUR can offer a complete solution for reverse engineering of complex parts. Several months ago, TURBOMECA introduced CT into many development, validation and industrialization processes and has demonstrated how to take corrective actions to process deviation on their aeroengine components by: extracting the nonexisting CAD model of a part, generating CAD compatible data to check dimensional conformity and, eventually correct design misfits or manufacturing drifts, highlighting the metallurgical health of first article parts, making the decision of repairing the defining the appropriate method, generating a file (.STL) to build a rapid prototype or a file to pilot tool parts for machining, calculating physical properties such as behavior or flow analysis on a 'real' model. The image also allows a drawing to be made of a part that was originally produced by a supplier or competitor. This paper will be illustrated with a large number of examples

  15. A new Mumford-Shah total variation minimization based model for sparse-view x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Bian, Zhaoying; Zhou, Xiaohui; Chen, Wensheng; Ma, Jianhua; Liang, Zhengrong

    2018-04-12

    Total variation (TV) minimization for the sparse-view x-ray computer tomography (CT) reconstruction has been widely explored to reduce radiation dose. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the TV model, the reconstructed images often suffer from over-smoothness on the image edges. To mitigate this drawback of TV minimization, we present a Mumford-Shah total variation (MSTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented MSTV model is derived by integrating TV minimization and Mumford-Shah segmentation. Subsequently, a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) scheme with MSTV is developed for the sparse-view CT reconstruction. For simplicity, the proposed algorithm is named as 'PWLS-MSTV.' To evaluate the performance of the present PWLS-MSTV algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted by using a digital XCAT phantom and a physical phantom. Experimental results show that the present PWLS-MSTV algorithm has noticeable gains over the existing algorithms in terms of noise reduction, contrast-to-ratio measure and edge-preservation.

  16. Low-dose X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Yunwan; Niu, Shanzhou; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2014-06-16

    To realize low-dose imaging in X-ray computed tomography (CT) examination, lowering milliampere-seconds (low-mAs) or reducing the required number of projection views (sparse-view) per rotation around the body has been widely studied as an easy and effective approach. In this study, we are focusing on low-dose CT image reconstruction from the sinograms acquired with a combined low-mAs and sparse-view protocol and propose a two-step image reconstruction strategy. Specifically, to suppress significant statistical noise in the noisy and insufficient sinograms, an adaptive sinogram restoration (ASR) method is first proposed with consideration of the statistical property of sinogram data, and then to further acquire a high-quality image, a total variation based projection onto convex sets (TV-POCS) method is adopted with a slight modification. For simplicity, the present reconstruction strategy was termed as "ASR-TV-POCS." To evaluate the present ASR-TV-POCS method, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed on a physical phantom. Experimental results have demonstrated that the present ASR-TV-POCS method can achieve promising gains over other existing methods in terms of the noise reduction, contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge detail preservation.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  18. Technical aspects of X-ray micro-computed tomography. Initial experience of 27-μm resolution using feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kohara, Kazushi; Iinuma, Gen; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce the technical utility of micro-computed tomography (CT) with 27-μm resolution by cone-beam CT algorithm. Whole-body micro-CT scans were performed to honeybee. Two- and three-dimensional image analyses were performed by originally developed and available open-source software for acquired images. The original contribution of this work is to describe the technical characteristics of the X-ray micro-CT system, keeping a small experimental insect in a unique condition. Micro-CT may be used as a rapid prototyping tool to research and understand the high-resolution system with Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction. (author)

  19. Greedy algorithms for diffuse optical tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, B. P. V.; Das, Tapan; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs the optical parameters of a highly scattering medium. However, the inverse problem of DOT is ill-posed and highly nonlinear due to the zig-zag propagation of photons that diffuses through the cross section of tissue. The conventional DOT imaging methods iteratively compute the solution of forward diffusion equation solver which makes the problem computationally expensive. Also, these methods fail when the geometry is complex. Recently, the theory of compressive sensing (CS) has received considerable attention because of its efficient use in biomedical imaging applications. The objective of this paper is to solve a given DOT inverse problem by using compressive sensing framework and various Greedy algorithms such as orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP), and stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), regularized orthogonal matching pursuit (ROMP) and simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (S-OMP) have been studied to reconstruct the change in the absorption parameter i.e, Δα from the boundary data. Also, the Greedy algorithms have been validated experimentally on a paraffin wax rectangular phantom through a well designed experimental set up. We also have studied the conventional DOT methods like least square method and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) for comparison. One of the main features of this work is the usage of less number of source-detector pairs, which can facilitate the use of DOT in routine applications of screening. The performance metrics such as mean square error (MSE), normalized mean square error (NMSE), structural similarity index (SSIM), and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) have been used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms mentioned in this paper. Extensive simulation results confirm that CS based DOT reconstruction outperforms the conventional DOT imaging methods in terms of

  20. Computed Tomography. Chapter 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geleijns, J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    After its clinical introduction in 1971, computed tomography (CT) developed from an X ray modality that was limited to axial imaging of the brain in neuroradiology into a versatile 3-D whole body imaging modality for a wide range of applications, including oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and interventional radiology. CT is applied for diagnosis and follow-up studies of patients, for planning of radiotherapy, and even for screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors.

  1. Computed Tomography Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  2. The influence on the images of computed tomography caused by the use of artificial cranial reconstructive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itokawa, Hiroshi; Moriya, Masao; Fujimoto, Michio; Nagashima, Goro; Suzuki, Ryuta; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Yasuda, Mitsuyoshi; Kato, Kyoichi; Hirade, Tsuneo

    2008-01-01

    Various materials have been used for cranioplasty; however these materials frequently produce artifacts that appear when examined with conventional radiography. Computed tomography (CT) in particular, detects high density artifacts near artificial bones, which is manipulated by increased noise, and limits diagnostic performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent and shape of the artifacts due to artificial cranial bones and to consider CT imaging parameters necessary for accurate recognition of structures under the materials. Four different artificial bone materials were evaluated in this study: hydroxyapatite with 40% or 50% porosity, titanium plate, and hydroxyapatite-polymethylmethacrylate composite (HA-PMMA). CT scanning was performed with standard clinical settings. Sample specimens were placed on the right side, under the artificial bones, and CT was performed to evaluate specimen visibility. We compared the artifacts created by the four bone types listed above, and measured the CT, values of those materials. With ordinary scan settings, all the artificial bones revealed high-density artifact surrounding the materials, including the inability to accurately measure specimen thickness. The upper part of the specimen in contact with the artificial bones could not be distinguished from the artifact. The CT value in the medial aspect of the artificial bones increased more than the actual CT values. Of the four artificial bone materials studied, HA-PMMA produced the fewest artifacts. Description of the structures under the artificial bones can be improved by extending the window width to aproximately twice that of normal settings. (author)

  3. Computed tomography angiographic study of internal mammary perforators and their use as recipient vessels for free tissue transfer in breast reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya V Kanoi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The internal mammary artery perforator vessels (IMPV as a recipient in free flap breast reconstruction offer advantages over the more commonly used thoracodorsal vessels and the internal mammary vessels (IMV. Aims: This study was designed to assess the anatomical consistency of the IMPV and the suitability of these vessels for use as recipients in free flap breast reconstruction. Patients and Methods: Data from ten randomly selected female patients who did not have any chest wall or breast pathology but had undergone a computed tomography angiography (CTA for unrelated diagnostic reasons from April 2013 to October 2013 were analysed. Retrospective data of seven patients who had undergone mastectomy for breast cancer and had been primarily reconstructed with a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator free flap transfer using the IMPV as recipient vessels were studied. Results: The CTA findings showed that the internal mammary perforator was consistently present in all cases bilaterally. In all cases, the dominant perforator arose from the upper four intercostal spaces (ICS with the majority (55% arising from the 2nd ICS. The mean distance of the perforators from the sternal border at the level of pectoralis muscle surface on the right side was 1.86 cm (range: 0.9–2.5 cm with a mode value of 1.9 cm. On the left side, a mean of 1.77 cm (range: 1.5–2.1 cm and a mode value of 1.7 cm were observed. Mean perforator artery diameters on the right and left sides were 2.2 mm and 2.4 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Though the internal mammary perforators are anatomically consistent, their use as recipients in free tissue transfer for breast reconstruction eventually rests on multiple variables.

  4. MO-DE-207B-04: Impact of Reconstruction Field of View On Radiomics Features in Computed Tomography (CT) Using a Texture Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafiq ul Hassan, M; Zhang, G; Oliver, J; Moros, E [H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Department of Physics, University of South Florida (United States); Latifi, K; Hunt, D; Guzman, R; Balagurunathan, Y; Gillies, R [H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Mackin, D; Court, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of reconstruction Field of View on Radiomics features in computed tomography (CT) using a texture phantom. Methods: A rectangular Credence Cartridge Radiomics (CCR) phantom, composed of 10 different cartridges, was scanned on four different CT scanners from two manufacturers. A pre-defined scanning protocol was adopted for consistency. The slice thickness and reconstruction interval of 1.5 mm was used on all scanners. The reconstruction FOV was varied to result a voxel size ranging from 0.38 to 0.98 mm. A spherical region of interest (ROI) was contoured on the shredded rubber cartridge from CCR phantom CT scans. Ninety three Radiomics features were extracted from ROI using an in-house program. These include 10 shape, 22 intensity, 26 GLCM, 11 GLZSM, 11 RLM, 5 NGTDM and 8 fractal dimensional features. To evaluate the Interscanner variability across three scanners, a coefficient of variation (COV) was calculated for each feature group. Each group was further classified according to the COV by calculating the percentage of features in each of the following categories: COV≤ 5%, between 5 and 10% and ≥ 10%. Results: Shape features were the most robust, as expected, because of the spherical contouring of ROI. Intensity features were the second most robust with 54.5 to 64% of features with COV < 5%. GLCM features ranged from 31 to 35% for the same category. RLM features were sensitive to specific scanner and 5% variability was 9 to 54%. Almost all GLZM and NGTDM features showed COV ≥10% among the scanners. The dependence of fractal dimensions features on FOV was not consistent across different scanners. Conclusion: We concluded that reconstruction FOV greatly influence Radiomics features. The GLZSM and NGTDM are highly sensitive to FOV. funded in part by Grant NIH/NCI R01CA190105-01.

  5. Computed tomography of cryogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Gerd; Anderson, E.; Vogt, S.; Knochel, C.; Weiss, D.; LeGros, M.; Larabell, C.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the short wavelengths of X-rays and low numerical aperture of the Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray objectives, the depth of field is several microns. Within the focal depth, imaging a thick specimen is to a good approximation equivalent to projecting the specimen absorption. Therefore, computed tomography based on a tilt series of X-ray microscopic images can be used to reconstruct the local linear absorption coefficient and image the three-dimensional specimen structure. To preserve the structural integrity of biological objects during image acquisition, microscopy is performed at cryogenic temperatures. Tomography based on X-ray microscopic images was applied to study the distribution of male specific lethal 1 (MSL-1), a nuclear protein involved in dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster, which ensures that males with single X chromosome have the same amount of most X-linked gene products as females with two X chromosomes. Tomographic reconstructions of X-ray microscopic images were used to compute the local three-dimensional linear absorption coefficient revealing the arrangement of internal structures of Drosophila melanogaster cells. Combined with labelling techniques, nanotomography is a new technique to study the 3D distribution of selected proteins inside whole cells. We want to improve this technique with respect to resolution and specimen preparation. The resolution in the reconstruction can be significantly improved by reducing the angular step size to collect more viewing angles, which requires an automated data acquisition. In addition, fast-freezing with liquid ethane instead of cryogenic He gas will be applied to improve the vitrification of the hydrated samples. We also plan to apply cryo X-ray nanotomography in order to study different types of cells and their nuclear protein distributions

  6. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  7. Computed Tomography evaluation of maxillofacial injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Natraj Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The maxillofacial region, a complex anatomical structure, can be evaluated by conventional (plain films, Tomography, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography, Orthopantomogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The study was conducted with objective of describing various forms of maxillofacial injuries, imaging features of different types of maxillofacial fractures and the advantage of using Three- Dimensional Computed Tomography reconstructed image. Materials & Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients during April 2014 to September 2016 using Toshiba Aquilion Prime 160 slice Multi Detector Computed Tomography scanner.Results: The maxillofacial fractures were significantly higher in male population (88% than female population (12 %. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause of injury others being physical assault and fall from height. It was most common in 31-40 years (26% and 21-30 (24% years age group. Maxillary sinus was the commonest fracture (36% followed by nasal bone and zygomatic bone (30%, mandible and orbital bones (28%. Soft tissue swelling was the commonest associated finding. Three dimensional images (3 D compared to the axial scans missed some fractures. However, the extension of the complex fracture lines and degree of displacement were more accurately assessed. Complex fractures found were Le fort (6% and naso-orbito-ethmoid (4% fractures.Conclusion: The proper evaluation of complex anatomy of the facial bones requires Multidetector Computed Tomography which offers excellent spatial resolution enabling multiplanar reformations and three dimensional reconstructions for enhanced diagnostic accuracy and surgical planning.

  8. Adaptive multiresolution method for MAP reconstruction in electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Erman, E-mail: erman.acar@tut.fi [Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere University of Technology, Biokatu 10, 33520 Tampere (Finland); Peltonen, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Ulla [Department of Signal Processing, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 553, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere University of Technology, Biokatu 10, 33520 Tampere (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    3D image reconstruction with electron tomography holds problems due to the severely limited range of projection angles and low signal to noise ratio of the acquired projection images. The maximum a posteriori (MAP) reconstruction methods have been successful in compensating for the missing information and suppressing noise with their intrinsic regularization techniques. There are two major problems in MAP reconstruction methods: (1) selection of the regularization parameter that controls the balance between the data fidelity and the prior information, and (2) long computation time. One aim of this study is to provide an adaptive solution to the regularization parameter selection problem without having additional knowledge about the imaging environment and the sample. The other aim is to realize the reconstruction using sequences of resolution levels to shorten the computation time. The reconstructions were analyzed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency using a simulated biological phantom and publically available experimental datasets of electron tomography. The numerical and visual evaluations of the experiments show that the adaptive multiresolution method can provide more accurate results than the weighted back projection (WBP), simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), and sequential MAP expectation maximization (sMAPEM) method. The method is superior to sMAPEM also in terms of computation time and usability since it can reconstruct 3D images significantly faster without requiring any parameter to be set by the user. - Highlights: • An adaptive multiresolution reconstruction method is introduced for electron tomography. • The method provides more accurate results than the conventional reconstruction methods. • The missing wedge and noise problems can be compensated by the method efficiently.

  9. Computed tomography - old ideas and new technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, Dominik; Boas, F.E. [Stanford University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Several recently introduced 'new' techniques in computed tomography - iterative reconstruction, gated cardiac CT, multiple-source, and dual-energy CT - actually date back to the early days of CT. We review the historic origins and evolution of these techniques, which may provide some insight into the latest innovations in commercial CT systems. (orig.)

  10. The influence of secondary reconstruction slice thickness on NewTom 3G cone beam computed tomography-based radiological interpretation of sheep mandibular condyle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Yigit; Guven, Koray; Horasan, Sinan; Sencan, Sabri; Bakir, Baris; Barut, Oya; Tanyel, Cem; Aral, Ali; Firat, Deniz

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the different secondary reconstruction slice thicknesses of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) on artificially created mandibular condyle fractures. A total of 63 sheep heads with or without condylar fractures were scanned with a NewTom 3G CBCT scanner. Multiplanar reformatted (MPR) views in 0.2-mm, 1-mm, 2-mm, and 3-mm secondary reconstruction slice thicknesses were evaluated by 7 observers. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were calculated with weighted kappa statistics. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to statistically compare the area under the curve (AUC) of each slice thickness. The kappa coefficients varied from fair and to excellent. The AUCs of 0.2-mm and 1-mm slice thicknesses were found to be significantly higher than those of 2 mm and 3 mm for some type of fractures. CBCT was found to be accurate in detecting all variants of fractures at 0.2 mm and 1 mm. However, 2-mm and 3-mm slices were not suitable to detect fissure, complete, and comminuted types of mandibular condyle fractures. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pulmonary Nodule Volumetry at Different Low Computed Tomography Radiation Dose Levels With Hybrid and Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction: A Within Patient Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, Annemarie M; Willemink, Martin J; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Vonken, Evertjan P A; Schilham, Arnold M R; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Luijk, Bart; Budde, Ricardo P J; Leiner, Tim; de Jong, Pim A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) on pulmonary nodule volumetry. In this prospective study, 25 patients scheduled for follow-up of pulmonary nodules were included. Computed tomography acquisitions were acquired at 4 dose levels with a median of 2.1, 1.2, 0.8, and 0.6 mSv. Data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid IR, and model-based IR. Volumetry was performed using semiautomatic software. At the highest dose level, more than 91% (34/37) of the nodules could be segmented, and at the lowest dose level, this was more than 83%. Thirty-three nodules were included for further analysis. Filtered back projection and hybrid IR did not lead to significant differences, whereas model-based IR resulted in lower volume measurements with a maximum difference of -11% compared with FBP at routine dose. Pulmonary nodule volumetry can be accurately performed at a submillisievert dose with both FBP and hybrid IR.

  12. 3D computed tomography using a microfocus X-ray source: Analysis of artifact formation in the reconstructed images using simulated as well as experimental projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krimmel, S.; Stephan, J.; Baumann, J.

    2005-01-01

    The scope of this contribution is to identify and to quantify the influence of different parameters on the formation of image artifacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT) resulting for example, from beam hardening or from partial lack of information using 3D cone beam CT. In general, the reconstructed image quality depends on a number of acquisition parameters concerning the X-ray source (e.g. X-ray spectrum), the geometrical setup (e.g. cone beam angle), the sample properties (e.g. absorption characteristics) and the detector properties. While it is difficult to distinguish the influence of different effects clearly in experimental projection data, they can be selected individually with the help of simulated projection data by varying the parameter set. The reconstruction of the 3D data set is performed with the filtered back projection algorithm according to Feldkamp, Davis and Kress for experimental as well as for simulated projection data. The experimental data are recorded with an industrial microfocus CT system which features a focal spot size of a few micrometers and uses a digital flat panel detector for data acquisition

  13. Image quality of low-dose CCTA in obese patients: impact of high-definition computed tomography and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, Cathérine; Fuchs, Tobias A; Fiechter, Michael; Stehli, Julia; Stähli, Barbara E; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2013-10-01

    The accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in obese persons is compromised by increased image noise. We investigated CCTA image quality acquired on a high-definition 64-slice CT scanner using modern adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Seventy overweight and obese patients (24 males; mean age 57 years, mean body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) were studied with clinically-indicated contrast enhanced CCTA. Thirty-five patients underwent a standard definition protocol with filtered backprojection reconstruction (SD-FBP) while 35 patients matched for gender, age, body mass index and coronary artery calcifications underwent a novel high definition protocol with ASIR (HD-ASIR). Segment by segment image quality was assessed using a four-point scale (1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = moderate, 4 = non-diagnostic) and revealed better scores for HD-ASIR compared to SD-FBP (1.5 ± 0.43 vs. 1.8 ± 0.48; p ASIR as compared to 1.4 ± 0.4 mm for SD-FBP (p ASIR (388.3 ± 109.6 versus 350.6 ± 90.3 Hounsfield Units, HU; p ASIR vs. SD-ASIR respectively). Compared to a standard definition backprojection protocol (SD-FBP), a newer high definition scan protocol in combination with ASIR (HD-ASIR) incrementally improved image quality and visualization of distal coronary artery segments in overweight and obese individuals, without increasing image noise and radiation dose.

  14. Role of preoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction in depressed skull fractures treated with craniectomy: a case report of forensic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Guido; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Manara, Renzo; Cecchetto, Attilio; Montisci, Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Patients affected by cranial trauma with depressed skull fractures and increased intracranial pressure generally undergo neurosurgical intervention. Because craniotomy and craniectomy remove skull fragments and generate new fracture lines, they complicate forensic examination and sometimes prevent a clear identification of skull fracture etiology. A 3-dimensional reconstruction based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans, giving a picture of the injuries before surgical intervention, can help the forensic examiner in identifying skull fracture origin and the means of production.We report the case of a 41-year-old-man presenting at the emergency department with a depressed skull fracture at the vertex and bilateral subdural hemorrhage. The patient underwent 2 neurosurgical interventions (craniotomy and craniectomy) but died after 40 days of hospitalization in an intensive care unit. At autopsy, the absence of various bone fragments did not allow us to establish if the skull had been stricken by a blunt object or had hit the ground with high kinetic energy. To analyze bone injuries before craniectomy, a 3-dimensional CT reconstruction based on preoperative scans was performed. A comparative analysis between autoptic and radiological data allowed us to differentiate surgical from traumatic injuries. Moreover, based on the shape and size of the depressed skull fracture (measured from the CT reformations), we inferred that the man had been stricken by a cylindric blunt object with a diameter of about 3 cm.

