WorldWideScience

Sample records for compression ignition diesel

  1. Experimental and Numerical Study of Jet Controlled Compression Ignition on Combustion Phasing Control in Diesel Premixed Compression Ignition Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhang; Wuqiang Long; Jiangping Tian; Yicong Wang; Xiangyu Meng

    2014-01-01

    In order to directly control the premixed combustion phasing, a Jet Controlled Compression Ignition (JCCI) for diesel premixed compression ignition systems is investigated. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder natural aspirated diesel engine without EGR at 3000 rpm. Numerical models were validated by load sweep experiments at fixed spark timing. Detailed combustion characteristics were analyzed based on the BMEP of 2.18 bar. The simulation results showed that the high temperature j...

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study of Jet Controlled Compression Ignition on Combustion Phasing Control in Diesel Premixed Compression Ignition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to directly control the premixed combustion phasing, a Jet Controlled Compression Ignition (JCCI for diesel premixed compression ignition systems is investigated. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder natural aspirated diesel engine without EGR at 3000 rpm. Numerical models were validated by load sweep experiments at fixed spark timing. Detailed combustion characteristics were analyzed based on the BMEP of 2.18 bar. The simulation results showed that the high temperature jets of reacting active radical species issued from the ignition chamber played an important role on the onset of combustion in the JCCI system. The combustion of diesel pre-mixtures was initiated rapidly by the combustion products issued from the ignition chamber. Moreover, the flame propagation was not obvious, similar to that in Pre-mixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI. Consequently, spark timing sweep experiments were conducted. The results showed a good linear relationship between spark timing in the ignition chamber and CA10 and CA50, which indicated the ability for direct combustion phasing control in diesel PCCI. The NOx and soot emissions gradually changed with the decrease of spark advance angle. The maximum reduction of NOx and soot were both over 90%, and HC and CO emissions were increased.

  3. Combustion characteristics of compressed natural gas/diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compressed ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenghua, L.; Longbao, Z.; Ziyan, W.; Jiang, R. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ. (China). Dept. of Automotive Engineering

    2003-09-01

    The combustion characteristics of a turbocharged natural gas and diesel dual-fuelled compression ignition (CI) engine are investigated. With the measured cylinder pressures of the engine operated on pure diesel and dual fuel, the ignition delay, effects of pilot diesel and engine load on combustion characteristics are analysed. Emissions of HC, CO, NO{sub x} and smoke are measured and studied too. The results show that the quantity of pilot diesel has important effects on the performance and emissions of a dual-fuel engine at low-load operating conditions. Ignition delay varies with the concentration of natural gas. Smoke is much lower for the developed dual-fuel engine under all the operating conditions. (Author)

  4. Development of compressed natural gas/diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compressed ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenghua, L.; Ziyan, W.; Jiang, R. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ. (China). Dept. of Automotive Engineering

    2003-09-01

    A natural gas and diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compression ignition (CI) engine is developed to reduce emissions of a heavy-duty diesel engine. The compressed natural gas (CNG) pressure regulator is specially designed to feed back the boost pressure to simplify the fuel metering system. The natural gas bypass improves the engine response to acceleration. The modes of diesel injection are set according to the engine operating conditions. The application of honeycomb mixers changes the flowrate shape of natural gas and reduces hydrocarbon (HC) emission under low-load and lowspeed conditions. The cylinder pressures of a CI engine fuelled with diesel and dual fuel are analysed. The introduction of natural gas makes the ignition delay change with engine load. Under the same operating conditions, the emissions of smoke and NO{sub x} from the dual-fuel engine are both reduced. The HC and CO emissions for the dual-fuel engine remain within the range of regulation. (Author)

  5. Direct Injection Compression Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Carl L

    2006-09-25

    The underlying goal of this prqject was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome teclmological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the U.S. market. Fu1iher, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive teclmologies. Eight objectives were defmed to accomplish this goal: 1. Develop an interdisciplinary internal co1nbustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. 2. Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. 3. Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary cuniculum. 4. Promote strong interaction with indusuy, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. 5. Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. 6. Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. 7. Establish 'off-campus' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various indusuial sites. 8. Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

  6. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafi H.; Hasan M.M; Rahman M.M; Noor M.M; Kadirgama K.; Ramasamy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend). A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5) and 10% ethanol (E10) (in vo...

  7. Functional Group Analysis for Diesel-like Mixing-Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Blendstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; McCormick, Robert L.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Fioroni, Gina; George, Anthe; Albrecht, Karl O.

    2016-12-30

    This report addresses the suitability of hydrocarbon and oxygenate functional groups for use as a diesel-like fuel blending component in an advanced, mixing-controlled, compression ignition combustion engine. The functional groups are chosen from those that could be derived from a biomass feedstock, and represent a full range of chemistries. This first systematic analysis of functional groups will be of value to all who are pursuing new bio-blendstocks for diesel-like fuels.

  8. Study of emissions for a compression ignition engine fueled with a mix of DME and diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurchiş, Bogdan; Nicolae, Burnete; Călin, Iclodean; Nicolae Vlad, Burnete

    2017-10-01

    Currently, there is a growing demand for diesel engines, primarily due to the relatively low fuel consumption compared to spark-ignition engines. However, these engines have a great disadvantage in terms of pollution because they produce solid particles that ultimately form particulate matter (PM), which has harmful effects on human health and also on the environment. The toxic emissions from the diesel engine exhaust, like particulate matter (PM) and NOx, generated by the combustion of fossil fuels, lead to the necessity to develop green fuels which on one hand should be obtained from regenerative resources and on the other hand less polluting. In this paper, the authors focused on the amount of emissions produced by a diesel engine when running with a fuel mixture consisting of diesel and DME. Dimethyl ether (DME) is developed mainly by converting natural gas or biomass to synthesis gas (syngas). It is an extremely attractive resource for the future used in the transport industry, given that it can be obtained at low costs from renewable resources. Using DME mixed with diesel for the combustion process, besides the fact that it produces less smoke, the emission levels of particulate matter is reduced compared to diesel and in some situations, NOx emissions may decrease. DME has a high enough cetane number to perform well as a compression-ignition fuel but due to the poor lubrication and viscosity, it is difficult to be used as the main fuel for combustion

  9. Performance of compression ignition engine with indigenous castor oil bio diesel in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Castor oil available indigenously in Pakistan was converted successfully to bio diesel and blended to 10% quantity (by volume) with high speed mineral diesel (HSD) fuel. This fuel was tested in a compression-ignition engine in order to assess its environmental emissions as well as engine performance parameters. The blended fuel was found to give lower environmental emissions in most accounts except for higher CO/sub 2/ and higher NOx. In addition, three engine performance parameters were assessed; which were engine brake power, engine torque and exhaust temperature. In the first two cases, blended bio diesel fuel gave lower figures than pure mineral diesel due to lower calorific value. However, its higher flash point resulted in higher engine exhaust temperatures than pure mineral diesel. Overall, in terms of engine performance, castor oil bio diesel (from non edible oil of castor bean -growing on marginal lands of Pakistan) fared better in comparison to canola oil bio diesel (from expensive edible oil) and can be recommended for further tests at higher blend ratios. (author)

  10. Characterization of Diesel and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion in a Rapid Compression-Expansion Machine using OH* Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Sundar Rajan; Srinivasan, Kalyan Kumar; Stegmeir, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Direct-injection compression ignition combustion of diesel and gasoline were studied in a rapid compression-expansion machine (RCEM) using high-speed OH* chemiluminescence imaging. The RCEM (bore = 84 mm, stroke = 110-250 mm) was used to simulate engine-like operating conditions at the start of fuel injection. The fuels were supplied by a high-pressure fuel cart with an air-over-fuel pressure amplification system capable of providing fuel injection pressures up to 2000 bar. A production diesel fuel injector was modified to provide a single fuel spray for both diesel and gasoline operation. Time-resolved combustion pressure in the RCEM was measured using a Kistler piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted on the cylinder head and the instantaneous piston displacement was measured using an inductive linear displacement sensor (0.05 mm resolution). Time-resolved, line-of-sight OH* chemiluminescence images were obtained using a Phantom V611 CMOS camera (20.9 kHz @ 512 x 512 pixel resolution, ~ 48 μs time resolution) coupled with a short wave pass filter (cut-off ~ 348 nm). The instantaneous OH* distributions, which indicate high temperature flame regions within the combustion chamber, were used to discern the characteristic differences between diesel and gasoline compression ignition combustion. The authors gratefully acknowledge facilities support for the present work from the Energy Institute at Mississippi State University.

  11. IMPLEMENTATION OF DIOXANE AND DIESEL FUEL BLENDS TO REDUCE EMISSION AND TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    SENDILVELAN S.; SUNDAR RAJ C.

    2017-01-01

    Performance of a compression ignition engine fuelled with 1, 4 Dioxane- diesel blends is evaluated. A single-cylinder, air-cooled, direct injection diesel engine developing a power output of 5.2 kW at 1500 rev/min is used. Base data is generated with standard diesel fuel subsequently; five fuel blends namely 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 percentages by volume of diesel and dioxane were prepared and tested in the diesel engine. Engine performance and emission data were used to optimize ...

  12. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend. A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5 and 10% ethanol (E10 (in vol. under full load condition at variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 2750 rpm with 250 rpm increment. The model was then validated with other researcher’s experimental result. Model consists of intake and exhaust systems, cylinder, head, valves and port geometries. Performance tests were conducted for volumetric efficiency, brake engine torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure, brake specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency, while exhaust emissions were analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC. The results showed that blending diesel with ethanol increases the volumetric efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while it decreases brake engine torque, brake power and brake mean effective pressure. In term of emission characteristics, the CO emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decrease significantly with ethanol as additive. But for HC emission, its concentration increase when apply in high engine speed. In conclusion, using Ethanol as fuel additive blend with Diesel operating in HCCI shows a good result in term of performance and emission in low speed but not recommended to use in high speed engine. Ethanol-diesel blends need to researched more to make it commercially useable.

  13. Experimental investigation of gasoline compression ignition combustion in a light-duty diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeper, C. Paul

    Due to increased ignition delay and volatility, low temperature combustion (LTC) research utilizing gasoline fuel has experienced recent interest [1-3]. These characteristics improve air-fuel mixing prior to ignition allowing for reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot (or particulate matter, PM). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Engine Research Center (Ra et al. [4, 5]) have validated these attributes and established baseline operating parameters for a gasoline compression ignition (GCI) concept in a light-duty diesel engine over a large load range (3-16 bar net IMEP). In addition to validating these computational results, subsequent experiments at the Engine Research Center utilizing a single cylinder research engine based on a GM 1.9-liter diesel engine have progressed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition processes, and established the capability of critical controlling input parameters to better control GCI operation. The focus of this thesis can be divided into three segments: 1) establishment of operating requirements in the low-load operating limit, including operation sensitivities with respect to inlet temperature, and the capabilities of injection strategy to minimize NOx emissions while maintaining good cycle-to-cycle combustion stability; 2) development of novel three-injection strategies to extend the high load limit; and 3) having developed fundamental understanding of gasoline autoignition kinetics, and how changes in physical processes (e.g. engine speed effects, inlet pressure variation, and air-fuel mixture processes) affects operation, develop operating strategies to maintain robust engine operation. Collectively, experimental results have demonstrated the ability of GCI strategies to operate over a large load-speed range (3 bar to 17.8 bar net IMEP and 1300-2500 RPM, respectively) with low emissions (NOx and PM less than 1 g/kg-FI and 0.2 g/kg-FI, respectively), and low

  14. Combustion performance, flame, and soot characteristics of gasoline–diesel pre-blended fuel in an optical compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Joonho; Lee, Jong Tae; Kwon, Sang Il; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Gasoline–diesel pre-blended fuel was investigated in an optical direct-injection diesel engine. • KIVA3V-CHEMKIN code modeled blended fuel spray and combustion with discrete multi-component model. • Flame and soot characteristics in the combustion chamber were shown by optical kits. • Combustion performance and soot emissions for gasoline–diesel blended fuel were discussed. - Abstract: Among the new combustion technologies available for internal combustion engines to enhance performance and reduce exhausted emissions, the homogeneous charge compression ignition method is one of the most effective strategies for the compression-ignition engine. There are some challenges to realize the homogeneous charge compression ignition method in the compression-ignition engine. The use of gasoline–diesel blended fuel has been suggested as an alternative strategy to take advantages of homogeneous charge compression ignition while overcoming its challenges. Gasoline and diesel fuels are reference fuels for the spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines, respectively, both of which are widely used. The application of both these fuels together in the compression-ignition engine has been investigated using a hybrid injection system combining port fuel injection (gasoline) and direct injection (diesel); this strategy is termed reactivity controlled compression ignition. However, the pre-blending of gasoline and diesel fuels for direct injection systems has been rarely studied. For the case of direct injection of pre-blended fuel into the cylinder, various aspects of blended fuels should be investigated, including their spray breakup, fuel/air mixing, combustion development, and emissions. In the present study, the use of gasoline–diesel pre-blended fuel in an optical single-cylinder compression-ignition engine was investigated under various conditions of injection timing and pressure. Furthermore, KIVA-3V release 2 code was employed to model the

  15. IMPLEMENTATION OF DIOXANE AND DIESEL FUEL BLENDS TO REDUCE EMISSION AND TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SENDILVELAN S.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance of a compression ignition engine fuelled with 1, 4 Dioxane- diesel blends is evaluated. A single-cylinder, air-cooled, direct injection diesel engine developing a power output of 5.2 kW at 1500 rev/min is used. Base data is generated with standard diesel fuel subsequently; five fuel blends namely 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 percentages by volume of diesel and dioxane were prepared and tested in the diesel engine. Engine performance and emission data were used to optimize the blends for reducing emission and improving performance. Results show improved performance with B10 blends compared to neat fuel for all conditions of the engine. Other blends recorded marginal decrease in brake thermal efficiency. The maximum efficiency for B30, B50 blends at peak load are 26.3%, 25.2% respectively against 29.1% for sole fuel. NOx emissions were found to be high or the blends. Peak pressure and rate of pressure rise are increased with increase in dioxane ratio due to improved combustion rate. Heat release pattern shows higher premixed combustion rate with the blends. Higher ignition delay and lower combustion duration are found with all blends than neat diesel fuel.

  16. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a dual fuel compression ignition engine operated with pilot Diesel fuel and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakis, R.G.; Hountalas, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. These engines are known as dual fuel combustion engines, i.e. they use conventional Diesel fuel and a gaseous fuel as well. This technology is currently reintroduced, associated with efforts to overcome various difficulties of HCCI engines, using various fuels. The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using natural gas in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high autoignition temperature of natural gas is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under dual fuel conditions. The primary amount of fuel is the gaseous one, which is ignited by a pilot Diesel liquid injection. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and dual fuel operation, revealing the effect of dual fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  17. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a compression ignition engine using liquefied petroleum gas-Diesel blended fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, D.H.; Bian, Y.ZH.; Ma, ZH.Y.; Zhang, CH.H.; Liu, SH.Q.

    2007-01-01

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially smoke and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection (DI) Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using LPG in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high auto-ignition temperature of LPG is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under LPG-Diesel blended fuel conditions, using LPG-Diesel blended fuels with various blended rates (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%). Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and blended fuels, revealing the effect of blended fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  18. Effects of ethanol added fuel on exhaust emissions and combustion in a premixed charge compression ignition diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Yungjin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of diesel engines for vehicle has been increasing recently due to its higher thermal efficiency and lower CO2 emission level. However, in the case of diesel engine, NOx increases in a high temperature combustion region and particulate matter is generated in a fuel rich region. Therefore, the technique of PCCI (premixed charge compression ignition is often studied to get the peak combustion temperature down and to make a better air-fuel mixing. However it also has got a limited operating range and lower engine power produced by the wall wetting and the difficulty of the ignition timing control. In this research, the effect of injection strategies on the injected fuel behavior, combustion and emission characteristics in a PCCI engine were investigated to find out the optimal conditions for fuel injection, and then ethanol blended diesel fuel was used to control the ignition timing. As a result, the combustion pressures and ROHR (rate of heat release of the blended fuel became lower, however, IMEP showed fewer differences. Especially in the case of triple injection, smoke could be reduced a little and NOx emission decreased a lot by using the ethanol blended fuel simultaneously without much decreasing of IMEP compared to the result of 100% diesel fuel.

  19. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Combustion and Knock in a Dual Fuel Gas/Diesel Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gharehghani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional compression ignition engines can easily be converted to a dual fuel mode of operation using natural gas as main fuel and diesel oil injection as pilot to initiate the combustion. At the same time, it is possible to increase the output power by increasing the diesel oil percentage. A detailed performance and combustion characteristic analysis of a heavy duty diesel engine has been studied in dual fuel mode of operation where natural gas is used as the main fuel and diesel oil as pilot. The influence of intake pressure and temperature on knock occurrence and the effects of initial swirl ratio on heat release rate, temperature-pressure and emission levels have been investigated in this study. It is shown that an increase in the initial swirl ratio lengthens the delay period for auto-ignition and extends the combustion period while it reduces NOx. There is an optimum value of the initial swirl ratio for a certain mixture intake temperature and pressure conditions that can achieve high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions while decreases the tendency to knock. Simultaneous increase of intake pressure and initial swirl ratio could be the solution to power loss and knock in dual fuel engine.

  20. Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Compression Ignition Engine Operating on Blends of Castor Oil Biodiesel-Diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Roopesh; Sharma, Pushpendra Kumar; Singh, Aditya Narayan; Agrawal, Yadvendra Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Diesel vehicles are the nerves and veins of transportation, particularly in developing countries. With the rapid rate of modernization, increasing demand of fuel is inevitable. The exponential increase in fuel prices and the scarcity of its supply from the environment have promoted interest in the development of alternative sources of fuel. In this work, genus Ricinus communis L. was studied in order to delimit their potential as a raw material for biodiesel production. Further, castor oil, ethyl ester were prepared by transesterification using potassium hydroxide (KOH) as a catalyst and tested on a four-stroke, single-cylinder compression ignition engine. The test was carried out at a constant speed of 3000 rpm at different loads. The results represent a substantial decrease in carbon monoxide (CO) emission with an increasing biodiesel percentage. The reduction of CO in B05, B10, B15 and B20 averaged 11.75, 22.02, 24.23 and 28.79 %, respectively, compared to mineral diesel. The emission results of the comparative test indicated that CO, oxygen (O2) and smoke density emissions are found to be lower when the engine is filled with B05, B10, B15 and B20 as compared to mineral diesel, while carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) with B05, B10, B15 and B20 are found to increase marginally. Brake thermal efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption decrease and increase respectively in biodiesel with different blends in comparison of mineral diesel.

  1. A study of diesel-hydrogen fuel exhaust emissions in a compression ignition engine/generator assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karri, V.; Hafez, H.A.; Kirkegaard, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    A compression engine and duel-fuel supply system was studied in order to determine the influence of hydrogen gas on a diesel engine's exhaust system. Commercially available solenoid valves and pulse actuators were used in a customized mechatronic control unit (MICU) to inject the hydrogen gas into the cylinders during the experiments. The MICU was designed as a generic external attachment. Diesel fuel was used to ignite the hydrogen gas-air mixture after compression. Various different electrical loads were then applied using an alternator in order to stimulate the engine governor and control diesel flow. Results of the study showed that measured carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxide (NO x ) loads of exhaust emissions increased, while emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) decreased. Results also showed that higher temperatures and levels of NO x occurred when hydrogen was mixed with the induced air. It was concluded that higher levels of hydrogen may be needed to reduce emissions. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  2. An assessment of the dual-mode reactivity controlled compression ignition/conventional diesel combustion capabilities in a EURO VI medium-duty diesel engine fueled with an intermediate ethanol-gasoline blend and biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; García, Antonio; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier; Balloul, Iyad; Pradel, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Reactivity controlled compression ignition regime utilized from 25% to 35% load. • Dual-mode reduces the regeneration periods of the diesel particulate filter. • The use of near-term available biofuels allows good performance and emissions. • Dual-mode leads to 2% greater efficiency than diesel combustion at high engine speeds. - Abstract: This work investigates the capabilities of the dual-mode reactivity controlled compression ignition/conventional diesel combustion engine operation to cover the full operating range of a EURO VI medium-duty diesel engine with compression ratio of 17.5:1. This concept is based on covering all the engine map switching between the reactivity controlled compression ignition and the conventional diesel combustion operating modes. Specifically, the benefits of reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion are exploited whenever possible according to certain restrictions, while the conventional diesel combustion operation is used to cover the zones of the engine map in which the reactivity controlled compression ignition operation is limited. The experiments were conducted using a single-cylinder research diesel engine derived from the multi-cylinder production engine. In addition, considering the mandatory presence of biofuels in the future context of road transport and the ability of ethanol to be blended with gasoline, the low reactivity fuel used in the study is a blend of 20% ethanol by volume with 80% of 95 octane number gasoline. Moreover, a diesel containing 7% of biodiesel has been used as high reactivity fuel. Firstly, a reactivity controlled compression ignition mapping is performed to check the operational limits of the concept in this engine platform. Later, based on the results, the potential of the dual-mode concept is discussed. Results suggest that, under the constraints imposed, reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion can be utilized between 25% and 35% load. In this region

  3. Prediction of an optimum biodiesel-diesel blended fuel for compression ignition engine using GT-power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Shah, F.H.; Shahid, E.M.; Gardezi, S.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a turbocharged direct-injection compression ignition (CI) engine model using fluid-dynamic engine simulation codes through a simulating tool known as GT Power. The model was first fueled with diesel, and then with various blends of biodiesel and diesel by allotting suitable parameters to predict an optimum blended fuel. During the optimization, main focus was on the engine performance, combustion, and one of the major regulated gaseous pollutants known as oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The combustion parameters such as Premix Duration (DP), Main Duration (DM), Premix Fraction (FP), Main Exponent (EM) and ignition delay (ID) affect the start of injection (SOI) angle, and thus played significant role in the prediction of optimum blended fuel. The SOI angle ranging from 5.2 to 5.7 degree crank angle (DCA) measured before top dead center (TDC) revealed an optimum biodiesel-diesel blend known as B20 (20% biodiesel and 80% diesel by volume). B20 exhibited the minimum possible NOx emissions, better combustion and acceptable engine performance. Moreover, experiments were performed to validate the simulated results by fueling the engine with B20 fuel and operating it on AC electrical dynamometer. Both the experimental and simulated results were in good agreement revealing maximum deviations of only 3%, 3.4%, 4.2%, and 5.1% for NOx, maximum combustion pressure (MCP), engine brake power (BP), and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), respectively. Meanwhile, a positive correlation was found between MCP and NOx showing that both the parameters are higher at lower speeds, relative to higher engine speeds. (author)

  4. Effect of diesel pre-injection timing on combustion and emission characteristics of compression ignited natural gas engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Min; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Hongfei; An, Tao; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-injection timing on combustion and emission of CING engine are studied. • Closely pre-injection operations leads to increase of combustion intensity. • Early pre-injection operations leads to lower combustion intensity. • Early pre-injection modes provide better NO x emission. - Abstract: Pre-injection strategy is considered to be one of the most important ways to improve diesel engine performance, emission and combustion. It is the same important factor in pilot diesel compression ignition natural gas (CING) engine. In this study, effects of pre-injection timing on combustion and emission performances were experimentally studied in a CING engine which was modified from a turbocharged six-cylinder diesel engine. The experiments were conducted at constant speed of 1400 rpm and different engine loads with a constant fuel injection pressure of 1100 bar. Main injection timing was fixed at 10 °CA BTDC in the advance process of pre-injection timing. The cylinder pressure, heart release rate (HRR), pressure rise rate (PRR), start of combustion (SOC) and coefficient of variation (COV IMEP ), as well as NO x , HC and CO emissions were analyzed. The results indicated that closely pre-injection operations lead to the advance of SOC which intensified combustion of in-cylinder mixture, thereby resulting in higher cylinder pressure, HRR and PRR, as well higher NO x emissions and lower HC and CO emissions. However, early pre-injection operations lead to lower cylinder pressure, HRR and PRR due to decreasing in combustion intensity. Pre-injection timing of 70 °CA BTDC is a conversion point in which influence of pre-injection fuel on ignition and combustion of natural gas nearly disappeared and lowest NO x emission could be obtained. Compared with single injection ignition mode, NO x emissions at the conversion point were reduced by 33%, 38% and 7% at engine load of 38%, 60% and 80% respectively. This is important for the conditions that ignition fuel

  5. An overview of engine durability and compatibility using biodiesel–bioethanol–diesel blends in compression-ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharma, S.; Ong, Hwai Chyuan; Masjuki, H.H.; Sebayang, A.H.; Silitonga, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects on engine performance and emission depend on biofuel properties. • The engine performance can improve and emission reduces with biofuel as the fuel. • Biofuel can ensure the long term engine durability and materials of diesel engine. • Feasibility of biofuel carried out extended periods in corrosion behaviour. • Biofuel appears to reduce life-cycle cost efficiencies for the alternative fuel. - Abstract: The realization of declining fossil fuel supplies and the adverse impact of fossil fuels on the environment has accelerated research and development activities in renewable energy sources and technologies. Biofuels are renewable fuels made from edible, non-edible or waste oils, as well as animal fats and algae, and these fuels have been proven to be good substitutes for fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Bioethanol and biodiesels have gained worldwide attention in order to address environmental issues associated with fossil fuels, provide energy security, reduce imports and rural employment, as well as improve agricultural economy. Bioethanol has high oxygen content and octane content up to 35% and 108, respectively and hence, it increases oxygenation and improves combustion of fuel. In addition, bioethanol has lower vaporization pressure, which reduces the risks associated with evaporative emissions. In contrast, biodiesel has good lubricity, which helps protect the surface of engine components from wear and friction. The use of biodiesel–bioethanol–petroleum diesel blends poses a greater challenge with regards to improving the compatibility of the materials with the fuel system in compression ignition (CI) and spark ignition (SI) engines. In this work, the technical conditions of an engine (i.e. engine deposits, wear of the engine components and quality of the lubrication oil) are assessed by the application of with biodiesel–bioethanol–petroleum diesel blends. It is deemed important to evaluate the effects of

  6. Analysis of Engine Parameters at Using Diesel-LPG and Diesel-CNG Mixture in Compression-ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Jukl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed on influence of diesel engine parameters that is used with mixture of gas and diesel fuel. The first part of the article describes diesel fuel systems where small part of diesel fuel is replaced by LPG or CNG fuel. These systems are often called as Diesel-Gas systems. Next part of the article focuses on tested car and measurement equipment. Measurement was performed by common-rail diesel engine in Fiat Doblň. Tests were carried out in laboratories of the Department of Engineering and Automobile Transport at the Mendel University in Brno. They were observed changes between emissions of used fuels – diesel without addition of gas, diesel + LPG and diesel + CNG mixture. It was found that that the addition of gas had positive effect on the performance parameters and emissions.

  7. A comparative experimental study on engine operating on premixed charge compression ignition and compression ignition mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhiogade Girish E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New combustion concepts have been recently developed with the purpose to tackle the problem of high emissions level of traditional direct injection Diesel engines. A good example is the premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A strategy in which early injection is used causing a burning process in which the fuel burns in the premixed condition. In compression ignition engines, soot (particulate matter and NOx emissions are an extremely unsolved issue. Premixed charge compression ignition is one of the most promising solutions that combine the advantages of both spark ignition and compression ignition combustion modes. It gives thermal efficiency close to the compression ignition engines and resolves the associated issues of high NOx and particulate matter, simultaneously. Premixing of air and fuel preparation is the challenging part to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. In the present experimental study a diesel vaporizer is used to achieve premixed charge compression ignition combustion. A vaporized diesel fuel was mixed with the air to form premixed charge and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke. Low diesel volatility remains the main obstacle in preparing premixed air-fuel mixture. Exhaust gas re-circulation can be used to control the rate of heat release. The objective of this study is to reduce exhaust emission levels with maintaining thermal efficiency close to compression ignition engine.

  8. Combustion characteristics of a turbocharged DI compression ignition engine fueled wth petroleum diesel fuels and biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, M. [Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Education

    2007-04-15

    In this study, the combustion characteristics and emissions of two different petroleum diesel fuels (No. 1 and No. 2) and biodiesel from soybean oil were compared. The tests were performed at steady state conditions in a four-cylinder turbocharged DI diesel engine at full load at 1400-rpm engine speed. The experimental results compared with No. 2 diesel fuel showed that biodiesel provided significant reductions in PM, CO, and unburned HC, the NO{sub x} increased by 11.2%. Biodiesel had a 13.8% increase in brake-specific fuel consumption due to its lower heating value. However, using No. 1 diesel fuel gave better emission results, NO{sub x} and brake-specific fuel consumption reduced by 16.1% and 1.2%, respectively. The values of the principal combustion characteristics of the biodiesel were obtained between two petroleum diesel fuels. The results indicated that biodiesel may be blended with No. 1 diesel fuel to be used without any modification on the engine. (author)

  9. Comparative evaluation of the effect of sweet orange oil-diesel blend on performance and emissions of a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S. M. Ashrafur; Hossain, F. M.; Van, Thuy Chu; Dowell, Ashley; Islam, M. A.; Rainey, Thomas J.; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Brown, Richard J.

    2017-06-01

    In 2014, global demand for essential oils was 165 kt and it is expected to grow 8.5% per annum up to 2022. Every year Australia produces approximately 1.5k tonnes of essential oils such as tea tree, orange, lavender, eucalyptus oil, etc. Usually essential oils come from non-fatty areas of plants such as the bark, roots, heartwood, leaves and the aromatic portions (flowers, fruits) of the plant. For example, orange oil is derived from orange peel using various extraction methods. Having similar properties to diesel, essential oils have become promising alternate fuels for diesel engines. The present study explores the opportunity of using sweet orange oil in a compression ignition engine. Blends of sweet orange oil-diesel (10% sweet orange oil, 90% diesel) along with neat diesel fuel were used to operate a six-cylinder diesel engine (5.9 litres, common rail, Euro-III, compression ratio 17.3:1). Some key fuel properties such as: viscosity, density, heating value, and surface tension are presented. Engine performance (brake specific fuel consumption) and emission parameters (CO, NOX, and Particulate Matter) were measured to evaluate running with the blends. The engine was operated at 1500 rpm (maximum torque condition) with different loads. The results from the property analysis showed that sweet orange oil-diesel blend exhibits lower density, viscosity and surface tension and slightly higher calorific value compared to neat diesel fuel. Also, from the engine test, the sweet orange oil-diesel blend exhibited slightly higher brake specific fuel consumption, particulate mass and particulate number; however, the blend reduced the brake specific CO emission slightly and brake specific NOX emission significantly compared to that of neat diesel.

  10. Optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions for compression ignition engine fueled with pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokhwon; Jeon, Joonho; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel was used with direct injection system. • KIVA-CHEMKIN code modeled dual-fuel fuel spray and combustion processes with discrete multi-component model. • The characteristics of Combustion and emission on pre-blended fuel was investigated with various fuel reactivities. • Optimization of combustion chamber shape improved combustion performance of the gasoline-diesel blended fuel engine. - Abstract: In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were used to improve the fuel efficiency of compression ignition engine using a gasoline-diesel blended fuel and an optimization technology. The blended fuel is directly injected into the cylinder with various blending ratios. Combustion and emission characteristics were investigated to explore the effects of gasoline ratio on fuel blend. The present study showed that the advantages of gasoline-diesel blended fuel, high thermal efficiency and low emission, were maximized using the numerical optimization method. The ignition delay and maximum pressure rise rate increased with the proportion of gasoline. As the gasoline fraction increased, the combustion duration and the indicated mean effective pressure decreased. The homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture was improved due to longer ignition delay. Soot emission was significantly reduced up to 90% compared to that of conventional diesel. The nitrogen oxides emissions of the blended fuel increased slightly when the start of injection was retarded toward top dead center. For the numerical study, KIVA-CHEMKIN multi-dimensional CFD code was used to model the combustion and emission characteristics of gasoline-diesel blended fuel. The micro genetic algorithm coupled with the KIVA-CHEMKIN code were used to optimize the combustion chamber shape and operating conditions to improve the combustion performance of the blended fuel engine. The optimized chamber geometry enhanced the fuel efficiency, for a level of nitrogen oxides

  11. Results and analyses of the smoke from compression ignition CI engines (diesel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrovski, Mile; Mitreski, Stevo M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this examination is to improve the knowledge about the actual ecological condition which is a result of the gas and particles emission from the diesel engines. The mechanism of the production of combustion products including the particles in the combustion chamber has been studied, as well as the options for reduction of the emission. Measurements of the smoke emission from the vehicles in Skopje have been made and the results are given, including their analyses. The conclusion from the analyses is that it is necessary to improve the conditions for normal use of the diesel engine vehicles, as well as to engage new vehicles which cause less damage for the environment (Author)

  12. Effect of the use of olive–pomace oil biodiesel/diesel fuel blends in a compression ignition engine: Preliminary exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, I.; Quintana, C.E.; Ruiz, J.J.; Cruz-Peragón, F.; Dorado, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Olive–pomace oil (OPO) biodiesel constitute a new second-generation biofuel. • Exergy efficiency and performance of OPO biodiesel, straight and blended with diesel fuel was evaluated. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided similar performance parameters. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided similar exergy efficiency compared to diesel fuel. • OPO biodiesel, straight and blended, provided no exergy cost increment compared to diesel fuel. - Abstract: Although biodiesel is among the most studied biofuels for diesel engines, it is usually produced from edible oils, which gives way to controversy between the use of land for fuel and food. For this reason, residues like olive–pomace oil are considered alternative raw materials to produce biodiesel that do not compete with the food industry. To gain knowledge about the implications of its use, olive–pomace oil methyl ester, straight and blended with diesel fuel, was evaluated as fuel in a direct injection diesel engine Perkins AD 3-152 and compared to the use of fossil diesel fuel. Performance curves were analyzed at full load and different speed settings. To perform the exergy balance of the tested fuels, the operating conditions corresponding to maximum engine power values were considered. It was found that the tested fuels offer similar performance parameters. When straight biodiesel was used instead of diesel fuel, maximum engine power decreased to 5.6%, while fuel consumption increased up to 7%. However, taking into consideration the Second Law of the Thermodynamics, the exergy efficiency and unitary exergetic cost reached during the operation of the engine under maximum power condition for the assessed fuels do not display significant differences. Based on the exergy results, it may be concluded that olive–pomace oil biodiesel and its blends with diesel fuel may substitute the use of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines without any exergy cost increment

  13. A computational investigation of diesel and biodiesel combustion and NOx formation in a light-duty compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zihan [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Srinivasan, Kalyan K. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krishnan, Sundar R. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Som, Sibendu [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research

    2012-04-24

    Diesel and biodiesel combustion in a multi-cylinder light duty diesel engine were simulated during a closed cycle (from IVC to EVO), using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE, coupled with detailed chemical kinetics. The computational domain was constructed based on engine geometry and compression ratio measurements. A skeletal n-heptane-based diesel mechanism developed by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and a reduced biodiesel mechanism derived and validated by Luo and co-workers were applied to model the combustion chemistry. The biodiesel mechanism contains 89 species and 364 reactions and uses methyl decanoate, methyl-9- decenoate, and n-heptane as the surrogate fuel mixture. The Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) spray breakup model for diesel and biodiesel was calibrated to account for the differences in physical properties of the fuels which result in variations in atomization and spray development characteristics. The simulations were able to capture the experimentally observed pressure and apparent heat release rate trends for both the fuels over a range of engine loads (BMEPs from 2.5 to 10 bar) and fuel injection timings (from 0° BTDC to 10° BTDC), thus validating the overall modeling approach as well as the chemical kinetic models of diesel and biodiesel surrogates. Moreover, quantitative NOx predictions for diesel combustion and qualitative NOx predictions for biodiesel combustion were obtained with the CFD simulations and the in-cylinder temperature trends were correlated to the NOx trends.

  14. Performance and specific emissions contours throughout the operating range of hydrogen-fueled compression ignition engine with diesel and RME pilot fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Imran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance and emissions contours of a hydrogen dual fueled compression ignition (CI engine with two pilot fuels (diesel and rapeseed methyl ester, and compares the performance and emissions iso-contours of diesel and rapeseed methyl ester (RME single fueling with diesel and RME piloted hydrogen dual fueling throughout the engines operating speed and power range. The collected data have been used to produce iso-contours of thermal efficiency, volumetric efficiency, specific oxides of nitrogen (NOX, specific hydrocarbons (HC and specific carbon dioxide (CO2 on a power-speed plane. The performance and emission maps are experimentally investigated, compared, and critically discussed. Apart from medium loads at lower and medium speeds with diesel piloted hydrogen combustion, dual fueling produced lower thermal efficiency everywhere across the map. For diesel and RME single fueling the maximum specific NOX emissions are centered at the mid speed, mid power region. Hydrogen dual fueling produced higher specific NOX with both pilot fuels as compared to their respective single fueling operations. The range, location and trends of specific NOX varied significantly when compared to single fueling cases. The volumetric efficiency is discussed in detail with the implications of manifold injection of hydrogen analyzed with the conclusions drawn.

  15. Emission Characteristics for a Homogeneous Charged Compression Ignition Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation Using Split Injection Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhee Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the serious issues caused by air pollution and global warming, emission regulations are becoming stricter. New technologies that reduce NOx and PM emissions are needed. To cope with these social exhaust gas regulation demands, many advanced countries are striving to develop eco-friendly vehicles in order to respond to stricter emissions regulations. The homogeneous charged compression ignition engine (HCCI incorporates a multi-stage combustion engine with multiple combustion modes, catalyst, direct fuel injection and partial mixing combustion. In this study, the HCCI combustion was applied to analyze and review the results of engines applying HCCI combustion without altering the conventional engine specifications. The optimization of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR and compression ratio changes provides an optimal fuel economy. In this study, potential for optimum economy within the range of IMEP 0.8 MPa has been evaluated.

  16. Numerical Study of Natural Gas/Diesel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion with Large Eddy Simulation and Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Hasan Kakaee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a comparative study is performed using Large Eddy Simulation (LES and Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS turbulence models on a natural gas/diesel Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI engine. The numerical results are validated against the available research work in the literature. The RNG (Re-Normalization Group k − ε and dynamic structure models are employed to model turbulent flow for RANS and LES simulations, respectively. Parameters like the premixed natural gas mass fraction, the second start of injection timing (SOI2 of diesel and the engine speed are studied to compare performance of RANS and LES models on combustion and pollutant emissions prediction. The results obtained showed that the LES and RANS model give almost similar predictions of cylinder pressure and heat release rate at lower natural gas mass fractions and late SOI2 timings. However, the LES showed improved capability to predict the natural gas auto-ignition and pollutant emissions prediction compared to RANS model especially at higher natural gas mass fractions.

  17. Effect of fuel injection parameters on combustion stability and emissions of a mineral diesel fueled partially premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Ayush; Singh, Akhilendra Pratap; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • NOx and PM emissions were lowest at 700 bar fuel injection pressure (FIP). • PCCI showed lower knocking than compression ignition combustion mode. • Increasing FIP reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides and smoke opacity in PCCI mode. • Increasing FIP reduced nucleation mode particle concentration. • Increasing FIP with advanced main injection timings improved PCCI combustion. - Abstract: This experimental study focuses on developing new combustion concept for compression ignition (CI) engines by achieving partially homogeneous charge, leading to low temperature combustion (LTC). Partially premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion is a single-stage phenomenon, with combustion shifting towards increasingly premixed combustion phase, resulting in lower in-cylinder temperatures. PCCI leads to relatively lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) simultaneously. To investigate combustion, performance and emission characteristics of the PCCI engine, experiments were performed in a mineral diesel fueled single cylinder research engine, which was equipped with flexible fuel injection equipment (FIE). Effects of fuel injection pressure (FIP) were investigated by changing the FIP from 400 bar to 1000 bar. Experiments were carried out by varying start of main injection (SoMI) timings (from 12° to 24° before top dead center (bTDC)), when using single pilot injection. This experimental study included detailed investigations of particulate characteristics such as particulate number-size distribution using engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS), particulate bound trace metal analysis using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), and soot morphology using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PCCI combustion improved with increasing FIP (up to 700 bar) due to superior fuel atomization however further increasing FIP deteriorated PCCI combustion and engine performance due to intense

  18. Experimental study on the performance and emissions of a compression ignition engine fuelled with butanol diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Duraid F.; Prabhakaran, P.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the application of the blends of butanol with diesel to a direct injection diesel engine was carried out. Experimental tests were carried out to study the performance and emissions of the engine fuelled with the blends compared with those fuelled by diesel. The test results show that it is feasible and applicable for the blends with butanol to replace conventional diesel as the fuel for diesel engine; the fuel consumption, brake efficiency, exhaust temperature, and volumetric efficiency of the engine fuelled by the blends were comparable with that fuelled by diesel. The characteristics of the emissions were also studied. CO, CO 2 , HC and NO X are measured and compared with the base fuel case when the conventional diesel is used alone. The results were different for different speeds, loads and blends. (author)

  19. Isotopic Tracing of Particulate Matter from a Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Ethanol-in-Diesel Blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, A.S.; Dibble, R.W.; Buchholz, B.

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to investigate the relative contribution to diesel engine particulate matter (PM) from the ethanol and diesel fractions of blended fuels. Four test fuels along with a diesel fuel baseline were investigated. The test fuels were comprised of 14 C depleted diesel fuel mixed with contemporary grain ethanol (>400 the 14 C concentration of diesel). An emulsifier (Span 85) or cosolvent (butyl alcohol) was used to facilitate mixing. The experimental test engine was a 1993 Cummins B5.9 diesel rated at 175 hp at 2500 rpm. Test fuels were run at steady-state conditions of 1600 rpm and 210 ft-lbs, and PM samples were collected on quartz filters following dilution of engine exhaust in a mini-dilution tunnel. AMS analysis of the filter samples showed that the ethanol contributed less to PM relative to its fraction in the fuel blend. For the emulsified blends, 6.4% and 10.3% contributions to PM were observed for 11.5% and 23.0% ethanol fuels, respectively. For the cosolvent blends, even lower contributions were observed (3.8% and 6.3% contributions to PM for 12.5% and 25.0% ethanol fuels, respectively)

  20. Investigating the reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion strategy in a natural gas/diesel fueled engine with a pre-chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahi, Mohammad Mahdi; Esfahanian, Vahid; Gharehghani, Ayatallah; Mirsalim, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel combustion strategy, RCCI with a pre-chamber, is proposed and investigated. • The proposed strategy extends the RCCI operating range to use less intake air temperatures. • The new concept extends the RCCI operating range to use lower portions of the active fuel. • The proposed strategy is sensitive to engine load and is more efficient for high loads. - Abstract: Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) concept has been proven to be a promising combustion mode for the next generations of internal combustion engines. This strategy is still subject of extensive studies to overcome its operational limitations. In the present work, the effect of using a pre-chamber to extend some operating ranges in a RCCI engine is investigated using coupled multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. To accomplish this, the combustion and flow field in a single cylinder engine with a pre-chamber, working in RCCI mode and fueled with natural gas/diesel are numerically modeled. Experimental data is used to validate the simulation results and then, combustion characteristics and engine emissions in some various operating regions, in terms of initial temperature, fuel equivalence ratio and portions of the two fuels are discussed. The results reveal that the proposed strategy provides the ability to extend the engine operating ranges to use lower intake temperatures, even to 50 K lower for some cases, and also using a larger portion of natural gas instead of diesel fuel. On the other hand, the new strategy could result in incomplete combustion and formation of related emissions in low loads, but for higher engine loads it shows better combustion characteristics.

  1. Application of Dimethyl Ether in Compression Ignition Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene

    -Marathon. The diesel engine test results from 1995 showed that DME is a superb diesel fuel. DME is easy to ignite by compression ignition and it has a molecular structure that results in near-zero emission of particulates when burned. These are features of a fuel that are highly desirable in a diesel engine....... The challenges with DME as a diesel engine fuel are mainly related to poor lubricity and incompatibility with a range of elastomers commonly used for seals in fuel injection systems. This means that although DME burns well in a diesel engine designing a fuel injection system for DME is challenging. Since...... then studies have revealed that the injection pressure for DME does not have to be as high as with diesel to achieve satisfactory performance. This opens for a larger range of possibilities when designing injection systems. In the period from 2004 to 2009 the DME engine was perfected for use in the car DTU...

  2. Auto-ignition modelling: analysis of the dilution effects by the unburnt gases and of the interactions with turbulence for diesel homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines; Modelisation de l'auto-inflammation: analyse des effets de la dilution par les gaz brules et des interactions avec la turbulence dediee aux moteurs Diesel a charge homogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, G.

    2005-09-15

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is an alternative engine combustion process that offers the potential for substantial reductions in both NO{sub x} and particulate matter still providing high Diesel-like efficiencies. Combustion in HCCI mode takes place essentially by auto-ignition. It is mainly controlled by the chemical kinetics. It is therefore necessary to introduce detailed chemistry effects in combustion CFD codes in order to properly model the HCCI combustion process. The objective of this work is to develop an auto-ignition model including detailed chemical kinetics and its interactions with turbulence. Also, a comprehensive study has been performed to analyze the chemical influence of CO and H{sub 2} residual species on auto-ignition, which can be present in the exhaust gases. A new auto-ignition model, TKI-PDF (Tabulated Kinetics for Ignition - with turbulent mixing interactions through a pdf approach) dedicated to RANS 3D engine combustion CFD calculations is proposed. The TKI-PDF model is formulated in order to accommodate the detailed chemical kinetics of auto-ignition coupled with turbulence/chemistry interactions. The complete model development and its validation against experimental results are presented in two parts. The first part of this work describes the detailed chemistry input to the model. The second part is dedicated to the turbulent mixing description. A method based on a progress variable reaction rate tabulation is used. A look-up table for the progress variable reaction rates has been built through constant volume complex chemistry simulations. Instantaneous local reaction rates inside the CFD computational cell are then calculated by linear interpolation inside the look-up table depending on the local thermodynamic conditions. In order to introduce the turbulent mixing effects on auto-ignition, a presumed pdf approach is used. The model has been validated in different levels. First, the detailed kinetic approach was

  3. Numerical investigation on soot particles emission in compression ignition diesel engine by using particulate mimic soot model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Fadzli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research via computational method, specifically by detailed-kinetic soot model offers much more advantages than the simple model as more detailed formation/oxidation process is taken into consideration, thus providing better soot mass concentration, soot size, soot number density as well as information regarding other related species. In the present computational study, investigation of in-cylinder soot concentration as well as other emissions in a single cylinder diesel engine has been conducted, using a commercial multidimensional CFD software, CONVERGE CFD. The simulation was carried out for a close-cycle combustion environment from inlet valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. In this case, detailed-kinetic Particulate Mimic (PM soot model was implemented as to take benefit of the method of moment, instead of commonly implemented simple soot model. Analyses of the results are successfully plotted to demonstrate that the soot size and soot mass concentration are strongly dependent on the detailed soot formation and oxidation process rates. The calculated of soot mass concentration and average soot size at EVO provide the end value of 29.2 mg/m3 and 2.04 × 10−8 m, respectively. Besides, post-processing using EnSight shows the qualitative results of soot concentration along simulation period in the combustion chamber.

  4. Comportamento de um motor de ignição por compressão trabalhando com óleo Diesel e gás natural A dual fuel compression ignition engine performance, running with Diesel fuel and natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Schlosser

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A previsível escassez de petróleo aliada a uma consciência ecológica está levando pesquisadores a procurar novas fontes de energia e processos de combustão mais eficientes e menos poluentes. Entre os combustíveis menos poluentes está o gás natural, cujo consumo aumenta ano a ano. Os motores de combustão interna são transformadores de energia que têm baixa eficiência de conversão. Este trabalho avaliou um motor Diesel, bicombustível, movido a Diesel e gás natural. Nesse motor, a energia provém, basicamente, da combustão do gás natural. O Diesel tem a função de produzir o início da combustão do gás, que é o combustível principal. Assim, haverá uma substituição parcial de óleo Diesel por gás natural, aumentando o rendimento da combustão. Inicialmente, foi feito um ensaio-testemunha, somente com óleo Diesel e após foram feitos ensaios, com três repetições, para variadas proporções de óleo Diesel, gás natural e ângulos de avanço da injeção. O melhor desempenho foi obtido para 22% de óleo Diesel em relação ao máximo débito da bomba injetora e 13 L min-1 de gás natural com ângulo de avanço de injeção original (21º. Nesse caso, a potência média aumentou 14%, e o consumo específico (medido em valores monetários diminuiu 46% em relação ao ensaio-testemunha.The foresight of a petroleum shortage and an ecological conscience is moving scientists to look for new sources of energy and to develop more efficient combustion processes and reduced emissions. Natural gas is a reduced emission fuel, whose consumption increases every year. The present work evaluates a dual fuel compression ignition engine. The major portion of the fuel burned is natural gas. The Diesel fuel acts as combustion starter, which ignites under the compression heat. Diesel fuel is used only as an ignition source. The partial substitution of Diesel fuel by natural gas increases the combustion efficiency and achieves significant

  5. A Study on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Gasoline Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Makoto; Morikawa, Koji; Itoh, Jin; Saishu, Youhei

    A new engine concept consisting of HCCI combustion for low and midrange loads and spark ignition combustion for high loads was introduced. The timing of the intake valve closing was adjusted to alter the negative valve overlap and effective compression ratio to provide suitable HCCI conditions. The effect of mixture formation on auto-ignition was also investigated using a direct injection engine. As a result, HCCI combustion was achieved with a relatively low compression ratio when the intake air was heated by internal EGR. The resulting combustion was at a high thermal efficiency, comparable to that of modern diesel engines, and produced almost no NOx emissions or smoke. The mixture stratification increased the local A/F concentration, resulting in higher reactivity. A wide range of combustible A/F ratios was used to control the compression ignition timing. Photographs showed that the flame filled the entire chamber during combustion, reducing both emissions and fuel consumption.

  6. Comparative study of oxihydrogen injection in turbocharged compression ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barna, L.; Lelea, D.

    2018-01-01

    This document proposes for analysis, comparative study of the turbocharged, compression-ignition engine, equipped with EGR valve, operation in case the injection in intake manifold thereof a maximum flow rate of 1l/min oxyhydrogen resulted of water electrolysis, at two different injection pressures, namely 100 Pa and 3000 Pa, from the point of view of flue gas opacity. We found a substantial reduction of flue gas opacity in both cases compared to conventional diesel operation, but in different proportions.

  7. Research on the combustion, energy and emission parameters of diesel fuel and a biomass-to-liquid (BTL) fuel blend in a compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimkus, Alfredas; Žaglinskis, Justas; Rapalis, Paulius; Skačkauskas, Paulius

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Researched physical–chemical and performance properties of diesel fuel and BTL blend (85/15 V/V). • BTL additive reduced Brake Specific Fuel Consumption, improved engine efficiency. • Simpler BTL molecular chains and lower C/H ratio reduced CO_2 emission and smokiness. • Higher cetane number of BTL reduced heat release in beginning of combustion and NO_x emission. • Advanced start of fuel injection caused reduced fuel consumption and smokiness, increased NO_x emission. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparable research results of the physical–chemical and direct injection (DI) diesel engine properties of diesel fuel and BTL (biomass-to-liquid) blend (85/15 V/V). The energy, ecological and in-cylinder parameters were analysed under medium engine speed and brake torque load regimes; the start of fuel injection was also adjusted. After analysis of the engine bench tests and simulation with AVL BOOST software, it was observed that the BTL additive shortened the fuel ignition delay phase, reduced the heat release in the pre-mixed intensive combustion phase, reduced the nitrogen oxide (NO_x) concentration in the engine exhaust gases and reduced the thermal and mechanical load of the crankshaft mechanism. BTL additive reduced the rates of carbon dioxide (CO_2), incompletely burned hydrocarbons (HC) emission and smokiness due to its chemical composition and combustion features. BTL also reduced Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC, g/kW h) and improved engine efficiency (η_e); however, the volumetric fuel consumption changed due to the lower density of BTL. The start of fuel injection was adjusted for maximum engine efficiency; concomitantly, reductions in the CO_2 concentration, HC concentration and smokiness were achieved. However, the NO_x and thermo-mechanical engine load increased.

  8. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  9. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  10. Standardized Gasoline Compression Ignition Fuels Matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2018-04-03

    Direct injection compression ignition engines running on gasoline-like fuels have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition and diesel engines. The compression and lean combustion mode eliminates throttle losses yielding higher thermodynamic efficiencies and the better mixing of fuel/air due to the longer ignition delay times of the gasoline-like fuels allows better emission performance such as nitric oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). These gasoline-like fuels which usually have lower octane compared to market gasoline have been identified as a viable option for the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine applications due to its lower reactivity and lighter evaporation compared to diesel. The properties, specifications and sources of these GCI fuels are not fully understood yet because this technology is relatively new. In this work, a GCI fuel matrix is being developed based on the significance of certain physical and chemical properties in GCI engine operation. Those properties were chosen to be density, temperature at 90 volume % evaporation (T90) or final boiling point (FBP) and research octane number (RON) and the ranges of these properties were determined from the data reported in literature. These proposed fuels were theoretically formulated, while applying realistic constraints, using species present in real refinery streams. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the proposed GCI fuels and the similarities and differences were highlighted.

  11. Standardized Gasoline Compression Ignition Fuels Matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Bakor, Radwan; AlRamadan, Abdullah; Almansour, Mohammed; Sim, Jaeheon; Ahmed, Ahfaz; Viollet, Yoann; Chang, Junseok

    2018-01-01

    Direct injection compression ignition engines running on gasoline-like fuels have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition and diesel engines. The compression and lean combustion mode eliminates throttle losses yielding higher thermodynamic efficiencies and the better mixing of fuel/air due to the longer ignition delay times of the gasoline-like fuels allows better emission performance such as nitric oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). These gasoline-like fuels which usually have lower octane compared to market gasoline have been identified as a viable option for the gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engine applications due to its lower reactivity and lighter evaporation compared to diesel. The properties, specifications and sources of these GCI fuels are not fully understood yet because this technology is relatively new. In this work, a GCI fuel matrix is being developed based on the significance of certain physical and chemical properties in GCI engine operation. Those properties were chosen to be density, temperature at 90 volume % evaporation (T90) or final boiling point (FBP) and research octane number (RON) and the ranges of these properties were determined from the data reported in literature. These proposed fuels were theoretically formulated, while applying realistic constraints, using species present in real refinery streams. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) engine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the proposed GCI fuels and the similarities and differences were highlighted.

  12. Fuel octane effects in the partially premixed combustion regime in compression ignition engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildingsson, L.; Kalghatgi, G.T.; Tait, N.; Johansson, B.H.; Harrison, A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has showed that it may be advantageous to use fuels of lower cetane numbers compared to today's diesel fuels in compression ignition engines. The benefits come from the longer ignition delays that these fuels have. There is more time available for the fuel and air to mix before

  13. Experimental and numerical assessment of ignition delay period for pure diesel and biodiesel B20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhaidhawi, Mohanad; Brabec, Marek; Lucian, Miron; Chiriac, Radu; Bădescu, Viorel

    2017-10-01

    The ignition delay period for a compression ignition engine fueled alternatively with pure diesel and with biodiesel B20 has been experimentally and numerically investigated. The engine was operated under full load conditions for two speeds, 1400 rpm speed for maximum brake torque and 2400 rpm speed for maximum brake power. Different parameters suggested as important to define the start of combustion have been considered before the acceptance of a certain evaluation technique of ignition delay. Correlations between these parameters were analyzed and concluded about the best method to identify the start of combustion. The experimental results were further compared with the ignition delay predicted by some correlations. The results showed that the determined ignition delays are in good agreement with those of the Arrhenius type expressions for pure diesel fuel, while for biodiesel B20 the correlation results are significantly different than the experimental results.

  14. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr

    This thesis is based on experimental and numerical studies on the use of dimethyl ether (DME) in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. The first paper in this thesis was published in 2007 and describes HCCI combustion of pure DME in a small diesel engine. The tests...... were designed to investigate the effect of engine speed, compression ratio and equivalence ratio on the combustion timing and the engine performance. It was found that the required compression ratio depended on the equivalence ratio used. A lower equivalence ratio requires a higher compression ratio...... before the fuel is burned completely, due to lower in-cylinder temperatures and lower reaction rates. The study provided some insight in the importance of operating at the correct compression ratio, as well as the operational limitations and emission characteristics of HCCI combustion. HCCI combustion...

  15. An Experimental Investigation on Performance and Emissions Characteristics of Jatropha Oil Blends with Diesel in a Direct Injection Compression Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, B.; Bose, P. K.; Panua, R. S.

    2012-07-01

    Continuous effort to reducing pollutant emissions, especially smoke and nitrogen oxides from internal combustion engines, have promoted research for alternative fuels. Vegetable oils, because of their agricultural origin and due to less carbon content compared to mineral diesel are producing less CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. It also reduces import of petroleum products. In the present contribution, experiments were conducted using Jatropha oil blends with diesel to study the effect on performance and emissions characteristics of a existing diesel engine. In this study viscosity of Jatropha oil was reduced by blending with diesel. A single cylinder, four stroke, constant speed, water cooled, diesel engine was used. The results show that for lower blend concentrations various parameters such as thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption, smoke opacity, CO2, and NO x emissions are acceptable compared to that of mineral diesel. But, it was observed that for higher blend concentrations, performance and emissions were much inferior compared to diesel.

  16. Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1932-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed reduces the lag.

  17. Diethyl Ether as an Ignition Enhancer for Naphtha Creating a Drop in Fuel for Diesel

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2016-12-01

    Direct use of naphtha in compression ignition (CI) engines is not advisable because its lower cetane number negatively impacts the auto ignition process. However, engine or fuel modifications can be made to operate naphtha in CI engines. Enhancing a fuel’s auto ignition characteristics presents an opportunity to use low cetane fuel, naphtha, in CI engines. In this research, Di-ethyl ether (DEE) derived from ethanol is used as an ignition enhancer for light naphtha. With this fuel modification, a “drop-in” fuel that is interchangeable with existing diesel fuel has been created. The ignition characteristics of DEE blended naphtha were studied in an ignition quality tester (IQT); the measured ignition delay time (IDT) for pure naphtha was 6.9 ms. When DEE was added to naphtha, IDT decreased and D30 (30% DEE + 70% naphtha) showed comparable IDT with US NO.2 diesel. The derived cetane number (DCN) of naphtha, D10 (10% DEE + 90% naphtha), D20% DEE + 80% naphtha) and D30 were measured to be 31, 37, 40 and 49, respectively. The addition of 30% DEE in naphtha achieved a DCN equivalent to US NO.2 diesel. Subsequent experiments in a CI engine exhibited longer ignition delay for naphtha compared to diesel. The peak in-cylinder pressure is higher for naphtha than diesel and other tested fuels. When DEE was added to naphtha, the ignition delay shortened and peak in-cylinder pressure is reduced. A 3.7% increase in peak in-cylinder pressure was observed for naphtha compared to US NO.2 diesel, while D30 showed comparable results with diesel. The pressure rise rate dropped with the addition of DEE to naphtha, thereby reducing the ringing intensity. Naphtha exhibited a peak heat release rate of 280 kJ/m3deg, while D30 showed a comparable peak heat release rate to US NO.2 diesel. The amount of energy released during the premixed combustion phase decreased with the increase of DEE in naphtha. Thus, this study demonstrates the suitability of DEE blended naphtha mixtures as a

  18. Diethyl Ether as an Ignition Enhancer for Naphtha Creating a Drop in Fuel for Diesel

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Sarathy, Mani; Dibble, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Direct use of naphtha in compression ignition (CI) engines is not advisable because its lower cetane number negatively impacts the auto ignition process. However, engine or fuel modifications can be made to operate naphtha in CI engines. Enhancing a fuel’s auto ignition characteristics presents an opportunity to use low cetane fuel, naphtha, in CI engines. In this research, Di-ethyl ether (DEE) derived from ethanol is used as an ignition enhancer for light naphtha. With this fuel modification, a “drop-in” fuel that is interchangeable with existing diesel fuel has been created. The ignition characteristics of DEE blended naphtha were studied in an ignition quality tester (IQT); the measured ignition delay time (IDT) for pure naphtha was 6.9 ms. When DEE was added to naphtha, IDT decreased and D30 (30% DEE + 70% naphtha) showed comparable IDT with US NO.2 diesel. The derived cetane number (DCN) of naphtha, D10 (10% DEE + 90% naphtha), D20% DEE + 80% naphtha) and D30 were measured to be 31, 37, 40 and 49, respectively. The addition of 30% DEE in naphtha achieved a DCN equivalent to US NO.2 diesel. Subsequent experiments in a CI engine exhibited longer ignition delay for naphtha compared to diesel. The peak in-cylinder pressure is higher for naphtha than diesel and other tested fuels. When DEE was added to naphtha, the ignition delay shortened and peak in-cylinder pressure is reduced. A 3.7% increase in peak in-cylinder pressure was observed for naphtha compared to US NO.2 diesel, while D30 showed comparable results with diesel. The pressure rise rate dropped with the addition of DEE to naphtha, thereby reducing the ringing intensity. Naphtha exhibited a peak heat release rate of 280 kJ/m3deg, while D30 showed a comparable peak heat release rate to US NO.2 diesel. The amount of energy released during the premixed combustion phase decreased with the increase of DEE in naphtha. Thus, this study demonstrates the suitability of DEE blended naphtha mixtures as a

  19. Prechamber Compression-Ignition Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Charles S; Collins, John H , Jr

    1938-01-01

    Single-cylinder compression-ignition engine tests were made to investigate the performance characteristics of prechamber type of cylinder head. Certain fundamental variables influencing engine performance -- clearance distribution, size, shape, and direction of the passage connecting the cylinder and prechamber, shape of prechamber, cylinder clearance, compression ratio, and boosting -- were independently tested. Results of motoring and of power tests, including several typical indicator cards, are presented.

