WorldWideScience

Sample records for compound semiconductor electronics

  1. Secondary electron emission from metals and semi-conductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Susumu; Kanaya, Koichi

    1979-01-01

    Attempt was made to present the sufficient solution of the secondary electron yield of metals and semiconductor compounds except insulators, applying the free electron scattering theory to the absorption of secondary electrons generated within a solid target. The paper is divided into the sections describing absorption coefficient and escape depth, quantitative characteristics of secondary yield, angular distribution of secondary electron emission, effect of incident angle to secondary yield, secondary electron yield transmitted, and lateral distribution of secondary electron emission, besides introduction and conclusion. The conclusions are as follows. Based on the exponential power law for screened atomic potential, secondary electron emission due to both primary and backscattered electrons penetrating into metallic elements and semi-conductive compounds is expressed in terms of the ionization loss in the first collision for escaping secondary electrons. The maximum yield and the corresponding primary energy can both consistently be derived as the functions of three parameters: atomic number, first ionization energy and backscattering coefficient. The yield-energy curve as a function of the incident energy and the backscattering coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental results. The energy dependence of the yield in thin films and the lateral distribution of secondary yield are derived as the functions of the backscattering coefficient and the primary energy. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. K.; Park, S. H.; Lee, W. G.; Ha, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    In 1945, Van Heerden measured α, β and γ radiations with the cooled AgCl crystal. It was the first radiation measurement using the compound semiconductor detector. Since then the compound semiconductor has been extensively studied as radiation detector. Generally the radiation detector can be divided into the gas detector, the scintillator and the semiconductor detector. The semiconductor detector has good points comparing to other radiation detectors. Since the density of the semiconductor detector is higher than that of the gas detector, the semiconductor detector can be made with the compact size to measure the high energy radiation. In the scintillator, the radiation is measured with the two-step process. That is, the radiation is converted into the photons, which are changed into electrons by a photo-detector, inside the scintillator. However in the semiconductor radiation detector, the radiation is measured only with the one-step process. The electron-hole pairs are generated from the radiation interaction inside the semiconductor detector, and these electrons and charged ions are directly collected to get the signal. The energy resolution of the semiconductor detector is generally better than that of the scintillator. At present, the commonly used semiconductors as the radiation detector are Si and Ge. However, these semiconductor detectors have weak points. That is, one needs thick material to measure the high energy radiation because of the relatively low atomic number of the composite material. In Ge case, the dark current of the detector is large at room temperature because of the small band-gap energy. Recently the compound semiconductor detectors have been extensively studied to overcome these problems. In this paper, we will briefly summarize the recent research topics about the compound semiconductor detector. We will introduce the research activities of our group, too

  3. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  4. Novel engineered compound semiconductor heterostructures for advanced electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Gregory E.; Holonyak, Nick, Jr.; Coleman, James J.

    1992-06-01

    To provide the technology base that will enable SDIO capitalization on the performance advantages offered through novel engineered multiple-lavered compound semiconductor structures, this project has focussed on three specific areas: (1) carbon doping of AlGaAs/GaAs and InP/InGaAs materials for reliable high frequency heterojunction bipolar transistors; (2) impurity induced layer disordering and the environmental degradation of AlxGal-xAs-GaAs quantum-well heterostructures and the native oxide stabilization of AlxGal-xAs-GaAs quantum well heterostructure lasers; and (3) non-planar and strained-layer quantum well heterostructure lasers and laser arrays. The accomplishments in this three year research are reported in fifty-six publications and the abstracts included in this report.

  5. Ion implantation in compound semiconductors for high-performance electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced electronic devices based on compound semiconductors often make use of selective area ion implantation doping or isolation. The implantation processing becomes more complex as the device dimensions are reduced and more complex material systems are employed. The authors review several applications of ion implantation to high performance junction field effect transistors (JFETs) and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) that are based on compound semiconductors, including: GaAs, AlGaAs, InGaP, and AlGaSb

  6. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  7. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  8. A new standardless quantitative electron probe microanalysis technique applied to III-V compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangalis, K.P.; Christou, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present paper introduces a new standardless quantitative scheme for off-line electron microprobe analysis applications. The analysis is based on standard equations of the type Isub(i)=Csub(i)fsub(ZAF)βsub(i) and is specifically suitable for compound semiconductors. The roots to the resultant nth-degree polynomial are the unknown concentrations. Methods for computing Csub(i) when coefficients βsub(i) are unknown are also outlined. Applications of standardless analysis to GaAs and InP specimens are compared with results obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy and quantitative electron probe analysis with standards. (Auth.)

  9. Contributions of electron microscopy to the understanding of reactions on compound semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sands, T.

    1986-01-01

    Reacted films on compound semiconductor substrates present challenging materials characterization problems which often require the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. In this paper, both the problem - solving potential of the TEM techniques and the limits imposed by preparation of thin film/compound semiconductor TEM specimens are discussed. Studies of the Ni/GaAs, CuCl/aq)/CdS and Pd/GaAs reactions exemplify the role of TEM in identifying and determining the spatial distribution of interface - stabilized polymorphs and new ternary phases (e.g. tetragonal Cu/sub 2/S, Ni/sub 3/GaAs and Pd/sub x/GaAs). These examples also serve to clarify the relationship between TEM and complementary analysis techniques such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy and glancing-angle x-ray diffraction. In particular, it is argued that a combination of (1) high-spatial-resolution information obtained by TEM and (2) an indication of the ''average'' behavior provided by data from a complementary characterization technique provide the minimum quality and quantity of data necessary to understand most reactions on compound semiconductor substrates

  10. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  11. Semiconductor Physical Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor Physical Electronics, Second Edition, provides comprehensive coverage of fundamental semiconductor physics that is essential to an understanding of the physical and operational principles of a wide variety of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. This text presents a unified and balanced treatment of the physics, characterization, and applications of semiconductor materials and devices for physicists and material scientists who need further exposure to semiconductor and photonic devices, and for device engineers who need additional background on the underlying physical principles. This updated and revised second edition reflects advances in semicondutor technologies over the past decade, including many new semiconductor devices that have emerged and entered into the marketplace. It is suitable for graduate students in electrical engineering, materials science, physics, and chemical engineering, and as a general reference for processing and device engineers working in the semicondi...

  12. Semiconductor opto-electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, TS; Ellis, B

    1972-01-01

    Semiconductor Opto-Electronics focuses on opto-electronics, covering the basic physical phenomena and device behavior that arise from the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and electrons in a solid. The first nine chapters of this book are devoted to theoretical topics, discussing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with solids, dispersion theory and absorption processes, magneto-optical effects, and non-linear phenomena. Theories of photo-effects and photo-detectors are treated in detail, including the theories of radiation generation and the behavior of semiconductor lasers a

  13. Direct observation of dopant distribution in GaAs compound semiconductors using phase-shifting electron holography and Lorentz microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hirokazu; Otomo, Shinya; Minato, Ryuichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirayama, Tsukasa

    2014-06-01

    Phase-shifting electron holography and Lorentz microscopy were used to map dopant distributions in GaAs compound semiconductors with step-like dopant concentration. Transmission electron microscope specimens were prepared using a triple beam focused ion beam (FIB) system, which combines a Ga ion beam, a scanning electron microscope, and an Ar ion beam to remove the FIB damaged layers. The p-n junctions were clearly observed in both under-focused and over-focused Lorentz microscopy images. A phase image was obtained by using a phase-shifting reconstruction method to simultaneously achieve high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. Differences in dopant concentrations between 1 × 10(19) cm(-3) and 1 × 10(18) cm(-3) regions were clearly observed by using phase-shifting electron holography. We also interpreted phase profiles quantitatively by considering inactive layers induced by ion implantation during the FIB process. The thickness of an inactive layer at different dopant concentration area can be measured from the phase image. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  15. Electronic properties of semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einevoll, G.T.

    1991-02-01

    Ten papers on the electronic properties of semiconductors and semiconductor heterostructures constitute the backbone of this thesis. Four papers address the form and validity of the single-band effective mass approximation for semiconductor heterostructures. In four other papers properties of acceptor states in bulk semiconductors and semiconductor heterostructures are studied using the novel effective bond-orbital model. The last two papers deal with localized excitions. 122 refs

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of InP-based compound semiconductor materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.N.G.

    1990-01-01

    InP/InGaAsP-based heteroepitaxial structures constitute the major optoelectronic devices for state-of-the-art long wavelength optical fiber communication system.s Future advanced device structures will require thin heteroepitaxial quantum wells and superlattices a few tens of angstrom or less in thickness, and lateral dimensions ranging from a few tens angstrom for quantum dots and wires to a few μm in width for buried heterostructure lasers. Due to the increasing complexity of the device structure required by band-gap engineering, the performance of these devices becomes susceptible to any lattice imperfections present in the structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), therefore, becomes the most important technique in characterizing the structural integrity of these materials. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) not only provides the necessary geometric information on the device structure; a careful study of the materials science behind the observed lattice imperfections provides directions for optimization of both the epitaxial growth parameters and device processing conditions. Furthermore, for device reliability studies, TEM is the only technique that unambiguously identifies the cause of device degradation. In this paper, the authors discuss areas of application of various TEM techniques, describe the TEM sample preparation technique, and review case studies to demonstrate the power of the TEM technique

  17. Development of semiconductor electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, John.

    1977-01-01

    In 1931, Wilson applied Block's theory about the energy bands for the motion of electrons in a crystal lattice to semiconductors and showed that conduction can take place in two different ways, by electrons and by holes. Not long afterwards Frenkel showed that these carriers can flow by diffusion in a concentration gradient as well as under the influence of an electric field and wrote down equations for the current flow. The third major contribution, in the late 1930's was the explanation of rectification at a metalsemiconductor contact by Mott and more completely by Schottky. In late 1947 the first transistor of the point contact type was invented by Brattin, Shockley and Bardeen. Then after single crystals of Ge were grown, the junction transistor was developed by the same group. The first silicon transistors appeared in 1954. Then an important step was discovery of the planar transistor by Hoenri in 1960 which led to development of integrated circuits by 1962. Many transistors are produced by batch processing on a slice of silicon. Then in 1965 Mos (Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) transistor and in 1968 LSI (Large Scale Intergration circuits) were developed. Aside from electronic circuits, there are many other applications of semiconductors, including junction power rectifiers, junction luminescence (including lasers), solar batteries, radiation detectors, microwave oscillators and charged-coupled devices for computer memories and devices. One of the latest developments is a microprocessor with thousands of transistors and associated circuitry on a single small chip of silicon. It can be programmed to provide a variety of circuit functions, thus it is not necessary to go through the great expense of LSI's for each desired function, but to use standard microprocessors and program to do the job

  18. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, F

    1983-02-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.

  19. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  20. Self-consistent method for quantifying indium content from X-ray spectra of thick compound semiconductor specimens in a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, T; Wang, X

    2016-05-01

    Based on Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray generation by fast electrons we calculate curves of effective sensitivity factors for analytical transmission electron microscopy based energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy including absorption and fluorescence effects, as a function of Ga K/L ratio for different indium and gallium containing compound semiconductors. For the case of InGaN alloy thin films we show that experimental spectra can thus be quantified without the need to measure specimen thickness or density, yielding self-consistent values for quantification with Ga K and Ga L lines. The effect of uncertainties in the detector efficiency are also shown to be reduced. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Integrating magnetism into semiconductor electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharchenya, Boris P; Korenev, Vladimir L [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-30

    The view of a ferromagnetic-semiconducting hybrid structure as a single tunable system is presented. Based on an analysis of existing experiments it is shown that, contrary to a 'common sense', a nonmagnetic semiconductor is capable of playing an important role in controlling ferromagnetism. Magnetic properties of a hybrid (the hysteresis loop and the spatial orientation of magnetization) can be tuned both optically and electrically by utilizing semiconductor-making the hybrid an electronic-write-in and electronic-read-out elementary storage unit. (methodological notes)

  2. Integrating magnetism into semiconductor electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharchenya, Boris P; Korenev, Vladimir L

    2005-01-01

    The view of a ferromagnetic-semiconducting hybrid structure as a single tunable system is presented. Based on an analysis of existing experiments it is shown that, contrary to a 'common sense', a nonmagnetic semiconductor is capable of playing an important role in controlling ferromagnetism. Magnetic properties of a hybrid (the hysteresis loop and the spatial orientation of magnetization) can be tuned both optically and electrically by utilizing semiconductor-making the hybrid an electronic-write-in and electronic-read-out elementary storage unit. (methodological notes)

  3. Reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors, which have evolved rapidly during the last 15 years. Johnston's perspective in the book focuses on high-reliability applications in space, but his discussion of reliability is applicable to high reliability terrestrial applications as well. The book is important because there are new reliability mechanisms present in compound semiconductors that have produced a great deal of confusion. They are complex, and appear to be major stumbling blocks in the application of these types of devices. Many of the reliability problems that were prominent research topics five to ten years ago have been solved, and the reliability of many of these devices has been improved to the level where they can be used for ten years or more with low failure rates. There is also considerable confusion about the way that space radiation affects compound semiconductors. Some optoelectronic devices are so sensitive to damage in space that they are very difficu...

  4. Selective photochemical dry etching of compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, C.I.H.

    1988-01-01

    When laser-driven etching of a semiconductor requires direct participation of photogenerated carriers, the etching quantum yield will be sensitive to the electronic properties of a specific semiconductor material. The band-gap energy of the semiconductor determines the minimum photon energy needed for carrier-driven etching since sub-gap photons do not generate free carriers. However, only those free carriers that reach the reacting surface contribute to etching and the ultimate carrier flux to the surface is controlled by more subtle electronic properties than the lowest-energy band gap. For example, the initial depth of carrier generation and the probability of carrier recombination between the point of generation and the surface profoundly influence the etching quantum yield. Appropriate manipulation of process parameters can provide additional reaction control based on such secondary electronic properties. Applications to selective dry etching of GaAs and related materials are discussed

  5. Surface passivation process of compound semiconductor material using UV photosulfidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Carol I. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method for passivating compound semiconductor surfaces by photolytically disrupting molecular sulfur vapor with ultraviolet radiation to form reactive sulfur which then reacts with and passivates the surface of compound semiconductors.

  6. Electron beam writing on semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierhenke, H.; Kutzer, E.; Pascher, A.; Plitzner, H.; Rummel, P.; Siemens A.G., Muenchen; Siemens A.G., Muenchen

    1979-08-01

    Reported are the results of the 3 1/2 year research project 'Electron beam Writing on Semiconductors'. Work has been done in the field of direct wafer exposure techniques, and of mask making. Described are resist technology, setting up of a research device, exploration of alignment procedures, manufacturing of devices and their radiation influence. Furthermore, investigations and measurements of an electron beam machine bought for mask making purposes, the development of LSI-circuits with this machine, the software necessary and important developments of digital subsystems are reported. (orig.) [de

  7. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  8. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresse, J.F.; Dupuy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy in semiconductors opens up a large field of use. The operating modes lending themselves to the study of semiconductors are the induced current, cathodoluminescence and the use of the potential contrast which can also be applied very effectively to the study of the devices (planar in particular). However, a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of the penetration of electrons, generation and recombination of generated carriers in a semiconductor is necessary in order to attain a better understanding of the operating modes peculiar to semiconductors [fr

  10. Additional compound semiconductor nanowires for photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, F.

    2016-02-01

    GaAs related compound semiconductor heterostructures are one of the most developed materials for photonics. Those have realized various photonic devices with high efficiency, e. g., lasers, electro-optical modulators, and solar cells. To extend the functions of the materials system, diluted nitride and bismide has been paid attention over the past decade. They can largely decrease the band gap of the alloys, providing the greater tunability of band gap and strain status, eventually suppressing the non-radiative Auger recombinations. On the other hand, selective oxidation for AlGaAs is a vital technique for vertical surface emitting lasers. That enables precisely controlled oxides in the system, enabling the optical and electrical confinement, heat transfer, and mechanical robustness. We introduce the above functions into GaAs nanowires. GaAs/GaAsN core-shell nanowires showed clear redshift of the emitting wavelength toward infrared regime. Further, the introduction of N elongated the carrier lifetime at room temperature indicating the passivation of non-radiative surface recombinations. GaAs/GaAsBi nanowire shows the redshift with metamorphic surface morphology. Selective and whole oxidations of GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires produce semiconductor/oxide composite GaAs/AlGaOx and oxide GaOx/AlGaOx core-shell nanowires, respectively. Possibly sourced from nano-particle species, the oxide shell shows white luminescence. Those property should extend the functions of the nanowires for their application to photonics.

  11. Correlation between electronic structure and energy band in Eu-doped CuInTe2 semiconductor compound with chalcopyrite structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tai Wang; Yong-Quan Guo; Shuai Li

    2017-01-01

    The Eu-doped Cu(In,Eu)Te2 semiconductors with chalcopyrite structures are promising materials for their applications in the absorption layer for thin-film solar cells due to their wider band-gaps and better optical properties than those of CulnTe2.In this paper,the Eu-doped CulnTe2 (Culn1-xEuxTe2,x =0,0.1,0.2,0.3) are studied systemically based on the empirical electron theory (EET).The studies cover crystal structures,bonding regularities,cohesive energies,energy levels,and valence electron structures.The theoretical values fit the experimental results very well.The physical mechanism of a broadened band-gap induced by Eu doping into CuInTe2 is the transitions between different hybridization energy levels induced by electron hopping between s and d orbitals and the transformations from the lattice electrons to valence electrons for Cu and In ions.The research results reveal that the photovoltaic effect induces the increase of lattice electrons of In and causes the electric resistivity to decrease.The Eu doping into CuInTe2 mainly influences the transition between different hybridization energy levels for Cu atoms,which shows that the 3d electron numbers of Cu atoms change before and after Eu doping.In single phase CuIn1-xEuxTe2,the number of valence electrons changes regularly with increasing Eu content,and the calculated band gap Eg also increases,which implies that the optical properties of Eu-doped CuIn1-xEuxTe2 are improved.

  12. Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Tunneling of electrons through semiconductor superlattices. C L ROY. Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India. Abstract. The purpose of the present paper is to report a study of tunneling of electrons through semicon- ductor superlattices (SSL); specially, we have ...

  13. Electron Spins in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, R.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding and controlling the behavior of the spin degree of freedom of single electrons, confined in semiconductor quantum dots. This research work is motivated by the prospects of using the electron spin as a quantum bit (qubit), the basic

  14. Comparison of the Koster-Slater and the equation-of-motion method for calculation of the electronic structure of defects in compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tit, N.; Halley, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Traditional methods of calculating the electronic structure of defects in semiconductors rely on matrix-diagonalization methods which use the unperturbed crystalline wave functions as a basis. Equation-of-motion (EOM) methods, on the other hand, give excellent results with strong disorder and many defects and make no use of the basis of unperturbed wave functions, but require self-averaging properties of the wave functions which appear superficially to make them unsuitable for study of local properties. We show here that EOM methods are better than traditional methods for calculating the electronic structure of essentially any finite-range impurity potential. The reason is basically that the numerical cost of the traditional Green's-function methods grows approximately as R 7 o/Iper sitet/P, where R is the range of the potential, whereas the cost of the EOM methods per site is independent of the range of the potential. Our detailed calculations on a model of an oxygen vacancy in rutile TiO 2 show that a crossover occurs very soon, so that equation-of-motion methods are better than the traditional ones in the case of potentials of realistic range

  15. Temperature dependent electronic conduction in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.G.; Munn, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This review describes the temperature dependence of bulk-controlled electronic currents in semiconductors. The scope of the article is wide in that it contrasts conduction mechanisms in inorganic and organic solids and also single crystal and disordered semiconductors. In many experimental situations it is the metal-semiconductor contact or the interface between two dissimilar semiconductors that governs the temperature dependence of the conductivity. However, in order to keep the length of the review within reasonable bounds, these topics have been largely avoided and emphasis is therefore placed on bulk-limited currents. A central feature of electronic conduction in semiconductors is the concentrations of mobile electrons and holes that contribute to the conductivity. Various statistical approaches may be used to calculate these densities which are normally strongly temperature dependent. Section 1 emphasizes the relationship between the position of the Fermi level, the distribution of quantum states, the total number of electrons available and the absolute temperature of the system. The inclusion of experimental data for several materials is designed to assist the experimentalist in his interpretation of activation energy curves. Sections 2 and 3 refer to electronic conduction in disordered solids and molecular crystals, respectively. In these cases alternative approaches to the conventional band theory approach must be considered. For example, the velocities of the charge carriers are usually substantially lower than those in conventional inorganic single crystal semiconductors, thus introducing the possibility of an activated mobility. Some general electronic properties of these materials are given in the introduction to each of these sections and these help to set the conduction mechanisms in context. (orig.)