  15. Measuring techniques in emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, K.; Knoop, B.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter reviews the historical development of the emission computed tomography and its basic principles, proceeds to SPECT and PET, special techniques of emission tomography, and concludes with a comprehensive discussion of the mathematical fundamentals of the reconstruction and the quantitative activity determination in vivo, dealing with radon transformation and the projection slice theorem, methods of image reconstruction such as analytical and algebraic methods, limiting conditions in real systems such as limited number of measured data, noise enhancement, absorption, stray radiation, and random coincidence. (orig./HP) With 111 figs., 6 tabs [de

  16. The effects of iodine attenuation on pulmonary nodule volumetry using novel dual-layer computed tomography reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, A.M. den; Hamersvelt, R.W. van; Leiner, T.; Schilham, A.M.R.; Willemink, M.J.; Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bangert, F. [Sint Antonius Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Milles, Julien [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2017-12-15

    To assess the effect of iodine attenuation on pulmonary nodule volumetry using virtual non-contrast (VNC) and mono-energetic reconstructions. A consecutive series of patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced chest CT scan were included. Images were acquired on a novel dual-layer spectral CT system. Conventional reconstructions as well as VNC and mono-energetic images at different keV levels were used for nodule volumetry. Twenty-four patients with a total of 63 nodules were included. Conventional reconstructions showed a median (interquartile range) volume and diameter of 174 (87 - 253) mm{sup 3} and 6.9 (5.4 - 9.9) mm, respectively. VNC reconstructions resulted in a significant volume reduction of 5.5% (2.6 - 11.2%; p<0.001). Mono-energetic reconstructions showed a correlation between nodule attenuation and nodule volume (Spearman correlation 0.77, (0.49 - 0.94)). Lowering the keV resulted in increased volumes while higher keV levels resulted in decreased pulmonary nodule volumes compared to conventional CT. Novel dual-layer spectral CT offers the possibility to reconstruct VNC and mono-energetic images. Those reconstructions show that higher pulmonary nodule attenuation results in larger nodule volumes. This may explain the reported underestimation in nodule volume on non-contrast enhanced compared to contrast-enhanced acquisitions. (orig.)

  17. The effects of iodine attenuation on pulmonary nodule volumetry using novel dual-layer computed tomography reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, A.M. den; Hamersvelt, R.W. van; Leiner, T.; Schilham, A.M.R.; Willemink, M.J.; Jong, P.A. de; Bangert, F.; Milles, Julien

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of iodine attenuation on pulmonary nodule volumetry using virtual non-contrast (VNC) and mono-energetic reconstructions. A consecutive series of patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced chest CT scan were included. Images were acquired on a novel dual-layer spectral CT system. Conventional reconstructions as well as VNC and mono-energetic images at different keV levels were used for nodule volumetry. Twenty-four patients with a total of 63 nodules were included. Conventional reconstructions showed a median (interquartile range) volume and diameter of 174 (87 - 253) mm 3 and 6.9 (5.4 - 9.9) mm, respectively. VNC reconstructions resulted in a significant volume reduction of 5.5% (2.6 - 11.2%; p<0.001). Mono-energetic reconstructions showed a correlation between nodule attenuation and nodule volume (Spearman correlation 0.77, (0.49 - 0.94)). Lowering the keV resulted in increased volumes while higher keV levels resulted in decreased pulmonary nodule volumes compared to conventional CT. Novel dual-layer spectral CT offers the possibility to reconstruct VNC and mono-energetic images. Those reconstructions show that higher pulmonary nodule attenuation results in larger nodule volumes. This may explain the reported underestimation in nodule volume on non-contrast enhanced compared to contrast-enhanced acquisitions. (orig.)

  18. The Effects of Iodine Attenuation on Pulmonary Nodule Volumetry using Novel Dual-Layer Computed Tomography Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, A M; Bangert, F; van Hamersvelt, R W; Leiner, T; Milles, Julien; Schilham, A M R; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A

    2017-12-01

    To assess the effect of iodine attenuation on pulmonary nodule volumetry using virtual non-contrast (VNC) and mono-energetic reconstructions. A consecutive series of patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced chest CT scan were included. Images were acquired on a novel dual-layer spectral CT system. Conventional reconstructions as well as VNC and mono-energetic images at different keV levels were used for nodule volumetry. Twenty-four patients with a total of 63 nodules were included. Conventional reconstructions showed a median (interquartile range) volume and diameter of 174 (87 - 253) mm 3 and 6.9 (5.4 - 9.9) mm, respectively. VNC reconstructions resulted in a significant volume reduction of 5.5% (2.6 - 11.2%; p<0.001). Mono-energetic reconstructions showed a correlation between nodule attenuation and nodule volume (Spearman correlation 0.77, (0.49 - 0.94)). Lowering the keV resulted in increased volumes while higher keV levels resulted in decreased pulmonary nodule volumes compared to conventional CT. Novel dual-layer spectral CT offers the possibility to reconstruct VNC and mono-energetic images. Those reconstructions show that higher pulmonary nodule attenuation results in larger nodule volumes. This may explain the reported underestimation in nodule volume on non-contrast enhanced compared to contrast-enhanced acquisitions. • Pulmonary nodule volumes were measured on virtual non-contrast and mono-energetic reconstructions • Mono-energetic reconstructions showed that higher attenuation results in larger volumes • This may explain the reported nodule volume underestimation on non-contrast enhanced CT • Mostly metastatic pulmonary nodules were evaluated, results might differ for benign nodules.

  19. Dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andisco, D.; Blanco, S.; Buzzia, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The amount of computed tomography (CT) studies that are performed each year in the world is growing exponentially mainly due to the incorporation of multislice CT that allows studies in a few seconds. But, despite the benefit received by patients with the diagnosis, radiation dose is a concern in the professional community and it has be reduced as much as reasonably possible. This article describes the main dosimetric CT units used in order to work with this practice easily, using the values that provide modern equipment and internationally known reference levels. (authors) [es

  20. Prediction of optimal deployment projection for transcatheter aortic valve replacement: angiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction of the aortic root versus multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Ronald K; Leipsic, Jonathon; Wood, David; Moore, Teri; Toggweiler, Stefan; Willson, Alex; Gurvitch, Ronen; Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G

    2012-04-01

    Identifying the optimal fluoroscopic projection of the aortic valve is important for successful transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Various imaging modalities, including multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), have been proposed for prediction of the optimal deployment projection. We evaluated a method that provides 3-dimensional angiographic reconstructions (3DA) of the aortic root for prediction of the optimal deployment angle and compared it with MDCT. Forty patients undergoing transfemoral TAVR at St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, were evaluated. All underwent preimplant 3DA and 68% underwent preimplant MDCT. Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions were generated from images of a C-arm rotational aortic root angiogram during breath-hold, rapid ventricular pacing, and injection of 32 mL contrast medium at 8 mL/s. Two independent operators prospectively predicted perpendicular valve projections. The implant angle was chosen at the discretion of the physician performing TAVR. The angles from 3DA, from MDCT, the implant angle, and the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis view were compared. The shortest distance from the postdeployment perpendicular prosthesis projection to the regression line of predicted perpendicular projections was calculated. All but 1 patient had adequate image quality for reproducible angle predictions. There was a significant correlation between 3DA and MDCT for prediction of perpendicular valve projections (r=0.682, Pregression line of predicted angles to the postdeployment prosthesis view was 5.1±4.6° for 3DA and 7.9±4.9° for MDCT (P=0.01). Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions and MDCT are safe, practical, and accurate imaging modalities for identifying the optimal perpendicular valve deployment projection during TAVR.

  1. Evaluation of Medial Acetabular Wall Bone Stock in Patients with Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Using a Helical Computed Tomography Multiplanar Reconstruction Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Yu Liu; Kun Zheng Wang; Chun Sheng Wang; Xiao Qian Dang; Zhi Qin Tong (Second Hospital Affiliated to the Medical College of Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an Shaanxi (China))

    2009-08-15

    Background: The technique of medialization has been used to reconstruct acetabula at the level of true acetabula in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Appreciation of the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall is significant for making an optimal acetabular reconstruction plan and avoiding complications. Purpose: To evaluate the bone stock of the medial acetabular wall and its relation to the degree of subluxation in patients with DDH using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Helical CT scans of 27 hips were obtained from 21 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to DDH who were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. Eleven hips belonged to Crowe class I, while 16 hips belonged to Crowe class II/III. The raw CT data were reprocessed in various planes by scrolling multiplanar reformation (MPR). Acetabular opening, depth, and medial bone stock, as indicated by the minimum thickness of the medial acetabular wall, were measured in the transverse reformed MPR plane. Results: The minimum thicknesses of the medial acetabular wall in Crowe-I and Crowe-II/III hips were 3.8+-2.1 mm and 7.1+-3.1 mm, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall correlated with the degree of subluxation (R=0.69) and the acetabular depth (R= ;- ;0.71). Conclusion: There was significantly more bone stock in the medial acetabular wall in patients with higher-degree subluxation than there was in the less-severe class. This difference should be taken into consideration when reconstructing acetabula in THA in patients with DDH using the technique of medialization

  2. Impact of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction on myocardial late iodine enhancement in computed tomography and comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yuki; Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Fukuyama, Naoki; Yokoi, Takahiro; Kido, Tomoyuki; Uetani, Teruyoshi; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Tokuyasu, Shinichi; Yamashita, Natsumi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the image quality and diagnostic performance of late iodine enhancement computed tomography (LIE-CT) with knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) for the detection of myocardial infarction (MI) in comparison with late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI). The study investigated 35 patients who underwent a comprehensive cardiac CT protocol and LGE-MRI for the assessment of coronary artery disease. The CT protocol consisted of stress dynamic myocardial CT perfusion, coronary CT angiography (CTA) and LIE-CT using 256-slice CT. LIE-CT scans were acquired 5 min after CTA without additional contrast medium and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), a hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR), and IMR. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were assessed. Sensitivity and specificity of LIE-CT for detecting MI were assessed according to the 16-segment model. Image quality scores, and diagnostic performance were compared among LIE-CT with FBP, HIR and IMR. Among the 35 patients, 139 of 560 segments showed MI in LGE-MRI. On LIE-CT with FBP, HIR, and IMR, the median SNRs were 2.1, 2.9, and 6.1; and the median CNRs were 1.7, 2.2, and 4.7, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 56 and 93% for FBP, 62 and 91% for HIR, and 80 and 91% for IMR. LIE-CT with IMR showed the highest image quality and sensitivity (p quality and diagnostic performance of LIE-CT for detecting MI in comparison with FBP and HIR.

  3. Evaluation of Medial Acetabular Wall Bone Stock in Patients with Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Using a Helical Computed Tomography Multiplanar Reconstruction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Yu Liu; Kun Zheng Wang; Chun Sheng Wang; Xiao Qian Dang; Zhi Qin Tong

    2009-01-01

    Background: The technique of medialization has been used to reconstruct acetabula at the level of true acetabula in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Appreciation of the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall is significant for making an optimal acetabular reconstruction plan and avoiding complications. Purpose: To evaluate the bone stock of the medial acetabular wall and its relation to the degree of subluxation in patients with DDH using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Helical CT scans of 27 hips were obtained from 21 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to DDH who were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. Eleven hips belonged to Crowe class I, while 16 hips belonged to Crowe class II/III. The raw CT data were reprocessed in various planes by scrolling multiplanar reformation (MPR). Acetabular opening, depth, and medial bone stock, as indicated by the minimum thickness of the medial acetabular wall, were measured in the transverse reformed MPR plane. Results: The minimum thicknesses of the medial acetabular wall in Crowe-I and Crowe-II/III hips were 3.8±2.1 mm and 7.1±3.1 mm, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall correlated with the degree of subluxation (R=0.69) and the acetabular depth (R= ;- ;0.71). Conclusion: There was significantly more bone stock in the medial acetabular wall in patients with higher-degree subluxation than there was in the less-severe class. This difference should be taken into consideration when reconstructing acetabula in THA in patients with DDH using the technique of medialization

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of second-generation dual-source computed tomography coronary angiography with iterative reconstructions: a real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, E; Martini, C; Rossi, A; Mollet, N; Lario, C; Castiglione Morelli, M; Clemente, A; Gentile, G; Arcadi, T; Seitun, S; Catalano, O; Aldrovandi, A; Cademartiri, F

    2012-08-01

    The authors evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of second-generation dual-source (DSCT) computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) with iterative reconstructions for detecting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Between June 2010 and February 2011, we enrolled 160 patients (85 men; mean age 61.2±11.6 years) with suspected CAD. All patients underwent CTCA and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). For the CTCA scan (Definition Flash, Siemens), we use prospective tube current modulation and 70-100 ml of iodinated contrast material (Iomeprol 400 mgI/ ml, Bracco). Data sets were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction algorithm (IRIS, Siemens). CTCA and CCA reports were used to evaluate accuracy using the threshold for significant stenosis at ≥50% and ≥70%, respectively. No patient was excluded from the analysis. Heart rate was 64.3±11.9 bpm and radiation dose was 7.2±2.1 mSv. Disease prevalence was 30% (48/160). Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of CTCA in detecting significant stenosis were 90.1%, 93.3%, 53.2% and 99.1% (per segment), 97.5%, 91.2%, 61.4% and 99.6% (per vessel) and 100%, 83%, 71.6% and 100% (per patient), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios at the per-patient level were 5.89 and 0.0, respectively. CTCA with second-generation DSCT in the real clinical world shows a diagnostic performance comparable with previously reported validation studies. The excellent negative predictive value and likelihood ratio make CTCA a first-line noninvasive method for diagnosing obstructive CAD.

  5. DART: a practical reconstruction algorithm for discrete tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, Kees Joost; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we present an iterative reconstruction algorithm for discrete tomography, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART). DART can be applied if the scanned object is known to consist of only a few different compositions, each corresponding to a constant gray value in the reconstruction. Prior knowledge of the gray values for each of the compositions is exploited to steer the current reconstruction towards a reconstruction that contains only these gray values. Based on experiments with both simulated CT data and experimental μCT data, it is shown that DART is capable of computing more accurate reconstructions from a small number of projection images, or from a small angular range, than alternative methods. It is also shown that DART can deal effectively with noisy projection data and that the algorithm is robust with respect to errors in the estimation of the gray values.

  6. Mathematics in computed tomography and related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical basis of computed tomography (CT) was formulated in 1917 by Radon. His theorem states that the 2-D function f(x,y) can be determined at all points from a complete set of its line integrals. Modern methods of image reconstruction include three approaches: algebraic reconstruction techniques with simultaneous iterative reconstruction or simultaneous algebraic reconstruction; convolution back projection; and the Fourier transform method. There is no one best approach. Because the experimental data do not strictly satisfy theoretical models, a number of effects have to be taken into account; in particular, the problems of beam geometry, finite beam dimensions and distribution, beam scattering, and the radiation source spectrum. Tomography with truncated data is of interest, employing mathematical approximations to compensate for the unmeasured projection data. Mathematical techniques in image processing and data analysis are also extensively used. 13 refs

  7. Knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction: comparative image quality and radiation dose with a pediatric computed tomography phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Young Jin; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One; Ha, Seongmin

    2016-01-01

    CT of pediatric phantoms can provide useful guidance to the optimization of knowledge-based iterative reconstruction CT. To compare radiation dose and image quality of CT images obtained at different radiation doses reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction, hybrid iterative reconstruction and filtered back-projection. We scanned a 5-year anthropomorphic phantom at seven levels of radiation. We then reconstructed CT data with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (iterative model reconstruction [IMR] levels 1, 2 and 3; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA), hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose 4 , levels 3 and 7; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA) and filtered back-projection. The noise, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated. We evaluated low-contrast resolutions and detectability by low-contrast targets and subjective and objective spatial resolutions by the line pairs and wire. With radiation at 100 peak kVp and 100 mAs (3.64 mSv), the relative doses ranged from 5% (0.19 mSv) to 150% (5.46 mSv). Lower noise and higher signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise and objective spatial resolution were generally achieved in ascending order of filtered back-projection, iDose 4 levels 3 and 7, and IMR levels 1, 2 and 3, at all radiation dose levels. Compared with filtered back-projection at 100% dose, similar noise levels were obtained on IMR level 2 images at 24% dose and iDose 4 level 3 images at 50% dose, respectively. Regarding low-contrast resolution, low-contrast detectability and objective spatial resolution, IMR level 2 images at 24% dose showed comparable image quality with filtered back-projection at 100% dose. Subjective spatial resolution was not greatly affected by reconstruction algorithm. Reduced-dose IMR obtained at 0.92 mSv (24%) showed similar image quality to routine-dose filtered back-projection obtained at 3.64 mSv (100%), and half-dose iDose 4 obtained at 1.81 mSv. (orig.)

  8. Knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction: comparative image quality and radiation dose with a pediatric computed tomography phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Young Jin; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Ha, Seongmin; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One

    2016-03-01

    CT of pediatric phantoms can provide useful guidance to the optimization of knowledge-based iterative reconstruction CT. To compare radiation dose and image quality of CT images obtained at different radiation doses reconstructed with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction, hybrid iterative reconstruction and filtered back-projection. We scanned a 5-year anthropomorphic phantom at seven levels of radiation. We then reconstructed CT data with knowledge-based iterative reconstruction (iterative model reconstruction [IMR] levels 1, 2 and 3; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA), hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose(4), levels 3 and 7; Philips Healthcare, Andover, MA) and filtered back-projection. The noise, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated. We evaluated low-contrast resolutions and detectability by low-contrast targets and subjective and objective spatial resolutions by the line pairs and wire. With radiation at 100 peak kVp and 100 mAs (3.64 mSv), the relative doses ranged from 5% (0.19 mSv) to 150% (5.46 mSv). Lower noise and higher signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise and objective spatial resolution were generally achieved in ascending order of filtered back-projection, iDose(4) levels 3 and 7, and IMR levels 1, 2 and 3, at all radiation dose levels. Compared with filtered back-projection at 100% dose, similar noise levels were obtained on IMR level 2 images at 24% dose and iDose(4) level 3 images at 50% dose, respectively. Regarding low-contrast resolution, low-contrast detectability and objective spatial resolution, IMR level 2 images at 24% dose showed comparable image quality with filtered back-projection at 100% dose. Subjective spatial resolution was not greatly affected by reconstruction algorithm. Reduced-dose IMR obtained at 0.92 mSv (24%) showed similar image quality to routine-dose filtered back-projection obtained at 3.64 mSv (100%), and half-dose iDose(4) obtained at 1.81 mSv.

  9. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents imaging: Initial evaluation of the optimal reconstruction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoming; Li, Tao; Li, Xin; Zhou, Weihua

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of four image reconstruction algorithms in a high-definition CT (HDCT) scanner with improved spatial resolution for the evaluation of coronary artery stents and intrastent lumina. Thirty-nine consecutive patients with a total of 71 implanted coronary stents underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) on a HDCT (Discovery CT 750 HD; GE Healthcare) with the high-resolution scanning mode. Four different reconstruction algorithms (HD-stand, HD-detail; HD-stand-plus; HD-detail-plus) were applied to reconstruct the stented coronary arteries. Image quality for stent characterization was assessed. Image noise and intrastent luminal diameter were measured. The relationship between the measurement of inner stent diameter (ISD) and the true stent diameter (TSD) and stent type were analysed. The stent-dedicated kernel (HD-detail) offered the highest percentage (53.5%) of good image quality for stent characterization and the highest ratio (68.0±8.4%) of visible stent lumen/true stent lumen for luminal diameter measurement at the expense of an increased overall image noise. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the ISD and TSD measurement and spearman correlation coefficient between the ISD measurement and stent type were 0.83 and 0.48, respectively. Compared with standard reconstruction algorithms, high-definition CT imaging technique with dedicated high-resolution reconstruction algorithm provides more accurate stent characterization and intrastent luminal diameter measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mesenteric panniculitis: computed tomography aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Alves, Jose Ricardo Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Pinheiro, Ricardo Andrade; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Noro, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is an inflammatory process that represents the second stage of a rare progressive disease involving the adipose tissue of the mesentery. Imaging methods used in the diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis include barium studies, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomography is important for both, diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of the disease and treatment monitoring. Computed tomography findings may vary according to the stage of the disease and the amount of inflammatory material or fibrosis. There is also good correlation between the computed tomography and anatomical pathology findings. The authors studied 10 patients with mesenteric panniculitis submitted to computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in one patient. In all patients, computed tomography revealed a heterogeneous mass in the mesentery with density of fat, interspersed with areas of soft tissue density and dilated vessels. (author)

  11. The neutron computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, G.; Krata, S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of computer tomography (CT) was applied for neutrons instead of X-rays. The neutron radiography image of samples was scanned by microphotometer to get the transmission data. This process was so time-consuming that the number of incident angles to samples could not be increased. The transmission data was processed by FACOM computer and CT image was gained. In the experiment at the Japan Research Reactor No. 4 at Tokai-mura with 18 projection angles, the resolution of paraffin in the aluminum block was less than 0.8 mm. In the experiment at Van de Graaf accelerator of Nagoya University, this same resolution was 1.2 mm because of the angle distribution of neutron beam. This experiment is the preliminary one, the facility which utilizes neutron television and video-recorder will be necessary for the next stage. (Auth.)

  12. Computed tomography of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, I.; Antoun, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Until the advent of Computed Tomography (CT), axial studies of the spine were limited in the main to gross bony anatomy and to conventional transaxial tomography (TAT). Others studied the upper cervical cord in transverse section during gas myelography and encephalography. The potential role of CT in the evaluation of spinal anatomy and disease was recognized, however, at an early stage in the development of the general purpose CT scanner. CT is not organ specific and therefore provides a uniformly thin (1.5-13 mm) axial section displaying detailed spinal topographical anatomy against a background of paravertebral muscles, vascular structures and body cavity organs. The relationships of the apophyseal joints to the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina are particularly well displayed. The study of neural tissue and pathology within the spinal canal is facilitated by the use of a non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium (viz. metrizamide) in the subarachnoid spaces. The high sensitivity of CT to very small changes in X-ray attenuation permits studies to be continued over several hours. The digital derivation of the sequential CT transaxial sections enables not only interrogation of data and quantitative studies to be made but also makes possible computer-generated reconstructions in other planes

  13. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents imaging: Initial evaluation of the optimal reconstruction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaoming, E-mail: mmayzy2008@126.com; Li, Tao, E-mail: litaofeivip@163.com; Li, Xin, E-mail: lx0803@sina.com.cn; Zhou, Weihua, E-mail: wangxue0606@gmail.com

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • High-resolution scan mode is appropriate for imaging coronary stent. • HD-detail reconstruction algorithm is stent-dedicated kernel. • The intrastent lumen visibility also depends on stent diameter and material. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of four image reconstruction algorithms in a high-definition CT (HDCT) scanner with improved spatial resolution for the evaluation of coronary artery stents and intrastent lumina. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine consecutive patients with a total of 71 implanted coronary stents underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) on a HDCT (Discovery CT 750 HD; GE Healthcare) with the high-resolution scanning mode. Four different reconstruction algorithms (HD-stand, HD-detail; HD-stand-plus; HD-detail-plus) were applied to reconstruct the stented coronary arteries. Image quality for stent characterization was assessed. Image noise and intrastent luminal diameter were measured. The relationship between the measurement of inner stent diameter (ISD) and the true stent diameter (TSD) and stent type were analysed. Results: The stent-dedicated kernel (HD-detail) offered the highest percentage (53.5%) of good image quality for stent characterization and the highest ratio (68.0 ± 8.4%) of visible stent lumen/true stent lumen for luminal diameter measurement at the expense of an increased overall image noise. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the ISD and TSD measurement and spearman correlation coefficient between the ISD measurement and stent type were 0.83 and 0.48, respectively. Conclusions: Compared with standard reconstruction algorithms, high-definition CT imaging technique with dedicated high-resolution reconstruction algorithm provides more accurate stent characterization and intrastent luminal diameter measurement.