  20. Numerical investigation on the combined effects of varying piston bowl geometries and ramp injection rate-shapes on the combustion characteristics of a kerosene-diesel fueled direct injection compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Zhao, Feiyang; Yu, Wenbin; Mohan, Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of injection rate-shaping on heat-release is significant with less turbulence. • Two peak heat-releases are seen for the shallow-depth re-entrant piston. • Significant combustion phasing occurs with kerosene usage and high turbulence. - Abstract: In this work, the combustion characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition (DICI) engine fueled with kerosene-diesel blends, using different piston bowl geometries together with varying injection rate-shapes were investigated. A total of three combustion bowl geometries, namely the omega combustion chamber (OCC), the shallow-depth combustion chamber (SCC) and the shallow-depth re-entrant combustion chamber (SRCC), were used together with six different ramp injection rate-shapes and pure diesel, kerosene-diesel and pure kerosene fuels. It is seen that the SRCC geometry, which has the shortest throat length, gives the highest turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and this resulted in two peak heat-releases, with a primary peak heat-release during the premixed combustion phase and a secondary peak heat-release during the mixing-controlled combustion phase. In addition, the SCC geometry gives rather distinct premixed combustion and mixing-controlled combustion phases due to the fact that combustion is predominantly controlled by the injected fuel spray itself because of less turbulence. Also, when kerosene is used in place of diesel, the heat-release during the premixed combustion phase increases and diminishes during the mixing-controlled and late combustion phases. It is interesting to note that the effect of injection rate-shaping on the heat-release rate is more obvious for bowl geometries that generate less TKE. Moreover, bowl geometries that generate higher TKEs as well as fuels with lower viscosities generally give lower carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and higher nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions. More importantly, it is possible to achieve low NO and CO emissions simultaneously by using the

  1. BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO AT DIESEL ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoje B Pešić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The compression ratio strongly affects the working process and provides an exceptional degree of control over engine performance. In conventional internal combustion engines, the compression ratio is fixed and their performance is therefore a compromise between conflicting requirements. One fundamental problem is that drive units in the vehicles must successfully operate at variable speeds and loads and in different ambient conditions. If a diesel engine has a fixed compression ratio, a minimal value must be chosen that can achieve a reliable self-ignition when starting the engine in cold start conditions. In diesel engines, variable compression ratio provides control of peak cylinder pressure, improves cold start ability and low load operation, enabling the multi-fuel capability, increase of fuel economy and reduction of emissions. This paper contains both theoretical and experimental investigation of the impact that automatic variable compression ratios has on working process parameters in experimental diesel engine. Alternative methods of implementing variable compression ratio are illustrated and critically examined.

  2. Investigating the compression ignition combustion of multiple biodiesel/ULSD (ultra-low sulfur diesel) blends via common-rail injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, Michael; Kiani, Farshid; Mattson, Jonathan; Tabakh, Daniel; Petka, James; Depcik, Christopher; Peltier, Edward; Stagg-Williams, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Researchers across the globe are searching for energy sources to replace the petroleum-based fuels used by the transportation sector. A fuel of particular interest is biodiesel, produced from a diverse variety of feedstock oils with differing fuel properties that alter the operation and emissions of the engines using them. As biodiesel may be mixed with petroleum-based diesel, the fuel being used by a diesel engine may vary by both biodiesel blend percentage and source. Therefore, the influence of biodiesel properties as a function of blend is important to understand. In this study, four biodiesels, produced from palm, jatropha, soybean, and beef tallow, are tested with blends of petroleum diesel at ratios of 5%, 10%, 20%, and 50% biodiesel content. The results are compared with tests of neat diesel and each biodiesel. Using electronic injection, timing is modulated to normalize combustion phasing for all fuels tested to directly investigate the effects of biodiesel on combustion. Results indicate that fuel viscosity, energy content, and molecular structure have distinct influences on combustion that must be considered for engine calibration. When adjusted for combustion timing, biodiesel blends also showed a general decrease in NO x emissions compared to ultra-low sulfur diesel. - Highlights: • Biodiesel injection timing is adjusted to remove cetane number effect on combustion. • When combustion is normalized, biodiesel NO x emissions are lower than those of ULSD. • Four distinct biodiesels used in blends from 0% to 100% biodiesel/ULSD fraction. • Correlating fuel properties to combustion/emissions is useful for engine calibration

  3. Low-Load Limit in a Diesel-Ignited Gas Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hutter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The lean-burn capability of the Diesel-ignited gas engine combined with its potential for high efficiency and low CO 2 emissions makes this engine concept one of the most promising alternative fuel converters for passenger cars. Instead of using a spark plug, the ignition relies on the compression-ignited Diesel fuel providing ignition centers for the homogeneous air-gas mixture. In this study the amount of Diesel is reduced to the minimum amount required for the desired ignition. The low-load operation of such an engine is known to be challenging, as hydrocarbon (HC emissions rise. The objective of this study is to develop optimal low-load operation strategies for the input variables equivalence ratio and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR rate. A physical engine model helps to investigate three important limitations, namely maximum acceptable HC emissions, minimal CO 2 reduction, and minimal exhaust gas temperature. An important finding is the fact that the high HC emissions under low-load and lean conditions are a consequence of the inability to raise the gas equivalence ratio resulting in a poor flame propagation. The simulations on the various low-load strategies reveal the conflicting demand of lean combustion with low CO 2 emissions and stoichiometric operation with low HC emissions, as well as the minimal feasible dual-fuel load of 3.2 bar brake mean effective pressure.

  4. Using gasoline in an advanced compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cracknell, R.F.; Ariztegui, J.; Dubois, T.; Hamje, H.D.C.; Pellegrini, L.; Rickeard, D.J.; Rose, K.D. [CONCAWE, Brussels (Belgium); Heuser, B. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Combustion Engines; Schnorbus, T.; Kolbeck, A.F. [FEV GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    Future vehicles will be required to improve their efficiency, reduce both regulated and CO{sub 2} emissions, and maintain acceptable driveability, safety, and noise. To achieve this overall performance, they will be configured with more advanced hardware, sensors, and control technologies that will also enable their operation on a broader range of fuel properties. Fuel flexibility has already been demonstrated in previous studies on a compression ignition bench engine and a demonstration vehicle equipped with an advanced engine management system, closed-loop combustion control, and air-path control strategies. An unresolved question is whether engines of this sort can also operate on market gasoline while achieving diesel-like efficiency and acceptable emissions and noise levels. In this study, a compression ignition bench engine having a higher compression ratio, optimised valve timing, advanced engine management system, and flexible fuel injection could be operated on a European gasoline over full to medium part loads. The combustion was sensitive to EGR rates, however, and optimising all emissions and combustion noise was a considerable challenge at lower loads. (orig.)

  5. Vehicle Integrated Photovoltaics for Compression Ignition Vehicles: An Experimental Investigation of Solar Alkaline Water Electrolysis for Improving Diesel Combustion and a Solar Charging System for Reducing Auxiliary Engine Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Garry Inocentes

    Vehicle-integrated photovoltaic electricity can be applied towards aspiration of hydrogen-oxygen-steam gas produced through alkaline electrolysis and reductions in auxiliary alternator load for reducing hydrocarbon emissions in low nitrogen oxide indirect-injection compression-ignition engines. Aspiration of 0.516 ± 0.007 liters-per-minute of gas produced through alkaline electrolysis of potassium-hydroxide 2wt.% improves full-load performance; however, part-load performance decreases due to auto-ignition of aspirated gas prior to top-dead center. Alternator load reductions offer improved part-load and full-load performance with practical limitations resulting from accessory electrical loads. In an additive approach, solar electrolysis can electrochemically convert solar photovoltaic electricity into a gas comprised of stoichiometric hydrogen and oxygen gas. Aspiration of this hydrogen-oxygen gas enhances combustion properties decreasing emissions and increased combustion efficiency in light-duty diesel vehicles. The 316L stainless steel (SS) electrolyser plates are arranged with two anodes and three cathodes space with four bipolar plates delineating four stacks in parallel with five cells per stack. The electrolyser was tested using potassium hydroxide 2 wt.% and hydronium 3wt.% at measured voltage and current inputs. The flow rate output from the reservoir cell was measured in parallel with the V and I inputs producing a regression model correlating current input to flow rate. KOH 2 wt.% produced 0.005 LPM/W, while H9O44 3 wt.% produced less at 0.00126 LPM/W. In a subtractive approach, solar energy can be used to charge a larger energy storage device, as is with plug-in electric vehicles, in order to alleviate the engine of the mechanical load placed upon it by the vehicles electrical accessories through the alternator. Solar electrolysis can improve part-load emissions and full-load performance. The average solar-to-battery efficiency based on the OEM rated

  6. Auto-Ignition and Combustion of Diesel Fuel in a Constant-Volume Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Robert F

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of a study of variations in ignition lag and combustion associated with changes in air temperature and density for a diesel fuel in a constant-volume bomb. The test results have been discussed in terms of engine performance wherever comparisons could be drawn. The most important conclusions drawn from this investigation are: the ignition lag was essentially independent of the injected fuel quantity. Extrapolation of the curves for the fuel used shows that the lag could not be greatly decreased by exceeding the compression-ignition engines. In order to obtain the best combustion and thermal efficiency, it was desirable to use the longest ignition lag consistent with a permissible rate of pressure rise.

  7. Utilization of Alcohol Fuel in Spark Ignition and Diesel Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Don; Stengel, Ron

    These five units comprise a course intended to prepare and train students to conduct alcohol fuel utilization seminars in spark ignition and diesel engines. Introductory materials include objectives and a list of instructor requirements. The first four units cover these topics: ethanol as an alternative fuel (technical and economic advantages,…

  8. Performance and emissions of a dual-fuel pilot diesel ignition engine operating on various premixed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefi, Amin; Birouk, Madjid; Lawler, Benjamin; Gharehghani, Ayatallah

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Natural gas/diesel, methanol/diesel, and hydrogen/diesel cases were investigated. • For leaner mixtures, the hydrogen/diesel case has the highest IMEP and ITE. • The methanol/diesel case has the maximum IMEP and ITE for richer mixtures. • Hydrogen/diesel case experiences soot and CO free combustion at rich regions. - Abstract: A multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model coupled with chemical kinetics mechanisms was applied to investigate the effect of various premixed fuels and equivalence ratios on the combustion, performance, and emissions characteristics of a dual-fuel indirect injection (IDI) pilot diesel ignition engine. The diesel fuel is supplied via indirect injection into the cylinder prior to the end of the compression stroke. Various premixed fuels were inducted into the engine through the intake manifold. The results showed that the dual-fuel case using hydrogen/diesel has a steeper pressure rise rate, higher peak heat release rate (PHRR), more advanced ignition timing, and shorter ignition delay compared to the natural gas/diesel and methanol/diesel dual-fuel cases. For leaner mixtures (Φ_P 0.32). For instance, with an equivalence ratio of 0.35, the ITE is 56.24% and 60.85% for hydrogen/diesel and methanol/diesel dual-fuel cases, respectively. For an equivalence ratio of 0.15, the natural gas/diesel simulation exhibits partial burn combustion and thus results in a negative IMEP. At equivalence ratios of 0.15, 0.2, and 0.25, the methanol/diesel case experiences misfiring phenomenon which consequently deteriorates the engine performance considerably. As for the engine-out emissions, the hydrogen/diesel results display carbon monoxide (CO) free combustion relative to natural gas/diesel and methanol/diesel engines; however, considerable amount of nitrogen oxides (NO_x) emissions are produced at an equivalence ratio of 0.35 which exceeds the Euro 6 NO_x limit. Due to the larger area exposed to high temperature regions

  9. Utilisation of VOC in Diesel Engines. Ignition and combustion of VOC released in crude oil tankers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melhus, Oeyvin

    2002-01-01

    The emission of VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) is a significant source of hydrocarbon pollution. In Norway, the offshore oil industry represents a major source. This emission represents both an energy loss and an environmental problem. Gas tankers have used boil-off gas from the cargo tanks as fuel for some time. However, for the current VOC project a new fuel injection concept is designed for tankers to take advantage of the energy present in the VOC evaporated from crude oil. The VOC is mixed with inert gas in these tankers, and thus the utilisation of this gas represents new challenges. The VOC project uses the concept of ''Condensate Diesel Process'' with pilot ignition. An experimental study of ignition and combustion of VOC Fuels reported here was initiated by the time it was decided to start a pilot project converting propulsion engines in shuttle tankers to use VOC Fuel. It is an experimental study carried out at the Marine Technology Centre (MTS). The objective was to study ignition and combustion of the chosen process in comparison with an ordinary diesel process. The experimental results have been discussed and compared with theoretical considerations of injection, ignition and combustion. For experiments on combustion, a rapid compression machine ''DyFo'' was redesigned to use VOC Fuel. The DyFo test rig was initially designed to study ignition and early combustion of spark ignited homogeneous gas/air charges. To study the ignition and early combustion of VOC Fuel injected at high pressure and ignited by pilot diesel fuel, a redesign was necessary. An important feature of the DyFo, is the visualisation of the combustion. The advantage of the DyFo test rig over an engine, is its simplicity and controllability. In an engine the visualisation would suffer from combustion deposits disturbing the view through the quartz glasses, making the images more difficult to interpret. The simplicity is on the other side a drawback. Correct thermal conditions inside

  10. Variable valve timing in a homogenous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Keith E.; Faletti, James J.; Funke, Steven J.; Maloney, Ronald P.

    2004-08-03

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogenous charge compression ignition engines, in which fuel is injected when the cylinder piston is relatively close to the bottom dead center position for its compression stroke. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder during the compression stroke to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. The present invention utilizes internal exhaust gas recirculation and/or compression ratio control to control the timing of ignition events and combustion duration in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Thus, at least one electro-hydraulic assist actuator is provided that is capable of mechanically engaging at least one cam actuated intake and/or exhaust valve.

  11. Effect of biodiesel on the performance and combustion parameters of a turbocharged compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Baluch, A.H.; Chao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Direct injection compression ignition engines have proved to be the best option in heavy duty applications like transportation and power generation ,but rapid depleting sources of conventional fossil fuels, their rising prices and ever increasing environmental issues are the major concerns. Alternative fuels, particularly bio fuels are receiving increasing attention during the last few years. Biodiesel has already been commercialized in the transport sector. In the present work, a turbocharged intercooled and DI diesel engine has been alternatively fuelled with biodiesel and its 20% blend with commercial diesel. The experimental results show that BSFC, maximum combustion pressure and start of injection angle increase; on the other hand BSEC, maximum rate of pressure rise, ignition lag and premixed combustion amount decrease however HRR duration remains almost unaffected in the case of biodiesel as compared to commercial diesel. (author)

  12. Numerical parametric investigations of a gasoline fuelled partially-premixed compression-ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemati, Arash [Islamic Azad University, Miyaneh Branch, Miyaneh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilarya, Shahram; Jafarmadar, Samad; Khatamenjhad, Hassan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Vahid [Islamic Azad University, Ajagshir Branch, Ajabshir (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Parametric studies of a heavy duty direct injection (DI) gasoline fueled compression ignition (CI) engine combustion are presented. Gasoline because of its higher ignition delay has much lower soot emission in comparison with diesel fuel. Using double injection strategy reduces the maximum heat release rate that leads to nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction. A three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was employed and compared with experimental data. The model results show a good agreement with experimental data. The effect of injection characteristics such as, injection duration, main SOI timing, and nozzle hole size investigated on combustion and emissions.

  13. A comparison of Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) strategies at high load, low speed conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavuri, Chaitanya; Paz, Jordan; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Targeting high load-low speed, optimizations of RCCI and GCI strategies were performed. • The two strategies were compared in terms of performance, controllability and stability. • The optimum cases had high gross indicated efficiency (∼47%) and low NOx emissions. • RCCI strategy showed better combustion control but had higher soot emissions. • GCI strategy was relatively more sensitive to fluctuations in charge conditions. - Abstract: Past research has shown that Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) and Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) combustion are promising approaches to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions. However, the benefits have generally been confined to mid-load operating conditions. To enable practical application, these approaches must be able to operate over the entire engine map. A particularly challenging area is high load, low speed operation. Accordingly, the present work uses detailed CFD modeling and engine experiments to compare RCCI and GCI combustion strategies at a high load, low speed condition. Computational optimizations of RCCI and GCI combustion were performed at 20 bar gross indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and 1300 rev/min. The optimum points from the two combustion strategies were verified using engine experiments and were used to make the comparisons between RCCI and GCI combustion. The comparison showed that both the strategies had very similar combustion characteristics with a near top dead center injection initiating combustion. A parametric study was performed to identify the key input parameters that control combustion for the RCCI and GCI strategies. For both strategies, the combustion phasing could be controlled by the start of injection (SOI) timing of the near TDC injection. The short ignition delay of diesel fuel gave the RCCI strategy better control over combustion than the GCI strategy, but also had a simultaneous tradeoff with soot emissions. With the GCI

  14. Diesel engines vs. spark ignition gasoline engines -- Which is ``greener``?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Criteria emissions, i.e., NO{sub x}, PM, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, from recently manufactured automobiles, compared on the basis of what actually comes out of the engines, the diesel engine is greener than spark ignition gasoline engines and this advantage for the diesel engine increases with time. SI gasoline engines tend to get out of tune more than diesel engines and 3-way catalytic converters and oxygen sensors degrade with use. Highway measurements of NO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and CO revealed that for each model year, 10% of the vehicles produce 50% of the emissions and older model years emit more than recent model year vehicles. Since 1974, cars with SI gasoline engines have uncontrolled emission until the 3-way catalytic converter reaches operating temperature, which occurs after roughly 7 miles of driving. Honda reports a system to be introduced in 1998 that will alleviate this cold start problem by storing the emissions then sending them through the catalytic converter after it reaches operating temperature. Acceleration enrichment, wherein considerable excess fuel is introduced to keep temperatures down of SI gasoline engine in-cylinder components and catalytic converters so these parts meet warranty, results in 2,500 times more CO and 40 times more H{sub 2} being emitted. One cannot kill oneself, accidentally or otherwise, with CO from a diesel engine vehicle in a confined space. There are 2,850 deaths per year attributable to CO from SI gasoline engine cars. Diesel fuel has advantages compared with gasoline. Refinery emissions are lower as catalytic cracking isn`t necessary. The low volatility of diesel fuel results in a much lower probability of fires. Emissions could be improved by further reducing sulfur and aromatics and/or fuel additives. Reformulated fuel has become the term covering reducing the fuels contribution to emissions. Further PM reduction should be anticipated with reformulated diesel and gasoline fuels.

  15. Gasoline compression ignition approach to efficient, clean and affordable future engines

    KAUST Repository

    Kalghatgi, Gautam

    2017-04-03

    The worldwide demand for transport fuels will increase significantly but will still be met substantially (a share of around 90%) from petroleum-based fuels. This increase in demand will be significantly skewed towards commercial vehicles and hence towards diesel and jet fuels, leading to a probable surplus of lighter low-octane fuels. Current diesel engines are efficient but expensive and complicated because they try to reduce the nitrogen oxide and soot emissions simultaneously while using conventional diesel fuels which ignite very easily. Gasoline compression ignition engines can be run on gasoline-like fuels with a long ignition delay to make low-nitrogen-oxide low-soot combustion very much easier. Moreover, the research octane number of the optimum fuel for gasoline compression ignition engines is likely to be around 70 and hence the surplus low-octane components could be used without much further processing. Also, the final boiling point can be higher than those of current gasolines. The potential advantages of gasoline compression ignition engines are as follows. First, the engine is at least as efficient and clean as current diesel engines but is less complicated and hence could be cheaper (lower injection pressure and after-treatment focus on control of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions rather than on soot and nitrogen oxide emissions). Second, the optimum fuel requires less processing and hence would be easier to make in comparison with current gasoline or diesel fuel and will have a lower greenhouse-gas footprint. Third, it provides a path to mitigate the global demand imbalance between heavier fuels and lighter fuels that is otherwise projected and improve the sustainability of refineries. The concept has been well demonstrated in research engines but development work is needed to make it feasible on practical vehicles, e.g. on cold start, adequate control of exhaust carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and control of noise at medium to high loads

  16. Numerical investigation of the impact of gas composition on the combustion process in a dual-fuel compression-ignition engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikulski, M.; Wierzbicki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses the model of operation of a dual-fuel compression-ignition engine, powered by gaseous fuel with an initial dose of diesel fuel as the ignition inhibitor. The study used a zero-dimensional multiphase mathematical model of a dual-fuel engine to simulate the impact of enhancing

  17. An Experimental and Numerical Study of N-Dodecane/Butanol Blends for Compression Ignition Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Wakale, Anil Bhaurao; Mohamed, Samah; Naser, Nimal; Jaasim, Mohammed; Banerjee, Raja; Im, Hong G.; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Alcohols are potential blending agents for diesel that can be effectively used in compression ignition engines. This work investigates the use of n-butanol as a blending component for diesel fuel using experiments and simulations. Dodecane was selected as a surrogate for diesel fuel and various concentrations of n-butanol were added to study ignition characteristics. Ignition delay times for different n-butanol/dodecane blends were measured using the ignition quality tester at KAUST (KR-IQT). The experiments were conducted at pressure of 21 and 18 bar, temperature ranging from 703-843 K and global equivalence ratio of 0.85. A skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane and n-butanol blends with 203 species was developed for numerical simulations. The mechanism was developed by combining n-dodecane skeletal mechanism containing 106 species and a detailed mechanism for all the butanol isomers. The new mixture mechanism was validated for various pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio using a 0-D homogeneous reactor model from CHEMKIN for pure base fuels (n-dodecane and butanol). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE was used to further validate the new mechanism. The new mechanism was able to reproduce the experimental results from IQT at different pressure and temperature conditions.

  18. An Experimental and Numerical Study of N-Dodecane/Butanol Blends for Compression Ignition Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Wakale, Anil Bhaurao

    2018-04-03

    Alcohols are potential blending agents for diesel that can be effectively used in compression ignition engines. This work investigates the use of n-butanol as a blending component for diesel fuel using experiments and simulations. Dodecane was selected as a surrogate for diesel fuel and various concentrations of n-butanol were added to study ignition characteristics. Ignition delay times for different n-butanol/dodecane blends were measured using the ignition quality tester at KAUST (KR-IQT). The experiments were conducted at pressure of 21 and 18 bar, temperature ranging from 703-843 K and global equivalence ratio of 0.85. A skeletal mechanism for n-dodecane and n-butanol blends with 203 species was developed for numerical simulations. The mechanism was developed by combining n-dodecane skeletal mechanism containing 106 species and a detailed mechanism for all the butanol isomers. The new mixture mechanism was validated for various pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio using a 0-D homogeneous reactor model from CHEMKIN for pure base fuels (n-dodecane and butanol). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CONVERGE was used to further validate the new mechanism. The new mechanism was able to reproduce the experimental results from IQT at different pressure and temperature conditions.

  19. Flamelet Generated Manifold Strategies in Modeling of an Igniting Diesel Spray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekdemir, C.; Somers, L.M.T.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2009-01-01

    A study is presented on the modeling of fuel spray combustion in diesel engines. The objective is to model igniting diesel sprays with the detailed chemistry tabulation method FGM (Flamelet GeneratedManifold). The emphasis is on the accurate prediction of auto-ignition as well as the steady

  20. Ohmic ignition of Neo-Alcator tokamak with adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Yuichi

    1992-01-01

    Ohmic ignition condition on axis of the DT tokamak plasma heated by minor radius and major radius adiabatic compression is studied assuming parabolic profiles for plasma parameters, elliptic plasma cross section, and Neo-Alcator confinement scaling. It is noticeable that magnetic compression reduces the necessary total plasma current for Ohmic ignition device. Typically in compact ignition tokamak of the minor radius of 0.47 m, major radius of 1.5 m and on-axis toroidal field of 20 T, the plasma current of 6.8 MA is sufficient for compression plasma, while that of 11.7 MA is for no compression plasma. Another example with larger major radius is also described. In such a device the large flux swing of Ohmic transformer is available for long burn. Application of magnetic compression saves the flux swing and thereby extends the burn time. (author)

  1. Combustion characteristics of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus oil in a partial premixed charge compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Alagumalai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Indeed, the development of alternate fuels for use in internal combustion engines has traditionally been an evolutionary process in which fuel-related problems are met and critical fuel properties are identified and their specific limits defined to resolve the problem. In this regard, this research outlines a vision of lemongrass oil combustion characteristics. In a nut-shell, the combustion phenomena of lemongrass oil were investigated at engine speed of 1500 rpm and compression ratio of 17.5 in a 4-stroke cycle compression ignition engine. Furthermore, the engine tests were conducted with partial premixed charge compression ignition-direct injection (PCCI-DI dual fuel system to profoundly address the combustion phenomena. Analysis of cylinder pressure data and heat-release analysis of neat and premixed lemongrass oil were demonstrated in-detail and compared with conventional diesel. The experimental outcomes disclosed that successful ignition and energy release trends can be obtained from a compression ignition engine fueled with lemongrass oil.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Hollow-Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-29

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines. Lean-burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677). The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677; Chang et al., 2013, "Fuel Economy Potential of Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) Combustion With Naphtha Fuel," SAE Technical Paper No. 2013-01-2701). The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition (CI) engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using converge as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been

  3. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  4. Performance, emission and combustion analysis of a compression ignition engine using biofuel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ors Ilker

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects on performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of adding biodiesel and bioethanol to diesel fuel. Diesel fuel and blend fuels were tested in a water-cooled compression ignition engine with direct injection. Test results showed that brake specific fuel consumption and volumetric efficiency increased by about 30.6% and 3.7%, respectively, with the addition of bioethanol to binary blend fuels. The results of the blend fuel’s combustion analysis were similar to the diesel fuel’s results. Bioethanol increased maximal in-cylinder pressure compared to biodiesel and diesel fuel at both 1400 rpm and 2800 rpm. Emissions of CO increased by an amount of about 80% for fuels containing a high level of bioethanol when compared to CO emissions for diesel fuel. Using biodiesel, NO emissions increased by an average of 31.3%, HC emissions decreased by an average of 39.25%, and smoke opacity decreased by an average of 6.5% when compared with diesel fuel. In addition, when using bioethanol, NO emissions and smoke opacity decreased by 55% and 17% on average, respectively, and HC emissions increased by an average of 53% compared with diesel fuel.

  5. Characterization and effect of using Mahua oil biodiesel as fuel in compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilan, N.; Ashok Babu, T. P.; Reddy, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    There is an increasing interest in India, to search for suitable alternative fuels that are environment friendly. This led to the choice of Mahua Oil (MO) as one of the main alternative fuels to diesel. In this investigation, Mahua Oil Biodiesel (MOB) and its blend with diesel were used as fuel in a single cylinder, direct injection and compression ignition engine. The MOB was prepared from MO by transesterification using methanol and potassium hydroxide. The fuel properties of MOB are close to the diesel and confirm to the ASTM standards. From the engine test analysis, it was observed that the MOB, B5 and B20 blend results in lower CO, HC and smoke emissions as compared to diesel. But the B5 and B20 blends results in higher efficiency as compared to MOB. Hence MOB or blends of MOB and diesel (B5 or B20) can be used as a substitute for diesel in diesel engines used in transportation as well as in the agriculture sector.

  6. Use of a non-edible vegetable oils as an alternative fuel in compression ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraj, S.; Ramadhas, A.S.; Muraleedharan, C.

    2006-01-01

    Shortage of petroleum fuels is assumed predominance globally and hence efforts are being made in every country to look for alternative fuels, especially for running internal compression ignition engines. However, the limited availability of edible vegetable oils in excess amounts is a limiting factors, which limits their large usage as an alternative fuel. A remedy for this is the use of non-edible oils obtained mainly from seeds, which are otherwise dumped as waste material. An effort is made here to use rubber seed oil as fuel in compression ignition engine at various proportions, mixed with diesel oil. The performance and emission characteristics of the engine are measured under dual fuel operation. The compression ignition engine could be run satisfactorily without any noticeable problem, even with 100% rubber seed oil. A multi-layer artificial neural network model was developed for predicting the performance and emission characteristics of the engine under dual fuel operation. Experimental data has been used to train the network. The predicted engine performance and emission characteristics obtained by neural network model are validated by using the experimental data. The neural network model is found to be quite efficient in predicting engine performance and emission characteristics. It has been found that 60-80% diesel replacement by rubber seed oil is the optimum in order to get maximum engine performance and minimum exhaust emission

  7. Effect of laser induced plasma ignition timing and location on Diesel spray combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, José V.; García-Oliver, José M.; García, Antonio; Pinotti, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser plasma ignition is applied to a direct injection Diesel spray, compared with auto-ignition. • Critical local fuel/air ratio for LIP provoked ignition is obtained. • The LIP system is able to stabilize Diesel combustion compared to auto-ignition cases. • Varying LIP position along spray axis directly affects Ignition-delay. • Premixed combustion is reduced both by varying position and delay of the LIP ignition system. - Abstract: An experimental study about the influence of the local conditions at the ignition location on combustion development of a direct injection spray is carried out in an optical engine. A laser induced plasma ignition system has been used to force the spray ignition, allowing comparison of combustion’s evolution and stability with the case of conventional autoignition on the Diesel fuel in terms of ignition delay, rate of heat release, spray penetration and soot location evolution. The local equivalence ratio variation along the spray axis during the injection process was determined with a 1D spray model, previously calibrated and validated. Upper equivalence ratios limits for the ignition event of a direct injected Diesel spray, both in terms of ignition success possibilities and stability of the phenomena, could been determined thanks to application of the laser plasma ignition system. In all laser plasma induced ignition cases, heat release was found to be higher than for the autoignition reference cases, and it was found to be linked to a decrease of ignition delay, with the premixed peak in the rate of heat release curve progressively disappearing as the ignition delay time gets shorter. Ignition delay has been analyzed as a function of the laser position, too. It was found that ignition delay increases for plasma positions closer to the nozzle, indicating that the amount of energy introduced by the laser induced plasma is not the only parameter affecting combustion initiation, but local equivalence ratio

  8. Numerical Simulations of Hollow Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-11

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Lean burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel [1]. The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco [1, 2]. The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using CONVERGE as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been tested and compared with the experimental data. An optimum combination has been identified and applied in the combusting GCI simulations. Linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) breakup model and modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) break models proved to work the best for the investigated injector. Comparisons between various existing spray models and a parametric study have been carried out to study the effects of various spray parameters. The fuel effects have been tested by using three different primary reference fuel (PRF

  9. Uniaxial compression tests on diesel contaminated frozen silty soil specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenaf, D.; Stampli, N.; Bathurst, R.; Chapuis, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Results of a uniaxial, unconfined compression test on artificial diesel-contaminated and uncontaminated frozen silty soils are discussed. The testing program involved 59 specimens. The results show that for the same fluid content, diesel contamination reduced the strength of the frozen specimens by increasing the unfrozen water content. For example, in specimens containing 50 per cent diesel oil of the fluid content by weight the maximum strength was reduced by 95 per cent compared to the strength of an uncontaminated specimen. Diesel contamination was also shown to contribute to the slippage between soil particles by acting as a lubricant, thus accelerating the loss of compressive strength.13 refs., 18 figs

  10. Hydrogen as an Auxiliary Fuel in Compression-Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Foster, H

    1936-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine whether a sufficient amount of hydrogen could be efficiently burned in a compression-ignition engine to compensate for the increase of lift of an airship due to the consumption of the fuel oil. The performance of a single-cylinder four-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine operating on fuel oil alone was compared with its performance when various quantities of hydrogen were inducted with the inlet air. Engine-performance data, indicator cards, and exhaust-gas samples were obtained for each change in engine-operating conditions.

  11. Natural-gas fueled spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engine performance and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korakianitis, T.; Namasivayam, A.M.; Crookes, R.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Natural gas is a fossil fuel that has been used and investigated extensively for use in spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Compared with conventional gasoline engines, SI engines using natural gas can run at higher compression ratios, thus producing higher thermal efficiencies but also increased nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions, while producing lower emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO). These engines also produce relatively less power than gasoline-fueled engines because of the convergence of one or more of three factors: a reduction in volumetric efficiency due to natural-gas injection in the intake manifold; the lower stoichiometric fuel/air ratio of natural gas compared to gasoline; and the lower equivalence ratio at which these engines may be run in order to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. High NO{sub x} emissions, especially at high loads, reduce with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, EGR rates above a maximum value result in misfire and erratic engine operation. Hydrogen gas addition increases this EGR threshold significantly. In addition, hydrogen increases the flame speed of the natural gas-hydrogen mixture. Power levels can be increased with supercharging or turbocharging and intercooling. Natural gas is used to power CI engines via the dual-fuel mode, where a high-cetane fuel is injected along with the natural gas in order to provide a source of ignition for the charge. Thermal efficiency levels compared with normal diesel-fueled CI-engine operation are generally maintained with dual-fuel operation, and smoke levels are reduced significantly. At the same time, lower NO{sub x} and CO{sub 2} emissions, as well as higher HC and CO emissions compared with normal CI-engine operation at low and intermediate loads are recorded. These trends are caused by the low charge temperature and increased ignition delay, resulting in low combustion temperatures. Another factor is

  12. Possibility to Increase Biofuels Energy Efficiency used for Compression Ignition Engines Fueling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin D. Iclodean

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the possibilities of optimizing the use of biofuels in terms of energy efficiency in compression ignition (CI engines fueling. Based on the experimental results was determinate the law of variation of the rate of heat released by the combustion process for diesel fuel and different blends of biodiesel. Using this law, were changed parameters of the engine management system (fuel injection law and was obtain increased engine performance (in terms of energy efficiency for use of different biofuel blends.

  13. Ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity of MTBE blended diesel fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon; Naser, Nimal; Chung, Suk-Ho; Al-Qurashi, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was added to diesel fuel to investigate the effect on ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity. An ignition quality tester (IQT) was used to study the ignition propensity of MTBE blended diesel fuels in a reactive spray environment. The IQT data showed that ignition delay increases linearly as the MTBE fraction increases in the fuel. A four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine was used to generate soot samples for a soot oxidation study. Soot samples were pre-treated using a tube furnace in a nitrogen environment to remove any soluble organic fractions and moisture content. Non-isothermal oxidation of soot samples was conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was observed that oxidation of 'MTBE soot' started began at a lower temperature and had higher reaction rate than 'diesel soot' across a range of temperatures. Several kinetic analyses including an isoconversional method and a combined model fitting method were carried out to evaluate kinetic parameters. The results showed that Diesel and MTBE soot samples had similar activation energy but the pre-exponential factor of MTBE soot was much higher than that of the Diesel soot. This may explain why MTBE soot was more reactive than Diesel soot. It is suggested that adding MTBE to diesel fuel is better for DPF regeneration since an MTBE blend can significantly influence the ignition characteristics and, consequently, the oxidative reactivity of soot. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  14. Ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity of MTBE blended diesel fuel

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon

    2014-04-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) was added to diesel fuel to investigate the effect on ignition delay and soot oxidative reactivity. An ignition quality tester (IQT) was used to study the ignition propensity of MTBE blended diesel fuels in a reactive spray environment. The IQT data showed that ignition delay increases linearly as the MTBE fraction increases in the fuel. A four-stroke single cylinder diesel engine was used to generate soot samples for a soot oxidation study. Soot samples were pre-treated using a tube furnace in a nitrogen environment to remove any soluble organic fractions and moisture content. Non-isothermal oxidation of soot samples was conducted using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was observed that oxidation of \\'MTBE soot\\' started began at a lower temperature and had higher reaction rate than \\'diesel soot\\' across a range of temperatures. Several kinetic analyses including an isoconversional method and a combined model fitting method were carried out to evaluate kinetic parameters. The results showed that Diesel and MTBE soot samples had similar activation energy but the pre-exponential factor of MTBE soot was much higher than that of the Diesel soot. This may explain why MTBE soot was more reactive than Diesel soot. It is suggested that adding MTBE to diesel fuel is better for DPF regeneration since an MTBE blend can significantly influence the ignition characteristics and, consequently, the oxidative reactivity of soot. Copyright © 2014 SAE International.

  15. Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Variable Compression Ignition Engine Fueled with Jatropha curcas Ethyl Ester Blends at Different Compression Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine performance and emission characteristics of unmodified biodiesel fueled diesel engines are highly influenced by their ignition and combustion behavior. In this study, emission and combustion characteristics were studied when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B40 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 17.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The change of compression ratio from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1 resulted in 27.1%, 27.29%, 26.38%, 28.48%, and 34.68% increase in cylinder pressure for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions. Higher peak heat release rate increased by 23.19%, 14.03%, 26.32%, 21.87%, and 25.53% for the blends B0, B10, B20, B30, and B40, respectively, at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. The delay period decreased by 21.26%, CO emission reduced by 14.28%, and NOx emission increased by 22.84% for B40 blends at 75% of rated load conditions, when compression ratio was increased from 16.5 : 1 to 18.5 : 1. It is concluded that Jatropha oil ester can be used as fuel in diesel engine by blending it with diesel fuel.

  16. Variations in speciated emissions from spark-ignition and compression-ignition motor vehicles in California's south coast air basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Eric M; Zielinska, Barbara; Campbell, David E; Arnott, W Patrick; Sagebiel, John C; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Chow, Judith C; Gabele, Peter A; Crews, William; Snow, Richard; Clark, Nigel N; Wayne, W Scott; Lawson, Douglas R

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Gasoline/Diesel PM Split Study examined the sources of uncertainties in using an organic compound-based chemical mass balance receptor model to quantify the contributions of spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engine exhaust to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5). This paper presents the chemical composition profiles of SI and CI engine exhaust from the vehicle-testing portion of the study. Chemical analysis of source samples consisted of gravimetric mass, elements, ions, organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) by the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) and Speciation Trends Network (STN) thermal/optical methods, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, steranes, alkanes, and polar organic compounds. More than half of the mass of carbonaceous particles emitted by heavy-duty diesel trucks was EC (IMPROVE) and emissions from SI vehicles contained predominantly OC. Although total carbon (TC) by the IMPROVE and STN protocols agreed well for all of the samples, the STN/IMPROVE ratios for EC from SI exhaust decreased with decreasing sample loading. SI vehicles, whether low or high emitters, emitted greater amounts of high-molecular-weight particulate PAHs (benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and coronene) than did CI vehicles. Diesel emissions contained higher abundances of two- to four-ring semivolatile PAHs. Diacids were emitted by CI vehicles but are also prevalent in secondary organic aerosols, so they cannot be considered unique tracers. Hopanes and steranes were present in lubricating oil with similar composition for both gasoline and diesel vehicles and were negligible in gasoline or diesel fuels. CI vehicles emitted greater total amounts of hopanes and steranes on a mass per mile basis, but abundances were comparable to SI exhaust normalized to TC emissions within measurement uncertainty. The combustion-produced high-molecular-weight PAHs were found in used

  17. Influence of fuel type, dilution and equivalence ratio on the emission reduction from the auto-ignition in an Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, TIPs - Fluid Physics, CP165/67, 50 Avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Amouroux, Jacques [UPMC Universite Paris 06, ENSCP, 11 rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    One technology that seems to be promising for automobile pollution reduction is the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). This technology still faces auto-ignition and emission-control problems. This paper focuses on the emission problem, since it is incumbent to realize engines that pollute less. For this purpose, this paper presents results concerning the measurement of the emissions of CO, NO{sub x}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbons. HCCI conditions are used, with equivalence ratios between 0.26 and 0.54, inlet temperatures of 70 C and 120 C and compression ratios of 10.2 and 13.5, with different fuel types: gasoline, gasoline surrogate, diesel, diesel surrogate and mixtures of n-heptane/toluene. The effect of dilution is considered for gasoline, while the effect of the equivalence ratio is considered for all the fuels. No significant amount of NO{sub x} has been measured. It appeared that the CO, O{sub 2} and hydrocarbon emissions were reduced by decreasing the toluene content of the fuel and by decreasing the dilution. The opposite holds for CO{sub 2}. The reduction of the hydrocarbon emission appears to compete with the reduction of the CO{sub 2} emission. Diesel seemed to produce less CO and hydrocarbons than gasoline when auto-ignited. An example of emission reduction control is presented in this paper. (author)

  18. Mechanism of hydrocarbon reduction using multiple injection in a natural gas fuelled/micro-pilot diesel ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklow, G.J.; Gong, W. [University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Research has shown that a large amount of natural gas (NG) is unburned at light loads in an NG fuelled/micro-pilot diesel compression ignition engine. A mechanism of unburned hydrocarbon (HC) reduction using multiple injections of micro-pilot diesel has been proposed in this paper. Multidimensional computations were carried out for a dual-fuel engine based on a modified CAT3401 engine configuration. The computations show that a split injection with a small percentage (e.g. 30 per cent of diesel in the second injection pulse) can significantly reduce HC, CO and NO{sub x} emissions. Based on parax metric studies to optimize the timing of both of the injection pulses, HC emissions could be reduced by 90 per cent, with a reduction in CO emissions of 50 per cent and NO{sub x} emissions of 70 per cent in comparison to a singlex injection pulse-base case configuration. (author)

  19. Studies on biogas-fuelled compression ignition engine under dual fuel mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahla, Sunil Kumar; Singla, Varun; Sandhu, Sarbjot Singh; Dhir, Amit

    2018-04-01

    Experimental investigation has been carried out to utilize biogas as an alternative source of energy in compression ignition (CI) engine under dual fuel operational mode. Biogas was inducted into the inlet manifold at different flow rates along with fresh air through inlet manifold and diesel was injected as a pilot fuel to initiate combustion under dual fuel mode. The engine performance and emission characteristics of dual fuel operational mode were analyzed at different biogas flow rates and compared with baseline conventional diesel fuel. Based upon the improved performance and lower emission characteristics under the dual fuel operation, the optimum flow rate of biogas was observed to be 2.2 kg/h. The lower brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and higher brake-specific energy consumption (BSEC) were noticed with biogas-diesel fuel under dual fuel mode when compared with neat diesel operation. Test results showed reduced NO x emissions and smoke opacity level in the exhaust tailpipe emissions. However, higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were noticed under dual fuel mode at entire engine loads when compared with baseline fossil petro-diesel. Hence, the use of low-cost gaseous fuel such as biogas would be an economically viable proposition to address the current and future problems of energy scarcity and associated environmental concerns.

  20. Modeling of heat release and emissions from droplet combustion of multi component fuels in compression ignition engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Anders

    emissions from the compression ignition engines (CI engines or diesel engines) are continuously increased. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. The complex combustion process of a compression ignition engine may be divided...... it is well suited for optical line of sight diagnostics in both pre and post combustion regions. The work also includes some preliminary studies of radiant emissions from helium stabilized ethylene/air and methane/oxygen flames. It is demonstrated that nano particles below the sooting threshold actually...... of ethylene/air flames well known from the experimental work, was used for the model validation. Two cases were helium stabilized flames with φ = 1 and 2.14. The third case was an unstable flame with φ = 2.14. The unstable case was used to test whether a transient model would be able to predict the frequency...

  1. COMBUSTION ANALYSIS OF ALGAL OIL METHYL ESTER IN A DIRECT INJECTION COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARIRAM V.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Algal oil methyl ester was derived from microalgae (Spirulina sp. The microalga was cultivated in BG 11 media composition in a photobioreactor. Upon harvesting, the biomass was filtered and dried. The algal oil was obtained by a two step solvent extraction method using hexane and ether solvent. Cyclohexane was added to biomass to expel the remaining algal oil. By this method 92% of algal oil is obtained. Transesterification process was carried out to produce AOME by adding sodium hydroxide and methanol. The AOME was blended with straight diesel in 5%, 10% and 15% blend ratio. Combustion parameters were analyzed on a Kirloskar single cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine. The cylinder pressure characteristics, the rate of pressure rise, heat release analysis, performance and emissions were studied for straight diesel and the blends of AOME’s. AOME 15% blend exhibits significant variation in cylinder pressure and rate of heat release.

  2. Fundamental Interactions in Gasoline Compression Ignition Engines with Fuel Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, Benjamin Matthew

    Transportation accounted for 28% of the total U.S. energy demand in 2011, with 93% of U.S. transportation energy coming from petroleum. The large impact of the transportation sector on global climate change necessitates more-efficient, cleaner-burning internal combustion engine operating strategies. One such strategy that has received substantial research attention in the last decade is Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). Although the efficiency and emissions benefits of HCCI are well established, practical limits on the operating range of HCCI engines have inhibited their application in consumer vehicles. One such limit is at high load, where the pressure rise rate in the combustion chamber becomes excessively large. Fuel stratification is a potential strategy for reducing the maximum pressure rise rate in HCCI engines. The aim is to introduce reactivity gradients through fuel stratification to promote sequential auto-ignition rather than a bulk-ignition, as in the homogeneous case. A gasoline-fueled compression ignition engine with fuel stratification is termed a Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engine. Although a reasonable amount of experimental research has been performed for fuel stratification in GCI engines, a clear understanding of how the fundamental in-cylinder processes of fuel spray evaporation, mixing, and heat release contribute to the observed phenomena is lacking. Of particular interest is gasoline's pressure sensitive low-temperature chemistry and how it impacts the sequential auto-ignition of the stratified charge. In order to computationally study GCI with fuel stratification using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and chemical kinetics, two reduced mechanisms have been developed. The reduced mechanisms were developed from a large, detailed mechanism with about 1400 species for a 4-component gasoline surrogate. The two versions of the reduced mechanism developed in this work are: (1) a 96-species version and (2

  3. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2018-01-30

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  4. Impact of thermodynamic properties and heat loss on ignition of transportation fuels in rapid compression machines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz; Hantouche, Mireille; Khurshid, Muneeb; Mohamed, Samah; Nasir, Ehson Fawad; Farooq, Aamir; Roberts, William L.; Knio, Omar; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Rapid compression machines (RCM) are extensively used to study autoignition of a wide variety of fuels at engine relevant conditions. Fuels ranging from pure species to full boiling range gasoline and diesel can be studied in an RCM to develop a better understanding of autoignition kinetics in low to intermediate temperature ranges. In an RCM, autoignition is achieved by compressing a fuel/oxidizer mixture to higher pressure and temperature, thereby initiating chemical reactions promoting ignition. During these experiments, the pressure is continuously monitored and is used to deduce significant events such as the end of compression and the onset of ignition. The pressure profile is also used to assess the temperature evolution of the gas mixture with time using the adiabatic core hypothesis and the heat capacity ratio of the gas mixture. In such RCM studies, real transportation fuels containing many components are often represented by simpler surrogate fuels. While simpler surrogates such as primary reference fuels (PRFs) and ternary primary reference fuel (TPRFs) can match research and motor octane number of transportation fuels, they may not accurately replicate thermodynamic properties (including heat capacity ratio). This non-conformity could exhibit significant discrepancies in the end of compression temperature, thereby affecting ignition delay (τign) measurements. Another aspect of RCMs that can affect τign measurement is post compression heat loss, which depends on various RCM parameters including geometry, extent of insulation, pre-heating temperature etc. To, better understand the effects of these non-chemical kinetic parameters on τign, thermodynamic properties of a number of FACE G gasoline surrogates were calculated and simulated in a multi-zone RCM model. The problem was further investigated using a variance based analysis and individual sensitivities were calculated. This study highlights the effects on τign due to thermodynamic properties of

  5. Ignition Delay Properties of Alternative Fuels with Navy-Relevant Diesel Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    nozzle tip. 8 Figure 3 EMD injector cross-sectional view, after [15]. c. Sturman Injector A Sturman research diesel injector was used to validate...PROPERTIES OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS WITH NAVY-RELEVANT DIESEL INJECTORS by Andrew J. Rydalch June 2014 Thesis Advisor: Christopher M. Brophy...Navy’s Green Fleet Initiative, this thesis researched the ignition characteristics for diesel replacement fuels used with Navy-relevant fuel injectors

  6. CONVERSION OF DIESEL ENGINE INTO SPARK IGNITION ENGINE TO WORK WITH CNG AND LPG FUELS FOR MEETING NEW EMISSION NORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Kaleemuddin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating fuel prices and associated pollution problems of largely exploited petroleum liquid fuel has stimulated the research on abundantly available gaseous fuels to keep the mobility industry intact. In the present work an air cooled diesel engine was modified suitably into a spark ignition engine incorporating electronic ignition and variable speed dependant spark timing to accommodate both LPG and CNG as fuels. Engine was optimized for stoichiometric operation on engine dynamometer. Materials of a few intricate engine components were replaced to suit LPG and CNG application. Ignition timing was mapped to work with gaseous fuels for different speeds. Compensation was done for recovering volumetric efficiency when operated with CNG by introducing more volume of air through resonator. Ignition timing was observed to be the pertinent parameter in achieving good performance with gaseous fuels under consideration. Performance and emission tests were carried out on engine dynamometer and chassis dynamometer. Under wide open throttle and at rated speed condition, it was observed that the peak pressure with LPG was lying between diesel fuel and CNG fuel operation due to slow burning nature of gaseous fuels. As compression ratio was maintained same for LPG and CNG fuel operation, low CO emissions were observed with LPG where as HC + NOx emissions were lower with CNG fuel operation. Chassis dynamometer based emission tests yielded lower CO2 levels with CNG operation.

  7. ANALYSIS OF OPERATING PARAMETERS AND INDICATORS OF A COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH LPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GARBALA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibilities for using alternative fuels to power vehicles equipped with compression ignition (CI engines (diesel. Systems for using such fuels have been discussed. Detailed analysis and research covered the LPG STAG autogas system, which is used to power dual-fuel engine units (LPG+diesel. A description of the operation of the autogas system and installation in a vehicle has been presented. The basic algorithms of the controller, which is an actuating element of the whole system, have been discussed. Protection systems of a serial production engine unit to guarantee its factorycontrolled durability standards have been presented. A long-distance test drive and examinations of the engine over 150,000 km in a Toyota Hilux have been performed. Operating parameters and performance indicators of the engine with STAG LPG+diesel fuelling have been verified. Directions and perspectives for the further development of such a system in diesel-powered cars have been also indicated.

  8. An investigation of the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition engine operating with biodiesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, D.; Tesfa, B.; Yuan, X.; Wang, R.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation has been carried out on the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The experiment was conducted on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine which runs with biodiesel (B50 and B100) and pure diesel. The signals of acoustic, vibration and in-cylinder pressure were measured during the experiment. To correlate the combustion process and the acoustic characteristics, both phenomena have been investigated. The acoustic analysis resulted in the sound level being increased with increasing of engine loads and speeds as well as the sound characteristics being closely correlated to the combustion process. However, acoustic signals are highly sensitive to the ambient conditions and intrusive background noise. Therefore, the spectral subtraction was employed to minimize the effects of background noise in order to enhance the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the acoustic characteristics of CI engine running with different fuels (biodiesel blends and diesel) was analysed for comparison. The results show that the sound energy level of acoustic signals is slightly higher when the engine fuelled by biodiesel and its blends than that of fuelled by normal diesel. Hence, the acoustic characteristics of the CI engine will have useful information for engine condition monitoring and fuel content estimation.

  9. Straight vegetable oils usage in a compression ignition engine - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, R.D.; Murthy, M.S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, National Institute of Technology, Silchar 788010, Assam (India)

    2010-12-15

    The ever increasing fossil fuel usage and cost, environmental concern has forced the world to look for alternatives. Straight vegetable oils in compression ignition engine are a ready solution available, however, with certain limitations and with some advantages as reported by many researchers. A comprehensive and critical review is presented specifically pertaining to straight vegetable oils usage in diesel engine. A detailed record of historical events described. Research carried out specifically under Indian conditions and international research work on the usage of straight vegetable oils in the diesel engine is separately reviewed. Many researchers have reported that straight vegetable oils in small percentage blends with diesel when used lower capacity diesel engines have shown great promise with regards to the thermal performance as well exhaust emissions. This has been explained in detail. Finally based on the review of international as well as Indian research a SWOT analysis is carried out. The review concludes that there is still scope for research in this area. (author)

  10. BENEFITS AND CHALLENGES OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO AT DIESEL ENGINES

    OpenAIRE

    Radivoje B Pešić; Saša T Milojević; Stevan P Veinović

    2010-01-01

    The compression ratio strongly affects the working process and provides an exceptional degree of control over engine performance. In conventional internal combustion engines, the compression ratio is fixed and their performance is therefore a compromise between conflicting requirements. One fundamental problem is that drive units in the vehicles must successfully operate at variable speeds and loads and in different ambient conditions. If a diesel engine has a fixed compression ratio, a minim...

  11. Performance and emission studies on port injection of hydrogen with varied flow rates with Diesel as an ignition source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravanan, N.; Nagarajan, G.

    2010-01-01

    Automobiles are one of the major sources of air pollution in the environment. In addition CO 2 emission, a product of complete combustion also has become a serious issue due to global warming effect. Hence the search for cleaner alternative fuels has become mandatory. Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problems of air pollution and greenhouse gas problems (carbon dioxide), thereby protecting the environment. Hence in the present work, an experimental investigation has been carried out using hydrogen in the dual fuel mode in a Diesel engine system. In the study, a Diesel engine was converted into a dual fuel engine and hydrogen fuel was injected into the intake port while Diesel was injected directly inside the combustion chamber during the compression stroke. Diesel injected inside the combustion chamber will undergo combustion first which in-turn would ignite the hydrogen that will also assist the Diesel combustion. Using electronic control unit (ECU), the injection timings and injection durations were varied for hydrogen injection while for Diesel the injection timing was 23 o crank angle (CA) before injection top dead centre (BITDC). Based on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics, the optimized injection timing was found to be 5 o CA before gas exchange top dead centre (BGTDC) with injection duration of 30 o CA for hydrogen Diesel dual fuel operation. The optimum hydrogen flow rate was found to be 7.5 lpm. Results indicate that the brake thermal efficiency in hydrogen Diesel dual fuel operation increases by 15% compared to Diesel fuel at 75% load. The NO X emissions were higher by 1-2% in dual fuel operation at full load compared to Diesel. Smoke emissions are lower in the entire load spectra due to the absence of carbon in hydrogen fuel. The carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions were lesser in hydrogen Diesel dual fuel operation compared to Diesel. The use of hydrogen

  12. Performance and emission studies on port injection of hydrogen with varied flow rates with Diesel as an ignition source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, N. [ERC Engines, Tata Motors, Pimpri, Pune (India); Nagarajan, G. [Internal Combustion Engineering Division, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Guindy, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2010-07-15

    Automobiles are one of the major sources of air pollution in the environment. In addition CO{sub 2} emission, a product of complete combustion also has become a serious issue due to global warming effect. Hence the search for cleaner alternative fuels has become mandatory. Hydrogen is expected to be one of the most important fuels in the near future for solving the problems of air pollution and greenhouse gas problems (carbon dioxide), thereby protecting the environment. Hence in the present work, an experimental investigation has been carried out using hydrogen in the dual fuel mode in a Diesel engine system. In the study, a Diesel engine was converted into a dual fuel engine and hydrogen fuel was injected into the intake port while Diesel was injected directly inside the combustion chamber during the compression stroke. Diesel injected inside the combustion chamber will undergo combustion first which in-turn would ignite the hydrogen that will also assist the Diesel combustion. Using electronic control unit (ECU), the injection timings and injection durations were varied for hydrogen injection while for Diesel the injection timing was 23 crank angle (CA) before injection top dead centre (BITDC). Based on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics, the optimized injection timing was found to be 5 CA before gas exchange top dead centre (BGTDC) with injection duration of 30 CA for hydrogen Diesel dual fuel operation. The optimum hydrogen flow rate was found to be 7.5 lpm. Results indicate that the brake thermal efficiency in hydrogen Diesel dual fuel operation increases by 15% compared to Diesel fuel at 75% load. The NO{sub X} emissions were higher by 1-2% in dual fuel operation at full load compared to Diesel. Smoke emissions are lower in the entire load spectra due to the absence of carbon in hydrogen fuel. The carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions were lesser in hydrogen Diesel dual fuel operation compared to Diesel. The use of

  13. Optimization of operating conditions in the early direct injection premixed charge compression ignition regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, M.D.; Luijten, C.C.M.; Rijk, E.P.; Albrecht, B.A.; Baert, R.S.G.