  16. Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Pearton, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Reliability Handbook for Semiconductor Optical and Electron Devices provides comprehensive coverage of reliability procedures and approaches for electron and photonic devices. These include lasers and high speed electronics used in cell phones, satellites, data transmission systems and displays. Lifetime predictions for compound semiconductor devices are notoriously inaccurate due to the absence of standard protocols. Manufacturers have relied on extrapolation back to room temperature of accelerated testing at elevated temperature. This technique fails for scaled, high current density devices. Device failure is driven by electric field or current mechanisms or low activation energy processes that are masked by other mechanisms at high temperature. The Handbook addresses reliability engineering for III-V devices, including materials and electrical characterization, reliability testing, and electronic characterization. These are used to develop new simulation technologies for device operation and ...

  17. Electrons and Phonons in Semiconductor Multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, B. K.

    1996-11-01

    This book provides a detailed description of the quantum confinement of electrons and phonons in semiconductor wells, superlattices and quantum wires, and shows how this affects their mutual interactions. It discusses the transition from microscopic to continuum models, emphasizing the use of quasi-continuum theory to describe the confinement of optical phonons and electrons. The hybridization of optical phonons and their interactions with electrons are treated, as are other electron scattering mechanisms. The book concludes with an account of the electron distribution function in three-, two- and one-dimensional systems, in the presence of electrical or optical excitation. This text will be of great use to graduate students and researchers investigating low-dimensional semiconductor structures, as well as to those developing new devices based on these systems.

  18. Microscopical Studies of Structural and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of point defects in semiconductors, e.g. radiation defects, impurities or passivating defects can excellently be studied by the hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC). The serious limitation of this method, the small number of chemically different radioactive PAC probe atoms can be widely overcome by means of ISOLDE. Providing shortliving isotopes, which represent common dopants as well as suitable PAC probe atoms, the ISOLDE facility enables a much broader application of PAC to problems in semiconductor physics.\\\\ Using the probe atom $^{111m}$ Cd , the whole class of III-V compounds becomes accessible for PAC investigations. First successful experiments in GaAs, InP and GaP have been performed, concerning impurity complex formation and plasma induced defects. In Si and Ge, the electronic properties~-~especially their influence on acceptor-donor interaction~-~could be exemplarily st...

  19. N-doping of organic semiconductors by bis-metallosandwich compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Stephen; Qi, Yabing; Kahn, Antoine; Marder, Seth; Kim, Sang Bok; Mohapatra, Swagat K.; Guo, Song

    2016-01-05

    The various inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to the field of methods for n-doping organic semiconductors with certain bis-metallosandwich compounds, the doped compositions produced, and the uses of the doped compositions in organic electronic devices. Metals can be manganese, rhenium, iron, ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, or iridium. Stable and efficient doping can be achieved.

  20. Modulation doping and delta doping of III-V compound semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, P.; Zwaal, E.A.E.; Haverkort, J.E.M.; Wolter, J.H.; Razeghi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The transport properties of the 2D electron gas produced by modulation doping of compound semiconductors are reviewed with attention given to the properties at high electric fields. Experimental studies are discussed in which the transport properties lead to insights into current instabilities and

  1. Structural trends in off stoichiometric chalcopyrite type compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Energy supply is one of the most controversial topics that are currently discussed in our global community. Most of the energy delivered to the customer today has its origin in fossil and nuclear power plants. Indefinable risks and the radioactive waste repository problem of the latter as well as the global scarcity of fossil resources cause the renewable energies to grow more and more important for achieving sustainability. The main renewable energy sources are wind power, hydroelectric power and solar energy. On the photovoltaic (PV) market different materials are competing as part of different kinds of technologies, with the largest contribution still coming from wafer based crystalline silicon solar cells (95 %). Until now thin film solar cells only contribute a small portion to the whole PV market, but large capacities are under construction. Thin film photovoltaic shows a number of advantages in comparison to wafer based crystalline silicon PV. Among these material usage and production cost reduction are two prominent examples. The type of PV materials, which are analyzed in this work, are high potential compounds that are widely used as absorber layer in thin film solar cells. These are compound semiconductors of the type CuB III C VI 2 (B III = In, Ga and C VI = Se, S). Several years of research have already gone into understanding the efficiency limiting factors for solar cell devices fabricated from this compound. Most of the studies concerning electronic defects are done by spectroscopic methods mostly performed using thin films from different kinds of synthesis, without any real knowledge regarding the structural origin of these defects. This work shows a systematic fundamental structural study of intrinsic point defects that are present within the material at various compositions in CuB III C VI 2 compound semiconductors. The study is done on reference powder samples with well determined chemical composition and using advanced diffraction techniques

  2. MCNPX calculations for electron irradiated semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlackova, K.; Necas, V.; Sagatova, A.; Zatko, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to treat some practical problems of (not only) semiconductor material irradiation by high energy electron beam using MCNPX simulation code. The relation between the absorbed dose and the fluency was found and the energy distribution of electron flux density was simulated on the top and back side of 270 μm thick GaAs, SiC and Si detectors. Furthermore, the dose depth profiles were calculated for GaAs, SiC and Si materials irradiated by 4 and 5 MeV electron beams. For the GaAs detector, a very good agreement with the experiment was shown. To match the absolute values of the absorbed dose with experimentally obtained values, the electron source emissivity has to be determined in relation to the electron beam setting parameters. (authors)

  3. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Integrating magnetism into semiconductor electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenya, Boris P.; Korenev, Vladimir L.

    2005-06-01

    The view of a ferromagnetic-semiconducting hybrid structure as a single tunable system is presented. Based on an analysis of existing experiments it is shown that, contrary to a 'common sense', a nonmagnetic semiconductor is capable of playing an important role in controlling ferromagnetism. Magnetic properties of a hybrid (the hysteresis loop and the spatial orientation of magnetization) can be tuned both optically and electrically by utilizing semiconductor—making the hybrid an electronic-write-in and electronic-read-out elementary storage unit.

  4. Structures and electronics of buried and unburied semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    The structure of interfaces plays an important role in determining the electronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures. Here, such examples are shown and discussed using semiconductor nanostructures prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and colloidal synthesis.

  5. Electronic properties and phase transitions in low-dimensional semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M

    2008-01-01

    We present the first review of the current state of the literature on electronic properties and phase transitions in TlX and TlMX 2 (M = Ga, In; X = Se, S, Te) compounds. These chalcogenides belong to a family of the low-dimensional semiconductors possessing chain or layered structure. They are of significant interest because of their highly anisotropic properties, semi- and photoconductivity, nonlinear effects in their I-V characteristics (including a region of negative differential resistance), switching and memory effects, second harmonic optical generation, relaxor behavior and potential applications for optoelectronic devices. We review the crystal structure of TlX and TlMX 2 compounds, their transport properties under ambient conditions, experimental and theoretical studies of the electronic structure, transport properties and semiconductor-metal phase transitions under high pressure, and sequences of temperature-induced structural phase transitions with intermediate incommensurate states. The electronic nature of the ferroelectric phase transitions in the above-mentioned compounds, as well as relaxor behavior, nanodomains and possible occurrence of quantum dots in doped and irradiated crystals is discussed. (topical review)

  6. Handbook of compound semiconductors growth, processing, characterization, and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Holloway, Paul H

    1996-01-01

    This book reviews the recent advances and current technologies used to produce microelectronic and optoelectronic devices from compound semiconductors. It provides a complete overview of the technologies necessary to grow bulk single-crystal substrates, grow hetero-or homoepitaxial films, and process advanced devices such as HBT's, QW diode lasers, etc.

  7. Transparent Oxide Semiconductors for Emerging Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso

    2013-11-01

    Transparent oxide electronics have emerged as promising materials to shape the future of electronics. While several n-type oxides have been already studied and demonstrated feasibility to be used as active materials in thin film transistors, high performance p-type oxides have remained elusive. This dissertation is devoted to the study of transparent p-type oxide semiconductor tin monoxide and its use in the fabrication of field effect devices. A complete study on the deposition of tin monoxide thin films by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering is performed. Carrier density, carrier mobility and conductivity are studied over a set of deposition conditions where p-type conduction is observed. Density functional theory simulations are performed in order to elucidate the effect of native defects on carrier mobility. The findings on the electrical properties of SnO thin films are then translated to the fabrication of thin films transistors. The low processing temperature of tin monoxide thin films below 200 oC is shown advantageous for the fabrication of fully transparent and flexible thin film transistors. After careful device engineering, including post deposition annealing temperature, gate dielectric material, semiconductor thickness and source and drain electrodes material, thin film transistors with record device performance are demonstrated, achieving a field effect mobility >6.7 cm2V-1s-1. Device performance is further improved to reach a field effect mobility of 10.8 cm2V-1s-1 in SnO nanowire field effect transistors fabricated from the sputtered SnO thin films and patterned by electron beam lithography. Downscaling device dimension to nano scale is shown beneficial for SnO field effect devices not only by achieving a higher hole mobility but enhancing the overall device performance including better threshold voltage, subthreshold swing and lower number of interfacial defects. Use of p-type semiconductors in nonvolatile memory applications is then

  8. Transistor electronics use of semiconductor components in switching operations

    CERN Document Server

    Rumpf, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Transistor Electronics: Use of Semiconductor Components in Switching Operations presents the semiconductor components as well as their elementary circuits. This book discusses the scope of application of electronic devices to increase productivity. Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general equation for the representation of integer positive numbers. This text then examines the properties and characteristics of basic electronic components, which relates to an understanding of the operation of semiconductors. Other chapters consider the electronic circuit ar

  9. Bond charges and electronic charge transfer in ternary semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, U.

    1986-01-01

    By means of a simple molecule-theoretic model of 'linear superposition of two-electron molecules' the bond charges between nearest neighbours and the effective charges of ions are calculated for ternary zinc-blende structure alloys as well as chalcopyrite semiconductors. Taking into account both, the charge transfer among the ions caused by the differences of electronegativities of atoms used and between the bonds created by the internal stress of the lattice a nearly unvaried averaged bond charge amount of the alloy is found, but rather dramatically changed local bond charge parameters in comparison with the respective values of binary compounds used. This fact should influence the noncentral force interaction in such semiconductors. (author)

  10. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications

  11. TDPAC study of complex structure semiconductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitu, J.; Renteria, M.; Massolo, C.P.; Bibiloni, A.G.; Desimoni, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for analyzing Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation spectra is presented and applied to study the hyperfine interaction of 100 Rh in the high temperature modification of niobium pentoxide. The measured quadrupole interactions are assigned to about 80% of the radioactive probes replacing niobium atoms in the lattice and about 20% located in perturbed sites. The origin of this perturbation, producing a high frequency component in the measured spectra is discussed and temptatively assigned to remaining radiation damage in the compound. The hyperfine interaction of 111 Cd probes, introduced through thermal diffusion into niobium pentoxide, is also presented. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine parameters in this case is studied in the temperature range RT-800 degrees C. The spectral analyzing method employed allows a direct comparison of experimental data with point charge model calculations and a simultaneous evaluation of the anti-shielding factor β. The obtained values (27 for 100 Rh and 15 for 111 Cd) are discussed in terms of the compound and probe's characteristics

  12. TDPAC study of complex structure semiconductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitu, J.; Renteria, M.; Massolo, C.P.; Bibiloni, A.G.; Desimonni, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for analyzing Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation spectra is presented and applied to study the hyperfine interaction of 100 Rh in the high temperature modification of niobium pentoxide. The measured quadrupole interactions are assigned to about 80% of the radioactive probes replacing niobium atoms in the lattice and about 20% located in perturbed sites. The origin of this perturbation, producing a high frequency component in the measured spectra is discussed and temptatively assigned to remaining radiation damage in the compound. The hyperfine interaction of 111 Cd probes, introduced through thermal diffusion into niobium pentoxide, is also presented. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine parameters in this case is studied in the temperature range RT-800 degrees C. The spectral analyzing method employed allows a direct comparison of experimental data with point charge model calculations and a simultaneous evaluation of the antishielding factor β. The obtained values (27 for 100 Rh and 15 for 111 Cd) are discussed in terms of the compound and probe's characteristics

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Copper System Compound Semiconductor Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Motoyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper system compound semiconductor solar cells were produced by a spin-coating method, and their cell performance and structures were investigated. Copper indium disulfide- (CIS- based solar cells with titanium dioxide (TiO2 were produced on F-doped SnO2 (FTO. A device based on an FTO/CIS/TiO2 structure provided better cell performance compared to that based on FTO/TiO2/CIS structure. Cupric oxide- (CuO- and cuprous oxide- (Cu2O- based solar cells with fullerene (C60 were also fabricated on FTO and indium tin oxide (ITO. The microstructure and cell performance of the CuO/C60 heterojunction and the Cu2O:C60 bulk heterojunction structure were investigated. The photovoltaic devices based on FTO/CuO/C60 and ITO/Cu2O:C60 structures provided short-circuit current density of 0.015 mAcm−2 and 0.11 mAcm−2, and open-circuit voltage of 0.045 V and 0.17 V under an Air Mass 1.5 illumination, respectively. The microstructures of the active layers were examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Electron and nuclear spin system polarization in semiconductors by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharchenya, B; Flejsher, V

    1981-02-01

    Discussed are the principles of optical electron spin orientation, dynamic polarization and cooling of nuclear spin systems in optical electron orientation, and behavioural characteristics of bound electron and nuclear spin systems of a semiconductor in the optical orientation situation.

  15. Method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2012-12-25

    A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent to the process chamber. The process chamber contains a sample comprising a Ga-based compound semiconductor. The sample is in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. The method includes flowing SiCl.sub.4 gas into the chamber, flowing Ar gas into the chamber, and flowing H.sub.2 gas into the chamber. RF power is supplied independently to the source electrode and the platen. A plasma is generated based on the gases in the process chamber, and regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched to create a substantially smooth etched surface including features having substantially vertical walls beneath the masked portions.

  16. Structural trends in off stoichiometric chalcopyrite type compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Christiane

    2011-03-15

    Energy supply is one of the most controversial topics that are currently discussed in our global community. Most of the energy delivered to the customer today has its origin in fossil and nuclear power plants. Indefinable risks and the radioactive waste repository problem of the latter as well as the global scarcity of fossil resources cause the renewable energies to grow more and more important for achieving sustainability. The main renewable energy sources are wind power, hydroelectric power and solar energy. On the photovoltaic (PV) market different materials are competing as part of different kinds of technologies, with the largest contribution still coming from wafer based crystalline silicon solar cells (95 %). Until now thin film solar cells only contribute a small portion to the whole PV market, but large capacities are under construction. Thin film photovoltaic shows a number of advantages in comparison to wafer based crystalline silicon PV. Among these material usage and production cost reduction are two prominent examples. The type of PV materials, which are analyzed in this work, are high potential compounds that are widely used as absorber layer in thin film solar cells. These are compound semiconductors of the type CuB{sup III}C{sup VI}{sub 2} (B{sup III} = In, Ga and C{sup VI} = Se, S). Several years of research have already gone into understanding the efficiency limiting factors for solar cell devices fabricated from this compound. Most of the studies concerning electronic defects are done by spectroscopic methods mostly performed using thin films from different kinds of synthesis, without any real knowledge regarding the structural origin of these defects. This work shows a systematic fundamental structural study of intrinsic point defects that are present within the material at various compositions in CuB{sup III}C{sup VI}{sub 2} compound semiconductors. The study is done on reference powder samples with well determined chemical composition and

  17. The effect of threading dislocations on optical absorption and electron scattering in strongly mismatched heteroepitaxial III-V compound semiconductors on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Peiner, E; Wehmann, H H

    2002-01-01

    The effect of threading dislocations on the optical and electrical properties of InP and GaAs heteroepitaxial layers on (001) silicon was investigated. Charged deep states act as scattering centres for electrons, thus affecting the electron mobility at low temperatures. The electric field arising from charged dislocations causes enhanced optical absorption at wavelengths near the fundamental absorption edge. The mean charge of the threading dislocations in GaAs/Si was found to be considerably higher than that for InP/Si. A model is described relating this effect to a regular arrangement of alpha-type 60 deg. dislocations at extended twin defects which were observed in InP/Si but were absent in GaAs/Si.

  18. Electronic structure of defects in semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussy, Bernard; Ganghoffer, Jean Francois

    2002-01-01

    Full text.heterojunctions and semiconductors and superlattices are well known and well used by people interested in optoelectronics communications. Components based on the use of heterojunctions are interesting for confinement of light and increase of quantum efficiency. An heterojunction is the contact zone between two different semiconductors, for example GaAs and Ga 1-x Al x As. Superlattices are a succession of heterojunctions (up to 10 or 20). These systems have been the subjects of many experiments ao analyse the contact between semiconductors. They also have been theoretically studied by different types of approach. The main result of those studies is the prediciton of band discontinuities. Defects in heterojunctions are real traps for charge carriers; they can affect the efficiency of the component decreasing the currents and the fluxes in it. the knowledge of their electronic structure is important, a great density of defects deeply modifies the electronic structure of the whole material creating real new bands of energy in the band structure of the component. in the first part of this work, we will describe the heterostructure and the defect in terms of quantum wells and discrete levels. This approach allows us to show the role of the width of the quantum well describing the structure but induces specific behaviours due to the one dimensional modelling. Then a perturbative treatment is proposed using the Green's functions formalism. We build atomic chains with different types of atoms featuring the heterostructure and the defect. Densities of states of a structure with a defect and levels associated to the defect are obtained. Results are comparable with the free electrons work, but the modelling do not induce problems due to a one dimensional approach. To extend our modelling, a three dimensions approach, based on a cavity model, is investigated. The influence of the defect, - of hydrogenoid type - introduced in the structure, is described by a cavity

  19. Electronic structure of point defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    This 'Habilitation a diriger des Recherches' memoir presents most of my scientific activities during the past 7 years, in the field of electronic structure calculations of defects in solids. Point defects (vacancies, interstitials, impurities) in functional materials are a key parameter to determine if these materials will actually fill the role they have been assigned or not. Indeed, the presence of defects cannot be avoided when the temperature is increased or when the material is subjected to external stresses, such as irradiation in the nuclear reactors and in artificial satellites with solar radiations. However, in many cases, defects are introduced in the materials on purpose to tune the electronic transport, optical or even magnetic properties. This procedure is called the doping of semiconductors, which is the foundation technique for transistors, diodes, or photovoltaic cells. However, doping is not always straightforward and unexpected features may occur, such as doping asymmetry or Fermi level pinning, which can only be explained by complex phenomena involving different types of defects or complexes of defects. In this context, the calculations of electronic structure ab initio is an ideal tool to complement the experimental observations, to gain the understanding of phenomena at the atomic level, and even to predict the properties of defects. The power of the ab initio calculations comes from their ability to describe any system of electrons and nuclei without any specific adjustment. But although there is a strong need for numerical simulations in this field, the ab initio calculations for defects are still under development as of today. The work presented in this memoir summarizes my contributions to methodological developments on this subject. These developments have followed two main tracks. The first topic is the better understanding of the unavoidable finite size effects. Indeed, defects in semiconductors or insulators are generally present in

  20. The electronic properties of semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.A.

    2000-10-01

    This work is an investigation into the electronic behaviour of semiconductor quantum dots, particularly self-assembled quantum dot arrays. Processor-efficient models are developed to describe the electronic structure of dots, deriving analytic formulae for the strain tensor, piezoelectric distribution and diffusion- induced evolution of the confinement potential, for dots of arbitrary initial shape and composition profile. These models are then applied to experimental data. Transitions due to individual quantum dots have a narrow linewidth as a result of their discrete density of states. By contrast, quantum dot arrays exhibit inhomogeneous broadening which is generally attributed to size variations between the individual dots in the ensemble. Interpreting the results of double resonance spectroscopy, it is seen that variation in the indium composition of the nominally InAs dots is also present. This result also explains the otherwise confusing relationship between the spread in the ground-state and excited-state transition energies. Careful analysis shows that, in addition to the variations in size and composition, some other as yet unidentified broadening mechanism must also be present. The influence of rapid thermal annealing on dot electronic structure is also considered, finding that the experimentally observed blue-shift and narrowing of the photoluminescence linewidth may both be explained in terms of normal In/Ga interdiffusion. InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots are commonly assumed to have a pyramidal geometry, so that we would expect the energy separation of the ground-state electron and hole levels in the dot to be largest at a positive applied field. This should also be the case for any dot of uniform composition whose shape tapers inwards from base to top, counter to the results of experimental Stark-shift spectroscopy which show a peak transition energy at a negative applied field. It is demonstrated that this inversion of the ground state

  1. Thermodynamics and phase equilibria of ternary systems relevant to contact materials for compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipser, H.; Richter, K.; Micke, K.