  14. Joint image reconstruction method with correlative multi-channel prior for x-ray spectral computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Andersen, Martin S

    2018-01-01

    peaks. The acquired energy-binned data, however, suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio, acquisition artifacts, and frequently angular undersampled conditions. New regularized iterative reconstruction methods have the potential to produce higher quality images and since energy channels are mutually...... to encourage joint smoothing directions. In particular, the method selects reference channels from which to propagate structure in an adaptive and stochastic way while preferring channels with a high data signal-to-noise ratio. The method is compared with current state-of-the-art multi-channel reconstruction...

  15. Comparative analysis of the results of surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with the use of 3D reconstructions of computed tomography angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Grachev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: The relapse rates after surgery for juvenile nasopharyngeal and/or skull base angiofibroma is in the range of 23 to 27.5%, which is mostly related to diagnostic issues. Aim: To perform a comparative analysis of the results of surgical treatment for juvenile nasopharyngeal and skull base angiofibroma based on our technique of 3D reconstructions of computed tomography angiograms in patients with primary tumors and with relapses. Materials and methods: We analyzed retrospectively the data from 32 patients with juvenile nasopharyngeal and skull base angiofibroma who had been diagnosed and treated from 2013 to 2017 (42 surgeries. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT angiography with 3D reconstruction was used for the planning of surgical approaches. At days 3 to 7 after the surgery, in 31 patients with stages II, IIIa and IIIb (according to U. Fisch classification modified by R. Andrews, 1989, we looked for residual tumor tissues by MSCT with standard analysis and with 3D MSCT angiography reconstructions, comparing them with their corresponding baseline images. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, 17 patients with primary tumors (median age 13.5 years, group 2, 14 patients who had been previously operated (median age 14 years. Both groups were comparable in their clinical and demographic characteristics, as well as in the tumor staging (p > 0.05. Results: The relapse rates were 22.58% (7 / 31 patients, being 11.76% (2 / 17 in the group 1 and 35.71% (5 / 14 in the group 2 (p > 0.05. In each group, the maximal difference in the resected tumor volume was found in stage II patients, with more radical resection in the patients with primary tumors (p < 0.05. Contrast-enhanced MSCT showed residual tumor masses in 19 patients (8, with primary tumors and 11, with relapses. From those, 10 patients (3 with primary tumors and 7 who had underwent surgery earlier required second surgeries (4 patients were curatively operated, and 2

  16. Joint image reconstruction method with correlative multi-channel prior for x-ray spectral computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Jørgensen, Jakob S.; Andersen, Martin S.; Lionheart, William R. B.; Lee, Peter D.; Withers, Philip J.

    2018-06-01

    Rapid developments in photon-counting and energy-discriminating detectors have the potential to provide an additional spectral dimension to conventional x-ray grayscale imaging. Reconstructed spectroscopic tomographic data can be used to distinguish individual materials by characteristic absorption peaks. The acquired energy-binned data, however, suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio, acquisition artifacts, and frequently angular undersampled conditions. New regularized iterative reconstruction methods have the potential to produce higher quality images and since energy channels are mutually correlated it can be advantageous to exploit this additional knowledge. In this paper, we propose a novel method which jointly reconstructs all energy channels while imposing a strong structural correlation. The core of the proposed algorithm is to employ a variational framework of parallel level sets to encourage joint smoothing directions. In particular, the method selects reference channels from which to propagate structure in an adaptive and stochastic way while preferring channels with a high data signal-to-noise ratio. The method is compared with current state-of-the-art multi-channel reconstruction techniques including channel-wise total variation and correlative total nuclear variation regularization. Realistic simulation experiments demonstrate the performance improvements achievable by using correlative regularization methods.

  17. The Effects of Iodine Attenuation on Pulmonary Nodule Volumetry using Novel Dual-Layer Computed Tomography Reconstructions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Harder, A M; Bangert, F; van Hamersvelt, R W; Leiner, T; Milles, Julien; Schilham, A M R; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of iodine attenuation on pulmonary nodule volumetry using virtual non-contrast (VNC) and mono-energetic reconstructions. METHODS: A consecutive series of patients who underwent a contrast-enhanced chest CT scan were included. Images were acquired on a novel

  18. Few-view single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on a blurred piecewise constant object model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Paul A.; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2013-01-01

    the assumed blurring model. Generally, increased values of the blurring parameter and TV weighting parameters reduced noise and streaking artifacts, while decreasing spatial resolution. As the number of views decreased from 60 to 9 the accuracy of images reconstructed using the proposed algorithm varied...

  19. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  20. Positron emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, M.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regional mycardial blood flow and substrate metabolism can be non-invasively evaluated and quantified with positron emission computed tomography (Positron-CT). Tracers of exogenous glucose utilization and fatty acid metabolism are available and have been extensively tested. Specific tracer kinetic models have been developed or are being tested so that glucose and fatty acid metabolism can be measured quantitatively by Positron-CT. Tracers of amino acid and oxygen metabolism are utilized in Positron-CT studies of the brain and development of such tracers for cardiac studies are in progress. Methods to quantify regional myocardial blood flow are also being developed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of Positron-/CT to document myocardial infarction. Experimental and clinical studies have begun to identify metabolic markers of reversibly ischemic myocardium. The potential of Positron-CT to reliably detect potentially salvageable myocardium and, hence, to identify appropriate therapeutic interventions is one of the most exciting applications of the technique

  1. ADART: an adaptive algebraic reconstruction algorithm for discrete tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Deusto, F Javier; Scavello, Giovanni; Pizarro, Joaquín; Galindo, Pedro L

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we suggest an algorithm based on the Discrete Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (DART) which is capable of computing high quality reconstructions from substantially fewer projections than required for conventional continuous tomography. Adaptive DART (ADART) goes a step further than DART on the reduction of the number of unknowns of the associated linear system achieving a significant reduction in the pixel error rate of reconstructed objects. The proposed methodology automatically adapts the border definition criterion at each iteration, resulting in a reduction of the number of pixels belonging to the border, and consequently of the number of unknowns in the general algebraic reconstruction linear system to be solved, being this reduction specially important at the final stage of the iterative process. Experimental results show that reconstruction errors are considerably reduced using ADART when compared to original DART, both in clean and noisy environments.

  2. Microfocal X-ray computed tomography post-processing operations for optimizing reconstruction volumes of stented arteries during 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladisa, John F; Olson, Lars E; Ropella, Kristina M; Molthen, Robert C; Haworth, Steven T; Kersten, Judy R; Warltier, David C; Pagel, Paul S

    2005-08-01

    Restenosis caused by neointimal hyperplasia (NH) remains an important clinical problem after stent implantation. Restenosis varies with stent geometry, and idealized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have indicated that geometric properties of the implanted stent may differentially influence NH. However, 3D studies capturing the in vivo flow domain within stented vessels have not been conducted at a resolution sufficient to detect subtle alterations in vascular geometry caused by the stent and the subsequent temporal development of NH. We present the details and limitations of a series of post-processing operations used in conjunction with microfocal X-ray CT imaging and reconstruction to generate geometrically accurate flow domains within the localized region of a stent several weeks after implantation. Microfocal X-ray CT reconstruction volumes were subjected to an automated program to perform arterial thresholding, spatial orientation, and surface smoothing of stented and unstented rabbit iliac arteries several weeks after antegrade implantation. A transfer function was obtained for the current post-processing methodology containing reconstructed 16 mm stents implanted into rabbit iliac arteries for up to 21 days after implantation and resolved at circumferential and axial resolutions of 32 and 50 microm, respectively. The results indicate that the techniques presented are sufficient to resolve distributions of WSS with 80% accuracy in segments containing 16 surface perturbations over a 16 mm stented region. These methods will be used to test the hypothesis that reductions in normalized wall shear stress (WSS) and increases in the spatial disparity of WSS immediately after stent implantation may spatially correlate with the temporal development of NH within the stented region.

  3. Filter-based reconstruction methods for tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelt, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    In X-ray tomography, a three-dimensional image of the interior of an object is computed from multiple X-ray images, acquired over a range of angles. Two types of methods are commonly used to compute such an image: analytical methods and iterative methods. Analytical methods are computationally

  4. Knee rotation influences the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a 3-dimensional computed tomography model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Thorhauer, Eric; Marsh, Chelsea; Fu, Freddie H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Femoral tunnel angle (FTA) has been proposed as a metric for evaluating whether ACL reconstruction was performed anatomically. In clinic, radiographic images are typically acquired with an uncertain amount of internal/external knee rotation. The extent to which knee rotation will influence FTA measurement is unclear. Furthermore, differences in FTA measurement between the two common positions (0° and 45° knee flexion) have not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of knee rotation on FTA measurement after ACL reconstruction. Methods Knee CT data from 16 subjects were segmented to produce 3D bone models. Central axes of tunnels were identified. The 0° and 45° flexion angles were simulated. Knee internal/external rotations were simulated in a range of ±20°. FTA was defined as the angle between the tunnel axis and femoral shaft axis, orthogonally projected into the coronal plane. Results Femoral tunnel angle was positively/negatively correlated with knee rotation angle at 0°/45° knee flexion. At 0° knee flexion, FTA for anterio-medial (AM) tunnels was significantly decreased at 20° of external knee rotation. At 45° knee flexion, more than 16° external or 19° internal rotation significantly altered FTA measurements for single-bundle tunnels; smaller rotations (±9° for AM, ±5° for PL) created significant errors in FTA measurements after double-bundle reconstruction. Conclusion Femoral tunnel angle measurements were correlated with knee rotation. Relatively small imaging malalignment introduced significant errors with knee flexed 45°. This study supports using the 0° flexion position for knee radiographs to reduce errors in FTA measurement due to knee internal/external rotation. Level of evidence Case–control study, Level III. PMID:23589127

  5. Studies of Sensitivity in the Dictionary Learning Approach to Computed Tomography: Simplifying the Reconstruction Problem, Rotation, and Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Sara

    investigate the sensitivity and robustness of the reconstruction to variations of the scale and orientation in the training images and we suggest algorithms to estimate the correct relative scale and orientation of the unknown image to the training images from the data....... formulation in [22] enforces that the solution is an exact representation by the dictionary; in this report, we investigate this requirement. Furthermore, the underlying assumption that the scale and orientation of the training images are consistent with the unknown image of interest may not be realistic. We...

  6. [Computed tomography of the heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, T.S.; Kofoed, K.F.; der, Recke P. von

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of the coronary arteries by multi-detector row computed tomography is a promising new alternative to conventional invasive coronary angiography. This article describes the technical background, methods, limitations and clinical applications and reviews current literature...... that compares the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector row computed tomography with that of coronary angiography Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4/6...

  7. Intraosseous focal venous malformation of the mandibular body: Cone beam computed tomography planning followed by piezoelectric knife resection and free bone graft reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Živorad S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intraosseous vascular malformation could be life-threatening due to uncontrolled hemorrhage after tooth extraction. According to biological behavior of this lesion, adequate diagnostic and treatment strategies are necessary in order to avoid possible complications. We reported cone beam computed tomography (CBCT planning of an urgent en bloc resection of an intraosseous venous malformation by piezoelectric knife. Case report. A 55-year-old man was submitted to CBCT planning followed by piezoelectric knife resection of an intraosseous focal venous malformation of the mandibular body. Immediate reconstruction of the defect using iliac bone free graft was performed. The surgical treatment was uneventful and a 2-year follow-up revealed no signs of recurrence. Conclusion. Piezoelectric knife could provide precise, safe and bloodless procedure which is especially important in this pathology. Advantages of this technique are: lower risk of damaging soft tissue structures, precise osteotomy and bloodless surgery. Moreover, using piezosurgery bone knife, blood transfusion and blood transmitted diseases could be avoided. This case highlights the importance of CBCT as planning tool for resection of the mandible, using piezoelectric knife as safe method to achieve bloodless surgery. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 175075

  8. A novel region-growing based semi-automatic segmentation protocol for three-dimensional condylar reconstruction using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Xi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present and validate a semi-automatic segmentation protocol to enable an accurate 3D reconstruction of the mandibular condyles using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Approval from the regional medical ethics review board was obtained for this study. Bilateral mandibular condyles in ten CBCT datasets of patients were segmented using the currently proposed semi-automatic segmentation protocol. This segmentation protocol combined 3D region-growing and local thresholding algorithms. The segmentation of a total of twenty condyles was performed by two observers. The Dice-coefficient and distance map calculations were used to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the segmented and 3D rendered condyles. RESULTS: The mean inter-observer Dice-coefficient was 0.98 (range [0.95-0.99]. An average 90th percentile distance of 0.32 mm was found, indicating an excellent inter-observer similarity of the segmented and 3D rendered condyles. No systematic errors were observed in the currently proposed segmentation protocol. CONCLUSION: The novel semi-automated segmentation protocol is an accurate and reproducible tool to segment and render condyles in 3D. The implementation of this protocol in the clinical practice allows the CBCT to be used as an imaging modality for the quantitative analysis of condylar morphology.

  9. Reducing radiation dose in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and lower tube potential in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, David; Grupp, Ulrich; Kahn, Johannes; Wiener, Edzard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of ASIR (adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction) and lower tube potential on dose reduction and image quality in chest computed tomography angiographies (CTAs) of patients with pulmonary embolism. CT data from 44 patients with pulmonary embolism were acquired using different protocols - Group A: 120 kV, filtered back projection, n = 12; Group B: 120 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 12; Group C: 100 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 12 and Group D: 80 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 8. Normalised effective dose was calculated; image quality was assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Normalised effective dose in Group B was 33.8 % lower than in Group A (p = 0.014) and 54.4 % lower in Group C than in Group A (p < 0.001). Group A, B and C did not show significant differences in qualitative or quantitative analysis of image quality. Group D showed significantly higher noise levels in qualitative and quantitative analysis, significantly more artefacts and decreased overall diagnosability. Best results, considering dose reduction and image quality, were achieved in Group C. The combination of ASIR and lower tube potential is an option to reduce radiation without significant worsening of image quality in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  10. Reducing radiation dose in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and lower tube potential in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, David [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Grupp, Ulrich; Kahn, Johannes; Wiener, Edzard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ghadjar, Pirus [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    To assess the impact of ASIR (adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction) and lower tube potential on dose reduction and image quality in chest computed tomography angiographies (CTAs) of patients with pulmonary embolism. CT data from 44 patients with pulmonary embolism were acquired using different protocols - Group A: 120 kV, filtered back projection, n = 12; Group B: 120 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 12; Group C: 100 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 12 and Group D: 80 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 8. Normalised effective dose was calculated; image quality was assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Normalised effective dose in Group B was 33.8 % lower than in Group A (p = 0.014) and 54.4 % lower in Group C than in Group A (p < 0.001). Group A, B and C did not show significant differences in qualitative or quantitative analysis of image quality. Group D showed significantly higher noise levels in qualitative and quantitative analysis, significantly more artefacts and decreased overall diagnosability. Best results, considering dose reduction and image quality, were achieved in Group C. The combination of ASIR and lower tube potential is an option to reduce radiation without significant worsening of image quality in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  11. Simultaneous reconstruction of 3D refractive index, temperature, and intensity distribution of combustion flame by double computed tomography technologies based on spatial phase-shifting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenyan; Song, Yang; Yuan, Qun; Wulan, Tuya; Chen, Lei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a transient multi-parameter three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction method is proposed to diagnose and visualize a combustion flow field. Emission and transmission tomography based on spatial phase-shifted technology are combined to reconstruct, simultaneously, the various physical parameter distributions of a propane flame. Two cameras triggered by the internal trigger mode capture the projection information of the emission and moiré tomography, respectively. A two-step spatial phase-shifting method is applied to extract the phase distribution in the moiré fringes. By using the filtered back-projection algorithm, we reconstruct the 3D refractive-index distribution of the combustion flow field. Finally, the 3D temperature distribution of the flame is obtained from the refractive index distribution using the Gladstone-Dale equation. Meanwhile, the 3D intensity distribution is reconstructed based on the radiation projections from the emission tomography. Therefore, the structure and edge information of the propane flame are well visualized.

  12. A fast sparse reconstruction algorithm for electrical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jia; Xu, Yanbin; Tan, Chao; Dong, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Electrical tomography (ET) has been widely investigated due to its advantages of being non-radiative, low-cost and high-speed. However, the image reconstruction of ET is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem and the imaging results are easily affected by measurement noise. A sparse reconstruction algorithm based on L 1 regularization is robust to noise and consequently provides a high quality of reconstructed images. In this paper, a sparse reconstruction by separable approximation algorithm (SpaRSA) is extended to solve the ET inverse problem. The algorithm is competitive with the fastest state-of-the-art algorithms in solving the standard L 2 −L 1 problem. However, it is computationally expensive when the dimension of the matrix is large. To further improve the calculation speed of solving inverse problems, a projection method based on the Krylov subspace is employed and combined with the SpaRSA algorithm. The proposed algorithm is tested with image reconstruction of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the computational time and improve the noise robustness for the image reconstruction. (paper)

  13. Denoising multicriterion iterative reconstruction in emission spectral tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiong; Yin, Aihan

    2007-03-01

    In the study of optical testing, the computed tomogaphy technique has been widely adopted to reconstruct three-dimensional distributions of physical parameters of various kinds of fluid fields, such as flame, plasma, etc. In most cases, projection data are often stained by noise due to environmental disturbance, instrumental inaccuracy, and other random interruptions. To improve the reconstruction performance in noisy cases, an algorithm that combines a self-adaptive prefiltering denoising approach (SPDA) with a multicriterion iterative reconstruction (MCIR) is proposed and studied. First, the level of noise is approximately estimated with a frequency domain statistical method. Then the cutoff frequency of a Butterworth low-pass filter was established based on the evaluated noise energy. After the SPDA processing, the MCIR algorithm was adopted for limited-view optical computed tomography reconstruction. Simulated reconstruction of two test phantoms and a flame emission spectral tomography experiment were employed to evaluate the performance of SPDA-MCIR in noisy cases. Comparison with some traditional methods and experiment results showed that the SPDA-MCIR combination had obvious improvement in the case of noisy data reconstructions.

  14. Quality of image and exposure dose according to kVp, mA and lterative reconstruction in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Sang Young [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Yoon [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon Christian Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong Ki [Dept. of Radiological Technology, DongNam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeon Hun [Dept. of Radiatioin Oncology, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Ansan University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the image quality and exposure dose according to kVp and mAs in CT and to confirm improvement in image quality according to None IR and IR(Iterative Reconstruction) levels. Measurement results of image quality using Image J, HU(Hounsfield units) and BN(Background Noise) are decreased, while SNR(Signal to Noise Ratio) and CTDIvol(CT dose index volume) are increased as the kVp increases and there was no change of BHU(Background Hounsfield units). BN was reduced due to increased kVp, while SNR and CTDIvol were increased. Also, the higher IR stage, the lower BN, SI(Signal Intensity) and HU while SNR was improved by about 10∼60%. Based on this, when applying IR for clinical applications, it is necessary to finely adjust kVp and mA with a phased approach.