    2009-01-01

    Early Direct Injection Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (EDI PCCI) is a widely researched combustion concept, which promises soot and CO2 emission levels of a spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engine, respectively. Application of this concept to a conventional CI engine using a

  14. Influences of ignition improver additive on ternary (diesel-biodiesel-higher alcohol) blends thermal stability and diesel engine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imdadul, H.K.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Zulkifli, N.W.M.; Alabdulkarem, Abdullah; Rashed, M.M.; Ashraful, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ignition improver additives makes the biodiesel-alcohol blends more thermally stable. • Density and cetane number improved significantly with EHN mixing. • BP and BSFC improved by adding ignition improver additives. • Nitric oxides and smoke of the EHN treated blends decreased. • CO and HC increased slightly with EHN addition. - Abstract: Pentanol is a long chain alcohol produced from renewable sources and considered as a promising biofuel as a blending component with diesel or biodiesel blends. However, the lower cetane number of alcohols is a limitation, and it is important to increase the overall cetane number of biodiesel fuel blends for efficient combustion and lower emission. In this consideration, ignition improver additive 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) were used at a proportion of 1000 and 2000 ppm to diesel-biodiesel-pentanol blends. Experiments were conducted in a single cylinder; water-cooled DI diesel engine operated at full throttle and varying speed condition. The thermal stability of the modified ternary fuel blends was evaluated through thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, and the physic-chemical properties of the fuel as well as engine characteristics were studied and compared. The addition of EHN to ternary fuel blends enhanced the cetane number significantly without any significant adverse effect on the other properties. TGA and DSC analysis reported about the improvement of thermal characteristics of the modified blends. It was found that, implementing ignition improver make the diesel-biodiesel-alcohol blends more thermally stable. Also, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), nitric oxides (NO) and smoke emission reduced remarkably with the addition of EHN. Introducing EHN to diesel-biodiesel-alcohol blends increased the cetane number, shorten the ignition delay by increasing the diffusion rate and improve combustion. Hence, the NO and BSFC reduced while, carbon

  15. Physical and chemical effects of low octane gasoline fuels on compression ignition combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Viollet, Yoann; Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid; Im, Hong G.; Chang, Junseok

    2016-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines running on low octane gasoline fuels are considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. In this study, three fuels with different chemical and physical characteristics have

  16. Potential for using a tyre pyrolysis oil-biodiesel blend in a diesel engine at different compression ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Murugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The possibility of operating a compression ignition engine with a non petroleum diesel fuel. • A possible solution to replace certain amount of biodiesel by tyre pyrolysis oil in a biodiesel fueled diesel engine. • The optimum compression ratio for engine fueled with biodiesel-tyre pyrolysis oil blend. - Abstract: This study is aimed at investigating effects of varying the compression ratio at optimum injection timing and nozzle opening pressure on the behaviour of a diesel engine, using a non-petroleum fuel, i.e. a blend of 80% biodiesel, and 20% oil obtained from pyrolysis of waste tyres. The engine was subjected to one lower (16.5) and one higher (18.5) compression ratio in addition to the standard compression ratio of 17.5. At the higher compression ratio of 18.5 and full load, shorter ignition delay, maximum cylinder pressure and higher heat release rate were found for the blend, compared to those of the original compression ratio. The increase in the compression ratio from 17.5 to 18.5 for the blend improved the brake thermal efficiency by about 8% compared to that of the original compression ratio at full load. The experimental results indicated that for the blend at a higher compression ratio of 18.5, the brake specific carbon monoxide (BSCO), brake specific hydrocarbon emission (BSHC) and smoke opacity were reduced by about 10.5%, 32%, and 17.4% respectively, than those of the original compression ratio at full load

  17. Effects of In-Cylinder Mixing on Low Octane Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir; Sim, Jaeheon; Viollet, Yoann; Im, Hong G.; Chang, Junseok

    2016-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and in the volatility range of gasoline fuels. In this study, we have investigated the effect of different injection timings at part-load conditions using light naphtha stream in single cylinder engine experiments in the GCI combustion mode with injection pressure of 130 bar. A toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) was used as a surrogate for the light naphtha in the engine simulations performed here. A physical surrogate based on the evaporation characteristics of the light naphtha has been developed and its properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. Full cycle GCI computational fluid dynamics (CFD) engine simulations have been successfully performed while changing the start of injection (SOI) timing from -50° to -11 ° CAD aTDC. The effect of SOI on mixing and combustion phasing was investigated using detailed equivalence ratio-temperature maps and ignition delay times. Both experimental and computational results consistently showed that an SOI of -30° CAD aTDC has the most advanced combustion phasing (CA50), with the highest NOx emission. The effects of the SOI on the fuel containment in the bowl of the piston, the ignition delay time, combustion rate and emissions have been carefully examined through the CFD calculations. It was found that the competition between the equivalence ratio and temperature is the controlling parameter in determining the combustion phasings.

  18. Effects of In-Cylinder Mixing on Low Octane Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-04-05

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and in the volatility range of gasoline fuels. In this study, we have investigated the effect of different injection timings at part-load conditions using light naphtha stream in single cylinder engine experiments in the GCI combustion mode with injection pressure of 130 bar. A toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) was used as a surrogate for the light naphtha in the engine simulations performed here. A physical surrogate based on the evaporation characteristics of the light naphtha has been developed and its properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. Full cycle GCI computational fluid dynamics (CFD) engine simulations have been successfully performed while changing the start of injection (SOI) timing from -50° to -11 ° CAD aTDC. The effect of SOI on mixing and combustion phasing was investigated using detailed equivalence ratio-temperature maps and ignition delay times. Both experimental and computational results consistently showed that an SOI of -30° CAD aTDC has the most advanced combustion phasing (CA50), with the highest NOx emission. The effects of the SOI on the fuel containment in the bowl of the piston, the ignition delay time, combustion rate and emissions have been carefully examined through the CFD calculations. It was found that the competition between the equivalence ratio and temperature is the controlling parameter in determining the combustion phasings.

  19. A RCCI operational limits assessment in a medium duty compression ignition engine using an adapted compression ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; Pastor, José V.; García, Antonio; Boronat, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • RCCI with CR 12.75 reaches up to 80% load fulfilling mechanical limits. • Ultra-low levels in NOx and soot emissions are obtained in the whole engine map. • Ultra-high levels of CO and uHC have been measured overall at low load. • RCCI improves fuel consumption from 25% to 80% engine loads comparing with CDC. - Abstract: Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition concept offers an ultra-low nitrogen oxide and soot emissions with a high thermal efficiency. This work investigates the capabilities of this low temperature combustion concept to work on the whole map of a medium duty engine proposing strategies to solve its main challenges. In this sense, an extension to high loads of the concept without exceeding mechanical stress as well as a mitigation of carbon oxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at low load together with a fuel consumption penalty have been identified as main Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition drawbacks. For this purpose, a single cylinder engine derived from commercial four cylinders medium-duty engine with an adapted compression ratio of 12.75 is used. Commercial 95 octane gasoline was used as a low reactivity fuel and commercial diesel as a high reactivity fuel. Thus, the study consists of two different parts. Firstly, the work is focused on the development and evaluation of an engine map trying to achieve the maximum possible load without exceeding a pressure rise rate of 15 bar/CAD. The second part holds on improving fuel consumption and carbon oxide and unburned hydrocarbons emissions at low load. Results suggest that it is possible to achieve up to 80% of nominal conventional diesel combustion engine load without overpassing the constraints of pressure rise rate (below 15 bar/CAD) and maximum pressure peak (below 190 bar) while obtaining ultra-low levels of nitrogen oxide and soot emissions. Regarding low load challenges, it has developed a particular methodology sweeping the gasoline-diesel blend together

  20. Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M

    1933-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine the factors which control the combustion in a high-speed compression-ignition engine is presented. Indicator cards were taken with the Farnboro indicator and analyzed according to the tangent method devised by Schweitzer. The analysis show that in a quiescent combustion chamber increasing the time lag of auto-ignition increases the maximum rate of combustion. Increasing the maximum rate of combustion increases the tendency for detonation to occur. The results show that by increasing the air temperature during injection the start of combustion can be forced to take place during injection and so prevent detonation from occurring. It is shown that the rate of fuel injection does not in itself control the rate of combustion.

  1. Combustion and emissions characteristics of a compression ignition engine fueled with n-butanol blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusri, I. M.; Mamat, R.; Ali, O. M.; Aziz, A.; Akasyah, M. K.; Kamarulzaman, M. K.; Ihsan, C. K.; Mahmadul, H. M.; Rosdi, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The use of biomass based renewable fuel, n-butanol blends for compression ignition (CI) engine has attracted wide attention due to its superior properties such as better miscibility, higher energy content, and cetane number. In this present study the use of n-butanol 10% blends (Bu10) with diesel fuel has been tested using 4-cylinder, 4-stroke common rail direct injection CI engine to investigate the combustion and emissions of the blended fuels. Based on the tested engine at BMEP=3.5Bar Bu10 fuel indicates lower first and second peak pressure by 5.4% and 2.4% for engine speed 1000rpm and 4.4% and 2.1% for engine speed 2500rpm compared to diesel fuel respectively. Percentage reduction relative to diesel fuel at engine speeds 1000rpm and 2500rpm for Bu10: Exhaust temperature was 7.5% and 5.2% respectively; Nitrogen oxides (NOx) 73.4% and 11.3% respectively.

  2. Studying the effect of compression ratio on an engine fueled with waste oil produced biodiesel/diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed EL_Kassaby

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Wasted cooking oil from restaurants was used to produce neat (pure biodiesel through transesterification, and then used to prepare biodiesel/diesel blends. The effect of blending ratio and compression ratio on a diesel engine performance has been investigated. Emission and combustion characteristics was studded when the engine operated using the different blends (B10, B20, B30, and B50 and normal diesel fuel (B0 as well as when varying the compression ratio from 14 to 16 to 18. The result shows that the engine torque for all blends increases as the compression ratio increases. The bsfc for all blends decreases as the compression ratio increases and at all compression ratios bsfc remains higher for the higher blends as the biodiesel percent increase. The change of compression ratio from 14 to 18 resulted in, 18.39%, 27.48%, 18.5%, and 19.82% increase in brake thermal efficiency in case of B10, B20, B30, and B50 respectively. On an average, the CO2 emission increased by 14.28%, the HC emission reduced by 52%, CO emission reduced by 37.5% and NOx emission increased by 36.84% when compression ratio was increased from 14 to 18. In spite of the slightly higher viscosity and lower volatility of biodiesel, the ignition delay seems to be lower for biodiesel than for diesel. On average, the delay period decreased by 13.95% when compression ratio was increased from 14 to 18. From this study, increasing the compression ratio had more benefits with biodiesel than that with pure diesel.

  3. Results of experiments with flare type igniters on diesel fuel and crude oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, C.; Hankins, P.

    1997-01-01

    Development of a hand-deployable igniter that could ignite contained diesel fuel and crude oil emulsions on water was described. The igniter was developed as part of the U.S. Navy Supervisor of Salvage (SUPSALV) In-Situ Burn (ISB) system. It is a manually operated, electrically fired, high temperature flare type igniter. It is 41 cm long, 10 cm in diameter, weighs 1.5 kg, and is packaged and shipped with the ISB system. The chemical and mineral composition of the flair allows for a three minute burn of up to 1370 degrees C (2500 degrees F) at the center. The flare is most effective when used in conjunction with a shroud of sorbent material which traps and holds oil around the burning flare aiding the ignition process by increasing the initial propagation area. In small-scale tank experiments the flare ignited diesel fuel in ambient temperatures of 3 degrees C, with winds of 8 to 10 m/sec. The flare also ignited 22.5 per cent water-in crude oil emulsion in 3 degrees C temperatures. 4 refs., 3 tabs

  4. Oxygenated palm biodiesel: Ignition, combustion and emissions quantification in a light-duty diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Ng, Jo-Han; Ahmad, Solehin; Rajoo, Srithar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Diesel engine test using palm biodiesel and diesel at varying speed and load. • Palm biodiesel shows better performance at late stage of cycle evolution. • Oxygen in palm biodiesel fuel improves local combustion at late stage of combustion. • Emissions of NO are lower at low and medium operating speed for palm biodiesel. • Formulation of trend guide for performance and emissions characteristics for light-duty diesel engines. - Abstract: This paper presents an investigation of oxygenated neat palm biodiesel in a direct injection single cylinder diesel engine in terms of ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics. Conventional non-oxygenated diesel fuel is compared as baseline. The engine testing is performed between the operating speed of 2000–3000 rpm and load of up to 3 bar of brake mean effective pressure. From it, a total of 50 experiment cases are tested to form a comprehensive operational speed-load contour map for ignition and combustion; while various engine-out emissions such as NO, CO, UHCs and CO 2 are compared based on fuel type-speed combinations. The ignition and combustion evolution contour maps quantify the absolute ignition delay period and elucidate the difference between that of palm biodiesel and fossil diesel. Although diesel has shorter ignition delay period by up to 0.6 CAD at 3000 rpm and burns more rapidly at the start of combustion, combustion of palm biodiesel accelerates during the mid-combustion phase and overtakes diesel in the cumulative heat release rates (HRR) prior to the 90% cumulative HRR. This can be attributed to the oxygen contained in palm biodiesel assisting in localized regions of combustion. In terms of performance, the oxygenated nature of palm biodiesel provided mixed performances with improved thermal efficiency and increased brake specific fuel consumption, due to the improved combustion and lower calorific values, respectively. Emission measurements show that NO for palm biodiesel is

  5. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion: Challenges and Proposed Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine and car manufacturers are experiencing the demand concerning fuel efficiency and low emissions from both consumers and governments. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI is an alternative combustion technology that is cleaner and more efficient than the other types of combustion. Although the thermal efficiency and NOx emission of HCCI engine are greater in comparison with traditional engines, HCCI combustion has several main difficulties such as controlling of ignition timing, limited power output, and weak cold-start capability. In this study a literature review on HCCI engine has been performed and HCCI challenges and proposed solutions have been investigated from the point view of Ignition Timing that is the main problem of this engine. HCCI challenges are investigated by many IC engine researchers during the last decade, but practical solutions have not been presented for a fully HCCI engine. Some of the solutions are slow response time and some of them are technically difficult to implement. So it seems that fully HCCI engine needs more investigation to meet its mass-production and the future research and application should be considered as part of an effort to achieve low-temperature combustion in a wide range of operating conditions in an IC engine.

  6. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D 3 He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D 3 He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R cm ) from the downshift of the shock-produced D 3 He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR

  7. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  8. Evaporation and Ignition Characteristics of Water Emulsified Diesel under Conventional and Low Temperature Combustion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The combination of emulsified diesel and low temperature combustion (LTC technology has great potential in reducing engine emissions. A visualization study on the spray and combustion characteristics of water emulsified diesel was conducted experimentally in a constant volume chamber under conventional and LTC conditions. The effects of ambient temperature on the evaporation, ignition and combustion characteristics of water emulsified diesel were studied under cold, evaporating and combustion conditions. Experimental results showed that the ambient temperature had little effect on the spray structures, in terms of the liquid core length, the spray shape and the spray area. However, higher ambient temperature slightly reduced the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD of the spray droplets. The auto-ignition delay time increased significantly with the decrease of the ambient temperature. The ignition process always occurred at the entrainment region near the front periphery of the liquid core. This entrainment region was evolved from the early injected fuel droplets which were heated and mixed by the continuous entrainment until the local temperature and equivalence ratio reached the ignition condition. The maximum value of integrated natural flame luminosity (INFL reduced by 60% when the ambient temperature dropped from 1000 to 800 K, indicating a significant decrease of the soot emissions could be achieved by LTC combustion mode than the conventional diesel engines.

  9. Pneumatic hybridization of a diesel engine using compressed air storage for wind-diesel energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basbous, Tammam; Younes, Rafic; Ilinca, Adrian; Perron, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we are studying an innovative solution to reduce fuel consumption and production cost for electricity production by Diesel generators. The solution is particularly suitable for remote areas where the cost of energy is very high not only because of inherent cost of technology but also due to transportation costs. It has significant environmental benefits as the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation is a significant source of GHG (Greenhouse Gas) emissions. The use of hybrid systems that combine renewable sources, especially wind, and Diesel generators, reduces fuel consumption and operation cost and has environmental benefits. Adding a storage element to the hybrid system increases the penetration level of the renewable sources, that is the percentage of renewable energy in the overall production, and further improves fuel savings. In a previous work, we demonstrated that CAES (Compressed Air Energy Storage) has numerous advantages for hybrid wind-diesel systems due to its low cost, high power density and reliability. The pneumatic hybridization of the Diesel engine consists to introduce the CAES through the admission valve. We have proven that we can improve the combustion efficiency and therefore the fuel consumption by optimizing Air/Fuel ratio thanks to the CAES assistance. As a continuation of these previous analyses, we studied the effect of the intake pressure and temperature and the exhaust pressure on the thermodynamic cycle of the diesel engine and determined the values of these parameters that will optimize fuel consumption. -- Highlights: ► Fuel economy analysis of a simple pneumatic hybridization of the Diesel engine using stored compressed air. ► Thermodynamic analysis of the pneumatic hybridization of diesel engines for hybrid wind-diesel energy systems. ► Analysis of intake pressure and temperature of compressed air and exhaust pressure on pressure/temperature during Diesel thermodynamic cycle. ► Direct admission of

  10. Operation of neat pine oil biofuel in a diesel engine by providing ignition assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; Yang, W.M.; Lee, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Operational feasibility of neat pine oil biofuel has been examined. • Pine oil suffers lower cetane number, which mandates for necessary ignition assistance. • Ignition support is provided by preheating the inlet air and incorporating a glow plug. • At an inlet air temperature of 60 °C, the BTE for pine oil was found to be in par with diesel. • CO and smoke emissions were reduced by 13.2% and 16.8%, respectively, for neat pine oil. - Abstract: The notion to provide ignition support for the effective operation of lower cetane fuels in a diesel engine has been ably adopted in the present study for the sole fuel operation of pine oil biofuel. Having noted that the lower cetane number and higher self-ignition temperature of pine oil biofuel would inhibit its direct use in a diesel engine, combined ignition support in the form of preheating the inlet air and installing a glow plug in the cylinder head has been provided to improve the auto-ignition of pine oil. While, an air preheater, installed in the inlet manifold of the engine, preheated the inlet air so as to provide ignition assistance partially, the incorporation of glow plug in the cylinder head imparted the further required ignition support appropriately. Subsequently, the operational feasibility of neat pine oil biofuel has been examined in a single cylinder diesel engine and the engine test results were analyzed. From the experimental investigation, though the engine performance and emissions such as CO (carbon monoxide) and smoke were noted to be better for pine oil with an inlet air temperature of 40 °C, the engine suffered the setback of knocking due to delayed SOC (start of combustion). However, with the ignition support through glow plug and preheating of inlet air, the engine knocking was prevented and the normal operation of the engine was ensured. Categorically, at an inlet air temperature of 60 °C, BTE (brake thermal efficiency) was found to be in par with diesel, while

  11. Dynamic control of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Mehresh, Parag [Peoria, IL; Schuh, David [Peoria, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL

    2008-06-03

    A homogenous charge compression ignition engine is operated by compressing a charge mixture of air, exhaust and fuel in a combustion chamber to an autoignition condition of the fuel. The engine may facilitate a transition from a first combination of speed and load to a second combination of speed and load by changing the charge mixture and compression ratio. This may be accomplished in a consecutive engine cycle by adjusting both a fuel injector control signal and a variable valve control signal away from a nominal variable valve control signal. Thereafter in one or more subsequent engine cycles, more sluggish adjustments are made to at least one of a geometric compression ratio control signal and an exhaust gas recirculation control signal to allow the variable valve control signal to be readjusted back toward its nominal variable valve control signal setting. By readjusting the variable valve control signal back toward its nominal setting, the engine will be ready for another transition to a new combination of engine speed and load.

  12. Visualizing ignition and combustion of methanol mixtures in a diesel engine; Methanol funmu no glow chakka to nensho no kashika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inomoto, Y; Harada, T; Kusaka, J; Daisho, Y; Kihara, R; Saito, T [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    A glow-assisted ignition system tends to suffer from poor ignitability and slow flame propagation at low load in a direct-injection diesel engine fueled with methanol. To investigate the ignition process and improve such disadvantages, methanol sprays, their ignition and flames were visualized at high pressures and temperatures using a modified two-stroke engine. The results show that parameters influencing ignition, the location of a glow-plug, swirl level, pressure and temperature are important. In addition, a full kinetics calculation was conducted to predict the delay of methanol mixture ignition by taking into account 39 chemical species and 157 elementary reactions. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Study of ignition characteristics of microemulsion of coconut oil under off diesel engine conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir H. Salmani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing awareness of the depletion of fossil fuel resources and the environmental benefits motivates the use of vegetable oils, however there is little known information about ignition and combustion characteristics of vegetable oil based fuels under off diesel engine conditions. These conditions are normally reached either during starting or when the engine is sufficiently worn out. A fuel was prepared by co-solvent blending of coconut oil with 20% butyl alcohol and was analysed. An experimental study of the measurement of ignition delay (ID characteristics of conical fuel sprays impinging on hot surface in cylindrical combustion chamber was carried out. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of hot surface temperatures on ignition delays of microemulsion of coconut oil at various ambient air pressures and temperatures which would have reached under off diesel engine conditions. An experimental set-up was designed and developed for a maximum air pressure of 200 bar and a maximum temperature of 800 °C with the emphasis on optical method for the measurement of ignition delay. Hot surface temperature range chosen was 300–450 °C and ambient air pressure (inside the combustion chamber range chosen was 10–25 bar. Present study shows that at fixed injection pressure and fixed ambient (hot surface temperature, at higher ambient air pressure (25 bar inside the combustion chamber, ignition delay of diesel and microemulsion of coconut oil are comparable and therefore are having matching combustion characteristics. Although a pressure of 25 bar is much less than the precombustion pressure of most diesel engines but again conclusively establish that combustion characteristics are same despite lower air pressure, temperature and lower injection pressure. At higher injection pressure ignition delay of microemulsion of coconut oil and pure diesel attains the lower value at the same ambient air pressure inside the

  14. Experimental investigation of hydrogen energy share improvement in a compression ignition engine using water injection and compression ratio reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy efficiency (EE) increased with increase in hydrogen (H_2) energy share. • H_2 energy share increased from 19% to 79% with combined CR reduction and water. • In-cylinder temperature decreased significantly with water addition and CR reduction. • HC, CO, smoke and NO_x emissions with water and CR are lower than base diesel. - Abstract: This study deals with the effect of water addition on enhancement of maximum hydrogen energy share in a compression ignition engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode. The specific water consumption (SWC) was varied from 130 to 480 g/kW h in step of 70 g/kW h using manifold and port injection methods. Subsequently, the combined effect of reduction of compression ratio (CR) of the engine (from 19.5:1 (base) to 16.5:1 and 15.4:1) along with water addition on further enhancement of hydrogen energy share is investigated. The hydrogen energy share was limited to 18.8% with conventional dual fuel mode due to knocking. However, the energy share increased to 66.5% with water addition (maximum SWC: 480 g/kW h), and 79% with combined control strategies (SWC of 340 g/kW h and CR reduction to 16.5:1). Thermal efficiency of the engine under water added dual fuel mode is higher than base diesel mode (single fuel mode), but it is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode without water. The efficiency of the engine with reduced CR and water addition is lower than the conventional dual fuel mode, however at the CR of 16.5:1 and SWC of 340 g/kW h, the efficiency is comparable with base diesel mode efficiency. Hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, smoke, and oxides of nitrogen emissions of the engine with water addition (340 g/kW h) and CR reduction (to 16.5:1) decreased significantly as compared to base diesel mode, but slightly higher than conventional dual fuel mode.

  15. Performance Characterization and Auto-Ignition Performance of a Rapid Compression Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A rapid compression machine (RCM test bench is developed in this study. The performance characterization and auto-ignition performance tests are conducted at an initial temperature of 293 K, a compression ratio of 9.5 to 16.5, a compressed temperature of 650 K to 850 K, a driving gas pressure range of 0.25 MPa to 0.7 MPa, an initial pressure of 0.04 MPa to 0.09 MPa, and a nitrogen dilution ratio of 35% to 65%. A new type of hydraulic piston is used to address the problem in which the hydraulic buffer adversely affects the rapid compression process. Auto-ignition performance tests of the RCM are then performed using a DME–O2–N2 mixture. The two-stage ignition delay and negative temperature coefficient (NTC behavior of the mixture are observed. The effects of driving gas pressure, compression ratio, initial pressure, and nitrogen dilution ratio on the two-stage ignition delay are investigated. Results show that both the first-stage and overall ignition delays tend to increase with increasing driving gas pressure. The driving gas pressure within a certain range does not significantly influence the compressed pressure. With increasing compression ratio, the first-stage ignition delay is shortened, whereas the second-stage ignition delay is extended. With increasing initial pressure, both the first-stage and second-stage ignition delays are shortened. The second-stage ignition delay is shortened to a greater extent than that of the first-stage. With increasing nitrogen dilution ratio, the first-stage ignition delay is shortened, whereas the second-stage is extended. Thus, overall ignition delay presents different trends under various compression ratios and compressed pressure conditions.

  16. Approaches to Improve Mixing in Compression Ignition Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boot, M.D.

    2010-04-20

    This thesis presents three approaches to suppress soot emissions in compression ignition (CI) engines. First, a fuel chemistry approach is proposed. A particular class of fuels - cyclic oxygenates - is identified which is capable of significantly reducing engine-out soot emissions. By means of experiments in 'closed' and optical engines, as well as on an industrial burner, two possible mechanisms are identified that could account for the observed reduction in soot: a) an extended ignition delay (ID) and b) a longer flame lift-length (FLoL). Further analysis of the available data suggests that both mechanisms are related to the inherently low reactivity of the fuel class in question. These findings are largely in line with data found in literature. In the second approach, it is attempted to reduce soot by adopting an alternative combustion concept: early direct injection premixed charge compression ignition (EDI PCCI). In this concept, fuel is injected relatively early in the compression stroke instead of conventional, close to top-dead-center (TDC), injection schemes. While the goal of soot reduction can indeed be achieved via this approach, an important drawback must be addressed before this concept can be considered practically viable. Due to the fact that combustion chamber temperature and pressure is relatively low early in the compression stroke, fuel impingement against the cylinder liner (wall-wetting) often occurs. Consequently, high levels of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), oil dilution and poor efficiency are observed. Several strategies, combining a limited engine modification with dedicated air management and fueling settings, are investigated to tackle this drawback. All of these strategies, and especially their combination, resulted in significantly lower UHC emissions and improved fuel economy. Although UHC emissions are typically a tell-tale sign of wall-wetting, as mentioned earlier, the relation between these two has long been hypothetical

  17. International Standards to Reduce Emissions from Marine Diesel Engines and Their Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview of EPA coordination with International Maritime Organization including a list of all international regulations and materials related to emissions from marine compression-ignition (diesel) engines.

  18. Future combustion technology for synthetic and renewable fuels in compression ignition engines (REFUEL). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakko-Saksa, P.; Brink, A.; Happonen, M. [and others

    2012-07-01

    This domestic project, Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Compression Ignition Engines (ReFuel), was part of a Collaborative Task 'Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Transport' of International Energy Agency (IEA) Combustion Agreement. This international Collaborative Task is coordinated by Finland. The three-year (2009-2011) prooject was a joint research project with Aalto University (Aalto), Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and Aabo Akademi University (AAU). The project was funded by TEKES, Waertsilae Oyj, Agro Sisu Power, Aker Arctic Technology Oy and the research partners listed above. Modern renewable diesel fuels have excellent physical and chemical properties, in comparison to traditional crude oil based fuels. Purely paraffinic fuels do not contain aromatic compounds and they are totally sulphur free. Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO) was studied as an example of paraffinic high cetane number (CN) diesel fuels. HVO has no storage and low temperature problems like the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) have. The combustion properties are better than those of crude oil based fuels and FAME, because they have very high cetane numbers and contain no polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). With low HVO density, viscosity and distillation temperatures, these advantageous properties allow far more advanced combustion strategies, such as very high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates or extreme Miller timings, than has been possible with current fossil fuels. The implementation of these advanced combustion technologies, together with the novel renewable diesel fuel, brought significant nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), particulate matter (PM) emission reductions with no efficiency losses. (orig.)

  19. Applicability of dimethyl ether (DME) in a compression ignition engine as an alternative fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Su Han; Lee, Chang Sik

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Overall characteristics of DME fueled engine are reviewed. • Fuel properties characteristics of DME are introduced. • New technologies for DME vehicle are systemically reviewed. • Research trends for the development of DME vehicle in the world are introduced. - Abstract: From the perspectives of environmental conservation and energy security, dimethyl-ether (DME) is an attractive alternative to conventional diesel fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This review article deals with the application characteristics of DME in CI engines, including its fuel properties, spray and atomization characteristics, combustion performance, and exhaust emission characteristics. We also discuss the various technological problems associated with its application in actual engine systems and describe the field test results of developed DME-fueled vehicles. Combustion of DME fuel is associated with low NO x , HC, and CO emissions. In addition, PM emission of DME combustion is very low due to its molecular structure. Moreover, DME has superior atomization and vaporization characteristics than conventional diesel. A high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate can be used in a DME engine to reduce NO x emission without any increase in soot emission, because DME combustion is essentially soot-free. To decrease NO x emission, engine after-treatment devices, such as lean NO x traps (LNTs), urea-selective catalytic reduction, and the combination of EGR and catalyst have been applied. To use DME fuel in automotive vehicles, injector design, fuel feed pump, and the high-pressure injection pump have to be modified, combustion system components, including sealing materials, have to be rigorously designed. To use DME fuel in the diesel vehicles, more research is required to enhance its calorific value and engine durability due to the low lubricity of DME, and methods to reduce NO x emission are also required

  20. The use of modified tyre derived fuel for compression ignition engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilusa, T J

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated physical and chemical modification of tyre-derived fuel oil (TDFO) obtained from pyrolysis of waste tyres and rubber products for application as an alternative fuel for compression ignition engines (CIE's). TDFO collected from a local waste tyre treatment facility was refined via a novel "oxidative gas-phase fractional distillation over 13× molecular sieves" to recover the light to medium fractions of the TDFO while oxidising and capturing some sulphur compounds in a gas phase. This was followed by desulphurization and chemical modification to improve cetane number, kinematic viscosity and fuel stability. The resulting fuel was tested in an ADE407T truck engine to compare its performance with petroleum diesel fuel. It was discovered that gas phase oxidative fractional distillation reduces the low boiling point sulphur compounds in TDFO such as mercaptans. Using petroleum diesel fuel as a reference, it was observed that the produced fuel has a lower cetane number, flash point and viscosity. On storage the fuel tends to form fibrous microstructures as a result of auto-oxidation of asphaltenes present in the fuel. Mixtures of alkyl nitrate, vinyl acetate, methacrylic anhydride, methyl-tert butyl ether, n-hexane and n-heptane were used to chemically modify the fuel in accordance with the minimum fuel specifications as per SANS 342. The engine performance tests results did not show any sign of engine ceasing or knocking effect. The power-torque trend was very consistent and compared well with petroleum diesel fuelled engine. The levels of total sulphur are still considerably high compared to other cleaner fuel alternatives derived from zero sulphur sources. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Numerical Investigation of a Gasoline-Like Fuel in a Heavy-Duty Compression Ignition Engine Using Global Sensitivity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Pinaki; Probst, Daniel; Pei, Yuanjiang; Zhang, Yu; Traver, Michael; Cleary, David; Som, Sibendu

    2017-03-28

    Fuels in the gasoline auto-ignition range (Research Octane Number (RON) > 60) have been demonstrated to be effective alternatives to diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Such fuels allow more time for mixing with oxygen before combustion starts, owing to longer ignition delay. Moreover, by controlling fuel injection timing, it can be ensured that the in-cylinder mixture is “premixed enough” before combustion occurs to prevent soot formation while remaining “sufficiently inhomogeneous” in order to avoid excessive heat release rates. Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) has the potential to offer diesel-like efficiency at a lower cost and can be achieved with fuels such as low-octane straight run gasoline which require significantly less processing in the refinery compared to today’s fuels. To aid the design and optimization of a compression ignition (CI) combustion system using such fuels, a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) was conducted to understand the relative influence of various design parameters on efficiency, emissions and heat release rate. The design parameters included injection strategies, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) fraction, temperature and pressure at intake valve closure and injector configuration. These were varied simultaneously to achieve various targets of ignition timing, combustion phasing, overall burn duration, emissions, fuel consumption, peak cylinder pressure and maximum pressure rise rate. The baseline case was a three-dimensional closed-cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with a sector mesh at medium load conditions. Eleven design parameters were considered and ranges of variation were prescribed to each of these. These input variables were perturbed in their respective ranges using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to generate a set of 256 CFD simulations and the targets were calculated from the simulation results. GSA was then applied as a screening tool to identify the input parameters having the most

  2. Impact of Biodiesel Blends and Di-Ethyl-Ether on the Cold Starting Performance of a Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Clenci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. Many studies have been conducted to assess the impact of biodiesel use on engine performances. Most of them were carried out in positive temperature conditions. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. Since diesel engine behavior at negative temperatures is an important quality criterion of the engine’s operation, one goal of this paper is to assess the starting performance at −20 °C of a common automotive compression ignition engine, fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Results showed that increasing the biodiesel blend ratio generated a great deterioration in engine startability. Another goal of this study was to determine the biodiesel blend ratio limit at which the engine would not start at −20 °C and, subsequently, to investigate the impact of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE injection into the intake duct on the engine’s startability, which was found to be recovered.

  3. Dual-fuelling of a direct-injection automotive diesel engine by diesel and compressed natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirouzpanah, V.; Mohammadi Kosha, A.; Mosseibi, A.; Moshirabadi, J.; Gangi, A.; Moghadaspour, M.

    2000-01-01

    Application of Compressed Natural Gas in diesel engines has always been important, especially in the field of automotive engineering. This is due to easy accessibility, better mixing quality and good combustion characteristics of the Compressed Natural Gas fuel. In this study the application of Compressed Natural Gas fuel along with diesel oil in a heavy duty direct-injection automotive diesel engine is experimentally investigated. In order to convert a diesel engine into a diesel-gas one, the so called m ixed diesel-gas a pproach has been used and for this purpose a carbureted Compressed Natural Gas fuel system has been designed and manufactured. For controlling quantity of Compressed Natural Gas, the gas valve is linked to the diesel fuel injection system by means of a set of rods. Then, the dual-fuel system is adjusted so that, at full load conditions, the quantity of diesel fuel is reduced to 20% and 80% of its equivalent energy is substituted by Compressed Natural Gas fuel. Also injection pressure of pilot jet is increased by 11.4%. Performance and emission tests are conducted under variation of load and speed on both diesel and diesel-gas engines. Results show that, with equal power and torque, the diesel-gas engine has the potential to improve overall engine performance and emission. For example, at rated power and speed, fuel economy increases by 5.48%, the amount of smoke decreases by 78%, amount of CO decreases by 64.3% and mean exhaust gas temperature decreases by 6.4%

  4. Fuels for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. Automotive fuels survey. Part 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walwijk, M.

    2001-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a third mode of operation for internal combustion engines, beside spark ignition and conventional compression ignition. This report concentrates on the requirements that HCCI operation puts on fuels for these engines. For readers with limited time available, this summary describes the main findings. Policy makers that need some more background information may turn directly to chapter 7, 'Fuels for HCCI engines'. The rest of this report can be considered as a reference guide for more detailed information. The driving force to investigate HCCI engines is the potential of low emissions and simultaneously high energy efficiency. HCCI is gaining attention the last few years. However, HCCI engines are still in the research phase. After many experiments with prototype engines, people have now started working on computer simulations of the combustion process, to obtain a fundamental understanding of HCCI combustion and to steer future engine developments. In HCCI engines, an air/fuel mixture is prepared before it enters the combustion chamber. The homogeneous mixture is in the combustion chamber compressed to auto-ignition. Unlike in conventional engines, combustion starts at many different locations simultaneously and the speed of combustion is very high, so there is no flame front. Lean air/fuel mixtures (excess air) are used to control combustion speed. Because of the excess air, combustion temperature is relatively low, resulting in low NOx emissions. When the fuel is vaporised to a truly homogeneous mixture, complete combustion results in low particulate emissions. The most important advantages of HCCI engines are: - Emissions of NOx and particulates are very low. - Energy efficiency is high. It is comparable to diesel engines. - Many different fuels (one at a time) can be used in the HCCI concept. There are also some hurdles to overcome: - Controlling combustion is difficult, it complicates engine design

  5. Optimization of combustion chamber geometry for natural gas engines with diesel micro-pilot-induced ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bin; Li, Tie; Ge, Linlin; Ogawa, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion chamber geometry is optimized to reduce the HC/CO emissions. • CFD model is calibrated against the spray visualization and engine bench test data. • Design space is explored by the multi-objective NSGA-II with Kriging meta-model. • HC and CO emissions are respectively reduced by 56.47% and 33.55%. - Abstract: Smokeless, low nitrogen oxides (NOx), and high thermal efficiency have been achieved through the lean-burn concept for natural gas engine with diesel micro-pilot-induced ignition (MPII). However, the combustion chamber is usually not specialized for natural gas combustion, and increases in the unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions are still a challenge for this type of engines. This paper describes optimization of the combustion chamber geometry to reduce the HC and CO emissions and improve the combustion efficiency in the MPII natural gas engine. The 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model coupled with a chemical reaction mechanism is described. The temporal development of the short-pulsed diesel spray in a high pressure constant-volume vessel is measured and used to calibrate the spray model in the CFD simulation. The simulation models are validated by the experimental data of the in-cylinder pressure trace, apparent heat release rate (AHRR) and exhaust gas emissions from a single-cylinder MPII natural gas engine. To generate the various combustion chamber geometries, the bowl outline is parameterized by the two cubic Bezier curves while keeping the compression ratio constant. The available design space is explored by the multi-objective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) with Kriging-based meta-model. With the optimization, the HC and CO emissions are reduced by 56.47% and 33.55%, respectively, while the NOx emissions, the maximum rate of pressure rise and the gross indicated thermal efficiency that are employed as the constraints are slightly improved. Finally, the

  6. Hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, E.; Kawahara, N. [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan); Roy, M.M. [Rajshahi Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi (Bangladesh)

    2009-07-01

    A hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel was discussed in this presentation. A schematic diagram of the experimental study was first presented. The single cylinder, water-cooled, supercharged test engine was illustrated. Results were presented for the following: fuel energy and energy share (hydrogen and diesel fuel); pressure history and rate of heat release; engine performance and exhaust emissions; effect of nitrogen dilution on heat value per cycle; effect of N{sub 2} dilution on pressure history and rate of heat release; and engine performance and exhaust emissions. This presentation demonstrated that smooth and knock-free engine operation results from the use of hydrogen in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for leaner fuel-air equivalence ratios maintaining high thermal efficiency. It was possible to attain mor3 than 90 per cent hydrogen-energy substitution to the diesel fuel with zero smoke emissions. figs.

  7. Hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, E.; Kawahara, N.; Roy, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    A hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel was discussed in this presentation. A schematic diagram of the experimental study was first presented. The single cylinder, water-cooled, supercharged test engine was illustrated. Results were presented for the following: fuel energy and energy share (hydrogen and diesel fuel); pressure history and rate of heat release; engine performance and exhaust emissions; effect of nitrogen dilution on heat value per cycle; effect of N 2 dilution on pressure history and rate of heat release; and engine performance and exhaust emissions. This presentation demonstrated that smooth and knock-free engine operation results from the use of hydrogen in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for leaner fuel-air equivalence ratios maintaining high thermal efficiency. It was possible to attain mor3 than 90 per cent hydrogen-energy substitution to the diesel fuel with zero smoke emissions. figs.

  8. Gaseous and particle emissions from an ethanol fumigated compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surawski, Nicholas C.; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Brown, Richard J.; Situ, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ethanol fumigation system fitted on a direct injection compression ignition engine. ► Ethanol substitutions up to 40% (by energy) were achieved. ► Gaseous and particle emissions were measured at intermediate speed. ► PM and NO emissions significantly reduced, whilst CO and HC increased. ► The number of particles emitted generally higher with ethanol fumigation. - Abstract: A 4-cylinder Ford 2701C test engine was used in this study to explore the impact of ethanol fumigation on gaseous and particle emission concentrations. The fumigation technique delivered vaporised ethanol into the intake manifold of the engine, using an injector, a pump and pressure regulator, a heat exchanger for vaporising ethanol and a separate fuel tank and lines. Gaseous (Nitric oxide (NO), Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbons (HC)) and particulate emissions (particle mass (PM 2.5 ) and particle number) testing was conducted at intermediate speed (1700 rpm) using 4 load settings with ethanol substitution percentages ranging from 10% to 40% (by energy). With ethanol fumigation, NO and PM 2.5 emissions were reduced, whereas CO and HC emissions increased considerably and particle number emissions increased at most test settings. It was found that ethanol fumigation reduced the excess air factor for the engine and this led to increased emissions of CO and HC, but decreased emissions of NO. PM 2.5 emissions were reduced with ethanol fumigation, as ethanol has a very low “sooting” tendency. This is due to the higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of this fuel, and also because ethanol does not contain aromatics, both of which are known soot precursors. The use of a diesel oxidation catalyst (as an after-treatment device) is recommended to achieve a reduction in the four pollutants that are currently regulated for compression ignition engines. The increase in particle number emissions with ethanol fumigation was due to the formation of volatile (organic) particles

  9. Effect of the Ethanol Injection Moment During Compression Stroke on the Combustion of Ethanol - Diesel Dual Direct Injection Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Zhou, Liying; Huang, Haomin; Xu, Mingfei; Guo, Mei; Chen, Xin

    2018-01-01

    A set of GDI system is installed on a F188 single-cylinder, air-cooled and direct injection diesel engine, which is used for ethanol injection, with the injection time controlled by the crank angle signal collected by AVL angle encoder. The injection of ethanol amounts to half of the thermal equivalent of an original diesel fuel. A 3D combustion model is established for the ethanol - diesel dual direct injection engine. Diesel was injected from the original fuel injection system, with a fuel supply advance angle of 20°CA. The ethanol was injected into the cylinder during compression process. Diesel injection began after the completion of ethanol injection. Ethanol injection starting point of 240°CA, 260°CA, 280°CA, 300°CA and 319.4°CA were simulated and analyzed. Due to the different timing of ethanol injection, the ignition of the ethanol mixture when diesel fires, results in non-uniform ignition distribution and flame propagation rate, since the distribution and concentration gradients of the ethanol mixture in the cylinder are different, thus affecting the combustion process. The results show that, when ethanol is injected at 319.4°CA, the combustion heat release rate and the pressure rise rate during the initial stage are the highest. Also, the maximum combustion pressure, with a relatively advance phase, is the highest. In case of later initial ethanol injection, the average temperature in the cylinder during the initial combustion period will have a faster rise. In case of initial injection at 319.4°CA, the average temperature in the cylinder is the highest, followed by 240°CA ethanol injection. In the post-combustion stage, the earlier ethanol injection will result in higher average temperature in the cylinder and more complete fuel combustion. The injection of ethanol at 319.4°CA produces earlier and highest NOX emissions.

  10. Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; AlRamadan, Abdullah S.; Vedharaj, S; An, Yanzhao; Sim, Jaeheon; Chang, Junseok; Johansson, Bengt

    2018-01-01

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI

  11. Combustion and emission characteristics of Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) fuelled with naphtha and gasoline in wide load range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Buyu; Wang, Zhi; Shuai, Shijin; Yang, Hongqiang; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Naphtha MPCI can operate stably in wide load range from 0.4 MPa to 1.4 MPa of IMEP. • Naphtha MPCI can achieve high thermal efficiency due to low exhaust loss. • Gasoline MPCI has low heat transfer loss than CDC and naphtha MPCI. • MPCI can produce low NO x emissions (<0.4 g/kW h) with the EGR ratio less than 30%. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of naphtha (RON = 65.6) and commercial gasoline (RON = 94.0) on Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) mode. The experiment is conducted on a single cylinder research diesel engine with compression ratio of 16.7. The engine is operated at an engine speed of 1600 rpm for the IMEP from 0.4 to 1.4 MPa. Commercial diesel (CN = 56.5) is also tested in Conventional Diesel Combustion (CDC) mode as a baseline. At each operating point, the injection strategy and intake conditions are adjusted to meet with the criteria (NO x < 0.4 g/kW h, soot < 0.06 m −1 , MPRR < 1 MPa/deg and CA50 < 20 CAD ATDC). The typical two-stage combustion characteristics of MPCI are obtained in both naphtha and gasoline. Stable combustion is achieved by naphtha in wide load range, while the engine fuelled with gasoline cannot operate stably at 0.4 MPa IMEP. The COV of IMEP of gasoline MPCI is higher than that of naphtha and diesel. However, gasoline has the low MPRR and the retarded CA50 at medium and high loads due to its longest ignition delay. As a result of low exhaust loss for naphtha and low heat transfer loss for gasoline, the thermal efficiencies are higher for both naphtha and gasoline in MPCI mode than diesel in CDC mode, even though diesel has the highest combustion efficiency. The separated combustion in MPCI leads to low cylinder temperature, and moderate EGR ratio (less than 30%) is needed to control NO x emissions under the limit of EURO VI

  12. Low-Temperature Combustion of High Octane Fuels in a Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Duc Cung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gasoline compression ignition (GCI has been shown as one of the advanced combustion concepts that could potentially provide a pathway to achieve cleaner and more efficient combustion engines. Fuel and air in GCI are not fully premixed compared to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI, which is a completely kinetic-controlled combustion system. Therefore, the combustion phasing can be controlled by the time of injection, usually postinjection in a multiple-injection scheme, to mitigate combustion noise. Gasoline usually has longer ignition delay than diesel. The autoignition quality of gasoline can be indicated by research octane number (RON. Fuels with high octane tend to have more resistance to autoignition, hence more time for fuel-air mixing. In this study, three fuels, namely, aromatic, alkylate, and E30, with similar RON value of 98 but different hydrocarbon compositions were tested in a multicylinder engine under GCI combustion mode. Considerations of exhaust gas recirculating (EGR, start of injection, and boost were investigated to study the sensitivity of dilution, local stratification, and reactivity of the charge, respectively, for each fuel. Combustion phasing (location of 50% of fuel mass burned was kept constant during the experiments. This provides similar thermodynamic conditions to study the effect of fuels on emissions. Emission characteristics at different levels of EGR and lambda were revealed for all fuels with E30 having the lowest filter smoke number and was also most sensitive to the change in dilution. Reasonably low combustion noise (<90 dB and stable combustion (coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure <3% were maintained during the experiments. The second part of this article contains visualization of the combustion process obtained from endoscope imaging for each fuel at selected conditions. Soot radiation signal from GCI combustion were strong during late injection and also more intense

  13. Homogeneous charge compression ignition compared with Otto-Atkinson in a passenger car size engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Andreas

    2000-07-01

    The use of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) was investigated in an ordinary SI (spark ignition) engine, in this case a modified Volvo 850, working on one cylinder only, the others towed. The major purpose of this study was to examine whether there were the same kind of throttle losses in this engine as in a Diesel engine (Volvo TD 100). One reason for throttling is that HCCI causes very cold exhaust gases. The Diesel engine has a larger cylinder volume (1.6 compared to 0.5 litre), working at low engine speed (1000 rpm) and only two valves with comparably small area. The smaller Volvo 850 engine has four valves and was in this examination working at up to 3500 rpm. To make the engine run by HCCI following modifications were made. The compression was set to 20:1 by changing the piston. To affect the ignition an electrical heater was installed near the air inlet. Mixing iso-octane (ON 100) and N-heptane (ON 0) set the octane number. A couple of camshafts with different cam-profiles were used to achieve the right valve opening duration depending on which kind of combustion that was studied. There could then also be a comparison between Otto and HCCI combustion both working with wide-open throttle. To obtain comparable indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) the engine was working with late (LIVC) or early inlet valve closing (EIVC) at SI combustion. Measurements were taken involving in-cylinder pressure, temperature, speed, fuel-consumption, emissions etc. Regarding emissions there were special consideration taken to hydrocarbon and NO{sub x}, which are known to be extremely high respectively low with HCCI combustion. Important questions that should be answered were: * How does higher engine speed affect the combustion ?, * How does the engine size affect emissions ?, * How much is the valve area affecting gas exchange losses ?, and * How high is the efficiency with HCCI compared with Otto (LIVC/EIVC) ?. The best results are achieved at an indicated mean

  14. Effect of Temperature, Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Ignition Delay in Ignition Quality Tester (IQT): Diesel,n-Heptane, andiso-Octane Fuels under Low Temperature Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon

    2015-11-02

    Effects of temperature, pressure and global equivalence ratio on total ignition delay time in a constant volume spray combustion chamber were investigated for diesel fuel along with the primary reference fuels (PRFs) of n-heptane and iso-octane in relatively low temperature conditions to simulate unsteady spray ignition behavior. A KAUST Research ignition quality tester (KR-IQT) was utilized, which has a feature of varying temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio using a variable displacement fuel pump. A gradient method was adopted in determining the start of ignition in order to compensate pressure increase induced by low temperature heat release. Comparison of this method with other existing methods was discussed. Ignition delay times were measured at various equivalence ratios (0.5-1.7) with the temperatures of initial charge air in the range from 698 to 860 K and the pressures in the range of 1.5 to 2.1 MPa, pertinent to low temperature combustion (LTC) conditions. An attempt to scale the effect of pressure on total ignition delay was undertaken and the equivalence ratio exponent and activation energy in the Arrhenius expression of total ignition delay were determined. Ignition delay results indicated that there were strong correlations of pressure, temperature, and equivalence ratio under most conditions studied except at relatively low pressures. Diesel (DCN 52.5) and n-heptane (DCN 54) fuels exhibited reasonably similar ignition delay characteristics, while iso-octane showed a distinct behavior under low temperature regime having a two-stage ignition, which substantiate the adoption of the gradient method in determining ignition delay.

  15. The effect of additives on properties, performance and emission of biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashedul, H.K.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Ashraful, A.M.; Ashrafur Rahman, S.M.; Shahir, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel additives significantly improve the quality of biodiesel and its blends. • Fuel additives used to enhance biodiesel properties. • Fuel saving from optimized vehicle performance and economy with the use of additives. • Emission reduction from fuel system cleanliness and combustion optimization. - Abstract: With growing concern over greenhouse gases there is increasing emphasis on reducing CO 2 emissions. Despite engine efficiency improvements plus increased dieselization of the fleet, increasing vehicle numbers results in increasing CO 2 emissions. To reserve this trend the fuel source must be changed to renewable fuels which are CO 2 neutral. As a renewable, sustainable and alternative fuel for compression ignition engines, biodiesel is widely accepted as comparable fuel to diesel in diesel engines. This is due to several factors like decreasing the dependence on imported petroleum, reducing global warming, increasing lubricity, and reducing substantially the exhaust emissions from diesel engine. However, there is a major disadvantage in the use of biodiesel as it has lower heating value, higher density and higher viscosity, higher fuel consumption and higher NO X emission, which limits its application. Here fuel additives become essential and indispensable tools not only to minimize these drawbacks but also generate specified products to meet the regional and international standards. Fuel additives can contribute towards fuel economy and emission reduction either directly or indirectly. Their use enable vehicle performance to be maintained at, or near, optimum over the lifetime of the vehicle. A variety of additives are used in automotive biodiesel fuel to meet specification limits and to enhance quality. For example, metal based additives, oxygenated additives, antioxidants, cetane number improvers, lubricity improvers and cold flow improvers are used to meet specifications and quality. This article is a literature review of the effect

  16. Experimental investigations of effects of EGR on performance and emissions characteristics of CNG fueled reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Kalsi, Sunmeet; Subramanian, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • NO_x emission decreased drastically in RCCI engine with EGR. • CO and HC emissions decreased with 8% EGR. • Smoke emission increased with EGR but is still less than base diesel. • Brake thermal efficiency does not change with EGR up to 15% • 8% EGR is optimum based on less CO, HC, NO_x except smoke. - Abstract: Experimental: tests were carried out on a single cylinder diesel engine (7.4 kW rated power at 1500 rpm) under dual fuel mode (CNG-Diesel) with EGR (exhaust gas recirculation). Less reacting fuel (CNG) was injected inside the intake manifold using timed manifold gas injection system whereas high reactive diesel fuel was directly injected into the engine’s cylinder for initiation of ignition. EGR at different percentages (8%, 15% and 30%) was inducted to the engine through intake manifold and tests were conducted at alternator power output of 2 kW and 5 kW. The engine can operate under dual fuel mode with maximum CNG energy share of 85% and 92% at 5 kW and 2 kW respectively. The brake thermal efficiency of diesel engine improved marginally at 5 kW power output under conventional dual fuel mode with the CNG share up to 37% whereas the efficiency did not change with up to 15% EGR however it decreased beyond the EGR percentage. NO_x emission in diesel engine under conventional dual fuel mode decreased significantly and it further decreased drastically with EGR. The notable point emerged from this study is that CO and HC emissions, which are major problems at part load in reactivity controlled compression ignition engine (RCCI), decreased with 8% EGR along with further reduction of NO_x. However, smoke emission is marginally higher with EGR than without EGR but it is still less than conventional mode (Diesel alone). The new concept emerged from this study is that CO and HC emissions of RCCI engine at part load can be reduced using EGR.

  17. Performance and emission characteristics of a DI compression ignition engine operated on Honge, Jatropha and sesame oil methyl esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banapurmath, N.R.; Tewari, P.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.V.B. College of Engineering and Technology, Vidyanagar, Poona-Bangalore Road, Hubli 580031 (India); Hosmath, R.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, K.L.E' s C.E.T., Belgaum (India)

    2008-09-15

    The high viscosity of vegetable oils leads to problem in pumping and spray characteristics. The inefficient mixing of vegetable oils with air contributes to incomplete combustion. The best way to use vegetable oils as fuel in compression ignition (CI) engines is to convert it into biodiesel. Biodiesel is a methyl or ethyl ester of fatty acids made from vegetable oils (both edible and non-edible) and animal fat. The main resources for biodiesel production can be non-edible oils obtained from plant species such as Pongamia pinnata (Honge oil), Jatropha curcas (Ratanjyot), Hevea brasiliensis (Rubber) and Calophyllum inophyllum (Nagchampa). Biodiesel can be used in its pure form or can be blended with diesel to form different blends. It can be used in CI engines with very little or no engine modifications. This is because it has properties similar to mineral diesel. This paper presents the results of investigations carried out on a single-cylinder, four-stroke, direct-injection, CI engine operated with methyl esters of Honge oil, Jatropha oil and sesame oil. Comparative measures of brake thermal efficiency, smoke opacity, HC, CO, NO{sub X}, ignition delay, combustion duration and heat release rates have been presented and discussed. Engine performance in terms of higher brake thermal efficiency and lower emissions (HC, CO, NO{sub X}) with sesame oil methyl ester operation was observed compared to methyl esters of Honge and Jatropha oil operation. (author)

  18. Engine performance and emission of compression ignition engine fuelled with emulsified biodiesel-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawa, W. N.; Mamat, R.; Najafi, G.; Majeed Ali, O.; Aziz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The depletion of fossil fuel and environmental pollution has become world crucial issues in current era. Biodiesel-water emulsion is one of many possible approaches to reduce emissions. In this study, emulsified biodiesel with 4%, 6% and 8% of water contents were prepared to be used as fuel in a direct injection compression ignition engine. The performance indicator such as brake power, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and emissions such as NOx and particulate matter (PM) were investigated. The engine was set at constant speed of 2500 rpm and load from 20% to 60%. All the results were compared to B5 (blend of 95% petroleum diesel and 5% palm oil biodiesel) biodiesel. At low load, the BSFC decrease by 12.75% at 4% water ratio and decreased by 1.5% at 6% water ratio. However, the BSFC increases by 17.19% with increasing water ratio to 8% compared to B5. Furthermore, there was no significant decrease in brake power and BTE at 60% load. For 20% and 40% load there was some variance regarding to brake power and BTE. Significant reduction in NOx and PM emissions by 73.87% and 20.00% respectively were achieved with increasing water ratio to 8%. Overall, it is observed that the emulsified of biodiesel-water is an appropriate alternative fuel method to reduce emissions.

  19. Dual-Fuel Combustion for Future Clean and Efficient Compression Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Benajes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stringent emissions limits introduced for internal combustion engines impose a major challenge for the research community. The technological solution adopted by the manufactures of diesel engines to meet the NOx and particle matter values imposed in the EURO VI regulation relies on using selective catalytic reduction and particulate filter systems, which increases the complexity and cost of the engine. Alternatively, several new combustion modes aimed at avoiding the formation of these two pollutants by promoting low temperature combustion reactions, are the focus of study nowadays. Among these new concepts, the dual-fuel combustion mode known as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI seems more promising because it allows better control of the combustion process by means of modulating the fuel reactivity depending on the engine operating conditions. The present experimental work explores the potential of different strategies for reducing the energy losses with RCCI in a single-cylinder research engine, with the final goal of providing the guidelines to define an efficient dual-fuel combustion system. The results demonstrate that the engine settings combination, piston geometry modification, and fuel properties variation are good methods to increase the RCCI efficiency while maintaining ultra-low NOx and soot emissions for a wide range of operating conditions.

  20. THE EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO VARIATIONS ON THE ENGINE PERFORMANCE PARAMETRES IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of the spark ignition engines may be increased by changing the geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging in cylinders. The designed geometrical compression ratio can be realized as an effective compression ratio under the full load and full open throttle conditions since the effective compression ratio changes with the amount of charging into the cylinder in spark ignition engines. So, this condition of the spark ignition engines forces designers to change their geometrical compression ratio according to the amount of charging into the cylinder for improvement of performance and fuel economy. In order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy, power output, exhaust emissions at partial loads, compression ratio must be increased; but, under high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running the compression ratio must be decreased gradually. In this paper, relation of the performance parameters to compression ratio such as power, torque, specific fuel consumption, cylindir pressure, exhaust gas temperature, combustion chamber surface area/volume ratio, thermal efficiency, spark timing etc. in spark ignition engines have been investigated and using of engines with variable compression ratio is suggested to fuel economy and more clear environment.

  1. Confinement requirements for OHMIC-compressive ignition of a Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.; Gilligan, J.; Miley, G.

    1980-01-01

    The Moving Plasmoid Reactor (MPR) is an attractive alternative magnetic fusion scheme in which Spheromak plasmoids are envisioned to be formed, compressed, burned, and expanded as the plasmoids translate through a series of linear reactor modules. Although auxiliary heating of the plasmoids may be possible, the MPR scenario would be especially interesting if ohmic decay and compression along were sufficient to heat the plasmoids to an ignition temperature. In the present work, we will study the transport conditions under which a Spheromak plasmoid could be expected to reach ignition via a combination of ohmic and compression heating

  2. Confinement requirements for ohmic-compressive ignition of a Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Moving Plasmoid Reactor (MPR) is an attractive alternative magnetic fusion scheme in which Spheromak plasmoids are envisioned to be formed, compressed, burned, and expanded as the plasmoids translate through a series of linear reactor modules. Although auxiliary heating of the plasmoids may be possible, the MPR scenario would be especially interesting if ohmic decay and compression alone is sufficient to heat the plasmoids to an ignition temperature. In the present work, we examine the transport conditions under which a Spheromak plasmoid can be expected to reach ignition via a combination of ohmic and compression heating

  3. Physicochemical characterization of particulate emissions from a compression ignition engine employing two injection technologies and three fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawski, N C; Miljevic, B; Ayoko, G A; Roberts, B A; Elbagir, S; Fairfull-Smith, K E; Bottle, S E; Ristovski, Z D

    2011-07-01

    Alternative fuels and injection technologies are a necessary component of particulate emission reduction strategies for compression ignition engines. Consequently, this study undertakes a physicochemical characterization of diesel particulate matter (DPM) for engines equipped with alternative injection technologies (direct injection and common rail) and alternative fuels (ultra low sulfur diesel, a 20% biodiesel blend, and a synthetic diesel). Particle physical properties were addressed by measuring particle number size distributions, and particle chemical properties were addressed by measuring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Particle volatility was determined by passing the polydisperse size distribution through a thermodenuder set to 300 °C. The results from this study, conducted over a four point test cycle, showed that both fuel type and injection technology have an impact on particle emissions, but injection technology was the more important factor. Significant particle number emission (54%-84%) reductions were achieved at half load operation (1% increase-43% decrease at full load) with the common rail injection system; however, the particles had a significantly higher PAH fraction (by a factor of 2 to 4) and ROS concentrations (by a factor of 6 to 16) both expressed on a test-cycle averaged basis. The results of this study have significant implications for the health effects of DPM emissions from both direct injection and common rail engines utilizing various alternative fuels.

  4. Potential use of eucalyptus biodiesel in compressed ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The increased population has resulted in extra use of conventional sources of fuels due to which there is risk of extinction of fossil fuels’ resources especially petroleum diesel. Biodiesel is emerging as an excellent alternative choice across the world as a direct replacement for diesel fuel in vehicle engines. Biodiesel offers a great choice. It is mainly derived from vegetable oils, animal fats and algae. Hence in this paper effort has been made to find out feasibility of biodiesel obtained from eucalyptus oil and its impact on diesel engine. Higher viscosity is a major issue while using vegetable oil directly in engine which can be removed by converting it into biodiesel by the process of transesterification. Various fuel properties like calorific value, flash point and cetane value of biodiesel and biodiesel–diesel blends of different proportions were evaluated and found to be comparable with petroleum diesel. The result of investigation shows that Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC for two different samples of B10 blend of eucalyptus biodiesel is 2.34% and 2.93% lower than that for diesel. Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE for B10 blends was found to be 0.52% and 0.94% lower than that for diesel. Emission characteristics show that Smoke Opacity improves for both samples, smoke is found to be 64.5% and 62.5% cleaner than that of diesel. Out of all blends B10 was found to be a suitable alternative to conventional diesel fuel to control air pollution without much significant effect on engine performance. On comparing both samples, biodiesel prepared from sample A of eucalyptus oil was found to be superior in all aspects of performance and emission.