    1997-01-01

    In order to investigate the stability of ohmic contacts to compound semiconductors, it is necessary to know the phase equilibria in the corresponding multi-component systems. We are currently studying the phase equilibria and thermophysical properties of several ternary systems which are of interest in view of the use of nickel, palladium and platinum as contact materials for GaSb and InSb compound semiconductors: Ga-Ni-Sb, In-Ni-Sb, Ga-Pd-Sb and Ga-Pt-Sb. Phase equilibria are investigated by thermal analyses, X-ray powder diffraction methods as well as electron microprobe analysis. Thermodynamic properties are derived from vapour pressure measurements using an isopiestic method. It is planned to combine all information on phase equilibria and thermochemistry for the ternary and the limiting binary systems to perform an optimization of the ternary systems by computer calculations using standard software. (author)

  2. Contorted Organic Semiconductors for Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu

    Chapter 4, I discuss helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometers in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells. In Chapter 5, I compare analogous cyclic and acyclic pi-conjugated molecules as n-type electronic materials and find that the cyclic molecules have numerous benefits in organic photovoltaics. We designed two conjugated cycles for this study. Each comprises four subunits; one combines four electron-accepting, redox-active, diphenyl-perylenediimide subunits, and the other alternates two electron-donating bithiophene units with two diphenyl-perylenediimide units. We compare the macrocycles to acyclic versions of these molecules and find that, relative to the acyclic analogs, the conjugated macrocycles have bathochromically shifted UV-vis absorbances and are more easily reduced. In blended films, macrocycle-based devices show higher electron mobility and good morphology. All of these factors contribute to the more than doubling of the power conversion efficiency observed in organic photovoltaic devices with these macrocycles as the n-type, electron transporting material. This study highlights the importance of geometric design in creating new molecular semiconductors. In Chapter 6, I describe a new molecular design that enables high performance organic photodetectors. We use a rigid, conjugated macrocycle as the electron acceptor in devices to obtain high photocurrent and low dark current. We directly compare the

  3. Electronic structure of filled tetrahedral semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, D.M.; Zunger, Alex; Groot, R. de

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the susceptibility of zinc-blende semiconductors to band-structure modification by insertion of small atoms at their tetrahedral interstitial states. GaP is found to become a direct-gap semiconductor with two He atoms present at its interstitial sites; Si does not. Analysis of the factors

  4. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  5. Rethinking the theoretical description of photoluminescence in compound semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovskii, V.; Jandieri, K.; Gebhard, F.; Baranovskii, S. D.

    2018-02-01

    Semiconductor compounds, such as Ga(NAsP)/GaP or GaAsBi/GaAs, are in the focus of intensive research due to their unique features for optoelectronic devices. The optical spectra of compound semiconductors are strongly influenced by the random scattering potentials caused by compositional and structural disorder. The disorder potential is responsible for the red-shift (Stokes shift) of the photoluminescence (PL) peak and for the inhomogeneous broadening of the PL spectra. So far, the anomalous broadening of the PL spectra in Ga(NAsP)/GaP has been explained assuming two coexisting length scales of disorder. However, this interpretation appears in contradiction to the recently observed dependence of the PL linewidth on the excitation intensity. We suggest an alternative approach that describes the PL characteristics in the framework of a model with a single length scale of disorder. The price is the assumption of two types of localized states with different, temperature-dependent non-radiative recombination rates.

  6. Ion channeling study of defects in multicomponent semiconductor compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.; Nowicki, L.; Stonert, A.

    2002-01-01

    Compound semiconductor crystals are of great technological importance as basic materials for production of modern opto- and microelectronic devices. Ion implantation is one of the principal techniques for heterostructures processing. This paper reports the results of the study of defect formation and transformation in binary and ternary semiconductor compounds subjected to ion implantation with ions of different mass and energy. The principal analytical technique was He-ion channeling. The following materials were studied: GaN and InGaN epitaxial layers. First the semi empirical method of channeling spectra analysis for ion implanted multicomponent single crystal was developed. This method was later complemented by the more sophisticated method based on the Monte Carlo simulation of channeling spectra. Next, the damage buildup in different crystals and epitaxial layers as a function of the implantation dose was studied for N, Mg, Te, and Kr ions. The influence of the substrate temperature on the defect transformations was studied for GaN epitaxial layers implanted with Mg ions. Special attention was devoted to the study of growth conditions of InGaN/GaN/sapphire heterostructures, which are important component of the future blue laser diodes. In-atom segregation and tetragonal distortion of the epitaxial layer were observed and characterized. Next problem studied was the incorporation of hydrogen atoms in GaAs and GaN. Elastic recoil detection (ERDA) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) were applied for the purpose. (author)

  7. Dual passivation of intrinsic defects at the compound semiconductor/oxide interface using an oxidant and a reductant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Tyler; Chagarov, Evgeniy; Edmonds, Mary; Droopad, Ravi; Kummel, Andrew C

    2015-05-26

    Studies have shown that metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated utilizing compound semiconductors as the channel are limited in their electrical performance. This is attributed to imperfections at the semiconductor/oxide interface which cause electronic trap states, resulting in inefficient modulation of the Fermi level. The physical origin of these states is still debated mainly because of the difficulty in assigning a particular electronic state to a specific physical defect. To gain insight into the exact source of the electronic trap states, density functional theory was employed to model the intrinsic physical defects on the InGaAs (2 × 4) surface and to model the effective passivation of these defects by utilizing both an oxidant and a reductant to eliminate metallic bonds and dangling-bond-induced strain at the interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy were employed to experimentally determine the physical and electronic defects and to verify the effectiveness of dual passivation with an oxidant and a reductant. While subsurface chemisorption of oxidants on compound semiconductor substrates can be detrimental, it has been shown theoretically and experimentally that oxidants are critical to removing metallic defects at oxide/compound semiconductor interfaces present in nanoscale channels, oxides, and other nanostructures.

  8. Imaging the motion of electrons across semiconductor heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Michael K. L.; Margiolakis, Athanasios; Deckoff-Jones, Skylar; Harada, Takaaki; Wong, E. Laine; Krishna, M. Bala Murali; Madéo, Julien; Winchester, Andrew; Lei, Sidong; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Dani, Keshav M.

    2017-01-01

    Technological progress since the late twentieth century has centred on semiconductor devices, such as transistors, diodes and solar cells. At the heart of these devices is the internal motion of electrons through semiconductor materials due to applied electric fields or by the excitation of photocarriers. Imaging the motion of these electrons would provide unprecedented insight into this important phenomenon, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Current studies of electron dynamics in semiconductors are generally limited by the spatial resolution of optical probes, or by the temporal resolution of electronic probes. Here, by combining femtosecond pump-probe techniques with spectroscopic photoemission electron microscopy, we imaged the motion of photoexcited electrons from high-energy to low-energy states in a type-II 2D InSe/GaAs heterostructure. At the instant of photoexcitation, energy-resolved photoelectron images revealed a highly non-equilibrium distribution of photocarriers in space and energy. Thereafter, in response to the out-of-equilibrium photocarriers, we observed the spatial redistribution of charges, thus forming internal electric fields, bending the semiconductor bands, and finally impeding further charge transfer. By assembling images taken at different time-delays, we produced a movie lasting a few trillionths of a second of the electron-transfer process in the photoexcited type-II heterostructure—a fundamental phenomenon in semiconductor devices such as solar cells. Quantitative analysis and theoretical modelling of spatial variations in the movie provide insight into future solar cells, 2D materials and other semiconductor devices.

  9. Attractive electron correlation in wide band gap semiconductors by electron-photon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate attractive electron correlation in wide band gap semiconductors by electron-photon interaction. At low temperature, wavevectors of electromagnetic waves absorbed in wide band gap semiconductors cannot be neglected for wavevectors of electron waves; that is, electromagnetic waves affect the movements of electrons. In particular, attractive interaction occurs between two electrons when one electron changes from a valence band to a conduction band and the other electron changes from a conduction band to a valence band

  10. Electron and nuclear spin system polarization in semiconductors by light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharchenya, B.; Flejsher, V.

    1981-01-01

    Discussed are the principles of optical electron spin orientation, dynamic polarization and cooling of nuclear spin systems in optical electron orientation, and behavioural characteristics of bound electron and nuclear spin systems of a semiconductor in the optical orientation situation. (J.P.)

  11. Front-end electronics for multichannel semiconductor detector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Grybos, P

    2010-01-01

    Front-end electronics for multichannel semiconductor detektor systems Volume 08, EuCARD Editorial Series on Accelerator Science and Technology The monograph is devoted to many different aspects related to front-end electronics for semiconductor detector systems, namely: − designing and testing silicon position sensitive detectors for HEP experiments and X-ray imaging applications, − designing and testing of multichannel readout electronics for semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications, especially for noise minimization, fast signal processing, crosstalk reduction and good matching performance, − optimization of semiconductor detection systems in respect to the effects of radiation damage. The monograph is the result mainly of the author's experience in the above-mentioned areas and it is an attempt of a comprehensive presentation of issues related to the position sensitive detection system working in a single photon counting mode and intended to X-ray imaging applications. The structure...

  12. Electron spin and nuclear spin manipulation in semiconductor nanosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Yoshiro; Yusa, Go; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Manipulations of electron spin and nuclear spin have been studied in AlGaAs/GaAs semiconductor nanosystems. Non-local manipulation of electron spins has been realized by using the correlation effect between localized and mobile electron spins in a quantum dot- quantum wire coupled system. Interaction between electron and nuclear spins was exploited to achieve a coherent control of nuclear spins in a semiconductor point contact device. Using this device, we have demonstrated a fully coherent manipulation of any two states among the four spin levels of Ga and As nuclei. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as 'artificial atoms' by some, they are much larger (1 100 nm) than real atoms. One can study a variety of manyelectron effects in them, which are otherwise difficult to observe in a real atom. We have treated these effects within the ...

  14. Substrate effects on the formation of flat Ag films on (110) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, K.; Zhang, Z.; Ebert, P.; Shih, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Ag films grown at 135 K on (110) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors and annealed at room temperature are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Ag films on Ga-V semiconductors are well ordered, atomically flat, and exhibit a specific critical thickness, which is a function of the substrate material. Films grown on In-V semiconductors are still rather flat, but significantly more disordered. The (111) oriented Ag films on III-arsenides and III-phosphides exhibit a clear twofold superstructure. Films on III-antimonides exhibit threefold low-energy electron diffraction images. The morphology of the Ag films can be explained on the basis of the electronic growth mechanism. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Elucidation and control of electronic properties related to organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Ueno, Nobuo; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure of organic solids and interfaces plays a crucial role in the performance of optoelectronic devices using organic semiconductors such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells. The functionality of these organic devices is seriously dominated by the geometric structure, which varies depending on the molecular structure and the sample preparation condition. Due to the rapid progress in sample preparation methods and surface science techniques, we can now discuss in detail the correlation of the electronic structure with the geometric structure of organic solids, films, and interfaces. This paper reviews the recent progress of studies in the geometric and electronic structures related to organic semiconductors. (author)

  16. Formation of Electron Strings in Narrow Band Polar Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2000-01-01

    We show that linear electron strings may arise in polar semiconductors. A single string consists of M spinless fermions trapped by an extended polarization well of a cigar shape. Inside the string the particles are free although they interact with each other via Coulomb forces. The strings arise as a result of an electronic phase separation associated with an instability of small adiabatic polarons. We have found the length of the string which depends on dielectric constants of semiconductors. The appearance of these electron strings may have an impact on the effect of stripe formation observed in a variety of high- Tc experiments.

  17. Imaging the motion of electrons in 2D semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Keshav

    Technological progress since the late 20th century has centered on semiconductor devices, such as transistors, diodes, and solar cells. At the heart of these devices, is the internal motion of electrons through semiconductor materials due to applied electric fields or by the excitation of photocarriers. Imaging the motion of these electrons would provide unprecedented insight into this important phenomenon, but requires high spatial and temporal resolution. Current studies of electron dynamics in semiconductors are generally limited by the spatial resolution of optical probes, or by the temporal resolution of electronic probes. In this talk, we combine femtosecond pump-probe techniques with spectroscopic photoemission electron microscopy to image the motion of photoexcited electrons from high-energy to low-energy states in a 2D InSe/GaAs heterostructure exhibiting a type-II band alignment. At the instant of photoexcitation, energy-resolved photoelectron images reveal a highly non-equilibrium distribution of photocarriers in space and energy. Thereafter, in response to the out-of-equilibrium photocarriers, we observe the spatial redistribution of charges, thus forming internal electric fields, bending the semiconductor bands, and finally impeding further charge transfer. By assembling images taken at different time-delays, we make a movie lasting a few tens of picoseconds of the electron transfer process in the photoexcited type-II heterostructure - a fundamental phenomenon in semiconductor devices like solar cells. Quantitative analysis and theoretical modeling of spatial variations in the video provide insight into future solar cells, electron dynamics in 2D materials, and other semiconductor devices.

  18. Electron emission from individual indium arsenide semiconductor nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, E.C.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Roest, A.L.; Kaiser, M.A.; Oosterkamp, T.H.; Jonge, de N.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure was developed to mount individual semiconductor indium arsenide nanowires onto tungsten support tips to serve as electron field-emission sources. The electron emission properties of the single nanowires were precisely determined by measuring the emission pattern, current-voltage curve,

  19. Structural defects in cubic semiconductors characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Kozak, Roksolana; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D., E-mail: marta.rossell@empa.ch

    2017-05-15

    The development of new electro-optical devices and the realization of novel types of transistors require a profound understanding of the structural characteristics of new semiconductor heterostructures. This article provides a concise review about structural defects which occur in semiconductor heterostructures on the basis of micro-patterned Si substrates. In particular, one- and two-dimensional crystal defects are being discussed which are due to the plastic relaxation of epitaxial strain caused by the misfit of crystal lattices. Besides a few selected examples from literature, we treat in particular crystal defects occurring in GaAs/Si, Ge/Si and β-SiC/Si structures which are studied by high-resolution annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The relevance of this article is twofold; firstly, it should provide a collection of data which are of help for the identification and characterization of defects in cubic semiconductors by means of atomic-resolution imaging, and secondly, the experimental data shall provide a basis for advancing the understanding of device characteristics with the aid of theoretical modelling by considering the defective nature of strained semiconductor heterostructures. - Highlights: • The heterogeneous integration of high-quality compound semiconductors remains a challenge. • Lattice defects cause severe degradation of the semiconductor device performances. • Aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM allows atomic-scale characterization of defects. • An overview of lattice defects found in cubic semiconductors is presented. • Theoretical modelling and calculations are needed to determine the defect properties.

  20. Reactivity of group IV (100) semiconductor surfaces towards organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T.

    The reactions of simple and multifunctional organic compounds with the clean silicon, germanium, and diamond (100)-2 x 1 semiconductor surfaces have been investigated using a combination of multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry density functional theory calculations. From these studies, an improved understanding of the atomic level reactivity of these semiconductor surfaces has been obtained, along with insights into how to achieve their selective coupling with organics of desired and varied functionality. In addition to the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces, our results show that cycloaddition chemistry can also be extended to the diamond (100) surface. At room temperature, 1,3-butadiene was found to form a Diels-Alder product with the diamond (100) surface, as evidenced by isotopic substitution experiments and comparison of the surface adduct with its direct molecular analogue, cyclohexene. The reactions of other classes of molecules in addition to alkenes on the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces, including a series of five-membered cyclic amines, were also examined. For tertiary aliphatic amines on Si(100) and both secondary and tertiary aliphatic amines on Ge(100), a majority of the molecules were observed to become stably trapped in dative-bonded precursor states rather than form energetically favorable dissociation products. For pyrrole, aromaticity was found to play a defining role in its reactivity, and a comparison of its molecular and surface reactivity reveals interesting similarities. To probe the factors controlling the selectivity of organic reactions on clean semiconductor surfaces, the adsorption of acetone and a series of unsaturated ketones was also investigated. The reaction of acetone on Ge(100) was found to be under thermodynamic control at room temperature, resulting in the formation of an "ene" product rather than the kinetically favored [2+2] C=O cycloaddition product previously observed on the Si(100) surface. In

  1. Donors in Semiconductors - are they Understood in Electronic Era?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmochowski, Janusz E

    2007-01-01

    The physics of semiconductors and contemporary electronics cannot be understood without impurities. The hydrogen-like shallow donor (and acceptor) state of electron (hole) bound by Coulomb electrostatic force of excess charge of impurity is used to control conductivity of semiconductors and construct semiconductor diodes, transistors and numerous types of semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices, including lasers. Recently, surprisingly, the physics of impurity donors appeared to be much reacher. Experimental evidence has been provided for universal existence of other types of electronic states of the same donor impurity: i) mysterious, deep, DX-type state resulting in metastability - slow hysteresis phenomena - understood as two-electron, acceptor-like state of donor impurity, formed upon large lattice distortion or rearrangement around impurity and accompanying capture of second electron, resulting in negative electron correlation energy U; ii) deep, localized, fully symmetric, A1, one-electron donor state of substitutional impurity. The latter state can be formed from the 'ordinary' shallow hydrogen-like state in the process of strong localization of electron by short range, local potential of impurity core, preserving full (A 1 ) symmetry of the substitutional impurity in the host lattice. The 'anticrossing' of the two A 1 (shallow hydrogenic and deep localized) energy levels upon transformation is observed. All types of electronic states of impurity can be universally observed for the same donor impurity and mutual transformation between different states occur upon changing experimental conditions. The knowledge about existence and properties of these n ew , molecular type, donor states in semiconductors seems still await general recognition and positive application in contemporary material and device science and engineering

  2. Thiazole-based organic semiconductors for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Fan, Haijun; Li, Yongfang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2012-06-19

    Over the past two decades, organic semiconductors have been the subject of intensive academic and commercial interests. Thiazole is a common electron-accepting heterocycle due to electron-withdrawing nitrogen of imine (C=N), several moieties based on thiazole have been widely introduced into organic semiconductors, and yielded high performance in organic electronic devices. This article reviews recent developments in the area of thiazole-based organic semiconductors, particularly thiazole, bithiazole, thiazolothiazole and benzobisthiazole-based small molecules and polymers, for applications in organic field-effect transistors, solar cells and light-emitting diodes. The remaining problems and challenges, and the key research direction in near future are discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2008-04-02

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M{sub 3}P{sub 2} (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be{sub 3}P{sub 2}, Mg{sub 3}P{sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}P{sub 2}, respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail.