  15. Optimization of hybrid iterative reconstruction level and evaluation of image quality and radiation dose for pediatric cardiac computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lin; Liang, Changhong; Zhuang, Jian; Huang, Meiping; Liu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and produce better image quality compared with filtered back-projection (FBP), but few reports describe optimization of the iteration level. We optimized the iteration level of iDose"4 and evaluated image quality for pediatric cardiac CT angiography. Children (n = 160) with congenital heart disease were enrolled and divided into full-dose (n = 84) and half-dose (n = 76) groups. Four series were reconstructed using FBP, and iDose"4 levels 2, 4 and 6; we evaluated subjective quality of the series using a 5-grade scale and compared the series using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. For FBP and iDose"4-optimal images, we compared contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) using a Student's t-test. We also compared diagnostic-accuracy of each group using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. Mean scores for iDose"4 level 4 were the best in both dose groups (all P < 0.05). CNR was improved in both groups with iDose"4 level 4 as compared with FBP. Mean decrease in SSDE was 53% in the half-dose group. Diagnostic accuracy for the four datasets were in the range 92.6-96.2% (no statistical difference). iDose"4 level 4 was optimal for both the full- and half-dose groups. Protocols with iDose"4 level 4 allowed 53% reduction in SSDE without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  16. Optimization of hybrid iterative reconstruction level and evaluation of image quality and radiation dose for pediatric cardiac computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin; Liang, Changhong [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Zhuang, Jian [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Inst., Guangdong Provincial Key Lab. of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Meiping [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Inst., Guangdong Provincial Key Lab. of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Hui [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-01-15

    Hybrid iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and produce better image quality compared with filtered back-projection (FBP), but few reports describe optimization of the iteration level. We optimized the iteration level of iDose{sup 4} and evaluated image quality for pediatric cardiac CT angiography. Children (n = 160) with congenital heart disease were enrolled and divided into full-dose (n = 84) and half-dose (n = 76) groups. Four series were reconstructed using FBP, and iDose{sup 4} levels 2, 4 and 6; we evaluated subjective quality of the series using a 5-grade scale and compared the series using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. For FBP and iDose{sup 4}-optimal images, we compared contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) using a Student's t-test. We also compared diagnostic-accuracy of each group using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. Mean scores for iDose{sup 4} level 4 were the best in both dose groups (all P < 0.05). CNR was improved in both groups with iDose{sup 4} level 4 as compared with FBP. Mean decrease in SSDE was 53% in the half-dose group. Diagnostic accuracy for the four datasets were in the range 92.6-96.2% (no statistical difference). iDose{sup 4} level 4 was optimal for both the full- and half-dose groups. Protocols with iDose{sup 4} level 4 allowed 53% reduction in SSDE without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  17. Vectorization with SIMD extensions speeds up reconstruction in electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulleiro, J I; Garzón, E M; García, I; Fernández, J J

    2010-06-01

    Electron tomography allows structural studies of cellular structures at molecular detail. Large 3D reconstructions are needed to meet the resolution requirements. The processing time to compute these large volumes may be considerable and so, high performance computing techniques have been used traditionally. This work presents a vector approach to tomographic reconstruction that relies on the exploitation of the SIMD extensions available in modern processors in combination to other single processor optimization techniques. This approach succeeds in producing full resolution tomograms with an important reduction in processing time, as evaluated with the most common reconstruction algorithms, namely WBP and SIRT. The main advantage stems from the fact that this approach is to be run on standard computers without the need of specialized hardware, which facilitates the development, use and management of programs. Future trends in processor design open excellent opportunities for vector processing with processor's SIMD extensions in the field of 3D electron microscopy.

  18. Utility of 3D Reconstruction of 2D Liver Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Images as a Surgical Planning Tool for Residents in Liver Resection Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Caitlin T; MacDonald, Andrew; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Jalink, Diederick; Zevin, Boris; Fichtinger, Gabor; Nanji, Sulaiman

    A fundamental aspect of surgical planning in liver resections is the identification of key vessel tributaries to preserve healthy liver tissue while fully resecting the tumor(s). Current surgical planning relies primarily on the surgeon's ability to mentally reconstruct 2D computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) images into 3D and plan resection margins. This creates significant cognitive load, especially for trainees, as it relies on image interpretation, anatomical and surgical knowledge, experience, and spatial sense. The purpose of this study is to determine if 3D reconstruction of preoperative CT/MR images will assist resident-level trainees in making appropriate operative plans for liver resection surgery. Ten preoperative patient CT/MR images were selected. Images were case-matched, 5 to 2D planning and 5 to 3D planning. Images from the 3D group were segmented to create interactive digital models that the resident can manipulate to view the tumor(s) in relation to landmark hepatic structures. Residents were asked to evaluate the images and devise a surgical resection plan for each image. The resident alternated between 2D and 3D planning, in a randomly generated order. The primary outcome was the accuracy of resident's plan compared to expert opinion. Time to devise each surgical plan was the secondary outcome. Residents completed a prestudy and poststudy questionnaire regarding their experience with liver surgery and the 3D planning software. Senior level surgical residents from the Queen's University General Surgery residency program were recruited to participate. A total of 14 residents participated in the study. The median correct response rate was 2 of 5 (40%; range: 0-4) for the 2D group, and 3 of 5 (60%; range: 1-5) for the 3D group (p surgery planning increases accuracy of resident surgical planning and decreases amount of time required. 3D reconstruction would be a useful model for improving trainee understanding of liver anatomy and surgical

  19. Time-resolved computed tomography of the liver: retrospective, multi-phase image reconstruction derived from volumetric perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael A.; Kartalis, Nikolaos; Aspelin, Peter; Albiin, Nils; Brismar, Torkel B. [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Leidner, Bertil; Svensson, Anders [Karolinska University Hospital, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-01-15

    To assess feasibility and image quality (IQ) of a new post-processing algorithm for retrospective extraction of an optimised multi-phase CT (time-resolved CT) of the liver from volumetric perfusion imaging. Sixteen patients underwent clinically indicated perfusion CT using 4D spiral mode of dual-source 128-slice CT. Three image sets were reconstructed: motion-corrected and noise-reduced (MCNR) images derived from 4D raw data; maximum and average intensity projections (time MIP/AVG) of the arterial/portal/portal-venous phases and all phases (total MIP/ AVG) derived from retrospective fusion of dedicated MCNR split series. Two readers assessed the IQ, detection rate and evaluation time; one reader assessed image noise and lesion-to-liver contrast. Time-resolved CT was feasible in all patients. Each post-processing step yielded a significant reduction of image noise and evaluation time, maintaining lesion-to-liver contrast. Time MIPs/AVGs showed the highest overall IQ without relevant motion artefacts and best depiction of arterial and portal/portal-venous phases respectively. Time MIPs demonstrated a significantly higher detection rate for arterialised liver lesions than total MIPs/AVGs and the raw data series. Time-resolved CT allows data from volumetric perfusion imaging to be condensed into an optimised multi-phase liver CT, yielding a superior IQ and higher detection rate for arterialised liver lesions than the raw data series. (orig.)

  20. Increased accuracy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion scintigraphy using iterative reconstruction of images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Filtered back projection (FBP is a common way of processing myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI studies. There are artifacts in FBP which can cause falsepositive results. Iterative reconstruction (IR is developed to reduce false positive findings in MPI studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in the number of false positive findings in MPI studies, between FBP and IR processing. Methods. We examined 107 patients with angina pectoris with MPI and coronary angiography (CAG, 77 man and 30 woman, aged 32−82. MPI studies were processed with FBP and with IR. Positive finding at MPI was visualization of the perfusion defect. Positive finding at CAG was stenosis of coronary artery. Perfusion defect at MPI without coronary artery stenosis at CAG was considered like false positive. The results were statistically analyzed with bivariate correlation, and with one sample t-test. Results. There were 20.6% normal, and 79.4% pathologic findings at FBP, 30.8% normal and 69.2% pathologic with IR and 37.4% normal and 62.6% pathologic at CAG. FBP produced 19 false-positive findings, at IR 11 false positive findings. The correlation between FBP and CAG was 0.658 (p < 0.01 and between IR and CAG 0.784 (p < 0.01. The number of false positive findings at MPI with IR was significantly lower than at FBP (p < 0.01. Conclusion. Our study shows that IR processing MPI scintigraphy has less number of false positive findings, therefore it is our choice for processing MPI studies.

  1. Computed tomography apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairbairn, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    In fan-beam computed tomography apparatus, timing reference pulses, normally occurring at intervals t, for data transfer and reset of approx. 500 integrators in the signal path from the detector array, are generated from the scan displacement, e.g. using a graticule and optical sensor to relate the measurement paths geometrically to the body section. Sometimes, a slow scan rate is required to provide a time-averaged density image, e.g. for planning irradiation therapy, and then the sensed impulses will occur at extended intervals and can cause integrator overload. An improvement is described which provides a pulse generator which responds to a reduced scan rate by generating a succession of further transfer and reset pulses at intervals approximately equal to t starting a time t after each timing reference pulse. Then, using an adding device and RAM, all the transferred signals integrated in the interval t' between two successive slow scan reference pulses are accumulated in order to form a corresponding measurement signal. (author)

  2. Geometric reconstruction methods for electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpers, Andreas, E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching bei München (Germany); Gardner, Richard J., E-mail: Richard.Gardner@wwu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225-9063 (United States); König, Stefan, E-mail: koenig@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching bei München (Germany); Pennington, Robert S., E-mail: robert.pennington@uni-ulm.de [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boothroyd, Chris B., E-mail: ChrisBoothroyd@cantab.net [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Houben, Lothar, E-mail: l.houben@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E., E-mail: rdb@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Joost Batenburg, Kees, E-mail: Joost.Batenburg@cwi.nl [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, NL-1098XG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Vision Lab, Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2013-05-15

    Electron tomography is becoming an increasingly important tool in materials science for studying the three-dimensional morphologies and chemical compositions of nanostructures. The image quality obtained by many current algorithms is seriously affected by the problems of missing wedge artefacts and non-linear projection intensities due to diffraction effects. The former refers to the fact that data cannot be acquired over the full 180° tilt range; the latter implies that for some orientations, crystalline structures can show strong contrast changes. To overcome these problems we introduce and discuss several algorithms from the mathematical fields of geometric and discrete tomography. The algorithms incorporate geometric prior knowledge (mainly convexity and homogeneity), which also in principle considerably reduces the number of tilt angles required. Results are discussed for the reconstruction of an InAs nanowire. - Highlights: ► Four algorithms for electron tomography are introduced that utilize prior knowledge. ► Objects are assumed to be homogeneous; convexity and regularity is also discussed. ► We are able to reconstruct slices of a nanowire from as few as four projections. ► Algorithms should be selected based on the specific reconstruction task at hand.

  3. Geometric reconstruction methods for electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gardner, Richard J.; König, Stefan; Pennington, Robert S.; Boothroyd, Chris B.; Houben, Lothar; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Joost Batenburg, Kees

    2013-01-01

    Electron tomography is becoming an increasingly important tool in materials science for studying the three-dimensional morphologies and chemical compositions of nanostructures. The image quality obtained by many current algorithms is seriously affected by the problems of missing wedge artefacts and non-linear projection intensities due to diffraction effects. The former refers to the fact that data cannot be acquired over the full 180° tilt range; the latter implies that for some orientations, crystalline structures can show strong contrast changes. To overcome these problems we introduce and discuss several algorithms from the mathematical fields of geometric and discrete tomography. The algorithms incorporate geometric prior knowledge (mainly convexity and homogeneity), which also in principle considerably reduces the number of tilt angles required. Results are discussed for the reconstruction of an InAs nanowire. - Highlights: ► Four algorithms for electron tomography are introduced that utilize prior knowledge. ► Objects are assumed to be homogeneous; convexity and regularity is also discussed. ► We are able to reconstruct slices of a nanowire from as few as four projections. ► Algorithms should be selected based on the specific reconstruction task at hand

  4. Computed tomography of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmannskog, F.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Aakhus, T.; Bergan, A.; Fausa, O.; Elgjo, K.

    1980-01-01

    The findings by computed tomography in 203 cases of suspected pancreatic tumours, pancreatitis or peripancreatic abnormalities were evaluated. The appearances of the normal and the diseased pancreas are described. Computed tomography is highly accurate in detecting pancreatic masses, but can not differentiate neoplastic from inflammatory disease. The only reliable signs of pancreatic carcinoma are a focal mass in the pancreas, together with liver metastasis. When a pancreatic mass is revealed by computed tomography, CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas is recommended. Thus the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures and explorative laparotomy may be avoided in some patients. (Auth.)

  5. Validation of the Gate simulation platform in single photon emission computed tomography and application to the development of a complete 3-dimensional reconstruction algorithm; Validation de la plate-forme de simulation GATE en tomographie a emission monophotonique et application au developpement d'un algorithme de reconstruction 3D complete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, D

    2003-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are currently considered in nuclear medical imaging as a powerful tool to design and optimize detection systems, and also to assess reconstruction algorithms and correction methods for degrading physical effects. Among the many simulators available, none of them is considered as a standard in nuclear medical imaging: this fact has motivated the development of a new generic Monte Carlo simulation platform (GATE), based on GEANT4 and dedicated to SPECT/PET (single photo emission computed tomography / positron emission tomography) applications. We participated during this thesis to the development of the GATE platform within an international collaboration. GATE was validated in SPECT by modeling two gamma cameras characterized by a different geometry, one dedicated to small animal imaging and the other used in a clinical context (Philips AXIS), and by comparing the results obtained with GATE simulations with experimental data. The simulation results reproduce accurately the measured performances of both gamma cameras. The GATE platform was then used to develop a new 3-dimensional reconstruction method: F3DMC (fully 3-dimension Monte-Carlo) which consists in computing with Monte Carlo simulation the transition matrix used in an iterative reconstruction algorithm (in this case, ML-EM), including within the transition matrix the main physical effects degrading the image formation process. The results obtained with the F3DMC method were compared to the results obtained with three other more conventional methods (FBP, MLEM, MLEMC) for different phantoms. The results of this study show that F3DMC allows to improve the reconstruction efficiency, the spatial resolution and the signal to noise ratio with a satisfactory quantification of the images. These results should be confirmed by performing clinical experiments and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be applied in SPECT but also in PET. (author)

  6. Statistical reconstruction for cosmic ray muon tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Larry J; Blanpied, Gary S; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Fraser, Andrew M; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Klimenko, Alexei V; Morris, Christopher L; Orum, Chris; Sossong, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    Highly penetrating cosmic ray muons constantly shower the earth at a rate of about 1 muon per cm2 per minute. We have developed a technique which exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering of these particles to perform nondestructive inspection without the use of artificial radiation. In prior work [1]-[3], we have described heuristic methods for processing muon data to create reconstructed images. In this paper, we present a maximum likelihood/expectation maximization tomographic reconstruction algorithm designed for the technique. This algorithm borrows much from techniques used in medical imaging, particularly emission tomography, but the statistics of muon scattering dictates differences. We describe the statistical model for multiple scattering, derive the reconstruction algorithm, and present simulated examples. We also propose methods to improve the robustness of the algorithm to experimental errors and events departing from the statistical model.

  7. Duality reconstruction algorithm for use in electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.Z.; Dickin, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    A duality reconstruction algorithm for solving the inverse problem in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is described. In this method, an algorithm based on the Geselowitz compensation (GC) theorem is used first to reconstruct an approximate version of the image. It is then fed as a first guessed data to the modified Newton-Raphson (MNR) algorithm which iteratively correct the image until a final acceptable solution is reached. The implementation of the GC and MNR based algorithms using the finite element method will be discussed. Reconstructed images produced by the algorithm will also be presented. Consideration is also given to the most computationally intensive aspects of the algorithm, namely the inversion of the large and sparse matrices. The methods taken to approximately compute the inverse ot those matrices will be outlined. (author)

  8. The posterior communicating artery: morphometric study in 3D angio-computed tomography reconstruction. The proof of the mathematical definition of the hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierżanowski, J; Szarmach, A; Słoniewski, P; Czapiewski, P; Piskunowicz, M; Bandurski, T; Szmuda, T

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphometry of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA), on the basis of angio-computed tomography (CT), and to give proof of the mathematical definition of the term "hypopal sia of the PCoA". One hundred 3-dimensional (3D) angio-CT images, performed in adult patients with bilateral reconstruction of the PCoA (200 results) were used tocalculate the morphometry of the vessel. The average length of the vessel on the right side was 14.48 ± 3.47 mm, andon the left side 14.98 ± 4.77 mm (in women 14.75 mm, in men 14.70 mm). The mean of the diameter at the "proximal" point (the junction with P1) on the right side was 1.49 ± 0.51 mm, and on the left 1.46 ± 0.47 mm (in women 1.44 mm and in men 1.51 mm). The mean of the diameter in the "distal" part (the connection with ICA) on the right side was 1.4 ± 0.49 mm, and on the left 1.37 ± 0.41 mm (in women 1.38 mm, and in men 1.39 mm). No statistical correlation between the length and the diameter of the PCoA in relation to the sex and side was shown. On the basis of our measurements, we defined the hypoplasia of the artery as the estimated value less than the average diameter minus the standard deviation. The percentage distribution was as follows: the left artery 15.5%, the right artery 24%, women 11.5%, and the men 9%. Similarly to the above parameters, we have not found any statistical differences. The presence of the foetal origin was noted in 25% of the radiological examinations. The infundibular widening was visualised in 11.5% of cases of 3D reconstructions. The agenesis of PCoA was found in 9% (never bilaterally), and in 1 case the unilateral duplication of the artery was observed. No statistical differences between those parameters in relation to sex and the examined side were revealed. Morphological calculation of the PCoA on the basis of angio-CT from adult patients did not show any statistical differences depending on sex or the investigated side. The presented

  9. Image evaluation and exposure dose with the application of tube voltage and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction of low dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Tae Joon [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Gimsangyeong Internal Medicine Clinic, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The study has attempted to evaluate and compare the image evaluation and exposure dose by respectively applying filter back projection (FBP), the existing test method, and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with different values of tube voltage during the low dose computed tomography (LDCT). With the image reconstruction method as basis, chest phantom was utilized with the FBP and ASIR set at 10%, 20% respectively, and the change of tube voltage (100 kVp, 120 kVp). For image evaluation, back ground noise, signal-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-noise ratio (CNR) were measured, and, for dose assessment, CTDIvol and DLP were measured respectively. In terms of image evaluation, there was significant difference in ascending aorta (AA) SNR and inpraspinatus muscle (IM) SNR with the different amount of tube voltage (p < 0.05). In terms of CTDIvol, the measured values with the same tube voltage of 120 kVp were 2.6 mGy with no-ASIR and 2.17 mGy with 20%-ASIR respectively, decreased by 0.43 mGy, and the values with 100 kVp were 1.61 mGy with no-ASIR and 1.34 mGy with 20%-ASIR, decreased by 0.27 mGy. In terms of DLP, the measured values with 120 kVp were 103.21 mGy‧cm with no-ASIR and 85.94 mGy‧cm with 20%-ASIR, decreased by 17.27mGy‧cm (about 16.7%), and the values with 100 kVp were 63.84 mGy‧cm with no-ASIR and 53.25 mGy‧cm with 20%-ASIR, a decrease by 10.62 mGy‧cm ( about 16.7%). At lower tube voltage, the rate of dose significantly decreased, but the negative effects on image evaluation was shown due to the increase of noise.

  10. Image evaluation and exposure dose with the application of tube voltage and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction of low dose computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Tae Joon; Kim, Ki Jeong; Lee, Hye Nam

    2017-01-01

    The study has attempted to evaluate and compare the image evaluation and exposure dose by respectively applying filter back projection (FBP), the existing test method, and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with different values of tube voltage during the low dose computed tomography (LDCT). With the image reconstruction method as basis, chest phantom was utilized with the FBP and ASIR set at 10%, 20% respectively, and the change of tube voltage (100 kVp, 120 kVp). For image evaluation, back ground noise, signal-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-noise ratio (CNR) were measured, and, for dose assessment, CTDIvol and DLP were measured respectively. In terms of image evaluation, there was significant difference in ascending aorta (AA) SNR and inpraspinatus muscle (IM) SNR with the different amount of tube voltage (p < 0.05). In terms of CTDIvol, the measured values with the same tube voltage of 120 kVp were 2.6 mGy with no-ASIR and 2.17 mGy with 20%-ASIR respectively, decreased by 0.43 mGy, and the values with 100 kVp were 1.61 mGy with no-ASIR and 1.34 mGy with 20%-ASIR, decreased by 0.27 mGy. In terms of DLP, the measured values with 120 kVp were 103.21 mGy‧cm with no-ASIR and 85.94 mGy‧cm with 20%-ASIR, decreased by 17.27mGy‧cm (about 16.7%), and the values with 100 kVp were 63.84 mGy‧cm with no-ASIR and 53.25 mGy‧cm with 20%-ASIR, a decrease by 10.62 mGy‧cm ( about 16.7%). At lower tube voltage, the rate of dose significantly decreased, but the negative effects on image evaluation was shown due to the increase of noise

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic ... is used to evaluate: complications from infections such as pneumonia a tumor that arises in the lung ...

  12. Computed tomography of drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, T.

    1985-08-01

    A preliminary computed tomography evaluation of drill cores of granite and sandstone has generated geologically significant data. Density variations as small as 4 percent and fractures as narrow as 0.1 mm were easily detected

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for ... Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer top ... Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  18. X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, Willi A

    2006-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT), introduced into clinical practice in 1972, was the first of the modern slice-imaging modalities. To reconstruct images mathematically from measured data and to display and to archive them in digital form was a novelty then and is commonplace today. CT has shown a steady upward trend with respect to technology, performance and clinical use independent of predictions and expert assessments which forecast in the 1980s that it would be completely replaced by magnetic resonance imaging. CT not only survived but exhibited a true renaissance due to the introduction of spiral scanning which meant the transition from slice-by-slice imaging to true volume imaging. Complemented by the introduction of array detector technology in the 1990s, CT today allows imaging of whole organs or the whole body in 5 to 20 s with sub-millimetre isotropic resolution. This review of CT will proceed in chronological order focussing on technology, image quality and clinical applications. In its final part it will also briefly allude to novel uses of CT such as dual-source CT, C-arm flat-panel-detector CT and micro-CT. At present CT possibly exhibits a higher innovation rate than ever before. In consequence the topical and most recent developments will receive the greatest attention. (review)

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue damage in patients with facial trauma, and planning surgical reconstruction. diagnose diseases of the temporal bone ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  20. Image Reconstruction Algorithm For Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko

    2001-01-01

    ). Most image reconstruction algorithms for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) use sensitivity maps as weighting factors. The computation is fast, involving a simple multiply-and- accumulate (MAC) operation, but the resulting image suffers from blurring due to the soft-field effect of the sensor. This paper presents a low cost iterative method employing proportional thresholding, which improves image quality dramatically. The strategy for implementation, computational cost, and achievable speed is examined when using a personal computer (PC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP). For PC implementation, Watcom C++ 10.6 and Visual C++ 5.0 compilers were used. The experimental results are compared to the images reconstructed by commercially available software. The new algorithm improves the image quality significantly at a cost of a few iterations. This technique can be readily exploited for online applications

  1. Reconstruction of an InAs nanowire using geometric tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.; König, Stefan; Alpers, Andreas

    Geometric tomography and conventional algebraic tomography algorithms are used to reconstruct cross-sections of an InAs nanowire from a tilt series of experimental annular dark-field images. Both algorithms are also applied to a test object to assess what factors affect the reconstruction quality....... When using the present algorithms, geometric tomography is faster, but artifacts in the reconstruction may be difficult to recognize....