  5. Spark ignition engine performance and emissions in a high compression engine using biogas and methane mixtures without knock occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Montoya Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to use biogas in an internal combustion engine with high compression ratio and in order to get a high output thermal efficiency, this investigation used a diesel engine with a maximum output power 8.5 kW, which was converted to spark ignition mode to use it with gaseous fuels. Three fuels were used: Simulated biogas, biogas enriched with 25% and 50% methane by volume. After conversion, the output power of the engine decreased by 17.64% when using only biogas, where 7 kW was the new maximum output power of the engine. The compression ratio was kept at 15.5:1, and knocking did not occur during engine operation. Output thermal efficiency operating the engine in SI mode with biogas enriched with 50% methane was almost the same compared with the engine running in diesel-biogas dual mode at full load and was greater at part loads. The dependence of the diesel pilot was eliminated when biogas was used in the engine converted in SI mode. The optimum condition of experiment for the engine without knocking was using biogas enriched with 50% methane, with 12 degrees of spark timing advance and equivalence ratio of 0.95, larger output powers and higher values of methane concentration lead the engine to knock operation. The presence of CO2 allows operating engines at high compression ratios with normal combustion conditions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and unburnt methane all in g/kWh decreased when the biogas was enriched with 50% methane.

  6. Internal combustion engines a detailed introduction to the thermodynamics of spark and compression ignition engines, their design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Rowland S

    1979-01-01

    Internal Combustion of Engines: A Detailed Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Spark and Compression Ignition Engines, Their Design and Development focuses on the design, development, and operations of spark and compression ignition engines. The book first describes internal combustion engines, including rotary, compression, and indirect or spark ignition engines. The publication then discusses basic thermodynamics and gas dynamics. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics; internal energy and enthalpy diagrams; gas mixtures and homocentric flow; and state equation. The text ta

  7. Investigation into the effect of different fuels on ignition delay of M-type diesel combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibić Dževad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An ignition delay is a very complex process which depends on a great number of parameters. In practice, definition of the ignition delay is based on the use of correlation expressions. However, the correlation expressions have very often limited application field. This paper presents a new correlation which has been developed during the research project on the direct injection M-type diesel engine using both the diesel and biodiesel fuel, as well as different values of a static injection timing. A dynamic start of injection, as well as the ignition delay, is defined in two ways. The first approach is based on measurement of a needle lift, while the second is based on measurement of a fuel pressure before the injector. The latter approach requires calculation of pressure signals delay through the fuel injection system and the variation of a static advance injection angle changing. The start of a combustion and the end of the ignition delay is defined on the basis of measurements of an in-cylinder pressure and its point of separation from a skip-fire pressure trace. The developed correlation gives better prediction of the ignition delay definition for the M-type direct injection diesel engine in the case of diesel and biodiesel fuel use when compared with the classic expression by the other authors available in the literature.

  8. Performance analysis of exhaust heat recovery using organic Rankine cycle in a passenger car with a compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilvacs, M.; Prisecaru, T.; Pop, H.; Apostol, V.; Prisecaru, M.; Pop, E.; Popescu, Gh; Ciobanu, C.; Mohanad, A.; Alexandru, A.

    2016-08-01

    Compression ignition engines transform approximately 40% of the fuel energy into power available at the crankshaft, while the rest part of the fuel energy is lost as coolant, exhaust gases and other waste heat. An organic Rankine cycle (ORC) can be used to recover this waste heat. In this paper, the characteristics of a system combining a compression ignition engine with an ORC which recover the waste heat from the exhaust gases are analyzed. The performance map of the diesel engine is measured on an engine test bench and the heat quantities wasted by the exhaust gases are calculated over the engine's entire operating region. Based on this data, the working parameters of ORC are defined, and the performance of a combined engine-ORC system is evaluated across this entire region. The results show that the net power of ORC is 6.304kW at rated power point and a maximum of 10% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption can be achieved.

  9. Optimization of injection pressure for a compression ignition engine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    injection and atomization and contributes to incomplete combustion, nozzle clogging, ... this non edible oil may be an appropriate substitute for diesel fuel. ... The effect of injector opening pressure on the performance of a jatropha oil fuelled ...

  10. Review of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engines and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) effects on HCCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akma Tuan Kamaruddin, Tengku Nordayana; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul; Sies, Mohsin Mohd

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the development in ICE which leads to the new advanced combustion mode named Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI). It explains regarding the theory and working principle of HCCI plus the difference of the process in gasoline and diesel fuelled engines. Many of pioneer and recent research works are discussed to get the current state of art about HCCI. It gives a better indication on the potential of this method in improving the fuel efficiency and emission produced by the vehicles' engine. Apart from the advantages, the challenges and future trend of this technology are also included. HCCI is applying few types of control strategy in producing the optimum performance. This paper looks into Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) as one of the control strategies.

  11. Compression Ignition Engines - revolutionary technology that has civilized frontiers all over the globe from the Industrial Revolution into the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Anthony Ciatti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The history, present and future of the compression ignition engine is a fascinating story that spans over 100 years, from the time of Rudolf Diesel to the highly regulated and computerized engines of the 21st Century. The development of these engines provided inexpensive, reliable and high power density machines to allow transportation, construction and farming to be more productive with less human effort than in any previous period of human history. The concept that fuels could be consumed efficiently and effectively with only the ignition of pressurized and heated air was a significant departure from the previous coal-burning architecture of the 1800s. Today, the compression ignition engine is undergoing yet another revolution. The equipment that provides transport, builds roads and infrastructure, and harvests the food we eat needs to meet more stringent requirements than ever before. How successfully 21st Century engineers are able to make compression ignition engine technology meet these demands will be of major influence in assisting developing nations (with over 50% of the world’s population achieve the economic and environmental goals they seek.

  12. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the “failure of ignition” of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  13. An experimental and numerical analysis of the HCCI auto-ignition process of primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel in an engine, varying the engine parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr-I' Ecole (France); Gilbert, Philippe [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr-I' Ecole (France)

    2008-11-15

    For a future HCCI engine to operate under conditions that adhere to environmental restrictions, reducing fuel consumption and maintaining or increasing at the same time the engine efficiency, the choice of the fuel is crucial. For this purpose, this paper presents an auto-ignition investigation concerning the primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel, in order to study the effect of linear alkanes, branched alkanes and aromatics on the auto-ignition. The auto-ignition of these fuels has been studied at inlet temperatures from 25 to 120 C, at equivalence ratios from 0.18 to 0.53 and at compression ratios from 6 to 13.5, in order to extend the range of investigation and to assess the usability of these parameters to control the auto-ignition. It appeared that both iso-octane and toluene delayed the ignition with respect to n-heptane, while toluene has the strongest effect. This means that aromatics have higher inhibiting effects than branched alkanes. In an increasing order, the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio had a promoting effect on the ignition delays. A previously experimentally validated reduced surrogate mechanism, for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, has been used to explain observations of the auto-ignition process. (author)

  14. Combustion visualization and experimental study on spark induced compression ignition (SICI) in gasoline HCCI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhi; He Xu; Wang Jianxin; Shuai Shijin; Xu Fan; Yang Dongbo

    2010-01-01

    Spark induced compression ignition (SICI) is a relatively new combustion control technology and a promising combustion mode in gasoline engines with high efficiency. SICI can be divided into two categories, SACI and SI-CI. This paper investigated the SICI combustion process using combustion visualization and engine experiment respectively. Ignition process of SICI was captured by high speed photography in an optical engine with different compression ratios. The results show that SICI is a combustion mode combined with partly flame propagation and main auto-ignition. The spark ignites the local mixture near spark electrodes and the flame propagation occurs before the homogeneous mixture is auto-ignited. The heat release from central burned zone due to the flame propagation increases the in-cylinder pressure and temperature, resulting in the unburned mixture auto-ignition. The SICI combustion process can be divided into three stages of the spark induced stage, the flame propagation stage and the compression ignition stage. The SICI combustion mode is different from the spark ignition (SI) knocking in terms of the combustion and emission characteristics. Furthermore, three typical combustion modes including HCCI, SICI, SI, were compared on a gasoline direct injection engine with higher compression ratio and switchable cam-profiles. The results show that SICI has an obvious combustion characteristic with two-stage heat release and lower pressure rise rate. The SICI combustion mode can be controlled by spark timings and EGR rates and utilized as an effective method for high load extension on the gasoline HCCI engine. The maximum IMEP of 0.82 MPa can be achieved with relatively low NO x emission and high thermal efficiency. The SICI combustion mode can be applied in medium-high load region for high efficiency gasoline engines.

  15. Combustion visualization and experimental study on spark induced compression ignition (SICI) in gasoline HCCI engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhi, E-mail: wangzhi@tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Xu; Wang Jianxin; Shuai Shijin; Xu Fan; Yang Dongbo [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Spark induced compression ignition (SICI) is a relatively new combustion control technology and a promising combustion mode in gasoline engines with high efficiency. SICI can be divided into two categories, SACI and SI-CI. This paper investigated the SICI combustion process using combustion visualization and engine experiment respectively. Ignition process of SICI was captured by high speed photography in an optical engine with different compression ratios. The results show that SICI is a combustion mode combined with partly flame propagation and main auto-ignition. The spark ignites the local mixture near spark electrodes and the flame propagation occurs before the homogeneous mixture is auto-ignited. The heat release from central burned zone due to the flame propagation increases the in-cylinder pressure and temperature, resulting in the unburned mixture auto-ignition. The SICI combustion process can be divided into three stages of the spark induced stage, the flame propagation stage and the compression ignition stage. The SICI combustion mode is different from the spark ignition (SI) knocking in terms of the combustion and emission characteristics. Furthermore, three typical combustion modes including HCCI, SICI, SI, were compared on a gasoline direct injection engine with higher compression ratio and switchable cam-profiles. The results show that SICI has an obvious combustion characteristic with two-stage heat release and lower pressure rise rate. The SICI combustion mode can be controlled by spark timings and EGR rates and utilized as an effective method for high load extension on the gasoline HCCI engine. The maximum IMEP of 0.82 MPa can be achieved with relatively low NO{sub x} emission and high thermal efficiency. The SICI combustion mode can be applied in medium-high load region for high efficiency gasoline engines.

  16. Low Load Limit Extension for Gasoline Compression Ignition Using Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2018-04-03

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) is widely studied for the benefits of simultaneous reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO) and soot emissions without compromising the engine efficiency. Despite this advantage, the operational range for GCI is not widely expanded, as the auto-ignition of fuel at low load condition is difficult. The present study aims to extend the low load operational limit for GCI using negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy. The engine used for the current experimentation is a single cylinder diesel engine that runs at an idle speed of 800 rpm with a compression ratio of 17.3. The engine is operated at homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and partially premixed combustion (PPC) combustion modes with the corresponding start of injection (SOI) at 180 CAD (aTDC) and 30 CAD (aTDC), respectively. In the presented work, intake air temperature is used as control parameter to maintain combustion stability at idle and low load condition, while the intake air pressure is maintained at 1 bar (ambient). The engine is equipped with variable valve cam phasers that can phase both inlet and exhaust valves from the original timing. For the maximum cam phasing range (56 CAD) at a valve lift of 0.3 mm, the maximum allowable positive valve overlap was 20 CAD. In the present study, the exhaust cam is phased to 26 CAD and 6 CAD and the corresponding NVO is noted to be 10 CAD and 30 CAD, respectively. With exhaust cam phasing adjustment, the exhaust valve is closed early to retain hot residual gases inside the cylinder. As such, the in-cylinder temperature is increased and a reduction in the required intake air temperature to control combustion phasing is possible. For a constant combustion phasing of 3 CAD (aTDC), a minimum load of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) = 1 bar is attained for gasoline (RON = 91) at HCCI and PPC modes. The coefficient of variance was observed to below 5% at these idle and low load conditions. At the minimum load point, the

  17. Hydrofluoric acid burn resulting from ignition of gas from a compressed air duster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Jones, LouAnn; Caruso, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    A young female suffered burns to her hand after the ignition of gas from a compressed air duster. After debridement and dressing, the patient continued to have pain out of proportion to injury that was refractory to intravenous morphine. The material safety data sheet revealed that the chemical used was 1,1-difluoroethane. High temperatures can cause decompensation to form hydrofluoric acid. Calcium gluconate gel was applied topically to the patient's burns, which caused prompt and complete relief of her pain. A review of different compressed air duster products revealed that the main ingredient in each was a halogenated hydrocarbon. Although not considered flammable, all products have warnings regarding the possibility of ignition under various circumstances. Ignition of the gas in compressed air cleaners not only can cause flame burns, it can also cause chemical damage from exposure to hydrogen and fluoride ions. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary to prevent severe injury.

  18. Exploration of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME as fuel in compression ignition engines: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kathirvel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever growing human population and the corresponding economic development of mankind have caused a relentless surge in the energy demand of the world. The fast diminishing fossil fuel reserves and the overdependence of petroleum based fuels have already prompted the world to look for alternate sources of energy to offset the fuel crisis in the future. Waste Cooking Oil Methyl Ester (WCOME has proven itself as a viable alternate fuel that can be used in Compression Ignition (CI engines due to its low cost, non-toxicity, biodegradability and renewable nature. It also contributes a minimum amount of net greenhouse gases, such as CO2, SO2 and NO emissions to the atmosphere. The main objective of this paper is to focus on the study of the performance, combustion and emission parameters of CI engines using WCOME and to explore the possibility of utilizing WCOME blends with diesel extensively in place of diesel. The production methods used for transesterification play a vital role in the physiochemical properties of the methyl esters produced. Various production intensification technologies such as hydrodynamic cavitation and ultrasonic cavitation were employed to improve the yield of the methyl esters during transesterification. This review includes the study of WCOME from different origins in various types of diesel engines. Most of the studies comply with the decrease in carbon monoxide (CO emissions and the increase in brake thermal efficiency while using WCOME in CI engines. Many researchers reported slight increase in the emissions of oxides of nitrogen. ANN modeling has been widely used to predict the process variables of the diesel engine while using WCOME. The versatility of ANN modeling was proven by the minimum error percentages of the actual and predicted values of the performance and emission characteristics.

  19. Study of ignition in a high compression ratio SI (spark ignition) methanol engine using LES (large eddy simulation) with detailed chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Xudong; Wang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Methanol has been recently used as an alternative to conventional fuels for internal combustion engines in order to satisfy some environmental and economical concerns. In this paper, the ignition in a high compression ratio SI (spark ignition) methanol engine was studied by using LES (large eddy simulation) with detailed chemical kinetics. A 21-species, 84-reaction methanol mechanism was adopted to simulate the auto-ignition process of the methanol/air mixture. The MIT (minimum ignition temperature) and MIE (minimum ignition energy) are two important properties for designing safety standards and understanding the ignition process of combustible mixtures. The effects of the flame kernel size, flame kernel temperature and equivalence ratio were also examined on MIT, MIE and IDP (ignition delay period). The methanol mechanism was validated by experimental test. The simulated results showed that the flame kernel size, temperature and energy dramatically affected the values of the MIT, MIE and IDP for a methanol/air mixture, the value of the ignition delay period was not only related to the flame kernel energy, but also to the flame kernel temperature. - Highlights: • We used LES (large eddy simulation) coupled with detailed chemical kinetics to simulate methanol ignition. • The flame kernel size and temperature affected the minimum ignition temperature. • The flame kernel temperature and energy affected the ignition delay period. • The equivalence ratio of methanol–air mixture affected the ignition delay period

  20. Gasoline – ignition improver – oxygenate blends as fuels for advanced compression ignition combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, L.; Boot, M.D.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Mixing is inhibited both by the relatively low volatility of conventional diesel fuel and the short premixing time due to high fuel reactivity (i.e. cetane number (CN)). Consequently, in this research two promising oxygenates which can be produced from 2 nd generation biomass -ethanol from cellulose

  1. Validation of a zero-dimensional and 2-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to re-duce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of liquid fuel injected directly into the cylinder acts as the ignition inhibitor of the gaseous fuel. Achieving the optimum combustion process in such an engine requires the application of advanced control algorithms which require mathematical modelling support. In response to the growing demand for new simulation tools, a 0-D model of a dual-fuel engine was proposed and validated. The validation was performed in a broad range of engine operating points, including various speeds and load condition, as well as different natural gas/diesel blend ratios. It was demonstrated that the average model calculation error within the entire cycle did not exceed 6.2%, and was comparable to the measurement results cycle to cycle variations. The maximum model calculation error in a single point of a cycle was 15% for one of the complex (multipoint injection cases. In other cases, it did not exceed 11%.

  2. Experimental investigation of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion of biodiesel fuel with external mixture formation in a CI engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, D; Nagarajan, G; Ganesan, S

    2014-01-01

    In parallel to the interest in renewable fuels, there has also been increased interest in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. HCCI engines are being actively developed because they have the potential to be highly efficient and to produce low emissions. Even though HCCI has been researched extensively, few challenges still exist. These include controlling the combustion at higher loads and the formation of a homogeneous mixture. To obtain better homogeneity, in the present investigation external mixture formation method was adopted, in which the fuel vaporiser was used to achieve excellent HCCI combustion in a single cylinder air-cooled direct injection diesel engine. In continuation of our previous works, in the current study a vaporised jatropha methyl ester (JME) was mixed with air to form a homogeneous mixture and inducted into the cylinder during the intake stroke to analyze the combustion, emission and performance characteristics. To control the early ignition of JME vapor-air mixture, cooled (30 °C) Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technique was adopted. The experimental result shows 81% reduction in NOx and 72% reduction in smoke emission.

  3. Optimization of diesel engine performances for a hybrid wind-diesel system with compressed air energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, H.; Younes, R.; Basbous, T.; Ilinca, A.; Dimitrova, M.

    2011-01-01

    Electricity supply in remote areas around the world is mostly guaranteed by diesel generators. This relatively inefficient and expensive method is responsible for 1.2 million tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission in Canada annually. Some low- and high-penetration wind-diesel hybrid systems (WDS) have been experimented in order to reduce the diesel consumption. We explore the re-engineering of current diesel power plants with the introduction of high-penetration wind systems together with compressed air energy storage (CAES). This is a viable alternative to major the overall percentage of renewable energy and reduce the cost of electricity. In this paper, we present the operative principle of this hybrid system, its economic benefits and advantages and we finally propose a numerical model of each of its components. Moreover, we are demonstrating the energy efficiency of the system, particularly in terms of the increase of the engine performance and the reduction of its fuel consumption illustrated and supported by a village in northern Quebec. -- Highlights: → The Wind-Diesel-Compressed Air Storage System (WDCAS) has a very important commercial potential for remote areas. → The WDCAS is conceived like the adaptation of the existing engines at the level of the intake system. → A wind turbine and an air compression and storage system are added on the diesel plant. → This study demonstrates the potential of WDCAS to reduce fuel consumption and increase the efficiency of the diesel engine. → This study demonstrates that we can expect savings which can reach 50%.

  4. Application of multicriteria decision making methods to compression ignition engine efficiency and gaseous, particulate, and greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surawski, Nicholas C; Miljevic, Branka; Bodisco, Timothy A; Brown, Richard J; Ristovski, Zoran D; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2013-02-19

    Compression ignition (CI) engine design is subject to many constraints, which present a multicriteria optimization problem that the engine researcher must solve. In particular, the modern CI engine must not only be efficient but must also deliver low gaseous, particulate, and life cycle greenhouse gas emissions so that its impact on urban air quality, human health, and global warming is minimized. Consequently, this study undertakes a multicriteria analysis, which seeks to identify alternative fuels, injection technologies, and combustion strategies that could potentially satisfy these CI engine design constraints. Three data sets are analyzed with the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations and Geometrical Analysis for Interactive Aid (PROMETHEE-GAIA) algorithm to explore the impact of (1) an ethanol fumigation system, (2) alternative fuels (20% biodiesel and synthetic diesel) and alternative injection technologies (mechanical direct injection and common rail injection), and (3) various biodiesel fuels made from 3 feedstocks (i.e., soy, tallow, and canola) tested at several blend percentages (20-100%) on the resulting emissions and efficiency profile of the various test engines. The results show that moderate ethanol substitutions (~20% by energy) at moderate load, high percentage soy blends (60-100%), and alternative fuels (biodiesel and synthetic diesel) provide an efficiency and emissions profile that yields the most "preferred" solutions to this multicriteria engine design problem. Further research is, however, required to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) emissions with alternative fuels and to deliver technologies that do not significantly reduce the median diameter of particle emissions.

  5. Compression ignition of light naphtha and its multicomponent surrogate under partially premixed conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, B.; Chang, J.; Sarathy, M.; Johansson, B.

    2017-01-01

    Light naphtha is the light distillate from crude oil and can be used in compression ignition (CI) engines; its low boiling point and octane rating (RON = 64.5) enable adequate premixing. This study investigates the combustion characteristics of light naphtha (LN) and its multicomponent surrogate

  6. Study of high load operation limit for premixed compression ignition engine; Yokongo asshuku chakka kikan no kofuka unten genkai ni kansuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, N. [Isuzu Advanced Engineering Center Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Akagawa, H. [Nissan Diesel Motor Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Miyamoto, T.

    2000-11-25

    NO{sub x} emission was remarkably reduced by PREDIC (PREmixed lean DIesel Combustion) system in which fuel was injected at very early stage of compression stroke and the major part of the fuel is considered to be burned with self-ignition of premixed charge around TDC. However PREDIC system had some problems, a restriction of a high load operation was one of these problems. In order to investigate the combustion characteristics of PREDIC at the richer operation limit, a test engine was operated with gaseous fuel-air mixture where less heterogeneous mixture can be formed than that of conventional diesel engines. A steep pressure rise or the abrupt increase in NO{sub x} emission determined the richer operation limit. This was at 2 to 2.4 of excess air ratio. Supercharging operation enabled the high load operation more than 2.4 of excess air ratio. (author)

  7. Experimental investigation on the availability, performance, combustion and emission distinctiveness of bael oil/ diesel/ diethyl ether blends powered in a variable compression ratio diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, M.; Malayalamurthi, R.

    2018-02-01

    The present work aims at experimental investigation on the combined effect of injection timing (IT) and injection pressure (IP) on the performance and emissions characteristics, and exergy analysis of a compression-ignition (CI) engine powered with bael oil blends. The tests were conducted using ternary blends of bael oil, diethyl ether (DEE) and neat diesel (D) at various engine loads at a constant engine speed (1500 rpm). With B2 (60%D + 30%bael oil+10%DEE) fuel, the brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the engine is augmented by 3.5%, reduction of 4.7% of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission has been observed at 100% engine load with 250 bar IP. B2 fuel exhibits 7% lower scale of HC emissions compared to that of diesel fuel at 100% engine load in 23 °bTDC IT. The increment in both cooling water and exhaust gas availabilities lead to increasing exergy efficiency with increasing load. The exergy efficiency of about 62.17% has been recorded by B2 fuel at an injection pressure of 230 IP bar with 100% load. On the whole, B2 fuel displays the best performance and combustion characteristics. It also exhibits better characteristics of emissions level in terms of lower HC, smoke opacity and NOx.

  8. Performance Characterization and Auto-Ignition Performance of a Rapid Compression Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Liu; Hongguang Zhang; Zhicheng Shi; Haitao Lu; Guangyao Zhao; Baofeng Yao

    2014-01-01

    A rapid compression machine (RCM) test bench is developed in this study. The performance characterization and auto-ignition performance tests are conducted at an initial temperature of 293 K, a compression ratio of 9.5 to 16.5, a compressed temperature of 650 K to 850 K, a driving gas pressure range of 0.25 MPa to 0.7 MPa, an initial pressure of 0.04 MPa to 0.09 MPa, and a nitrogen dilution ratio of 35% to 65%. A new type of hydraulic piston is used to address the problem in which the hydraul...

  9. Methodology to estimate the threshold in-cylinder temperature for self-ignition of fuel during cold start of Diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broatch, A.; Ruiz, S.; Margot, X.; Gil, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cold startability of automotive direct injection (DI) Diesel engines is frequently one of the negative features when these are compared to their closest competitor, the gasoline engine. This situation worsens with the current design trends (engine downsizing) and the emerging new Diesel combustion concepts, such as HCCI, PCCI, etc., which require low compression ratio engines. To mitigate this difficulty, pre-heating systems (glow plugs, air heating, etc.) are frequently used and their technologies have been continuously developed. For the optimum design of these systems, the determination of the threshold temperature that the gas should have in the cylinder in order to provoke the self-ignition of the fuel injected during cold starting is crucial. In this paper, a novel methodology for estimating the threshold temperature is presented. In this methodology, experimental and computational procedures are adequately combined to get a good compromise between accuracy and effort. The measurements have been used as input data and boundary conditions in 3D and 0D calculations in order to obtain the thermodynamic conditions of the gas in the cylinder during cold starting. The results obtained from the study of two engine configurations -low and high compression ratio- indicate that the threshold in-cylinder temperature is a single temperature of about 415 o C.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF INCREASE THE COMPRESSION RATIO ON PERFORMANCE OF A DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan PARLAK

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimisation of the Diesel cycle has been performed for power output and thermal efficiency with respect to compression ratio for various extreme temperature ratio. The relation between compression ratio and extreme temperature ratio, which gives optimum performance is derived. As the compression ratio of the diesel engine is increased in comparison to the optimum value of the engine, it is shown that the performance of the engine is decreased. The experimental study agrees with these results. In this study, compression ratio of a single cylinder pre-combustion chamber variable compression ratio Ricardo E6 type engine with the optimum compression ratio of 18.20 was increased to 19.60. As a results of this increase, specific fuel consumption was increased about 8 % and brake thermal efficiency was decreased about 7.5 %.

  11. Attempt of multiple stage injection with EGR for high load operation of a premixed compression ignition engine; Tadan funsha ni yoru yokongo asshuku chakka kikan no unten ryoiki kakudai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Akagawa, H. [New ACE Institute Co. Ltd., Tsukuba (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-01-25

    By injecting fuel at the very early stage of compression stroke and thus creating homogeneous lean mixture before ignition, (PREDIC ; PREmixed lean DIesel Combustion), simultaneous reduction of NO{sub x} and smoke was obtained. However, since increasing the mixture equivalence ratio cause knocking, it was difficult to operate at higher load conditions. In this study, in order to reduce combustion rate at high load conditions in a premixed compression ignition engine, multiple stage injection method and EGR were combined, and heterogeneous mixture was made before ignition. The engine test results showed that NO{sub x} emissions could be reduced to less than 50 ppm, without knocking even at full load conditions. In addition, smoke emissions were also maintained below invisible level. It can be understood that the premixing of fuel was advanced, smoke was reduced, and EGR rate was increased, resulting lower heat release rate and NO{sub x} emissions. (author)

  12. Performance and emission of generator Diesel engine using methyl esters of palm oil and diesel blends at different compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhaidhawi, M.; Chiriac, R.; Bădescu, V.; Pop, H.; Apostol, V.; Dobrovicescu, A.; Prisecaru, M.; Alfaryjat, A. A.; Ghilvacs, M.; Alexandru, A.

    2016-08-01

    This study proposes engine model to predicate the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a single cylinder four stroke direct injection engine which was fuelled with diesel and palm oil methyl ester of B7 (blends 7% palm oil methyl ester with 93% diesel by volume) and B10. The experiment was conducted at constant engine speed of 3000 rpm and different engine loads operations with compression ratios of 18:1, 20:1 and 22:1. The influence of the compression ratio and fuel typeson specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency has been investigated and presented. The optimum compression ratio which yields better performance has been identified. The result from the present work confirms that biodiesel resulting from palm oil methyl ester could represent a superior alternative to diesel fuel when the engine operates with variable compression ratios. The blends, when used as fuel, result in a reduction of the brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while NOx emissions was increased when the engine is operated with biodiesel blends.

  13. Compressed Biogas-Diesel Dual-Fuel Engine Optimization Study for Ultralow Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Koten

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find out the optimum operating conditions in a diesel engine fueled with compressed biogas (CBG and pilot diesel dual-fuel. One-dimensional (1D and three-dimensional (3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD code and multiobjective optimization code were employed to investigate the influence of CBG-diesel dual-fuel combustion performance and exhaust emissions on a diesel engine. In this paper, 1D engine code and multiobjective optimization code were coupled and evaluated about 15000 cases to define the proper boundary conditions. In addition, selected single diesel fuel (dodecane and dual-fuel (CBG-diesel combustion modes were modeled to compare the engine performances and exhaust emission characteristics by using CFD code under various operating conditions. In optimization study, start of pilot diesel fuel injection, CBG-diesel flow rate, and engine speed were optimized and selected cases were compared using CFD code. CBG and diesel fuels were defined as leading reactants using user defined code. The results showed that significantly lower NOx emissions were emitted under dual-fuel operation for all cases compared to single-fuel mode at all engine load conditions.

  14. Experimental investigation of performance, exhaust emission and combustion parameters of stationary compression ignition engine using ethanol fumigation in dual fuel mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamuwa, D.K.; Sharma, D.; Soni, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potential of renewable fuels as diesel replacement is being emphasized. • Effect of ethanol fumigation on the performance of diesel engine is investigated. • NOx, CO_2 and smoke decreases with simultaneous increase in HC and CO. • Increase in ignition delay with decrease in combustion duration for ethanol substitution observed. - Abstract: Dwindling reserves and steeply increasing prices of the fossil-fuels, concern over climatic change due to release of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and the strict environmental regulations have motivated the researchers for the search for renewable alternative fuel that has clean burning characteristics and may be produced indigenously. Alcohols, being oxygenated fuel improve the combustion and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, thus enhancing agrarian economies and encouraging national economy as a whole. The objective of this paper is to investigate the thermal performance, exhaust emissions and combustion behaviour of small capacity compression ignition engine using fumigated ethanol. Fumigated ethanol at different flow rates is supplied to the cylinder during suction with the help of a simplified low cost ethanol fuelling system. With ethanol fumigation, brake thermal efficiency decreased upto 11.2% at low loads due to deteriorated combustion, whereas improved combustion increased efficiency up to 6% at higher loads, as compared to pure diesel. Maximum reduction of 22%, 41% and 27% respectively in nitrogen oxide, smoke and carbon-di-oxide emissions with simultaneous increase in hydrocarbon and carbon-mono-oxide emissions upto maximum of 144% and 139% respectively for different rates of ethanol fumigation have been observed, when compared to pure diesel operation. This is due to the changes in physico-chemical properties of air fuel mixture, viz combustion temperature, oxygen concentration, latent heat of vaporisation, fuel distribution, cetane number and ignition delay, that occurred with addition of

  15. Fuel Vaporization and Its Effect on Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1933-01-01

    The tests discussed in this report were conducted to determine whether or not there is appreciable vaporization of the fuel injected into a high-speed compression-ignition engine during the time available for injection and combustion. The effects of injection advance angle and fuel boiling temperature were investigated. The results show that an appreciable amount of the fuel is vaporized during injection even though the temperature and pressure conditions in the engine are not sufficient to cause ignition either during or after injection, and that when the conditions are such as to cause ignition the vaporization process affects the combustion. The results are compared with those of several other investigators in the same field.

  16. Combustion Temperature Effect of Diesel Engine Convert to Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Semin; Abdul R. Ismail; Rosli A. Bakar

    2009-01-01

    Effect of combustion temperature in the engine cylinder of diesel engine convert to Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engine was presents in this study. The objective of this study was to investigate the engine cylinder combustion temperature effect of diesel engine convert to CNG engine on variation engine speed. Problem statement: The hypothesis was that the lower performance of CNG engine was caused by the effect of lower in engine cylinder temperature. Are the CNG engine is lower cylinder temp...

  17. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10 4 T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ∼50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities

  18. TOPSIS-based parametric optimization of compression ignition engine performance and emission behavior with bael oil blends for different EGR and charge inlet temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniappan, Krishnamoorthi; Rajalingam, Malayalamurthi

    2018-05-02

    The demand for higher fuel energy and lesser exhaust emissions of diesel engines can be achieved by fuel being used and engine operating parameters. In the present work, effects of engine speed (RPM), injection timing (IT), injection pressure (IP), and compression ratio (CR) on performance and emission characteristics of a compression ignition (CI) engine were investigated. The ternary test fuel of 65% diesel + 25% bael oil + 10% diethyl ether (DEE) was used in this work and test was conducted at different charge inlet temperature (CIT) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All the experiments are conducted at the tradeoff engine load that is 75% engine load. When operating the diesel engine with 320 K CIT, brake thermal efficiency (BTE) is improved to 28.6%, and carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions have been reduced to 0.025% and 12.5 ppm at 18 CR. The oxide of nitrogen (NOx) has been reduced to 240 ppm at 1500 rpm for 30% EGR mode. Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) method is frequently used in multi-factor selection and gray correlation analysis method is used to study uncertain of the systems.

  19. Development of a self-ignition and combustion model for diesel engines; Modelisation de l`auto-inflammation et de la combustion pour les moteurs diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires Da Cruz, A.

    1997-12-09

    The work concerns self-ignition and combustion modelling in Diesel engines. Special attention is given to turbulence induced effects. Only gas fuel injection is taken into account. Turbulent mixing is identified as one of the main parameters controlling self-ignition in Diesel engines. However, turbulence effects are often neglected by models currently used in engine calculation codes. A new model based on results obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) is proposed. It includes turbulence effects by means of the scalar dissipation rate and presumed pdf of the mixture fraction and a chemical reaction progress variable. The model is validated through several steps. First, its results are compared to DNS in simple mixing and self-ignition cases. Then, its averaged version is integrated into the KIVA2-MB calculation code, where its behavior is tested in a one dimensional version and compared to other formulations. Finally, the model is validated with comparisons to experimental results of methane injection into a high pressure combustion chamber filled with hot air. The combustion chamber allows large optical access and therefore, optical diagnostics can be made. (author) 101 refs.

  20. An investigation of partially premixed compression ignition combustion using gasoline and spark assistance

    OpenAIRE

    Benajes Calvo, Jesus Vicente; García Martínez, Antonio; Doménech Llopis, Vicente; Durret, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays the automotive scientific community and companies are focusing part of their efforts on the investigation of new combustion modes in Compression Ignition (Cl) engines, mainly based on the use of locally lean air fuel mixtures. This characteristic, combined with exhaust gas recirculation, provides low combustion temperatures that reduce pollutant formation. However these combustion concepts have some shortcomings, related to combustion phasing control and combustion stability under th...

  1. Over compression influence to the performances of the spark ignition engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakosi, E.; Talif, S. G.; Manolache, G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and experimental results of some procedures used in improving the performances of the automobile spark ignition engines. The study uses direct injection and high over-compression applied to a standard engine. To this purpose, the paper contains both the constructive solutions and the results obtained from the test bed concerning the engine power indices, fuel consumption and exhaust emissions.

  2. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, H.; Lee, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Shiroto, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Sunahara, A.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Pérez, F.; Patel, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm"2. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  3. Flash Kα radiography of laser-driven solid sphere compression for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, H. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lee, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Ueda, T.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Shiroto, T.; Ohnishi, N. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Sunahara, A. [Institute of Laser Technology, Nishi-ku, Osaka (Japan); Beg, F. N. [University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Pérez, F. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, Cedex (France); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Time-resolved compression of a laser-driven solid deuterated plastic sphere with a cone was measured with flash Kα x-ray radiography. A spherically converging shockwave launched by nanosecond GEKKO XII beams was used for compression while a flash of 4.51 keV Ti Kα x-ray backlighter was produced by a high-intensity, picosecond laser LFEX (Laser for Fast ignition EXperiment) near peak compression for radiography. Areal densities of the compressed core were inferred from two-dimensional backlit x-ray images recorded with a narrow-band spherical crystal imager. The maximum areal density in the experiment was estimated to be 87 ± 26 mg/cm{sup 2}. The temporal evolution of the experimental and simulated areal densities with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code is in good agreement.

  4. THE EFFECT OF VARIABLE COMPRESSION RATIO ON FUEL CONSUMPTION IN SPARK IGNITION ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup SEKMEN

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to lack of energy sources in the world, we are obliged to use our current energy sources in the most efficient way. Therefore, in the automotive industry, research works to manufacture more economic cars in terms of fuelconsumption and environmental friendly cars, at the same time satisfying the required performance have been intensively increasing. Some positive results have been obtained by the studies, aimed to change the compression ratio according to the operating conditions of engine. In spark ignition engines in order to improve the combustion efficiency, fuel economy and exhaust emission in the partial loads, the compression ratio must be increased; but, under the high load and low speed conditions to prevent probable knock and hard running compression ratio must be decreased slightly. In this paper, various research works on the variable compression ratio with spark ignition engines, the effects on fuel economy, power output and thermal efficiency have been investigated. According to the results of the experiments performed with engines having variable compression ratio under the partial and mid-load conditions, an increase in engine power, a decrease in fuel consumption, particularly in partial loads up to 30 percent of fuel economy, and also severe reductions of some exhaust emission values were determined.

  5. Engine performance, combustion, and emissions study of biomass to liquid fuel in a compression-ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Renewable biomass to liquid (BTL) fuel was tested in a direct injection diesel engine. • Engine performance, in-cylinder pressure, and exhaust emissions were measured. • BTL fuel reduces pollutant emission for most conditions compared with diesel and biodiesel. • BTL fuel leads to high thermal efficiency and lower fuel consumption compared with diesel and biodiesel. - Abstract: In this work, the effects of diesel, biodiesel and biomass to liquid (BTL) fuels are investigated in a single-cylinder diesel engine at a fixed speed (2000 rpm) and three engine loads corresponding to 0 bar, 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The engine performance, in-cylinder combustion, and exhaust emissions were measured. Results show an increase in indicated work for BTL and biodiesel at 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP when compared to diesel but a decrease at 0 bar. Lower mechanical efficiency was observed for BTL and biodiesel at 1.26 bar BMEP but all three fuels had roughly the same mechanical efficiency at 3.77 bar BMEP. BTL was found to have the lowest brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and the highest brake thermal efficiency (BTE) among the three fuels tested. Combustion profiles for the three fuels were observed to vary depending on the engine load. Biodiesel was seen to have the shortest ignition delay among the three fuels regardless of engine loads. Diesel had the longest ignition delay at 0 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP but had the same ignition delay as BTL at 1.26 bar BMEP. At 1.26 bar and 3.77 bar BMEP, BTL had the lowest HC emissions but highest HC emissions at no load conditions when compared to biodiesel and diesel. When compared to diesel and biodiesel BTL had lower CO and CO 2 emissions. At 0 bar and 1.26 bar BMEP, BTL had higher NOx emissions than diesel fuel but lower NOx than biodiesel at no load conditions. At the highest engine load tested, NOx emissions were observed to be highest for diesel fuel but lowest for BTL. At 1

  6. Effect of engine load and biogas flow rate to the performance of a compression ignition engine run in dual-fuel (dieselbiogas) mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.

    2018-02-01

    The Government of Indonesia (GoI) has released a target on reduction Green Houses Gases emissions (GHG) by 26% from level business-as-usual by 2020, and the target can be up to 41% by international supports. In the energy sector, this target can be reached effectively by promoting fossil fuel replacement or blending with biofuel. One of the potential solutions is operating compression ignition (CI) engine in dual-fuel (diesel-biogas) mode. In this study effects of engine load and biogas flow rate on the performance and exhaust gas emissions of a compression ignition engine run in dual-fuel mode are investigated. In the present study, the used biogas is refined with methane content 70% of volume. The objectives are to explore the optimum operating condition of the CI engine run in dual-fuel mode. The experiments are performed on a four-strokes CI engine with rated output power of 4.41 kW. The engine is tested at constant speed 1500 rpm. The engine load varied from 600W to 1500W and biogas flow rate varied from 0 L/min to 6 L/min. The results show brake thermal efficiency of the engine run in dual-fuel mode is better than pure diesel mode if the biogas flow rates are 2 L/min and 4 L/min. It is recommended to operate the present engine in a dual-fuel mode with biogas flow rate of 4 L/min. The consumption of diesel fuel can be replaced up to 50%.

  7. Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables

  8. Economical and environmental assessments of compressed natural gas for diesel vehicle in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateep Chouykerd

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The economic assessments for the use of compressed natural gas as fuel for several types of diesel vehicles, rarely pick up, non-fixed route truck and private truck, were studied. It is noted that two main technologies of diesel natural gas vehicle (NGV, i.e. dedicated retrofit and diesel dual fuel (DDF, were considered in this work. It was found that the dedicated retrofit needs higher investment costs than dual fuel, but can achieve higher diesel saving than dual fuel. In detail, the payback period of dual fuel non-fixed route truck was found to be identical to dual fuel private truck both in the cases of6 wheel and 10 wheel, while dedicated retrofit non-fixed route truck and private truck are also identical and have longerpay back period than dual fuel due to its higher conversion costs.This work also presents the emissions released from all types of engines especially green house gas CO2. It was found that, in the case of light duty diesel i.e. pickup truck, dedicated retrofit emitted high level of CO2 than both dual fuel and conventional diesel engines. For heavy duty i.e. non-fixed route truck and private truck vehicles, dedicated retrofit emitted a lower level of CO2 than normal diesel engine. Other pollutants from engine emission, i.e. hydrocarbon (HC,nitric oxide (NOx, carbon monoxide (CO and particulate matter, (PM were also observed. The results indicated that, inthe case of light duty diesel, dedicated retrofit engine emits higher levels of HC and CO than diesel engine; in contrast, it emits lower level of NOx and PM than diesel and dual fuel. Dual fuel emits HC and CO higher than diesel and dedicated retrofit but emits lower level of NOx and PM than diesel. Lastly, for heavy duty diesel, it was demonstrated that non-fixed route truck and private truck heavy duty dedicated retrofit have potential to reduce emissions of HC, NOx, CO and PM when compared to normal heavy duty diesel. Engine efficiencies under dual fuel and dedicated

  9. Off-road compression-ignition engine emission regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999 : guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    This guide explained the requirements for Off-Road Compression Ignition Engine Emission Regulations established under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The regulations are enforced by Environment Canada, which authorizes and monitors the use of the national emissions mark. The regulations prescribe standards for off-road engines that operate as reciprocating, internal combustion engines, other than those that operate under characteristics similar to the Otto combustion cycle and that use a spark plug or other sparking device. The regulations apply to engines that are typically diesel-fuelled and found in construction, mining, farming and forestry machines such as tractors, excavators and log skidders. Four different types of persons are potentially affected by the regulations: Canadian engine manufacturers; distributors of Canadian engines or machines containing Canadian engines; importers of engines or machines for the purpose of sale; and persons not in companies importing engines or machines. Details of emission standards were presented, as well as issues concerning evidence of conformity, importing engines, and special engine cases. Compliance and enforcement details were reviewed, as well as applicable standards and provisions for emission control systems and defeat devices; exhaust emissions; crankcase and smoke emissions; and adjustable parameters. Details of import declarations were reviewed, as well as issues concerning defects and maintenance instructions. 4 tabs., 4 figs

  10. Certain investigation in a compression ignition engine using rice bran methyl ester fuel blends with ethanol additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study and analysis, the physical properties such as calorific value, viscosity, flash, and fire point temperatures of rice bran oil methyl ester were found. The rice bran oil biodiesel has been prepared by transesterification process from pure rice bran oil in the presence of methanol and NaOH. Moreover, property enhancement of rice bran oil methyl ester was also made by adding different additives such as ethanol in various proportions. Rice bran oil methyl ester with 1, 3, and 5% ethanol were analyzed for its fuel properties. The effects of diesel-B20ROME blends with ethanol additive of 1, 3, and 5% on a compression ignition engine were examined considering its emissions. It is found that the increase in biodiesel concentration in the fuel blend influences CO2 and NOx emissions. On the other hand CO and HC emissions are reduced. It is interesting to observe the emission as ethanol-B20ROME blends, reduces CO2 and NOx which are the major contributors to global warming. As the NOx and CO2 can be reduced drastically by the proposed blends, the global warming can be reduced considerably.

  11. Experimental optimization of a direct injection homogeneous charge compression ignition gasoline engine using split injections with fully automated microgenetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, M. [Kocaeli Univ., Izmit (Turkey); Reitz, R.D. [Wisconsin Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is receiving attention as a new low-emission engine concept. Little is known about the optimal operating conditions for this engine operation mode. Combustion under homogeneous, low equivalence ratio conditions results in modest temperature combustion products, containing very low concentrations of NO{sub x} and particulate matter (PM) as well as providing high thermal efficiency. However, this combustion mode can produce higher HC and CO emissions than those of conventional engines. An electronically controlled Caterpillar single-cylinder oil test engine (SCOTE), originally designed for heavy-duty diesel applications, was converted to an HCCI direct injection (DI) gasoline engine. The engine features an electronically controlled low-pressure direct injection gasoline (DI-G) injector with a 60 deg spray angle that is capable of multiple injections. The use of double injection was explored for emission control and the engine was optimized using fully automated experiments and a microgenetic algorithm optimization code. The variables changed during the optimization include the intake air temperature, start of injection timing and the split injection parameters (per cent mass of fuel in each injection, dwell between the pulses). The engine performance and emissions were determined at 700 r/min with a constant fuel flowrate at 10 MPa fuel injection pressure. The results show that significant emissions reductions are possible with the use of optimal injection strategies. (Author)

  12. Neutral-beam requirements for compression-boosted ignited tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.; Jassby, D.L.; Kreischer, K.

    1977-12-01

    Neutral-beam energies of 200 to 500-keV D 0 may be required to insure adequate penetration into the center of ignition-sized tokamak plasmas. However, the beam energy requirement can be reduced by using a start-up scenario in which the final plasma is formed by major-radius compression of a beam-heated plasma whose density-radius product, na, is determined by satisfactory neutral-beam penetration. ''Compression boosting'' is attractive only for plasmas in which ntau/sub E/ increases with na, because a major-radius compression C increases na by C 3 / 2 . The dependence on C of beam energy and beam power for plasmas which obey ''empirical scaling laws'' of the type ntau/sub E/ varies as (na) 2 is analyzed. The dependences on C of stored magnetic energy and TF-coil power dissipation are also determined. It is found that a compression ratio of 1.5 to attain the ignited plasma permits adequate penetration by 150-keV D 0 beams

  13. LES/FMDF of turbulent jet ignition in a rapid compression machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Schock, Harold; Toulson, Elisa; Jaberi, Farhad; CFD; Engine Research Labs, Michigan State University Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI) is an efficient method for initiating and controlling combustion in combustion systems, e.g. internal combustion engines. It enables combustion in ultra-lean mixtures by utilizing hot product turbulent jets emerging from a pre-chamber combustor as the ignition source for the main combustion chamber. Here, we study the TJI-assisted ignition and combustion of lean methane-air mixtures in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) for various flow/combustion conditions with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) computational model. In the LES/FMDF model, the filtered form of compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity, while the FMDF transport equation is solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (species mass fraction and temperature) field. The LES/FMDF data are used to study the physics of TJI and combustion in RCM. The results show the very complex behavior of the reacting flow and the flame structure in the pre-chamber and RCM.

  14. Combustion Characterization and Ignition Delay Modeling of Low- and High-Cetane Alternative Diesel Fuels in a Marine Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, John; Seivwright, Doug; Caton, Patrick; Millsaps, Knox

    2014-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ef500565t In support of an ongoing U.S. Navy alternative fuel evaluation program, the combustion characteristics of two very different alternative diesel fuels were evaluated in a direct-injection marine diesel engine across a variety of speeds and loads. The fuels were an algal-based hydrotreated renewable diesel fuel (HRD) with cetane number of ∼75 and a synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) with cetane n...

  15. Controlled auto-ignition characteristics of methane-air mixture in a rapid intake compression and expansion machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyubaek; Jeong, Dongsoo [Engine Research Team, Eco-Machinery Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 104 Sinseongno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea); Moon, Gunfeel [Department of Clean Environmental system, University of Science and Technology, 52 Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea); Bae, Choongsik [Engine Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 GuSeong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

    2010-10-15

    The characteristics of controlled auto-ignition (CAI) were investigated with a methane-air mixture and simulated residual gas, that represents internal exhaust gas recirculation (IEGR). Supply systems were additionally installed on the conventional rapid compression machine (RCM), and this modified machine - a rapid intake compression and expansion machine (RICEM) - was able to simulate an intake stroke for the evaluation of controlled auto-ignition with fuel-air mixture. The fuel-air mixture and the simulated residual gas were introduced separately into the combustion chamber through the spool valves. Various IEGR rates and temperatures of the IEGR gas were tested. The initial reaction and the development in controlled auto-ignition combustion were compared with spark-ignited combustion by visualization with a high-speed digital camera. Under the controlled auto-ignition operation, multi-point ignition and faster combustion were observed. With increasing the temperature of IEGR gas, the auto-ignition timing was advanced and burning duration was shortened. The higher rate of IEGR had the same effects on the combustion of the controlled auto-ignition. However, this trend was reversed with more than 47 per cent of IEGR. (author)

  16. Sensors Based Measurement Techniques of Fuel Injection and Ignition Characteristics of Diesel Sprays in DI Combustion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rehman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovative sensor based measurement techniques like needle lift sensor, photo (optical sensor and piezoresistive pressure transmitter are introduced and used to measure the injection and combustion characteristics in direct injection combustion system. Present experimental study is carried out in the constant volume combustion chamber to study the ignition, combustion and injection characteristics of the solid cone diesel fuel sprays impinging on the hot surface. Hot surface ignition approach has been used to create variety of advanced combustion systems. In the present study, the hot surface temperatures were varied from 623 K to 723 K. The cylinder air pressures were 20, 30 and 40 bar and fuel injection pressures were 100, 200 and 300 bar. It is found that ignition delay of fuel sprays get reduced with the rise in injection pressure. The ignition characteristics of sprays much less affected at high fuel injection pressures and high surface temperatures. The fuel injection duration reduces with the increase in fuel injection pressures. The rate of heat release becomes high at high injection pressures and it decreases with the increase in injection duration. It is found that duration of burn/combustion decrease with the increase in injection pressure. The use of various sensors is quite effective, reliable and accurate in measuring the various fuel injection and combustion characteristics. The study simulates the effect of fuel injection system parameters on combustion performance in large heavy duty engines.

  17. Study of In-Cylinder Reactions of High Power-Density Direct Injection Diesel Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansons, M

    2004-01-01

    Direct-injection (DI) Diesel or compression-ignition (CI) engine combustion process is investigated when new design and operational strategies are employed in order to achieve a high power-density (HPD) engine...

  18. Biodiesel production from Cynara cardunculus L. and Brassica carinata A. Braun seeds and their suitability as fuels in compression ignition engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania De Domenico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of energy crops can provide environmental benefits and may represent an opportunity to improve agriculture in areas considered at low productivity. In this work, we studied the energy potential of two species (Brassica carinata A. Braun and Cynara cardunculus L. and their seed oil productivity under different growth conditions. Furthermore, the biodiesel from the oil extracted from the seeds of these species was produced and analysed in term of utilisation as fuels in compression ignition engines. In particular, the spray penetration and shape ratio were measured in a constant-volume chamber and compared with the results obtained with a standard diesel fuel. These results were obtained using a standard common rail injection system at different injection pressure, injection duration, and constant-volume chamber pressure.

  19. Performance of Diesel Engine Using Blended Crude Jatropha Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Kamarul Azhar; Mohd Sazali, Nor Shahida Akma; Mohd Ali, Mas Fauzi; Alimin, Ahmad Jais; Khir, Saffiah Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Vegetable oil presents a very promising alternative to diesel oil since it is renewable and has similar properties to the diesel. In view of this, crude jatropha oil is selected and its viscosity is reduced by blending it with diesel. Since jatropha oil has properties which are similar to mineral diesel, it can be used in compression ignition engines without any engine modification. This paper presents the results of investigation carried out on a four-cylinder, four strokes and indirect-injection diesel engine. The engine, operated using composition blends of crude jatropha oil and diesel, were compared with mineral diesel. An experimental investigation has been carried out to analyze the performance characteristics of a compression ignition engine from the blended fuel (5%, 10%, 20% and 30%). A naturally aspirated four-stroke indirect injection diesel engine was tested at full load conditions, speeds between 1000 and 3500 rpm with intervals of 500 rpm. Results obtained from the measures of torque, power, specific fuel consumptions, thermal efficiency and brake mean effective pressure are nearly the same between blended and diesel fuel. An overall graph shows that the performance of relevant parameters from blended fuel is most likely similar to the performance produced from diesel. The experimental results proved that the use of crude jatropha oil in compression ignition engines is a viable alternative to diesel.

  20. Development and Validation of 3D-CFD Injection and Combustion Models for Dual Fuel Combustion in Diesel Ignited Large Gas Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Eder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on improving the 3D-Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD modeling of diesel ignited gas engines, with an emphasis on injection and combustion modeling. The challenges of modeling are stated and possible solutions are provided. A specific approach for modeling injection is proposed that improves the modeling of the ballistic region of the needle lift. Experimental results from an inert spray chamber are used for model validation. Two-stage ignition methods are described along with improvements in ignition delay modeling of the diesel ignited gas engine. The improved models are used in the Extended Coherent Flame Model with the 3 Zones approach (ECFM-3Z. The predictive capability of the models is investigated using data from single cylinder engine (SCE tests conducted at the Large Engines Competence Center (LEC. The results are discussed and further steps for development are identified.

  1. On the effect of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) injection upon the cold starting of a biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenci, Adrian; Niculescu, Rodica; Iorga-Simǎn, Victor; Tricǎ, Alina; Danlos, Amélie

    2017-02-01

    The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. This paper is a consequence of a study on assessing the cold-starting performance of a compression ignition engine fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Through experimental investigations, it was found that the engine starting at -20°C was no longer possible in the case of using B50 (50% diesel + 50% biofuel made from sunflower oil). In order to "force" the engine starting in this particular situation, Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) was injected into the intake manifold. DEE being a highly flammable substance, the result was a sudden and explosive engine starting, the peak pressure in the monitored cylinder in the first successful engine cycle being almost twice the one which is usually considered as normal. Thus, to explain the observed phenomena, we launched this work relying on the analysis of the in-cylinder instantaneous pressure evolution, which was acquired during cranking, stabilizing and idling phases. Moreover, since the cause of the sudden and explosive engine starting was the DEE, by using a CFD approach, we also obtained results regarding the inter-cylinder distribution of the injected DEE.

  2. Effect of main injection timing for controlling the combustion phasing of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine using a new dual injection strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Pranab; Subbarao, P.M.V.; Subrahmanyam, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new dual injection concept is developed by minimum geometry modification. • The occurrence of combustion parameters strongly depend on main injection timing. • At higher load, premixed equivalence ratio dominates over main injection timing. • Retarded of main injection timing tends to retard combustion phasing. • Slightly retarded main injection timing is recommended to avoid intense knocking. - Abstract: Homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion of diesel fuel is implemented using a novel dual injection strategy. A new experimental technique is developed to modify a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine to run on homogeneous combustion mode. Effect of main injection timing is investigated covering a range from 26 to 8 crank angle degrees before top dead center with an interval of 3°. Retarded main injection timing is identified as a control strategy for delaying combustion phasing and a means of controlled combustion phasing of direct injection homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion. Two load conditions were investigated and it was observed that at higher load, start of combustion depends more on fuel air equivalence ratio than main injection timing, whereas at low load, it significantly varies with varying main injection timing. Significant improvements in smoke and oxides of nitrogen emissions are observed when compared with the baseline conventional combustion. By studying different combustion parameters, it is observed that there is an improvement in performance and emissions with marginal loss in thermal efficiency when the main injection timing is 20° before top dead center. This is identified as the optimum main injection timing for such homogeneous combustion under the same operating condition

  3. Compression Ratio and Catalyst Aging Effects on Aqueous Ethanol Ignition (Year 2): Part 1. Compression Ratio Effects on Aqueous Ethanol Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The lean burning of water ethanol blends has the potential to reduce NOx, CO, and HC emissions while reducing the ethanol fermentation production cost of distillation and dehydration. The torch style ignition produced by the catalytic igniter allows ...

  4. Improving the performance of a compression ignition engine by directing flow of inlet air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Carlton

    1946-01-01

    The object of this report is to present the results of tests performed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effect on engine performance of directing the flow of the inlet air to a 5-inch by 7-inch cylinder, solid injection, compression ignition engine, After a few preliminary tests, comparative runs were made at a speed of 1500 r.p.m. with and without directed air flow. It was found that directing the flow of the inlet air toward the fuel injection valve gave steadier engine operation, and an appreciable increase in power, and decreased fuel consumption. The results indicate the possibility of improving the performance of a given type of combustion chamber without changing its shape and with no change in valve timing. They would also seem to prove that directional turbulence, set up before the inlet valve of a four-stroke cycle engine, continues in the engine cylinder throughout the compression stroke.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HOMOGENEOUS MIXTURE COMPRESSION IGNITION IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

    OpenAIRE

    ANTHONY OSWALDO ROQUE CCACYA

    2010-01-01

    Com o intuito de reduzir as emissões e melhorar a combustão em uma maior faixa de rotação e carga de um motor, foi proposto o estudo da combustão por compressão de misturas homogêneas (HCCI), este processo apresenta altas eficiências e baixas emissões, principalmente de NOx e fuligem. Assim, o objetivo do presente trabalho é a determinação das faixas de operação estável em um motor diesel, de alta taxa de compressão (20:1). O combustível utilizado foi gasolina tipo A, tendo em vista a sua gra...

  6. Compression ignition of low-octane gasoline: Life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Han; Liu, Feiqi; Liu, Zongwei; Zhao, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A process-based, well-to-wheel conceptualized life cycle assessment model is established. • The impacts of using low-octane gasoline on compression ignition engines are examined. • Life cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions reductions are 24.6% and 21.6%. • Significant technical and market barriers are still to be overcome. - Abstract: The use of low-octane gasoline on Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines is considered as a competitive alternative to the conventional vehicle propulsion technologies. In this study, a process-based, well-to-wheel conceptualized life cycle assessment model is established to estimate the life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the conventional gasoline-Spark Ignition (SI) and low-octane gasoline-GCI pathways. It is found that compared with the conventional pathway, the low-octane gasoline-GCI pathway leads to a 24.6% reduction in energy consumption and a 22.8% reduction in GHG emissions. The removal of the isomerization and catalytic reforming units in the refinery and the higher energy efficiency in the vehicle use phase are the substantial drivers behind the reductions. The results indicate that by promoting the use of low-octane gasoline coupled with the deployment of GCI vehicles, considerable reductions of energy consumption and GHG emissions in the transport sector can be achieved. However, significant technical and market barriers are still to be overcome. The inherent problems of NO_x and PM exhaust emissions associated with GCI engines need to be further addressed with advanced combustion techniques. Besides, the yield of low-octane gasoline needs to be improved through adjusting the refinery configurations.

  7. Study and design of a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air energy storage system for remote areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, H.; Younes, R.; Ilinca, A.; Dimitrova, M.; Perron, J.

    2010-01-01

    Remote areas around the world predominantly rely on diesel-powered generators for their electricity supply, a relatively expensive and inefficient technology that is responsible for the emission of 1.2 million tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) annually, only in Canada . Wind-diesel hybrid systems (WDS) with various penetration rates have been experimented to reduce diesel consumption of the generators. After having experimented wind-diesel hybrid systems (WDS) that used various penetration rates, we turned our focus to that the re-engineering of existing diesel power plants can be achieved most efficiently, in terms of cost and diesel consumption, through the introduction of high penetration wind systems combined with compressed air energy storage (CAES). This article compares the available technical alternatives to supercharge the diesel that was used in this high penetration wind-diesel system with compressed air storage (WDCAS), in order to identify the one that optimizes its cost and performances. The technical characteristics and performances of the best candidate technology are subsequently assessed at different working regimes in order to evaluate the varying effects on the system. Finally, a specific WDCAS system with diesel engine downsizing is explored. This proposed design, that requires the repowering of existing facilities, leads to heightened diesel power output, increased engine lifetime and efficiency and to the reduction of fuel consumption and GHG emissions, in addition to savings on maintenance and replacement cost.