  4. Density functional study of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2008-01-01

    The full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method, as implemented in the suite of software WIEN2k, has been used to systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of the group II phosphide semiconductor compounds M 3 P 2 (M = Be, Mg and Ca). The exchange-correlation functional was approximated as a generalized gradient functional introduced by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (GGA96) and Engel-Vosko (EV-GGA). Internal parameters were optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The structural parameters, bulk modules, cohesive energy, band structures and density of states have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. These compounds are predicted to be semiconductors with the direct band gap of about 1.60, 2.55 and 2.62 eV for Be 3 P 2 , Mg 3 P 2 and Ca 3 P 2 , respectively. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band gap, valence bandwidths and anti-symmetric gap (the energy gap between two parts of the valence bands) are investigated using both GGA96 and EV-GGA. The contribution of s, p and d orbitals of different atoms to the density of states is discussed in detail

  5. Problems of linear electron (polaron) transport theory in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, M I

    1979-01-01

    Problems of Linear Electron (Polaron) Transport Theory in Semiconductors summarizes and discusses the development of areas in electron transport theory in semiconductors, with emphasis on the fundamental aspects of the theory and the essential physical nature of the transport processes. The book is organized into three parts. Part I focuses on some general topics in the theory of transport phenomena: the general dynamical theory of linear transport in dissipative systems (Kubo formulae) and the phenomenological theory. Part II deals with the theory of polaron transport in a crystalline semicon

  6. Transparent Oxide Semiconductors for Emerging Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, Jesus Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Transparent oxide electronics have emerged as promising materials to shape the future of electronics. While several n-type oxides have been already studied and demonstrated feasibility to be used as active materials in thin film transistors, high

  7. Room Temperature Hard Radiation Detectors Based on Solid State Compound Semiconductors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2018-05-01

    Si and Ge single crystals are the most common semiconductor radiation detectors. However, they need to work at cryogenic temperatures to decrease their noise levels. In contrast, compound semiconductors can be operated at room temperature due to their ability to grow compound materials with tunable densities, band gaps and atomic numbers. Highly efficient room temperature hard radiation detectors can be utilized in biomedical diagnostics, nuclear safety and homeland security applications. In this review, we discuss room temperature compound semiconductors. Since the field of radiation detection is broad and a discussion of all compound materials for radiation sensing is impossible, we discuss the most important materials for the detection of hard radiation with a focus on binary heavy metal semiconductors and ternary and quaternary chalcogenide compounds.

  8. Room Temperature Hard Radiation Detectors Based on Solid State Compound Semiconductors: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Ali; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Kim, Sang Sub; Kim, Hyoun Woo

    2018-03-01

    Si and Ge single crystals are the most common semiconductor radiation detectors. However, they need to work at cryogenic temperatures to decrease their noise levels. In contrast, compound semiconductors can be operated at room temperature due to their ability to grow compound materials with tunable densities, band gaps and atomic numbers. Highly efficient room temperature hard radiation detectors can be utilized in biomedical diagnostics, nuclear safety and homeland security applications. In this review, we discuss room temperature compound semiconductors. Since the field of radiation detection is broad and a discussion of all compound materials for radiation sensing is impossible, we discuss the most important materials for the detection of hard radiation with a focus on binary heavy metal semiconductors and ternary and quaternary chalcogenide compounds.

  9. Activity coefficients of electrons and holes in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orazem, M.E.; Newman, J.

    1984-01-01

    Dilute-solution transport equations with constant activity coefficients are commonly used to model semiconductors. These equations are consistent with a Boltzmann distribution and are invalid in regions where the species concentration is close to the respective site concentration. A more rigorous treatment of transport in a semiconductor requires activity coefficients which are functions of concentration. Expressions are presented for activity coefficients of electrons and holes in semiconductors for which conduction- and valence-band energy levels are given by the respective bandedge energy levels. These activity coefficients are functions of concentration and are thermodynamically consistent. The use of activity coefficients in macroscopic transport relationships allows a description of electron transport in a manner consistent with the Fermi-Dirac distribution

  10. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A.; Vacchi, A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process. 5 refs., 11 figs

  11. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  12. Molecular fingerprints in the electronic properties of crystalline organic semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciuchi, S.; Hatch, R.C.; Höchst, H.

    2012-01-01

    bands can be achieved in organic semiconductors provided that one properly accounts for the coupling to molecular vibrational modes and the presence of disorder. Our findings rationalize the growing experimental evidence that even the best band structure theories based on a many-body treatment...... of electronic interactions cannot reproduce the experimental photoemission data in this important class of materials....

  13. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  14. Nonlinear charge transport in bipolar semiconductors due to electron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina-Valdovinos, S.; Gurevich, Yu.G.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that when strong electric field is applied to a semiconductor sample, the current voltage characteristic deviates from the linear response. In this letter, we propose a new point of view of nonlinearity in semiconductors which is associated with the electron temperature dependence on the recombination rate. The heating of the charge carriers breaks the balance between generation and recombination, giving rise to nonequilibrium charge carriers concentration and nonlinearity. - Highlights: • A new mechanism of nonlinearity of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is proposed. • The hot electron temperature violates the equilibrium between electrons and holes. • This violation gives rise to nonequilibrium concentration of electrons and holes. • This leads to nonlinear CVC (along with the heating nonlinearity).

  15. Nonlinear charge transport in bipolar semiconductors due to electron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Valdovinos, S., E-mail: sergiom@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Física, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo, La Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac, México (Mexico); Gurevich, Yu.G. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Física, Av. IPN 2508, México D.F., CP 07360, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-27

    It is known that when strong electric field is applied to a semiconductor sample, the current voltage characteristic deviates from the linear response. In this letter, we propose a new point of view of nonlinearity in semiconductors which is associated with the electron temperature dependence on the recombination rate. The heating of the charge carriers breaks the balance between generation and recombination, giving rise to nonequilibrium charge carriers concentration and nonlinearity. - Highlights: • A new mechanism of nonlinearity of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is proposed. • The hot electron temperature violates the equilibrium between electrons and holes. • This violation gives rise to nonequilibrium concentration of electrons and holes. • This leads to nonlinear CVC (along with the heating nonlinearity).

  16. Mixing of III-V compound semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Ping.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, the methods as well as mechanisms of III-V compound superlattice mixing are discussed, with particular attention on the AlGaAs based superlattice system. Comparative studies of ion-induced mixing showed two distinct effects resulting from ion implantation followed by a thermal anneal; i.e. collisional mixing and impurity induced mixing. It was found that Ga and As ion induced mixing are mainly due to the collisional effect, where the extent of the mixing can be estimated theoretically, with the parameters of ion mass, incident energy and the implant dose. The impurity effect was dominant for Si, Ge, Be, Zn and Te. Quantitative studies of impurity induced mixing have been conducted on samples doped with Si or Te during the growth process. It was discovered that Si induced AlGaAs superlattice mixing yielded an activation energy of approximately 4 eV for the Al diffusion coefficient with a high power law dependence of the prefactor on the Si concentration. In the Te doped AlGaAs superlattice the Al diffusion coefficient exhibited an activation energy of ∼3.0 eV, with a prefactor approximately proportional to the Te concentration. These results are of importance in examining the current diffusion models. Zn and Si induced InP/InGaAs superlattice mixing are examined. It was found that Zn predominantly induces cation interdiffusion, while Si induces comparable cation and anion interdiffusion. In addition, widely dispersed Zn rich islands form with Zn residing in the InP layers in the form of Zn 3 P 2 . With unstrained starting material, the layer bandgap disparity increases due to mixing induced strain, while in the Si diffused sample the mixed region would be expected to exhibit bandgaps intermediate between those of the original layers. Semiconductor superlattice mixing shows technological potential for optoelectronic device fabrication

  17. Electron dynamics in intentionally disordered semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, E.; Sanchez, A.; Dominguez-Adame, F.; Berman, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    We study the dynamical behavior of disordered quantum well-based semiconductor superlattices where the disorder is intentional and short-range correlated. We show that, whereas the transmission time of a particle grows exponentially with the number of wells in an usual disordered superlattice for any value of the incident particle energy, for specific values of the incident energy this time increases linearly when correlated disorder is included. As expected, those values of the energy coincide with a narrow subband of extended states predicted by the static calculations of Domacute inguez-Adame et al.[Phys. Rev. B 51, 14359 (1994)]; such states are seen in our dynamical results to exhibit a ballistic regime, very close to the WKB approximation of a perfect superlattice. Fourier transform of the output signal for an incident Gaussian wave packet reveals a dramatic filtering of the original signal, which makes us confident that devices based on this property may be designed and used for nanotechnological applications. This is more so in view of the possibility of controlling the output band using a dc-electric field, which we also discuss. In the conclusion we summarize our results and present an outlook for future developments arising from this work. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. n-Type organic semiconductors in organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, John E; Facchetti, Antonio; Heeney, Martin; Marder, Seth R; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2010-09-08

    Organic semiconductors have been the subject of intensive academic and commercial interest over the past two decades, and successful commercial devices incorporating them are slowly beginning to enter the market. Much of the focus has been on the development of hole transporting, or p-type, semiconductors that have seen a dramatic rise in performance over the last decade. Much less attention has been devoted to electron transporting, or so called n-type, materials, and in this paper we focus upon recent developments in several classes of n-type materials and the design guidelines used to develop them.

  19. Quantum theory of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Hartmut

    1990-01-01

    The current technological revolution in the development of computing devices has created a demand for a textbook on the quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. This book successfully fulfills this need. Based on lectures given by the authors, it is a comprehensive introduction for researchers or graduate-level students to the subject. Certain sections can also serve as a graduate-level textbook for use in solid state physics courses or for more specialized courses. The final chapters establish a direct link to current research in sem

  20. Progress in Group III nitride semiconductor electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yue; Zhang Jinfeng; Shen Bo; Liu Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    Recently there has been a rapid domestic development in group III nitride semiconductor electronic materials and devices. This paper reviews the important progress in GaN-based wide bandgap microelectronic materials and devices in the Key Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China, which focuses on the research of the fundamental physical mechanisms of group III nitride semiconductor electronic materials and devices with the aim to enhance the crystal quality and electric performance of GaN-based electronic materials, develop new GaN heterostructures, and eventually achieve high performance GaN microwave power devices. Some remarkable progresses achieved in the program will be introduced, including those in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and metal—oxide—semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs) with novel high-k gate insulators, and material growth, defect analysis and material properties of InAlN/GaN heterostructures and HEMT fabrication, and quantum transport and spintronic properties of GaN-based heterostructures, and high-electric-field electron transport properties of GaN material and GaN Gunn devices used in terahertz sources. (invited papers)

  1. Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds in a hybrid system composed of a molecular catalyst and visible light-absorbing semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Li, Fei; Li, Xiaona; Li, Hua; Wang, Yong; Sun, Licheng

    2015-01-14

    Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds proceeded efficiently in a hybrid system with ruthenium aqua complexes as catalysts, BiVO4 as a light absorber, [Co(NH3)5Cl](2+) as a sacrificial electron acceptor and water as an oxygen source. The photogenerated holes in the semiconductor are used to oxidize molecular catalysts into the high-valent Ru(IV)=O intermediates for 2e(-) oxidation.

  2. Cathodoluminescence of semiconductors in the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriegas, Javier Piqueras de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cathodoluminescence (CL) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a nondestructive technique, useful for characterization of optical and electronic properties of semiconductors, with spatial resolution. The contrast in the images of CL is related to the presence of crystalline defects, precipitates or impurities and provides information on their spatial distribution. CL spectra allows to study local energy position of localized electronic states. The application of the CL is extended to semiconductor very different characteristics, such as bulk material, heterostructures, nanocrystalline film, porous semiconductor, nanocrystals, nanowires and other nano-and microstructures. In the case of wafers, provides information on the homogeneity of their electronic characteristics, density of dislocations, grain sub frontiers, distribution of impurities and so on. while on the study of heterostructures CL images can determine, for example, the presence of misfit dislocations at the interface between different sheets, below the outer surface of the sample. In the study of other low dimensional structures, such as nanocrystalline films, nanoparticles and nano-and microstructures are observed elongated in some cases quantum confinement effects from the CL spectra. Moreover, larger structures, the order of hundreds of nanometers, with forms of wires, tubes or strips, is that in many semiconductor materials, mainly oxides, the behavior of luminescence is different from bulk material. The microstructures have a different structure of defects and a greater influence of the surface, which in some cases leads to a higher emission efficiency and a different spectral distribution. The presentation describes the principle of the CL technique and examples of its application in the characterization of a wide range of both semiconductor materials of different composition, and of different sizes ranging from nanostructures to bulk samples

  3. Thin film transistors for flexible electronics: Contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Quevedo-López, Manuel Angel Quevedo

    2011-06-01

    The development of low temperature, thin film transistor processes that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, radiation detectors, etc. In this paper, we review the impact of gate dielectrics, contacts and semiconductor materials on thin film transistors for flexible electronics applications. We present our recent results to fully integrate hybrid complementary metal oxide semiconductors comprising inorganic and organic-based materials. In particular, we demonstrate novel gate dielectric stacks and semiconducting materials. The impact of source and drain contacts on device performance is also discussed. Copyright © 2011 American Scientific Publishers.

  4. Thin film transistors for flexible electronics: Contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Quevedo-Ló pez, Manuel Angel Quevedo; Wondmagegn, Wudyalew T.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Ramí rez-Bon, Rafael; Gnade, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    The development of low temperature, thin film transistor processes that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, radiation detectors, etc. In this paper, we review the impact of gate dielectrics, contacts and semiconductor materials on thin film transistors for flexible electronics applications. We present our recent results to fully integrate hybrid complementary metal oxide semiconductors comprising inorganic and organic-based materials. In particular, we demonstrate novel gate dielectric stacks and semiconducting materials. The impact of source and drain contacts on device performance is also discussed. Copyright © 2011 American Scientific Publishers.

  5. Electron microscopy of nanostructured semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    For various material systems of low dimensions, including multilayers, islands, and quantum dots, the potential applicability of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is demonstrated. Conventional TEM is applied to elucidate size, shape, and arrangement of nanostructures, whereas high-resolution imaging is used for visualizing their atomic structure. In addition, microchemical peculiarities of the nanoscopic objects are investigated by analytical TEM techniques (energy-filtered TEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy)

  6. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  7. Metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Luisa; Vogt, Christian; Büthe, Lars; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Tröster, Gerhard [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Münzenrieder, Niko [Electronics Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich (Switzerland); Sensor Technology Research Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Faber, Hendrik; Bottacchi, Francesca; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The field of flexible electronics has rapidly expanded over the last decades, pioneering novel applications, such as wearable and textile integrated devices, seamless and embedded patch-like systems, soft electronic skins, as well as imperceptible and transient implants. The possibility to revolutionize our daily life with such disruptive appliances has fueled the quest for electronic devices which yield good electrical and mechanical performance and are at the same time light-weight, transparent, conformable, stretchable, and even biodegradable. Flexible metal oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors (TFTs) can fulfill all these requirements and are therefore considered the most promising technology for tomorrow's electronics. This review reflects the establishment of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs, from the development of single devices, large-area circuits, up to entirely integrated systems. First, an introduction on metal oxide semiconductor TFTs is given, where the history of the field is revisited, the TFT configurations and operating principles are presented, and the main issues and technological challenges faced in the area are analyzed. Then, the recent advances achieved for flexible n-type metal oxide semiconductor TFTs manufactured by physical vapor deposition methods and solution-processing techniques are summarized. In particular, the ability of flexible metal oxide semiconductor TFTs to combine low temperature fabrication, high carrier mobility, large frequency operation, extreme mechanical bendability, together with transparency, conformability, stretchability, and water dissolubility is shown. Afterward, a detailed analysis of the most promising metal oxide semiconducting materials developed to realize the state-of-the-art flexible p-type TFTs is given. Next, the recent progresses obtained for flexible metal oxide semiconductor-based electronic circuits, realized with both unipolar and complementary technology, are reported. In

  8. Semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This book deals with process and measurement of semiconductor. It contains 20 chapters, which goes as follows; semiconductor industry, introduction of semiconductor manufacturing, yield of semiconductor process, materials, crystal growth and a wafer forming, PN, control pollution, oxidation, photomasking photoresist chemistry, photomasking technologies, diffusion and ion injection, chemical vapor deposition, metallization, wafer test and way of evaluation, semiconductor elements, integrated circuit and semiconductor circuit technology.

  9. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  10. An Electron-Beam Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    of the Seventeenth Power Modulator Symposium, Seattle, WA, pp. 214-218. 1986. 21. Bovino , L., ’ioumans,R., Weiner, H., Burke, T . , "Optica lly... Bovino , R. Youmans, M. Weiner, and T. Burke, ’ ’Optically Co ntrolled Semiconducto r Switch for ~lulti-~legawatt Rep-Rated Pulse r s ," Conf. Record...p. 615. (II 1 W. N. Carr, IEEE Trans. Electron Devices, vol. ED-12, p. 531 , 1965. (121 T. Burke, M. Weiner. L. Bovino , and R. Youmans, in Proc

  11. High-Temperature Electronics: A Role for Wide Bandgap Semiconductors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that semiconductor based electronics that can function at ambient temperatures higher than 150 C without external cooling could greatly benefit a variety of important applications, especially-in the automotive, aerospace, and energy production industries. The fact that wide bandgap semiconductors are capable of electronic functionality at much higher temperatures than silicon has partially fueled their development, particularly in the case of SiC. It appears unlikely that wide bandgap semiconductor devices will find much use in low-power transistor applications until the ambient temperature exceeds approximately 300 C, as commercially available silicon and silicon-on-insulator technologies are already satisfying requirements for digital and analog very large scale integrated circuits in this temperature range. However, practical operation of silicon power devices at ambient temperatures above 200 C appears problematic, as self-heating at higher power levels results in high internal junction temperatures and leakages. Thus, most electronic subsystems that simultaneously require high-temperature and high-power operation will necessarily be realized using wide bandgap devices, once the technology for realizing these devices become sufficiently developed that they become widely available. Technological challenges impeding the realization of beneficial wide bandgap high ambient temperature electronics, including material growth, contacts, and packaging, are briefly discussed.

  12. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinczuk, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  13. Electronics Industry Study Report: Semiconductors and Defense Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Access Memory (DRAM) chips and microprocessors. Samsung , Micron, Hynix, and Infineon control almost three-fourths of the DRAM market,8 while Intel alone...Country 2001 Sales ($B) 2002 Sales ($B) % Change % 2002 Mkt 1 1 Intel U.S. 23.7 24.0 1% 16.9% 2 3 Samsung Semiconductor S. Korea 6.3...located in four major regions: the United States, Europe, Japan, and the Asia-Pacific region (includes South Korea, China, Singapore, Malaysia , Taiwan

  14. Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M.

    2010-01-01

    Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in the presence of the external magnetic field and electric bias in semiconductor nano-structures has been studied by time- and polarization-resolved spectrometry. The obtained experimental data are presented in dependence of the strength of the magnetic field. The optically generated electron-spin precession frequency and dephasing time and rate are estimated. It is found that both the spin precession frequency and dephasing rate increase linearly with the external magnetic field up to about 9 T. However, the spin dephasing time is within sub-μs and is found to decrease exponentially with the strength of the external magnetic field. The results are discussed by exploring possible mechanisms of spin dephasing in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, where the quantum-confinement persists within the nano-range.