  2. Robust statistical reconstruction for charged particle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Larry Joe; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Morris, Christopher; Orum, John Christopher; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Sossong, Michael James; Hengartner, Nicolas W

    2013-10-08

    Systems and methods for charged particle detection including statistical reconstruction of object volume scattering density profiles from charged particle tomographic data to determine the probability distribution of charged particle scattering using a statistical multiple scattering model and determine a substantially maximum likelihood estimate of object volume scattering density using expectation maximization (ML/EM) algorithm to reconstruct the object volume scattering density. The presence of and/or type of object occupying the volume of interest can be identified from the reconstructed volume scattering density profile. The charged particle tomographic data can be cosmic ray muon tomographic data from a muon tracker for scanning packages, containers, vehicles or cargo. The method can be implemented using a computer program which is executable on a computer.

  3. Matrix-based image reconstruction methods for tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Meng, J.D.

    1984-10-01

    Matrix methods of image reconstruction have not been used, in general, because of the large size of practical matrices, ill condition upon inversion and the success of Fourier-based techniques. An exception is the work that has been done at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for imaging with accelerated radioactive ions. An extension of that work into more general imaging problems shows that, with a correct formulation of the problem, positron tomography with ring geometries results in well behaved matrices which can be used for image reconstruction with no distortion of the point response in the field of view and flexibility in the design of the instrument. Maximum Likelihood Estimator methods of reconstruction, which use the system matrices tailored to specific instruments and do not need matrix inversion, are shown to result in good preliminary images. A parallel processing computer structure based on multiple inexpensive microprocessors is proposed as a system to implement the matrix-MLE methods. 14 references, 7 figures

  4. Interactive reconstruction in single-photon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.R.; Wallis, J.W.; Wilson, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new method is described to allow interactive selection of the reconstruction filter at the time of interpretation of images from single-photon tomography. In the filtered back projection algorithm, the only part of the reconstruction process requiring user interaction is the selection of the window function. Since the ramp and window filters have different purposes, they can be separated, placing the window at the end of the reconstruction process as a three-dimensional filter. All stages of reconstruction except the window filtering are performed before the physician begins to interpret the study. The three-dimensional filtering is performed very rapidly with use of the Chebyshev convolution algorithm. A 64 x 64 x 64 pixel cube of data is filtered in 13-33 s using filters of 3-11 lengths. Smaller volumes of image data can be filtered in less than 1 s; thus, the user can interactively choose any desired filter for a given tomographic study at the time of interpretation of the images. (orig.)

  5. Physics and instrumentation of emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Links, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse emission computed tomography can be divided into two distinct classes: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). SPECT is usually accomplished with specially-adapted scintillation cameras, although dedicated SPECT scanners are available. The special SPECT cameras are standard cameras which are mounted on gantries that allow 360 degree rotation around the long axis of the head or body. The camera stops at a number of angles around the body (usually 64-128), acquiring a ''projection'' image at each stop. The data from these projections are used to reconstruct transverse images with a standard ''filtered back-projection'' algorithm, identical to that used in transmission CT. Because the scintillation camera acquires two-dimensional images, a simple 360 degree rotation around the patient results in the acquisition of data for a number of contiguous transverse slices. These slices, once reconstructed, can be ''stacked'' in computer memory, and orthogonal coronal and sagittal slices produced. Additionally, reorienting algorithms allow the generation of slices that are oblique to the long axis of the body

  6. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  7. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Weinrich, W.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions

  8. Industrial Computed Tomography using Proximal Algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Zang, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    fewer projections. We compare our framework to state-of-the-art methods and existing popular software tomography reconstruction packages, on both synthetic and real datasets, and show superior reconstruction quality, especially from noisy data and a

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to ...

  14. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, D.; Dafni, E.; Levene, S.; Malamud, G.; Shapiro, O.; Shechter, G.; Zahavi, O.

    1999-01-01

    Computerized Tomography. has become, during the past few years, one of the mostly used apparatus in X-ray diagnosis. Its clinical applications has penetrated to various fields, like operational guidance, cardiac imaging, computer aided surgery etc. The first second-generation CT scanners consisted of a rotate-rotate system detectors array and an X-ray tube. These scanners were capable of acquiring individual single slices, the duration of each being several seconds. The slow scanning rate, and the then poor computers power, limited the application range of these scanners, to relatively stable organs, short body coverage at given resolutions. Further drawbacks of these machines were weak X-ray sources and low efficiency gas detectors. In the late 80's the first helical scanners were introduced by Siemens. Based on a continuous patient couch movement during gantry rotation, much faster scans could be obtained, increasing significantly the volume coverage at a given time. In 1992 the first dual-slice scanners, equipped with high efficiency solid state detectors were introduced by Elscint. The acquisition of data simultaneously from two detector arrays doubled the efficiency of the scan. Faster computers and stronger X-ray sources further improved the performance, allowing for a new range of clinical applications. Yet, the need for even faster machines and bigger volume coverage led to further R and D efforts by the leading CT manufacturers. In order to accomplish the most demanding clinical needs, innovative 2 dimensional 4-rows solid-state detector arrays were developed, together with faster rotating machines and bigger X-ray tubes, all demanding extremely accurate and robust mechanical constructions. Parallel, multi-processor custom computers were made, in order to allow the on-line reconstruction of the growing amounts of raw data. Four-slice helical scanners, rotating at 0.5 sec per cycle are being tested nowadays in several clinics all over the world. This talk

  15. Computed tomography in renal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, W.; Eisenberger, F.; Buck, J.

    1981-01-01

    In a group of 19 patients suffering from flank trauma and gross hematuria the diagnostic value of angiography was compared with that of computed tomography. The cases that underwent both tests were found to have the some diagnosis of rupture of the kidney. Typical CT-findings in kidney rupture are demonstrated. Whereas angiography presents an exact picture of the arterial system of the kidney, including its injures computed tomography reveals the extent of organ lesons by showing extra- and intrarenal hematomas. If surgery is planned angiography is still mandatory, whereby the indication is largely determined by the clinical findings. Computed tomography as a non-invasive method is equally suitable for follow-ups. (orig.) [de

  16. Computed tomography of the skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maas, R.; Heller, M.

    1990-01-01

    Patients showing severe multiple injuries, require special care and attention in the hospital. In these cases, the range of the diagnostic measures taken subsequent to computed tomography of the cranium must be broadened to include examinations of the vertebral column and pelvic ring for traumatic lesions. Radiological routine procedures are discussed wit hthe view of throwing some light on the problems involved incomputed tomography of the vertebral disks. In degenerative processes associated with spinal stenosis and hypertrophic facets it has been found that angular-sagittal-reconstruction may be quite useful. Computed tomography provides valuable information on morphological factors and has great discriminating power in the diagnosis of skeletal tumours of the extremities. Quantitative computed tomography offers unprecedented possibilities in the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Here, particular care must be taken to avoid inaccuracies of measurement as a result of incorrectly performed examinations. In malignant bone tumours the method of dynamic scanning permits the success or failure of any radiotherapeutic or chemical measures taken to be evaluated at an early stage. The success or failure of any radiotherapeutic or chemical measures taken to to treat malignant bone tumours can be evaluated at an early stage using the method on dynamic scanning. (orig.) [de

  17. Computed tomography in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented

  18. Computed tomography in trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  19. GPU-based cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Peter B; Walczak, Alan M; Xu, Jinhui; Corso, Jason J; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Schafer, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is growing in the clinical arena due to its ability to provide 3D information during interventions, its high diagnostic quality (sub-millimeter resolution), and its short scanning times (60 s). In many situations, the short scanning time of CBCT is followed by a time-consuming 3D reconstruction. The standard reconstruction algorithm for CBCT data is the filtered backprojection, which for a volume of size 256(3) takes up to 25 min on a standard system. Recent developments in the area of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) make it possible to have access to high-performance computing solutions at a low cost, allowing their use in many scientific problems. We have implemented an algorithm for 3D reconstruction of CBCT data using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) provided by NVIDIA (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, California), which was executed on a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280. Our implementation results in improved reconstruction times from minutes, and perhaps hours, to a matter of seconds, while also giving the clinician the ability to view 3D volumetric data at higher resolutions. We evaluated our implementation on ten clinical data sets and one phantom data set to observe if differences occur between CPU and GPU-based reconstructions. By using our approach, the computation time for 256(3) is reduced from 25 min on the CPU to 3.2 s on the GPU. The GPU reconstruction time for 512(3) volumes is 8.5 s. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computed tomography of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hajime; Honda, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Chikashi; Kimoto, Tatsuya; Nakayama, Takashi

    1983-01-01

    We have evaluated the value of computed tomography (CT) in distinguishing benign and malignant pulmonary nodules. CT was performed on 30 cases of solitary pulmonary nodules consisting of 17 primary lung cancers, 3 metastatic tumors and 10 benign nodules. The CT number was calculated for each lesion. Three benign nodules showed CT numbers well above the range of malignant nodules, and only in one of them was calcification visible on conventional tomography. In 6 benign nodules, the CT numbers overlapped those of malignant lesion and could not be differentiated. Thus the measurement of CT number can be useful to confirm the benign nature of certain nodules when calcification is unclear or not visible on conventional tomography. As for the morphological observation of the nodule, CT was not superior to conventional tomography and its value seems to be limited. (author)

  1. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Although there are many common aspects to x-ray transmission and radionuclide emission (ECT) computerized tomography, there are added difficulties and a number of particular factors which form the basis of ECT. The relationship between the physical factors, system design, methodologic approach and assumptions of ECT is discussed. The instrumentation design and application strategies in ECT at this time are diverse and in a rapid stage of development. The approaches are divided into two major categories of Single Photon Counting (SPC) employing scanner and camera concepts with radionuclides of 99 /sup m/Tc, 201 Tl, 123 I etc., and Annihilation Coincidence Detection (ACD) of positron-emitting radionuclides. Six systems in the former and ten systems in the latter category, with examples of typical studies, illustrate the different approaches

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose sinusitis . evaluate sinuses that are filled with fluid or thickened sinus membranes . detect the presence of ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. If ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to ... planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... to you, revolve around you during the imaging process. You will be alone in the exam room ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... artifacts on the images. This loss of image quality can resemble the blurring seen on a photograph ...

  4. Application of protons to computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.; Bradbury, J.N.; Cannon, T.M.; Hutson, R.L.; Laubacher, D.B.; Macek, R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Taylor, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the application of protons to computed tomography can result in a significant dose advantage relative to x rays. Thus, at the same dose as is delivered by contemporary commercial x-ray scanners, a proton scanner could produce reconstructions with a factor of 2 or more improvement in density resolution. Whether such an improvement can result in significantly better diagnoses of human disease is an open question which can only be answered by the implementation of a proton scanner in a clinical situation

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information about radiation dose. There always is a risk of complications from general anesthesia or sedation. Every measure will be taken to ... in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Anesthesia Safety Children and Radiation Safety ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) ...

  6. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver

  7. Computer tomography in Caisson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, F.; Csobaly, S.; Institute for Advanced Training of Physicians, Budapest

    1981-01-01

    Computer tomography was performed on 20 patients with the early stages of Caisson osteoarthropathy, as well as in other patients with chronic bone infarcts. From their results the authors have formed the opinion that CT is valuable, not only in the diagnosis of early cases, but that it can provide significant information concerning the osteopathy and bone infarcts. (orig.) [de

  8. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  9. Laryngopyocele: signs on computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaroglu, Hasan E-mail: hnazarog@dicle.edu.tr; Oezates, Mustafa; Uyar, Asur; Deger, Emin; Simsek, Masum

    2000-01-01

    A laryngocele is an air-filled dilation of the saccule of the larynx. An infected laryngocele is called a laryngopyocele. Our experience with a case of laryngopyocele with signs on computed tomography before and after antibiotic therapy is presented since laryngopyocele is more unusual.

  10. Laryngopyocele: signs on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroglu, Hasan; Oezates, Mustafa; Uyar, Asur; Deger, Emin; Simsek, Masum

    2000-01-01

    A laryngocele is an air-filled dilation of the saccule of the larynx. An infected laryngocele is called a laryngopyocele. Our experience with a case of laryngopyocele with signs on computed tomography before and after antibiotic therapy is presented since laryngopyocele is more unusual

  11. Industrial applications of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Kruth, J. -P.

    2014-01-01

    The number of industrial applications of Computed Tomography(CT) is large and rapidly increasing. After a brief market overview, the paper gives a survey of state of the art and upcoming CT technologies, covering types of CT systems, scanning capabilities, and technological advances. The paper...

  12. Positron computed tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hervouet, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, F.; Lamy, T.; Le Gouil, S.; Devillers, A.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Ansquer, C.; Cheze-le Rest, C.; Metges, J.P.; Teyton, P.; Lozach, P.; Volant, A.; Bizais, Y.; Visvikis, D.; Morel, O.; Girault, S.; Soulie, P.; Dupoiron, D.; Berthelot, C.; Lorimier, G.; Jallet, P.; Garin, E.; Prigent, F.; Lesimple, T.; Barge, M.L.; Rousseau, C.; Devillers, A.; Bernard, A.M.; Bouriel, C.; Bridji, B.; Resche, R.; Banayan, S.; Claret, M.; Ninet, J.; Janier, M.; Billotey, C.; Garin, E.; Devillers, A.; Becker, S.; Lecloirec, J.; Boucher, E.; Raoul, J.L.; Rolland, V.; Oudoux, A.; Valette, F.; Dupas, B.; Moreau, P.; Champion, L.; Anract, P.; Wartski, M.; Laurence, V.; Goldwasser, F.; Pecking, A.P.; Alberini, J.L.; Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Allal, B.; Zerdoud, S.; Gansel, M.G.; Thomas, F.; Dierrickx, L.; Delord, J.P.; Marchand, C.; Resche, I.; Mahe, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Several oral communications present the interest of positron computed tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose in the detection of cancers, or for the follow up of cancers treatments in order to detect early possible relapses.PET FDG is also used to optimize the definition of target volume in order to avoid side effects and to get a better control of the illness. (N.C.)

  13. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  14. Sparsity reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography: An experimental evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Gehre, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the potential of sparsity constraints in the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) inverse problem of inferring the distributed conductivity based on boundary potential measurements. In sparsity reconstruction, inhomogeneities of the conductivity are a priori assumed to be sparse with respect to a certain basis. This prior information is incorporated into a Tikhonov-type functional by including a sparsity-promoting ℓ1-penalty term. The functional is minimized with an iterative soft shrinkage-type algorithm. In this paper, the feasibility of the sparsity reconstruction approach is evaluated by experimental data from water tank measurements. The reconstructions are computed both with sparsity constraints and with a more conventional smoothness regularization approach. The results verify that the adoption of ℓ1-type constraints can enhance the quality of EIT reconstructions: in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity constraints are both qualitatively and quantitatively more feasible than that with the smoothness constraint. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Iterative Reconstruction Methods for Hybrid Inverse Problems in Impedance Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Knudsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    For a general formulation of hybrid inverse problems in impedance tomography the Picard and Newton iterative schemes are adapted and four iterative reconstruction algorithms are developed. The general problem formulation includes several existing hybrid imaging modalities such as current density...... impedance imaging, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography, and ultrasound modulated electrical impedance tomography, and the unified approach to the reconstruction problem encompasses several algorithms suggested in the literature. The four proposed algorithms are implemented numerically in two...

  16. Computed tomography in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, C.M.; Lee, K.R.; Dwyer, S.; Zellmer, D.; Cook, P.

    1983-01-01

    CT scanning adds to the ability to evaluate brachytherapy techniques. It provides an additional method in the assessment of patients who are candidates for or who are being treated by brachytherapy. The CT scan can give information regarding the position of the sources and their relation to the tumor and normal structures with greater ease than do orthogonal views. This makes it possible to accurately calculate areas of high or low dose. Potential areas of overdose can be recognized, thereby decreasing the chances of postbrachytherapy complications. CT scanning can be used at various levels of complexity in dosimetry evaluation. Adequate brachytherapy dosimetry information is obtainable from CT slices through one or more levels of the implanted volume. In some instances it is possible to obtain additional information by reconstructing the scans in other planes, e.g., coronal or sagittal. Three-dimensional viewing of the implant is desirable, but it should be pointed out that this approach is time-consuming and beyond the capabilities of most institutions at present. It will be necessary to continue work on three-dimensional treatment planning to make it readily available

  17. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens

  18. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  19. Cranial computed tomography in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkai, P.; Bogerts, B.

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography has gained importance as a diagnostic tool in psychiatry to exclude structural brain pathology, but has passed on its role in research to magnetic resonance tomography. It helps to distinguish between senile dementia of Alzheimer type and multi-infarct dementia. The enlargement of the ventricular system and cortical sulci is well established in schizophrenic and affective psychosis. Some alcohol addicts show a considerable degree of cerebral atrophy, only exceeded by demented patients, but this condition is potentially reversible. To screen psychiatric patients by CT is recommendable, as 2-10% of hospitalized psychiatric patients have structural brain disease. (orig.) [de

  20. Advanced reconstruction algorithms for electron tomography: From comparison to combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goris, B. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Roelandts, T. [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1098XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heidari Mezerji, H. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bals, S., E-mail: sara.bals@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), the total variation minimization (TVM) reconstruction technique and the discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) for electron tomography are compared and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, we describe how the result of a three dimensional (3D) reconstruction based on TVM can provide objective information that is needed as the input for a DART reconstruction. This approach results in a tomographic reconstruction of which the segmentation is carried out in an objective manner. - Highlights: ► A comparative study between different reconstruction algorithms for tomography is performed. ► Reconstruction algorithms that uses prior knowledge about the specimen have a superior result. ► One reconstruction algorithm can provide the prior knowledge for a second algorithm.

  1. Computed tomography of limy bile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kimoto, Masatoshi; Gunge, Nobuharu; Sano, Kaizo; Yamashita, Sachiko; Hirano, Yutaka

    1983-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of three cases of limy bile was reported. The CT findings consist of uniform high density within gallbladder, niveau formation between limy bile and noncalcified bile. Sagittal reconstruction of CT images was especially useful in the differentiation of limy bile and gallstones. (author)

  2. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  3. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutchko, R.; Sitek, A.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  4. Practical implementation of tetrahedral mesh reconstruction in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutchko, R; Gullberg, G T; Sitek, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a practical implementation of image reconstruction on tetrahedral meshes optimized for emission computed tomography with parallel beam geometry. Tetrahedral mesh built on a point cloud is a convenient image representation method, intrinsically three-dimensional and with a multi-level resolution property. Image intensities are defined at the mesh nodes and linearly interpolated inside each tetrahedron. For the given mesh geometry, the intensities can be computed directly from tomographic projections using iterative reconstruction algorithms with a system matrix calculated using an exact analytical formula. The mesh geometry is optimized for a specific patient using a two stage process. First, a noisy image is reconstructed on a finely-spaced uniform cloud. Then, the geometry of the representation is adaptively transformed through boundary-preserving node motion and elimination. Nodes are removed in constant intensity regions, merged along the boundaries, and moved in the direction of the mean local intensity gradient in order to provide higher node density in the boundary regions. Attenuation correction and detector geometric response are included in the system matrix. Once the mesh geometry is optimized, it is used to generate the final system matrix for ML-EM reconstruction of node intensities and for visualization of the reconstructed images. In dynamic PET or SPECT imaging, the system matrix generation procedure is performed using a quasi-static sinogram, generated by summing projection data from multiple time frames. This system matrix is then used to reconstruct the individual time frame projections. Performance of the new method is evaluated by reconstructing simulated projections of the NCAT phantom and the method is then applied to dynamic SPECT phantom and patient studies and to a dynamic microPET rat study. Tetrahedral mesh-based images are compared to the standard voxel-based reconstruction for both high and low signal-to-noise ratio

  5. Total variation-based neutron computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Richard C.; Bilheux, Hassina; Toops, Todd; Nafziger, Eric; Finney, Charles; Splitter, Derek; Archibald, Rick

    2018-05-01

    We perform the neutron computed tomography reconstruction problem via an inverse problem formulation with a total variation penalty. In the case of highly under-resolved angular measurements, the total variation penalty suppresses high-frequency artifacts which appear in filtered back projections. In order to efficiently compute solutions for this problem, we implement a variation of the split Bregman algorithm; due to the error-forgetting nature of the algorithm, the computational cost of updating can be significantly reduced via very inexact approximate linear solvers. We present the effectiveness of the algorithm in the significantly low-angular sampling case using synthetic test problems as well as data obtained from a high flux neutron source. The algorithm removes artifacts and can even roughly capture small features when an extremely low number of angles are used.

  6. Protean appearance of craniopharyngioma on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danziger, A.; Price, H.I.