  8. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost effective physical

  9. Control and diagnosis oriented modelling of the compression ignition engine; Modelisation du moteur a allumage par compression dans la perspective du controle et du diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grondin, O.

    2004-12-15

    This thesis has described an investigation into the modelling of compression ignition engine for control and diagnosis purpose. The Diesel engine is the most efficient and clean internal combustion engine due to modem electromechanical actuators. However, pollutant emission regulations are much more stricter, thus, these complex systems need sophisticated and efficient control algorithms to reach very low emission levels. For this task, engine models are required at each step of the control system development: control laws synthesis, simulation and validation. The system under study is a six cylinder direct injection Diesel engine fitted with a turbocharger. The model of this system is based on physical laws for some parts of the engine such as cylinders, manifolds, turbocharger and crank-slider system. In order to reduce computing time we choose to model heat transfer and heat release during combustion using simple empirical correlations. Resulting model has been implemented in the Matlab-Simulink environment and it can predict variables of interest for control purpose with one degree crank angle resolution. The model has been tested numerically and compared with an industrial engine simulation code with good results. Moreover, model output variables are in good agreement with experimental data recorded on a heavy-duty research engine. The engine model has been embedded on a board providing enough computing performances to perform real-time simulations, this will be helpful for 'hardware-in-the-loop' simulations. Another part of this study is dedicated to the combustion process modelling using a non linear phenomenological model: the NARMAX model. The goal is to predict the in-cylinder pressure evolution using other measurements available on the engine. The NARMAX model parameters have been identified using input-output data carried out from the experimental engine. Such model is well suited for real-time applications compare to numerically cost

  10. CFD modeling of two-stage ignition in a rapid compression machine: Assessment of zero-dimensional approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Gaurav [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Raju, Mandhapati P. [General Motor R and D Tech Center, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Sung, Chih-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    In modeling rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments, zero-dimensional approach is commonly used along with an associated heat loss model. The adequacy of such approach has not been validated for hydrocarbon fuels. The existence of multi-dimensional effects inside an RCM due to the boundary layer, roll-up vortex, non-uniform heat release, and piston crevice could result in deviation from the zero-dimensional assumption, particularly for hydrocarbons exhibiting two-stage ignition and strong thermokinetic interactions. The objective of this investigation is to assess the adequacy of zero-dimensional approach in modeling RCM experiments under conditions of two-stage ignition and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) response. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are conducted for n-heptane ignition in an RCM and the validity of zero-dimensional approach is assessed through comparisons over the entire NTC region. Results show that the zero-dimensional model based on the approach of 'adiabatic volume expansion' performs very well in adequately predicting the first-stage ignition delays, although quantitative discrepancy for the prediction of the total ignition delays and pressure rise in the first-stage ignition is noted even when the roll-up vortex is suppressed and a well-defined homogeneous core is retained within an RCM. Furthermore, the discrepancy is pressure dependent and decreases as compressed pressure is increased. Also, as ignition response becomes single-stage at higher compressed temperatures, discrepancy from the zero-dimensional simulations reduces. Despite of some quantitative discrepancy, the zero-dimensional modeling approach is deemed satisfactory from the viewpoint of the ignition delay simulation. (author)

  11. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart Zzzz of... - Operating Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions, Existing Non-Emergency Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP, and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Burn Stationary RICE â¥250 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2b Table 2b to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2a to Subpart Zzzz of... - Emission Limitations for New and Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reconstructed 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Stationary RICE â¥250 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2a Table 2a to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... 2SLB and Compression Ignition Stationary RICE >500 HP and New and Reconstructed 4SLB Stationary RICE...

  13. Experimental investigations of ignition delay period and performance of a diesel engine operated with Jatropha oil biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed EL-Kasaby

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha-curcas as a non-edible methyl ester biodiesel fuel source is used to run single cylinder, variable compression ratio, and four-stroke diesel engine. Combustion characteristics as well as engine performance are measured for different biodiesel – diesel blends. It has been shown that B50 (50% of biodiesel in a mixture of biodiesel and diesel fuel gives the highest peak pressure at 1750 rpm, while B10 gives the highest peak pressure at low speed, 1000 rpm. B50 shows upper brake torque, while B0 shows the highest volumetric efficiency. B50 shows also, the highest BSFC by about (12.5–25% compared with diesel fuel. B10 gives the highest brake thermal efficiency. B50 to B30 show nearly the lowest CO concentration, besides CO concentration is the highest at both idle and high running speeds. Exhaust temperature and NOx are maximum for B50. Delay period is measured and correlated for different blends. Modified empirical formulae are obtained for each blend. The delay period is found to be decreased with the increase of cylinder pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio.

  14. Autoignition of straight-run naphtha: A promising fuel for advanced compression ignition engines

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed

    2017-11-24

    Naphtha, a low-octane distillate fuel, has been proposed as a promising low-cost fuel for advanced compression ignition engine technologies. Experimental and modelling studies have been conducted in this work to assess autoignition characteristics of naphtha for use in advanced engines. Ignition delay times of a certified straight-run naphtha fuel, supplied by Haltermann Solutions, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid comparison machine over wide ranges of experimental conditions (20 and 60 bar, 620–1223 K, ϕ = 0.5, 1 and 2). The Haltermann straight-run naphtha (HSRN) has research octane number (RON) of 60 and motor octane number (MON) of 58.3, with carbon range spanning C3–C9. Reactivity of HSRN was compared, via experiments and simulations, with three suitably formulated surrogates: a two-component PRF (n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, a three-component TPRF (toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, and a six-component surrogate. All surrogates reasonably captured the ignition delays of HSRN at high and intermediate temperatures. However, at low temperatures (T < 750 K), the six-component surrogate performed the best in emulating the reactivity of naphtha fuel. Temperature sensitivity and rate of production analyses revealed that the presence of cyclo-alkanes in naphtha inhibits the overall fuel reactivity. Zero-dimensional engine simulations showed that PRF is a good autoignition surrogate for naphtha at high engine loads, however, the six-component surrogate is needed to match the combustion phasing of naphtha at low engine loads.

  15. Autoignition of straight-run naphtha: A promising fuel for advanced compression ignition engines

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbad, Mohammed; Issayev, Gani; Badra, Jihad; Voice, Alexander K.; Giri, Binod; Djebbi, Khalil; Ahmed, Ahfaz; Sarathy, Mani; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Naphtha, a low-octane distillate fuel, has been proposed as a promising low-cost fuel for advanced compression ignition engine technologies. Experimental and modelling studies have been conducted in this work to assess autoignition characteristics of naphtha for use in advanced engines. Ignition delay times of a certified straight-run naphtha fuel, supplied by Haltermann Solutions, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid comparison machine over wide ranges of experimental conditions (20 and 60 bar, 620–1223 K, ϕ = 0.5, 1 and 2). The Haltermann straight-run naphtha (HSRN) has research octane number (RON) of 60 and motor octane number (MON) of 58.3, with carbon range spanning C3–C9. Reactivity of HSRN was compared, via experiments and simulations, with three suitably formulated surrogates: a two-component PRF (n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, a three-component TPRF (toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane) surrogate, and a six-component surrogate. All surrogates reasonably captured the ignition delays of HSRN at high and intermediate temperatures. However, at low temperatures (T < 750 K), the six-component surrogate performed the best in emulating the reactivity of naphtha fuel. Temperature sensitivity and rate of production analyses revealed that the presence of cyclo-alkanes in naphtha inhibits the overall fuel reactivity. Zero-dimensional engine simulations showed that PRF is a good autoignition surrogate for naphtha at high engine loads, however, the six-component surrogate is needed to match the combustion phasing of naphtha at low engine loads.

  16. Research on cylinder processes of gasoline homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofaru, Corneliu

    2017-10-01

    This paper is designed to develop a HCCI engine starting from a spark ignition engine platform. The engine test was a single cylinder, four strokes provided with carburetor. The results of experimental research on this version were used as a baseline for the next phase of the work. After that, the engine was modified for a HCCI configuration, the carburetor was replaced by a direct fuel injection system in order to control precisely the fuel mass per cycle taking into account the measured intake air-mass. To ensure that the air - fuel mixture auto ignite, the compression ratio was increased from 9.7 to 11.5. The combustion process in HCCI regime is governed by chemical kinetics of mixture of air-fuel, rein ducted or trapped exhaust gases and fresh charge. To modify the quantities of trapped burnt gases, the exchange gas system was changed from fixed timing to variable valve timing. To analyze the processes taking place in the HCCI engine and synthesizing a control system, a model of the system which takes into account the engine configuration and operational parameters are needed. The cylinder processes were simulated on virtual model. The experimental research works were focused on determining the parameters which control the combustion timing of HCCI engine to obtain the best energetic and ecologic parameters.

  17. Performance and Emission Investigations of Jatropha and Karanja Biodiesels in a Single-Cylinder Compression-Ignition Engine Using Endoscopic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistri, Gayatri K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Longman, Douglas; Agarwal, Avinash K.

    2015-09-07

    Biofuels produced from non-edible sources that are cultivated on marginal lands represent a viable source of renewable and carbon-neutral energy. In this context, biodiesel obtained from Jatropha and Karanja oil seeds have received significant interest, especially in South Asian subcontinent. Both of these fuels are produced from non-edible plant seeds with high oil content, which can be grown on marginal lands. In this research, we have investigated the performance and emission characteristics of Jatropha and Karanja methyl esters (biodiesel) and their blends with diesel. Another objective is to examine the effect of long-term storage on biodiesel’s oxidative stability. The biodiesels were produced at Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, (IIT Kanpur), India, and the engine experiments were performed in a single cylinder, 4-stroke, compression ignition engine at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Chicago. An endoscope was used to visualize in-cylinder combustion events and examine the soot distribution. The effects of fuel and start of injection (SOI) on engine performance and emissions were investigated. Results indicated that ignition delay was shorter with biodiesel. Consequently the cylinder pressure and premixed heat release were higher for diesel compared to biodiesel. Engine performance data for biodiesel (J100, K100) and biodiesel blends (J30, K30) showed an increase in break thermal efficiency (BTE) (10.9%, 7.6% for biodiesel and blend, respectively), BSFC (13.1% and 5.6%), and NOx emission (9.8% and 12.9%), and a reduction in BSHC (8.64% and 12.9%), and BSCO (15.56% and 4.0%). The soot analysis from optical images qualitatively showed that biodiesel and blends produced less soot compared to diesel. The temperature profiles obtained from optical imaging further supported higher NOx in biodiesels and their blends compared to diesel. Additionally, the data indicated that retarding the injection timing leads to higher BSFC, but lower flame temperatures

  18. Notion Of Artificial Labs Slow Global Warming And Advancing Engine Studies Perspectives On A Computational Experiment On Dual-Fuel Compression-Ignition Engine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonye K. Jack

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To appreciate clean energy applications of the dual-fuel internal combustion engine D-FICE with pilot Diesel fuel to aid public policy formulation in terms of present and future benefits to the modern transportation stationary power and promotion of oil and gas green- drilling the brief to an engine research team was to investigate the feasible advantages of dual-fuel compression-ignition engines guided by the following concerns i Sustainable fuel and engine power delivery ii The requirements for fuel flexibility iii Low exhausts emissions and environmental pollution iv Achieving low specific fuel consumption and economy for maximum power v The comparative advantages over the conventional Diesel engines vi Thermo-economic modeling and analysis for the optimal blend as basis for a benefitcost evaluation Planned in two stages for reduced cost and fast turnaround of results - initial preliminary stage with basic simple models and advanced stage with more detailed complex modeling. The paper describes a simplified MATLAB based computational experiment predictive model for the thermodynamic combustion and engine performance analysis of dual-fuel compression-ignition engine studies operating on the theoretical limited-pressure cycle with several alternative fuel-blends. Environmental implications for extreme temperature moderation are considered by finite-time thermodynamic modeling for maximum power with predictions for pollutants formation and control by reaction rates kinetics analysis of systematic reduced plausible coupled chemistry models through the NCN reaction pathway for the gas-phase reactions classes of interest. Controllable variables for engine-out pollutants emissions reduction and in particular NOx elimination are identified. Verifications and Validations VampV through Performance Comparisons were made using a clinical approach in selection of StrokeBore ratios greater-than and equal-to one amp88051 low-to-high engine speeds and medium

  19. Efficiency and exhaust gas analysis of variable compression ratio spark ignition engine fuelled with alternative fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshaiah, N. [Mechanical Engineering Department, M.I.T.S, Madanapalle, Angallu-517325, A.P. (India)

    2010-07-01

    Considering energy crises and pollution problems today, investigations have been concentrated on decreasing fuel consumption by using alternative fuels and on lowering the concentration of toxic components in combustion products. In the present work, the variable compression ratio spark ignition engine designed to run on gasoline has been tested with pure gasoline, LPG (Isobutene), and gasoline blended with ethanol 10%, 15%, 25% and 35% by volume. Also, the gasoline mixed with kerosene at 15%, 25% and 35% by volume without any engine modifications has been tested and presented the result. Brake thermal and volumetric efficiency variation with brake load is compared and presented. CO and CO2 emissions have been also compared for all tested fuels.

  20. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, D. A., E-mail: shaughnessy2@llnl.gov; Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Despotopulos, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Radiochemistry Program, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  1. Increasing the Air Charge and Scavenging the Clearance Volume of a Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanogle, J A; Hicks, C W; Foster, H H

    1934-01-01

    The object of the investigation presented in this report was to determine the effects of increasing the air charge and scavenging the clearance volume of a 4-stroke-cycle compression-ignition engine having a vertical-disk form combustion chamber. Boosting the inlet-air pressure with normal valve timing increased the indicated engine power in proportion to the additional air inducted and resulted in smoother engine operation with less combustion shock. Scavenging the clearance volume by using a valve overlap of 145 degrees and an inlet-air boost pressure of approximately 2 1/2 inches of mercury produced a net increase in performance for clear exhaust operation of 33 percent over that obtained with normal valve timing and the same boost pressure. The improved combustion characteristics result in lower specific fuel consumption, and a clearer exhaust.

  2. A Review on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition and Low Temperature Combustion by Optical Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical diagnostics is an effective method to understand the physical and chemical reaction processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI and low temperature combustion (LTC modes. Based on optical diagnostics, the true process on mixing, combustion, and emissions can be seen directly. In this paper, the mixing process by port-injection and direct-injection are reviewed firstly. Then, the combustion chemical reaction mechanism is reviewed based on chemiluminescence, natural-luminosity, and laser diagnostics. After, the evolution of pollutant emissions measured by different laser diagnostic methods is reviewed and the measured species including NO, soot, UHC, and CO. Finally, a summary and the future directions on HCCI and LTC used optical diagnostics are presented.

  3. Theoretical modeling of combustion characteristics and performance parameters of biodiesel in DI diesel engine with variable compression ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dawody, Mohamed F.; Bhatti, S.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Andhra University (India)

    2013-07-01

    Increasing of costly and depleting fossil fuels are prompting researchers to use edible as well as non-edible vegetable oils as a promising alternative to petro-diesel fuels. A comprehensive computer code using ''Quick basic'' language was developed for the diesel engine cycle to study the combustion and performance characteristics of a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection diesel engine with variable compression ratio. The engine operates on diesel fuel and 20% (mass basis) of biodiesel (derived from soybean oil) blended with diesel. Combustion characteristics such as cylinder pressure, heat release fraction, heat transfer and performance characteristics such as brake power; and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) were analyzed. On the basis of the first law of thermodynamics the properties at each degree crank angle was calculated. Wiebe function is used to calculate the instantaneous heat release rate. The computed results are validated through the results obtained in the simulation Diesel-rk software.

  4. Validation of a zero-dimensional and two-phase combustion model for dual-fuel compression ignition engine simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikulski, M.; Wierzbicki, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing demands for the reduction of exhaust emissions and the pursuit to reduce the use of fossil fuels require the search for new fuelling technologies in combustion engines. One of the most promising technologies is the multi-fuel compression ignition engine concept, in which a small dose of

  5. 76 FR 25246 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression-Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1042 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression- Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR Correction Correction In rule document 2011-8794 appearing on pages 20550-20551 in the issue of Wednesday, April 13, 2011, make the following correction: Sec. 1042...

  6. 76 FR 26620 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression-Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1042 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression- Ignition Engines and Vessels; CFR Correction Correction In rule correction document C1-2011-8794 appearing on page 25246 in the issue of Wednesday, May 4, 2011, make the following correction: Sec. 1042.901...

  7. 76 FR 20550 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression-Ignition Engines and Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1042 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Marine Compression- Ignition Engines and Vessels CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part... service, whichever comes first. (2) For vessels with no Category 3 engines, a vessel that has been...

  8. 75 FR 37310 - Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Nonroad Compression-Ignition Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 1039 Control of Emissions From New and In-Use Nonroad Compression- Ignition Engines CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1000 to End... for my engines in model year 2014 and earlier? * * * * * Table 2 of Sec. 1039.102--Interim Tier 4...

  9. Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Samveg

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are one of the most promising engine technologies for the future of energy conversion from clean, efficient combustion. HCCI engines allow high efficiency and lower CO2 emission through the use of high compression ratios and the removal of intake throttle valves (like Diesel), and allow very low levels of urban pollutants like nitric oxide and soot (like Otto). These engines, however, are not without their challenges, such as low power density compared with other engine technologies, and a difficulty in controlling combustion timing. This dissertation first addresses the power output limits. The particular strategies for enabling high power output investigated in this dissertation focus on avoiding five critical limits that either damage an engine, drastically reduce efficiency, or drastically increase emissions: (1) ringing limits, (2) peak in-cylinder pressure limits, (3) misfire limits, (4) low intake temperature limits, and (5) excessive emissions limits. The research shows that the key factors that enable high power output, sufficient for passenger vehicles, while simultaneously avoiding the five limits defined above are the use of: (1) high intake air pressures allowing improved power output, (2) highly delayed combustion timing to avoid ringing limits, and (3) using the highest possible equivalence ratio before encountering ringing limits. These results are revealed by conducting extensive experiments spanning a wide range of operating conditions on a multi-cylinder HCCI engine. Second, this dissertation discusses strategies for effectively sensing combustion characteristics on a HCCI engine. For effective feedback control of HCCI combustion timing, a sensor is required to quantify when combustion occurs. Many laboratory engines use in-cylinder pressure sensors but these sensors are currently prohibitively expensive for wide-scale commercialization. Instead, ion sensors made from inexpensive sparkplugs

  10. DT ignition in a Z pinch compressed by an imploding liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, L.; Bernal, L.; Linhart, J.G.; Verri, G.

    2001-01-01

    It has been shown that an m=0 instability of a Z pinch carrying a current of the order of 10 MA with a rise time of less than 10 ns can generate a spark capable of igniting a fusion detonation in the adjacent DT plasma channel. A possible method for generating such currents, necessary for the implosion of an initial large radius, low temperature Z pinch, can be a radial implosion of a cylindrical fast liner. The problem has been addressed in previous publications without considering the role played by an initially impressed m=0 perturbation, a mechanism indispensable for the generation of a spark. The liner-Z pinch dynamics can be solved at several levels of physical model completeness. The first corresponds to a zero dimensional model in which the liner has a given mass per unit length and a zero thickness, the plasma is compressed adiabatically and is isotropic, and there are no energy losses or Joule heating. The second level is one dimensional. The Z pinch plasma is described by the full set of MHD, two-fluid equations. The liner is treated first as thin and incompressible, and subsequently it is assumed that it has a finite thickness and is composed of a heavy ion plasma, having an artificial but realistic equation of state. Both plasma and liner are considered uniform in the Z direction and only DT reactions are considered. It is shown that, given sufficient energy and speed of the liner, the Z pinch can reach a volume ignition. The third level is two dimensional. Plasma and liner are treated as in the second level but either the Z pinch or the liner is perturbed by an m=0 non-uniformity. Provided the liner energy is high enough and the initial m=0 perturbation is correctly chosen, the final neck plasma can act as a spark for DT ignition. It is also shown that the liner energy required for generating a spark and the subsequent detonation propagation are considerably less than in the case of volume ignition. (author)

  11. A spectroscopy study of gasoline partially premixed compression ignition spark assisted combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, J.V.; García-Oliver, J.M.; García, A.; Micó, C.; Durrett, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PPC combustion combined with spark assistance and gasoline fuel on a CI engine. ► Chemiluminescence of different chemical species describes the progress of combustion reaction. ► Spectra of a novel combustion mode under SACI conditions is described. ► UV–Visible spectrometry, high speed imaging and pressure diagnostic were employed for analysis. - Abstract: Nowadays many research efforts are focused on the study and development of new combustion modes, mainly based on the use of locally lean air–fuel mixtures. This characteristic, combined with exhaust gas recirculation, provides low combustion temperatures that reduces pollutant formation and increases efficiency. However these combustion concepts have some drawbacks, related to combustion phasing control, which must be overcome. In this way, the use of a spark plug has shown to be a good solution to improve phasing control in combination with lean low temperature combustion. Its performance is well reported on bibliography, however phenomena involving the combustion process are not completely described. The aim of the present work is to develop a detailed description of the spark assisted compression ignition mode by means of application of UV–Visible spectrometry, in order to improve insight on the combustion process. Tests have been performed in an optical engine by means of broadband radiation imaging and emission spectrometry. The engine hardware is typical of a compression ignition passenger car application. Gasoline was used as the fuel due to its low reactivity. Combining broadband luminosity images with pressure-derived heat-release rate and UV–Visible spectra, it was possible to identify different stages of the combustion reaction. After the spark discharge, a first flame kernel appears and starts growing as a premixed flame front, characterized by a low and constant heat-release rate in combination with the presence of remarkable OH radical radiation. Heat release increases

  12. Influence of Compression Ratio on the Performance and Emission Characteristics of Annona Methyl Ester Operated DI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Ramalingam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find the optimum performance and emission characteristics of single cylinder variable compression ratio (VCR engine with different blends of Annona methyl ester (AME as fuel. The performance parameters such as specific fuel consumption (SFC, brake thermal efficiency (BTE, and emission levels of HC, CO, Smoke, and NOx were compared with the diesel fuel. It is found that, at compression ratio of 17: 1 for A20 blended fuel (20% AME + 80% Diesel shows better performance and lower emission level which is very close to neat diesel fuel. The engine was operated with different values of compression ratio (15, 16, and 17 to find out best possible combination for operating engine with blends of AME. It is also found that the increase of compression ratio increases the BTE and reduces SFC and has lower emission without any engine in design modifications.

  13. Prediction of biodiesel ignition delay in a diesel engine using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piloto-Rodríguez, Ramón; Sánchez-Borroto, Yisel

    2017-01-01

    Ignition delay is one of the most important parameters of the combustion process and have a strong influence in exhaust emissions and engines performance. In the present work, the results of the mathematical modeling of ignition delay through artificial neural networks are shown. The modeling starts from input values that cover thermodynamic variables, engines parameters and biodiesel properties. The model obtained is only useful for biodiesel samples and several neural network algorithms were applied in order to predict the ignition delay. From its correlation coefficient, prediction capability and lowest absolute error, the best model was selected. Among other network’s input parameters, the cetane number was taken into account, also previously predicted by the use of ANN. (author)

  14. Investigation of spray characteristics from a low-pressure common rail injector for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kihyung; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2004-03-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion provides extremely low levels of pollutant emissions, and thus is an attractive alternative for future IC engines. In order to achieve a uniform mixture distribution within the engine cylinder, the characteristics of the fuel spray play an important role in the HCCI engine concept. It is well known that high-pressure common rail injection systems, mainly used in diesel engines, achieve poor mixture formation because of the possibility of direct fuel impingement on the combustion chamber surfaces. This paper describes spray characteristics of a low-pressure common rail injector which is intended for use in an HCCI engine. Optical diagnostics including laser diffraction and phase Doppler methods, and high-speed camera photography, were applied to measure the spray drop diameter and to investigate the spray development process. The drop sizing results of the laser diffraction method were compared with those of a phase Doppler particle analyser (PDPA) to validate the accuracy of the experiments. In addition, the effect of fuel properties on the spray characteristics was investigated using n-heptane, Stoddard solvent (gasoline surrogate) and diesel fuel because HCCI combustion is sensitive to the fuel composition. The results show that the injector forms a hollow-cone sheet spray rather than a liquid jet, and the atomization efficiency is high (small droplets are produced). The droplet SMD ranged from 15 to 30 µm. The spray break-up characteristics were found to depend on the fuel properties. The break-up time for n-heptane is shorter and the drop SMD is smaller than that of Stoddard solvent and diesel fuel.

  15. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrocarbon Ignition in Practical Combustion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical kinetic factors of hydrocarbon oxidation are examined in a variety of ignition problems. Ignition is related to the presence of a dominant chain branching reaction mechanism that can drive a chemical system to completion in a very short period of time. Ignition in laboratory environments is studied for problems including shock tubes and rapid compression machines. Modeling of the laboratory systems are used to develop kinetic models that can be used to analyze ignition in practical systems. Two major chain branching regimes are identified, one consisting of high temperature ignition with a chain branching reaction mechanism based on the reaction between atomic hydrogen with molecular oxygen, and the second based on an intermediate temperature thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Kinetic models are then used to describe ignition in practical combustion environments, including detonations and pulse combustors for high temperature ignition, and engine knock and diesel ignition for intermediate temperature ignition. The final example of ignition in a practical environment is homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) which is shown to be a problem dominated by the kinetics intermediate temperature hydrocarbon ignition. Model results show why high hydrocarbon and CO emissions are inevitable in HCCI combustion. The conclusion of this study is that the kinetics of hydrocarbon ignition are actually quite simple, since only one or two elementary reactions are dominant. However, there are many combustion factors that can influence these two major reactions, and these are the features that vary from one practical system to another

  16. In-vehicle measurement of ultrafine particles on compressed natural gas, conventional diesel, and oxidation-catalyst diesel heavy-duty transit buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Davyda; Jones, Steven; Lalor, Melinda

    2007-02-01

    Many metropolitan transit authorities are considering upgrading transit bus fleets to decrease ambient criteria pollutant levels. Advancements in engine and fuel technology have lead to a generation of lower-emission buses in a variety of fuel types. Dynamometer tests show substantial reductions in particulate mass emissions for younger buses (vehicle particle number concentration measurements on conventional diesel, oxidation-catalyst diesel and compressed natural gas transit buses are compared to estimate relative in-vehicle particulate exposures. Two primary consistencies are observed from the data: the CNG buses have average particle count concentrations near the average concentrations for the oxidation-catalyst diesel buses, and the conventional diesel buses have average particle count concentrations approximately three to four times greater than the CNG buses. Particle number concentrations are also noticeably affected by bus idling behavior and ventilation options, such as, window position and air conditioning.

  17. Self-ignition and oxidation of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 K at high pressure: experimental study with fast compression machine and modeling; Autoinflammation et oxydation de divers hydrocarbures entre 600 et 1000 K a haute pression: etude experimentale en machine a compression rapide et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribaucour, M.

    2002-12-01

    Low- and intermediate-temperature oxidation and self-ignition of hydrocarbons play a major role in spark ignition, diesel and HCCI (homogenous charge compression ignition) engines. A deep understanding of the chemistry linked with both phenomena is necessary to improve the engines efficiency and to reduce the formation of pollutants. This document treats of works about the self-ignition and oxidation at high pressure of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 deg. K. The experimental tool used is a fast compression machine fitted with a fast sampling system for the measurement of self-ignition delays and of the concentrations of intermediate oxidation products. The advantages and limitations of this tool are discussed. The self-ignition of various hydrocarbons is compared using pre-defined data which characterize the phenomenologies like cold flames, negative temperature coefficients and self-ignition limits. The hydrocarbons considered are pure or binary mixtures of alkanes, pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The development of high pressure oxidation reaction schemes of alkanes between 600 and 1000 deg. K is described. It is directly based on the analysis of intermediate oxidation products. This methodology is also applied to pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The construction of detailed thermo-kinetic models of oxidation and the modeling of phenomena are made for n-butane, n-heptane, for the 3 pentane isomers, for pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. Finally, the perspectives of future works are evoked. They concern new modeling and new methodologies to be applied in more predictive thermo-kinetic models and the reduction of detailed models in order to include them inside fluid dynamics codes. (J.S.)

  18. Effects of air jet duration and timing on the combustion characteristics of high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition combustion mode in a hybrid pneumatic engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Wuqiang; Meng, Xiangyu; Tian, Jiangping; Tian, Hua; Cui, Jingchen; Feng, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3-D CFD model of the power cylinder in HPE was developed. • High-pressure air JCCI combustion mode includes two-stage high-temperature reaction. • The combustion phasing of the pre-mixture is controllable via the SOJ timing. • There exists an optimum SOJ timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration. - Abstract: The high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition (JCCI) combustion mode was employed to control the premixed diesel compression ignition combustion phasing by using the compound thermodynamic cycle under all operating conditions, which is accomplished in a hybrid pneumatic engine (HPE). A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation coupled with reduced n-heptane chemical kinetics mechanism has been applied to investigate the effects of high-pressure air jet duration and the start of jet (SOJ) timing on the combustion characteristics in the power cylinder of HPE. By sweeping the high-pressure air jet durations from 6 to 14 °CA and SOJ timings from −12 °CA ATDC to the top dead center (TDC) under the air jet temperatures of 400 and 500 K, respectively, the low- and high-temperature reactions, combustion efficiency, as well as the combustion phasing and burning duration have been analyzed in detail. The results illustrated that a longer air jet duration results in a higher peak in the first-stage high-temperature reaction, and the short air jet duration of 6 °CA can lead to a higher combustion efficiency. The SOJ timing sweep results showed that there exists an optimum timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration.

  19. Experimental study on combustion and emission characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with 2,5-dimethylfuran–diesel, n-butanol–diesel and gasoline–diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guisheng; Shen, Yinggang; Zhang, Quanchang; Yao, Mingfa; Zheng, Zunqing; Liu, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    In the paper, combustion and emissions of a multi-cylinder CI (compression-ignition) engine fueled with DMF–diesel, n-butanol–diesel and gasoline–diesel blends were experimentally investigated, and fuel characteristics of DMF, n-butanol and gasoline were compared. Diesel was used as the base fuel. And 30% of DMF, n-butanol and gasoline were blended with the base fuel by volume respectively, referred to as D30, B30 and G30. Results show that compared to B30 and G30, D30 has longer ignition delay because of lower cetane number, which leads to faster burning rate and higher pressure rise rate. With increasing EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) rate, D30 gets the lowest soot emissions, and extended ignition delay and fuel oxygen are two key factors reducing soot emissions, and ignition delay has greater effects than fuel oxygen on soot reduction. In addition, D30 and B30 improve the trade-off of NO x -soot remarkably and extend low-emission region without deteriorating fuel efficiency by utilizing medium EGR rates ( x , THC and CO emissions and BSFC, but reduce soot greatly. • Fuel oxygen is more efficient than air oxygen while ignition delay has greater effects than fuel oxygen to reduce soot. • As diesel additive, DMF is superior to n-butanol and gasoline for reducing soot emissions. • Using DMF–diesel blends combined with medium EGR may be a better way to meet future emission standards

  20. Fuel effects on illumination ignition delay and soot lift-off length in diesel combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, P.J.M.; Vallen, R.G.M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Luijten, C.C.M.; Baert, R.S.G.; Skevis, G.

    2007-01-01

    Ignition behavior of different fuels is investigated by recording broadband soot luminosity at high speed (60 kHz).The tested fuels are regular low sulphur EN 590:2004 fuel, EN 14214:2003 (FAME), n-heptane and IDEA (2component surrogate fuel), all with a Cetane Index between 51 and 57. For this an

  1. Physical and chemical effects of low octane gasoline fuels on compression ignition combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-09-30

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines running on low octane gasoline fuels are considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. In this study, three fuels with different chemical and physical characteristics have been investigated in single cylinder engine running in GCI combustion mode at part-load conditions both experimentally and numerically. The studied fuels are: Saudi Aramco light naphtha (SALN) (Research octane number (RON) = 62 and final boiling point (FBP) = 91 °C), Haltermann straight run naphtha (HSRN) (RON = 60 and FBP = 140 °C) and a primary reference fuel (PRF65) (RON = 65 and FBP = 99 °C). Injection sweeps, where the start of injection (SOI) is changed between −60 and −11 CAD aTDC, have been performed for the three fuels. Full cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were executed using PRFs as chemical surrogates for the naphtha fuels. Physical surrogates based on the evaporation characteristics of the naphtha streams have been developed and their properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. It was found that the three fuels have similar combustion phasings and emissions at the conditions tested in this work with minor differences at SOI earlier than −30 CAD aTDC. These trends were successfully reproduced by the CFD calculations. The chemical and physical effects were further investigated numerically. It was found that the physical characteristics of the fuel significantly affect the combustion for injections earlier than −30 CAD aTDC because of the low evaporation rates of the fuel because of the higher boiling temperature of the fuel and the colder in-cylinder air during injection. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Performance of a diesel engine transformed to spark ignition using natural gas; Desempenho de um motor diesel convertido para utilizacao de gas natural como combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Ricardo H.R. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LEDAV/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Dinamicos e Analise de Vibracao; Belchior, Carlos R.P. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LMT/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Maquinas Termicas; Sodre, Jose Ricardo [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais (PUC/Minas), MG (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    A zero-dimensional thermodynamic model for a diesel engine converted for dedicated use of natural gas was developed in this work. The computational model covers from the time of closing the inlet valve to the time of opening the exhaust valve and it was divided into three stages (compression, combustion and expansion). A model based on the first law of thermodynamics for closed cycle has been developed to study the performance of the engine. The combustion process was modeled using the equation of Wiebe. It was taken into consideration the convective heat transfer through the walls of the cylinder and the heat transfer coefficient was calculated by the Eichelberg correlation. It was also considered that the thermodynamic properties vary with temperature. To represent the gas mixture behavior inside the cylinder two approaches (Ideal Gas Equation and Van Der Waals's Real Gas Equation) were used and results compared. The computational model was validated with experimental tests. (author)

  3. Caracterización experimental mediante técnicas ópticas de sprays en combustión con mezclas de combustibles gasolina y diesel

    OpenAIRE

    ESCOBEDO CARBONELL, PABLO

    2017-01-01

    Sprays injected into an atmosphere with thermodynamic conditions similar to those occuring inside the cylinder of an internal combustion engine have been characterized motor of ignition for the compression for the automotive is carried out. As fuel, commercial gasoline and diesel blends are used in different proportions, given the potential mixtures have for producing efficient fuels in compression ignition engines, with pollutant emissions lower than those achieved in current diesel engines....

  4. Diesel vs. compressed natural gas for school buses: a cost-effectiveness evaluation of alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Reducing emissions from school buses is a priority for both state and federal regulators. Two popular alternative technologies to conventional diesel (CD) are emission controlled diesel (ECD), defined here to be diesel buses equipped with continuously regenerating particle filters, and engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG). This paper uses a previously published model to quantify the impact of particulate matter (PM), oxides of nitrogen (NO x ), and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions on population exposure to ozone and to primary and secondary PM, and to quantify the resulting health damages, expressed in terms of lost quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Resource costs include damages from greenhouse gas-induced climate change, vehicle procurement, infrastructure development, and operations. I find that ECD and CNG produce very similar reductions in health damages compared to CD, although CNG has a modest edge because it may have lower NO x emissions. However, ECD is far more cost effective ($400,000-900,000 cost per QALY saved) than CNG (around $4 million per QALY saved). The results are uncertain because the model used makes a series of simplifying assumptions and because emissions data and cost data for school buses are very limited

  5. Energetic and exergetic analyses of a variable compression ratio spark ignition gas engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaheri, A.; Esfahanian, V.; Salavati-Zadeh, A.; Darzi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of CR and λ on CNG SI ICE 1st and 2nd law analyses are experimentally studied. • The performance of pure methane and a real CNG are observed and compared. • The ratio of actual to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is 0.78 for all cases. • At least 25.5% of destructed availability is due to combustion irreversibility. • With decrease in methane content, CNG shows more combustion irreversibility. - Abstract: Considering the significance of obtaining higher efficiencies from internal combustion engines (ICE) along with the growing role of natural gas as a fuel, the present work is set to explore the effects of compression ratio (CR hereafter) and air/fuel equivalence ratio (AFER hereafter) on the energy and exergy potentials in a gas-fueled spark ignition internal combustion engine. Experiments are carried out using a single cylinder, port injection, water cooled, variable compression ratio (VCR hereafter), spark ignition engine at a constant engine speed of 2000 rpm. The study involves CRs of 12, 14 and 16 and 10 AFERs between 0.8 and 1.25. Pure methane is utilized for the analysis. In addition, a natural gas blend with the minimum methane content among Iranian gas sources is also tested in order to investigate the effect of real natural gas on findings. The energy analysis involves input fuel power, indicated power and losses due to high temperature of exhaust gases and their unburned content, blow-by and heat loss. The exergy analysis is carried out for availability input and piston, exhaust, and losses availabilities along with destructed entropy. The analysis indicates an increase in the ratio of thermo-mechanical exhaust availability to fuel availability by CR with a maximum near stoichiometry, whereas it is shown that chemical exhaust exergy is not dependent on CR and reduces with AFER. In addition, it is indicated that the ratio of actual cycle to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is about constant (about 0.784) with changing CR

  6. Gasoline compression ignition approach to efficient, clean and affordable future engines

    KAUST Repository

    Kalghatgi, Gautam; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    towards diesel and jet fuels, leading to a probable surplus of lighter low-octane fuels. Current diesel engines are efficient but expensive and complicated because they try to reduce the nitrogen oxide and soot emissions simultaneously while using

  7. Effect of Temperature, Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Ignition Delay in Ignition Quality Tester (IQT): Diesel,n-Heptane, andiso-Octane Fuels under Low Temperature Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon; Naser, Nimal; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Junepyo

    2015-01-01

    -octane in relatively low temperature conditions to simulate unsteady spray ignition behavior. A KAUST Research ignition quality tester (KR-IQT) was utilized, which has a feature of varying temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio using a variable displacement fuel

  8. Boosted performance of a compression-ignition engine with a displaced piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Charles S; Foster, Hampton H

    1936-01-01

    Performance tests were made using a rectangular displacer arranged so that the combustion air was forced through equal passages at either end of the displacer into the vertical-disk combustion chamber of a single-cylinder, four-stroke-cycle compression-ignition test engine. After making tests to determine optimum displacer height, shape, and fuel-spray arrangement, engine-performance tests were made at 1,500 and 2,000 r.p.m. for a range of boost pressures from 0 to 20 inches of mercury and for maximum cylinder pressures up to 1,150 pounds per square inch. The engine operation for boosted conditions was very smooth, there being no combustion shock even at the highest maximum cylinder pressures. Indicated mean effective pressures of 240 pounds per square inch for fuel consumptions of 0.39 pound per horsepower-hour have been readily reproduced during routine testing at 2,000 r.p.m. at a boost pressure of 20 inches of mercury.

  9. Biodiesel from plant seed oils as an alternate fuel for compression ignition engines-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, C; Ramesh, M; Murugesan, A; Panneerselvam, N; Subramaniam, D; Bharathiraja, M

    2016-12-01

    The modern scenario reveals that the world is facing energy crisis due to the dwindling sources of fossil fuels. Environment protection agencies are more concerned about the atmospheric pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel research is getting augmented because of the above reasons. Plant seed oils (vegetable oils) are cleaner, sustainable, and renewable. So, it can be the most suitable alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the availability of different types of plant seed oils, several methods for production of biodiesel from vegetable oils, and its properties. The different types of oils considered in this review are cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) oil, ginger oil, eucalyptus oil, rice bran oil, Calophyllum inophyllum, hazelnut oil, sesame oil, clove stem oil, sardine oil, honge oil, polanga oil, mahua oil, rubber seed oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, jatropha oil, egunsi melon oil, shea butter, linseed oil, Mohr oil, sea lemon oil, pumpkin oil, tobacco seed oil, jojoba oil, and mustard oil. Several methods for production of biodiesel are transesterification, pre-treatment, pyrolysis, and water emulsion are discussed. The various fuel properties considered for review such as specific gravity, viscosity, calorific value, flash point, and fire point are presented. The review also portrays advantages, limitations, performance, and emission characteristics of engine using plant seed oil biodiesel are discussed. Finally, the modeling and optimization of engine for various biofuels with different input and output parameters using artificial neural network, response surface methodology, and Taguchi are included.

  10. Effect of Combustion-chamber Shape on the Performance of a Prechamber Compression-ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C S; Collins, J H , Jr

    1934-01-01

    The effect on engine performance of variations in the shape of the prechamber, the shape and direction of the connecting passage, the chamber volume using a tangential passage, the injection system, and the direction od the fuel spray in the chamber was investigated using a 5 by 7 inch single-cylinder compression-ignition engine. The results show that the performance of this engine can be considerably improved by selecting the best combination of variables and incorporating them in a single design. The best combination as determined from these tests consisted of a disk-shaped chamber connected to the cylinder by means of a flared tangential passage. The fuel was injected through a single-orifice nozzle directed normal to the air swirl and in the same plane. At an engine speed of 1,500 r.p.m. and with the theoretical fuel quantity for no excess air, the engine developed a brake mean effective pressure of 115 pounds per square inch with a fuel consumption of 0.49 pound per brake horsepower-hour and an explosion pressure of 820 pounds per square inch. A brake mean effective pressure of 100 pounds per square inch with a brake-fuel consumption of 0.44 pound per horsepower-hour at 1,500 r.p.m. was obtained.

  11. Application of ORC power station to increase electric power of gas compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocarski Szymon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the calculation results of efficiency of the subcritical low temperature ORC power station powered by waste heat resulting from the process of cooling a stationary compression ignition engine. The source of heat to supply the ORC power station is the heat in a form of water jet cooling the engine at a temperature of 92°C, and the exhaust gas stream at a temperature of 420°C. The study considers three variants of systems with the ORC power stations with different ways of using heat source. The first variant assumes using just engine cooling water to power the ORC station. In the second variant the ORC system is powered solely by a heat flux from the combustion gases by means of an intermediary medium - thermal oil, while the third variant provides the simultaneous management of both heat fluxes to heat the water stream as a source of power supply to the ORC station. The calculations were made for the eight working media belonging both to groups of so-called dry media (R218, R1234yf, R227ea and wet media (R32, R161, R152a, R134a, R22.

  12. An experimental and numerical analysis of the HCCI auto-ignition process of primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel in an engine, varying the engine parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon; Gilbert, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    For a future HCCI engine to operate under conditions that adhere to environmental restrictions, reducing fuel consumption and maintaining or increasing at the same time the engine efficiency, the choice of the fuel is crucial. For this purpose, this paper presents an auto-ignition investigation concerning the primary reference fuels, toluene reference fuels and diesel fuel, in order to study the effect of linear alkanes, branched alkanes and aromatics on the auto-ignition. The auto-ignition o...

  13. EFFECT OF COMPRESSION RATIO ON ENERGY AND EMISSION OF VCR DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH DUAL BLENDS OF BIODIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. EKNATH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent 10 years biodiesel fuel was studied extensively as an alternative fuel. Most of researchers reported performance and emission of biodiesel and their blends with constant compression ratio. Also all the research was conducted with use of single biodiesel and its blend. Few reports are observed with the use of variable compression ratio and blends of more than one biodiesel. Main aim of the present study is to analyse the effect of compression ratio on the performance and emission of dual blends of biodiesel. In the present study Blends of Jatropha and Karanja with Diesel fuel was tested on single cylinder VCR DI diesel engine for compression ratio 16 and 18. High density of biodiesel fuel causes longer delay period for Jatropha fuel was observed compare with Karanja fuel. However blending of two biodiesel K20J40D results in to low mean gas temperature which is the main reason for low NOx emission.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of a variable compression ratio diesel engine running with palm oil methyl ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debnath, Biplab K.; Sahoo, Niranjan; Saha, Ujjwal K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Energy and exergy analysis of palm oil methyl ester (POME) run diesel engine. ► Engine was run at various compression ratios (CRs) and injection timings (ITs). ► POME can recover around 26% of the energy supplied by the fuel. ► CR rise and IT change cause shaft energy per unit fuel supply to increase. ► CR of 18 and IT of 20°BTDC reduce more entropy generation. - Abstract: The present work is set to explore the effect of compression ratio (CR) and injection timing (IT) on energy and exergy potential of a palm oil methyl ester (POME) run diesel engine. Experiments are carried out in a single cylinder, direct injection, water cooled variable compression ratio diesel engine at a constant peed of 1500 rpm under a full load of 4.24 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). The study involves four different CRs of 16, 17, 17.5 and 18; and three different ITs of 20°, 23° and 28°BTDC. Here, the CR of 17.5 and IT of 23°BTDC are the standard ones. The energy analysis performed for the experimental data includes shaft power, energy input through fuel, output by cooling water and exhaust, uncounted loss per unit time. Side by side, the effects of varying CR and IT on peak pressure, peak heat release rate, brake thermal efficiency and exhaust gas temperature are also studied. The exergy analysis is carried out for availability input, shaft, cooling water and exhaust availability, availability destruction and entropy generation. It shows that higher values of CR increase the shaft availability and cooling water availability, however, they decrease the exhaust flow availability. The retardation and advancement of IT give similar results. The exergy analysis also shows that with the increase of CR, the injection retardation and advancement increase the shaft availability and exergy efficiency, while it reduces the exergy destruction. The entropy generation is also reduced for the similar CR and IT modifications.

  15. Mechanical characterization of diesel soot nanoparticles: in situ compression in a transmission electron microscope and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenei, Istvan Zoltan; Dassenoy, Fabrice; Epicier, Thierry; Khajeh, Arash; Martini, Ashlie; Uy, Dairene; Ghaednia, Hamed; Gangopadhyay, Arup

    2018-02-01

    Incomplete fuel burning inside an internal combustion engine results in the creation of soot in the form of nanoparticles. Some of these soot nanoparticles (SNP) become adsorbed into the lubricating oil film present on the cylinder walls, which adversely affects the tribological performance of the lubricant. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying the wear caused by SNPs, it is important to understand the behavior of SNPs and to characterize potential changes in their mechanical properties (e.g. hardness) caused by (or during) mechanical stress. In this study, the behavior of individual SNPs originating from diesel engines was studied under compression. The experiments were performed in a transmission electron microscope using a nanoindentation device. The nanoparticles exhibited elasto-plastic behavior in response to consecutive compression cycles. From the experimental data, the Young’s modulus and hardness of the SNPs were calculated. The Young’s modulus and hardness of the nanoparticles increased with the number of compression cycles. Using an electron energy loss spectroscopy technique, it was shown that the sp2/sp3 ratio within the compressed nanoparticle decreases, which is suggested to be the cause of the increase in elasticity and hardness. In order to corroborate the experimental findings, molecular dynamics simulations of a model SNP were performed. The SNP model was constructed using carbon and hydrogen atoms with morphology and composition comparable to those observed in the experiment. The model SNP was subjected to repeated compressions between two virtual rigid walls. During the simulation, the nanoparticle exhibited elasto-plastic behavior like that in the experiments. The results of the simulations confirm that the increase in the elastic modulus and hardness is associated with a decrease in the sp2/sp3 ratio.

  16. Performance and exhaust emission characteristics of variable compression ratio diesel engine fuelled with esters of crude rice bran oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, Mohit; Sharma, Sumeet; Mohapatra, S K; Kundu, Krishnendu

    2016-01-01

    As a substitute to petroleum-derived diesel, biodiesel has high potential as a renewable and environment friendly energy source. For petroleum importing countries the choice of feedstock for biodiesel production within the geographical region is a major influential factor. Crude rice bran oil is found to be good and viable feedstock for biodiesel production. A two step esterification is carried out for higher free fatty acid crude rice bran oil. Blends of 10, 20 and 40 % by vol. crude rice bran biodiesel are tested in a variable compression ratio diesel engine at compression ratio 15, 16, 17 and 18. Engine performance and exhaust emission parameters are examined. Cylinder pressure-crank angle variation is also plotted. The increase in compression ratio from 15 to 18 resulted in 18.6 % decrease in brake specific fuel consumption and 14.66 % increase in brake thermal efficiency on an average. Cylinder pressure increases by 15 % when compression ratio is increased. Carbon monoxide emission decreased by 22.27 %, hydrocarbon decreased by 38.4 %, carbon dioxide increased by 17.43 % and oxides of nitrogen as NOx emission increased by 22.76 % on an average when compression ratio is increased from 15 to 18. The blends of crude rice bran biodiesel show better results than diesel with increase in compression ratio.

  17. AN EXPERIMENTAL NOX REDUCTION POTENTIAL INVESTIGATION OF THE PARTIAL HCCI APPLICATION, ON A HIGH PRESSURE FUEL INJECTION EQUIPPED DIESEL ENGINE BY IMPLEMENTING FUMIGATION OF GASOLINE PORT INJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    ERGENÇ, Alp Tekin; YÜKSEK, Levent; ÖZENER, Orkun; IŞIN, Övün

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effects of partial HCCI (Homogeneous charge compression ignition) application on today's modern diesel engine tail pipe NOx emissions. Gasoline fumigation is supplied via a port fuel injection system located in the intake port of DI(Direct injection) diesel engine to maintain partial HCCI conditions and also diesel fuel injected directly into the combustion chamber before TDC(Top dead center). A single cylinder direct injection diesel research engine equipped w...

  18. Effect of fuel oxygen on the energetic and exergetic efficiency of a compression ignition engine fuelled separately with palm and karanja biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, Jibanananda; Misra, Rahul Dev

    2014-01-01

    Exergy analysis of any thermodynamic system can take care of the limitations of energy analysis such as irreversible losses, their magnitude and the source of thermodynamic inefficiencies apart from energy losses. In the present study, both the analyses along with heat release analysis are conducted on a natural aspirated diesel engine fuelled separately with palm biodiesel (PB), karanja biodiesel (KB), and petrodiesel (PD) using the experimental data. Since the engine performs best at about 85% loading condition, the energetic and exergetic performance parameters of the engine are evaluated at 85% loading condition for each type of fuel. The aim of the study is to determine the effect of fuel oxygen on energy and exergy efficiencies of a CI (compression ignition) engine. Various exergy losses, exergy destruction and their ratios associated with the heat transfer through cooling water, radiation, exhaust gas, friction, and some uncounted exergy destruction are investigated. Apart from exergy loss due to heat transfer; the uncounted exergy destruction (due to combustion) also plays a major role in the system inefficiency. Based on the comparative assessment of the obtained results, it is concluded that a better combustion with less irreversibility is possible with the increase in O 2 content in the fuel. - Highlights: • Efficiency of a CI engine increases with the increase in oxygen quantity in the fuel. • Irreversibility of a CI engine decreases with increase in oxygen content in the fuel. • Palm biodiesel performs better than karanja biodiesel and petrodiesel for a CI engine

  19. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of the highest compression inertial confinement fusion ignition experiment from the National Ignition Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The recently completed National Ignition Campaign (NIC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) showed significant discrepancies between post-shot simulations of implosion performance and experimentally measured performance, particularly in thermonuclear yield. This discrepancy between simulation and observation persisted despite concerted efforts to include all of the known sources of performance degradation within a reasonable two-dimensional (2-D), and even three-dimensional (3-D), simulation model, e.g., using measured surface imperfections and radiation drives adjusted to reproduce observed implosion trajectories [Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056318 (2013)]. Since the completion of the NIC, several effects have been identified that could explain these discrepancies and that were omitted in previous simulations. In particular, there is now clear evidence for larger than anticipated long-wavelength radiation drive asymmetries and a larger than expected perturbation seeded by the capsule support tent. This paper describes an updated suite of one-dimensional (1-D), 2-D, and 3-D simulations that include the current best understanding of these effects identified since the NIC, as applied to a specific NIC shot. The relative importance of each effect on the experimental observables is compared. In combination, these effects reduce the simulated-to-measured yield ratio from 125:1 in 1-D to 1.5:1 in 3-D, as compared to 15:1 in the best 2-D simulations published previously. While the agreement with the experimental data remains imperfect, the comparison to the data is significantly improved and suggests that the largest sources for the previous discrepancies between simulation and experiment are now being included.

  20. Effect of compression ratio on performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine run on raw biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, Bhaskor J.; Saha, Ujjwal K.; Chatterjee, Soumya; Veer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Maximum brake thermal efficiency of 20.04% was obtained in dual fuel mode. • Compression ratio of 18 produced the maximum brake thermal efficiency. • Maximum replacement of diesel was found to be 79.46% at a compression ratio of 18. • CO gets reduced by 26.22% with the increase of compression ratio from 16 to18. • HC gets reduced by 41.97% with the increase of compression ratio from 16 to18. - Abstract: The energy consumption of the world is increasing at a staggering rate due to population explosion. The extensive use of energy has led to fossil fuel depletion and the rise in pollution. Renewable energy holds the key solution to these aforementioned problems. Biogas, one such renewable fuel, can be used in a diesel engine under dual fuel mode for the generation of power. This work attempts to unfold the effect of compression ratio on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a dual fuel diesel engine run on raw biogas. For this investigation, a 3.5 kW single cylinder, direct injection, water cooled, variable compression ratio diesel engine is converted into a biogas run dual fuel diesel engine by connecting a venturi gas mixer at the inlet manifold. Experiments have been conducted at various compression ratios (18, 17.5, 17 and 16) and under different loading conditions fixing the standard injection timing at 23° before top dead centre. At 100% load, the brake thermal efficiencies of the dual fuel mode are found to be 20.04%, 18.25%, 17.07% and 16.42% at compression ratios of 18, 17.5, 17 and 16, respectively, whereas at the same load, the diesel mode shows an efficiency of 27.76% at a compression ratio of 17.5. The maximum replacement of the precious fossil fuel is found to be 79.46%, 76.1%, 74% and 72% at compression ratios of 18, 17.5, 17 and 16, respectively at 100% load. For the dual fuel mode, on an average, there is a reduction in carbon monoxide as well as hydrocarbon emission by 26.22% and 41.97% when compression

  1. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-10-27

    C5 alcohols are considered alternative fuels because they emit less greenhouse gases and fewer harmful pollutants. In this study, the combustion characteristics of 2-methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) and isopentanol (3-methyl-1-butanol) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction path analyses were conducted at intermediate and high temperatures to identify the most influential reactions controlling ignition of C5 alcohols. The direct relation graph with expert knowledge methodology was used to eliminate unimportant species and reactions in the detailed mechanism, and the resulting skeletal mechanism was tested at various homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion conditions. These simulations were used to investigate the heat release characteristics of the methyl-substituted C5 alcohols, and the results show relatively strong reactions at intermediate temperatures prior to hot ignition. C5 alcohol blending in PRF75 in HCCI combustion leads to a significant decrease of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) and a delay of the main combustion. The heat release features demonstrated by C5 alcohols can be used to improve the design and operation of advanced engine technologies.

  2. Effect of FeCl3 and diethyl ether as additives on compression ignition engine emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragyan P. Patnaik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving the performance of internal combustion engines and ensuring the reduction of pollution by the application of an advanced technology constitutes one of the main keys for safe guarding nation's economy and health. In this context it is pertinent to note that in terms of brake thermal efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption, a single cylinder four stroke engine acquires a better performance with 15% diethyl ether (DEE as an additive to diesel. Thus, the present investigation is motivated to compare the performance of the engine when run with diesel alone and when it is run with additives like ferric chloride (FeCl3 and diethyl ether. The experiments in the laboratory establish lowering emissions of CO, HC and smoke (excluding NO with diesel and DEE additives compared to that with diesel and FeCl3 additives and diesel alone.

  3. Schlieren-based temperature measurement inside the cylinder of an optical spark ignition and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiferis, Pavlos; Charalambides, Alexandros; Hardalupas, Yannis; Soulopoulos, Nikolaos; Taylor, A M K P; Urata, Yunichi

    2015-05-10

    Schlieren [Schlieren and Shadowgraphy Techniques (McGraw-Hill, 2001); Optics of Flames (Butterworths, 1963)] is a non-intrusive technique that can be used to detect density variations in a medium, and thus, under constant pressure and mixture concentration conditions, measure whole-field temperature distributions. The objective of the current work was to design a schlieren system to measure line-of-sight (LOS)-averaged temperature distribution with the final aim to determine the temperature distribution inside the cylinder of internal combustion (IC) engines. In a preliminary step, we assess theoretically the errors arising from the data reduction used to determine temperature from a schlieren measurement and find that the total error, random and systematic, is less than 3% for typical conditions encountered in the present experiments. A Z-type, curved-mirror schlieren system was used to measure the temperature distribution from a hot air jet in an open air environment in order to evaluate the method. Using the Abel transform, the radial distribution of the temperature was reconstructed from the LOS measurements. There was good agreement in the peak temperature between the reconstructed schlieren and thermocouple measurements. Experiments were then conducted in a four-stroke, single-cylinder, optical spark ignition engine with a four-valve, pentroof-type cylinder head to measure the temperature distribution of the reaction zone of an iso-octane-air mixture. The engine optical windows were designed to produce parallel rays and allow accurate application of the technique. The feasibility of the method to measure temperature distributions in IC engines was evaluated with simulations of the deflection angle combined with equilibrium chemistry calculations that estimated the temperature of the reaction zone at the position of maximum ray deflection as recorded in a schlieren image. Further simulations showed that the effects of exhaust gas recirculation and air

  4. Performance and emission characteristics of compression ignition engine operating with false flax biodiesel and butanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Atakan Akar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fuel properties, engine performance, and emission characteristics of diesel fuel, false flax biodiesel, and their blends with butanol have been evaluated. Blend ratios used in this study were diesel–biodiesel–butanol (70% diesel–20% biodiesel–10% butanol and 60% diesel–20% biodiesel–20% butanol by volume and biodiesel–diesel (20% biodiesel–80% diesel and 100% biodiesel by volume. Experiments showed that 10% alcohol addition to diesel and biodiesel fuels caused a decrease in torque value up to 8.57%. When butanol ratio raised to 20%, torque value decreased to an average of 12.7% and power values decreased to an average of 13.57%. Specific fuel consumption increased to an average of 10.63% and 12.80% with 10% and 20% butanol addition, respectively. Alcohol addiction into conventional diesel and biodiesel fuel slightly increased NOX emissions. Supplement of alcohol decreased CO and CO2 emissions when it was entrained to diesel and increased it when it was added to biodiesel. It means that addition of alcohol to diesel changed CO and CO2 emissions.

  5. The possibility of controlled auto-ignition (CAI) in gasoline engine and gas to liquid (GTL) as a fuel of diesel engine in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, D. [Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Daejou (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    A significant challenge grows from the ever-increasing demands for the optimization of performance, emissions, fuel economy and drivability. The most powerful technologies in the near future to improve these factors are believed Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) in gasoline engine and Gas to Liquid (GTL) as a fuel of Diesel engine. In recent years there has been an increasing trend to use more complex valvetrain designs from traditional camshaft driven mechanical systems to camless electromagnetic or electrohydraulic solutions. Comparing to fixed valve actuation systems, variable valve actuation (VVA) should be powerful to optimize the engine cycle. The matching of valve events to the engine performance and to emission requirements at a given engine or vehicle operating condition can be further optimized to the Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) in gasoline engine, which has benefits in NOx emission, fuel consumption, combustion stability and intake throttle load. In case of Diesel engine, the increasing demands for NOx and soot emission reduction have introduced aftertreatment technologies recently, but been in need of basic solution for the future, such as a super clean fuel like Gas to Liquid (GTL), which has benefits in comparability to diesel fuel, independency from crude oil and reduction of CO, THC and soot emissions. Korea looks to the future with these kinds of technologies, and tries to find the possibility for reaching the future targets in the internal combustion engine. (orig.)