  15. Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong - 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2010-09-13

    Dephasing of optically generated electron spins in the presence of the external magnetic field and electric bias in semiconductor nano-structures has been studied by time- and polarization-resolved spectrometry. The obtained experimental data are presented in dependence of the strength of the magnetic field. The optically generated electron-spin precession frequency and dephasing time and rate are estimated. It is found that both the spin precession frequency and dephasing rate increase linearly with the external magnetic field up to about 9 T. However, the spin dephasing time is within sub-{mu}s and is found to decrease exponentially with the strength of the external magnetic field. The results are discussed by exploring possible mechanisms of spin dephasing in low-dimensional semiconductor structures, where the quantum-confinement persists within the nano-range.

  16. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2011-03-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, triaxially textured, single-crystal or single-crystal-like, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  17. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    A method to prepare cross-sectional (X) semiconductor specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been described. The power and utility of XTEM has been demonstrated. It has been shown that accuracy and interpretation of indirect structural-defects profiling techniques, namely, MeV He + channeling and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be greatly enhanced by comparing their results with those obtained by XTEM from the same set of samples

  18. Electronic structure of semiconductor quantum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.B.; Yeh, C.; Zunger, A.

    1993-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin (≤30 A) free-standing ideal films of Si(001), Si(110), and GaAs(110) is calculated using a plane-wave pseudopotential description. Unlike the expectation based on the simple effective-mass model, we find the following. (i) The band gaps of (001) quantum films exhibit even-odd oscillation as a function of the number N of monolayers. (ii) In addition to sine-type envelope functions which vanish at the film boundaries, some states have cosine envelope functions with extrema at boundaries. (iii) Even-layer Si(001) films exhibit at the valence-band maximum a state whose energy does not vary with the film thickness. Such zero confinement states have constant envelope throughout the film. (iv) Optical transitions in films exhibit boundary-imposed selection rules. Furthermore, oscillator strengths for pseudodirect transitions in the vicinity of forbidden direct transitions can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. These findings, obtained in direct supercell calculations, can be explained in terms of a truncated crystal (TC) analysis. In this approach the film's wave functions are expanded in terms of pairs of bulk wave functions exhibiting a destructive interference at the boundaries. This maps the eigenvalue spectra of a film onto the bulk band structure evaluated at special k points which satisfy the boundary conditions. We find that the TC representation reproduces accurately the above-mentioned results of direct diagonalization of the film's Hamiltonian. This provides a simple alternative to the effective-mass model and relates the properties of quantum structures to those of the bulk material

  19. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Opportunities in Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sujit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marlino, Laura D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Kristina O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The report objective is to explore the Wide Bandgap (WBG) Power Electronics (PE) market, applications, and potential energy savings in order to identify key areas where further resources and investments of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE EERE) would have the most impact on U.S. competiveness. After considering the current market, several potential near-term application areas were identified as having significant market and energy savings potential with respect to clean energy applications: (1) data centers (uninterruptible power supplies and server power supplies); (2) renewable energy generation (photovoltaic-solar and wind); (3) motor drives (industrial, commercial and residential); (4) rail traction; and, (5) hybrid and electric vehicles (traction and charging). After the initial explorative analyses, it became clear that, SiC, not GaN, would be the principal WBG power device material for the chosen markets in the near future. Therefore, while GaN is discussed when appropriate, this report focuses on SiC devices, other WBG applications (e.g., solid-state transformers, combined heat and power, medical, and wireless power), the GaN market, and GaN specific applications (e.g., LiDAR, 5G) will be explored at a later date. In addition to the market, supply and value chain analyses addressed in Section 1 of this report, a SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat) analysis and potential energy savings analysis was conducted for each application area to identify the major potential WBG application area(s) with a U.S. competitiveness opportunity in the future.

  20. Spin-filter and spin-gapless semiconductors: The case of Heusler compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanakis, I.; Özdoğan, K.; Şaşıoğlu, E.

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent first-principles results on the inverse Heusler compounds and the ordered quaternary (also known as LiMgPdSn-type) Heusler compounds. Among these two subfamilies of the full-Heusler compounds, several have been shown to be magnetic semiconductors. Such material can find versatile applications, e.g. as spin-filter materials in magnetic tunnel junctions. Finally, a special case are the spin-gapless semiconductors, where the energy gap at the Fermi level for the one spin-direction is almost vanishing, offering novel functionalities in spintronic/magnetoelectronic devices.

  1. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  2. Single electron-spin memory with a semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Robert J; Dewhurst, Samuel J; Stevenson, R Mark; Atkinson, Paola; Bennett, Anthony J; Ward, Martin B; Cooper, Ken; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    We show storage of the circular polarization of an optical field, transferring it to the spin-state of an individual electron confined in a single semiconductor quantum dot. The state is subsequently read out through the electronically-triggered emission of a single photon. The emitted photon shares the same polarization as the initial pulse but has a different energy, making the transfer of quantum information between different physical systems possible. With an applied magnetic field of 2 T, spin memory is preserved for at least 1000 times more than the exciton's radiative lifetime

  3. III-V group compound semiconductor light-emitting element having a doped tantalum barrier layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oanna, Y.; Ozawa, N.; Yamashita, M.; Yasuda, N.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a III-V Group compound semiconductor light-emitting element having a III-V Group compound semiconductor body with a p-n junction and including a p-type layer involved in forming the p-n junction; and a multi-layer electrode mounted on the p-type layer of the semiconductor body. The electrode comprises a first layer of gold alloy containing a small amount of beryllium or zinc and formed in direct contact with the p-type layer of the semiconductor body and an uppermost layer formed of gold or aluminum. A tantalum layer doped with carbon, nitrogen and/or oxygen is formed between the first layer and the uppermost layer by means of vacuum vapor deposition

  4. Structure of metal-rich (001) surfaces of III-V compound semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Smilgies, D.; Landemark, E.

    2001-01-01

    The atomic structure of the group-III-rich surface of III-V semiconductor compounds has been under intense debate for many years, yet none of the models agrees with the experimental data available. Here we present a model for the three-dimensional structure of the (001)-c(8x2) reconstruction on In......(8 x 2) reconstructions of III-V semiconductor surfaces contain the same essential building blocks....

  5. Chemical Modification of Semiconductor Surfaces for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilan, Ayelet; Cahen, David

    2017-03-08

    Inserting molecular monolayers within metal/semiconductor interfaces provides one of the most powerful expressions of how minute chemical modifications can affect electronic devices. This topic also has direct importance for technology as it can help improve the efficiency of a variety of electronic devices such as solar cells, LEDs, sensors, and possible future bioelectronic ones. The review covers the main aspects of using chemistry to control the various aspects of interface electrostatics, such as passivation of interface states and alignment of energy levels by intrinsic molecular polarization, as well as charge rearrangement with the adjacent metal and semiconducting contacts. One of the greatest merits of molecular monolayers is their capability to form excellent thin dielectrics, yielding rich and unique current-voltage characteristics for transport across metal/molecular monolayer/semiconductor interfaces. We explain the interplay between the monolayer as tunneling barrier on the one hand, and the electrostatic barrier within the semiconductor, due to its space-charge region, on the other hand, as well as how different monolayer chemistries control each of these barriers. Practical tools to experimentally identify these two barriers and distinguish between them are given, followed by a short look to the future. This review is accompanied by another one, concerning the formation of large-area molecular junctions and charge transport that is dominated solely by molecules.

  6. CCST [Center for Compound Semiconductor Technology] research briefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipperian, T.E.; Voelker, E.R.

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: theoretical predictions of valence and conduction band offsets in III-V semiconductors; reflectance modulation of a semiconductor superlattice optical mirror; magnetoquantum oscillations of the phonon-drag thermoelectric power in quantum wells; correlation between photoluminescence line shape and device performance of p-channel strained-layer materials; control of threading dislocations in heteroepitaxial structures; improved growth of CdTe on GaAs by patterning; role of structure threading dislocations in relaxation of highly strained single-quantum-well structures; InAlAs growth optimization using reflection mass spectrometry; nonvolatile charge storage in III-V heterostructures; optically triggered thyristor switches; InAsSb strained-layer superlattice infrared detectors with high detectivities; resonant periodic gain surface-emitting semiconductor lasers; performance advantages of strained-quantum-well lasers in AlGaAs/InGaAs; optical integrated circuit for phased-array radar antenna control; and deposition and novel device fabrication from Tl 2 Ca 2 Ba 2 Cu 3 O y thin films

  7. Tunneling emission of electrons from semiconductors' valence bands in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalganov, V. D.; Mileshkina, N. V.; Ostroumova, E. V.

    2006-01-01

    Tunneling emission currents of electrons from semiconductors to vacuum (needle-shaped GaAs photodetectors) and to a metal (silicon metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes with a tunneling-transparent insulator layer) are studied in high and ultrahigh electric fields. It is shown that, in semiconductors with the n-type conductivity, the major contribution to the emission current is made by the tunneling emission of electrons from the valence band of the semiconductor, rather than from the conduction band

  8. Electron-electron scattering and mobilities in semiconductors and quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyo, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of electron-electron scattering on the mobility in semiconductors and semiconductor quantum wells is examined. A general exact formula is derived for the mobility, when the electron-electron collision rate is much faster than other scattering rates such as those by ionized impurities and phonons. In this limit, the transport relaxation rate is independent of the carrier's energy and contributions to the inverse mobility from individual scattering mechanism add up. The mobility becomes significantly reduced from its value in the absence of electron-electron scattering. When the collision rates are not necessarily dominated by electron-electron scattering, the mobility is calculated by the Kohler-Sondheimer variational method in the presence of ionized-impurity scattering and acoustic-phonon scattering in a nondegenerate two-dimensional quantum well

  9. Electronic collective modes and instabilities on semiconductor surfaces. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, A.; Hanke, W.

    1984-01-01

    A Green's-function theory of electronic collective modes is presented which leads to a practical scheme for a microscopic determination of surface elementary excitations in conducting as well as nonconducting solids. Particular emphasis is placed on semiconductor surfaces where the jellium approximation is not valid, due to the importance of density fluctuations on a microscopic scale (reflected in the local-field effects). Starting from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green's function of the surface system, an equation of motion for the electron-hole pair is obtained. Its solutions determine the energy spectra, lifetimes, and amplitudes of the surface elementary excitations, i.e., surface plasmons, excitons, polaritons, and magnons. Exchange and correlation effects are taken into account through the random-phase and time-dependent Hartree-Fock (screened electron-hole attraction) approximations. The formalism is applied to the study of electronic (charge- and spin-density) instabilities at covalent semiconductor surfaces. Quantitative calculations for an eight-layer Si(111) slab display an instability of the ideal paramagnetic surface with respect to spin-density waves with wavelength nearly corresponding to (2 x 1) and (7 x 7) superstructures

  10. Response function and optimum configuration of semiconductor backscattered-electron detectors for scanning electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, E. I.; Orlikovskiy, N. A.; Ivanova, E. S.

    2012-01-01

    A new highly efficient design for semiconductor detectors of intermediate-energy electrons (1–50 keV) for application in scanning electron microscopes is proposed. Calculations of the response function of advanced detectors and control experiments show that the efficiency of the developed devices increases on average twofold, which is a significant positive factor in the operation of modern electron microscopes in the mode of low currents and at low primary electron energies.

  11. Velocity overshoot decay mechanisms in compound semiconductor field-effect transistors with a submicron characteristic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jyegal, Jang

    2015-01-01

    Velocity overshoot is a critically important nonstationary effect utilized for the enhanced performance of submicron field-effect devices fabricated with high-electron-mobility compound semiconductors. However, the physical mechanisms of velocity overshoot decay dynamics in the devices are not known in detail. Therefore, a numerical analysis is conducted typically for a submicron GaAs metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor in order to elucidate the physical mechanisms. It is found that there exist three different mechanisms, depending on device bias conditions. Specifically, at large drain biases corresponding to the saturation drain current (dc) region, the velocity overshoot suddenly begins to drop very sensitively due to the onset of a rapid decrease of the momentum relaxation time, not the mobility, arising from the effect of velocity-randomizing intervalley scattering. It then continues to drop rapidly and decays completely by severe mobility reduction due to intervalley scattering. On the other hand, at small drain biases corresponding to the linear dc region, the velocity overshoot suddenly begins to drop very sensitively due to the onset of a rapid increase of thermal energy diffusion by electrons in the channel of the gate. It then continues to drop rapidly for a certain channel distance due to the increasing thermal energy diffusion effect, and later completely decays by a sharply decreasing electric field. Moreover, at drain biases close to a dc saturation voltage, the mechanism is a mixture of the above two bias conditions. It is suggested that a large secondary-valley energy separation is essential to increase the performance of submicron devices

  12. Electronic fitness function for screening semiconductors as thermoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Guangzong; Sun, Jifeng; Li, Yuwei; Fan, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Here, we introduce a simple but efficient electronic fitness function (EFF) that describes the electronic aspect of the thermoelectric performance. This EFF finds materials that overcome the inverse relationship between σ and S based on the complexity of the electronic structures regardless of specific origin (e.g., isosurface corrugation, valley degeneracy, heavy-light bands mixture, valley anisotropy or reduced dimensionality). This function is well suited for application in high throughput screening. We applied this function to 75 different thermoelectric and potential thermoelectric materials including full- and half-Heuslers, binary semiconductors, and Zintl phases. We find an efficient screening using this transport function. The EFF identifies known high-performance p- and n-type Zintl phases and half-Heuslers. In addition, we find some previously unstudied phases with superior EFF.

  13. Paramagnetic resonance and electronic conduction in organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechtschein, M.

    1963-01-01

    As some organic bodies simultaneously display semi-conducting properties and a paramagnetism, this report addresses the study of conduction in organic bodies. The author first briefly recalls how relationships between conductibility and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) can be noticed in a specific case (mineral and metallic semiconductors). He discusses published results related to paramagnetism and conductibility in organic bodies. He reviews various categories of organic bodies in which both properties are simultaneously present. He notably addresses radical molecular crystals, non-radical molecular crystals, charge transfer complexes, pyrolyzed coals, and pseudo-ferromagnetic organic structures. He discusses the issue of relationships between conduction (charge transfer by electrons) and ERP (which reveals the existence of non-paired electrons which provide free spins)

  14. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, O L; Dellby, N; Murfitt, M F

    2011-01-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been able to image individual heavy atoms in a light matrix for some time. It is now able to do much more: it can resolve individual atoms as light as boron in monolayer materials; image atomic columns as light as hydrogen, identify the chemical type of individual isolated atoms from the intensity of their annular dark field (ADF) image and by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); and map elemental composition at atomic resolution by EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). It can even map electronic states, also by EELS, at atomic resolution. The instrumentation developments that have made this level of performance possible are reviewed, and examples of applications to semiconductors and oxides are shown.

  15. On genealogy of defect electron states in semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhmudov, A.Sh.

    1984-01-01

    Main factors of formation of defect electron structure in semiconductors are considered. It is concluded on the basis of analysis of papers published earlier that it is necessary to take account of two factors: long- and short-range orders i.e. the nature of the atom interaction with the several nearest neighbours as well as crystal periodicity, correctly formulated boundary conditions. One of possible wayes of the given task realization is the combination of a traditional scheme of the solid body theory- the Green function method and the semiempirical quantum-chemical method of equivalent orbitales

  16. Measuring processes with opto-electronic semiconductor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This is a report on the state of commercially available semiconductor emitters and detectors for the visible, near, middle and remote infrared range. A survey is given on the distance, speed, flow and length measuring techniques using opto-electronic components. Automatic focussing, the use of light barriers, non-contact temperature measurements, spectroscopic gas, liquid and environmental measurement techniques and gas analysis in medical techniques show further applications of the new components. The modern concept of guided radiation in optical fibres and their use in system technology is briefly explained. (DG) [de

  17. Electronic paramagnetic resonance in the Mn In X (X:Te,S) diluted magnetic semiconductor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, Bernardo; Betancourt, Luis; Sagredo, Vicente; Alcala, Rafael

    1996-01-01

    Semiconductor compounds wit the II-III-VI stoichiometry are very interesting materials since they present very good semiconducting characteristics and, along with strong magnetic properties, these II Mn In VI compounds have a great potential as opt and magneto-electronic devices. Among the possible magnetic properties of the materials is the presence of the spin-glass phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance is one of the techniques used to confirm this phase. The chosen crystals were chosen by chemical vapor transport. The absorption lines of these two families with 0.1 x 1 were all Lorentzian in shape and centred at g=2. A large broadening of the resonance line width was observed when lowering the temperature to below 80 K. This behaviour was fitted to the known existing models, and good values of the calculated parameters were obtained (author)

  18. High pressure study of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound in two different phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound are calculated at hydrostatic pressure using the full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method in both cubic and tetragonal phases. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the generalized gradient approximation within the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof, GGA96 (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865). Also, the Engel and Vosko GGA formalism, EV-GGA (Engel and Vosko 1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13164), is used to improve the band-gap results. Internal parameters are optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The lattice constants, internal parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy and band structures have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. The structural calculations predict that the stable phase is tetragonal. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band-gap, valence bandwidths and internal gaps (the energy gap between different parts of the valence bands) are studied using both GGA96 and EV-GGA.

  19. High pressure study of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound in two different phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Ali [Simulation Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shahrekord University, PB 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtari@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2009-07-08

    Electronic and structural properties of the zinc phosphide semiconductor compound are calculated at hydrostatic pressure using the full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital (FP-LAPW+lo) method in both cubic and tetragonal phases. The exchange-correlation potential is treated by the generalized gradient approximation within the scheme of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof, GGA96 (1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 3865). Also, the Engel and Vosko GGA formalism, EV-GGA (Engel and Vosko 1993 Phys. Rev. B 47 13164), is used to improve the band-gap results. Internal parameters are optimized by relaxing the atomic positions in the force directions using the Hellman-Feynman approach. The lattice constants, internal parameters, bulk modulus, cohesive energy and band structures have been calculated and compared to the available experimental and theoretical results. The structural calculations predict that the stable phase is tetragonal. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on the behavior of band parameters such as band-gap, valence bandwidths and internal gaps (the energy gap between different parts of the valence bands) are studied using both GGA96 and EV-GGA.