    1979-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas present a diverse appearance on computed tomography. Histological diagnosis is not always possible, but computed tomography is of great assistance in the delineation of the tumour as well as of the degree of associated hydrocephalus. Computed tomography also enables rapid non-invasive follow-up after surgery or radiotherapy, or both

  7. Overall evaluability of low dose protocol for computed tomography angiography of thoracic aorta using 80 kV and iterative reconstruction algorithm using different concentration contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Andrea Daniele; Mancini, Maria E; Andreini, Daniele; Formenti, Alberto; Mushtaq, Saima; Nobili, Enrica; Guglielmo, Marco; Baggiano, Andrea; Conte, Edoardo; Pepi, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography (MDCTA) is presently the imaging modality of choice for aortic disease. However, the effective radiation dose and the risk related to the use of contrast agents associated with MDCTA is an issue of concern. Aim of this study was to assess image quality of a low dose ECG-gated MDCTA of thoracic aorta using different concentration contrast media without tailored injection protocol. Two-hundred patients were randomised into four different scan protocols: Group A (Iodixanol 320 and 80 Kvp tube voltage), Group B (Iodixanol 320 and 100 Kvp tube voltage), Group C (Iomeprol 400 and 80 Kvp tube voltage) and Group D (Iomeprol 400 and 100 Kvp tube voltage). Image quality, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose (ED) were compared among groups. No significant differences in image noise, SNR and CNR between groups with the same tube voltage. Significant differences in SNR and CNR were found among groups with 80 kV versus groups using 100 kV but without differences in terms of image quality. ED was significantly lower in groups with 80 kV. Multidetector Computed Tomography Angiography protocols using 80 kV and low concentration contrast media are feasible without need of tailored injection protocols. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Three-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography Volumetric Outcomes of rhBMP-2/Demineralized Bone Matrix versus Iliac Crest Bone Graft for Alveolar Cleft Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Yen, Stephen L-K; Imahiyerobo, Thomas; Sanborn, Luke; Yen, Leia; Yen, Daniel; Nazarian, Sheila; Jedrzejewski, Breanna; Urata, Mark; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in a demineralized bone matrix scaffold is a comparable alternative to iliac bone autograft in the setting of secondary alveolar cleft repair. Postreconstruction occlusal radiographs demonstrate improved bone stock when rhBMP-2/demineralized bone matrix (DBM) scaffold is used but lack the capacity to evaluate bone growth in three dimensions. This study uses cone beam computed tomography to provide the first clinical evaluation of volumetric and density comparisons between these two treatment modalities. A prospective study was conducted with 31 patients and 36 repairs of the alveolar cleft over a 2-year period. Twenty-one repairs used rhBMP-2/DBM scaffold and 14 repairs used iliac bone grafting. Postoperatively, occlusal radiographs were obtained at 3 months to evaluate bone fill; cone beam computed tomographic images were obtained at 6 to 9 months to compare volumetric and density data. At 3 months, postoperative occlusal radiographs demonstrated that 67 percent of patients receiving rhBMP-2/DBM scaffold had complete bone fill of the alveolus, versus 56 percent of patients in the autologous group. In contrast, cone beam computed tomographic data showed 31.6 percent (95 percent CI, 24.2 to 38.5 percent) fill in the rhBMP-2 group compared with 32.5 percent (95 percent CI, 22.1 to 42.9 percent) in the autologous population. Density analysis demonstrated identical average values between the groups (1.38 g/cc). These data demonstrate comparable bone regrowth and density values following secondary alveolar cleft repair using rhBMP-2/DBM scaffold versus autologous iliac bone graft. Cone beam computed tomography provides a more nuanced understanding of true bone regeneration within the alveolar cleft that may contribute to the information provided by occlusal radiographs alone. Therapeutic, II.

  9. Optimisation and validation of a 3D reconstruction algorithm for single photon emission computed tomography by means of GATE simulation platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bitar, Ziad

    2006-12-01

    Although time consuming, Monte-Carlo simulations remain an efficient tool enabling to assess correction methods for degrading physical effects in medical imaging. We have optimized and validated a reconstruction method baptized F3DMC (Fully 3D Monte Carlo) in which the physical effects degrading the image formation process were modelled using Monte-Carlo methods and integrated within the system matrix. We used the Monte-Carlo simulation toolbox GATE. We validated GATE in SPECT by modelling the gamma-camera (Philips AXIS) used in clinical routine. Techniques of threshold, filtering by a principal component analysis and targeted reconstruction (functional regions, hybrid regions) were used in order to improve the precision of the system matrix and to reduce the number of simulated photons as well as the time consumption required. The EGEE Grid infrastructures were used to deploy the GATE simulations in order to reduce their computation time. Results obtained with F3DMC were compared with the reconstruction methods (FBP, ML-EM, MLEMC) for a simulated phantom and with the OSEM-C method for the real phantom. Results have shown that the F3DMC method and its variants improve the restoration of activity ratios and the signal to noise ratio. By the use of the grid EGEE, a significant speed-up factor of about 300 was obtained. These results should be confirmed by performing studies on complex phantoms and patients and open the door to a unified reconstruction method, which could be used in SPECT and also in PET. (author)

  10. Tomography reconstruction methods for damage diagnosis of wood structure in construction field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qiwen; Lau, Denvid

    2018-03-01

    The structural integrity of wood building element plays a critical role in the public safety, which requires effective methods for diagnosis of internal damage inside the wood body. Conventionally, the non-destructive testing (NDT) methods such as X-ray computed tomography, thermography, radar imaging reconstruction method, ultrasonic tomography, nuclear magnetic imaging techniques, and sonic tomography have been used to obtain the information about the internal structure of wood. In this paper, the applications, advantages and disadvantages of these traditional tomography methods are reviewed. Additionally, the present article gives an overview of recently developed tomography approach that relies on the use of mechanical and electromagnetic waves for assessing the structural integrity of wood buildings. This developed tomography reconstruction method is believed to provide a more accurate, reliable, and comprehensive assessment of wood structural integrity

  11. The Role of Synthetic Reconstruction Tests in Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, N.; Spakman, W.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic reconstruction tests are widely used in seismic tomography as a means for assessing the robustness of solutions produced by linear or iterative non-linear inversion schemes. The most common test is the so-called checkerboard resolution test, which uses an alternating pattern of high and low wavespeeds (or some other seismic property such as attenuation). However, checkerboard tests have a number of limitations, including that they (1) only provide indirect evidence of quantitative measures of reliability such as resolution and uncertainty; (2) give a potentially misleading impression of the range of scale-lengths that can be resolved; (3) don't give a true picture of the structural distortion or smearing caused by the data coverage; and (4) result in an inverse problem that is biased towards an accurate reconstruction. The widespread use of synthetic reconstruction tests in seismic tomography is likely to continue for some time yet, so it is important to implement best practice where possible. The goal here is to provide a general set of guidelines, derived from the underlying theory and illustrated by a series of numerical experiments, on their implementation in seismic tomography. In particular, we recommend (1) using a sparse distribution of spikes, rather than the more conventional tightly-spaced checkerboard; (2) using the identical data coverage (e.g. geometric rays) for the synthetic model that was computed for the observation-based model; (3) carrying out multiple tests using anomalies of different scale length; (4) exercising caution when analysing synthetic recovery tests that use anomaly patterns that closely mimic the observation-based model; (5) investigating the trade-off between data noise levels and the minimum wavelength of recovered structure; (6) where possible, test the extent to which preconditioning (e.g. identical parameterization for input and output models) influences the recovery of anomalies.

  12. Industrial applications of computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Kanglong; Qiang Yujun; Yang Fujia

    1992-01-01

    Industrial computer tomography (CT) and its application is a rapidly developing field of high technology. CT systems have been playing important roles in nondestructive testing (NDT) of products and equipment for a number of industries. Recently, the technique has advanced into the area of industrial process control, bringing even greater benefit to mankind. The basic principles and typical structure of an industrial CT system Descriptions are given of some successful CT systems for either NDT application or process control purposes

  13. Computed tomography of projectile injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, A.J.; Rutty, G.N.; Robinson, C.; Morgan, B.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a gold standard in clinical imaging but forensic professions have been slow to embrace radiological advances. Forensic applications of CT are now exponentially expanding, replacing other imaging methods. As post-mortem cross-sectional imaging increases, radiologists will fall under increasing pressure to interpret complex forensic cases involving both living and deceased patients. This review presents a wide variety of weapon and projectile types aiding interpretation of projectile injuries both in forensic and clinical practice

  14. Computed tomography in osteoid osteoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, J.L.; Aubspin, D.; Buchon, R.; Schoenenberger, P.; Flageat, J.

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of suspected osteoid osteoma were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). The role of CT was related, as a key diagnostic tool: radionuclide imaging is helpful in directing subsequent CT scans, which allows the study of complex anatomical sites (spine) or the analysis of atypical lesions (invisible nidus, sclerosis or lytic lesions, double nidus...). CT provides the surgeon with the exact location and extent of the lesion, and thus, CT may allow a more limited surgical resection of the involved bone [fr

  15. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, E; Lemahieu, I; Desmedt, P [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, University of Ghent, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, E.; Lemahieu, I.; Desmedt, P.

    1994-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors)

  17. The value of computed tomography in ''sciatica''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm-Jurkovic, H.; Hammer, B.

    1981-01-01

    13 cases of therapy-resistant lumboischialgia without herniated disk, caused in 12 cases by a tumour and in 1 case by an abscess, were examined by computed tomography of the lumbar and pelvic region. This method is indicated immediately after insufficient results of conventional X-ray methods (including tomography) and of lumbosacral radiculography. The computed tomography is indispensable also in patients with ''sciatica'' with a known malignoma. The information given by computed tomography is essential for the therapy planning. (author)

  18. Computed tomography of the ossicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakeres, D.W.; Weider, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Otologists and otolaryngologists have described in detail the disorders which are unique to the ossicles. However the anatomy and spectrum of pathology and anatomy of the ossicles are not familiar to most radiologists. Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) and a systematic approach to evaluation now allow accurate identification of even subtle abnormalities of the ossicles. We present the normal anatomy, ossicular abnormalities, and indications for computed tomographic study. Because of the greater diagnostic capability of CT, the radiologist's role has increased in evaluation and treatment planning of patients with suspected ossicular abnormalities. (orig.)

  19. Update on the non-prewhitening model observer in computed tomography for the assessment of the adaptive statistical and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Julien G.; Becce, Fabio; Monnin, Pascal; Schmidt, Sabine; Bochud, François O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2014-08-01

    The state of the art to describe image quality in medical imaging is to assess the performance of an observer conducting a task of clinical interest. This can be done by using a model observer leading to a figure of merit such as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using the non-prewhitening (NPW) model observer, we objectively characterised the evolution of its figure of merit in various acquisition conditions. The NPW model observer usually requires the use of the modulation transfer function (MTF) as well as noise power spectra. However, although the computation of the MTF poses no problem when dealing with the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm, this is not the case when using iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms, such as adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) or model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Given that the target transfer function (TTF) had already shown it could accurately express the system resolution even with non-linear algorithms, we decided to tune the NPW model observer, replacing the standard MTF by the TTF. It was estimated using a custom-made phantom containing cylindrical inserts surrounded by water. The contrast differences between the inserts and water were plotted for each acquisition condition. Then, mathematical transformations were performed leading to the TTF. As expected, the first results showed a dependency of the image contrast and noise levels on the TTF for both ASIR and MBIR. Moreover, FBP also proved to be dependent of the contrast and noise when using the lung kernel. Those results were then introduced in the NPW model observer. We observed an enhancement of SNR every time we switched from FBP to ASIR to MBIR. IR algorithms greatly improve image quality, especially in low-dose conditions. Based on our results, the use of MBIR could lead to further dose reduction in several clinical applications.

  20. Advanced virtual monochromatic reconstruction of dual-energy unenhanced brain computed tomography in children: comparison of image quality against standard mono-energetic images and conventional polychromatic computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Juil [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pak, Seong Yong [Siemens Healthineers, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Krauss, Bernhard [Siemens Healthineers, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Advanced virtual monochromatic reconstruction from dual-energy brain CT has not been evaluated in children. To determine the most effective advanced virtual monochromatic imaging energy level for maximizing pediatric brain parenchymal image quality in dual-energy unenhanced brain CT and to compare this technique with conventional monochromatic reconstruction and polychromatic scanning. Using both conventional (Mono) and advanced monochromatic reconstruction (Mono+) techniques, we retrospectively reconstructed 13 virtual monochromatic imaging energy levels from 40 keV to 100 keV in 5-keV increments from dual-source, dual-energy unenhanced brain CT scans obtained in 23 children. We analyzed gray and white matter noise ratios, signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratio, and posterior fossa artifact. We chose the optimal mono-energetic levels and compared them with conventional CT. For Mono+maximum optima were observed at 60 keV, and minimum posterior fossa artifact at 70 keV. For Mono, optima were at 65-70 keV, with minimum posterior fossa artifact at 75 keV. Mono+ was superior to Mono and to polychromatic CT for image-quality measures. Subjective analysis rated Mono+superior to other image sets. Optimal virtual monochromatic imaging using Mono+ algorithm demonstrated better image quality for gray-white matter differentiation and reduction of the artifact in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  1. The value of unenhanced multi-detector computed tomography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Unenhanced computed tomography (CT) is used to detect urinary tract calculi with high accuracy. The development of multi-detector CT (MDCT) allows reconstructions in coronal, sagittal and oblique directions. Objective: To compare MDCT with three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) imaging in evaluating ...

  2. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 19,2016 What is Computerized Tomography (CT)? CT is a noninvasive test that uses ...

  3. The history of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, J.

    1980-01-01

    New scientific discoveries are often made by the synthetising of other discoveries. Computed tomography is such an example. The three necessary elements were: 1/ the fact that certain simple crystals scintillate when exposed to X-rays, 2/ the advent of electronics and 3/ that of computers. The fact that X-rays cause crystals to scintillate was learnt very shortly after Roentgen's discovery, electronics and computers coming very much later. To put all these together and apply them to diagnostic radiology, and at the same time dismiss the concept so firmly ingrained in everyone's mind that an X-ray picture must be produced on photographic film, required a genius. (orig./VJ) [de

  4. Accelerating image reconstruction in three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography on graphics processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Huang, Chao; Kao, Yu-Jiun; Chou, Cheng-Ying; Oraevsky, Alexander A; Anastasio, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Optoacoustic tomography (OAT) is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) inverse problem. However, most studies of OAT image reconstruction still employ two-dimensional imaging models. One important reason is because 3D image reconstruction is computationally burdensome. The aim of this work is to accelerate existing image reconstruction algorithms for 3D OAT by use of parallel programming techniques. Parallelization strategies are proposed to accelerate a filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and two different pairs of projection/backprojection operations that correspond to two different numerical imaging models. The algorithms are designed to fully exploit the parallel computing power of graphics processing units (GPUs). In order to evaluate the parallelization strategies for the projection/backprojection pairs, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm is implemented. Computer simulation and experimental studies are conducted to investigate the computational efficiency and numerical accuracy of the developed algorithms. The GPU implementations improve the computational efficiency by factors of 1000, 125, and 250 for the FBP algorithm and the two pairs of projection/backprojection operators, respectively. Accurate images are reconstructed by use of the FBP and iterative image reconstruction algorithms from both computer-simulated and experimental data. Parallelization strategies for 3D OAT image reconstruction are proposed for the first time. These GPU-based implementations significantly reduce the computational time for 3D image reconstruction, complementing our earlier work on 3D OAT iterative image reconstruction.

  5. Accuracy of measurement of pulmonary emphysema with computed tomography: relevant points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson; Oliveira, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Some technical aspects should be taken into consideration in order to guarantee the reliability of the assessment of pulmonary emphysema with lung computed tomography densitometry. Changes in lung density associated with variations in lungs inspiratory and expiratory levels, computed tomography slice thickness, reconstruction algorithm and type of computed tomography apparatus make tomographic comparisons more difficult in follow-up studies of pulmonary emphysema. Nevertheless, quantitative computed tomography has replaced the visual assessment competing with pulmonary function tests as a sensitive method to measure pulmonary emphysema. The present review discusses technical variables of lung computed tomography and their influence on measurements of pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  6. Accuracy of measurement of pulmonary emphysema with computed tomography: relevant points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochhegger, Bruno, E-mail: brunohochhegger@googlemail.co [Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Irion, Klaus L. [Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Oliveira, Hugo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    Some technical aspects should be taken into consideration in order to guarantee the reliability of the assessment of pulmonary emphysema with lung computed tomography densitometry. Changes in lung density associated with variations in lungs inspiratory and expiratory levels, computed tomography slice thickness, reconstruction algorithm and type of computed tomography apparatus make tomographic comparisons more difficult in follow-up studies of pulmonary emphysema. Nevertheless, quantitative computed tomography has replaced the visual assessment competing with pulmonary function tests as a sensitive method to measure pulmonary emphysema. The present review discusses technical variables of lung computed tomography and their influence on measurements of pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  7. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  8. Duodenal diverticulitis. computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.; Martin, S.; Garcia, J.; Dominguez, A.

    2001-01-01

    Duodenal diverticular occur very frequently among the general public. However, duodenal diverticulitis is a very uncommon clinical entity, the diagnosis of which requires radiological studies since the clinical signs cam mimic a great number of disease processes with different treatments. We present a case of duodenal diverticulitis in which the diagnosis according to ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) studies was confirmed intraoperatively. We also review the few cases of this entity reported in the literature. The CT findings are highly suggestive of duodenal diverticulitis given their similarity to those associated with diverticulitis at other sites. (Author) 5 refs,

  9. High speed computer assisted tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maydan, D.; Shepp, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray generation and detection apparatus for use in a computer assisted tomography system which permits relatively high speed scanning. A large x-ray tube having a circular anode (3) surrounds the patient area. A movable electron gun (8) orbits adjacent to the anode. The anode directs into the patient area xrays which are delimited into a fan beam by a pair of collimating rings (21). After passing through the patient, x-rays are detected by an array (22) of movable detectors. Detector subarrays (23) are synchronously movable out of the x-ray plane to permit the passage of the fan beam

  10. Brain metastases: computed tomography assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, Victoria; Yagual, Glenda; Vinueza, Clayreth

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial metastatic tumor is relatively frequent in patients with cancer from other origin. Its location and type of metastasis varies in relation to its linage from the primary tumor. And the sequence goes from the most frequent: lung and breast cancer, melanoma, GU tract, leukemia, GI tract, head and neck tumor. Computed tomography findings are extremely varied and non specific, so there are no radiologic characteristics even from the primary tumor. We reviewed 29 TC studies in the Radiology department of ION-SOLCA, from patients with diagnosis of brain metastasis, our findings showed the great variability in the radio-diagnosis imaging. (The author)

  11. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic

  12. Whole-body computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegener, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    The vast literature on whole-body CT is presented in this bibliography which is published as a self-contained supplement to the monography entitled whole-body CT. For this documentation, the following journals have been scanned back to the year 1980: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography (JCAT), Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Roentgenstrahlen (RoeFo), Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), Der Radiologe, Neuroradiology, and American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR). The supplement includes keyword indexes that can be searched for terms indicating body organs, body regions, or certain lesions. The author index offers an additional access to the publication wanted. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Dynamic X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeat, P.

    2003-01-01

    Paper Dynamic computed tomography (CT) imaging aims at reconstructing image sequences where the dynamic nature of the living human body is of primary interest. Main concerned applications are image-guided interventional procedures, functional studies and cardiac imaging. The introduction of ultra-fast rotating gantries along with multi-row detectors and in near future area detectors allows a huge progress toward the imaging of moving organs with low-contrast resolution. This paper gives an overview of the different concepts used in dynamic CT. A new reconstruction algorithm based on a voxel-specific dynamic evolution compensation is also presented. It provides four-dimensional image sequences with accurate spatio-temporal information, where each frame is reconstructed using a long-scan acquisition mode on several half-turns. In the same time, this technique permits to reduce the dose delivered per rotation while keeping the same signal to noise ratio for every frame using an adaptive motion-compensated temporal averaging. Results are illustrated on simulated data. (authors)

  14. Reconstructed and analyzed X-ray computed tomography data of investment-cast and additive-manufactured aluminum foam for visualizing ligament failure mechanisms and regions of contact during a compression test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer E. Matheson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Three stochastic open-cell aluminum foam samples were incrementally compressed and imaged using X-ray Computed Tomography (CT. One of the samples was created using conventional investment casting methods and the other two were replicas of the same foam that were made using laser powder bed fusion. The reconstructed CT data were then examined in Paraview to identify and highlight the types of failure of individual ligaments. The accompanying sets of Paraview state files and STL files highlight the different ligament failure modes incrementally during compression for each foam. Ligament failure was classified as either “Fracture” (red or “Collapse” (blue. Also, regions of neighboring ligaments that came into contact that were not originally touching were colored yellow. For further interpretation and discussion of the data, please refer to Matheson et al. (2017 [1].

  15. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd, E-mail: azhani@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Abdullah, Jaafar, E-mail: jaafar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Plant Assessment Technology (PAT) Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  16. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm

  17. Image reconstruction of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on a pebble bed reactor (PBR) using expectation maximization and exact inversion algorithms: Comparison study by means of numerical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Azhani Mohd; Abdullah, Jaafar

    2015-04-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a well-known imaging technique used in medical application, and it is part of medical imaging modalities that made the diagnosis and treatment of disease possible. However, SPECT technique is not only limited to the medical sector. Many works are carried out to adapt the same concept by using high-energy photon emission to diagnose process malfunctions in critical industrial systems such as in chemical reaction engineering research laboratories, as well as in oil and gas, petrochemical and petrochemical refining industries. Motivated by vast applications of SPECT technique, this work attempts to study the application of SPECT on a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) using numerical phantom of pebbles inside the PBR core. From the cross-sectional images obtained from SPECT, the behavior of pebbles inside the core can be analyzed for further improvement of the PBR design. As the quality of the reconstructed image is largely dependent on the algorithm used, this work aims to compare two image reconstruction algorithms for SPECT, namely the Expectation Maximization Algorithm and the Exact Inversion Formula. The results obtained from the Exact Inversion Formula showed better image contrast and sharpness, and shorter computational time compared to the Expectation Maximization Algorithm.

  18. Dose determination in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descamps, C.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Germanier, A.