  6. Energy and Exergy Analysis of a Diesel Engine Fuelled with Diesel and Simarouba Biodiesel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Nabnit; Mohanty, Mahendra Kumar; Mishra, Sruti Ranjan; Mohanty, Ramesh Chandra

    2018-02-01

    This article intends to determine the available work and various losses of a diesel engine fuelled with diesel and SB20 (20 % Simarouba biodiesel by volume blended with 80 % diesel by volume). The energy and exergy analysis were carried out by using first law and second law of thermodynamics respectively. The experiments were carried out on a 3.5 kW compression ignition engine. The analysis was conducted on per mole of fuel basis. The energy analysis indicates that about 37.23 and 37.79 % of input energy is converted into the capacity to do work for diesel and SB20 respectively. The exergetic efficiency was 34.8 and 35 % for diesel and Simarouba respectively. Comparative study indicates that the energetic and exergetic performance of SB20 resembles with that of diesel fuel.

  7. Investigations of effects of pilot injection with change in level of compression ratio in a common rail diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajarlawar Nilesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available These day diesel engines are gaining lots of attention as prime movers for various source of transportation. It offers better drive ability, very good low end torque and importantly the lower CO2 emission. Diesel engines are bridging the gap between gasoline and diesel engines. Better noise vibration and harshness levels of gasoline engine are realized to great extent in diesel engine, thanks to common rail direct injection system. Common rail injection system is now well known entity. Its unique advantage is flexible in operation. In common rail injection system, number of injection prior and after main injection at different injection pressure is possible. Due to multiple injections, gain in emission reduction as well as noise has been already experienced and demonstrated by researcher in the past. However, stringent emission norms for diesel engine equipped vehicle demands for further lower emission of oxides of nitrogen (NOx and particulate matter (PM. In the present paper, authors attempted to study the effect of multiple injections in combination with two level of compression ratio. The aim was to study the combustion behavior with the reduced compression ratio which is going to be tried out as low temperature combustion concept in near future. The results were compared with the current level of compression ratio. Experiments were carried out in 2.2L cubic capacity engine with two levels of compression ratios. Pilot injection separation and quantities were varied keeping the main injection, rail pressure, boost pressure and EGR rate constant. Cylinder pressure traces and gross heat release rates were measured and analyzed to understand the combustion behavior.

  8. Decreasing the emissions of a partially premixed gasoline fueled compression ignition engine by means of injection characteristics and EGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemati Arash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is presented in order to elucidate some numerical investigations related to a partially premixed gasoline fuelled engine by means of three dimensional CFD code. Comparing with the diesel fuel, gasoline has lower soot emission because of its higher ignition delay. The application of double injection strategy reduces the maximum heat release rate and leads to the reduction of NOx emission. For validation of the model, the results for the mean in-cylinder pressure, H.R.R., NOx and soot emissions are compared with the corresponding experimental data and show good levels of agreement. The effects of injection characteristics such as, injection duration, spray angle, nozzle hole diameter, injected fuel temperature and EGR rate on combustion process and emission formation are investigated yielding the determination of the optimal point thereafter. The results indicated that optimization of injection characteristics leads to simultaneous reduction of NOx and soot emissions with negligible change in IMEP.

  9. Effect of hydroxy (HHO) gas addition on performance and exhaust emissions in compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ali Can; Uludamar, Erinc; Aydin, Kadir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, hydroxy gas (HHO) was produced by the electrolysis process of different electrolytes (KOH{sub (aq)}, NaOH{sub (aq)}, NaCl{sub (aq)}) with various electrode designs in a leak proof plexiglass reactor (hydrogen generator). Hydroxy gas was used as a supplementary fuel in a four cylinder, four stroke, compression ignition (CI) engine without any modification and without need for storage tanks. Its effects on exhaust emissions and engine performance characteristics were investigated. Experiments showed that constant HHO flow rate at low engine speeds (under the critical speed of 1750 rpm for this experimental study), turned advantages of HHO system into disadvantages for engine torque, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) emissions and specific fuel consumption (SFC). Investigations demonstrated that HHO flow rate had to be diminished in relation to engine speed below 1750 rpm due to the long opening time of intake manifolds at low speeds. This caused excessive volume occupation of hydroxy in cylinders which prevented correct air to be taken into the combustion chambers and consequently, decreased volumetric efficiency was inevitable. Decreased volumetric efficiency influenced combustion efficiency which had negative effects on engine torque and exhaust emissions. Therefore, a hydroxy electronic control unit (HECU) was designed and manufactured to decrease HHO flow rate by decreasing voltage and current automatically by programming the data logger to compensate disadvantages of HHO gas on SFC, engine torque and exhaust emissions under engine speed of 1750 rpm. The flow rate of HHO gas was measured by using various amounts of KOH, NaOH, NaCl (catalysts). These catalysts were added into the water to diminish hydrogen and oxygen bonds and NaOH was specified as the most appropriate catalyst. It was observed that if the molality of NaOH in solution exceeded 1% by mass, electrical current supplied from the battery increased dramatically due to the too much

  10. Studies on exhaust emissions of mahua oil operated compression ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilan, N; Reddy, R P

    2009-07-01

    The world is confronted with fossil fuel depletion and environmental degradation. The energy demand and pollution problems lead to research for an alternative renewable energy sources. Vegetable oils and biodiesel present a very promising alternative fuel to diesel. In this work, an experimental work was carried out to study the feasibility of using raw mahua oil (MO) as a substitute for diesel in dual fuel engine. A single cylinder diesel engine was modified to work in dual fuel mode and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was used as primary fuel and mahua oil was used as pilot fuel. The results show that the performance of the dual fuel engine at the injector opening pressure of 220 bar and the advanced injection timing of 30 degrees bTDC results in performance close to diesel base line (DBL) operation and lower smoke and oxides of nitrogen emission.

  11. Influence of oxygen enrichment on compression ignition engines using biodiesel blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaiyapuri Senthil Murugan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of oxygen enrichment on performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder diesel engine operated with biodiesel blends have been investigated in this work. The methyl ester of jatropha biodiesel was selected as bio-diesel and four blends (B10, B20, B30, and B40 were selected for experimental investigations. The performance and emission characteristics were obtained for the these blends along with three oxygen enrichment flow rates (1, 3, and 5 L per minute using an oxygen cylinder at the air intake in the diesel engine. The performance and emission characteristics were studied and compared with the diesel and biodiesel. It was observed that, oxygen enrichment enhances the brake thermal efficiency, HC, CO, and smoke. B10 biodiesel with 5 L per minute oxygen enrichment was found to be the best fuel for biodiesel operation.

  12. An experimental study of the combusition and emission performances of 2,5-dimethylfuran diesel blends on a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Helin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in a direct injection compression ignition engine fueled with diesel-dimethylfuran blends. The combustion and emission performances of diesel-dimethylfuran blends were investigated under various loads ranging from 0.13 to 1.13 MPa brake mean effective pressure, and a constant speed of 1800 rpm. Results indicate that diesel-dimethylfuran blends have different combustion performance and produce longer ignition delay and shorter combustion duration compared with pure diesel. Moreover, a slight increase of brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency occurs when a Diesel engine operates with blended fuels, rather than diesel fuel. Diesel-dimethylfuran blends could lead to higher NOx emissions at medium and high engine loads. However, there is a significant reduction in soot emission when engines are fueled with diesel-dimethylfuran blends. Soot emissions under each operating conditions are similar and close to zero except for D40 at 0.13 MPa brake mean effective pressure. The total number and mean geometric diameter of emitted particles from diesel-dimethylfuran blends are lower than pure diesel. The tested fuels exhibit no significant difference in either CO or HC emissions at medium and high engine loads. Nevertheless, diesel fuel produces the lowest CO emission and higher HC emission at low loads of 0.13 to 0.38 MPa brake mean effective pressure.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Hydrogen Manifold Injection on the Performance of Compression Ignition Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Haroun A.K. Shahad; Nabeel Abdul-Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the influence of the addition of hydrogen to the inlet air on the performance of a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine. Hydrogen was injected in the inlet manifold. The addition of hydrogen was done on energy replacement basis. It was found that the addition of hydrogen improves the combustion process due to superior combustion characteristics of hydrogen in comparison to conventional diesel fuels. It was also found that...

  14. A Phenomenological Model for Prediction Auto-Ignition and Soot Formation of Turbulent Diffusion Combustion in a High Pressure Common Rail Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghui Zhou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new phenomenological model, the TP (Temperature Phase model, is presented to carry out optimization calculations for turbulent diffusion combustion in a high-pressure common rail diesel engine. Temperature is the most important parameter in the TP model, which includes two parts: an auto-ignition and a soot model. In the auto-ignition phase, different reaction mechanisms are built for different zones. For the soot model, different methods are used for different temperatures. The TP model is then implemented in KIVA code instead of original model to carry out optimization. The results of cylinder pressures, the corresponding heat release rates, and soot with variation of injection time, variation of rail pressure and variation of speed among TP model, KIVA standard model and experimental data are analyzed. The results indicate that the TP model can carry out optimization and CFD (computational fluid dynamics and can be a useful tool to study turbulent diffusion combustion.

  15. Effect of Diesel Engine Converted to Sequential Port Injection Compressed Natural Gas Engine on the Cylinder Pressure vs Crank Angle in Variation Engine Speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Semin; Abdul R. Ismail; Rosli A. Bakar

    2009-01-01

    The diesel engine converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) engine effect is lower in performance. Problem statement: The hypothesis is that the lower performance of CNG engine is caused by the effect of lower in engine cylinder pressure. Are the CNG engine is lower cylinder pressure than diesel engine? This research is conducted to investigate the cylinder pressure of CNG engine as a new engine compared to diesel engine as a baseline engine. Approach: The research approach in this study is b...

  16. Fuel composition impact on heavy duty diesel engine combustion & emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Heavy Duty Diesel or compression ignition (CI) engine plays an important economical role in societies all over the world. Although it is a fuel efficient internal combustion engine design, CI engine emissions are an important contributor to global pollution. To further reduce engine emissions

  17. Pollution provoquée par le moteur Diesel. Niveaux d'émission. Comparaison avec le moteur à allumage commandé Pollution Caused by Diesel Engines. Emission Levels. Comparison with Spark-Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degobert P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A partir de l'analyse des différences de modes de combustion allumage commandé et Diesel , cet article compare et explique la nature et les niveaux des différents polluants émis en fonction de leurs mécanismes de formation. Les facteurs d'action au niveau moteur sont examinés, ainsi que l'influence du carburant utilisé. Based on an analysis of the difference between spark-ignition and diesel combustion modes, this article compares and explains the nature and levels of different pollutants emitted as a function of their formation mechanisms. The action factors at the engine> level are examined together with the influence of the fuel used.

  18. N-decane-air end-gas auto-ignition induced by flame propagation in a constant volume chamber: Influence of compression history

    OpenAIRE

    Quintens , Hugo; Strozzi , Camille; Zitoun , Ratiba; Bellenoue , Marc

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The present study aims at characterizing the end-gas auto-ignition of n-decane – air mixtures induced by a flame propagation in a constant volume chamber. A numerical tool is developed, and the study is first focused on academic compressions, e.g. at constant rate of pressure rise. Thermodynamic conditions of transition from deflagration to auto-ignition are first determined, and the involved physical processes are highlighted. A square section combustion chamber is th...

  19. Effect of Variable Compression Ratio on Performance of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Karanja Biodiesel and its Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rahul Kumar; soota, Tarun, Dr.; singh, Ranjeet

    2017-08-01

    Rapid exploration and lavish consumption of underground petroleum resources have led to the scarcity of underground fossil fuels moreover the toxic emissions from such fuels are pernicious which have increased the health hazards around the world. So the aim was to find an alternative fuel which would meet the requirements of petroleum or fossil fuels. Biodiesel is a clean, renewable and bio-degradable fuel having several advantages, one of the most important of which is being its eco-friendly and better knocking characteristics than diesel fuel. In this work the performance of Karanja oil was analyzed on a four stroke, single cylinder, water cooled, variable compression ratio diesel engine. The fuel used was 5% - 25% karanja oil methyl ester by volume in diesel. The results such obtained are compared with standard diesel fuel. Several properties i.e. Brake Thermal Efficiency, Brake Specific Fuel Consumptions, Exhaust Gas Temperature are determined at all operating conditions & at variable compression ratio 17 and 17.5.

  20. Performance of a small compression ignition engine fuelled by liquified petroleum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, Himsar; Yohanes Setyawan, Eko; Ginting, Sibuk; Naibaho, Waldemar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a small air cooled single cylinder of diesel engine with a rated power of 2.5 kW at 3000 rpm is tested in two different modes. In the first mode, the CI engines run on diesel fuel mode. In the second mode, the CI engine run on liquified petroleum gas (LPG) mode. In order to simulate the load, a generator is employed. The load is fixed at 800 W and engine speed varies from 2400 rpm to 3400 rpm. The out power, specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency resulted from the engine in both modes are compared. The results show that the output power of the CI engine run on LPG fuel is comparable with the engine run on diesel fuel. However, the specific fuel consumption of the CI engine with LPG fuel is higher 17.53% in average in comparison with the CI engine run on diesel fuel. The efficiency of the CI engine with LPG fuel is lower 21.43% in average in comparison with the CI engine run on diesel fuel.

  1. Effect of biodiesel unsaturated fatty acid on combustion characteristics of a DI compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puhan, Sukumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Veltech Engineering college, Avadi, Chennai (India); Saravanan, N. [ERC Engines, Tata Motors, Pimpri, Pune (India); Nagarajan, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University, Chennai (India); Vedaraman, N. [Chemical Engineering Division, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai (India)

    2010-08-15

    Several research works have been carried out on biodiesel combustion, performance and emissions till today. But very few studies have been made about the chemistry of biodiesel that affects the diesel engine operation. Biodiesel is derived from vegetable oil or animal fats, which comprises of several fatty acids with different chain length and bonding. The present work focuses on the effect of biodiesel molecular weight, structure (Cis and Trans), and the number of double bonds on the diesel engine operation characteristics. Three types of biodiesel with different molecular weight and number of double bond were selected for the experimental studies. The biodiesels were prepared and analyzed for fuel properties according to the standards. A constant speed diesel engine, which develops 4.4 kW of power, was run with biodiesels and its performance was compared with diesel fuel. The results show that Linseed oil methyl ester with high linolenic (unsaturated fatty acid ester) does not suit best for diesel engine due to high oxides of nitrogen emission and low thermal efficiency. (author)

  2. Assessment of maximum available work of a hydrogen fueled compression ignition engine using exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, Venkateswarlu; Subramanian, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    This work is aimed at study of maximum available work and irreversibility (mixing, combustion, unburned, and friction) of a dual-fuel diesel engine (H 2 (hydrogen)–diesel) using exergy analysis. The maximum available work increased with H 2 addition due to reduction in irreversibility of combustion because of less entropy generation. The irreversibility of unburned fuel with the H 2 fuel also decreased due to the engine combustion with high temperature whereas there is no effect of H 2 on mixing and friction irreversibility. The maximum available work of the diesel engine at rated load increased from 29% with conventional base mode (without H 2 ) to 31.7% with dual-fuel mode (18% H 2 energy share) whereas total irreversibility of the engine decreased drastically from 41.2% to 39.3%. The energy efficiency of the engine with H 2 increased about 10% with 36% reduction in CO 2 emission. The developed methodology could also be applicable to find the effect and scope of different technologies including exhaust gas recirculation and turbo charging on maximum available work and energy efficiency of diesel engines. - Highlights: • Energy efficiency of diesel engine increases with hydrogen under dual-fuel mode. • Maximum available work of the engine increases significantly with hydrogen. • Combustion and unburned fuel irreversibility decrease with hydrogen. • No significant effect of hydrogen on mixing and friction irreversibility. • Reduction in CO 2 emission along with HC, CO and smoke emissions

  3. Effects of biobutanol and biobutanol–diesel blends on combustion and emission characteristics in a passenger car diesel engine with pilot injection strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyuntae; Choi, Kibong; Lee, Chang Sik

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of biobutanol blends on NOx and soot emission characteristics in a diesel engine. • Comparison of combustion characteristics between biobutanol and diesel fuels. • Effect of pilot injection on combustion and emissions reduction in a diesel engine. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the effect of biobutanol and biobutanol–diesel blends on the combustion and emission characteristics in a four-cylinder compression ignition engine using pilot injection strategies. The test fuels were a mixture of 10% biobutanol and 90% conventional diesel (Bu10), 20% biobutanol and 80% diesel (Bu20), and 100% diesel fuel (Bu0) based on mass. To study the combustion and emission characteristics of the biobutanol blended fuels, we carried out experimental investigations under various pilot injection timings from BTDC 20° to BTDC 60° with constant main injection timing. As the butanol content in the blended fuel increased, the experimental results indicated that the ignition delay was longer than that of diesel fuel for all pilot injection timings. Also, the indicated specific fuel consumption (ISFC) of the blended fuels was higher than that of diesel at all test conditions. However, the exhaust temperature was lower than that of diesel at all injection timings. Nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO) and soot from Bu20 were lower than those from diesel fuel at all test conditions and hydrocarbons (HC) were higher than that from diesel.

  4. Performance characteristics of a glowplug assisted low heat rejection diesel engine using ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthikeyan, B.; Srithar, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Thiagarajar College of Engineering, Madurai, Tamilnadu 625 015 (India)

    2011-01-15

    Conventional diesel engines with ethanol as fuel are associated with problems due to high self-ignition temperature of the fuel. The hot surface ignition method, wherein a part of the injected fuel is made to touch an electrically heated hot surface (glowplug) for ignition, is an effective way of utilizing ethanol in conventional diesel engines. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of thermal insulation on ethanol fueled compression ignition engine. One of the important ethanol properties to be considered in the high compression ratio engine is the long ignition delay of the fuel, normally characterized by lower cetane number. In the present study, the ignition delay was controlled by partial insulation of the combustion chamber (low heat rejection engine) by plasma spray coating of yttria stabilized zirconia for a thickness of 300 {mu}m. Experiments were carried out on the glowplug assisted engine with and without insulation in order to find out the possible benefits of combustion chamber insulation in ethanol and diesel operation. Highest brake thermal efficiency of 32% was obtained with ethanol fuel by insulating the combustion chamber. Emissions of the unburnt hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxides were higher than that of diesel. But the smoke intensity and was less than that of diesel engine. Volumetric efficiency of the engine was reduced by a maximum of 9% in LHR mode of operation. (author)

  5. Will Aerosol Hygroscopicity Change with Biodiesel, Renewable Diesel Fuels and Emission Control Technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Diep; Short, Daniel; Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas D; Asa-Awuku, Akua

    2017-02-07

    The use of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels in compression ignition engines and aftertreatment technologies may affect vehicle exhaust emissions. In this study two 2012 light-duty vehicles equipped with direct injection diesel engines, diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), diesel particulate filter (DPF), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) were tested on a chassis dynamometer. One vehicle was tested over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle on seven biodiesel and renewable diesel fuel blends. Both vehicles were exercised over double Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Highway fuel economy test (HWFET) cycles on ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) and a soy-based biodiesel blend to investigate the aerosol hygroscopicity during the regeneration of the DPF. Overall, the apparent hygroscopicity of emissions during nonregeneration events is consistently low (κ diesel vehicles. As such, the contribution of regeneration emissions from a growing fleet of diesel vehicles will be important.

  6. IIT MMAE Dept. Research project the homogeneous charge thermal ignition (HCTI) engine

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech Menal, Joan Ignasi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays the main kinds of engines that are used in ground transportation are, gasoline Spark Ignition engines and diesel Compression Ignition engines. As every day more fuel is being used by a growing number of vehicles, fuel dependency growth and a growing concern for our environment health, it is a crucial point to gain in fuel efficiency for ground transportation engines. Many approaches are being investigated, but we will focus in one kind that we call the HCTI, homogeneous charge the...

  7. A comparative life cycle assessment of diesel and compressed natural gas powered refuse collection vehicles in a Canadian city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Lars; Hussain, Mohammed; Ahmed, Syed; Malek, Kourosh; Costanzo, Robert; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Consumers and organizations worldwide are searching for low-carbon alternatives to conventional gasoline and diesel vehicles to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and their impact on the environment. A comprehensive technique used to estimate overall cost and environmental impact of vehicles is known as life cycle assessment (LCA). In this article, a comparative LCA of diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) powered heavy duty refuse collection vehicles (RCVs) is conducted. The analysis utilizes real-time operational data obtained from the City of Surrey in British Columbia, Canada. The impact of the two alternative vehicles is assessed from various points in their life. No net gain in energy use is found when a diesel powered RCV is replaced by a CNG powered RCV. However, significant reductions (approximately 24% CO 2 -equivalent) in GHG and criteria air contaminant (CAC) emissions are obtained. Moreover, fuel cost estimations based on 2011 price levels and a 5-year lifetime for both RCVs reveal that considerable cost savings may be achieved by switching to CNG vehicles. Thus, CNG RCVs are not only favorable in terms of reduced climate change impact but also cost effective compared to conventional diesel RCVs, and provide a viable and realistic near-term strategy for cities and municipalities to reduce GHG emissions. - Highlights: ► Life cycle analysis is performed on two alternative refuse collection vehicle technologies. ► Real-time operational data obtained by the City of Surrey in British Columbia are utilized. ► The life cycle energy use is similar for diesel and CNG RCVs. ► A 24% reduction of GHG emissions (CO 2 -equivalent) may be realized by switching from diesel to CNG. ► CNG RCVs are estimated to be cost effective and may lead to reduced fuel costs.

  8. Durability Testing of Biomass Based Oxygenated Fuel Components in a Compression Ignition Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, Robert L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baumgardner, Marc E. [Gonzaga University; Lakshminarayanan, Arunachalam [Colorado State University; Olsen, Daniel B. [Colorado State University; Marchese, Anthony J. [Colorado State University

    2017-10-18

    Blending cellulosic biofuels with traditional petroleum-derived fuels results in transportation fuels with reduced carbon footprints. Many cellulosic fuels rely on processing methods that produce mixtures of oxygenates which must be upgraded before blending with traditional fuels. Complete oxygenate removal is energy-intensive and it is likely that such biofuel blends will necessarily contain some oxygen content to be economically viable. Previous work by our group indicated that diesel fuel blends with low levels (<4%-vol) of oxygenates resulted in minimal negative effects on short-term engine performance and emissions. However, little is known about the long-term effects of these compounds on engine durability issues such as the impact on fuel injection, in-cylinder carbon buildup, and engine oil degradation. In this study, four of the oxygenated components previously tested were blended at 4%-vol in diesel fuel and tested with a durability protocol devised for this work consisting of 200 hrs of testing in a stationary, single-cylinder, Yanmar diesel engine operating at constant load. Oil samples, injector spray patterns, and carbon buildup from the injector and cylinder surfaces were analyzed. It was found that, at the levels tested, these fuels had minimal impact on the overall engine operation, which is consistent with our previous findings.

  9. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  10. Experimental investigations of LPG use at the automotive diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nutu Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquefied petroleum gas has a great potential to improve energetically and pollution performance of compression ignition engines due to its good combustion properties. This paper presents results of the researches carried on a car compression ignition engine with a 1.5 dm3 displacement, fuelled with diesel fuel and liquefied petroleum gas by diesel-gas method at the operating regimens of 70% and 55% engine load, engine speed of 2000 rpm and for substitute ratios between (6–19%. A specific objective of this paper is to establish a correlation between the optimum adjustments and the substitute ratio of the diesel fuel with liquefied petroleum gas for the investigated regimens to limit the maximum pressure and smoke level, knock and rough engine functioning and having regard to decrease the fuel consumption and the level of the pollutant emissions.

  11. Natural gas in a D. I. diesel engine. A comparison of two different ways. [Direct injection diesel enginer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun-ming, Qu; Sorenson, S.C.; Kofoed, E.

    1987-01-01

    A D.I. diesel engine was modified for natural gas operation with pilot injection and with spark ignition so that a comparative analysis of these two different ways of using natural gas could be made. The results of the experiments indicate that for a diesel engine, it is possible that the operating characteristics of a straight natural gas engine are comparable with those of a diesel/gas engine at the same compression ratio and speed. For a dual fuel engine with pilot injection the best diesel/gas ratio by energy content is approximately 20/80 at full load operation. For straight natural gas engine with spark ignition, quality governed natural gas operation has good efficiency but poor NOx emissions. This problem could be improved through throttle controlled operation. These two different ways of using natural gas are best suited to stationary engines.

  12. The combustion behavior of diesel/CNG mixtures in a constant volume combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmansyah; Aziz, A. R. A.; Heikal, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The stringent emissions and needs to increase fuel efficiency makes controlled auto-ignition (CAI) based combustion an attractive alternative for the new combustion system. However, the combustion control is the main obstacles in its development. Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) that employs two fuels with significantly different in reactivity proven to be able to control the combustion. The RCCI concept applied in a constant volume chamber fuelled with direct injected diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) was tested. The mixture composition is varied from 0 - 100% diesel/CNG at lambda 1 with main data collection are pressure profile and combustion images. The results show that diesel-CNG mixture significantly shows better combustion compared to diesel only. It is found that CNG is delaying the diesel combustion and at the same time assisting in diesel distribution inside the chamber. This combination creates a multipoint ignition of diesel throughout the chamber that generate very fast heat release rate and higher maximum pressure. Furthermore, lighter yellow color of the flame indicates lower soot production in compared with diesel combustion.

  13. Potential utilization of biodiesel as alternative fuel for compression ignition engine in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, M. A.; Ma'arof, M. I. N.; Ahmad, I. N.; Husain, H.

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel is a type of fuel which is derived from various sources of vegetable plants and waste fuels. Today, numerous biodiesels have been engineered to be at par or even better in term of performance in comparison to pure diesel. Therefore, biodiesel has shown a promising sign as one of the best candidate in overcoming total dependency on pure diesel. This paper gives review on various tests and experiments conducted on biodiesel in order to highlight the potentials given by this particular fuel. In addition, providing the supporting evidences to further endorse for a mass usage of biodiesel in Malaysia - simultaneously, driving the country to become a potential global biodiesel producer in the near future. The reviewed studies were obtained mainly via indexed journals and online libraries. Conclusively, every test and study for every blend of biodiesel had shown consistent positive results in regards to performance and in overcoming emission related issues. Thus, providing the evidence that biodiesel is highly reliable. Malaysia as a semi-agricultural nation could take the advantage in becoming one of the leading global biodiesel producers. Nevertheless, this will requires total cooperation of every concerned government bodies and authorities.

  14. Jatropha oil in compression ignition engines. Effects on the engine, environment and Tanzania as supplying country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabe, E.L.M.

    2006-05-01

    Energy from biomass and more specific, biodiesel, is one of the opportunities that could cover the future energy demand. This thesis investigates the possibilities for biofuels produced from Jatropha Curcas, a plant that grows in countries around the equator, including Tanzania, on which this thesis focuses. The energy crop has several advantages; it grows on degraded, dry, wasted and even salty land, which can be re-cultivated afterwards; it is toxic, which makes it preferable to other energy crops, because it does not compete with food crops; it gives seeds already after one year and the life-span of the plant is more than 50 years; it is good for the economics and employment of the country; etc. The oil that was gained by pressing the Jatropha seeds and part of it has had a chemical treatment called esterification, which results in the less viscous Jatropha Methyl Ester, a biodiesel. The fuels were tested in an engine set-up and compared to two reference fuels; fossil diesel and the well-known biodiesel Rape Methyl Ester. The engine in the set-up was originally a 6-cylinder II.6 DAF WS engine. It had been adjusted in order to make one measuring cylinder optically accessible. Hereby the combustion process could be filmed with a high speed camera. The experiment yielded the in-cylinder pressure as function of the crank angle, NO/NOx measurements, a photo diode signal that represents the amount of soot produced and from the pressure also heat release and in-cylinder temperature could be computed. The investigation of both the experiments and the broader literature study did not lead to any findings that could hamper the application of Jatropha oil or Methyl Ester in diesel engines. In the short term however, the use should be restricted to Tanzania. In the longer term there might be possibilities for export to Europe as well. This depends on whether European regulation will stimulate the use of bio-oil and bio-diesel or not

  15. Ignition properties of n-butane and iso-butane in a rapid compression machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, S.; Mokhov, A. V.; Darmeveil, J. H.; Levinsky, H. B.

    Autoignition delay times of n-butane and iso-butane have been measured in a Rapid Compression Machine in the temperature range 660-1010 K, at pressures varying from 14 to 36 bar and at equivalence ratios phi = 1.0 and phi = 0.5. Both butane isomers exhibit a negative-temperature-coefficient (NTC)

  16. Experimental characterization of diesel ignition and lift-off length using a single-hole ECN injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; Payri, Raúl; Bardi, Michele; Martí-Aldaraví, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In this work, lift-off length and ignition delay have been measured via chemiluminescence techniques in a wide range of conditions for a single-hole injector from the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) dataset and using a single component fuel (n-dodecane). In addition, Schlieren technique was used to characterize the ignition event using a new developed post-processing methodology capable of characterizing the “disappearance” phenomenon linked to the start of cool flames. Experiments have been carried out in a novel constant-pressure flow facility able of reproducing engine-like thermodynamic conditions. Results show that oxygen concentration seems to have a negligible impact on the start of cool flames. Empirical correlations have been obtained for the three measured parameters and they manifest similar trends of other previously published correlations for lift-off length and second stage ignition. These correlations also underline that the effect of oxygen concentration and ambient density is caught differently by chemiluminescence and Schlieren techniques, even though the absolute value of the measurements remains close. -- Highlights: • Ignition delay and LOL of an ECN injector are measured using the ECN standard diagnostics. • A novel processing is developed for Schlieren images to determine first and second stage ignition. • A sweep of injection pressure, density, temperature and oxygen concentration is performed. • A statistical analysis is done to provide an analytical description of the results

  17. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2018-04-03

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  18. Reduced Gasoline Surrogate (Toluene/n-Heptane/iso-Octane) Chemical Kinetic Model for Compression Ignition Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Atef, Nour; Alfazazi, Adamu; Badra, Jihad; Zhang, Yu; Tzanetakis, Tom; Pei, Yuanjiang

    2018-01-01

    Toluene primary reference fuel (TPRF) (mixture of toluene, iso-octane and heptane) is a suitable surrogate to represent a wide spectrum of real fuels with varying octane sensitivity. Investigating different surrogates in engine simulations is a prerequisite to identify the best matching mixture. However, running 3D engine simulations using detailed models is currently impossible and reduction of detailed models is essential. This work presents an AramcoMech reduced kinetic model developed at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) for simulating complex TPRF surrogate blends. A semi-decoupling approach was used together with species and reaction lumping to obtain a reduced kinetic model. The model was widely validated against experimental data including shock tube ignition delay times and premixed laminar flame speeds. Finally, the model was utilized to simulate the combustion of a low reactivity gasoline fuel under partially premixed combustion conditions.

  19. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part II: modeling HCCI combustion in small scales with detailed homogeneous gas phase chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Operational maps for crankshaft-equipped miniature homogeneous charge compression ignition engines are established using performance estimation, detailed chemical kinetics, and diffusion models for heat transfer and radical loss. In this study, radical loss was found to be insignificant. In contrast, heat transfer was found to be increasingly significant for 10, 1, and 0.1 W engines, respectively. Also, temperature-pressure trajectories and ignition delay time maps are used to explore relationships between engine operational parameters and HCCI. Lastly, effects of engine operating conditions and design on the indicated fuel conversion efficiency are investigated. (author)

  20. Investigation the effects of injection pressure and compressibility and nozzle entry in diesel injector nozzle’s flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed mohammadjavad Zeidi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigating nozzle’s orifice flow is challenging both experimentally and theoretically. This paper focuses on simulating flow inside diesel injector nozzle via Ansys fluent v15. Validation is performed with experimental results from Winkhofler et al (2001. Several important parameters such as mass flow rate, velocity profiles and pressure profiles are used for this validation. Results include the effects of contraction inside nozzle’s orifice, effect of compressibility; effect of injection pressures and several orifice entries are also simulated in this study. For considering the effect of compressibility a user defined function used in this simulation. Cavitation model which is used in this simulation is Singhal et al. cavitation model. Presto discretization method is used for Pressure equation and second upwind discretization method is used for Momentum equation. Converging Singhal et al. cavitation model is very challenging and it needs several efforts and simulations.

  1. Emission testing of jatropha and pongamia mixed bio diesel fuel in a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.; Shaikh, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The present investigation is based on the emission characteristics of mixed bio diesel fuel in a four stroke single cylinder compression ignition engine at constant speed. Refined oils of jatropha and pongamia are converted into bio diesel by acid catalyzed esterification and base catalyzed transesterification reactions. The jatropha and pongamia bio diesel were mixed in equal proportions with conventional mineral diesel fuel. Four samples of fuel were tested namely, diesel fuel, B10, B20 and B40. The emission analysis showed B20 mixed bio diesel fuel blend having better results as compared to other samples. There is 60% and 35% lower emission of carbon monoxide and in sulphur dioxide observed while consuming B20 blended fuel respectively. The test result showed NOx emissions were 10% higher from bio diesel fuel, as compared to conventional diesel fuel. However, these emissions may be reduced by EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) technology. Present research also revealed that that B20 mixed bio diesel fuel can be used, without any modification in a CI engine. (author)

  2. Evaluation of carcinogenic hazard of diesel engine exhaust needs to consider revolutionary changes in diesel technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Roger O; Hesterberg, Thomas W; Wall, John C

    2012-07-01

    Diesel engines, a special type of internal combustion engine, use heat of compression, rather than electric spark, to ignite hydrocarbon fuels injected into the combustion chamber. Diesel engines have high thermal efficiency and thus, high fuel efficiency. They are widely used in commerce prompting continuous improvement in diesel engines and fuels. Concern for health effects from exposure to diesel exhaust arose in the mid-1900s and stimulated development of emissions regulations and research to improve the technology and characterize potential health hazards. This included epidemiological, controlled human exposure, laboratory animal and mechanistic studies to evaluate potential hazards of whole diesel exhaust. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (1989) classified whole diesel exhaust as - "probably carcinogenic to humans". This classification stimulated even more stringent regulations for particulate matter that required further technological developments. These included improved engine control, improved fuel injection system, enhanced exhaust cooling, use of ultra low sulfur fuel, wall-flow high-efficiency exhaust particulate filters, exhaust catalysts, and crankcase ventilation filtration. The composition of New Technology Diesel Exhaust (NTDE) is qualitatively different and the concentrations of particulate constituents are more than 90% lower than for Traditional Diesel Exhaust (TDE). We recommend that future reviews of carcinogenic hazards of diesel exhaust evaluate NTDE separately from TDE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of oxygenated fuel on premixed lean diesel combustion; Kihaku yokongo diesel nensho ni oyobosu gansanso nenryo kongo keiyu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Harada, A.; Akagawa, H.; Tsujimura, K. [New ACE Institute Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    Because injection timing in diesel engines is early in a premixed lean diesel combustion system using early fuel injection, ignition timing is determined by ignitability of the fuel used. The conventional diesel fuel, which has good ignitability, causes excessively early ignition, thus aggravating fuel consumption. In order to reduce cylinder temperature with an aim of delaying ignition timing to improve the fuel consumption, attempts are being made on using low cetane fuels to reduce CO2 gas supply or compression ratio, and to vary ignitability of the fuels. The present study investigated ignition timing control and properties of exhausts by mixing different types of oxygenated fuels into light oil. Mixing the oxygenated fuels into light oil proved that the ignition timing can be controlled, and mixing such low cetane fuels as ethanol and MTBE achieved improvement in fuel consumption. Trial use of the oxygenated fuels aggravated CO concentration, which is caused because the cylinder temperature was reduced. Numerical calculations suggest that use of fuels with faster evaporation speed and lower cetane number is effective in improving the fuel consumption and the exhausts. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Combustion characteristics of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) oil in a partial premixed charge compression ignition engine

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash Alagumalai

    2015-01-01

    Indeed, the development of alternate fuels for use in internal combustion engines has traditionally been an evolutionary process in which fuel-related problems are met and critical fuel properties are identified and their specific limits defined to resolve the problem. In this regard, this research outlines a vision of lemongrass oil combustion characteristics. In a nut-shell, the combustion phenomena of lemongrass oil were investigated at engine speed of 1500 rpm and compression ratio of 17....

  5. Separate direct injection of diesel and ethanol: A numerical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnete Nicolae V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the theoretical possibility of using a pilot diesel injection for the auto-ignition of a main ethanol injection in a compression ignition engine. To this effect a predictive simulation model has been built based on experimental results for a diesel cycle (pilot and main injection at 1500 and 2500 min–1, respectively. For every engine speed, in addition to the diesel reference cycle, two more simulations were done: one with the same amount of fuel injected into the cylinder and one with the same amount of energy, which required an increase in the quantity of ethanol proportional to the ratio of its lower heating value and that of diesel. The simulations showed that in all cases the pilot diesel led to the auto-ignition of ethanol. The analysis of the in-cylinder traces at 1500 min–1 showed that combustion efficiency is improved, the peak temperature value decrease with approximately 240 K and, as a result, the NO emissions are 3.5-4 times lower. The CO and CO2 values depend on the amount of fuel injected into the cylinder. At 2500 min–1 there are similar trends but with the following observations: the ignition delay increases, while the pressure and temperature are lower.

  6. Simultaneous reduction of NOx and smoke using stratified charge compression ignition; Sojo kongoki no asshuku chakka ni yoru NOx smoke no doji teige

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Akagawa, H. [New ACE Institute Co. Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Tsujimura, K. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-12-25

    Simultaneous reduction of NO{sub x} and smoke under high load conditions could be obtained by MULDIC (MULtiple stage DIesel Combustion) where mixture was made stratified before ignition. In this investigation of the basic characteristics of MULDIC, gaseous fuels (DME, Propane) were charged into the intake air which led to the creation of homogeneous lean mixture, and liquid fuel was injected into the cylinder and made rich mixture. The results of the engine test showed that NO{sub x} emissions could be reduced to less than 100 ppm and smoke emissions were also maintained 0 FSN even at higher loads. Moreover, homogeneous rich mixture test results showed that low smoke combustion could be obtained under equivalence ratio of 1.6. In MULDIC, increasing the ignition delay period of injected fuel, soot formation rate was decreased, because over rich region was avoided. (author)

  7. Diesel ignition delay and lift-off length through different methodologies using a multi-hole injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payri, Raúl; Salvador, F.J.; Manin, Julien; Viera, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Lift-off length and ignition delay are measured through different methodologies. • Oxygen concentration, temperature and injection pressure sweeps are performed. • A multi hole injector is compared with an equivalent single hole injector. • Multi hole injector has shorter ignition delay and lift-off length than single hole. • Empirical correlations were calculated for an analytical description of the results. - Abstract: In this paper, lift-off length has been measured via both broadband luminosity and OH chemiluminescence. In addition, ignition delay has also been measured via broadband chemiluminescence and Schlieren imaging. A 3 orifice injector from the Engine Combustion Network (ECN) set, referred to as Spray B, and a single component fuel (n-dodecane) was used. Experiments were carried out in a constant flow and pressure facility, that allowed to reproduce engine-like thermodynamic conditions, and enabled the study to be performed over a wide range of test conditions with a very high repetition rate. Data obtained was also compared with results from a single orifice injector also from the Engine Combustion Network, with analog orifice characteristics (90 μm outlet diameter and convergent shape) and technology as the injector used. Results showed that there is good correlation between the ignition delay measured through both methodologies, that oxygen concentration and injection pressure plays a minor role in the ignition delay, being ambient temperature and density the parameters with the highest influence. Lift-off length measurements showed significant differences between methodologies. Minor deviation was observed between injectors with different nozzle geometry (seat inclination angle), due to temperature variations along the chamber, highlighting the importance of temperature distribution along combustion vessels. Empirical correlations for lift-off and ignition delay were calculated, underlining the effect of the conditions on

  8. An effort to enhance hydrogen energy share in a compression ignition engine under dual-fuel mode using low temperature combustion strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintala, V.; Subramanian, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H 2 energy share increased from 18% with DDM to 36% with WDM (water injection). • H 2 energy share improved marginally with retarded injection timing mode (RDM). • Energy efficiency increased with increasing amount of H 2 in dual-fuel engine. • NO x emission decreased with water injection and retarded pilot fuel injection. • HC, CO and smoke emissions increased slightly with low temperature combustion. - Abstract: A limited hydrogen (H 2 ) energy share due to knocking is the major hurdle for effective utilization of H 2 in compression ignition (CI) engines under dual-fuel operation. The present study aims at improvement of H 2 energy share in a 7.4 kW direct injection CI engine under dual-fuel mode with two low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies; (i) retarded pilot fuel injection timing and (ii) water injection. Experiments were carried out under conventional strategies of diesel dual-fuel mode (DDM) and B20 dual-fuel mode (BDM); and LTC strategies of retarded injection timing dual-fuel mode (RDM) and water injected dual-fuel mode (WDM). The results explored that the H 2 energy share increased significantly from 18% with conventional DDM to 24, and 36% with RDM, and WDM respectively. The energy efficiency increased with increasing H 2 energy share under dual-fuel operation; however, for a particular energy share of 18% H 2 , it decreased from 34.8% with DDM to 33.7% with BDM, 32.7% with WDM and 29.9% with RDM. At 18% H 2 energy share, oxides of nitrogen emission decreased by 37% with RDM and 32% with WDM as compared to conventional DDM due to reduction of in-cylinder temperature, while it increased slightly about 5% with BDM. It is emerged from the study that water injection technique is the viable option among all other strategies to enhance the H 2 energy share in the engine with a slight penalty of increase in smoke, hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide emissions

  9. THE EFFECT OF KARANJA OIL METHYL ESTER ON KIRLOSKAR HA394DI DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST EMISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanappa K Godiganur

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels are being investigated as potential substitutes for current high pollutant fuels obtained from the conventional sources. The primary problem associated with using straight vegetable oil as fuel in a compression ignition engine is caused by viscosity. The process of transesterifiction of vegetable oil with methyl alcohol provides a significant reduction in viscosity, thereby enhancing the physical properties of vegetable oil. The Kirloskar HA394 compression ignition, multi cylinder diesel engine does not require any modification to replace diesel by karanja methyl ester. Biodiesel can be used in its pure form or can be blended with diesel to form different blends. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the potential of karanja oil methyl ester and its blend with diesel from 20% to 80% by volume. Engine performance and exhaust emissions were investigated and compared with the ordinary diesel fuel in a diesel engine. The experimental results show that the engine power of the mixture is closed to the values obtained from diesel fuel and the amounts of exhaust emissions are lower than those of diesel fuel. Hence, it is seen that the blend of karanja ester and diesel fuel can be used as an alternative successfully in a diesel engine without any modification and in terms of emission parameters; it is an environmental friendly fuel

  10. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  11. Experimental study of combustion and emission characteristics of ethanol fuelled port injected homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Agarwal, Avinash Kumar [Engine Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2011-04-15

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is an alternative combustion concept for in reciprocating engines. The HCCI combustion engine offers significant benefits in terms of its high efficiency and ultra low emissions. In this investigation, port injection technique is used for preparing homogeneous charge. The combustion and emission characteristics of a HCCI engine fuelled with ethanol were investigated on a modified two-cylinder, four-stroke engine. The experiment is conducted with varying intake air temperature (120-150 C) and at different air-fuel ratios, for which stable HCCI combustion is achieved. In-cylinder pressure, heat release analysis and exhaust emission measurements were employed for combustion diagnostics. In this study, effect of intake air temperature on combustion parameters, thermal efficiency, combustion efficiency and emissions in HCCI combustion engine is analyzed and discussed in detail. The experimental results indicate that the air-fuel ratio and intake air temperature have significant effect on the maximum in-cylinder pressure and its position, gas exchange efficiency, thermal efficiency, combustion efficiency, maximum rate of pressure rise and the heat release rate. Results show that for all stable operation points, NO{sub x} emissions are lower than 10 ppm however HC and CO emissions are higher. (author)

  12. Effect Of Compression Ratio On The Performance Of Diesel Engine At Different Loads.

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Reddy G; Nirmal Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    Variable compression ratio (VCR) technology has long been recognized as a method for improving the automobile engine performance, efficiency, fuel economy with reduced emission. The main feature of the VCR engine is to operate at different compression ratio, by changing the combustion chamber volume, depending on the vehicle performance needs .The need to improve the performance characteristics of the IC Engine has necessitated the present research. Increasing the compression rati...

  13. Performance and emission study in manifold hydrogen injection with diesel as an ignition source for different start of injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, N. [ERC-Engines, TATA Motors Ltd, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra 411018 (India); Nagarajan, G. [Internal Combustion Engineering Division, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Guindy, Anna University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600 025 (India)

    2009-01-15

    Over the past two decades there has been a considerable effort to develop and introduce alternative transportation fuels to replace conventional fuels, gasoline and diesel. Environmental issues are the principal driving forces behind this effort. To date the bulk of research has focused on the carbon-based fuels such as reformulated gasoline, methanol and natural gas. One alternative fuel to carbon-based fuels is hydrogen which is considered to be low polluting fuel. In the present experimental investigation hydrogen was injected into the intake manifold by using an injector. Using an electronic control unit (ECU) the injection timing and the duration were controlled. From the results it is observed that the optimum injection timing is at gas exchange top dead center (GTDC). The efficiency improved by about 15% with an increase in NO{sub X} emission by 3% compared to diesel. The smoke emission decreased by almost 100%. A net reduction in carbon emissions was also noticed due to the use of hydrogen. By adopting manifold injection technique the hydrogen-diesel dual fuel engine operates smoothly with a significant improvement in performance and reduction in emissions. (author)

  14. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    OpenAIRE

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured, The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 degrees C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels t...

  15. Study of alcohol fuel of butanol and ethanol effect on the compression ignition (CI) engine performance, combustion and emission characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, M. A.; Yusop, A. F.; Mat Yasin, M. H.; Hamidi, M. A.; Alias, A.; Hussin, H.; Hamri, S.

    2017-10-01

    Diesel engine which is one of the larger contributors to total consumption for petroleum is an attractive power unit used widely in many fields. However, diesel engines are among the main contributors to air pollutions for the large amount of emissions, such as CO, CO2 and NOx lead to an adverse effect on human health. Many researches have been done to find alternative fuels that are clean and efficient. Biodiesel is preferred as an alternative source for diesel engine which produces lower emission of pollutants. This study has focused on the evaluation of diesel and alcohol-diesel fuel properties and also the performance, combustion and exhaust emission from diesel engine fuelled with diesel and alcohol. Butanol and ethanol is blend with diesel fuel at 1:9 ratio. There are three test fuel that is tested which Diesel (100% diesel), D90BU10 (10% Butanol and 90% diesel) and D90E10 (10% Ethanol and 90% diesel). The comparison between diesel and alcohol-diesel blend has been made in terms of fuel properties characterization, engine performance such as brake power (BP) and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) also the in cylinder maximum pressure characteristic. Thus, exhaust gas emission of CO, CO2, NOx and O2 emission also has been observed at constant load of 50% but in different operating engine speed (1100 rpm, 1400 rpm, 1700 rpm, 2000 rpm and 2300 rpm). The results show the addition of 10% of each butanol and ethanol to diesel fuel had decreased the fuel density about 0.3% to 0.5% compared to mineral diesel. In addition, viscosity and energy content are also decrease. The addition of 10% butanol had improved the fuel cetane number however the ethanol blends react differently. In term of engine performance, as the engine speed increased, BP output also increase respectively. Hence, the alcohol blends fuel generates lower BP compared to diesel, plus BSFC for all test fuel shows decreasing trend at low and medium speed, however increased gradually at higher engine

  16. Conversion of cycle Diesel engines to Otto aiming the methane utilization as alternative fuel; Conversao de motores do ciclo diesel para Otto visando a utilizacao do metano como combustivel alternativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, J F; Venanzi, D [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    1988-12-31

    A diesel engine was converted in Otto engine for use methane as fuel, by modifications on compression ratio and on the induction system, and inclusion of a spark ignition system. The performance of dynamometer essays results in both cycles are compared and presented in overlapped curves. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratapas, John; Mather, Daniel; Kozlovsky, Anton

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen’s significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  18. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

    2007-03-31

    The objective of the proposed project was to confirm the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas to improve the performance, efficiency, controllability and emissions of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The project team utilized both engine simulation and laboratory testing to evaluate and optimize how blends of hydrogen and natural gas fuel might improve control of HCCI combustion. GTI utilized a state-of-the art single-cylinder engine test platform for the experimental work in the project. The testing was designed to evaluate the feasibility of extending the limits of HCCI engine performance (i.e., stable combustion, high efficiency and low emissions) on natural gas by using blends of natural gas and hydrogen. Early in the project Ricardo provided technical support to GTI as we applied their engine performance simulation program, WAVE, to our HCCI research engine. Modeling support was later provided by Digital Engines, LLC to use their proprietary model to predict peak pressures and temperatures for varying operating parameters included in the Design of Experiments test plan. Digital Engines also provided testing support for the hydrogen and natural gas blends. Prof. David Foster of University of Wisconsin-Madison participated early in the project by providing technical guidance on HCCI engine test plans and modeling requirements. The main purpose of the testing was to quantify the effects of hydrogen addition to natural gas HCCI. Directly comparing straight natural gas with the hydrogen enhanced test points is difficult due to the complexity of HCCI combustion. With the same air flow rate and lambda, the hydrogen enriched fuel mass flow rate is lower than the straight natural gas mass flow rate. However, the energy flow rate is higher for the hydrogen enriched fuel due to hydrogen's significantly greater lower heating value, 120 mJ/kg for hydrogen compared to 45 mJ/kg for natural gas. With these caveats in mind, an

  19. Experimental study into a hybrid PCCI/CI concept for next-generation heavy-duty diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doosje, E.; Willems, F.P.T.; Baert, R.S.G.; Dijk, M.D. van

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the first results of an experimental study into a hybrid combustion concept for next-generation heavy-duty diesel engines. In this hybrid concept, at low load operating conditions, the engine is run in Pre-mixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) mode, whereas at high load

  20. On the effects of fuel properties and injection timing in partially premixed compression ignition of low octane fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal

    2017-06-29

    A better understanding on the effects of fuel properties and injection timing is required to improve the performance of advanced engines based on low temperature combustion concepts. In this work, an experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the effects of physical and chemical kinetic properties of low octane fuels and their surrogates in partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) engines. The main objective was to identify the relative importance of physical versus chemical kinetic properties in predicting practical fuel combustion behavior across a range of injection timings. Two fuel/surrogate pairs were chosen for comparison: light naphtha (LN) versus the primary reference fuel (PRF) with research octane number of 65 (PRF 65), and FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) I gasoline versus PRF 70. Two sets of parametric studies were conducted: the first varied the amount of injected fuel mass at different injection timings to match a fixed combustion phasing, and the second maintained the same injected fuel mass at each injection timing to assess resulting combustion phasing changes. Full-cycle computational fluid dynamic engine simulations were conducted by accounting for differences in the physical properties of the original and surrogate fuels, while employing identical chemical kinetics. The simulations were found to capture trends observed in the experiments, while providing details on spatial mixing and chemical reactivity for different fuels and injection timings. It was found that differences in physical properties become increasingly important as injection timing was progressively delayed from premixed conditions, and this was rationalized by analysis of mixture stratification patterns resulting from injection of fuels with different physical properties. The results suggest that accurate descriptions of both physical and chemical behavior of fuels are critical in predictive simulations of PPCI engines for a wide range of

  1. Utilization of waste heat from a HCCI (homogeneous charge compression ignition) engine in a tri-generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabchi, N.; Khoshbakhti Saray, R.; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.

    2013-01-01

    The waste heat from exhaust gases and cooling water of Homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) are utilized to drive an ammonia-water cogeneration cycle (AWCC) and some heating processes, respectively. The AWCC is a combination of the Rankine cycle and an absorption refrigeration cycle. Considering the chemical kinetic calculations, a single zone combustion model is developed to simulate the natural gas fueled HCCI engine. Also, the performance of AWCC is simulated using the Engineering Equation Solver software (EES). Through combining these two codes, a detailed thermodynamic analysis is performed for the proposed tri-generation system and the effects of some main parameters on the performances of both the AWCC and the tri-generation system are investigated in detail. The cycle performance is then optimized for the fuel energy saving ratio (FESR). The enhancement in the FESR could be up to 28.56%. Under optimized condition, the second law efficiency of proposed system is 5.19% higher than that of the HCCI engine while the reduction in CO 2 emission is 4.067% as compared with the conventional separate thermodynamic systems. Moreover, the results indicate that the engine, in the tri-generation system and the absorber, in the bottoming cycle has the most contribution in exergy destruction. - Highlights: • A new thermodynamic tri-generation system is proposed for waste heat recovery of HCCI engine. • A single zone combustion model is developed to simulate the natural gas fueled HCCI engine. • The proposed tri-generation cycle is analyzed from the view points of both first and second laws of thermodynamics. • In the considered cycle, enhancements of 28.56% in fuel energy saving ratio and 5.19% in exergy efficiency are achieved

  2. On the effects of fuel properties and injection timing in partially premixed compression ignition of low octane fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Naser, Nimal; Jaasim, Mohammed; Atef, Nour; Chung, Suk-Ho; Im, Hong G.; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding on the effects of fuel properties and injection timing is required to improve the performance of advanced engines based on low temperature combustion concepts. In this work, an experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the effects of physical and chemical kinetic properties of low octane fuels and their surrogates in partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) engines. The main objective was to identify the relative importance of physical versus chemical kinetic properties in predicting practical fuel combustion behavior across a range of injection timings. Two fuel/surrogate pairs were chosen for comparison: light naphtha (LN) versus the primary reference fuel (PRF) with research octane number of 65 (PRF 65), and FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) I gasoline versus PRF 70. Two sets of parametric studies were conducted: the first varied the amount of injected fuel mass at different injection timings to match a fixed combustion phasing, and the second maintained the same injected fuel mass at each injection timing to assess resulting combustion phasing changes. Full-cycle computational fluid dynamic engine simulations were conducted by accounting for differences in the physical properties of the original and surrogate fuels, while employing identical chemical kinetics. The simulations were found to capture trends observed in the experiments, while providing details on spatial mixing and chemical reactivity for different fuels and injection timings. It was found that differences in physical properties become increasingly important as injection timing was progressively delayed from premixed conditions, and this was rationalized by analysis of mixture stratification patterns resulting from injection of fuels with different physical properties. The results suggest that accurate descriptions of both physical and chemical behavior of fuels are critical in predictive simulations of PPCI engines for a wide range of

  3. Uncertainty in particle number modal analysis during transient operation of compressed natural gas, diesel, and trap-equipped diesel transit buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmén, Britt A; Qu, Yingge

    2004-04-15

    The relationships between transient vehicle operation and ultrafine particle emissions are not well-known, especially for low-emission alternative bus technologies such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel buses equipped with particulate filters/traps (TRAP). In this study, real-time particle number concentrations measured on a nominal 5 s average basis using an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) for these two bus technologies are compared to that of a baseline catalyst-equipped diesel bus operated on ultralow sulfur fuel (BASE) using dynamometer testing. Particle emissions were consistently 2 orders of magnitude lower for the CNG and TRAP compared to BASE on all driving cycles. Time-resolved total particle numbers were examined in terms of sampling factors identified as affecting the ability of ELPI to quantify the particulate matter number emissions for low-emitting vehicles such as CNG and TRAP as a function of vehicle driving mode. Key factors were instrument sensitivity and dilution ratio, alignment of particle and vehicle operating data, sampling train background particles, and cycle-to-cycle variability due to vehicle, engine, after-treatment, or driver behavior. In-cycle variability on the central business district (CBD) cycle was highest for the TRAP configuration, but this could not be attributed to the ELPI sensitivity issues observed for TRAP-IDLE measurements. Elevated TRAP emissions coincided with low exhaust temperature, suggesting on-road real-world particulate filter performance can be evaluated by monitoring exhaust temperature. Nonunique particle emission maps indicate that measures other than vehicle speed and acceleration are necessary to model disaggregated real-time particle emissions. Further testing on a wide variety of test cycles is needed to evaluate the relative importance of the time history of vehicle operation and the hysteresis of the sampling train/dilution tunnel on ultrafine particle emissions. Future studies should

  4. Theoretical study of the effects of pilot fuel quantity and its injection timing on the performance and emissions of a dual fuel diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakis, R.G.; Hountalas, D.T.; Rakopoulos, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    Various solutions have been proposed for improving the combustion process of conventional diesel engines and reducing the exhaust emissions without making serious modifications on the engine, one of which is the use of natural gas as a supplement for the conventional diesel fuel, the so called dual fuel natural gas diesel engines. The most common type of these is referred to as the pilot ignited natural gas diesel engine (PINGDE). Here, the primary fuel is natural gas that controls the engine power output, while the pilot diesel fuel injected near the end of the compression stroke auto-ignites and creates ignition sources for the surrounding gaseous fuel mixture to be burned. Previous research studies have shown that the main disadvantage of this dual fuel combustion is its negative impact on engine efficiency compared to the normal diesel operation, while carbon monoxide emissions are also increased. The pilot diesel fuel quantity and injection advance influence significantly the combustion mechanism. Then, in order to examine the effect of these two parameters on the performance and emissions, a comprehensive two-zone phenomenological model is employed and applied on a high-speed, pilot ignited, natural gas diesel engine located at the authors' laboratory. According to the results, the simultaneously increase of the pilot fuel quantity accompanied with an increase of its injection timing results to an improvement of the engine efficiency (increase) and of the emitted CO emissions (decrease) while it has a negative effect (increase) of NO emissions

  5. Study and design of a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air system for providing electricity to a remote telecommunication station; Etudes et conception d'un systeme hybride eolien-diesel-air comprime pour l'electrification d'une station de telecommunications isolee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, H.; Dimitrova, M. [TechnoCentre eolien Gaspesie-les Iles, Gaspe, PQ (Canada); Ilinca, A. [Quebec Univ., Rimouski, PQ (Canada); Perron, J. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This poster reported on a study that examined the feasibility of using a hybrid wind-diesel-compressed air system to produce electricity at remote telecommunication stations. Low and high penetration wind-diesel hybrid systems were studied in order to reduce the diesel consumption. The use of a high penetration wind-diesel system together with compressed air energy storage (CAES) was shown to be a viable alternative to improve the overall percentage of renewable energy and reduce the cost of electricity in remote areas where a good wind resource is available. Different technical solutions for the CAES system were compared. refs., figs.

  6. Ignition studies of two low-octane gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2017-07-24

    Low-octane gasolines (RON ∼ 50–70 range) are prospective fuels for gasoline compression ignition (GCI) internal combustion engines. GCI technology utilizing low-octane fuels has the potential to significantly improve well-to-wheel efficiency and reduce the transportation sector\\'s environmental footprint by offsetting diesel fuel usage in compression ignition engines. In this study, ignition delay times of two low-octane FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE I and FACE J, were measured in a shock tube and a rapid compression machine over a broad range of engine-relevant conditions (650–1200 K, 20 and 40 bar and ϕ = 0.5 and 1). The two gasolines are of similar octane ratings with anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2, of ∼ 70 and sensitivity, S = RON–MON, of ∼ 3. However, the molecular compositions of the two gasolines are notably different. Experimental ignition delay time results showed that the two gasolines exhibited similar reactivity over a wide range of test conditions. Furthermore, ignition delay times of a primary reference fuel (PRF) surrogate (n-heptane/iso-octane blend), having the same AKI as the FACE gasolines, captured the ignition behavior of these gasolines with some minor discrepancies at low temperatures (T < 700 K). Multi-component surrogates, formulated by matching the octane ratings and compositions of the two gasolines, emulated the autoignition behavior of gasolines from high to low temperatures. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine simulations were used to show that the PRF and multi-component surrogates exhibited similar combustion phasing over a wide range of engine operating conditions.