  20. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S M

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed by a

  1. Analysis of quantum semiconductor heterostructures by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Daniel K.

    1998-09-01

    The microelectronics industry is diligently working to achieve the goal of gigascale integration (GSI) by early in the 21st century. For the past twenty-five years, progress toward this goal has been made by continually scaling down device technology. Unfortunately, this trend cannot continue to the point of producing arbitrarily small device sizes. One possible solution to this problem that is currently under intensive study is the relatively new area of quantum devices. Quantum devices represent a new class of microelectronic devices that operate by utilizing the wave-like nature (reflection, refraction, and confinement) of electrons together with the laws of quantum mechanics to construct useful devices. One difficulty associated with these structures is the absence of measurement techniques that can fully characterize carrier transport in such devices. This thesis addresses this need by focusing on the study of carrier transport in quantum semiconductor heterostructures using a relatively new and versatile measurement technique known as ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). To achieve this goal, a systematic approach that encompasses a set of progressively more complex structures is utilized. First, the simplest BEES structure possible, the metal/semiconductor interface, is thoroughly investigated in order to provide a foundation for measurements on more the complex structures. By modifying the semiclassical model commonly used to describe the experimental BEES spectrum, a very complete and accurate description of the basic structure has been achieved. Next, a very simple semiconductor heterostructure, a Ga1-xAlxAs single-barrier structure, was measured and analyzed. Low-temperature measurements on this structure were used to investigate the band structure and electron-wave interference effects in the Ga1-xAlxAs single barrier structure. These measurements are extended to a simple quantum device by designing, measuring, and analyzing a set of

  2. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  3. Detection of secondary electrons with pixelated hybrid semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebert, Ulrike Sonja

    2011-01-01

    Within the scope of this thesis, secondary electrons were detected with a pixelated semiconductor detector named Timepix. The Timepix detector consists of electronics and a sensor made from a semiconductor material. The connection of sensor and electronics is done for each pixel individually using bump bonds. Electrons with energies above 3 keV can be detected with the sensor. One electron produces a certain amount of electron-hole pairs according to its energy. The charge then drifts along an electric field to the pixel electronics, where it induces an electric signal. Even without a sensor it is possible to detect an electric signal from approximately 1000 electrons directly in the pixel electronics. Two different detector systems to detect secondary electrons using the Timepix detector were investigated during this thesis. First of all, a hybrid photon detector (HPD) was used to detect single photoelectrons. The HPD consists of a vacuum vessel with an entrance window and a cesium iodine photocathode at the inner surface of the window. Photoelectrons are released from the photocathode by incident light and are accelerated in an electric field towards the Timepix detector, where the point of interaction and the arrival time of the electron is determined. With a proximity focusing setup, a time resolution of 12 ns (with an acceleration voltage of 20 kV between photocathode and Timepix detector) was obtained. The HPD examined in this thesis showed a strong dependence of the dark rate form the acceleration voltage and the pressure in the vacuum vessel. At a pressure of few 10 -5 mbar and an acceleration voltage of 20 kV, the dark rate was about 800 Hz per mm 2 area of the read out photocathode. One possibility to reduce the dark rate is to identify ion feedback events. With a slightly modified setup it was possible to reduce the dark rate to 0.5 Hz/mm 2 . To achieve this, a new photocathode was mounted in a shorter distance to the detector. The measurements where

  4. Electronic and optical properties of diamond/organic semiconductor heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajewski, Wojciech; Garrido, Jose; Niedermeier, Martin; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institute, TU Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Williams, Oliver; Haenen, Ken [Institute for Materials Research, University of Hasselt, Wetenschapspark 1, BE-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    Different diamond substrates (single crystalline: SCD, poly-crystalline: PCD and nano-crystalline: NCD) were used to investigate the electronic and optical properties of the diamond/organic semiconductor heterostructures. Layers of a poly[ethynyl-(2-decyloxy-5methoxy)benzene] - PEB, pentacene and 4-nitro-biphenyl-4-diazonium cations - Ph-Ph-NO{sub 2} were prepared by spin coating, thermal evaporation and grafting, respectively. The measurements of the electronic transport along the organic layer were performed using a Hg probe as well as Hall effect measurements in the temperature range 70-400 K. The I-V characteristics of the B-doped diamond/organic semiconductor heterostructures were measured at room temperature by means of the Hg probe. Undoped IIa and undoped PCD films were used for a study of the optical and optoelectronic properties of prepared heterostructures. The influence of the organic layer homogeneity and layer thickness on the optical properties will be discussed. Furthermore, preliminary data on perpendicular and parallel transport in the heterostructures layer will be reported.

  5. 75 FR 9438 - Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC, DRAM Fab 1, a Subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... Semiconductor, LLC, DRAM Fab 1, a Subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Corporation, Including On-Site Leased... Semiconductor, LLC, a subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Corporation, DRAM Fab 1, including on-site leased.... The workers are engaged in activities related to the production of DRAM chips for use in electronics...

  6. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices

  7. A unique metal-semiconductor interface and resultant electron transfer phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Taft, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    An unusual electron transfer phenomenon has been identified from an n-type semiconductor to Schottky metal particles, the result of a unique metal semiconductor interface that results when the metal particles are grown from the semiconductor substrate. The unique interface acts as a one-way (rectifying) open gateway and was first identified in reduced rutile polycrystalline titanium dioxide (an n-type semiconductor) to Group VIII (noble) metal particles. The interface significantly affects th...

  8. Theory of semiconductor junction devices a textbook for electrical and electronic engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Leck, J H

    1967-01-01

    Theory of Semiconductor Junction Devices: A Textbook for Electrical and Electronic Engineers presents the simplified numerical computation of the fundamental electrical equations, specifically Poisson's and the Hall effect equations. This book provides the fundamental theory relevant for the understanding of semiconductor device theory. Comprised of 10 chapters, this book starts with an overview of the application of band theory to the special case of semiconductors, both intrinsic and extrinsic. This text then describes the electrical properties of conductivity, semiconductors, and Hall effe

  9. Collaborative Research and Development. Delivery Order 0006: Transmission Electron Microscope Image Modeling and Semiconductor Heterointerface Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    .... Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization studies were performed on a variety of novel III-V semiconductor heterostructures being developed for advanced optoelectronic device applications...

  10. A first-principles study of the electronic structure of the sulvanite compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio-Guillen, J.M., E-mail: jorge.osorio@fisica.udea.edu.co [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin A.A. 1226 (Colombia); Espinosa-Garcia, W.F. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin A.A. 1226 (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    We have investigated by means of first-principles total energy calculations the electronic structure of the sulvanite compounds: Cu{sub 3}VS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 3}NbS{sub 4} and Cu{sub 3}TaS{sub 4}; the later is a possible candidate as a p-type transparent conductor with potential applications in solar cells and electrochromic devices. The calculated electronic structure shows that these compounds are indirect band gap semiconductors, with the valence band maximum located at the R-point and the conduction band minimum located at the X-point. The character of the valence band maximum is dominated by Cu d-states and the character of the conduction band minimum is due to the d-states of the group five elements. From the calculated charge density and electron localisation function we can conclude that the sulvanite compounds are polar covalent semiconductors.

  11. Crystal Growth of Ternary Compound Semiconductors in Low Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A low gravity material experiment will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). There are two sections of the flight experiment: (I) crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds, such as ZnSeS and ZnSeTe, by physical vapor transport (PVT) and (II) melt growth of CdZnTe by directional solidification. The main objective of the project is to determine the relative contributions of gravity-driven fluid flows to the compositional distribution, incorporation of impurities and defects, and deviation from stoichiometry observed in the grown crystals as results of buoyancy-driven convection and growth interface fluctuations caused by irregular fluid-flows on Earth. The investigation consists of extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research efforts and concurrent flight experimentation. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the PVT crystal growth of ZnSe and related ternary compounds. The objectives of the ground-based studies are (1) obtain the experimental data and conduct the analyses required to define the optimum growth parameters for the flight experiments, (2) perfect various characterization techniques to establish the standard procedure for material characterization, (3) quantitatively establish the characteristics of the crystals grown on Earth as a basis for subsequent comparative evaluations of the crystals grown in a low-gravity environment and (4) develop theoretical and analytical methods required for such evaluations. ZnSe and related ternary compounds have been grown by vapor transport technique with real time in-situ non-invasive monitoring techniques. The grown crystals have been characterized extensively by various techniques to correlate the grown crystal properties with the growth conditions.

  12. Computational Search for Two-Dimensional MX2 Semiconductors with Possible High Electron Mobility at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhishuo Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neither of the two typical two-dimensional materials, graphene and single layer MoS 2 , are good enough for developing semiconductor logical devices. We calculated the electron mobility of 14 two-dimensional semiconductors with composition of MX 2 , where M (=Mo, W, Sn, Hf, Zr and Pt are transition metals, and Xs are S, Se and Te. We approximated the electron phonon scattering matrix by deformation potentials, within which long wave longitudinal acoustical and optical phonon scatterings were included. Piezoelectric scattering in the compounds without inversion symmetry is also taken into account. We found that out of the 14 compounds, WS 2 , PtS 2 and PtSe 2 are promising for logical devices regarding the possible high electron mobility and finite band gap. Especially, the phonon limited electron mobility in PtSe 2 reaches about 4000 cm 2 ·V - 1 ·s - 1 at room temperature, which is the highest among the compounds with an indirect bandgap of about 1.25 eV under the local density approximation. Our results can be the first guide for experiments to synthesize better two-dimensional materials for future semiconductor devices.

  13. Impact of Relativistic Electron Beam on Hole Acoustic Instability in Quantum Semiconductor Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, M.; Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Areeb, F.; Javed, Asif; Sumera, P.

    2018-01-01

    We studied the influence of the classical relativistic beam of electrons on the hole acoustic wave (HAW) instability exciting in the semiconductor quantum plasmas. We conducted this study by using the quantum-hydrodynamic model of dense plasmas, incorporating the quantum effects of semiconductor plasma species which include degeneracy pressure, exchange-correlation potential and Bohm potential. Analysis of the quantum characteristics of semiconductor plasma species along with relativistic effect of beam electrons on the dispersion relation of the HAW is given in detail qualitatively and quantitatively by plotting them numerically. It is worth mentioning that the relativistic electron beam (REB) stabilises the HAWs exciting in semiconductor (GaAs) degenerate plasma.

  14. Spin–orbit induced electronic spin separation in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Makoto; Nakamura, Shuji; Nishihara, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Ono, Teruo; Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Taiki; Nitta, Junsaku

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of quantized spin splitting by Stern and Gerlach is one of the most important experiments in modern physics. Their discovery was the precursor of recent developments in spin-based technologies. Although electrical spin separation of charged particles is fundamental in spintronics, in non-uniform magnetic fields it has been difficult to separate the spin states of charged particles due to the Lorentz force, as well as to the insufficient and uncontrollable field gradients. Here we demonstrate electronic spin separation in a semiconductor nanostructure. To avoid the Lorentz force, which is inevitably induced when an external magnetic field is applied, we utilized the effective non-uniform magnetic field which originates from the Rashba spin–orbit interaction in an InGaAs-based heterostructure. Using a Stern–Gerlach-inspired mechanism, together with a quantum point contact, we obtained field gradients of 108 T m−1 resulting in a highly polarized spin current. PMID:23011136

  15. Spin-orbit induced electronic spin separation in semiconductor nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Makoto; Nakamura, Shuji; Nishihara, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Ono, Teruo; Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Mineno, Taiki; Nitta, Junsaku

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of quantized spin splitting by Stern and Gerlach is one of the most important experiments in modern physics. Their discovery was the precursor of recent developments in spin-based technologies. Although electrical spin separation of charged particles is fundamental in spintronics, in non-uniform magnetic fields it has been difficult to separate the spin states of charged particles due to the Lorentz force, as well as to the insufficient and uncontrollable field gradients. Here we demonstrate electronic spin separation in a semiconductor nanostructure. To avoid the Lorentz force, which is inevitably induced when an external magnetic field is applied, we utilized the effective non-uniform magnetic field which originates from the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in an InGaAs-based heterostructure. Using a Stern-Gerlach-inspired mechanism, together with a quantum point contact, we obtained field gradients of 10(8) T m(-1) resulting in a highly polarized spin current.

  16. Surface electron structure of short-period semiconductor superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, I.; Czech Academy Science, Prague,; Strasser, T.; Schattke, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Semiconductor superlattices represent man-made crystals with unique physical properties. By means of the directed layer-by-layer molecular epitaxy growth their electric properties can be tailored (band structure engineering). Longer translational periodicity in the growth direction is responsible for opening of new electron energy gaps (minigaps) with surface states and resonances localized at superlattice surfaces. Similarly as for the electron structure of the bulk, a procedure enabling to modify the surface electron structure of superlattices is desirable. Short-period superlattice (GaAs) 2 (AlAs) 2 with unreconstructed (100) surface is investigated in detail. Theoretical description in terms of full eigenfunctions of individual components has to be used. The changes of electron surface state energies governed by the termination of a periodic crystalline potential, predicted on simple models, are confirmed for this system. Large surface state shifts are found in the lowest minigap of the superlattice when this is terminated in four different topmost layer configurations. The changes should be observable in angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy as demonstrated in calculations based on the one step model of photoemission. Surface state in the center of the two dimensional Brillouin zone moves from the bottom of the minigap (for the superlattice terminated by two bilayers of GaAs) to its top (for the superlattice terminated by two bilayers of AlAs) where it becomes a resonance. No surface state/resonance is found for a termination with one bilayer of AlAs. The surface state bands behave similarly in the corresponding gaps of the k-resolved section of the electron band structure. The molecular beam epitaxy, which enables to terminate the superlattice growth with atomic layer precision, provides a way of tuning the superlattice surface electron structure by purely geometrical means. The work was supported by the Grant Agency of the Academy of Sciences

  17. Electronic structures of interfacial states formed at polymeric semiconductor heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Shih; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Avilov, Igor; Sreearunothai, Paiboon; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Deleener, Caroline; Friend, Richard H.; Beljonne, David

    2008-06-01

    Heterojunctions between organic semiconductors are central to the operation of light-emitting and photovoltaic diodes, providing respectively for electron-hole capture and separation. However, relatively little is known about the character of electronic excitations stable at the heterojunction. We have developed molecular models to study such interfacial excited electronic excitations that form at the heterojunction between model polymer donor and polymer acceptor systems: poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) with poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT), and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylphenyl)diphenylamine) (TFB) with F8BT. We find that for stable ground-state geometries the excited state has a strong charge-transfer character. Furthermore, when partly covalent, modelled radiative lifetimes (~10-7s) and off-chain axis polarization (30∘) match observed `exciplex' emission. Additionally for the PFB:F8BT blend, geometries with fully ionic character are also found, thus accounting for the low electroluminescence efficiency of this system.

  18. Carbonyl Compounds Generated from Electronic Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Bekki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  19. Theoretical prediction and experimental confirmation of unusual ternary ordered semiconductor compounds in Sr-Pb-S system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shiqiang; Zhao, Li-Dong; Chen, Chang-Qiang; Dravid, Vinayak P; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Wolverton, Christopher M

    2014-01-29

    We examine the thermodynamics of phase separation and ordering in the ternary Ca(x)Pb(1-x)S and Sr(x)Pb(1-x)S systems by density-functional theory combined with a cluster expansion and Monte Carlo simulations. Similar to most other ternary III-V or IV-VI semiconductor alloys, we find that bulk phase separation is thermodynamically preferred for PbS-CaS. However, we predict the surprising existence of stable, ordered ternary compounds in the PbS-SrS system. These phases are previously unreported ordered rocksalt-based compounds: SrPb3S4, SrPbS2, and Sr3PbS4. The stability of these predicted ordered phases is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy observations and band gap measurements. We believe this work paves the way for a combined theory-experiment approach to decipher complex phase relations in multicomponent chalcogenide systems.

  20. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  1. Controlled buckling structures in semiconductor interconnects and nanomembranes for stretchable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A; Meitl, Matthew; Sun, Yugang; Ko, Heung Cho; Carlson, Andrew; Choi, Won Mook; Stoykovich, Mark; Jiang, Hanqing; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Zhu, Zhengtao; Menard, Etienne; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2014-05-20

    In an aspect, the present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, components such as semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed, and related methods of making or tuning such stretchable components. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention are adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  2. Electronic structure of A15 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    For the past twenty-five years compounds with the A15 crystal structure have dominated the class of high temperature superconductors. The crystal structure of an A15 compound A 3 B is cubic (space group O/sub h/ 3 ). However, the site symmetry (D/sub 2d/) of the A atoms is much lower than cubic, an unusual occurrence in cubic binary compounds. Variations on this theme have supplied the basis of many theoretical models of the anomalous temperature (T) dependence of normal state properties and the low temperature cubic reversible tetragonal structural transformations which accompany high values of T/sub c/ in A15 compounds. In this paper results of self-consistent pseudopotential band structure calculations are used to assess some important aspects of the unique and unusual behavior in A15 compounds: (1) the role of the B atom in determining the overall electronic structure will be shown to be important; (2) the effect of the low site symmetry of the A atom on the charge density and potential will be assessed; and (3) the bonding will be shown to be metallic-covalent with no significant A-B charge transfer

  3. Quantum theory of the optical and electronic properties of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    This invaluable textbook presents the basic elements needed to understand and research into semiconductor physics. It deals with elementary excitations in bulk and low-dimensional semiconductors, including quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. The basic principles underlying optical nonlinearities are developed, including excitonic and many-body plasma effects. Fundamentals of optical bistability, semiconductor lasers, femtosecond excitation, the optical Stark effect, the semiconductor photon echo, magneto-optic effects, as well as bulk and quantum-confined Franz-Keldysh effects, are covered. The material is presented in sufficient detail for graduate students and researchers with a general background in quantum mechanics.This fifth edition includes an additional chapter on 'Quantum Optical Effects' where the theory of quantum optical effects in semiconductors is detailed. Besides deriving the 'semiconductor luminescence equations' and the expression for the stationary luminescence spectrum, the resu...

  4. Molecular coatings of nitride semiconductors for optoelectronics, electronics, and solar energy harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee; Zhao, Chao; Priante, Davide; Ooi, Boon S.; Hussein, Mohamed Ebaid Abdrabou

    2018-01-01

    Gallium nitride based semiconductors are provided having one or more passivated surfaces. The surfaces can have a plurality of thiol compounds attached thereto for enhancement of optoelectronic properties and/or solar water splitting properties. The surfaces can also include wherein the surface has been treated with chemical solution for native oxide removal and / or wherein the surface has attached thereto a plurality of nitrides, oxides, insulating compounds, thiol compounds, or a combination thereof to create a treated surface for enhancement of optoelectronic properties and / or solar water splitting properties. Methods of making the gallium nitride based semiconductors are also provided. Methods can include cleaning a native surface of a gallium nitride semiconductor to produce a cleaned surface, etching the cleaned surface to remove oxide layers on the surface, and applying single or multiple coatings of nitrides, oxides, insulating compounds, thiol compounds, or a combination thereof attached to the surface.

  5. Molecular coatings of nitride semiconductors for optoelectronics, electronics, and solar energy harvesting

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2018-02-01

    Gallium nitride based semiconductors are provided having one or more passivated surfaces. The surfaces can have a plurality of thiol compounds attached thereto for enhancement of optoelectronic properties and/or solar water splitting properties. The surfaces can also include wherein the surface has been treated with chemical solution for native oxide removal and / or wherein the surface has attached thereto a plurality of nitrides, oxides, insulating compounds, thiol compounds, or a combination thereof to create a treated surface for enhancement of optoelectronic properties and / or solar water splitting properties. Methods of making the gallium nitride based semiconductors are also provided. Methods can include cleaning a native surface of a gallium nitride semiconductor to produce a cleaned surface, etching the cleaned surface to remove oxide layers on the surface, and applying single or multiple coatings of nitrides, oxides, insulating compounds, thiol compounds, or a combination thereof attached to the surface.

  6. Radiation effects and hardness of semiconductor electronic devices for nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payat, R.; Friant, A.

    1988-01-01

    After a brief review of industrial and nuclear specificity and radiation effects in electronics components (semiconductors) the need for a specific test methodology of semiconductor devices is emphasized. Some studies appropriate for nuclear industry at D. LETI/DEIN/CEN-SACLAY are related [fr

  7. Growth of Wide Band Gap II-VI Compound Semiconductors by Physical Vapor Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao

    1995-01-01

    The studies on the crystal growth and characterization of II-VI wide band gap compound semiconductors, such as ZnTe, CdS, ZnSe and ZnS, have been conducted over the past three decades. The research was not quite as extensive as that on Si, III-V, or even narrow band gap II-VI semiconductors because of the high melting temperatures as well as the specialized applications associated with these wide band gap semiconductors. In the past several years, major advances in the thin film technology such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) have demonstrated the applications of these materials for the important devices such as light-emitting diode, laser and ultraviolet detectors and the tunability of energy band gap by employing ternary or even quaternary systems of these compounds. At the same time, the development in the crystal growth of bulk materials has not advanced far enough to provide low price, high quality substrates needed for the thin film growth technology.