    2011-10-01

    In the last years the methodologies to determine the dose in computed tomography have been revised. In this work was realized a dosimetric study about the exploration protocols used for simulation of radiotherapy treatments. The methodology described in the Report No. 111 of the American Association of Medical Physiques on a computed tomograph of two cuts was applied. A cylindrical phantom of water was used with dimensions: 30 cm of diameter and 50 cm of longitude that simulates the absorption and dispersion conditions of a mature body of size average. The doses were determined with ionization chamber and thermoluminescent dosimetry. The results indicate that the dose information that provides the tomograph underestimates the dose between 32 and 35%.

  19. Application of reconstructive tomography to the measurement of density distribution in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Berggren, M.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The technique of reconstructive tomography has been applied to the measurement of average density and density distribution in multiphase flows. The technique of reconstructive tomography provides a model independent method of obtaining flow field density information. The unique features of interest in application of a practical tomographic densitometer system are the limited number of data values and the correspondingly coarse reconstruction grid (0.5 by 0.5 cm). These features were studied both experimentally, through the use of prototype hardware on a 3-in. pipe, and analytically, through computer generation of simulated data. Prototypical data were taken on phantoms constructed of Plexiglas and laminated Plexiglas, wood, and polyurethane foam. Reconstructions obtained from prototype data were compared with reconstructions from the simulated data

  20. Superfast maximum-likelihood reconstruction for quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jiangwei; Zhang, Zhengyun; Ng, Hui Khoon

    2017-06-01

    Conventional methods for computing maximum-likelihood estimators (MLE) often converge slowly in practical situations, leading to a search for simplifying methods that rely on additional assumptions for their validity. In this work, we provide a fast and reliable algorithm for maximum-likelihood reconstruction that avoids this slow convergence. Our method utilizes the state-of-the-art convex optimization scheme, an accelerated projected-gradient method, that allows one to accommodate the quantum nature of the problem in a different way than in the standard methods. We demonstrate the power of our approach by comparing its performance with other algorithms for n -qubit state tomography. In particular, an eight-qubit situation that purportedly took weeks of computation time in 2005 can now be completed in under a minute for a single set of data, with far higher accuracy than previously possible. This refutes the common claim that MLE reconstruction is slow and reduces the need for alternative methods that often come with difficult-to-verify assumptions. In fact, recent methods assuming Gaussian statistics or relying on compressed sensing ideas are demonstrably inapplicable for the situation under consideration here. Our algorithm can be applied to general optimization problems over the quantum state space; the philosophy of projected gradients can further be utilized for optimization contexts with general constraints.

  1. Motion artifacts in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    In the year 1972, the first Computed Tomography Scanner (or CT) was introduced and caused a revolution in the field of Diagnostic Radiology. A tomogram is a cross-sectional image of a three-dimensional object obtained through non-invasive measurements. The image that is presented is very similar to what would be seen if a thin cross-sectional slice of the patient was examined. In Computed Tomography, x-rays are passed through the body of a patient in many different directions and their attenuation is detected. By using some mathematical theorems, the attenuation information can be converted into the density of the patient along the x-ray path. Combined with modern sophisticated computer signal processing technology, a cross-sectional image can be generated and displayed on a TV monitor. Usually a good CT image relies on the patient not moving during the x-ray scanning. However, for some unconscious or severely ill patients, this is very difficult to achieve. Thus, the motion during the scan causes the so-called motion artifacts which distort the displayed image and sometimes these motion artifacts make diagnosis impossible. Today, to remove or avoid motion artifacts is one of the major efforts in developing new scanner systems. In this thesis, a better understanding of the motion artifacts problem in CT scaning is gained through computer simulations, real scanner experiments and theoretical analyses. The methods by which the distorted image can be improved are simulated also. In particular, it is assumed that perfect knowledge of the patient motion is known since this represents the theoretical limit on how well the distorted image can be improved

  2. Structure from Motion Photogrammetry and Micro X-Ray Computed Tomography 3-D Reconstruction Data Fusion for Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, K. R.; Blumenfeld, E. H.; Liddle, D. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Our team is developing a modern, cross-disciplinary approach to documentation and preservation of astromaterials, specifically lunar and meteorite samples stored at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility. Apollo Lunar Sample 60639, collected as part of rake sample 60610 during the 3rd Extra-Vehicular Activity of the Apollo 16 mission in 1972, served as the first NASA-preserved lunar sample to be examined by our team in the development of a novel approach to internal and external sample visualization. Apollo Sample 60639 is classified as a breccia with a glass-coated side and pristine mare basalt and anorthosite clasts. The aim was to accurately register a 3-dimensional Micro X-Ray Computed Tomography (XCT)-derived internal composition data set and a Structure-From-Motion (SFM) Photogrammetry-derived high-fidelity, textured external polygonal model of Apollo Sample 60639. The developed process provided the means for accurate, comprehensive, non-destructive visualization of NASA's heritage lunar samples. The data products, to be ultimately served via an end-user web interface, will allow researchers and the public to interact with the unique heritage samples, providing a platform to "slice through" a photo-realistic rendering of a sample to analyze both its external visual and internal composition simultaneously.

  3. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: Background corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, Carey E.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bender, Janelle E.; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Xia, Jessie Q.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Kiser, Matthew R.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Pedroni, Ronald S.; Macri, Robert A.; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Howell, Calvin R.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is an imaging technique that provides an in-vivo tomographic spectroscopic image of the distribution of elements in a body. To achieve this, a neutron beam illuminates the body. Nuclei in the body along the path of the beam are stimulated by inelastic scattering of the neutrons in the beam and emit characteristic gamma photons whose unique energy identifies the element. The emitted gammas are collected in a spectrometer and form a projection intensity for each spectral line at the projection orientation of the neutron beam. Rotating and translating either the body or the beam will allow a tomographic projection set to be acquired. Images are reconstructed to represent the spatial distribution of elements in the body. Critical to this process is the appropriate removal of background gamma events from the spectrum. Here we demonstrate the equivalence of two background correction techniques and discuss the appropriate application of each

  4. The dynamic micro computed tomography at SSRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Xu, L.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Xie, H.; Xiao, T.

    2018-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT) is a critical technique for quantitative characterizing the 3D internal structure of samples, recently the dynamic SR-μCT has been attracting vast attention since it can evaluate the three-dimensional structure evolution of a sample. A dynamic μCT method, which is based on monochromatic beam, was developed at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, by combining the compressed sensing based CT reconstruction algorithm and hardware upgrade. The monochromatic beam based method can achieve quantitative information, and lower dose than the white beam base method in which the lower energy beam is absorbed by the sample rather than contribute to the final imaging signal. The developed method is successfully used to investigate the compression of the air sac during respiration in a bell cricket, providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system.

  5. Data processing device for computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, N.; Ito, Y.; Iwata, K.; Nishihara, E.; Shibayama, S.

    1984-01-01

    A data processing device applied to a computed tomography system which examines a living body utilizing radiation of X-rays is disclosed. The X-rays which have penetrated the living body are converted into electric signals in a detecting section. The electric signals are acquired and converted from an analog form into a digital form in a data acquisition section, and then supplied to a matrix data-generating section included in the data processing device. By this matrix data-generating section are generated matrix data which correspond to a plurality of projection data. These matrix data are supplied to a partial sum-producing section. The partial sums respectively corresponding to groups of the matrix data are calculated in this partial sum-producing section and then supplied to an accumulation section. In this accumulation section, the final value corresponding to the total sum of the matrix data is calculated, whereby the calculation for image reconstruction is performed

  6. Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TR-7681 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt, Chris M...Laboratory Batch Computed Tomography Analysis of Projectiles by Michael C Golt and Matthew S Bratcher Weapons and Materials Research...values to account for projectile variability in the ballistic evaluation of armor. 15. SUBJECT TERMS computed tomography , CT, BS41, projectiles

  7. Applications of industrial computed tomography at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, R.P.; Morris, R.A.; Wecksung, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    A research and development program was begun three years ago at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to study nonmedical applications of computed tomography. This program had several goals. The first goal was to develop the necessary reconstruction algorithms to accurately reconstruct cross sections of nonmedical industrial objects. The second goal was to be able to perform extensive tomographic simulations to determine the efficacy of tomographic reconstruction with a variety of hardware configurations. The final goal was to construct an inexpensive industrial prototype scanner with a high degree of design flexibility. The implementation of these program goals is described

  8. Measurement of bone mineral density in the tunnel regions for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography scan, and the immersion technique based on Archimedes' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Kai; Wang, Hua; Wang, Xin; Chen, Liaobin

    2012-10-01

    To determine, for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, whether the bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral tunnel was higher than that of the tibial tunnel, to provide objective evidence for choosing the appropriate diameter of interference screws. Two groups were enrolled. One group comprised 30 normal volunteers, and the other comprised 9 patients with ACL rupture. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to measure the BMD of the femoral and tibial tunnel regions of the volunteers' right knees by choosing a circular area covering the screw fixation region. The knees were also scanned by spiral computed tomography (CT), and the 3-dimensional reconstruction technique was used to determine the circular sections passing through the longitudinal axis of the femoral and tibial tunnels. Grayscale CT values of the cross-sectional area were measured. Cylindrical cancellous bone blocks were removed from the femoral and tibial tunnels during the ACL reconstruction for the patients. The volumetric BMD of the bone blocks was measured using a standardized immersion technique according to Archimedes' principle. As measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, the BMD of the femoral and tibial tunnel regions was 1.162 ± 0.034 g/cm(2) and 0.814 ± 0.038 g/cm(2), respectively (P difference in both femoral and tibial tunnel regions. For ACL reconstruction, the BMD of the femoral tunnel is higher than that of the tibial tunnel. This implies that a proportionally larger-diameter interference screw should be used for fixation in the proximal tibia than that used for fixation in the distal femur. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Optoelectronic Computer Architecture Development for Image Reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forber, Richard

    1996-01-01

    .... Specifically, we collaborated with UCSD and ERIM on the development of an optically augmented electronic computer for high speed inverse transform calculations to enable real time image reconstruction...

  10. Measuring Weld Profiles By Computer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Noncontacting, nondestructive computer tomography system determines internal and external contours of welded objects. System makes it unnecessary to take metallurgical sections (destructive technique) or to take silicone impressions of hidden surfaces (technique that contaminates) to inspect them. Measurements of contours via tomography performed 10 times as fast as measurements via impression molds, and tomography does not contaminate inspected parts.

  11. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and

  12. Helical computed tomography and the workstation: introduction to a symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Santos, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We do a brief introduction to the possibilities of an helical computed tomography system when it is associated with a powerful workstation. The fast and volumetric way of acquisition constitutes, basically, the main advantage of this sort of computed tomography. The anatomical and radio pathological study, in a workstation, of the acquired information (thanks to multiplanar and 3D reconstruction), increases significantly our capacity of analysis in each patient. Only the clinical and radiological experience will tell us which is the right place that this symbiosis occupies within our diagnosis tools. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Computed tomography of surface related radionuclide distributions ('BONN'-tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Koenig, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method called the 'BONN' tomography is described to produce planar projections of circular activity distributions using standard single photon emission computed tomography. The clinical value of the method is demonstrated for bone scans of the jaw, thorax, and pelvis. Numerical or projection-related problems are discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-12-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children.

  15. Computed tomography of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.; Laing, F.C.; Federle, M.P.; Goodman, P.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty patients with abdominal trauma and possible splenic injury were evaluated by computed tomography (CT). CT correctly diagnosed 21 of 22 surgically proved traumatic sesions of the spleen (96%). Twenty-seven patients had no evidence of splenic injury. This was confirmed at operation in 1 patient and clinical follow-up in 26. There were one false negative and one false positive. In 5 patients (10%), CT demonstrated other clinically significant lesions, including hepatic or renal lacerations in 3 and large retroperitoneal hematomas in 2. In adolescents and adults, CT is an accurate, noninvasive method of rapidly diagnosing splenic trauma and associated injuries. Further experience is needed to assess its usefulness in evaluating splenic injuries in infants and small children

  16. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, M.; Rupp, N.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability. (orig.)

  17. Computed tomography in sport injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M; Rupp, N

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides axial slices plane and shows excellent details of bones and different soft tissues, favoring its use in traumatic lesions caused by sporting activities. Complex anatomical structures such as the shoulder, the vertebral column, the pelvis, the knee, the tarsal and carpal bones are often better recognized in detail than by conventional radiography. Fracture lines, localization of bone fragments and involvement of soft tissues are clearly demonstrated. Luxations and bone changes leading to luxations can be shown. CT arthrography provides for the first time a direct visualization of joint cartilage and of cruciate ligaments in the knee joint, so traumatic lesions such as chondropathia patellae or rupture of the cruciate ligaments are shown with a high degree of reliability.

  18. Computed tomography in hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with hepatic injury from blunt upper abdominal trauma were examined by computed tomography (CT). The spectrum of CT findings was recorded, and the size of the hepatic laceration and the associated hemoperitoneum were correlated with the mode of therapy used in each case (operative vs nonoperative). While the need for surgery correlated roughly with the size of the hepatic laceration, the size of the associated hemoperitoneum was an important modifying factor. Fifteen patients with hepatic lacerations but little or no hemoperitoneum were managed nonoperatively. CT seems to have significant advantages over hepatic scintigraphy, angiography, and diagnostic peritoneal lavage. By combining inforamtion on the clinical state of the patient and CT findings, therapy of hepatic injury can be individualized and the incidence of nontherapeutic laparotomies decreased

  19. Research of scatter correction on industry computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shaohua; Gao Wenhuan; Zhang Li; Chen Zhiqiang

    2002-01-01

    In the scanning process of industry computer tomography, scatter blurs the reconstructed image. The grey values of pixels in the reconstructed image are away from what is true and such effect need to be corrected. If the authors use the conventional method of deconvolution, many steps of iteration are needed and the computing time is not satisfactory. The author discusses a method combining Ordered Subsets Convex algorithm and scatter model to implement scatter correction and promising results are obtained in both speed and image quality

  20. Computer Based Road Accident Reconstruction Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Batista

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since road accident analyses and reconstructions are increasinglybased on specific computer software for simulationof vehicle d1iving dynamics and collision dynamics, and forsimulation of a set of trial runs from which the model that bestdescribes a real event can be selected, the paper presents anoverview of some computer software and methods available toaccident reconstruction experts. Besides being time-saving,when properly used such computer software can provide moreauthentic and more trustworthy accident reconstruction, thereforepractical experiences while using computer software toolsfor road accident reconstruction obtained in the TransportSafety Laboratory at the Faculty for Maritime Studies andTransport of the University of Ljubljana are presented and discussed.This paper addresses also software technology for extractingmaximum information from the accident photo-documentationto support accident reconstruction based on the simulationsoftware, as well as the field work of reconstruction expertsor police on the road accident scene defined by this technology.

  1. Cone beam tomography of the heart using single-photon emission-computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, G.T.; Christian, P.E.; Zeng, G.L.; Datz, F.L.; Morgan, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated cone beam single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) of the heart. A new cone beam reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct data collected from short scan acquisitions (of slightly more than 180 degrees) of a detector anteriorally traversing a noncircular orbit. The less than 360 degrees acquisition was used to minimize the attenuation artifacts that result from reconstructing posterior projections of 201T1 emissions from the heart. The algorithm includes a new method for reconstructing truncated projections of background tissue activity that eliminates reconstruction ring artifacts. Phantom and patient results are presented which compare a high-resolution cone beam collimator (50-cm focal length; 6.0-mm full width at half maximum [FWHM] at 10 cm) to a low-energy general purpose (LEGP) parallel hole collimator (8.2-mm FWHM at 10 cm) which is 1.33 times more sensitive. The cone beam tomographic results are free of reconstruction artifacts and show improved spatial and contrast resolution over that obtained with the LEGP parallel hole collimator. The limited angular sampling restrictions and truncation problems associated with cone beam tomography do not deter from obtaining diagnostic information. However, even though these preliminary results are encouraging, a thorough clinical study is still needed to investigate the specificity and sensitivity of cone beam tomography

  2. Geometric reconstruction methods for electron tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, Andreas; Gardner, Richard J.; König, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Electron tomography is becoming an increasingly important tool in materials science for studying the three-dimensional morphologies and chemical compositions of nanostructures. The image quality obtained by many current algorithms is seriously affected by the problems of missing wedge artefacts...... and discuss several algorithms from the mathematical fields of geometric and discrete tomography. The algorithms incorporate geometric prior knowledge (mainly convexity and homogeneity), which also in principle considerably reduces the number of tilt angles required. Results are discussed...

  3. Bayesian image reconstruction for improving detection performance of muon tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Schultz, Larry J; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-05-01

    Muon tomography is a novel technology that is being developed for detecting high-Z materials in vehicles or cargo containers. Maximum likelihood methods have been developed for reconstructing the scattering density image from muon measurements. However, the instability of maximum likelihood estimation often results in noisy images and low detectability of high-Z targets. In this paper, we propose using regularization to improve the image quality of muon tomography. We formulate the muon reconstruction problem in a Bayesian framework by introducing a prior distribution on scattering density images. An iterative shrinkage algorithm is derived to maximize the log posterior distribution. At each iteration, the algorithm obtains the maximum a posteriori update by shrinking an unregularized maximum likelihood update. Inverse quadratic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Laplacian priors and inverse cubic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Gaussian priors. Receiver operating characteristic studies using simulated data demonstrate that the Bayesian reconstruction can greatly improve the detection performance of muon tomography.

  4. Orbital computed tomography: technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.J.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; Miller, N.R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomographic scanning has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of orbital disease. The best use of this methodology requires knowledge of the principles and appropriate attention to scanning protocols. Computed tomographic scanning of the orbit is a demanding technique requiring thin sections through planes precisely positioned from the topographical anatomy. Ideally, orbital CT should include both transverse axial and coronal sections: The pathological condition and its plane of growth will influence the selection of the optimal plane or section. Coronal sections may be obtained either directly or indirectly by computer reconstruction from contiguous transverse images. Sagittal or oblique sections or both also are useful and may be obtained directly or indirectly. Difficulty in patient positioning may preclude direct sagittal imaging, however. The use of intravenous contrast enhancement is not necessary as a routine technique unless a mass is identified or suspected. Where surgical resection or biopsy of a space-occupying lesion is contemplated, contrast enhancement can be valuable in assessing relative vascularity and aiding diagnostic specificity. It should be continually emphasized that CT is a powerful technology which, in orbital diagnosis, produces the highest yield when clinician and radiologist collaborate in the radiodiagnostic workup. The clinical information supplied by the referring ophthalmologist is used by the radiologist both in the selection of the appropriate techniques for investigation and in striving to achieve the most specific conclusion

  5. Change of Femoral Anteversion Angle in Children With Intoeing Gait Measured by Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction: One-Year Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Minsik; Jo, Hongsik; Lee, Chang Han; Chun, Se-Woong; Yoon, Chulho; Shin, Heesuk

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate femoral anteversion angle (FAA) change in children with intoeing gait depending on age, gender, and initial FAA using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). The 3D-CT data acquired between 2006 and 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Children 4 to 10 years of age with symptomatic intoeing gait with follow-up interval of at least 1 year without active treatment were enrolled. Subjects were divided into three groups based on age: group 1 (≥4 and FAAs were measured using 3D-CT. Mean changes in FAAs were calculated and compared. A total of 200 lower limbs of 100 children (48 males and 52 females, mean age of 6.1±1.6 years) were included. The mean follow-up period was 18.0±5.4 months. Average initial and follow-up FAA in children with intoeing gait was 31.1°±7.8° and 28.9°±8.2°, respectively. The initial FAA of group 1 was largest (33.5°±7.7°). Follow-up FAA of group 1 was significantly reduced to 28.7°±9.2° (p=0.000). FAA changes in groups 1, 2, and 3 were -6.5°±5.8°, -6.4°±5.1°, and -5.3°±4.0°, respectively. These changes of FAA were not significantly (p=0.355) different among the three age groups. However, FAA changes were higher (p=0.012) in females than those in males. In addition, FAA changes showed difference depending on initial FAA. When initial FAA was smaller than 30°, mean FAA change was -5.6°±4.9°. When initial FAA was more than 30°, mean FAA change was -6.8°±5.4° (p=0.019). FAA initial in children with intoeing gait was the greatest in age group 1 (4-6 years). This group also showed significant FAA decrease at follow-up. FAA changes were greater when the child was a female, younger, and had greater initial FAA.

  6. Effects of knee immobilization on morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex after hamstring harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Evaluation using three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamae, Atsuo; Adachi, Nobuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Nishimori, Makoto; Ochi, Mitsuo; Deie, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    It is desirable to maintain the morphology of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex after tendon harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of knee immobilization on morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. In total, 39 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with autologous semitendinosus tendons were included in this study. After surgery, the knee was immobilized for 3 days in 1 group of patients (group 1; 24 patients; control group) and for a longer period (10-14 days) in the other group (group 2; 15 patients). Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) examination was performed at 6 and/or 12 months after the surgery for all patients. Morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex (proximal shift of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon junction, width of the regenerated semitendinosus tendons, re-insertion sites of the regenerated tendons, and rate of semitendinosus tendon regeneration) were evaluated. Successful regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was confirmed in all patients in group 2. In group 1, 3D CT showed that regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was unsuccessful in 1 of the 24 patients. The average length of the proximal shift of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon junction was 7.3±2.5 cm in group 1 and 7.2±1.9 cm in group 2. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with regard to the morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. This study showed that the structure of regenerated tendons could be clearly identified in 38 of 39 cases (97.4%) after ACL reconstruction. However, prolonged knee immobilization (10-14 days) could not prevent morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. (author)

  7. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Imaging Techniques in Arterial Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Adler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional imaging has become a critical aspect in the evaluation of arterial injuries. In particular, angiography using computed tomography (CT is the imaging of choice. A variety of techniques and options are available when evaluating for arterial injuries. Techniques involve contrast bolus, various phases of contrast enhancement, multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, and maximum intensity projection. After the images are rendered, a variety of features may be seen that diagnose the injury. This article provides a general overview of the techniques, important findings, and pitfalls in cross sectional imaging of arterial imaging, particularly in relation to computed tomography. In addition, the future directions of computed tomography, including a few techniques in the process of development, is also discussed.