  7. Effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the performance and emission characteristics of a spark ignition engine using hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, M.A.R. [University of Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The present energy situation has stimulated active research interest in non-petroleum and non-polluting fuels, particularly for transportation, power generation, and agricultural sectors. Researchers have found that hydrogen presents the best and an unprecedented solution to the energy crises and pollution problems, due to its superior combustion qualities and availability. This paper discusses analytically and provides data on the effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the engine performance, emissions and pre-ignition limits of a spark ignition engine operating on hydrogen fuel. These data are important in order to understand the interaction between engine performance and emission parameters, which will help engine designers when designing for hydrogen. (author)

  8. Effects of Direct Fuel Injection Strategies on Cycle-by-Cycle Variability in a Gasoline Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Sample Entropy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Hunicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we summarize and analyze experimental observations of cyclic variability in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion in a single-cylinder gasoline engine. The engine was configured with negative valve overlap (NVO to trap residual gases from prior cycles and thus enable auto-ignition in successive cycles. Correlations were developed between different fuel injection strategies and cycle average combustion and work output profiles. Hypothesized physical mechanisms based on these correlations were then compared with trends in cycle-by-cycle predictability as revealed by sample entropy. The results of these comparisons help to clarify how fuel injection strategy can interact with prior cycle effects to affect combustion stability and so contribute to design control methods for HCCI engines.

  9. Use of a single-zone thermodynamic model with detailed chemistry to study a natural gas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junnian; Caton, Jerald A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Auto-ignition characteristics of a natural gas fueled HCCI engine. ► Engine speed had the greatest effect on the auto-ignition process. ► Increases of C 2 H 6 or C 3 H 8 improved the auto-ignition process. ► Engine performance was not sensitive to small changes in C 2 H 6 or C 3 H 8 . ► Nitric oxides concentrations decreased as engine speed or EGR level was increased. - Abstract: A single zone thermodynamic model with detailed chemical kinetics was used to simulate a natural gas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The model employed Chemkin and used chemical kinetics for natural gas with 53 species and 325 reactions. This simulation was used to complete analyses for a modified 0.4 L single cylinder engine. The engine possessed a compression ratio of 21.5:1, and had a bore and stroke of 86 and 75 mm, respectively. Several sets of parametric studies were completed to investigate the minimal initial temperature, engine performance, and nitric oxide emissions of HCCI engine operation. The results show significant changes in combustion characteristics with varying engine operating conditions. Effects of varying equivalence ratios (0.3–1.0), engine speeds (1000–4000 RPM), EGR (0–40%), and fuel compositions were determined and analyzed in detail. In particular, every 0.1 increase in equivalence ratio or 500 rpm increase in engine speed requires about a 5 K higher initial temperature for complete combustion, and leads to around 0.7 bar increase in IMEP.

  10. Experimental study of hot electrons propagation and energy deposition in solid or laser-shock compressed targets: applications to fast igniter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani, F.

    2000-02-01

    In the fast igniter scheme, a recent approach proposed for the inertial confinement fusion, the idea is to dissociate the fuel ignition phase from its compression. The ignition phase would be then achieved by means of an external energy source: a fast electron beam generated by the interaction with an ultra-intense laser. The main goal of this work is to study the mechanisms of the hot electron energy transfer to the compressed fuel. We intent in particular to study the role of the electric and collisional effects involved in the hot electron propagation in a medium with properties similar to the compressed fuel. We carried out two experiments, one at the Vulcan laser facility (England) and the second one at the new LULI 100 TW laser (France). During the first experiment, we obtained the first results on the hot electron propagation in a dense and hot plasma. The innovating aspect of this work was in particular the use of the laser-shock technique to generate high pressures, allowing the strongly correlated and degenerated plasma to be created. The role of the electric and magnetic effects due to the space charge associated with the fast electron beam has been investigated in the second experiment. Here we studied the propagation in materials with different electrical characteristics: an insulator and a conductor. The analysis of the results showed that only by taking into account simultaneously the two propagation mechanisms (collisions and electric effects) a correct treatment of the energy deposition is possible. We also showed the importance of taking into account the induced modifications due to the electrons beam crossing the target, especially the induced heating. (author)

  11. Reducing the viscosity of Jojoba Methyl Ester diesel fuel and effects on diesel engine performance and roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to test two approaches to reduce the viscosity of the Jojoba Methyl Ester (JME) diesel fuel. The first approach is the heating of the fuel to two temperatures of 50 and 70 deg. C as compared to the base ambient temperature and to diesel fuel too. The second approach is adding one chemical which is considered by its own as alternative and renewable fuel which is Diethyl Ether (DEE). The viscosity has been reduced by both methods to close to diesel values. The performance of a diesel engine using those fuels has been tested in a variable compression research engine Ricardo E6 with the engine speed constant at 1200 rpm. The measured parameters included the exhaust gas temperature, the ignition delay period, the maximum pressure rise rate, maximum pressure, and indicated mean effective pressure and maximum heat release rate. The engine performance is presented and the effects of both approaches are scrutinized.

  12. Reducing the viscosity of Jojoba Methyl Ester diesel fuel and effects on diesel engine performance and roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E. [Mech. Eng. Dept., UAE University, Al-Ain, Abu Dhabi 17555 (United Arab Emirates)

    2009-07-15

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to test two approaches to reduce the viscosity of the Jojoba Methyl Ester (JME) diesel fuel. The first approach is the heating of the fuel to two temperatures of 50 and 70 C as compared to the base ambient temperature and to diesel fuel too. The second approach is adding one chemical which is considered by its own as alternative and renewable fuel which is Diethyl Ether (DEE). The viscosity has been reduced by both methods to close to diesel values. The performance of a diesel engine using those fuels has been tested in a variable compression research engine Ricardo E6 with the engine speed constant at 1200 rpm. The measured parameters included the exhaust gas temperature, the ignition delay period, the maximum pressure rise rate, maximum pressure, and indicated mean effective pressure and maximum heat release rate. The engine performance is presented and the effects of both approaches are scrutinized. (author)

  13. Reducing Diesel Engine Emission Using Reactivity Controlled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hasib Ghazal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several automobile manufacturers are interested in investigating of dual fuel internal combustion engines, due to high efficiencand low emissions. Many alternative fuels have been used in dual fuel mode for IC engine, such as methane, hydrogen, and natural gas. In the present study, a reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI engine using gasoline/diesel (G/D dual fuel has been investigated. The effectof mixing gasoline with diesel fuel on combustion characteristic, engine performance and emissions has been studied. The gasoline was injected in the engine intake port, to produce a homogeneous mixture with air. The diesel fuel was injected directly to the combustion chamber during compression stroke to initiate the combustion process. A direct injection compression ignition engine has been built and simulated using ANSYS Forte professional code. The gasoline amount in the simulation varied from (50%-80% by volume. The diesel fuel was injected to the cylinder in two stages. The model has been validated and calibrated for neat diesel fuel using available data from the literature. The results show that the heat release rate and the cylinder pressure increased when the amount of added gasoline is between 50%-60% volume of the total injected fuels, compared to the neat diesel fuel. Further addition of gasoline will have a contrary effect. In addition, the combustion duration is extended drastically when the gasoline ratio is higher than 60% which results in an incomplete combustion. The NO emission decreased drastically as the gasoline ratio increased. Moreover, addition of gasoline to the mixture increased the engine power, thermal efficienc and combustion efficienc compared to neat diesel fuel.

  14. Performance Test on Compression Ignition Engine by Blending Ethanol and Waste Plastic Pyrolysis Oil with Cetane Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Ganesan, S.; Jeswin Arputhabalan, J.; Chithrala, Varun; Ganesh Bairavan, P.

    2017-05-01

    The demand for diesel fuel is higher than that of petrol throughout the world hence seeking alternative to mineral diesel is a natural choice. Alternative fuels should be easily available at lower cost, environment friendly and fulfill energy needs without modifying engine’s operational parameters. Waste to energy is the trend in the selection of alternate fuels. In this work, Waste Plastic Pyrolysis oil (WPPO), Ethanol, Diesel blend with Cetane additive has been attempted as an alternative fuel. A Twin cylinder, Direct Injection engine was used to assess the engine performance and emission characteristics of waste plastic pyrolysis oil with cetane additive. Experimental results of blended plastic fuel and diesel fuel were compared.

  15. Miniature free-piston homogeneous charge compression ignition engine-compressor concept - Part I: performance estimation and design considerations unique to small dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichlmayr, H.T.; Kittelson, D.B.; Zachariah, M.R. [The University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States). Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    Research and development activities pertaining to the development of a 10 W, homogeneous charge compression ignition free-piston engine-compressor are presented. Emphasis is place upon the miniature engine concept and design rationale. Also, a crankcase-scavenged, two-stroke engine performance estimation method (slider-crank piston motion) is developed and used to explore the influence of engine operating conditions and geometric parameters on power density and establish plausible design conditions. The minimization of small-scale effects such as enhanced heat transfer, is also explored. (author)

  16. Ethanol-fueled low temperature combustion: A pathway to clean and efficient diesel engine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, Usman; Kumar, Raj; Zheng, Ming; Tjong, Jimi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Concept of ethanol–diesel fueled Premixed Pilot Assisted Combustion (PPAC). • Ultra-low NOx and soot with diesel-like thermal efficiency across the load range. • Close to TDC pilot injection timing for direct combustion phasing control. • Minimum pilot quantity (15% of total energy input) for clean, stable operation. • Defined heat release profile distribution (HRPD) to optimize pilot-ethanol ratio. - Abstract: Low temperature combustion (LTC) in diesel engines offers the benefits of ultra-low NOx and smoke emissions but suffers from lowered energy efficiency due to the high reactivity and low volatility of diesel fuel. Ethanol from renewable biomass provides a viable alternate to the petroleum based transportation fuels. The high resistance to auto-ignition (low reactivity) and its high volatility make ethanol a suitable fuel for low temperature combustion (LTC) in compression-ignition engines. In this work, a Premixed Pilot Assisted Combustion (PPAC) strategy comprising of the port fuel injection of ethanol, ignited with a single diesel pilot injection near the top dead centre has been investigated on a single-cylinder high compression ratio diesel engine. The impact of the diesel pilot injection timing, ethanol to diesel quantity ratio and exhaust gas recirculation on the emissions and efficiency are studied at 10 bar IMEP. With the lessons learnt, successful ethanol–diesel PPAC has been demonstrated up to a load of 18 bar IMEP with ultra-low NOx and soot emissions across the full load range. The main challenge of PPAC is the reduced combustion efficiency especially at low loads; therefore, the authors have presented a combustion control strategy to allow high efficiency, clean combustion across the load range. This work entails to provide a detailed framework for the ethanol-fueled PPAC to be successfully implemented.

  17. A Study on Performance, Combustion and Emission Characteristics of Compression Ignition Engine Using Fish Oil Biodiesel Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesha, D. K.; Thimmannachar, Rajiv K.; Simhasan, R.; Nagappa, Manjunath; Gowda, P. M.

    2012-07-01

    Bio-fuel is a clean burning fuel made from natural renewable energy resource; it operates in C. I. engine similar to the petroleum diesel. The rising cost of diesel and the danger caused to the environment has led to an intensive and desperate search for alternative fuels. Among them, animal fats like the fish oil have proven to be a promising substitute to diesel. In this experimental study, A computerized 4-stroke, single cylinder, constant speed, direct injection diesel engine was operated on fish oil-biodiesel of different blends. Three different blends of 10, 20, and 30 % by volume were used for this study. Various engine performance, combustion and emission parameters such as Brake Thermal Efficiency, Brake Specific Fuel Consumption, Heat Release Rate, Peak Pressure, Exhaust Gas Temperature, etc. were recorded from the acquired data. The data was recorded with the help of an engine analysis software. The recorded parameters were studied for varying loads and their corresponding graphs have been plotted for comparison purposes. Petroleum Diesel has been used as the reference. From the properties and engine test results it has been established that fish oil biodiesel is a better replacement for diesel without any engine modification.

  18. Simple model of the indirect compression of targets under conditions close to the national ignition facility at an energy of 1.5 MJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The possibility of the analysis and interpretation of the reported experiments with the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry has been studied. The problem of the energy balance in a target and the determination of the laser energy that should be used in the spherical model of the target has been considered. The results of action of pulses differing in energy and time profile (“low-foot” and “high-foot” regimes) have been analyzed. The parameters of the compression of targets with a high-density carbon ablator have been obtained. The results of the simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the measurements and correspond to the range of the observed parameters. The set of compared results can be expanded, in particular, for a more detailed determination of the parameters of a target near the maximum compression of the capsule. The physical foundation of the possibility of using the one-dimensional description is the necessity of the closeness of the last stage of the compression of the capsule to a one-dimensional process. The one-dimensional simulation of the compression of the capsule can be useful in establishing the boundary behind which two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulation should be used.

  19. Effect of compression ratio, nozzle opening pressure, engine load, and butanol addition on nanoparticle emissions from a non-road diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Saxena, Mohit Raj; Rai, Piyush; Bhardwaj, Aashish

    2018-05-01

    Currently, diesel engines are more preferred over gasoline engines due to their higher torque output and fuel economy. However, diesel engines confront major challenge of meeting the future stringent emission norms (especially soot particle emissions) while maintaining the same fuel economy. In this study, nanosize range soot particle emission characteristics of a stationary (non-road) diesel engine have been experimentally investigated. Experiments are conducted at a constant speed of 1500 rpm for three compression ratios and nozzle opening pressures at different engine loads. In-cylinder pressure history for 2000 consecutive engine cycles is recorded and averaged data is used for analysis of combustion characteristics. An electrical mobility-based fast particle sizer is used for analyzing particle size and mass distributions of engine exhaust particles at different test conditions. Soot particle distribution from 5 to 1000 nm was recorded. Results show that total particle concentration decreases with an increase in engine operating loads. Moreover, the addition of butanol in the diesel fuel leads to the reduction in soot particle concentration. Regression analysis was also conducted to derive a correlation between combustion parameters and particle number emissions for different compression ratios. Regression analysis shows a strong correlation between cylinder pressure-based combustion parameters and particle number emission.

  20. The individual effects of cetane number, oxygen content or fuel properties on the ignition delay, combustion characteristics, and cyclic variation of a turbocharged CRDI diesel engine – Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeckas, Gvidonas; Slavinskas, Stasys; Kanapkienė, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Diesel-HRD fuel blends involving ethanol (E) or biodiesel (B) were investigated in a turbocharged CRDI engine. • Improved cetane number of fuel blends ambiguously affected the ignition delay and maximum heat release rate. • Increased fuel-bound oxygen content enhanced combustion, heat release and in-cylinder pressure at 2500 rpm. • Fuel properties almost did not change premixed phase, but affected burn angle MBF 50 and the end of combustion. • Burn angles MBF 50 and MBF 90 were 1.0° and 5.7° CADs shorter when using oxygenated blend OE4 (3.6 wt%) at 2000 rpm. - Abstract: The study deals with the effects made by individual variation of cetane number, fuel-oxygen content, or widely differing properties of diesel-HRD fuel blends involving ethanol (E) or biodiesel (B) on the ignition delay, combustion phenomenon, maximum heat release rate, and the cyclic variation of a turbocharged CRDI diesel engine. The most important control factors one after another operated separately in this study to make a difference. Load characteristics were taken when running with a straight diesel and various (18) diesel-HRD fuel blends at maximum torque mode of 2000 rpm and speeds of 1500 and 2500 rpm to provide correct interpretation of the test results. Then, load (bmep) characteristics were plotted as a function of the relative air-fuel ratio (λ) and the analysis of combustion parameters was conducted for the ‘lambda’ values of λ = 1.30, 1.25 and 1.20, at the respective speeds of 1500, 2000 and 2500 rpm. Analysis of changes in the ignition delay, combustion characteristics, and the cyclic variation of parameters when using fuel blends of both origins was performed on comparative bases with the corresponding values measured with ‘base-line’ blends with CN = 51.2 or zero oxygen content and a straight diesel to reveal the potential developing trends. The enhanced cetane number of oxygenated fuels improved combustion and reduced cyclic variation when

  1. Alternatives to Diesel Fuel in California - Fuel Cycle Energy and Emission Effects of Possible Replacements Due to the TAC Diesel Particulate Decision; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher L. Saraicks; Donald M. Rote; Frank Stodolsky; James J. Eberhardt

    2000-01-01

    Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression ignition by spark ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, ressionignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOx emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM10 reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated

  2. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.

    2013-12-19

    In this study, the autoignition behavior of primary reference fuels (PRF) and blends of n-heptane/n-butanol were examined in a Waukesha Fuel Ignition Tester (FIT) and a Homogeneous Charge Compression Engine (HCCI). Fourteen different blends of iso-octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content can exhibit very different ignition delay periods than similarly blended reference fuels. The experiments further showed that n-butanol blends behaved unlike PRF blends when comparing the autoignition behavior as a function of the percentage of low reactivity component. The HCCI and FIT experimental results favorably compared against single and multizone models with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms - both an existing mechanism as well as one developed during this study were used. The experimental and modeling results suggest that that the FIT instrument is a valuable tool for analysis of high pressure, low temperature chemistry, and autoignition for future fuels in advanced combustion engines. Additionally, in both the FIT and engine experiments the fraction of low temperature heat release (fLTHR) was found to correlate very well with the crank angle of maximum heat release and shows promise as a useful metric for fuel reactivity in advanced combustion applications. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Emissions of toxic pollutants from compressed natural gas and low sulfur diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested over multiple driving cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Norman Y; Okamoto, Robert A; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Kobayashi, Reiko; Ayala, Alberto; Gebel, Michael E; Rieger, Paul L; Maddox, Christine; Zafonte, Leo

    2005-10-01

    The number of heavy-duty vehicles using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and new low-sulfur diesel fuel formulations and equipped with after-treatment devices are projected to increase. However, few peer-reviewed studies have characterized the emissions of particulate matter (PM) and other toxic compounds from these vehicles. In this study, chemical and biological analyses were used to characterize the identifiable toxic air pollutants emitted from both CNG and low-sulfur-diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested on a chassis dynamometer over three transient driving cycles and a steady-state cruise condition. The CNG bus had no after-treatment, and the diesel bus was tested first equipped with an oxidation catalyst (OC) and then with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Emissions were analyzed for PM, volatile organic compounds (VOCs; determined on-site), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and mutagenic activity. The 2000 model year CNG-fueled vehicle had the highest emissions of 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde) of the three vehicle configurations tested in this study. The 1998 model year diesel bus equipped with an OC and fueled with low-sulfur diesel had the highest emission rates of PM and PAHs. The highest specific mutagenic activities (revertants/microg PM, or potency) and the highest mutagen emission rates (revertants/mi) were from the CNG bus in strain TA98 tested over the New York Bus (NYB) driving cycle. The 1998 model year diesel bus with DPF had the lowest VOCs, PAH, and mutagenic activity emission. In general, the NYB driving cycle had the highest emission rates (g/mi), and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) had the lowest emission rates for all toxics tested over the three transient test cycles investigated. Also, transient emissions were, in general, higher than steady-state emissions. The emissions of toxic compounds from an in-use CNG transit bus (without an oxidation

  4. Experimental studies on natural aspirated diesel engine fuelled with corn seed oil methyl ester as a bio-diesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama Krishna Reddy, E.; Dhana Raju, V.

    2018-03-01

    This paper evaluates the possibilities of using corn seed oil methyl ester as a fuel for compression ignition engines. The biodiesels are contained high oxygen content, and high Cetane number, due to this properties efficiency of biodiesel is higher than diesel fuel. The experiments were conducted with different biodiesel blends of (B10, B15, B20 and B25) corn seed oil on single cylinder four stroke natural aspirated diesel engines. Performance parameters and exhaust emissions are investigated in this experimental with the blends of the corn seed oil methyl ester and diesel fuel. The test results showed that the bio-diesel blends gives improved results for brake thermal efficiency and specific fuel consumption when compared with the diesel fuel. The emissions of corn seed methyl esters follow the same trend of diesel but the smoke opacity was reduces for all blends. From the investigation, corn seed methyl ester is also having the properties similar to diesel fuel; it is biodegradable and renewable fuel, so it will be used as an alternative for diesel fuel.

  5. Performance and combustion analysis of Mahua biodiesel on a single cylinder compression ignition engine using electronic fuel injection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunasekaran Anandkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, experiment is carried out on a 1500 rpm constant speed single cylinder Diesel engine. The test is carried out with Neat diesel, neat biodiesel, and blend B20. The engine considered was run with electronic fuel injection system supported by common rail direct injection to obtain high atomization and effective air utilization inside the combustion chamber. The performance of the engine in terms of break thermal efficiency and brake specific energy consumption was found and compared. The B20 blend shows 1.11% decrease in break thermal efficiency and 3.35% increase in brake specific energy consumption than diesel. The combustion characteristics found are in-cylinder pressure, rate of pressure rise, and heat release rate and compared for peak pressure load to understand the nature of combustion process. For each fuel test run, the maximum peak pressure is observed at part load condition. The rate of change of pressure and heat release rate of diesel is high compared to pure biodiesel and B20 blend. The diffusion combustion is observed to be predominant in case of B100 than B20 and Neat diesel.

  6. An experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of the inlet temperature, equivalence ratio and compression ratio on the HCCI auto-ignition process of Primary Reference Fuels in an engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France); Cavadiasa, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D' Alembert (France)

    2008-11-15

    In order to understand better the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine, the influence of some important parameters on the auto-ignition is investigated. The inlet temperature, the equivalence ratio and the compression ratio were varied and their influence on the pressure, the heat release and the ignition delays were measured. The inlet temperature was changed from 25 to 70 C and the equivalence ratio from 0.18 to 0.41, while the compression ratio varied from 6 to 13.5. The fuels that were investigated were PRF40 and n-heptane. These three parameters appeared to decrease the ignition delays, with the inlet temperature having the least influence and the compression ratio the most. A previously experimentally validated reduced surrogate mechanism, for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene, has been used to explain observations of the auto-ignition process. The same kinetic mechanism is used to better understand the underlying chemical and physical phenomena that make the influence of a certain parameter change according to the operating conditions. This can be useful for the control of the auto-ignition process in an HCCI engine. (author)

  7. Study of the Injection Control Strategies of a Compression Ignition Free Piston Engine Linear Generator in a One-Stroke Starting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihua Feng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For a compression ignition (CI free piston engine linear generator (FPLG, injection timing is one of the most important parameters that affect its performance, especially for the one-stroke starting operation mode. In this paper, two injection control strategies are proposed using piston position and velocity signals. It was found experimentally that the injection timing’s influence on the compression ratio, the peak in-cylinder gas pressure and the indicated work (IW is different from that of traditional reciprocating CI engines. The maximum IW of the ignition starting cylinder, say left cylinder (LC and the right cylinder (RC are 132.7 J and 138.1 J, respectively. The thermal-dynamic model for simulating the working processes of the FPLG are built and verified by experimental results. The numerical simulation results show that the running instability and imbalance between LC and RC are the obvious characters when adopting the injection strategy of the velocity feedback. These could be solved by setting different triggering velocity thresholds for the two cylinders. The IW output from the FPLG under this strategy is higher than that of adopting the position feedback strategy, and the maximum IW of the RC could reach 162.3 J. Under this strategy, the prototype is able to achieve better starting conditions and could operate continuously for dozens of cycles.

  8. Effects of antioxidant additives on exhaust emissions reduction in compression ignition engine fueled with methyl ester of annona oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Senthil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, biodiesel is a cleaner burning alternative fuel to the Neat diesel fuel. However, several studies are pointed out that increase in NOx emission for biodiesel when compared with the Neat diesel fuel. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effect of antioxidant (p-phenylenediamine on engine emissions of a Diesel engine fuelled with methyl ester of annona oil. The antioxidant is mixed in various concentrations (0.010 to 0.040% (w/w with methyl ester of annona oil. Result shows that antioxidant additive mixture (MEAO+P200 is effective in control of NOx and HC emission of methyl ester of annona oil fuelled engine without doing any engine modification.

  9. An Experimental Investigation of Ethanol-Diesel Blends on Performance and Exhaust Emissions of Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Sandalcı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a promising alternative fuel, due to its renewable biobased origin. Also, it has lower carbon content than diesel fuel and it is oxygenated. For this reason, ethanol is providing remarkable potential to reduce particulate emulsions in compression-ignition engines. In this study, performance of ethanol-diesel blends has been investigated experimentally. Tested fuels were mineral diesel fuel (E0D100, 15% (v/v ethanol/diesel fuel blend (E15D85, and 30% (v/v ethanol/diesel fuel blend (E30D70. Firstly, the solubility of ethanol and diesel was experienced. Engine tests were carried out to reveal the performance and emissions of the engine fuelled with the blends. Full load operating conditions at various engine speeds were investigated. Engine brake torque, brake power, brake specific fuel consumption, brake thermal efficiency, exhaust gas temperature, and finally exhaust emissions were measured. Performance of the tested engine decreased substantially while improvement on smoke and gaseous emissions makes ethanol blend favorable.

  10. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo; Chung, Suk-Ho; Lu, Tianfeng; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    ) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction

  11. Optimizing the Performance of a 50cc Compression Ignition Two-Stroke Engine Operating on Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene; Dolriis, J.D.; Hansson, C.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the optimization of a 50cc crankcase scavenged two-stroke diesel engine operating on dimethyl ether (DME). The optimization is primarily done with respect to engine efficiency. The underlying idea behind the work is that the low weight, low internal friction and low engine...

  12. Bio diesel- the Clean, Green Fuel for Diesel Engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkareish, S.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils, animal fats and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean burning bio diesel fuels (1). Just like petroleum diesel, bio diesel operates in combustion-ignition engines. Blends of up to 20% bio diesel (mixed with petroleum diesel fuels) can be used in nearly all diesel equipment and are compatible with most storage and distribution equipment. Using bio diesel in a conventional diesel engine substantially reduces emissions of unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, sulphates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and particulate matter. The use of bio diesel has grown dramatically during the last few years. Egypt has a promising experiment in promoting forestation by cultivation of Jatropha plant especially in luxor and many other sites of the country. The first production of the Egyptian Jatropha seeds oil is now under evaluation to produce a cost-competitive bio diesel fuel

  13. Technical feasibility assessment of oleic sunflower methyl ester utilisation in Diesel bus engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Fernando Neto da; Prata, Antonio Salgado; Teixeira, Jorge Rocha

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained while testing the technical feasibility of using oleic sunflower methyl ester (SME) blended with Diesel fuel in proportions up to 30% in an unmodified Diesel bus engine. Vegetable oils methyl esters blended with Diesel oil are commonly used in compression ignition engines. However, R and D background information on the practical use of traditional sunflower oil derivatives is sparse. The present results include evaluation of the engine performance and fuel consumption and gaseous concentrations (CO and NO x ) in the exhaust gas. The exhaust gas opacity while using Diesel/SME blends and Diesel fuel was also compared. The collected data show that oleic SME utilisation did not lead to a deterioration of engine performance or to an increase in fuel consumption. Furthermore, significant increases of NO x and CO concentrations in the exhaust gas derived from SME utilisation were not detected. The smoke opacity was slightly reduced when SME was used in the proportion of 30%. The experimental testing seems to indicate that oleic SME is a suitable replacement for Diesel fuel and can be used safely in compression ignition engines in proportions as high as 30%. (Author)

  14. Technical feasibility assessment of oleic sunflower methyl ester utilisation in Diesel bus engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto da Silva, Fernando; Salgado Prata, Antonio; Rocha Teixeira, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained while testing the technical feasibility of using oleic sunflower methyl ester (SME) blended with Diesel fuel in proportions up to 30% in an unmodified Diesel bus engine. Vegetable oils methyl esters blended with Diesel oil are commonly used in compression ignition engines. However, R and D background information on the practical use of traditional sunflower oil derivatives is sparse. The present results include evaluation of the engine performance and fuel consumption and gaseous concentrations (CO and NO X ) in the exhaust gas. The exhaust gas opacity while using Diesel/SME blends and Diesel fuel was also compared. The collected data show that oleic SME utilisation did not lead to a deterioration of engine performance or to an increase in fuel consumption. Furthermore, significant increases of NO X and CO concentrations in the exhaust gas derived from SME utilisation were not detected. The smoke opacity was slightly reduced when SME was used in the proportion of 30%. The experimental testing seems to indicate that oleic SME is a suitable replacement for Diesel fuel and can be used safely in compression ignition engines in proportions as high as 30%

  15. Properties of chicken manure pyrolysis bio-oil blended with diesel and its combustion characteristics in RCEM, Rapid Compression and Expansion Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunbong Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil (bio-oil was produced from chicken manure in a pilot-scale pyrolysis facility. The raw bio-oil had a very high viscosity and sediments which made direct application to diesel engines difficult. The bio-oil was blended with diesel fuel with 25% and 75% volumetric ratio at the normal temperature, named as blend 25. A rapid compression and expansion machine was used for a combustion test under the experimental condition corresponding to the medium operation point of a light duty diesel engine using diesel fuel, and blend 25 for comparison. The injection related pressure signal and cylinder pressure signal were instantaneously picked up to analyze the combustion characteristics in addition to the measurement of NOx and smoke emissions. Blend 25 resulted in reduction of the smoke emission by 80% and improvements of the apparent combustion efficiency while the NOx emission increased by 40%. A discussion was done based on the analysis results of combustion.

  16. Combined effect of nanoemulsion and EGR on combustion and emission characteristics of neat lemongrass oil (LGO)-DEE-diesel blend fuelled diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiyamoorthi, R.; Sankaranarayanan, G.; Pitchandi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Neat lemongrass oil can be used as an alternate fuel in diesel engine. • The combined effect of nano emulsion and EGR using LGO25-DEE-Diesel is investigated. • The BTE is improved for nano emulsion fuel blend. • The NO_x and smoke emissions decrease significantly. • Cylinder pressure and Heat release rate increase with longer ignition delay. - Abstract: In the present experimental study, the combined effects of nanoemulsion and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, four stroke, variable compression ratio diesel engine fueled with neat lemongrass oil (LGO)-diesel-DEE (diethyl ether) blend are investigated. The Neat Lemongrass oil could be used as a new alternate fuel in compression ignition engines without any engine modifications. The entire investigation was conducted in the diesel engine using the following test fuels: emulsified LGO25, cerium oxide blended emulsified LGO25 and DEE added emulsified LGO25 with EGR respectively and compared with standard diesel and LGO25 (75% by volume of diesel and 25% by volume of lemongrass oil) fuels. The combined effect of DEE added nano-emulsified LGO25 with EGR yielded a significant reduction in NO_x and smoke emission by 30.72% and 11.2% respectively compared to LGO25. Furthermore, the HC and CO emissions were reduced by 18.18% and 33.31% respectively than with LGO25. The brake thermal efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption increased by 2.4% and 10.8% respectively than LGO25. The combustion characteristics such as cylinder pressure and heat release rate increased by 4.46% and 3.29% respectively than with LGO25. The combustion duration and ignition delay increase at nano-emulsified LGO25 with DEE and EGR mode but decrease for nano-emulsified LGO25 fuel.

  17. Impact of Formaldehyde Addition on Auto-Ignition in Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Kazunari; Ando, Hiromitsu; Furutani, Masahiro; Ohta, Yasuhiko

    By employing a direct-injection diesel engine equipped with a common-rail type of injection system, by adding formaldehyde (CH2O) to the intake air, and by changing the fuel-injection timing, the compression ratio and the intake-air temperature, a mechanism for CH2O as a fuel additive to affect auto-ignition was discussed. Unlike an HCCI type of engine, the diesel engine can expose an air-fuel mixture only to a limited range of the in-cylinder temperature before the ignition, and can separate low- and high-temperature parts of the mechanism. When low-temperature oxidation starts at a temperature above 900K, there are cases that the CH2O advances the ignition timing. Below 900K, to the contrary, it always retards the timing. It is because, above 900K, a part of the CH2O changes into CO together with H2O2 as an ignition promoter. Below 900K, on the other hand, the CH2O itself acts as an OH radical scavenger against cool-flame reaction, from the beginning of low-temperature oxidation. Then, the engine was modified for its extraordinary function as a gasoline-knocking generator, in order that an effect of CH2O on knocking could be discussed. The CH2O retards the onset of auto-ignition of an end gas. Judging from a large degree of the retardation, the ignition is probably triggered below 900K.

  18. METHODS FOR ORGANIZATION OF WORKING PROCESS FOR GAS-DIESEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Vershina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades reduction in pollutant emissions has become one of the main directions for further deve- lopment of engine technology. Solution of such problems has led to implementation of catalytic post-treatment systems, new technologies of fuel injection, technology for regulated phases of gas distribution, regulated turbocharger system and, lately, even system for variable compression ratio of engine. Usage of gaseous fuel, in particular gas-diesel process, may be one of the means to reduce air pollution caused by toxic substances and meet growing environmental standards and regulations. In this regard, an analysis of methods for organization of working process for a gas-diesel engine has been conducted in the paper. The paper describes parameters that influence on the nature of gas diesel process, it contains graphics of specific total heat consumption according to ignition portion of diesel fuel and dependence of gas-diesel indices on advance angle for igni-tion portion injection of the diesel fuel. A modern fuel system of gas-diesel engine ГД-243 has been demonstrated in the pa- per. The gas-diesel engine has better environmental characteristics than engines running on diesel fuel or gasoline. According to the European Natural & bio Gas Vehicle Association a significant reduction in emissions is reached at a 50%-substitution level of diesel fuel by gas fuel (methane and in such a case there is a tendency towards even significant emission decrease. In order to ensure widespread application of gaseous fuel as fuel for gas-diesel process it is necessary to develop a new wor- king process, to improve fuel equipment, to enhance injection strategy and fuel supply control. A method for organization of working process for multi-fuel engine has been proposed on the basis of the performed analysis. An application has been submitted for a patent.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF EMISSION AND PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF PONGAMIA BIODIESEL AND HHO GAS ADDITION IN A COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    Allen Jeffrey.J1, Divya Meena.S2, Balaji.P3, Bharathi.K4, Arvind Raj.R5

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays the environmental pollution has been increased incredibly by using conventional fuels. To control this increase in pollution alternate fuels has to be used as supplement for conventional fuels. While using conventional fuels such as petrol and diesel in IC engine there is a chance of increase in emissions. Alternate fuels can control emissions. This work is based on the investigation of emission parameters of pongamia biodiesel and HHO gas addition in a CI engine. Pongamia biodiesel ...

  20. Effects of varying composition of biogas on performance and emission characteristics of compression ignition engine using exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Saket; Das, L.M.; Kaushik, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Different compositions of biogas have been studied in dual fuel mode using exergy analysis. • Diesel substitution by biogas decreases with higher CO_2 fractions in biogas. • Exergy efficiency decreases with higher CO_2 fractions in biogas. • With low CO_2 fractions in biogas equitable performance can be obtained in dual fuel mode. • Engine modifications are needed to utilize high CO_2 containing biogas. - Abstract: Growing energy demands and environmental degradation with uncontrolled exploitation of fossil fuels have compelled the world to look for the alternatives. In this context, biogas is a promising candidate, which can easily be utilized in IC engines for vehicular as well as decentralized power generation applications. Primary constituents of raw biogas are methane (CH_4) that defines its heating value, and carbon dioxide (CO_2) that acts like a diluent. This dilution effect reduces the flame speed and heating value of biogas, eventually deteriorating the engine performances. Present article focuses on experimental evaluation and quantification of these variations of the engine performance. Three compositions of biogas: BG93, BG84 and BG75 (containing 93%, 84% and 75% of CH_4 by volume respectively) were studied on a small CI engine in dual fuel mode. Moreover, to evaluate individual process inefficiencies, exergy analysis based on second-law of thermodynamics is implemented. Exergy balances for different compositions of biogas are presented. Biogas dual fuel operation showed 80–90% diesel substitution at lower engine loads. At higher loads, total irreversibility of the engine was increased from 59.56% for diesel operation to 61.44%, 64.18% and 64.64% for BG93, BG84 and BG75 biogas compositions respectively. Furthermore, combustion irreversibility was found to be decreasing with higher CO_2 concentrations in biogas. BG93 showed comparable results to that of diesel operation with 26.9% and 27.4% second-law efficiencies respectively.

  1. 柴油在甲烷氛围及在甲醇氛围下的着火燃烧特性%Ignition and Combustion Characteristics of Diesel in Premixed Methane and Methanol Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿培林; 姚春德; 胡江涛; 张德福; 马明

    2017-01-01

    为了解不同着火性质燃料之间的相互作用,在定容燃烧弹上结合高压燃油共轨系统,通过高速摄像光学系统,研究了柴油分别在两种不同的单碳高辛烷值燃料氛围下的着火和燃烧行为.结果表明:降低环境温度和增加预混甲烷的浓度均延长柴油着火滞燃期,增大燃烧放热率峰值,且较低的环境温度和高的甲烷浓度有利于减少碳烟的生成;相比于甲烷,甲醇对柴油着火的抑制作用更强,具有较长的滞燃期,为油气混合赢得更多的时间,预混燃烧部分增加,因此柴油在甲醇氛围下的放热率峰值略高于甲烷氛围,同时产生碳烟的扩散燃烧比例降低,生成的碳烟减少.%In order to understand the interaction between fuels of different ignition properties,the ignition and combustion characteristics of diesel injected in either methanol or methane mixture were researched in a constant volume combustion chamber coupled with high pressure common rail system by using high speed camera optical system.The premixed atmospheres are the mixture of methane and the mixture of methanol and air, respectively.Results show that the ignition delay period and the peak combustion release heat rate increase as the ambient temperature decreases or the premixed methane concentration increases.Under low ambient temperature or premixed methane atmosphere,the soot formation decreases.Compared with methanemethanol has a greater inhibitory effect on diesel ignitionso the ignition delay period of the methanol atmosphere is longer than that of the methane atmosphere.There are much time for diesel fuel to mix with airso the peak release heat rate of the methanol atmosphere is bigger and less soot is generated.

  2. Performance and emission characteristics of a turbocharged spark-ignition hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas engine under wide open throttle operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fanhua; Wang, Mingyue; Jiang, Long; Deng, Jiao; Chen, Renzhe; Naeve, Nashay; Zhao, Shuli [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-11-15

    This paper investigates the effect of various hydrogen ratios in HCNG (hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas) fuels on performance and emission characteristics at wide open throttle operating conditions using a turbocharged spark-ignition natural gas engine. The experimental data was taken at hydrogen fractions of 0%, 30% and 55% by volume and was conducted under different excess air ratio ({lambda}) at MBT operating conditions. It is found that under various {lambda}, the addition of hydrogen can significantly reduce CO, CH{sub 4} emissions and the NO{sub x} emission remain at an acceptable level when ignition timing is optimized. Using the same excess air ratio, as more hydrogen is added the power, exhaust temperatures and max cylinder pressure decrease slowly until the mixture's lower heating value remains unchanged with the hydrogen enrichment, then they rise gradually. In addition, the early flame development period and the flame propagation duration are both shorter, and the indicated thermal efficiency and maximum heat release rate both increase with more hydrogen addition. (author)

  3. Modeling and controller design architecture for cycle-by-cycle combustion control of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines – A comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, Morteza; Jahanian, Omid; Shahbakhti, Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Addressing accuracy-speed compromise of HCCI representation is very important. • Phasing, load, exhaust temperature and emissions are the most important outputs. • Separability between the effects of the inputs on the outputs is of great interest. • Existing actuation systems combining inputs are favorable. • An HCCI controller should be a fast and robust one to become a viable solution. - Abstract: Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engines are advantageous in terms of good fuel economy and low levels of soot-nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions. However, they are accompanied with some intrinsic challenges, the most important of which is the lack of any direct control method for ignition trigger. Thus, implementation of HCCI combustion is in fact a control problem, and an optimized control structure is required for attaining the inherent benefits of HCCI. The control structure consists of a proper representation of engine processes; a suitable selection of state variables; useful and applicable set of inputs, outputs and observers; appropriate fixed or variable set-points for controlled parameters; instrumentations including sensors and actuators; and an applicable control law implemented in a controller. The present paper aims at addressing these issues altogether by introducing HCCI engine control structure in progress and presenting highlights from literature. Research should result in appropriately controlled HCCI engines which can provide desired load at rated speed with acceptable performance and emissions characteristics.

  4. Burned gas and unburned mixture composition prediction in biodiesel-fuelled compression igniton engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuepeng, S.; Komintarachati, C.

    2009-01-01

    A prediction of burned gas and unburned mixture composition from a variety of methyl ester based bio diesel combustion in compression ignition engine, in comparison with conventional diesel fuel is presented. A free-energy minimisation scheme was used to determine mixture composition. Firstly, effects of bio diesel type were studied without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The combustion of the higher hydrogen-to-carbon molar ratio (H/C) bio diesel resulted in lower carbon dioxide and oxygen emissions but higher water vapour in the exhaust gases, compared to those of lower H/C ratios. At the same results also show that relative air-to-fuel ratio, that bio diesel combustion gases contain a higher amount of water vapour and a higher level of carbon dioxide compared to those of diesel. Secondly, influences of EGR (burned gas fraction) addition to bio diesel-fuelled engine on unburned mixture were simulated. For both diesel and bio diesel, the increased burned gas fraction addition to the fresh charge increased carbon dioxide and water vapour emissions while lowering oxygen content, especially for the bio diesel case. The prediction was compared with experimental results from literatures; good agreement was found. This can be considered to be a means for explaining some phenomenon occurring in bio diesel-fuelled engines. (author)

  5. Revisiting diesel fuel formulation from Petroleum light and middle refinery streams based on optimized engine behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Amara , Arij; Dauphin , Roland; Babiker , Hassan; Viollet , Yoann; Chang , Junseok; Jeuland , Nicolas; Amer , Amer

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The share of diesel fuel in European transport sector, which currently represents over 50% of total 11 demand, is increasing, requiring massive imports of this product, while at the same time, gasoline fuels are 12 today in surplus. In terms of air pollutant emissions, gasoline and kerosene streams have shown potential 13 in achieving lower emissions in Compression Ignition (CI) engines, particularly nitrogen oxides (NOx) 14 and particulates. A new fuel formulation app...

  6. Investigation of split injection in a single cylinder optical diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Díez Rodríguez, Álvaro

    2009-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Over the last decade, the diesel engine has made dramatic progress in its performance and market penetration. However, in order to meet future emissions legislations, Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions will need to be reduced simultaneously. Nowadays researchers are focused on different combustion modes like homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion and...

  7. Effect of hydrogen-diesel combustion on the performance and combustion parameters of a dual fuelled diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, P.K.; Banerjee, Rahul; Deb, Madhujit [Mechanical Engineering Department, National Institute of Technology, Agartala, Tripura-799055 (India)

    2013-07-01

    Petroleum crude is expected to remain main source of transport fuels at least for the next 20 to 30 years. The petroleum crude reserves however, are declining and consumption of transport fuels particularly in the developing countries is increasing at high rates. Severe shortage of liquid fuels derived from petroleum may be faced in the second half of this century. In this paper, experiments are performed in a fur stroke, single cylinder, compression ignition diesel engine with dual fuel mode. Diesel and hydrogen are used as pilot liquid and primary gaseous fuel, respectively. The objective of this study is to find out the effects on combustion and performance parameters observed at diesel hydrogen fuel mixture for all the different loadings (2kg,4kg,6kg,8kg,10kg and 12kg) in the engine.

  8. Volatile organic compounds in a residential and commercial urban area with a diesel, compressed natural gas and oxygenated gasoline vehicular fleet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Eduardo Monteiro; Arbilla, Graciela; Gatti, Luciana Vanni

    2010-02-01

    Air samples were collected in a typical residential and commercial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where buses and trucks use diesel and light duty vehicles use compressed natural gas, ethanol, and gasohol (gasoline blended with ethanol) as fuel. A total of 66 C3-C12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified. The most abundant compounds, on a mass concentration basis, included propane, isobutane, i-pentane, m,p-xylene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, o-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Two VOCs photochemical reactivity rankings are presented: one involves reaction with OH and the other involves production of ozone.

  9. Achieving clean and efficient engine operation up to full load by combining optimized RCCI and dual-fuel diesel-gasoline combustion strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; García, Antonio; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier; Boronat, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimized dual-fuel strategy to cover the whole engine load-speed map. • EURO VI NOx levels up to 14 bar IMEP with fully and highly premixed RCCI strategies. • Dual-fuel provides up to 7% higher efficiency than CDC if urea consumption is considered. - Abstract: This experimental work investigates the capabilities of the reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion concept to be operated in the whole engine map and discusses its benefits when compared to conventional diesel combustion. The experiments were conducted using a single-cylinder medium-duty diesel engine fueled with regular gasoline and diesel fuels. The main modification on the stock engine architecture was the addition of a port fuel injector in the intake manifold. In addition, with the aim of extending the reactivity controlled compression ignition operating range towards higher loads, the piston bowl volume was increased to reduce the compression ratio of the engine from 17.5:1 (stock) down to 15.3:1. To allow the dual-fuel operation over the whole engine map without exceeding the mechanical limitations of the engine, an optimized dual-fuel combustion strategy is proposed in this research. The combustion strategy changes as the engine load increases, starting from a fully premixed reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion up to around 8 bar IMEP, then switching to a highly premixed reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion up to 15 bar IMEP, and finally moving to a mainly diffusive dual-fuel combustion to reach the full load operation. The engine mapping results obtained using this combustion strategy show that reactivity controlled compression ignition combustion allows fulfilling the EURO VI NOx limit up to 14 bar IMEP. Ultra-low soot emissions are also achieved when the fully premixed combustion is promoted, however, the soot levels rise notably as the combustion strategy moves to a less premixed pattern. Finally, the direct comparison of

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Hult, Johan; Nogenmyr, Karl-Johan

    2013-01-01

    The scavenging process is an integral part of any two-stroke internal combustion engine cycle whether it is spark ignited or compression ignited. The scavenging process is responsible for transporting the burned gases from the previous working stroke out of the combustion chamber to allow...... for the fresh charge or fresh air to enter for the next combustion/working stroke. This implies that the scavenging process is responsible for setting the initial condition for the combustion process, consequently affecting fuel economy, power output and emission of hazardous gases. Two-stroke diesel engines...

  11. Experimental investigation on dual fuel operation of acetylene in a DI diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmanan, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajarajeswari Engineering College, Adayalampattu, Chennai, 600095 (India); Nagarajan, G. [Internal Combustion Engineering Division, College of Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, 600025 (India)

    2010-05-15

    Depletion of fossils fuels and environmental degradation have prompted researchers throughout the world to search for a suitable alternative fuel for diesel engine. One such step is to utilize renewable fuels in diesel engines by partial or total replacement of diesel in dual fuel mode. In this study, acetylene gas has been considered as an alternative fuel for compression ignition engine, which has excellent combustion properties. Investigation has been carried out on a single cylinder, air cooled, direct injection (DI), compression ignition engine designed to develop the rated power output of 4.4 kW at 1500 rpm under variable load conditions, run on dual fuel mode with diesel as injected primary fuel and acetylene inducted as secondary gaseous fuel at various flow rates. Acetylene aspiration resulted in lower thermal efficiency. Smoke, HC and CO emissions reduced, when compared with baseline diesel operation. With acetylene induction, due to high combustion rates, NO{sub x} emission significantly increased. Peak pressure and maximum rate of pressure rise also increased in the dual fuel mode of operation due to higher flame speed. It is concluded that induction of acetylene can significantly reduce smoke, CO and HC emissions with a small penalty on efficiency. (author)

  12. LPG as a Fuel for Diesel Engines-Experimental Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian Nutu, Nikolaos; Pana, Constantin; Negurescu, Niculae; Cernat, Alexandru; Mirica, Ionel

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of the paper is to reduce the pollutant emissions of a compression ignition engine, fuelling the engine with liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), aiming to maintain the energetic performances of the engine. To optimise the engine operation a corelation between the substitute ratio of the diesel fuel with LPG and the adjustments for the investigated regimens must be made in order to limit the maximum pressure and smoke level, knock and rough engine functioning, fuel consumption and the level of the pollutant emissions. The test bed situated in the Thermotechnics, Engines, Thermal Equipments and Refrigeration Instalations Department was adapted to be fuelled with liquefied petroleum gas. A conventional LPG fuelling instalation was adopted, consisting of a LPG tank, a vaporiser, conections between the tank and the vaporiser and a valve to adjust the gaseous fuel flow. Using the diesel-gas methode, in the intake manifold of the engine is injected LPG in gaseous aggregation state and the airr-LPG homogeneous mixture is ignited from the flame appeared in the diesel fuel sprays. To maintain the engine power at the same level like in the standard case of fuelling only with diesel fuel, for each investigated operate regimen the diesel fuel dose was reduced, being energetically substituted with LPG. The engine used for experimental investigations is a turbocharged truck diesel engine with a 10.34 dm3 displacement. The investigated working regimen was 40% load and 1750 rpm and the energetic substitute ratios of the diesel fuel with LPG was situated between [0-25%].

  13. Investigation of nanoparticle additives to biodiesel for improvement of the performance of the exhaust emissions in a compression ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgur, Tayfun; Ozcanli, Mustafa; Aydin, Kadir [Cukurova University Engineering Architecture Faculty Mechanical Engineering Department (Turkey)], E-mail: tozgur@cu.edu.tr, email: ozcanli@cu.edu.tr, email: kdraydin@cu.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    Reformulated diesel fuels have been studied recently to achieve substantial reductions in harmful emissions by varying the physicochemical properties and combustion characteristics of the hydrocarbon fuel. This article investigates the effects of the addition of oxygen containing nanoparticle additives to biodiesel on fuel properties, engine performance and exhaust emission characteristics. Due to the addition of magnesium oxide (MgO) and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanoparticles at different dosing levels (25 and 50 ppm), it was observed that the density of biodiesel fuel does not show significant variation but the viscosity of biodiesel fuel was found to decrease. As a result of this study, optimum additive and addition dosage was determined as 25 ppm MgO and 25 ppm SiO2, engine emission values namely nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) were decreased and engine performance values slightly increased with the addition of nanoparticle additives at low extra cost of the biodiesel.

  14. Eucalyptus-Palm Kernel Oil Blends: A Complete Elimination of Diesel in a 4-Stroke VCR Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Kommana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuels derived from biomass are mostly preferred as alternative fuels for IC engines as they are abundantly available and renewable in nature. The objective of the study is to identify the parameters that influence gross indicated fuel conversion efficiency and how they are affected by the use of biodiesel relative to petroleum diesel. Important physicochemical properties of palm kernel oil and eucalyptus blend were experimentally evaluated and found within acceptable limits of relevant standards. As most of vegetable oils are edible, growing concern for trying nonedible and waste fats as alternative to petrodiesel has emerged. In present study diesel fuel is completely replaced by biofuels, namely, methyl ester of palm kernel oil and eucalyptus oil in various blends. Different blends of palm kernel oil and eucalyptus oil are prepared on volume basis and used as operating fuel in single cylinder 4-stroke variable compression ratio diesel engine. Performance and emission characteristics of these blends are studied by varying the compression ratio. In the present experiment methyl ester extracted from palm kernel oil is considered as ignition improver and eucalyptus oil is considered as the fuel. The blends taken are PKE05 (palm kernel oil 95 + eucalyptus 05, PKE10 (palm kernel oil 90 + eucalyptus 10, and PKE15 (palm kernel 85 + eucalyptus 15. The results obtained by operating with these fuels are compared with results of pure diesel; finally the most preferable combination and the preferred compression ratio are identified.

  15. A modelling study into the effects of variable valve timing on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve DI homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrous, A-F.M.; Potrzebowski, A.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Xu, H.M.; Tsolakis, A.; Luszcz, P.

    2009-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion mode is a relatively new combustion technology that can be achieved by using specially designed cams with reduced lift and duration. The auto-ignition in HCCI engine can be facilitated by adjusting the timing of the exhaust-valve-closing and, to some extent, the timing of the intake-valve-opening so as to capture a proportion of the hot exhaust gases in the engine cylinder during the gas exchange process. The effects of variable valve timing strategy on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve direct injection HCCI engine were computationally investigated using a 1D fluid-dynamic engine cycle simulation code. A non-typical intake valve strategy was examined; whereby the intake valves were assumed to be independently actuated with the same valve-lift profile but at different timings. Using such an intake valves strategy, the obtained results showed that the operating range of the exhaust-valve-timing within which the HCCI combustion can be facilitated and maintained becomes much wider than that of the typical intake-valve-timing case. Also it was found that the engine parameters such as load and volumetric efficiency are significantly modified with the use of the non-typical intake-valve-timing. Additionally, the results demonstrated the potential of the non-typical intake-valve strategy in achieving and maintaining the HCCI combustion at much lower loads within a wide range of valve timings. Minimizing the pumping work penalty, and consequently improving the fuel economy, was shown as an advantage of using the non-typical intake-valve-timing with the timing of the early intake valve coupled with a symmetric degree of exhaust-valve-closing timing

  16. A modelling study into the effects of variable valve timing on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve DI homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrous, A-F.M. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Lecturer at the Department of Mechanical Power Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Shebin El-Kom), Menoufiya University, Shebin El-Kom (Egypt); Potrzebowski, A.; Wyszynski, M.L.; Xu, H.M.; Tsolakis, A.; Luszcz, P. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion mode is a relatively new combustion technology that can be achieved by using specially designed cams with reduced lift and duration. The auto-ignition in HCCI engine can be facilitated by adjusting the timing of the exhaust-valve-closing and, to some extent, the timing of the intake-valve-opening so as to capture a proportion of the hot exhaust gases in the engine cylinder during the gas exchange process. The effects of variable valve timing strategy on the gas exchange process and performance of a 4-valve direct injection HCCI engine were computationally investigated using a 1D fluid-dynamic engine cycle simulation code. A non-typical intake valve strategy was examined; whereby the intake valves were assumed to be independently actuated with the same valve-lift profile but at different timings. Using such an intake valves strategy, the obtained results showed that the operating range of the exhaust-valve-timing within which the HCCI combustion can be facilitated and maintained becomes much wider than that of the typical intake-valve-timing case. Also it was found that the engine parameters such as load and volumetric efficiency are significantly modified with the use of the non-typical intake-valve-timing. Additionally, the results demonstrated the potential of the non-typical intake-valve strategy in achieving and maintaining the HCCI combustion at much lower loads within a wide range of valve timings. Minimizing the pumping work penalty, and consequently improving the fuel economy, was shown as an advantage of using the non-typical intake-valve-timing with the timing of the early intake valve coupled with a symmetric degree of exhaust-valve-closing timing. (author)

  17. Adjusting the operating characteristics to improve the performance of an emulsified palm oil methyl ester run diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debnath, Biplab K.; Sahoo, Niranjan; Saha, Ujjwal K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The oxygenated biodiesel has a lower calorific value and emits higher NO X than diesel. ► The objective is to study the water in palm oil biodiesel emulsion in a diesel engine. ► The tests are performed at higher compression ratio and retarded injection timing. ► The results obtained are compared with a POME run diesel engine. ► Higher efficiency, lower ignition delay and emissions are the outcomes. - Abstract: The popularity of emulsified fuels as alternative to diesel is cumulative. The water in diesel emulsion is the most practiced one. The presence of water in emulsion and its micro-explosion reduces emissions. However, the emulsified biodiesel is not properly explored. The reason may be due to its lesser calorific value that does not augment efficiency. Alongside oxygenated biodiesel generally emits higher NO X than diesel. Therefore, the present investigation targets at finding the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of emulsified biodiesel in a diesel engine at an elevated compression ratio (CR) and retarded injection timing (IT). This is because; at this CR–IT combination emulsified fuel will be injected at the warmer environment, mechanically created inside the cylinder. The objective is to achieve a faster combustion, lower ignition delay (ID), improved performance and emission characteristics. The biodiesel used in this work is the palm oil methyl ester (POME). The prepared two-phase water in POME (WIP) emulsion is tested in a variable compression ratio (VCR) diesel engine at CR = 18 and IT = 20°BTDC. The results obtained are then compared with the POME run engine data under the same CR and IT specifications. Additionally, experiments have also been conducted in the same engine at CR = 17.5 and IT = 23°BTDC to compare its results with those of WIP and POME run engines

  18. Experimental investigation of the impact of using alcohol- biodiesel-diesel blending fuel on combustion of single cylinder CI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudul, H. M.; Hagos, Ftwi Y.; Mamat, Rizalman; Abdullah, Abdul A.; Awad, Omar. I.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of alcohol addition has been experimentally in vestgated in the current study by blending it with diesel and palm based biodiesel on the combustion of a compression ignition engine. The experiment was run by single-cylinder, naturally aspirated, direct injection, four-stroke diesel engine. Based on the pressure-crank angle data collected from the pressure transducer and crank angle encoder, the combustion analysis such as incylinder pressure, incylinder temperature, energy release rate, cumulative energy release and ignition delay are analysed. In this comparative study, the effects of alcohols namely butanol BU20 (20% butanol addition on the commercially available diesel biodiesel emulsion) is compared and evaluated with pure diesel (D100). The results revealed that the the ignition delay for BU20 is longer as compared to that of D100 in all engine speeds and loads compared. Besides, the incylinder temperatures were rudecued with the butanol addition. The energy release rate for BU20 was higher than that for diesel, whereas the peak positions concerning the energy release rate for BU20 was discovered at 2400 rpm. Therefore addition of butanol will have positive role on the NOx emissions and stability of the engine due to its higher latent heat of vaporization.

  19. A Comparative study on VOCs and aldehyde-ketone emissions from a spark Ignition vehicle fuelled on compressed natural gas and gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, an experimental study was conducted on a spark ignition (SI) vehicle fuelled on compressed natural gas (CNG), and gasoline to compare the unregulated emissions such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehyde-ketones or carbonyls. In the meantime, ozone forming potential (OFP) of pollutants was also calculated on the basis of their specific reactivity (SR). The vehicle was run on a chassis dynamometer following the Chinese National Standards test scheduled for light duty vehicle (LDV) emissions. According to the results, total aldehyde-ketones were increased by 39.4% due to the substantial increase in formaldehyde and acrolein + acetone emissions, while VOCs and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene) reduced by 85.2 and 86% respectively, in case of CNG fuelled vehicle as compared to gasoline vehicle. Although total aldehyde-ketones were higher with CNG relative to gasoline, their SR was lower due decrease in acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, and methacrolein species having higher maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values. The SR of VOCs and aldehyde-ketones emitted from CNG fuelled vehicle was decreased by above 10% and 32% respectively, owing to better physicochemical properties and more complete burning of CNG as compared to gasoline. (author)

  20. Ignition delay time correlation of fuel blends based on Livengood-Wu description

    KAUST Repository

    Khaled, Fathi; Badra, Jihad; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    observed for combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) predictions between simulations performed with detailed chemistry and calculations using the developed ignition delay correlation.

  1. Role of biodiesel-diesel blends in alteration of particulate matter emanated by diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Shahid, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study is focused on the investigation of the role of biodiesel in the alteration of particulate matter (PM) composition emitted from a direct injection-compression ignition. Two important blends of biodiesel with commercial diesel known as B20 (20% biodiesel and 80% diesel by volume) and B50 were used for the comparative analysis of their pollutants with those of 100% or traditional diesel (D). The experiments were performed under the auspices of the Chinese 8-mode steady-state cycle on a test bench by coupling the engine with an AC electrical dynamometer. As per experimental results, over-50 nm aerosols were abated by 8.7-47% and 6-51% with B20 and B50, respectively, on account of lofty nitrogen dioxide to nitrogen oxides (NO2/NO) ratios. In case of B50, sub-50 nm aerosols and sulphates were higher at maximum load modes of the test, owing to adsorption phenomenon of inorganic nuclei leading to heterogeneous nucleation. Moreover, trace metal emissions (TME) were substantially reduced reflecting the reduction rates of 42-57% and 64-80% with B20 and B50, respectively, relative to baseline measurements taken with diesel. In addition to this, individual elements such as Ca and Fe were greatly minimised, while Na was enhanced with biodiesel blended fuels. (author)

  2. Optimum injection and combustion for gaseous fuel engine : characteristics of hydrogen auto-ignition phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, T.; Mikami, S.; Senda, J.; Fujimoto, H. [Doshisha Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Nakatani, K. [Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan); Tokunaga, Y. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A study was conducted in which the auto-ignition characteristics of hydrogen were examined in order to determine which factors dominate auto-ignition delay of hydrogen jets. Experiments were performed in a rapid compression/expansion machine in order to study the effects of ambient gas density and oxygen concentration on the auto-ignition delays. The focus of research was on an inert gas circulation type cogeneration system to apply hydrogen to a medium-sized diesel engine. Freedom of fuel-oxidizer mixing, ignition and combustion in the system could be achieved for stable combustion, high thermal efficiency, and zero emission. The study also involved chemical analysis using a detailed hydrogen reaction model that could simulate auto-ignition delays under various temperature, pressures, equivalence ratio, and dilution. It is shown that auto-ignition delays of hydrogen jets are very dependent on the ambient gas temperature and less dependent on its density and oxygen concentration. Temperature and hydrogen concentrations have significant impacts on the production and consumption rates of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and OH radicals. 21 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  3. Pulse heating and ignition for off-centre ignited targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdy, A.I.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.