  8. Materials for n-type organic electronics: synthesis and properties of fluoroarene-thiophene semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Antonio; Yoon, Myung-Han; Katz, Howard E.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2003-11-01

    Recent progress in the field of organic electronics is due to a fruitful combination of both innovative molecular design and promising low-cost material/device assembly. Targeting the first strategy, we present here the general synthesis of fluoroarene-containing thiophene-based semiconductors and the study of their properties with respect to the corresponding fluorine-free hole-transporting analogues. The new compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and 1H- and 19F NMR. The dramatic influence of fluorine substitution and molecular architecture has been investigated by solution/film optical absorption, fluorescence emission, and cyclic voltammetry. Single crystal data for all of the oligomers have been obtained and will be presented. Film microstructure and morphology of this new class of materials have been studied by XRD and SEM. Particular emphasis will be posed on the solution-processable oligomers and polymers.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a_0), bulk modulus (B_0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Neetu, E-mail: neetumanish@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AISECT University Bhopal, 464993 (India); Srivastava, Vipul [Department of Engineering Physics, NRI Institute of Research & Technology, Raisen Road, Bhopal, 462021 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  11. Tunneling microscopy of 2H-MoS2: A compound semiconductor surface

    OpenAIRE

    Weimer, M.; Kramar, J.; Bai, C.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide, a layered semiconductor, is an interesting material to study with the tunneling microscope because two structurally and electronically different atomic species may be probed at its surface. We report on a vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy study of 2H-MoS2. Atomic resolution topographs and current images show the symmetry of the surface unit cell and clearly reveal two distinct atomic sites in agreement with the well-known x-ray crystal structure.

  12. Electronic Properties of Metallic Nanoclusters on Semiconductor Surfaces: Implications for Nanoelectronic Device Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Takhee; Liu Jia; Chen, N.-P.; Andres, R.P.; Janes, D.B.; Reifenberger, R.

    2000-01-01

    We review current research on the electronic properties of nanoscale metallic islands and clusters deposited on semiconductor substrates. Reported results for a number of nanoscale metal-semiconductor systems are summarized in terms of their fabrication and characterization. In addition to the issues faced in large-area metal-semiconductor systems, nano-systems present unique challenges in both the realization of well-controlled interfaces at the nanoscale and the ability to adequately characterize their electrical properties. Imaging by scanning tunneling microscopy as well as electrical characterization by current-voltage spectroscopy enable the study of the electrical properties of nanoclusters/semiconductor systems at the nanoscale. As an example of the low-resistance interfaces that can be realized, low-resistance nanocontacts consisting of metal nanoclusters deposited on specially designed ohmic contact structures are described. To illustrate a possible path to employing metal/semiconductor nanostructures in nanoelectronic applications, we also describe the fabrication and performance of uniform 2-D arrays of such metallic clusters on semiconductor substrates. Using self-assembly techniques involving conjugated organic tether molecules, arrays of nanoclusters have been formed in both unpatterned and patterned regions on semiconductor surfaces. Imaging and electrical characterization via scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy indicate that high quality local ordering has been achieved within the arrays and that the clusters are electronically coupled to the semiconductor substrate via the low-resistance metal/semiconductor interface

  13. Electronic, Optical, and Thermal Properties of Reduced-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shouting

    Reduced-dimensional materials have attracted tremendous attention because of their new physics and exotic properties, which are of great interests for fundamental science. More importantly, the manipulation and engineering of matter on an atomic scale yield promising applications for many fields including nanoelectronics, nanobiotechnology, environments, and renewable energy. Because of the unusual quantum confinement and enhanced surface effect of reduced-dimensional materials, traditional empirical models suffer from necessary but unreliable parameters extracted from previously-studied bulk materials. In this sense, quantitative, parameter-free approaches are highly useful for understanding properties of reduced-dimensional materials and, furthermore, predicting their novel applications. The first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is proven to be a reliable and convenient tool. In particular, recent progress in many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) makes it possible to calculate excited-state properties, e.g., quasiparticle (QP) band gap and optical excitations, by the first-principles approach based on DFT. Therefore, during my PhD study, I employed first-principles calculations based on DFT and MBPT to systematically study fundamental properties of typical reduced-dimensional semiconductors, i.e., the electronic structure, phonons, and optical excitations of core-shell nanowires (NWs) and graphene-like two-dimensional (2D) structures of current interests. First, I present first-principles studies on how to engineer band alignments of nano-sized radial heterojunctions, Si/Ge core-shell NWs. Our calculation reveals that band offsets in these one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures can be tailored by applying axial strain or varying core-shell sizes. In particular, the valence band offset can be efficiently tuned across a wide range and even be diminished via applied strain. Two mechanisms contribute to this tuning of band offsets. Furthermore, varying the

  14. Electron states and electron Raman scattering in semiconductor double cylindrical quantum well wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munguía-Rodríguez, M; Riera, R; Betancourt-Riera, Ri; Betancourt-Riera, Re; Nieto Jalil, J M

    2016-01-01

    The differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well wire is calculated, and expressions for the electronic states are presented. The system is modeled by considering T = 0 K and also with a single parabolic conduction band, which is split into a subband system due to the confinement. The gain and differential cross-section for an electron Raman scattering process are obtained. In addition, the emission spectra for several scattering configurations are discussed, and interpretations of the singularities found in the spectra are given. The electron Raman scattering studied here can be used to provide direct information about the efficiency of the lasers. (paper)

  15. Electron-phonon coupling effect on wakefields in piezoelectric semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimullah, M; Shukla, P K; Ghosh, S K; Nitta, H; Hayashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    Using an appropriate dielectric constant for an n-type piezoelectric semiconductor plasma and a moving test particle approach, it is shown that, besides the usual screened potential, there exists a non-Coulombian oscillatory potential or a wakefield behind a moving charged particle due to a strong resonant interaction between the charged particle and the electro-acoustic mode of the host semiconductor. With the concept of the wakefield, a possible lattice formation of colloids resulting from ion implantation in a current-carrying piezoelectric semiconductor has been examined

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer from organic semiconductors onto redox mediators for CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portenkirchner, E.

    2014-01-01

    In this work the photoinduced electron transfer from organic semiconductors onto redox mediator catalysts for CO 2 reduction has been investigated. In the beginning, the work focuses on the identication, characterization and test of suitable catalyst materials. For this purpose, rhenium compounds with 2,2'-bipyridine bis(arylimino) acenaphthene ligands and pyridinium were tested for molecular homogenous catalysis. Infrared, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used for initial characterization of the catalyst substances. Since the interpretation of infrared spectra was difficult for large molecules based on measured data only, additionally infrared absorption spectra obtained by quantum mechanical density functional theory(DFT) calculations were successfully used to correlate characteristic features in the measured spectra to their molecular origin. It was found that experimentally observed data and quantum chemical predictions for the infrared spectra of the novel compounds are in good agreement. Additionally, quantum mechanical calculations were carried out for the determination of molecular orbital frontier energy levels and correlated to UV-Vis absorption and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Extensive cyclic voltammetry measurements and bulk controlled-potential electrolysis experiments were performed using a N 2 - and CO 2 -saturated electrolyte solution. Together with a detailed product analysis via infrared spectroscopy, gas and ion chromatography the results allowed electrochemical characterizations of the novel catalysts regarding their suitability for electrochemical CO 2 reduction. Once suitable catalysts were identied, the materials were immobilized on the electrode surface by electro-polymerization of the catalyst (5,5'bisphenylethynyl-2,2'-bipyridyl)Re(CO) 3 Cl itself or by incorporation of (2,2'-bipyridyl)Re(CO) 3 Cl into a polypyrrole matrix, thereby changing from homogeneous to

  17. The WSPC Reference on Organic Electronics: Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Bredas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide a basic theoretical perspective on charge-carrier transport in organic semiconductors, with a focus on organic molecular crystals. We introduce the microscopic parameters relevant to the intrinsic charge

  18. Growth of anodic films on compound semiconductor electrodes: InP in aqueous (NH sub 4) sub 2 S

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, D N

    2002-01-01

    Film formation on compound semiconductors under anodic conditions is discussed. The surface properties of InP electrodes were examined following anodization in a (NH sub 4) sub 2 S electrolyte. The observation of a current peak in the cyclic voltammetric curve was attributed to selective etching of the substrate and a film formation process. AFM images of samples anodized in the sulfide solution revealed surface pitting. Thicker films formed at higher potentials exhibited extensive cracking as observed by optical and electron microscopy, and this was explicitly demonstrated to occur ex situ rather than during the electrochemical treatment. The composition of the thick film was identified as In sub 2 S sub 3 by EDX and XPS. The measured film thickness varies linearly with the charge passed, and comparison between experimental thickness measurements and theoretical estimates for the thickness indicate a porosity of over 70 %. Cracking is attributed to shrinkage during drying of the highly porous film and does n...

  19. SÍNTESIS, CARACTERIZACIÓN ESTRUCTURAL Y PROPIEDADES MAGNÉTICAS DE COMPUESTOS SEMICONDUCTORES DEL TIPO Dy (x In (1-x Sb ISYNTHESIS, STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF SEMICONDUCTOR COMPOUNDS OF TYPE Dy x In (1-x S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides J. Velazco Rivero

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor compounds of molecular formula of type DyxIn (1-x Sb (x = 0,02; 0,03; 0,04; 0,05; 0,06 y 0,07 were synthesized by means of direct interaction of the elements under heat treatment to 550°C during 11 days in vacuum sealed quartz ampoules. The analyses by X-rays diffraction showed that the compounds with x = 0,02; 0,03 y 0,04 presented pure phases of InSb doped with Dy without presence of alternate phases of DySb. These compounds, analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy – SEM, showed particles with a variety of shapes and sizes each one. Whereas the magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that those doped compounds, in spite of their paramagnetic behavior, the predominant magnetic interaction is ferromagnetic due to their positive Curie temperature (θ

  20. Electron Tunneling in Junctions Doped with Semiconductors and Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lloyd Douglas, II

    In this study, tunnel junctions incorporating thin layers of semiconductors and metals have been analyzed. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) was employed to yield high-resolution vibrational spectra of surface species deposited at the oxide-M_2 interface of M_1-M_1O _{rm x}-M _2 tunneling samples. Analysis was also performed on the elastic component of the tunneling current, yielding information on the tunnel barrier shape. The samples in this research exhibit a wide range of behavior. The IETS for Si, SiO_2, and Ge doped samples show direct evidence of SiH _{rm x} and GeH_ {rm x} formation. The particular species formed is shown to depend on the form of the evaporated dopant. Samples were also made with organic dopants deposited over the evaporated dopants. Many such samples show marked effects of the evaporated dopants on the inelastic peak intensities of the organic dopants. These alterations are correlated with the changed reactivity of the oxide surface coupled with a change in the OH dipole layer density on the oxide. Thicker organic dopant layers cause large changes in the elastic tunneling barrier due to OH layer alterations or the low barrier attributes of the evaporated dopant. In the cases of the thicker layers an extra current-carrying mechanism is shown to be contributing. Electron ejection from charge traps is proposed as an explanation for this extra current. The trend of barrier shape with dopant thickness is examined. Many of these dopants also produce a voltage-induced shift in the barrier shape which is stable at low temperature but relaxes at high temperature. This effect is similar to that produced by certain organic dopants and is explained by metastable bond formation between the surface OH and dopant. Other dopants, such as Al, Mg, and Fe, produce different effects. These dopants cause large I-V nonlinearity at low voltages. This nonlinearity is modeled as a giant zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) and fits are presented which show good

  1. Crystallization of II-VI semiconductor compounds forming long microcrystalline linear assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Becerril

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report the formation of long microcrystalline linear self-assemblies observed during the thin film growth of several II-VI compounds. Polycrystalline CdTe, CdS, CdCO3, and nanocrystalline CdTe:Al thin films were prepared on glass substrates by different deposition techniques. In order to observe these crystalline formations in the polycrystalline materials, the thin film growth was suspended before the grains reached to form a continuous layer. The chains of semiconductor crystals were observed among many isolated and randomly distributed grains. Since CdTe, CdTe:Al, CdS and CdCO3 are not ferroelectric and/or ferromagnetic materials, the relevant problem would be to explain what is the mechanism through which the grains are held together to form linear chains. It is well known that some nanocrystalline materials form rods and wires by means of electrostatic forces. This occurs in polar semiconductors, where it is assumed that the attraction forces between surface polar faces of the small crystals are the responsible for the chains formation. Since there are not too many mechanisms responsible for the attraction we assume that a dipolar interaction is the force that originates the formation of chain-like grain clusters. The study of this property can be useful for the understanding of nucleation processes in the growth of semiconductor thin films.

  2. Properties of electronic emissions of semiconductors III-IV in a status of negative electron affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piaget, Claude

    1977-01-01

    This research thesis reports the use of various properties (electron emission, photo emission, secondary electron emission) to highlight the relationships between various solid properties (optical, electronic, structural properties), surfaces (clean or covered with adsorbates such as caesium and oxygen) and emission properties (quantum efficiency, energy distribution, and so on). The first part addresses applications, performance, physical properties and technological processes, and also problems related to the physics and chemistry of surfaces and adsorption layers. The second part reports a study of the main electron transport properties in emitters displaying a negative electron affinity, for example GaP. Some aspects of electron excitation by ultra-violet radiations and high energy electrons are studied from UV photo-emission properties and secondary electron emission. Then GaAs and similar pseudo-binary compounds are studied

  3. Distribution of volatile organic compounds over a semiconductor Industrial Park in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Kong-Hwa; Wu, Ben-Zen; Chang, Chih-Chung; Sree, Usha; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    2005-02-15

    This study examined volatile organic compounds (VOC) concentration in ambient air collected during the years 2000--2003 at several different locations of Hsinchu Science-based Industrial Park (HSIP) in Taiwan. A canister automated GC-MS system analyzed the volatile organics in ambient air grasp samples according to T0-15 method. Oxygenated volatiles were the most abundant VOC detected in HSIP followed by aromatics that are commonly used as solvents in the semiconductor industries. The major components measured in the ambient air are 2-propanol (29-135 ppbv), acetone (12-164 ppbv), benzene (0.7-1.7 ppbv), and toluene (13-20 ppbv). At some of the sampling locations, odorous compounds such as carbon disulfide and dimethyl sulfide levels exceed threshold values. The estimated toluene/benzene ratio is very high at most of the sites. However, the total amount of VOC is reduced over the years from 2000 to 2003 due to strict implementation on use and discharge of solvents in industries. There exists no definite seasonal pattern for sporadic occurrence of high levels of some of the volatile organics. Stagnant weather conditions with low wind speeds aid accumulation of toxic species at ground level. The results entail that hi-tech semiconductor industries are still a potential source for harmful organic substances to surrounding microenvironment.

  4. Mechanical properties of some binary, ternary and quaternary III-V compound semiconductor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navamathavan, R.; Arivuoli, D.; Attolini, G.; Pelosi, C.; Choi, Chi Kyu

    2007-01-01

    Vicker's microindentation tests have been carried out on InP/InP, GaAs/InP, InGaAs/InP and InGaAsP/InP III-V compound semiconductor alloys. The detailed mechanical properties of these binary, ternary and quaternary epilayers were determined from the indentation experiments. Microindentation studies of (1 1 1) GaAs/InP both A and B faces show that the hardness value increases with load and attains a constant for further increase in load and the microhardness values were found to lie between 3.5 and 4.0 GPa. The microhardness values of InGaAs/InP epilayers with different thickness were found to lie between 3.93 and 4.312 GPa. The microhardness values of InGaAsP/InP with different elemental composition were found to lie between 5.08 and 5.73 GPa. The results show that the hardness of the quaternary alloy drastically increases, the reason may be that the increase in As concentration hardens the lattice when phosphorous concentration is less and hardness decreases when phosphorous is increased. It was interestingly observed that the hardness value increases as we proceed from binary to quaternary III-V compound semiconductor alloys

  5. Ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shay, J L; Pamplin, B R

    2013-01-01

    Ternary Chalcopyrite Semiconductors: Growth, Electronic Properties, and Applications covers the developments of work in the I-III-VI2 and II-IV-V2 ternary chalcopyrite compounds. This book is composed of eight chapters that focus on the crystal growth, characterization, and applications of these compounds to optical communications systems. After briefly dealing with the status of ternary chalcopyrite compounds, this book goes on describing the crystal growth of II-IV-V2 and I-III-VI2 single crystals. Chapters 3 and 4 examine the energy band structure of these semiconductor compounds, illustrat

  6. Monte Carlo Studies of Electron Transport In Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Brian David

    An Ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) computer code has been developed to simulate, semi-classically, spin-dependent electron transport in quasi two-dimensional (2D) III-V semiconductors. The code accounts for both three-dimensional (3D) and quasi-2D transport, utilizing either 3D or 2D scattering mechanisms, as appropriate. Phonon, alloy, interface roughness, and impurity scattering mechanisms are included, accounting for the Pauli Exclusion Principle via a rejection algorithm. The 2D carrier states are calculated via a self-consistent 1D Schrodinger-3D-Poisson solution in which the charge distribution of the 2D carriers in the quantization direction is taken as the spatial distribution of the squared envelope functions within the Hartree approximation. The wavefunctions, subband energies, and 2D scattering rates are updated periodically by solving a series of 1D Schrodinger wave equations (SWE) over the real-space domain of the device at fixed time intervals. The electrostatic potential is updated by periodically solving the 3D Poisson equation. Spin-polarized transport is modeled via a spin density-matrix formalism that accounts for D'yakanov-Perel (DP) scattering. Also, the code allows for the easy inclusion of additional scattering mechanisms and structural modifications to devices. As an application of the simulator, the current voltage characteristics of an InGaAs/InAlAs HEMT are simulated, corresponding to nanoscale III-V HEMTs currently being fabricated by Intel Corporation. The comparative effects of various scattering parameters, material properties and structural attributes are investigated and compared with experiments where reasonable agreement is obtained. The spatial evolution of spin-polarized carriers in prototypical Spin Field Effect Transistor (SpinFET) devices is then simulated. Studies of the spin coherence times in quasi-2D structures is first investigated and compared to experimental results. It is found that the simulated spin coherence times for

  7. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  8. Rational In Silico Design of an Organic Semiconductor with Improved Electron Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Pascal; Gómez, Verónica; Sprau, Christian; Meded, Velimir; Strunk, Timo; Jenne, Michael; Magri, Andrea; Symalla, Franz; Colsmann, Alexander; Ruben, Mario; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2017-11-01

    Organic semiconductors find a wide range of applications, such as in organic light emitting diodes, organic solar cells, and organic field effect transistors. One of their most striking disadvantages in comparison to crystalline inorganic semiconductors is their low charge-carrier mobility, which manifests itself in major device constraints such as limited photoactive layer thicknesses. Trial-and-error attempts to increase charge-carrier mobility are impeded by the complex interplay of the molecular and electronic structure of the material with its morphology. Here, the viability of a multiscale simulation approach to rationally design materials with improved electron mobility is demonstrated. Starting from one of the most widely used electron conducting materials (Alq 3 ), novel organic semiconductors with tailored electronic properties are designed for which an improvement of the electron mobility by three orders of magnitude is predicted and experimentally confirmed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Electronic properties of electron and hole in type-II semiconductor nano-heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahul, K. Suseel [Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Riverside Transit Campus, Kasaragod, Kerala. India (India); Department of Physics, Sri Vyasa NSS College, Wadakkancheri, Thrissur, Kerala, PIN:680623. India (India); Souparnika, C. [Department of Physics, Sri Vyasa NSS College, Wadakkancheri, Thrissur, Kerala, PIN:680623. India (India); Salini, K.; Mathew, Vincent, E-mail: vincent@cukerala.ac.in [Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Riverside Transit Campus, Kasaragod, Kerala. India (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this project, we record the orbitals of electron and hole in type-II (CdTe/CdSe/CdTe/CdSe) semiconductor nanocrystal using effective mass approximation. In type-II the band edges of both valance and conduction band are higher than that of shell. So the electron and hole get confined in different layers of the hetero-structure. The energy eigen values and eigen functions are calculated by solving Schrodinger equation using finite difference matrix method. Based on this we investigate the effect of shell thickness and well width on energy and probability distribution of ground state (1s) and few excited states (1p,1d,etc). Our results predict that, type-II quantum dots have significant importance in photovoltaic applications.