  8. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Image Reconstruction For Bioluminescence Tomography From Partial Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, M.; Zhou, T.; Cheng, J. T.; Cong, W. X.; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    The bioluminescence tomography is a novel molecular imaging technology for small animal studies. Known reconstruction methods require the completely measured data on the external surface, although only partially measured data is available in practice. In this work, we formulate a mathematical model for BLT from partial data and generalize our previous results on the solution uniqueness to the partial data case. Then we extend two of our reconstruction methods for BLT to this case. The first m...

  10. 2-D Fused Image Reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography: a theoretical assessment using FDTD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G; Semenov, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient two-dimensional fused image reconstruction approach for Microwave Tomography (MWT). Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) models were created for a viable MWT experimental system having the transceivers modelled using thin wire approximation with resistive voltage sources. Born Iterative and Distorted Born Iterative methods have been employed for image reconstruction with the extremity imaging being done using a differential imaging technique. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the FDTD method of solving the time domain Maxwell's equations with the regularisation parameter computed using a stochastic approach. The algorithm is tested with 10% noise inclusion and successful image reconstruction has been shown implying its robustness.

  11. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krehl, Jonas; Lubk, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction

  12. Prospects of linear reconstruction in atomic resolution electron holographic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehl, Jonas, E-mail: Jonas.Krehl@triebenberg.de; Lubk, Axel

    2015-03-15

    Tomography commonly requires a linear relation between the measured signal and the underlying specimen property; for Electron Holographic Tomography this is given by the Phase Grating Approximation (PGA). While largely valid at medium resolution, discrepancies arise at high resolution imaging conditions. We set out to investigate the artefacts that are produced if the reconstruction still assumes the PGA even with an atomic resolution tilt series. To forego experimental difficulties the holographic tilt series was simulated. The reconstructed electric potential clearly shows peaks at the positions of the atoms. These peaks have characterisitic deformations, which can be traced back to the defocus a particular atom has in the holograms of the tilt series. Exchanging an atom for one of a different atomic number results in a significant change in the reconstructed potential that is well contained within the atom's peak. - Highlights: • We simulate a holographic tilt series of a nanocrystal with atomic resolution. • Using PGA-based Holographic Tomography we reconstruct the atomic structure. • The reconstruction shows characteristic artefacts, chiefly caused by defocus. • Changing one atom's Z produces a well localised in the reconstruction.

  13. Image reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.; Defrise, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-ray but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes. This report reviews the historical and physical basis of medical imaging techniques using positron-emitting radioisotopes. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimensional distributions of radioisotopes to be reconstructed from projection data (sinograms) acquired by detectors suitably positioned around the patient are discussed. The extension of conventional two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithms to fully three-dimensional reconstruction is described in detail. (orig.)

  14. Image quality at low tube voltage (70 kV) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction for computed tomography in infants with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Keita; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ohashi, Kazuya; Asano, Miki; Yamaguchi, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Lower tube voltage has advantages for CT angiography, such as improved contrast To evaluate the image quality of low-voltage (70 kV) CT for congenital heart disease and the ability of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction to improve image quality. Forty-six children with congenital heart disease (median age: 109 days) were examined using dual-source CT. Scans were performed at 80 kV and 70 kV in 21 and 25 children, respectively. A nonionic iodinated contrast medium (300 mg I/ml) was used for the 80-kV protocol. The contrast medium was diluted to 75% (225 mgI/mL) with saline for the 70-kV protocol. Image noise was measured in the two protocols for each group by extracting the standard deviations of a region of interest placed on the descending aorta. We then determined whether sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction reduced the image noise at 70 kV. There was more noise at 70 kV than at 80 kV (29 ± 12 vs 20 ± 4.8; P < 0.01). Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction with grade 4 strength settings improved the noise (20 ± 5.9; P < 0.01) for the 70-kV group. Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction improved the image quality of CT in congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  15. Image quality at low tube voltage (70 kV) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction for computed tomography in infants with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Keita; Shimohira, Masashi; Shibamoto, Yuta [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Ohashi, Kazuya [Nagoya City University Hospital, Division of Central Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Asano, Miki [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagoya (Japan); Yamaguchi, Sachiko [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Lower tube voltage has advantages for CT angiography, such as improved contrast To evaluate the image quality of low-voltage (70 kV) CT for congenital heart disease and the ability of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction to improve image quality. Forty-six children with congenital heart disease (median age: 109 days) were examined using dual-source CT. Scans were performed at 80 kV and 70 kV in 21 and 25 children, respectively. A nonionic iodinated contrast medium (300 mg I/ml) was used for the 80-kV protocol. The contrast medium was diluted to 75% (225 mgI/mL) with saline for the 70-kV protocol. Image noise was measured in the two protocols for each group by extracting the standard deviations of a region of interest placed on the descending aorta. We then determined whether sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction reduced the image noise at 70 kV. There was more noise at 70 kV than at 80 kV (29 ± 12 vs 20 ± 4.8; P < 0.01). Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction with grade 4 strength settings improved the noise (20 ± 5.9; P < 0.01) for the 70-kV group. Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction improved the image quality of CT in congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  16. Acute mediastinitis: multidetector computed tomography findings following cardiac surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Clarissa Aguiar de; Baena, Marcos Eduardo da Silva; Uezumi, Kiyomi Kato; Castro, Claudio Campi de; Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative mediastinitis is defined as an infection of the organs and tissues in the mediastinal space, with an incidence ranging between 0.4% and 5% of cases. This disease severity varies from infection of superficial tissues in the chest wall to fulminant mediastinitis with sternal involvement. Diagnostic criterion for postoperative detection of acute mediastinitis at computed tomography is the presence of fluid collections and gas in the mediastinal space, which might or might not be associated with peristernal abnormalities such as edema of soft tissues, separation of sternal segments with marginal bone resorption, sclerosis and osteomyelitis. Other associated findings include lymphadenomegaly, pulmonary consolidation and pleural/ pericardial effusion. Some of these findings, such as mediastinal gas and small fluid collections can be typically found in the absence of infection, early in the period following thoracic surgery where the effectiveness of computed tomography is limited. After approximately two weeks, computed tomography achieves almost 100% sensitivity and specificity. Patients with clinical suspicion of mediastinitis should be submitted to computed tomography for investigating the presence of fluid collections to identify the extent and nature of the disease. Multidetector computed tomography allows 3D images reconstruction, contributing particularly to the evaluation of the sternum. (author)

  17. Acute mediastinitis: multidetector computed tomography findings following cardiac surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Clarissa Aguiar de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto do Coracao (InCor)]. E-mail: clarissaaguiarm@yahoo.com.br; Baena, Marcos Eduardo da Silva [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Ultrasonography; Uezumi, Kiyomi Kato [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Computed Tomography; Castro, Claudio Campi de [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Center of Diagnosis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Radiology

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative mediastinitis is defined as an infection of the organs and tissues in the mediastinal space, with an incidence ranging between 0.4% and 5% of cases. This disease severity varies from infection of superficial tissues in the chest wall to fulminant mediastinitis with sternal involvement. Diagnostic criterion for postoperative detection of acute mediastinitis at computed tomography is the presence of fluid collections and gas in the mediastinal space, which might or might not be associated with peristernal abnormalities such as edema of soft tissues, separation of sternal segments with marginal bone resorption, sclerosis and osteomyelitis. Other associated findings include lymphadenomegaly, pulmonary consolidation and pleural/ pericardial effusion. Some of these findings, such as mediastinal gas and small fluid collections can be typically found in the absence of infection, early in the period following thoracic surgery where the effectiveness of computed tomography is limited. After approximately two weeks, computed tomography achieves almost 100% sensitivity and specificity. Patients with clinical suspicion of mediastinitis should be submitted to computed tomography for investigating the presence of fluid collections to identify the extent and nature of the disease. Multidetector computed tomography allows 3D images reconstruction, contributing particularly to the evaluation of the sternum. (author)

  18. Preliminary frequency-domain analysis for the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B.; Zhao, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Wu, D.; Zeng, Z.; Zeng, M.; Yi, H.; Luo, Z.; Yue, X.; Cheng, J.

    2014-11-01

    Muon tomography is an advanced technology to non-destructively detect high atomic number materials. It exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering information of muon to reconstruct the scattering density image of the traversed object. Because of the statistics of muon scattering, the measurement error of system and the data incompleteness, the reconstruction is always accompanied with a certain level of interference, which will influence the reconstructed spatial resolution. While statistical noises can be reduced by extending the measuring time, system parameters determine the ultimate spatial resolution that one system can reach. In this paper, an effective frequency-domain model is proposed to analyze the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography. The proposed method modifies the resolution analysis in conventional computed tomography (CT) to fit the different imaging mechanism in muon scattering tomography. The measured scattering information is described in frequency domain, then a relationship between the measurements and the original image is proposed in Fourier domain, which is named as "Muon Central Slice Theorem". Furthermore, a preliminary analytical expression of the ultimate reconstructed spatial is derived, and the simulations are performed for validation. While the method is able to predict the ultimate spatial resolution of a given system, it can also be utilized for the optimization of system design and construction.

  19. Preliminary frequency-domain analysis for the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, B.; Zhao, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Wu, D.; Zeng, Z.; Zeng, M.; Yi, H.; Luo, Z.; Yue, X.; Cheng, J.

    2014-01-01

    Muon tomography is an advanced technology to non-destructively detect high atomic number materials. It exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering information of muon to reconstruct the scattering density image of the traversed object. Because of the statistics of muon scattering, the measurement error of system and the data incompleteness, the reconstruction is always accompanied with a certain level of interference, which will influence the reconstructed spatial resolution. While statistical noises can be reduced by extending the measuring time, system parameters determine the ultimate spatial resolution that one system can reach. In this paper, an effective frequency-domain model is proposed to analyze the reconstructed spatial resolution of muon tomography. The proposed method modifies the resolution analysis in conventional computed tomography (CT) to fit the different imaging mechanism in muon scattering tomography. The measured scattering information is described in frequency domain, then a relationship between the measurements and the original image is proposed in Fourier domain, which is named as M uon Central Slice Theorem . Furthermore, a preliminary analytical expression of the ultimate reconstructed spatial is derived, and the simulations are performed for validation. While the method is able to predict the ultimate spatial resolution of a given system, it can also be utilized for the optimization of system design and construction

  20. Reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in computed tomography angiography: assessment of the utility of model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Kato, Ayumi [Tottori Municipal Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yonago (Japan); Sakamoto, Makoto; Kurosaki, Masamichi [Tottori University, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the value of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) for reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in carotid CT angiography (CTA). Thirty-seven patients with dental hardware who underwent carotid CTA were included. CTA was performed with a GE Discovery CT750 HD scanner and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), ASIR, and MBIR. We measured the standard deviation at the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery that was affected most by dental metal artifacts (SD{sub 1}) and the standard deviation at the common carotid artery that was not affected by the artifact (SD{sub 2}). We calculated the artifact index (AI) as follows: AI = [(SD{sub 1})2 - (SD{sub 2})2]1/2 and compared each AI for FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Visual assessment of the internal carotid artery was also performed by two neuroradiologists using a five-point scale for each axial and reconstructed sagittal image. The inter-observer agreement was analyzed using weighted kappa analysis. MBIR significantly improved AI compared with FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each). We found no significant difference in AI between FBP and ASIR (p = 0.502). The visual score of MBIR was significantly better than those of FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each), whereas the scores of ASIR were the same as those of FBP. Kappa values indicated good inter-observer agreements in all reconstructed images (0.747-0.778). MBIR resulted in a significant reduction in artifact from dental hardware in carotid CTA. (orig.)

  1. Reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in computed tomography angiography: assessment of the utility of model-based iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuya, Keita; Shinohara, Yuki; Ogawa, Toshihide; Kato, Ayumi; Sakamoto, Makoto; Kurosaki, Masamichi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the value of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) for reduction of metal artifacts due to dental hardware in carotid CT angiography (CTA). Thirty-seven patients with dental hardware who underwent carotid CTA were included. CTA was performed with a GE Discovery CT750 HD scanner and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), ASIR, and MBIR. We measured the standard deviation at the cervical segment of the internal carotid artery that was affected most by dental metal artifacts (SD_1) and the standard deviation at the common carotid artery that was not affected by the artifact (SD_2). We calculated the artifact index (AI) as follows: AI = [(SD_1)2 - (SD_2)2]1/2 and compared each AI for FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Visual assessment of the internal carotid artery was also performed by two neuroradiologists using a five-point scale for each axial and reconstructed sagittal image. The inter-observer agreement was analyzed using weighted kappa analysis. MBIR significantly improved AI compared with FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each). We found no significant difference in AI between FBP and ASIR (p = 0.502). The visual score of MBIR was significantly better than those of FBP and ASIR (p < 0.001, each), whereas the scores of ASIR were the same as those of FBP. Kappa values indicated good inter-observer agreements in all reconstructed images (0.747-0.778). MBIR resulted in a significant reduction in artifact from dental hardware in carotid CTA. (orig.)

  2. Computed tomography of obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jung Hek; Lee, Joong Suk; Chun, Beung He; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that the computed tomography (CT) is very useful in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice. We have studied 55 cases of obstructive jaundice with whole body scanner from Jun.1980 to Jun. 1981. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution was 36 males and 19 females, and 40 cases of obstructive jaundice were seen in fifth, sixth, and seventh decades. 2. Causes of obstructive jaundice were 25 cases of pancreas cancer, 8 cases of common duct cancer, 4 cases of gallbladder cancer, 4 cases of ampulla vater cancer, 12 cases of common duct stone, and 2 cases of common duct stricture. 3. Levels of obstruction were 8 cases of hepatic portion, 15 cases of suprapancreatic portion, 28 cases of pancreatic portion, and 4 cases of ampullary portion. 4. In tumorous condition, CT demonstrated metastasis of other organs, 9 cases of the liver, 1 case of the lung, 3 cases of the pancreas, 3 cases of the common bile duct, 1 case of the stomach, and 12 cases of adjacent lymph nodes. 5. Associated diseases were 12 cases of intrahepatic stone, 4 cases of clonorchiasis, 2 cases of pancreas pseudocyst, 1 cases of hydronephrosis, and 1 case of renal cyst

  3. Errors in abdominal computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, S.; Marting, I.; Dixon, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients are presented in whom a substantial error was made on the initial abdominal computed tomography report. Certain features of these errors have been analysed. In 30 (43.5%) a lesion was simply not recognised (error of observation); in 39 (56.5%) the wrong conclusions were drawn about the nature of normal or abnormal structures (error of interpretation). The 39 errors of interpretation were more complex; in 7 patients an abnormal structure was noted but interpreted as normal, whereas in four a normal structure was thought to represent a lesion. Other interpretive errors included those where the wrong cause for a lesion had been ascribed (24 patients), and those where the abnormality was substantially under-reported (4 patients). Various features of these errors are presented and discussed. Errors were made just as often in relation to small and large lesions. Consultants made as many errors as senior registrar radiologists. It is like that dual reporting is the best method of avoiding such errors and, indeed, this is widely practised in our unit. (Author). 9 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Brain perfusion: computed tomography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Within recent years, the broad introduction of fast multi-detector computed tomography (CT) systems and the availability of commercial software for perfusion analysis have made cerebral perfusion imaging with CT a practical technique for the clinical environment. The technique is widely available at low cost, accurate and easy to perform. Perfusion CT is particularly applicable to those clinical circumstances where patients already undergo CT for other reasons, including stroke, head injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and radiotherapy planning. Future technical developments in multi-slice CT systems may diminish the current limitations of limited spatial coverage and radiation burden. CT perfusion imaging on combined PET-CT systems offers new opportunities to improve the evaluation of patients with cerebral ischaemia or tumours by demonstrating the relationship between cerebral blood flow and metabolism. Yet CT is often not perceived as a technique for imaging cerebral perfusion. This article reviews the use of CT for imaging cerebral perfusion, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages and draws comparisons between perfusion CT and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  5. Computed tomography of epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Mana; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changes seen on cranial computed tomography (CT) of epileptic children, especially in the area of the temporal horn. The subjects were 242 epileptic children excluding those with encephalitis, brain tumor, neurocutaneous syndromes, degenerative disease, hydrocephalus etc. The control subjects were 195 children without any neurological disease and symptoms. CT scan were taken with a TCT-60A whole body scanner, and 14 check points were evaluated excluding the temporal horn. 195 epileptic children (N-group) and all control children were normal at 14 check points. Next, the areas of the temporal horns and adjoining hemispheres of the epileptic children (N-group) and control children were examined with Muto-Tablet-Desitizer. The temporal horn ratio ((area of temporal horn/area of ipsilateral hemisphere) x 100) was greater in younger children of the control group, and it was higher in epileptic than in control children. Enlargement of the temporal horn was seen in 1 % of the controls and in 35 % of the 125 epileptic children with normal measurements at 14 points on CT scans (p < 0.01). The frequency of enlargement of temporal horns was not variable among different epileptic types. In the epileptic children with normal CT scans except for enlargement of temporal horns behavioral disturbances were 6 boys and 5 had enlarged temporal horns (bilateral 1 case, left side 1 case, right side 3 cases). (author)

  6. Computed Tomography of Interacerebral Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate and reliable method for the diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the nematoma, associated cerebral edema, ventricular deformity and displacement, and hydrocephalus are all readily assessed. Aside from head trauma, the principal cause of intracerebral hematoma is hypertensive vascular disease. Although hematomas from various causes may present similar CT appearances frequently the correct etiology may be suggested by consideration of patient's age, clinical history, and the location of the hematoma. The analytical study was performed in 180 cases of intracerebral hemorrhages by CT from October 1981 to January 1983. The results were as follows; 1. The most prevalent age group was 6th decade (37.2%). Male was prevalent to female at the ration of 1.6 to 1. 2. The most common symptom and sign was mental disturbance (48.7%), motor weakness (23%), headache (10.6%), nausea and vomiting (9.8%). 3. The causes of hemorrhage were hypertension (53.9%), head trauma (30.6%), aneurysm (6.1%) and A-V malformation (7.2%). 4. The frequent locations of hemorrhage were basal ganglia and thalamus (40.4%), lobes (35%), ventricles (21.8%). 5. The distribution of hemorrhage was intracerebral hemorrhage (65.6%), intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage (30.3%), intraventricular hemorrhage (4.4%).

  7. Quantification in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this lecture is to understand the possibilities and limitations of the quantitative analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. It is also to identify the conditions to be fulfilled to obtain reliable quantitative measurements from images. Content: 1 - Introduction: Quantification in emission tomography - definition and challenges; quantification biasing phenomena; 2 - quantification in SPECT, problems and correction methods: Attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution, partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration; 3 - Synthesis: actual quantification accuracy; 4 - Beyond the activity concentration measurement

  8. Computer tomography of large dust clouds in complex plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killer, Carsten; Himpel, Michael; Melzer, André

    2014-01-01

    The dust density is a central parameter of a dusty plasma. Here, a tomography setup for the determination of the three-dimensionally resolved density distribution of spatially extended dust clouds is presented. The dust clouds consist of micron-sized particles confined in a radio frequency argon plasma, where they fill almost the entire discharge volume. First, a line-of-sight integrated dust density is obtained from extinction measurements, where the incident light from an LED panel is scattered and absorbed by the dust. Performing these extinction measurements from many different angles allows the reconstruction of the 3D dust density distribution, analogous to a computer tomography in medical applications

  9. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm.

  10. Resolving ambiguities in reconstructed grain maps using discrete tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, A.; Knudsen, E.; Poulsen, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    reconstruct the image from diffraction data, but they are often unable to assign unambiguous values to all pixels. We present an approach that resolves these ambiguous pixels by using a Monte Carlo technique that exploits the discrete nature of the problem and utilizes proven methods of discrete tomography...

  11. Computed tomography of the heart using thallium-201 in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treves, S.; Hill, T.C.; VanPraagh, R.; Holman, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Thallium-201 emission computed tomography (ECT) was performed in 3 pediatric patients in whom conventional scintigraphy was normal but there was a strong clinical suspicion of myocardial disease. Abnormalities in the distribution of myocardial perfusion appeared sharply delineated with ECT compared to normal conventional gamma camera scintigraphy. Single photon ECT provides a three dimensional reconstruction which results in greater enhancement since activity in overlying structures does not interfere. Its widespread use is limited only by the cost of the imaging device

  12. Computed tomography imaging for superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobeli, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Superior semicircular canal dehiscence is a newly described syndrome of sound and/or pressure induced vertigo. Computed tomography (CT) imaging plays an important role in confirmation of a defect in the bone overlying the canal. A high resolution CT technique utilising 0.5 mm or thinner slices and multi-planar reconstructions parallel to the superior semicircular canal is required. Placement of a histogram over a suspected defect can assist CT diagnosis

  13. Computed tomography of the facial canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Sousuke

    1983-01-01

    The radiological details of the facial canal was investigated by computed tomography. In the first part of this study, dry skulls were used to delineate the full course of the facial canal by computed tomography. In the second part of this study, the patients with chronic otitis media and secondary cholesteatoma were evaluated. The labyrinthine and tympanic parts of the canal were well demonstrated with the axial scanning, and the mastoid part with the coronal scanning. Moreover, computed tomography showed excellent delineation of the middle ear contents. In patients with secondary cholesteatoma, the destructions of the intratympanic course of the bony facial canal were also assessed preoperatively. (author)

  14. Multislice helical computed tomography in the evaluation of lumbar spine diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Rios, Adriana Martins; Almeida, Milena Oliveira; Garbaccio, Viviane Ladeira; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao

    2003-01-01