    1999-01-01

    An off-centre ignition model has been used to study the ignition conditions for laser targets related to the fast ignition scheme. A 2-D hydrodynamic code has been used, including alpha particle heating. The main goal of the study is the possibility of obtaining a high gain ICF target with fast ignition. In order to determine the ignition conditions, samples with various compressed core densities having different spark density-radius product (i.e. areal density) values were selected. The study was carried out in the presence of an external heating source, with a constant heating rate. A dependence of the ignition conditions on the heating rate of the external pulse is demonstrated. For a given set of ignition conditions, our simulation showed that an 11 ps pulse with 17 kJ of injected energy into the spark area was required to achieve ignition for a compressed core with a density of 200 g/cm 3 and 0.5 g/cm 2 spark areal density. It is shown that the ignition conditions are highly dependent on the heating rate of the external pulse. (author)

  4. Diesel/CNG Mixture Autoignition Control Using Fuel Composition and Injection Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmansyah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Combustion phasing is the main obstacle to the development of controlled auto-ignition based (CAI engines to achieve low emissions and low fuel consumption operation. Fuel combinations with substantial differences in reactivity, such as diesel/compressed natural gas (CNG, show desirable combustion outputs and demonstrate great possibility in controlling the combustion. This paper discusses a control method for diesel/CNG mixture combustion with a variation of fuel composition and fuel stratification levels. The experiments were carried out in a constant volume combustion chamber with both fuels directly injected into the chamber. The mixture composition was varied from 0 to 100% CNG/diesel at lambda 1 while the fuel stratification level was controlled by the injection phasing between the two fuels, with gaps between injections ranging from 0 to 20 ms. The results demonstrated the suppressing effect of CNG on the diesel combustion, especially at the early combustion stages. However, CNG significantly enhanced the combustion performance of the diesel in the later stages. Injection gaps, on the other hand, showed particular behavior depending on mixture composition. Injection gaps show less effect on combustion phasing but a significant effect on the combustion output for higher diesel percentage (≥70%, while it is contradictive for lower diesel percentage (<70%.

  5. Target design for shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurtz, G; Ribeyre, X; Lafon, M

    2010-01-01

    The conventional approach of laser driven inertial fusion involves the implosion of cryogenic shells of deuterium-tritium ice. At sufficiently high implosion velocities, the fuel ignites by itself from a central hot spot. In order to reduce the risks of hydrodynamic instabilities inherent to large implosion velocities, it was proposed to compress the fuel at low velocity, and ignite the compressed fuel by means of a convergent shock wave driven by an intense spike at the end of the laser pulse. This scheme, known as shock ignition, reduces the risks of shell break-up during the acceleration phase, but it may be impeded by a low coupling efficiency of the laser pulse with plasma at high intensities. This work provides a relationship between the implosion velocity and the laser intensity required to ignite the target by a shock. The operating domain of shock ignition at different energies is described.

  6. A comprehensive study on the emission characteristics of E-diesel dual-fuel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Avinash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Each year, the ultimate goal of emission legislation is to force technology to the point where a practically viable zero emission vehicle becomes a reality. Albeit the direction to reach this target is a formidable challenge, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI is a new combustion concept to produce ultra low nitrogen oxides (NOx and smoke emissions. By the way, an endeavor has been made in this work to achieve a simultaneous reduction in both NOx and smoke levels in a direct injection compression ignition engine converted to operate on premixed charge compression ignition mode. Indeed, these promises were made possible in this work by preparing premixed fuel–air mixture outside the engine cylinder. For this purpose, ethanol was injected in the intake port at various premixed ratios (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30% and conventional diesel was injected as usual. It was extrapolated from the experimental results that e-diesel operation can significantly reduce NOx and smoke levels. In addition, NOx and smoke levels reduced in this experimental study with increase in premixed fraction. Nevertheless, unburned hydrocarbons (UBHC and carbon monoxide (CO emissions exhibited reverse trend with increase in premixed fraction and the maximum value of HC and CO emission levels was noted with 30% premixed fraction.

  7. Evaluation of a combined cycle based on an HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine heat recovery employing two organic Rankine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaljani, M.; Saray, R. Khoshbakhti; Bahlouli, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a combined power cycle which includes a HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine and two ORCs (Organic Rankine Cycles) is introduced. In the proposed cycle, the waste heats from the engine cooling water and exhaust gases are utilized to drive the ORCs. A parametric study is conducted to show the effects of decision parameters on the performance and on the total cost rate of cycle. Results of the parametric study reveal that increasing the pinch point temperature difference of evaporator and temperature of the condenser leads to reduction in both exergy efficiency and total cost rate of the bottoming cycle. There is a specific evaporator temperature where exergy efficiency is improved, but the total cost rate of the bottoming cycle is maximized. Also, a multi-objective optimization strategy is performed to achieve the best system design parameters from both thermodynamic and economic aspects. The exergy efficiency and the total cost rate of the system have been considered as objective functions. Optimization results indicate that the exergy efficiency of the cycle increases from 44.96% for the base case to 46.02%. Also, approximately1.3% reduction in the cost criteria is achieved. Results of the multi-objective optimization justify the results obtained through the parametric study and demonstrate that the design parameters of both ORCs have conflict effect on the objective functions. - Highlights: • Two Organic Rankine bottoming cycles are coupled with an HCCI Engine. • Exergetic and Exergo-economic analysis of the bottoming cycle are reported. • The system is optimized using multi-objective genetic algorithm. • Objective functions are exergy efficiency and total cost rate of the system. • The exergy efficiency of the cycle increases from 44.96% to 46.02%.

  8. Chemical kinetic insights into the ignition dynamics of n-hexane

    KAUST Repository

    Tingas, Alexandros; Wang, Zhandong; Sarathy, Mani; Im, Hong G.; Goussis, Dimitris A.

    2017-01-01

    Normal alkanes constitute a significant fraction of transportation fuels, and are the primary drivers of ignition processes in gasoline and diesel fuels. Low temperature ignition of n-alkanes is driven by a complex sequence of oxidation reactions

  9. Combined effects of cooled EGR and a higher geometric compression ratio on thermal efficiency improvement of a downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Jianye; Xu, Min; Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Experiments for the effects of cooled EGR and two compression ratios (CR) on fuel efficiency were conducted. • The mechanism for the observed fuel efficiency behaviors by cooled EGR and high CR was clarified. • Cooled EGR offers more fuel efficiency improvement than elevating CR from 9.3 to 10.9. • Combining 18–25% cooled EGR with 10.9 CR lead to 2.1–3.5% brake thermal efficiency improvements. - Abstract: The downsized boosted spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine has proven to be one of the most promising concepts to improve vehicle fuel economy. However, the boosted engine is typically designed at a lower geometric compression ratio (CR) due to the increased knock tendency in comparison to naturally aspirated engines, limiting the potential of improving fuel economy. On the other hand, cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) has drawn attention due to the potential to suppress knock and improve fuel economy. Combing the effects of boosting, increased CR and cooled EGR to further improve fuel economy within acceptable knock tolerance has been investigated using a 2.0 L downsized boosted SIDI engine over a wide range of engine operating conditions from 1000 rpm to 3000 rpm at low to high loads. To clarify the mechanism of this complicated effects, the first law of thermodynamics analysis was conducted with the inputs from GT-Power® engine simulation. Experiment results indicate that cooled EGR provides more brake thermal efficiency improvement than increasing geometric CR from 9.3 to 10.9. The benefit of brake thermal efficiency from the higher CR is limited to low load conditions. The attributes for improving brake thermal efficiency by cooled EGR include reduced heat transfer loss, reduced pumping work and increased ratio of specific heats for all the engine operating conditions, as well as higher degree of constant volume heat release only for the knock-limited high load conditions. The combined effects of 18–25% cooled EGR

  10. The influence of turpentine additive on the ecological parameters of diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Butkus

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available After Lithuania’s accession to the EU it is very important to use a larger amount of renewable fuel. Based on economic and environmental considerations in Lithuania, we are interested in studying the effects of turpentine contents in the blended turpentine-diesel fuel on the engine performance and pollutant emission of compression ignition (CI engine. Therefore, we used engine test facilities to investigate the effects on the engine performance and pollutant emission of 5 % turpentine in the fuel blend. The tests were carried out in the laboratory on an engine dynamometer of the car Audi 1Z and tractor D21 diesel engines. The experimental results showed that turpentine used in the fuel blend for these diesel engines had a positive influence on the engine performance and exhaust emission.

  11. Heat Transfer in Two-Stroke Diesel Engines for Large Ship Propulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar Ask

    Demands on reducing the fuel consumption and harmful emissions from the compression ignition engines (diesel engines) have been continuously increasing in recent years. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. A very......%, 30% and 50% load) was performed on a MAN Diesel & Turbo SE test engine, which shows very promising results for further investigations of dynamic temperature and heat flux in large bore engines. Instantaneous heat flux is derived using both an analytical and a numerical model and compared. More...... was investigated by computer simulations using a 3-D numerical finite volume model made in STAR-CD. General trends are observed from the temperature measurements in the limited part load range. These include among others: local increase in mean surface temperature and mean surface heat flux with increasing load...

  12. Experimental Studies of Diestrol-Micro Emulsion Fuel in a Direct Injection Compression Ignition Engine under Varying Injection Pressures and Timings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Gopal Radhakrishnan

    2018-02-01

    The research work on biodiesel becomes more attractive in the context of limited availability of petroleum fuels and rapid increase of harmful emissions from diesel engine using conventional fossil fuels. The present investigation has dealt with the influence of biodiesel-diesel-ethanol (diestrol) water micro emulsion fuel (B60D20E20M) on the performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a diesel engine under different injection pressure and timing. The results revealed that the maximum brake thermal efficiency of 32.4% was observed at an injection pressure of 260 bar and injection timing of 25.5°bTDC. In comparison with diesel, micro emulsion fuel showed reduction in carbon monoxide (CO) and total hydrocarbon (THC) by 40 and 24%, respectively. Further, micro emulsion fuel decreased nitric oxide (NO) emission and smoke emission by 7 and 20.7%, while the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission is similar to that of diesel.

  13. Castor Seed from Melkasa Agricultural Research Centre, East Showa, Ethiopia and it’s biodiesel performance in Four Stroke Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfahun Tegegne Akanawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focused in investigating the fuel properties of Castor oil Methyl Ester (CME and its blend with diesel fuel in running a diesel engine. Engine tests have been carried out with the aim of obtaining comparative measures of torque, power, and specific fuel consumption. Castor oil was extracted by using a mechanical pressing machine and trans-esterification was made by methyl alcohol and potassium hydroxide as a catalyst.  So that its viscosity and density were reduced and by increasing its volatility.  By following the procedures given in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM book the fuel characteristics were identified whether it fulfil the requirements needed to be used as a fuel in internal combustion engines or not. From the characterization result, it was proved that trans-esterified castor oil was found to be a promising alternative fuel for compression ignition (diesel engines. But the viscosity of CME was still higher and the energy content was a little bit less as compared to petro diesel. To solve these problems CME was blended with petro diesel in some proportion (B5, B10, B20, B40, B80. The torque, power and brake specific fuel consumption performances of CME and its blends with petro diesel were tested in a four stroke diesel engine. The analyzed results were compared with that of petro diesel and found to be very nearly similar, making CME a suiTable alternative fuel for petro diesel.

  14. Progress of impact ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.

    2010-11-01

    In impact ignition scheme, a portion of the fuel (the impactor) is accelerated to a super-high velocity, compressed by convergence, and collided with a precompressed main fuel. This collision generates shock waves in both the impactor and the main fuel. Since the density of the impactor is generally much lower than that of the main fuel, the pressure balance ensures that the shock-heated temperature of the impactor is significantly higher than that of the main fuel. Hence, the impactor can reach ignition temperature and thus become an igniter. Here we report major new results on recent impact ignition research: (1) A maximum velocity ∼ 1000 km/s has been achieved under the operation of NIKE KrF laser at Naval Research Laboratory (laser wavelength=0.25μm) in the use of a planar target made of plastic and (2) We have performed two-dimensional simulation for burn and ignition to show the feasibility of the impact ignition. (author)

  15. Role of fuel additives on reduction of NOX emission from a diesel engine powered by camphor oil biofuel

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, Thiyagarajan

    2018-03-21

    The present study intends to explore the effect of the addition of fuel additives with camphor oil (CMO) on the characteristics of a twin-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine. The lower viscosity and boiling point of CMO when compared to diesel could improve the fuel atomization, evaporation, and air/fuel mixing process. However, the lower cetane index of CMO limits its use as a drop in fuel for diesel in CI engine. In general, NO emission increases for less viscous and low cetane (LVLC) fuels due to pronounced premixed combustion phase. To improve the ignition characteristics and decrease NO emissions, fuel additives such as diglyme (DGE)—a cetane enhancer, cumene (CU)—an antioxidant, and eugenol (EU) and acetone (A)—bio-additives, are added 10% by volume with CMO. The engine used for the experimentation is a twin-cylinder tractor engine that runs at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. The engine was operated with diesel initially to attain warm-up condition, which facilitates the operation of neat CMO. At full load condition, brake thermal efficiency (BTE) for CMO is higher (29.6%) than that of diesel (28.1%), while NO emission is increased by 9.4%. With DGE10 (10% DGE + 90% CMO), the ignition characteristics of CMO are improved and BTE is increased to 31.7% at full load condition. With EU10 (10% EU + 90% CMO) and A10 (10% A + 90% CMO), NO emission is decreased by 24.6 and 17.8% when compared to diesel, while BTE is comparable to diesel. While HC and CO emission decreased for DGE10 and CU10, they increased for EU10 and A10 when compared to baseline diesel and CMO.

  16. Role of fuel additives on reduction of NOX emission from a diesel engine powered by camphor oil biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Thiyagarajan; Varuvel, Edwin Geo; Ganapathy, Saravanan; Vedharaj, S; Vallinayagam, R

    2018-06-01

    The present study intends to explore the effect of the addition of fuel additives with camphor oil (CMO) on the characteristics of a twin-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine. The lower viscosity and boiling point of CMO when compared to diesel could improve the fuel atomization, evaporation, and air/fuel mixing process. However, the lower cetane index of CMO limits its use as a drop in fuel for diesel in CI engine. In general, NO X emission increases for less viscous and low cetane (LVLC) fuels due to pronounced premixed combustion phase. To improve the ignition characteristics and decrease NO X emissions, fuel additives such as diglyme (DGE)-a cetane enhancer, cumene (CU)-an antioxidant, and eugenol (EU) and acetone (A)-bio-additives, are added 10% by volume with CMO. The engine used for the experimentation is a twin-cylinder tractor engine that runs at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. The engine was operated with diesel initially to attain warm-up condition, which facilitates the operation of neat CMO. At full load condition, brake thermal efficiency (BTE) for CMO is higher (29.6%) than that of diesel (28.1%), while NO X emission is increased by 9.4%. With DGE10 (10% DGE + 90% CMO), the ignition characteristics of CMO are improved and BTE is increased to 31.7% at full load condition. With EU10 (10% EU + 90% CMO) and A10 (10% A + 90% CMO), NO X emission is decreased by 24.6 and 17.8% when compared to diesel, while BTE is comparable to diesel. While HC and CO emission decreased for DGE10 and CU10, they increased for EU10 and A10 when compared to baseline diesel and CMO.

  17. Role of fuel additives on reduction of NOX emission from a diesel engine powered by camphor oil biofuel

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, Thiyagarajan; Varuvel, Edwin Geo; Ganapathy, Saravanan; Vedharaj, S.; Vallinayagam, R.

    2018-01-01

    The present study intends to explore the effect of the addition of fuel additives with camphor oil (CMO) on the characteristics of a twin-cylinder compression ignition (CI) engine. The lower viscosity and boiling point of CMO when compared to diesel could improve the fuel atomization, evaporation, and air/fuel mixing process. However, the lower cetane index of CMO limits its use as a drop in fuel for diesel in CI engine. In general, NO emission increases for less viscous and low cetane (LVLC) fuels due to pronounced premixed combustion phase. To improve the ignition characteristics and decrease NO emissions, fuel additives such as diglyme (DGE)—a cetane enhancer, cumene (CU)—an antioxidant, and eugenol (EU) and acetone (A)—bio-additives, are added 10% by volume with CMO. The engine used for the experimentation is a twin-cylinder tractor engine that runs at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. The engine was operated with diesel initially to attain warm-up condition, which facilitates the operation of neat CMO. At full load condition, brake thermal efficiency (BTE) for CMO is higher (29.6%) than that of diesel (28.1%), while NO emission is increased by 9.4%. With DGE10 (10% DGE + 90% CMO), the ignition characteristics of CMO are improved and BTE is increased to 31.7% at full load condition. With EU10 (10% EU + 90% CMO) and A10 (10% A + 90% CMO), NO emission is decreased by 24.6 and 17.8% when compared to diesel, while BTE is comparable to diesel. While HC and CO emission decreased for DGE10 and CU10, they increased for EU10 and A10 when compared to baseline diesel and CMO.

  18. Magnetically Assisted Fast Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, W.-M.; Gibbon, P.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Li, Y.-T.

    2015-01-01

    Fast ignition (FI) is investigated via integrated particle-in-cell simulation including both generation andtransport of fast electrons, where petawatt ignition lasers of 2 ps and compressed targets of a peak density of300 g cm−3 and areal density of 0.49 g cm−2 at the core are taken. When a 20 MG static magnetic field isimposed across a conventional cone-free target, the energy coupling from the laser to the core is enhancedby sevenfold and reaches 14%. This value even exceeds that obtained u...

  19. Performance and heat release analysis of a pilot-ignited natural gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.R.; Biruduganti, M.; Mo, Y.; Bell, S.R.; Midkiff, K.C. [Alabama Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The influence of engine operating variables on the performance, emissions and heat release in a compression ignition engine operating in normal diesel and dual-fuel modes (with natural gas fuelling) was investigated. Substantial reductions in NO{sub x} emissions were obtained with dual-fuel engine operation. There was a corresponding increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions as the substitution of natural gas was increased. Brake specific energy consumption decreased with natural gas substitution at high loads but increased at low loads. Experimental results at fixed pilot injection timing have also established the importance of intake manifold pressure and temperature in improving dual-fuel performance and emissions at part load. (Author)

  20. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study Auxiliary Findings on 2007-Compliant Diesel Engines: A Comparison With Diesel Exhaust Genotoxicity Effects Prior to 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance M Hallberg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its beginning, more than 117 years ago, the compression-ignition engine, or diesel engine, has grown to become a critically important part of industry and transportation. Public concerns over the health effects from diesel emissions have driven the growth of regulatory development, implementation, and technological advances in emission controls. In 2001, the United States Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board issued new diesel fuel and emission standards for heavy-duty engines. To meet these stringent standards, manufacturers used new emission after-treatment technology, and modified fuel formulations, to bring about reductions in particulate matter and nitrogen oxides within the exhaust. To illustrate the impact of that technological transition, a brief overview of pre-2007 diesel engine exhaust biomarkers of genotoxicity and health-related concerns is provided, to set the context for the results of our research findings, as part of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES, in which the effects of a 2007-compliant diesel engine were examined. In agreement with ACES findings reported in other tissues, we observed a lack of measurable 2007-compliant diesel treatment–associated DNA damage, in lung tissue (comet assay, blood serum (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG] assay, and hippocampus (lipid peroxidation assay, across diesel exhaust exposure levels. A time-dependent assessment of 8-OHdG and lipid peroxidation also suggested no differences in responses across diesel exhaust exposure levels more than 24 months of exposure. These results indicated that the 2007-compliant diesel engine reduced measurable reactive oxygen species–associated tissue derangements and suggested that the 2007 standards–based mitigation approaches were effective.

  1. Analysis of the Effect of Injection Pressure on Ignition Delay and Combustion Process of Biodiesel from Palm Oil, Algae and Waste Cooking Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irham Anas, Mohd; Khalid, Amir; Hakim Zulkifli, Fathul; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease for use in diesel engines. The objective of this research is investigation the effects of the variant injection pressure on ignition delay and emission for different biodiesel using rapid compression machine. Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) is used to simulate a single compression stroke of an internal combustion engine as a real engine. Four types of biodiesel which are waste cooking oil, crude palm oil, algae and jatropha were tested at injection pressure of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under constant ambient temperature at 950 K. Increased in injection pressure resulted shorter ignition delay proven by WCO5 which decreased from 1.3 ms at 80 MPa to 0.7 ms at 130 MPa. Meanwhile, emission for CO2 increased due to better fuel atomization for fuel-air mixture formation lead to completed combustion.

  2. Semi-volatile and particulate emissions from the combustion of alternative diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S; Graham, J; Striebich, R

    2001-01-01

    Motor vehicle emissions are a major anthropogenic source of air pollution and contribute to the deterioration of urban air quality. In this paper, we report results of a laboratory investigation of particle formation from four different alternative diesel fuels, namely, compressed natural gas (CNG), dimethyl ether (DME), biodiesel, and diesel, under fuel-rich conditions in the temperature range of 800-1200 degrees C at pressures of approximately 24 atm. A single pulse shock tube was used to simulate compression ignition (CI) combustion conditions. Gaseous fuels (CNG and DME) were exposed premixed in air while liquid fuels (diesel and biodiesel) were injected using a high-pressure liquid injector. The results of surface analysis using a scanning electron microscope showed that the particles formed from combustion of all four of the above-mentioned fuels had a mean diameter less than 0.1 microm. From results of gravimetric analysis and fuel injection size it was found that under the test conditions described above the relative particulate yields from CNG, DME, biodiesel, and diesel were 0.30%. 0.026%, 0.52%, and 0.51%, respectively. Chemical analysis of particles showed that DME combustion particles had the highest soluble organic fraction (SOF) at 71%, followed by biodiesel (66%), CNG (38%) and diesel (20%). This illustrates that in case of both gaseous and liquid fuels, oxygenated fuels have a higher SOF than non-oxygenated fuels.

  3. Effect of advanced injection timing on the performance of rapeseed oil in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwafor, O.M.I.; Rice, G.; Ogbonna, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion studies on both diesel fuel and vegetable oil fuels, with the standard and advanced injection timing, were carried out using the same engine and test procedures so that comparative assessments may be made. The diesel engine principle demands self-ignition of the fuel as it is injected at some degrees before top dead centre (BTDC) into the hot compressed cylinder gas. Longer delays between injection and ignition lead to unacceptable rates of pressure rise with the result of diesel knock because too much fuel is ready to take part in premixed combustion. Alternative fuels have been noted to exhibit longer delay periods and slower burning rate especially at low load operating conditions hence resulting in late combustion in the expansion stroke. Advanced injection timing is expected to compensate these effects. The engine has standard injection timing of 30degC BTDC. The injection was first advanced by 5.5degC given injection timing of 35.5degC BTDC. The engine performance was very erratic on this timing. The injection was then advanced by 3.5degC and the effects are presented in this paper. The engine performance was smooth especially at low load levels. The ignition delay was reduced through advanced injection but tended to incur a slight increase in fuel consumption. Moderate advanced injection timing is recommended for low speed operations. (Author)

  4. Spray-combustion process characterization in a common rail diesel engine fuelled with butanol-diesel blends by conventional methods and optical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Silvia Merola

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The target of a sustainable mobility has led to investigate advanced combustion modes and fuels technologies. On the other side, the increasing global energy demand and the decreasing fossil-energy resources are enhancing the interest in the use of renewable alternative fuels for compression ignition engines with the target of near-zero emission levels. Although performance and emissions of alternative-fuel within light-duty diesel engines have been extensively investigated, results of fuel chemical composition impact on combustion by integrated optical methodologies are lacking. In order to meet this challenge, one of the main objectives of the research efforts is to characterize the combustion and species evolution. In this investigation, conventional tests and optical diagnostics were employed to enhance the comprehension of the combustion process and chemical markers in a common rail compression ignition engine powered by butanol-diesel blends. The investigation was focused on the effect of the injection strategy and blend composition on in-cylinder spray combustion and soot formation, through UV-visible digital imaging and natural emission spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in an optically accessible single cylinder high swirl compression ignition engine, equipped with a common rail multi-jets injection system. UV-visible emission spectroscopy was used to follow the evolution of the combustion process chemical markers. Spectral features of OH were identified and followed during the spray combustion process examining different pilot-main dwell timings. Soot spectral evidence in the visible wavelength range was correlated to soot engine out emissions. In this work, conventional and optical data related to diesel fuel blended with 40 % of n-butanol will be presented.

  5. Engine performance and emissions using Jatropha curcas, Ceiba pentandra and Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel in a CI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Hwai Chyuan; Masjuki, H.H.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Silitonga, A.S.; Chong, W.T.; Yusaf, Talal

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel is a recognized replacement for diesel fuel in compressed ignition engines due to its significant environmental benefits. The purpose of this study is to investigate the engine performance and emissions produced from Jatropha curcas, Ceiba pentandra and Calophyllum inophyllum biodiesel in compressed ignition engine. The biodiesel production process and properties are discussed and a comparison of the three biodiesels as well as diesel fuel is undertaken. After that, engine performance and emissions testing was conducted using biodiesel blends 10%, 20%, 30% and 50% in a diesel engine at full throttle load. The engine performance shows that those biodiesel blends are suitable for use in diesel engines. A 10% biodiesel blend shows the best engine performance in terms of engine torque, engine power, fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency among the all blending ratios for the three biodiesel blends. Biodiesel blends have also shown a significant reduction in CO 2 , CO and smoke opacity with a slight increase in NO x emissions. - Highlights: • The properties of JCME, CPME and CIME fulfill ASTM standard. • Engine performance and emission was conducted for JCME, CPME and CIME. • The B10 is the best engine performance and reduce in exhaust emission

  6. Numerical Evaluation ofThe Performance ofA Compression Ignition Cng Engine For Heavy DutyTrucksWithAn Optimum Speed PowerTurbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto A. Boretti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The turbocharged direct injection lean burn Diesel engine is the most efficient engine now in production for transport applications. CNG is an alternative fuel with a better carbon to hydrogen ratio therefore permitting reduced carbon dioxide emissions. It is injected in gaseous form for a much cleaner combustion almost cancelling some of the emissions of the Diesel and it permits a much better energy security within Australia. The paper discusses the best options currently available to convert Diesel engine platforms to CNG, with particular emphasis to the use of these CNG engines within Australia where the refuelling network is scarce. This option is determined in the dual fuel operation with a double injector design that couples a second CNG injector to the Diesel injector. This configuration permits the operation Diesel only or Diesel pilot and CNG main depending on the availability of refuelling stations where the vehicle operates. Results of engine performance simulations are performed for a straight six cylinder 13 litres truck engine with a novel power turbine connected to the crankshaft through a constant variable transmission that may be by-passed when non helpful to increase the fuel economy of the vehicle or when damaging the performances of the after treatment system.

  7. Shock Tube Ignition Delay Data Affected by Localized Ignition Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-12-29

    Shock tubes have conventionally been used for measuring high-temperature ignition delay times ~ O(1 ms). In the last decade or so, the operating regime of shock tubes has been extended to lower temperatures by accessing longer observation times. Such measurements may potentially be affected by some non-ideal phenomena. The purpose of this work is to measure long ignition delay times for fuels exhibiting negative temperature coefficient (NTC) and to assess the impact of shock tube non-idealities on ignition delay data. Ignition delay times of n-heptane and n-hexane were measured over the temperature range of 650 – 1250 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. Driver gas tailoring and long length of shock tube driver section were utilized to measure ignition delay times as long as 32 ms. Measured ignition delay times agree with chemical kinetic models at high (> 1100 K) and low (< 700 K) temperatures. In the intermediate temperature range (700 – 1100 K), however, significant discrepancies are observed between the measurements and homogeneous ignition delay simulations. It is postulated, based on experimental observations, that localized ignition kernels could affect the ignition delay times at the intermediate temperatures, which lead to compression (and heating) of the bulk gas and result in expediting the overall ignition event. The postulate is validated through simple representative computational fluid dynamic simulations of post-shock gas mixtures which exhibit ignition advancement via a hot spot. The results of the current work show that ignition delay times measured by shock tubes may be affected by non-ideal phenomena for certain conditions of temperature, pressure and fuel reactivity. Care must, therefore, be exercised in using such data for chemical kinetic model development and validation.

  8. Use of tobacco seed oil methyl ester in a turbocharged indirect injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usta, N.

    2005-01-01

    Vegetable oils and their methyl/ethyl esters are alternative renewable fuels for compression ignition engines. Different kinds of vegetable oils and their methyl/ethyl esters have been tested in diesel engines. However, tobacco seed oil and tobacco seed oil methyl ester have not been tested in diesel engines, yet. Tobacco seed oil is a non-edible vegetable oil and a by-product of tobacco leaves production. To the author's best knowledge, this is the first study on tobacco seed oil methyl ester as a fuel in diesel engines. In this study, potential tobacco seed production throughout the world, the oil extraction process from tobacco seed and the transesterification process for biodiesel production were examined. The produced tobacco seed oil methyl ester was characterized by exposing its major properties. The effects of tobacco seed oil methyl ester addition to diesel No. 2 on the performance and emissions of a four cycle, four cylinder turbocharged indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine were examined at both full and partial loads. Experimental results showed that tobacco seed oil methyl ester can be partially substituted for the diesel fuel at most operating conditions in terms of performance parameters and emissions without any engine modification and preheating of the blends. (Author)

  9. Main conditions and effectiveness of gas fuel use for powering of dual fuel IC self-ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan POSTRZEDNIK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Internal combustion engines are fuelled mostly with liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel. Nowadays the gaseous fuels are applied as driving fuel of combustion engines. In case of spark ignition engines the liquid fuel (petrol can be totally replaced by the gas fuels. This possibility in case of compression engines is essentially restricted through the higher self-ignition temperatures of the combustible gases in comparison to classical diesel oil. Solution if this problem can be achieved by using of the dual fuel system, where for ignition of the prepared fuel gas - air mixture a specified amount of the liquid fuel (diesel oil should be additionally injected into the combustion chamber. For assurance that the combustion process proceeds without mistakes and completely, some basic conditions should be satisfied. In the frame of this work, three main aspects of this problem are taken into account: a. filling efficiency of the engine, b. stoichiometry of the combustion, c. performance of mechanical parameters (torque, power. A complex analysis of these conditions has been done and some achieved important results are presented in the paper.

  10. Toxicological properties of emission particles from heavy duty engines powered by conventional and bio-based diesel fuels and compressed natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava, Pasi I; Aakko-Saksa, Päivi; Murtonen, Timo; Happo, Mikko S; Markkanen, Ari; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Hakulinen, Pasi; Hillamo, Risto; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Salonen, Raimo O; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2012-09-29

    One of the major areas for increasing the use of renewable energy is in traffic fuels e.g. bio-based fuels in diesel engines especially in commuter traffic. Exhaust emissions from fossil diesel fuelled engines are known to cause adverse effects on human health, but there is very limited information available on how the new renewable fuels may change the harmfulness of the emissions, especially particles (PM). We evaluated the PM emissions from a heavy-duty EURO IV diesel engine powered by three different fuels; the toxicological properties of the emitted PM were investigated. Conventional diesel fuel (EN590) and two biodiesels were used - rapeseed methyl ester (RME, EN14214) and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) either as such or as 30% blends with EN590. EN590 and 100% HVO were also operated with or without an oxidative catalyst (DOC + POC). A bus powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) was included for comparison with the liquid fuels. However, the results from CNG powered bus cannot be directly compared to the other situations in this study. High volume PM samples were collected on PTFE filters from a constant volume dilution tunnel. The PM mass emission with HVO was smaller and with RME larger than that with EN590, but both biofuels produced lower PAH contents in emission PM. The DOC + POC catalyst greatly reduced the PM emission and PAH content in PM with both HVO and EN590. Dose-dependent TNFα and MIP-2 responses to all PM samples were mostly at the low or moderate level after 24-hour exposure in a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Emission PM from situations with the smallest mass emissions (HVO + cat and CNG) displayed the strongest potency in MIP-2 production. The catalyst slightly decreased the PM-induced TNFα responses and somewhat increased the MIP-2 responses with HVO fuel. Emission PM with EN590 and with 30% HVO blended in EN590 induced the strongest genotoxic responses, which were significantly greater than those with EN590

  11. Experimental studies on the combustion characteristics and performance of a direct injection engine fueled with biodiesel/diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, D.H.; Chen, H.; Geng, L.M.; Bian, Y. ZH.

    2010-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel that can be produced from different kinds of vegetable oils. It is an oxygenated, non-toxic, sulphur-free, biodegradable, and renewable fuel and can be used in diesel engines without significant modification. However, the performance, emissions and combustion characteristics will be different for the same biodiesel used in different types of engine. In this study, the biodiesel produced from soybean crude oil was prepared by a method of alkaline-catalyzed transesterification. The effects of biodiesel addition to diesel fuel on the performance, emissions and combustion characteristics of a naturally aspirated DI compression ignition engine were examined. Biodiesel has different properties from diesel fuel. A minor increase in brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and decrease in brake thermal efficiency (BTE) for biodiesel and its blends were observed compared with diesel fuel. The significant improvement in reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) and smoke were found for biodiesel and its blends at high engine loads. Hydrocarbon (HC) had no evident variation for all tested fuels. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) were slightly higher for biodiesel and its blends. Biodiesel and its blends exhibited similar combustion stages to diesel fuel. The use of transesterified soybean crude oil can be partially substituted for the diesel fuel at most operating conditions in terms of the performance parameters and emissions without any engine modification.

  12. Ignition experiment - alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1979-10-01

    This report comprises three short papers on cost estimates, integral burn time and alternative versions of Tokamak ignition experiments. These papers were discussed at the ZEPHYR workshop with participants from IPP Garching, MIT Cambridge and PPPL Princeton (Garching July 30 - August 2 1979) (Chapters A, B, C). It is shown, that starting from a practical parameter independent minimum integral burn time of Tokamak ignition experiments (some 10 3 s) by adding a shield for protection of the magnet insulation (permitted neutron dose 10 9 rad) an integral burn time of some 10 4 s can be achieved for only about 30% more outlay. For a substantially longer integral burn time the outlay approaches rather quickly that for a Tokamak reactor. Some examples for alternatives to ZEPHYR are being given, including some with low or no compression. In a further chapter D some early results of evaluating an ignition experiment on the basis of the energy confinement scaling put forward by Coppi and Mazzucato are presented. As opposed to the case of the Alcator scaling used in chapters A through C the minimum integral burn time of Tokamak ignition experiments here depends on the plasma current. Provided neutral injectors up to about 160 keV are available compression boosting is not required with this scaling. The results presented have been obtained neglecting the effects of the toroidal field ripple. (orig.) 891 HT/orig. 892 RKD [de

  13. Experimental studies on fumigation of ethanol in a small capacity Diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Bhupendra Singh; Kumar, Naveen; Pal, Shyam Sunder; Du Jun, Yong

    2011-01-01

    To diversify the mix of domestic energy resources and to reduce dependence on imported oil, ethanol is widely investigated for applying in combination with Diesel fuel to reduce pollutants, including smoke and NO x . Present work aims at developing a fumigation system for introduction of ethanol in a small capacity Diesel engine and to determine its effects on emission. Fumigation was achieved by using a constant volume carburetor. Different percentages of ethanol fumes with air were then introduced in the Diesel engine, under various load conditions. Ethanol is an oxygenated fuel and lead to smooth and efficient combustion. Atomization of ethanol also results in lower combustion temperature. During the present study, gaseous emission has been found to be decreasing with ethanol fumigation. Results from the experiment suggest that ethanol fumigation can be effectively employed in existing compression ignition engine to achieve substantial saving of the limited Diesel oil. Results show that fumigated Diesel engine exhibit better engine performance with lower NOx, CO, CO 2 and exhaust temperature. Ethanol fumigation has resulted in increase of unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emission in the entire load range. Considering the parameters, the optimum percentage was found as 15% for ethanol fumigation. -- Research highlights: → To diversify energy resources and to reduce dependence on imported oil, ethanol is used in Diesel engine to reduce pollutants. → Developing a fumigation system to inject ethanol in a small capacity Diesel engine, to determine its effects on emissions. → Different percentages of ethanol fumes with air were introduced in Diesel engine, under various load conditions by using a constant volume carburetor. → Results show that fumigated Diesel engine exhibits better engine performance with lower NOx, CO, CO 2 and exhaust temperature. → Results show increase of unburned hydrocarbon emission in entire load range. Optimum percentage found as 15% for

  14. Effect of ethanol/water blends addition on diesel fuel combustion in RCM and DI diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nour, Mohamed; Kosaka, Hidenori; Sato, Susumu; Bady, Mahmoud; Abdel-Rahman, Ali K.; Uchida, Kenta

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of ethanol/water addition on diesel combustion studied using optical diagnostics. • The addition of water to ethanol improves engine combustion and soot oxidation. • Ethanol/water injection into exhaust manifold eliminates their endothermic effect. • Ethanol with high water content is recommended for better engine combustion. • Soot concentration reduced by 50% and NO x emissions reduced by 88%. - Abstract: The effect of ethanol/water blends addition on diesel fuel combustion and emissions is investigated experimentally in this study using optical diagnostics. Basic study is performed using rapid compression machine (RCM) under CI conditions. The tested ethanol energy fractions varied in the range of 10–40% of the total added fuel energy, while water volume ratios varied in the range of 10–40% of the injected ethanol. Ethanol and water were evaporated before entering the combustion chamber to eliminate their endothermic effect. Results reveal that addition of ethanol/water blends to diesel fuel results in longer ignition delay and promote the apparent heat release rate (AHRR) at the premixed combustion phase compared to absolute ethanol addition. Additionally, soot and NO x emissions are reduced with ethanol/water addition compared to absolute ethanol addition and neat diesel combustion. The basic study is then extended to investigate the effect ethanol/water blends addition on diesel fuel combustion using single cylinder diesel engine. Waste heat in exhaust manifold is utilized to vaporize ethanol/water blends before combustion. Results reveal that ethanol/water blends injection leads to increase in peak cylinder pressure, indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP), and AHRR at premixed combustion phase. Additionally, the ignition delay increased with ethanol/water addition. NO x emission is decreased up to 88% along with a reduction in soot by 50%. The lower ethanol to water volume ratios show better combustion efficiency, IMEP

  15. Assessment of n-pentanol/Calophyllum inophyllum/diesel blends on the performance, emission, and combustion characteristics of a constant-speed variable compression ratio direct injection diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Purnachandran; Kasimani, Ramesh; Peer, Mohamed Shameer; Rajamohan, Sakthivel

    2018-05-01

    Alcohol is used as an additive for a long time with the petroleum-based fuels. In this study, the higher alcohol, n-pentanol, was used as an additive to Calophyllum inophyllum (CI) biodiesel/diesel blends at 10, 15, and 20% by volume. In all blends, the ratio of CI was maintained at 20% by volume. The engine characteristics of the pentanol fuel blends were compared with the diesel and CI20 (Calophyllum inophyllum 20% and diesel 80%) biodiesel blend. The nitrogen oxide (NO) emission of the pentanol fuel blends showed an increased value than CI20 and neat diesel fuel. The carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) also increased with increase in pentanol addition with the fuel blends than CI20 fuel blend and diesel. The carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were decreased with increase in pentanol proportion in the blend than the CI20 fuel and diesel. The smoke emission was reduced and the combustion characteristics of the engine were also improved by using pentanol blended fuels. From this investigation, it is suggested that 20% pentanol addition with the biodiesel/diesel fuel is suitable for improved performance and combustion characteristics of a diesel engine without any engine modifications, whereas CO 2 and NO emissions increased with addition of pentanol due to effective combustion.

  16. High-Gain Shock Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. J.; Lafortune, K.; Bailey, D.; Lambert, M.; MacKinnon, A.; Blackfield, D.; Comley, A.; Schurtz, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Lebel, E.; Casner, A.; Craxton, R. S.; Betti, R.; McKenty, P.; Anderson, K.; Theobald, W.; Schmitt, A.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-11-01

    Shock ignition offers the possibility for a near-term test of high-gain ICF on the NIF at less than 1MJ drive energy and with day-1 laser hardware. We will summarize the status of target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the R&D program to be performed in order to test the potential of a shock-ignited target on NIF. In shock ignition, compressed fuel is separately ignited by a late-time laser-driven shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, simulations indicate that fusion energy gains of 60 may be achievable at laser energies around 0.5MJ. Like fast ignition, shock ignition offers high gain but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and focusing requirements. Conventional symmetry and stability constraints apply, thus a key immediate step towards attempting shock ignition on NIF is to demonstrate adequacy of low-mode uniformity and shock symmetry under polar drive

  17. Diesel oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oil ... Diesel oil ... Diesel oil poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of ... most dangerous effects of hydrocarbon (such as diesel oil) poisoning are due to inhaling the fumes. NERVOUS ...

  18. Dimethyl Ether in Diesel Fuel Injection Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorenson, Spencer C.; Glensvig, M.; Abata, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of the behaviour of DME in diesel injection systems. A discussion of the effects of compressibility of DME on compression work and wave propagation.DME spray shapes and penetration rates......A study of the behaviour of DME in diesel injection systems. A discussion of the effects of compressibility of DME on compression work and wave propagation.DME spray shapes and penetration rates...

  19. Alternative Diesel from Waste Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bezergianni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The long term ambition of energy security and solidarity, coupled with the environmental concerns of problematic waste accumulation, is addressed via the proposed waste-to-fuel technology. Plastic waste is converted into automotive diesel fuel via a two-step thermochemical process based on pyrolysis and hydrotreatment. Plastic waste was pyrolyzed in a South East Asia plant rendering pyrolysis oil, which mostly consisted of middle-distillate (naphtha and diesel hydrocarbons. The diesel fraction (170–370 °C was fractionated, and its further upgrade was assessed in a hydroprocessing pilot plant at the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH in Greece. The final fuel was evaluated with respect to the diesel fuel quality specifications EN 590, which characterized it as a promising alternative diesel pool component with excellent ignition quality characteristics and low back end volatility.

  20. Autoignition characterization of primary reference fuels and n-heptane/n-butanol mixtures in a constant volume combustion device and homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, Marc E.; Sarathy, Mani; Má rchese, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    -octane, n-heptane, and n-butanol were tested in the FIT - 28 test runs with 25 ignition measurements for each test run, totaling 350 individual tests in all. These experimental results supported previous findings that fuel blends with high alcohol content

  1. ALTERNATIVE FUELS FOR DIESEL ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Caban

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and genesis of the use of alternative fuels in internal combustion ignition engines. Based on the analysis of the literature, this article shows various alternative fuels used in Poland and all over the world. Furthermore, this article describes the research directions for alternative fuels use in road transport powered by diesel engines.

  2. Physical studies of fast ignition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X T; Cai, Hong-bo; Wu, Si-zhong; Cao, Li-hua; Zhang, Hua; He, Ming-qing; Chen, Mo; Wu, Jun-feng; Zhou, Cang-tao; Zhou, Wei-Min; Shan, Lian-qiang; Wang, Wei-wu; Zhang, Feng; Bi, Bi; Zhao, Zong-qing; Gu, Yu-qiu; Zhang, Bao-han; Wang, Wei; Fang, Zhi-heng; Lei, An-le

    2015-01-01

    Fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion is one of the important goals today, in addition to central hot spot ignition in China. The SG-IIU and PW laser facilities are coupled to investigate the hot spot formation for fast ignition. The SG-III laser facility is almost completed and will be coupled with tens kJ PW lasers for the demonstration of fast ignition. In recent years, for physical studies of fast ignition, we have been focusing on the experimental study of implosion symmetry, M-band radiation preheating and mixing, advanced fast ignition target design, and so on. In addition, the modeling capabilities and code developments enhanced our ability to perform the hydro-simulation of the compression implosion, and the particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid-PIC simulation of the generation, transport and deposition of relativistic electron beams. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding the critical issues of fast ignition. (paper)

  3. US Department of Energy - Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies and US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Inter-Agency Agreement Research on "The Analysis of Genotoxic Activities of Exhaust Emissions from Mobile Natural Gas, Diesel, and Spark-Ignition Engines"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Wallace

    2006-09-30

    The US Department of Energy-Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (now the DOE-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies) signed an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), No.01-15 DOE, 9/4/01, for 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile natural gas, diesel, and spark-ignition engines'; subsequently modified on 3/27/02 (DOE IAG No.01-15-02M1); subsequently modified 9/02/03 (IAA Mod No. 01-15-03M1), as 'The analysis of genotoxic activities of exhaust emissions from mobile internal combustion engines: identification of engine design and operational parameters controlling exhaust genotoxicity'. The DOE Award/Contract number was DE-AI26-01CH11089. The IAA ended 9/30/06. This is the final summary technical report of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health research performed with the US Department of Energy-Office of FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies under that IAA: (A) NIOSH participation was requested by the DOE to provide in vitro genotoxicity assays of the organic solvent extracts of exhaust emissions from a suite of in-use diesel or spark-ignition vehicles; (B) research also was directed to develop and apply genotoxicity assays to the particulate phase of diesel exhaust, exploiting the NIOSH finding of genotoxicity expression by diesel exhaust particulate matter dispersed into the primary components of the surfactant coating the surface of the deep lung; (C) from the surfactant-dispersed DPM genotoxicity findings, the need for direct collection of DPM aerosols into surfactant for bioassay was recognized, and design and developmental testing of such samplers was initiated.

  4. Experimental investigations of the hydrogen addition effects on diesel engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirica, I.; Pana, C.; Negurescu, N.; Cernat, A.; Nutu, C.

    2016-08-01

    In the global content regarding the impact on the environmental of the gases emissions resulted from the fossil fuels combustion, an interest aspect discussed on the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties from the 2015 Paris Climate Conference and the gradual diminution of the worldwide oil reserves contribute to the necessity of searching of alternative energy from durable and renewable resources. At the use of hydrogen as addition in air to diesel engine, the level of CO, HC and smoke from the exhaust gases will decrease due to the improvement of the combustion process. At low and medium partial loads and low hydrogen energetic ratios used the NOX emission level can decrease comparative to classic diesel engine. The hydrogen use as fuel for diesel engine leads to the improving of the energetic and emissions performance of the engine due to combustion improvement and reduction of carbon content. The paper presents, in a comparative way, results of the experimental researches carried on a truck compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel fuel and with hydrogen diesel fuel and hydrogen as addition in air at different engine operation regimes. The results obtained during experimental investigations show better energetic and pollution performance of the engine fuelled with hydrogen as addition in air comparative to classic engine. The influences of hydrogen addition on engine operation are shown.

  5. Analysis of the Impact of Early Exhaust Valve Opening and Cylinder Deactivation on Aftertreatment Thermal Management and Efficiency for Compression Ignition Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Leighton Edward

    2014-01-01

    In order to meet strict emissions regulations, engine manufacturers have implemented aftertreatment technologies which reduce the tailpipe emissions from diesel engines. The effectiveness of most of these systems is limited when exhaust temperatures are low (usually below 200°C to 250°C). This is a problem for extended low load operation, such as idling and during cold start. Use of variable valve actuation, including early exhaust valve opening (EEVO) and cylinder deactivation (CDA), has bee...

  6. Chemiluminescence analysis of the effect of butanol-diesel fuel blends on the spray-combustion process in an experimental common rail diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merola Simona Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion process was studied from the injection until the late combustion phase in an high swirl optically accessible combustion bowl connected to a single cylinder 2-stroke high pressure common rail compression ignition engine. Commercial diesel and blends of diesel and n-butanol (20%: BU20 and 40%: BU40 were used for the experiments. A pilot plus main injection strategy was investigated fixing the injection pressure and fuel mass injected per stroke. Two main injection timings and different pilot-main dwell times were explored achieving for any strategy a mixing controlled combustion. Advancing the main injection start, an increase in net engine working cycle (>40% together with a strong smoke number decrease (>80% and NOx concentration increase (@50% were measured for all pilot injection timings. Compared to diesel fuel, butanol induced a decrease in soot emission and an increase in net engine working area when butanol ratio increased in the blend. A noticeable increase in NOx was detected at the exhaust for BU40 with a slight effect of the dwell-time. Spectroscopic investigations confirmed the delayed auto-ignition (~60 ms of the pilot injection for BU40 compared to diesel. The spectral features for the different fuels were comparable at the start of combustion process, but they evolved in different ways. Broadband signal caused by soot emission, was lower for BU40 than diesel. Different balance of the bands at 309 and 282 nm, due to different OH transitions, were detected between the two fuels. The ratio of these intensities was used to follow flame temperature evolution.

  7. State of the art of NOx mitigation technologies and their effect on the performance and emission characteristics of biodiesel-fueled Compression Ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palash, S.M.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Masum, B.M.; Sanjid, A.; Abedin, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Different NO x reduction technologies are discussed along with their implementation. • EGR rate up to 25% is feasible considering engine performance and other emissions. • ITR technology reduces NO x fairly but increases other emissions, it also reduces performance. • LTC reduces NO x and PM emissions simultaneously but increases HC and CO emissions. • Water injection and emulsion reduce NO x (up to 38%) and PM but increases HC and CO emissions. - Abstract: Biodiesel fuels have the potential to become a reliable substitute for diesel which is used moderately to meet the current energy demands. This fuel can be produced from new or used vegetable oils, non-edible sources and animal fats, which are non-toxic, biodegradable and renewable. In spite of the many advantages of using biodiesel, most of the researchers have reported that they produce higher NO x emissions compared to diesel, which is a deterrent to the market expansion of these fuels. In this study, the different paths to reduce NO x emissions from diesel engines by applying several technologies, such as using additives into fuel, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), water injection (WI), emulsion technology (ET), injection timing retardation (ITR), simultaneous technology (ST) and low temperature combustion (LTC) mode are reviewed briefly. The impacts of different NO x mitigation technologies on biodiesel-fueled diesel engine performance and emissions are also analyzed critically and different methods of their implementation are shown. This paper also provides a comparison of different NO x mitigation technologies based on previous articles related to this topic. From this comparative study, it was found that the average reduction of NO x emissions by using additives, EGR, WI and ET, ITR, ST and LTC are in the ranges 4–45%, 26–84%, 10–38%, 9.77–37%, 22–95% and 66–93% respectively, compared to biodiesel combustion without applying technologies. However, the average reduction

  8. Chemical kinetic insights into the ignition dynamics of n-hexane

    KAUST Repository

    Tingas, Alexandros

    2017-10-13

    Normal alkanes constitute a significant fraction of transportation fuels, and are the primary drivers of ignition processes in gasoline and diesel fuels. Low temperature ignition of n-alkanes is driven by a complex sequence of oxidation reactions, for which detailed mechanisms are still being developed. The current study explores the dynamics of low-temperature ignition of n-hexane/air mixtures, and identifies chemical pathways that characterize the combustion process. Two chemical kinetic mechanisms were selected as a comparative study in order to better understand the role of specific reaction sequences in ignition dynamics: one mechanism including a new third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (recently proposed by Wang et al. 2017), while the other without (Zhang et al. 2015). The analysis is conducted by applying tools generated from the computational singular perturbation (CSP) approach to two distinct ignition phenomena: constant volume and compression ignition. In both cases, the role of the third sequential O2 addition reactions proves to be significant, although it is found to be much more pronounced in the constant volume cases compared to the HCCI. In particular, in the constant volume ignition case, reactions present in the third sequential O2 addition reaction pathways (e.g., KDHP  →  products + OH) contribute significantly to the explosivity of the mixture; when accounted for along with reactions P(OOH)2 + O2  →  OOP(OOH)2 and OOP(OOH)2  →  KDHP + OH, they decrease ignition delay time of the mixture by up to 40%. Under HCCI conditions, in the first-stage ignition, the third-O2 addition reactions contribute to the process, although their role decays with time and becomes negligible at the end of the first stage. The second ignition stage is dominated almost exclusively by hydrogen-related chemistry.

  9. Tests of an experimental slash ignition unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    James L. Murphy; Harry E. Schimke

    1965-01-01

    A prototype ignition package containing an incendiary powder and designed for slash and brush burning jobs showed some promise, but the unit tested was not superior to such conventional devices as fusees, diesel backpack type flamethrowers, Very pistols, and drip torches.

  10. Numerical investigation on the effect of reactivity gradient in an RCCI engine fueled with gasoline and diesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yang, W.M.; An, H.; Zhou, D.Z.; Yu, W.B.; Wang, J.X.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A chemical reaction mechanism is newly developed for dual fuel combustion. • The developed chemical kinetics is coupled with KIVA4 to model the combustion. • The role of reactivity gradient in RCCI combustion is investigated. • The RCCI (dual fuel mode) combustion is compared with blend fuel mode. - Abstract: The reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI), which belongs to dual fuel mode (DFM) combustion has been considered as a promising way to achieve high fuel conversion efficiency and low emissions. By this strategy, a fuel reactivity gradient is formed in the combustion chamber which offers the probability of controlling combustion phasing. In this study, the role of fuel reactivity gradient was examined numerically by comparing a DFM (i.e., RCCI) combustion with other hypothetical cases under one specific load condition. Firstly, a chemical reaction mechanism was developed aiming at a modelling study on dual fuel and blend fuel combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines fueled by gasoline/diesel and gasoline/biodiesel. Ignition delays were validated for 100% diesel, 100% gasoline and 100% biodiesel under 102 conditions in total. Subsequently, the validated reaction mechanism which consists of 107 species and 425 reactions was implemented in coupled KIVA4-CHEMKIN code. Three dimensional validations were further conducted under 3 conditions including pure diesel combustion, and gasoline/diesel DFM combustion with both single and double injection strategies in the engine. To investigate the fuel reactivity gradient, the gasoline/diesel DFM combustion with single injection was compared with other three hypothetical cases, one of which was DFM without fuel reactivity gradient, two were the blend fuel mode but with different start of injection (SOI) timings. The results showed that the fuel reactivity gradient could retard the ignition timing, reduce heat release rate, and ease peak pressure rise rate. In addition, low levels of NO

  11. Effects of pilot injection pressure on the combustion and emissions characteristics in a diesel engine using biodiesel–CNG dual fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyunghyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Injection pressure of pilot fuel in dual fuel combustion (DFC) affects the engine power and exhaust emissions. • In the biodiesel–CNG DFC mode, the combustion begins and ends earlier as the pilot-fuel injection pressure increases. • The ignition delay in the DFC mode is about 1.2–2.6 °CA longer than that in the diesel single fuel combustion (SFC) mode. • The smoke and NOx emissions are significantly reduced in the DFC mode. - Abstract: Biodiesel–compressed natural gas (CNG) dual fuel combustion (DFC) system is studied for the simultaneous reduction of particulate matters (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from diesel engine. In this study, biodiesel is used as a pilot injection fuel to ignite the main fuel, CNG of DFC system. In particular, the pilot injection pressure is controlled to investigate the characteristics of engine performance and exhaust emissions in a single cylinder diesel engine. The results show that the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) of biodiesel–CNG DFC mode is lower than that of diesel single fuel combustion (SFC) mode at higher injection pressure. However, the combustion stability of biodiesel–CNG DFC mode is increased with the increase of pilot injection pressure. At the same injection pressure, the start of combustion of biodiesel–CNG DFC is delayed compared to diesel SFC due to the increase of ignition delay of pilot fuel. On the contrary, it is observed that as the pilot injection pressure increase, the combustion process begins and ends a little earlier for biodiesel–CNG DFC. The ignition delay in the DFC is about 1.2–2.6 °CA longer compared to diesel SFC, but decreases with increases of pilot injection pressure. Smoke and NOx emissions are decreased and increased, respectively, as the pilot injection pressure increases in the biodiesel–CNG DFC. In comparison to diesel SFC, smoke emissions are significantly reduced over all the operating conditions and NOx emissions also exhibited similar

  12. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  13. Technologies for simulation improvement of NOx and PM emissions and fuel consumption of future diesel engines for heavy-duty trucks; Shorai no ogatasha diesel engine ni okeru NOx, PM, nenryo shohi no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoda, M.; Shimokawa, K.; Uchida, N.; Tsuji, Y.; Yokotaa, H.; Hosoya, M. [Hino Motors, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    Future diesel engines for heavy-duty trucks are required to have significantly low NO{sub x} and PM emissions and fuel consumption characteristics. In order to improve these characteristics, various technologies including high pressure fuel injection systems, combustion optimization. high boost pressure turbocharging, EGR homogeneous charge compression ignition combined with multiple injections, and aftertreatment are discussed. As each technology has a number of challenges to overcome, it will take long before engines with these technologies are commercially available. In this paper, the research activities accomplished to date are reported. (author)

  14. Analysis of cyclic variations during mode switching between spark ignition and controlled auto-ignition combustion operations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, T; Zhao, H; Xie, H; He, B

    2014-01-01

    © IMechE 2014. Controlled auto-ignition, also known as homogeneous charge compression ignition, has been the subject of extensive research because of their ability to provide simultaneous reductions in fuel consumption and NOx emissions from a gasoline engine. However, due to its limited operation range, switching between controlled auto-ignition and spark ignition combustion is needed to cover the complete operating range of a gasoline engine for passenger car applications. Previous research...

  15. Emission characteristics of multiple stage diesel combustion. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation; Nidan nensho diesel kikan no haishutsubutsu tokusei. EGR no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashizume, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Akagawa, H.; Tsujimura, K. [New A.C.E. Institute Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    For an aim to reduce NOx emission from diesel engines, it has become possible to realize it with smoke emission maintained at low levels by taking the following steps: initial combustion is carried out as lean pre-mixed combustion by adopting early fuel injection; the fuel is injected again after completion of this combustion; and EGR is combined with two-stage combustion which performs diffusion combustion under high temperature atmosphere. When a large quantity of EGR is used, cylinder temperature drops to have ignition timing delayed in the first stage, serving for improving fuel consumption. The problem of increase in smoke generation is solved by optimizing the injection timing at the second stage to suppress smoke generation increase, resulting in realization of lower NOx emission. By completing the second-stage fuel injection before ignition of the first-stage injection, it was possible to realize further lower NOx emission. Smoke increase due to higher EGR ratio was suppressed by pre-mixing both fuels injected in the first and second stages, although this is a high load operation. In addition, oxygen concentration and cylinder temperature were reduced, the gas pre-mixture was homogenized, and combustion velocity was suppressed by delaying the angle of ignition timing. This made low smoke combustion at {lambda} = 1 possible even in compressed ignition combustion. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Numerical investigation of exhaust gas emissions for a dual fuel engine configuration using diesel and pongamia oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Ibrahim, N H; Udayakumar, M

    2016-12-01

    The investigation presented in this paper focuses on determination of gaseous exhaust emissions by computational simulation during combustion in compression ignition engine with pongamia oil substitution. Combustion is modeled using Equilibrium Constants Method (ECM) with MATLAB program to calculate the mole fraction of 10 combustion products when pongamia oil is burnt along with diesel at variable equivalence ratio and blend ratio. It had been observed that pongamia oil substitution causes decrease in the CO emission and increase in the NO x emission as the blend ratio as well as equivalence ratio increases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Two-dimensional analysis of two-phase reacting flow in a firing direct-injection diesel engine