  10. Electronic properties of electron and hole in type-II semiconductor nano-heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, K. Suseel; Souparnika, C.; Salini, K.; Mathew, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    In this project, we record the orbitals of electron and hole in type-II (CdTe/CdSe/CdTe/CdSe) semiconductor nanocrystal using effective mass approximation. In type-II the band edges of both valance and conduction band are higher than that of shell. So the electron and hole get confined in different layers of the hetero-structure. The energy eigen values and eigen functions are calculated by solving Schrodinger equation using finite difference matrix method. Based on this we investigate the effect of shell thickness and well width on energy and probability distribution of ground state (1s) and few excited states (1p,1d,etc). Our results predict that, type-II quantum dots have significant importance in photovoltaic applications.

  11. Electronic, phonon and superconducting properties of LaPtBi half-Heusler compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Deepika; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2018-05-01

    In the framework of density functional theory based on plane wave pseudopotential method and linear response technique, we have studied the electronic, phonon and superconducting properties of LaPtBi half-Heusler compound. The electronic band structure and density of states show that it is gapless semiconductor which is consistent with previous results. The positive phonon frequencies confirm the stability of this compound in cubic MgAgAs phase. Superconductivity is studied in terms of Eliashberg spectral function (α2F(ω)), electron-phonon coupling constants (λ). The value of electron-phonon coupling parameter is found to be 0.41 and the superconducting transition temperature is calculated to be 0.76 K, in excellent agreement with the experimentally reported values.

  12. Electron dynamics in metals and semiconductors in strong THz fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors and metals respond to strong electric fields in a highly nonlinear fashion. Using single-cycle THz field transients it is possible to investigate this response in regimes not accessible by transport-based measurements. Extremely high fields can be applied without material damage...

  13. Electron Beam Induced Radiation Damage of the Semiconductor Radiation Detector based on Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Kim, Yong Kyun; Park, Se Hwan; Haa, Jang Ho; Kang, Sang Mook; Chung, Chong Eun; Cho, Seung Yeon; Park, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Tae Hyung

    2005-01-01

    A Silicon Surface Barrier (SSB) semiconductor detector which is generally used to detect a charged particle such as an alpha particle was developed. The performance of the developed SSB semiconductor detector was measured with an I-V curve and an alpha spectrum. The response for an alpha particle was measured by Pu-238 sources. A SSB semiconductor detector was irradiated firstly at 30sec, at 30μA and secondly 40sec, 40μA with a 2MeV pulsed electron beam generator in KAERI. And the electron beam induced radiation damage of a homemade SSB detector and the commercially available PIN photodiode were investigated. An annealing effect of the damaged SSB and PIN diode detector were also investigated using a Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). This data may assist in designing the silicon based semiconductor radiation detector when it is operated in a high radiation field such as space or a nuclear power plant

  14. Radiation hardness and qualification of semiconductor electronic devices for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friant, A.; Payat, R.

    1984-05-01

    After a brief review of radiation effects in semiconductors and radiation damage in semiconductor devices, the problems of qualification of electronic equipment to be used in nuclear reactors are compared to those relative to nuclear weapons or space experiments. The conclusion is that data obtained at very high dose rates or under pulsed irradiation in weapons and space programs should not be directly applied to nuclear plant instrumentation. The need for a specific qualification of semiconductor devices appropriate for nuclear reactors is emphasized. Some irradiation studies at IRDI/DEIN (CEN-Saclay) are related [fr

  15. Comparison of electron and phonon transport in disordered semiconductor carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Lehmann, T.; Ryndyk, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    as a function of length of the disordered device shows that both electrons and phonons with different energies display different transport regimes, i.e. quasi-ballistic, diffusive and localization regimes coexist. In the light of the results we discuss heating of the semiconductor device in electronic...

  16. Smooth Growth of Organic Semiconductor Films on Graphene for High-Efficiency Electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hlawacek, G.; Khokhar, F.S.; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Teichert, Christian

    2011-01-01

    High-quality thin films of conjugated molecules with smooth interfaces are important to assist the advent of organic electronics. Here, we report on the layer-by-layer growth of the organic semiconductor molecule p-sexiphenyl (6P) on the transparent electrode material graphene. Low energy electron

  17. Towards quantum optics and entanglement with electron spin ensembles in semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Caspar H.; Sladkov, Maksym

    We discuss a technique and a material system that enable the controlled realization of quantum entanglement between spin-wave modes of electron ensembles in two spatially separated pieces of semiconductor material. The approach uses electron ensembles in GaAs quantum wells that are located inside

  18. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Anders J., E-mail: anders.barlow@ncl.ac.uk; Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J. [National EPSRC XPS Users' Service (NEXUS), School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-κ dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025 nm/min (3.95 × 10{sup −2} amu/atom in ion) for 6 keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  19. The WSPC Reference on Organic Electronics: Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-12

    In this chapter, we provide a basic theoretical perspective on charge-carrier transport in organic semiconductors, with a focus on organic molecular crystals. We introduce the microscopic parameters relevant to the intrinsic charge-transport properties of these materials and describe some of the common quantum-chemical approaches used for their evaluation. We also discuss the nature of the possible charge-transport mechanisms in organic molecular crystals.

  20. Quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wayne Heung

    This thesis examines the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems. A theory is developed to study the electron-hole generation-recombination process of type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions based on a 3 x 3 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (three-band model) and an 8 x 8 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (eight-band model). A novel electron-hole generation and recombination process, which is called activationless generation-recombination process, is predicted. It is demonstrated that the current through the type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions is governed by the activationless electron-hole generation-recombination process at the heterointerfaces, and that the current-voltage characteristics are essentially linear. A qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is observed. The numerical results of the eight-band model are compared with those of the threeband model. Based on a lattice gas model, a theory is developed to study the influence of a random potential on the ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. It is demonstrated that ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs change drastically in the presence of strong disorder. It is predicted that strong disorder promotes dissociation of excitons in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. A theory of polariton (photon dressed by phonon) spontaneous emission in a III--V semiconductor doped with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells (QWs) is developed. For the first time, superradiant and subradiant polariton spontaneous emission phenomena in a polariton-QD (QW) coupled system are predicted when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie outside the polaritonic energy gap. It is also predicted that when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie inside the polaritonic energy gap, spontaneous emission of polariton in the polariton

  1. Refractive index of ternary and quaternary compound semiconductors below the fundamental absorption edge: Linear and nonlinear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.; Torabi, A.

    1985-01-01

    The index of refraction n is calculated as a function of frequency and mole fraction x for the following compounds: Hg/sub l-x/Cd/sub x/Te, Al/sub x/Ga/sub l-x/As, and In/sub l-x/Ga/sub x/As/sub y/P/sub l-y/ lattice matched to InP. Lattice matching of In/sub l-x/Ga/sub x/As/sub y/P/sub l-y/ to InP requires that x = 0.466 y. The theoretical result for the refractive index is obtained from a quantum mechanical calculation of the dielectric constant of a compound semiconductor. It is given in terms of the basic material parameters of band gap energy, effective electron mass m/sub n/, effective heavy hole mass m/sub rho/, spin orbit splitting energy, lattice constant, and carrier concentration n/sub e/ or rho for n-type or rho-type materials, respectively. If these quantities are known as functions of mole fraction x, there are no adjustable parameters involved. A negative change in the refractive index near the fundamental absorption edge is predicted on passing radiation through a crystal if the change in carrier concentration of the initially unoccupied conduction band is assumed proportional to internal intensity I. Comparison of theory with experimental data is given

  2. Electronic configurations and energies in some thermodynamically correlated laves compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.M.

    1979-04-01

    The known electronic configurations of simple elements in Laves compounds are correlated with those of the more complex systems to determine their electronic configurations and gaseous state promotion energies

  3. Semiconductor Quantum Electron Wave Transport, Diffraction, and Interference: Analysis, Device, and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory Newell

    Semiconductor device dimensions are rapidly approaching a fundamental limit where drift-diffusion equations and the depletion approximation are no longer valid. In this regime, quantum effects can dominate device response. To increase further device density and speed, new devices must be designed that use these phenomena to positive advantage. In addition, quantum effects provide opportunities for a new class of devices which can perform functions previously unattainable with "conventional" semiconductor devices. This thesis has described research in the analysis of electron wave effects in semiconductors and the development of methods for the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum devices based on these effects. First, an exact set of quantitative analogies are presented which allow the use of well understood optical design and analysis tools for the development of electron wave semiconductor devices. Motivated by these analogies, methods are presented for modeling electron wave grating diffraction using both an exact rigorous coupled-wave analysis and approximate analyses which are useful for grating design. Example electron wave grating switch and multiplexer designs are presented. In analogy to thin-film optics, the design and analysis of electron wave Fabry-Perot interference filters are also discussed. An innovative technique has been developed for testing these (and other) electron wave structures using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). This technique uses a liquid-helium temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform spectroscopy of the electron transmittance as a function of electron energy. Experimental results show that BEEM can resolve even weak quantum effects, such as the reflectivity of a single interface between materials. Finally, methods are discussed for incorporating asymmetric electron wave Fabry-Perot filters into optoelectronic devices. Theoretical and experimental results show that such structures could

  4. SEM evaluation of metallization on semiconductors. [Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh, D. L.; Adolphsen, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A test method for the evaluation of metallization on semiconductors is presented and discussed. The method has been prepared in MIL-STD format for submittal as a proposed addition to MIL-STD-883. It is applicable to discrete devices and to integrated circuits and specifically addresses batch-process oriented defects. Quantitative accept/reject criteria are given for contact windows, other oxide steps, and general interconnecting metallization. Figures are provided that illustrate typical types of defects. Apparatus specifications, sampling plans, and specimen preparation and examination requirements are described. Procedures for glassivated devices and for multi-metal interconnection systems are included.

  5. Role of 3d electrons in formation of ionic-covalent bonds in II-VI based ternary compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Iwanowski, R.J.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-01-01

    In the II-VI compounds doped with transition metals (diluted magnetic semiconductors) a substitution of cation by the introduced magnetic ion leads to hybridization of its 3d states with the sp states of the host semiconductor. The degree of hybridization of the 3d states and its interaction with the host material band states has been a subject of numerous discussions. Inner shell absorption spectroscopy provides very useful means of electronic structure analysis in a wide variety of systems. Due to its selectivity for atomic species and the selection rules for electron transitions, the soft X-ray absorption technique offers quite unique opportunity to measure directly the site-selective local density of the unoccupied d states in the compounds studied. Results are reported for ZnS compounds with Mn, Fe, Co or Ni substitutions for Zn

  6. Monolayer graphene-insulator-semiconductor emitter for large-area electron lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirley, Matthew P.; Aloui, Tanouir; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2017-06-01

    The rapid adoption of nanotechnology in fields as varied as semiconductors, energy, and medicine requires the continual improvement of nanopatterning tools. Lithography is central to this evolving nanotechnology landscape, but current production systems are subject to high costs, low throughput, or low resolution. Herein, we present a solution to these problems with the use of monolayer graphene in a graphene-insulator-semiconductor (GIS) electron emitter device for large-area electron lithography. Our GIS device displayed high emission efficiency (up to 13%) and transferred large patterns (500 × 500 μm) with high fidelity (industries and opening opportunities in nanomanufacturing.

  7. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, S I [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ing Metalurgica y Q. Inorganica, F. de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Galindo, P L [Departamento de Lenguajes y Sistemas Informaticos, CASEM, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus Rio San Pedro. 11510 Puerto Real (Cadiz) (Spain); Gonzalez, L; Ripalda, J M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid (CNM, CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Varela, M; Pennycook, S J, E-mail: sergio.molina@uca.e [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled {sup S}elf-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE){sup .}

  8. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... Strongly correlated electron systems: Overview ... Mutual interaction of electrons dominates their kinetic energies giving rise to ... transport properties. .... Low energy spin-flip excitations of a spin chain with lattice constant 1/n ...

  9. NaAuS chicken-wire-like semiconductor: Electronic structure and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshak, A.H.; Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Kamarudin, H.; Bila, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chicken wire like semiconductor NaAuS was investigated. • Good agreement with experimental data was found. • Electronic charge density of chicken wire like semiconductor NaAuS was obtained. • The calculated uniaxial anisotropy is −0.0005, indicating the strong anisotropy. -- Abstract: The electronic structure, charge density and optical properties of NaAuS a chicken-wire-like semiconductor was calculated using full potential linear augmented plane wave based on density functional theory. The Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Becke Ernzerhof Generalized gradient approximation and Engel Voskov Generalized Gradient Approximation were applied to solve the exchange correlation potential. The investigation of band structures and density of states elucidates that Engle Vasko Generalized Gradient Approximation shows close agreement to the experimental data. The calculated valence charge density shows pure ionic nature of Au–Au bond. It becomes partially covalent when Au is connected with two Na atoms. The linear optical susceptibilities of chicken-wire-like NaAuS semiconductor are calculated so as to obtain further insight into the electronic properties. The uniaxial anisotropy is −0.0005, indicating the strong anisotropy of the dielectric function in the NaAuS a chicken-wire-like semiconductor

  10. NaAuS chicken-wire-like semiconductor: Electronic structure and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Saleem Ayaz, E-mail: sayaz_usb@yahoo.com [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Bila, Jiri [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Chicken wire like semiconductor NaAuS was investigated. • Good agreement with experimental data was found. • Electronic charge density of chicken wire like semiconductor NaAuS was obtained. • The calculated uniaxial anisotropy is −0.0005, indicating the strong anisotropy. -- Abstract: The electronic structure, charge density and optical properties of NaAuS a chicken-wire-like semiconductor was calculated using full potential linear augmented plane wave based on density functional theory. The Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Becke Ernzerhof Generalized gradient approximation and Engel Voskov Generalized Gradient Approximation were applied to solve the exchange correlation potential. The investigation of band structures and density of states elucidates that Engle Vasko Generalized Gradient Approximation shows close agreement to the experimental data. The calculated valence charge density shows pure ionic nature of Au–Au bond. It becomes partially covalent when Au is connected with two Na atoms. The linear optical susceptibilities of chicken-wire-like NaAuS semiconductor are calculated so as to obtain further insight into the electronic properties. The uniaxial anisotropy is −0.0005, indicating the strong anisotropy of the dielectric function in the NaAuS a chicken-wire-like semiconductor.

  11. P-type Oxide Semiconductors for Transparent & Energy Efficient Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2018-03-11

    Emerging transparent semiconducting oxide (TSO) materials have achieved their initial commercial success in the display industry. Due to the advanced electrical performance, TSOs have been adopted either to improve the performance of traditional displays or to demonstrate the novel transparent and flexible displays. However, due to the lack of feasible p-type TSOs, the applications of TSOs is limited to unipolar (n-type TSOs) based devices. Compared with the prosperous n-type TSOs, the performance of p-type counterparts is lag behind. However, after years of discovery, several p-type TSOs are confirmed with promising performance, for example, tin monoxide (SnO). By using p-type SnO, excellent transistor field-effect mobility of 6.7 cm2 V-1 s-1 has been achieved. Motivated by this encouraging performance, this dissertation is devoted to further evaluate the feasibility of integrating p-type SnO in p-n junctions and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices. CMOS inverters are fabricated using p-type SnO and in-situ formed n-type tin dioxide (SnO2). The semiconductors are simultaneously sputtered, which simplifies the process of CMOS inverters. The in-situ formation of SnO2 phase is achieved by selectively sputtering additional capping layer, which serves as oxygen source and helps to balance the process temperature for both types of semiconductors. Oxides based p-n junctions are demonstrated between p-type SnO and n-type SnO2 by magnetron sputtering method. Diode operating ideality factor of 3.4 and rectification ratio of 103 are achieved. A large temperature induced knee voltage shift of 20 mV oC-1 is observed, and explained by the large band gap and shallow states in SnO, which allows minor adjustment of band structure in response to the temperature change. Finally, p-type SnO is used to demonstrating the hybrid van der Waals heterojunctions (vdWHs) with two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (2D MoS2) by mechanical exfoliation. The hybrid vdWHs show

  12. Oxide Ferromagnetic Semiconductors for Spin-Electronic Transprt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the viability of oxide magnetic semiconductors as potential materials for spintronics. We identified some members of the solid solution series of ilmenite (FeTiO3) and hematite (Fe2O3), abbreviated as (IH) for simplicity, for our investigations based on their ferromagnetic and semiconducting properties. With this objective in focus we limited our investigations to the following members of the modified Fe-titanates: IH33 (ilmenitehematite with 33 atomic percent hematite), IH45 (ilmenite-hematite with 45 atomic percent hematite), Mn-substituted ilmenite (Mn-FeTiO3), and Mn-substituted pseudobrookite (Mn- Fe2TiO5). All of them are: (1) wide bandgap semiconductors with band gaps ranging in values between 2.5 to 3.5 eV; (2) n-type semiconductors; (3) they exhibit well defined magnetic hysteresis loops and (4) their magnetic Curie points are greater than 400K. Ceramic, film and single crystal samples were studied and based on their properties we produced varistors (also known as voltage dependent resistors) for microelectronic circuit protection from power surges, three-terminal microelectronic devices capable of generating bipolar currents, and an integrated structured device with controlled magnetic switching of spins. Eleven refereed journal papers, three refereed conference papers and three invention disclosures resulted from our investigations. We also presented invited papers in three international conferences and one national conference. Furthermore two students graduated with Ph.D. degrees, three with M.S. degrees and one with B.S. degree. Also two post-doctoral fellows were actively involved in this research. We established the radiation hardness of our devices in collaboration with a colleague in an HBCU institution, at the Cyclotron Center at Texas A and M University, and at DOE National Labs (Los Alamos and Brookhaven). It is to be appreciated that we met most of our goals and expanded vastly the scope of

  13. Analytical Electron Diffraction from Iii-V and II-Vi Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellward, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a number of new TEM-based techniques for the measurement of composition in ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. New methods of polarity determination in binary and ternary compounds are also presented. The theory of high energy electron diffraction is outlined, with particular emphasis on zone axis diffraction from well-defined strings. An account of TEM microstructural studies of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te and CdTe epitaxial layers, which provided the impetus for developing the diffraction-based analytical techniques, is given. The wide range of TEM-based compositional determination techniques is described. The use of HOLZ deficiency lines to infer composition from a lattice parameter measurement is evaluated. In the case of Cd_{ rm x}Hg_{rm 1-x}Te, it is found to be inferior to other techniques developed. Studies of dynamical aspects of HOLZ diffraction can yield information about the dispersion surface from which a measure of composition may be obtained. This technique is evaluated for Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As, in which it is found to be of some use, and for Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te, in which the large Debye-Waller factor associated with mercury in discovered to render the method of little value. A number of critical voltages may be measured in medium voltage TEMs. The (111) zone axis critical voltage of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te is found to vary significantly with x and forms the basis of an accurate technique for composition measurement in that ternary compound. Other critical voltage phenomena are investigated. In Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As and other light ternaries, a non-systematic critical voltage is found to vary with x, providing a good indicator of composition. Critical voltage measurements may be made by conventional CBED or by various other techniques, which may also simultaneously yield information on the spatial variation of composition. The

  14. Inelastic light scattering by low-lying excitations of electrons in low-dimensional semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, V. [NEST CNR-INFM and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Pinczuk, A. [Department of Physics, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey (United States)

    2006-11-15

    The low-dimensional electron systems that reside in artificial semiconductor heterostructures of great perfection are a contemporary materials base for explorations of collective phenomena. Studies of low-lying elementary excitations by inelastic light scattering offer insights on properties such energetics, interactions and spin magnetization. We review here recent light scattering results obtained from two-dimensional (2D) quantum fluids in semiconductor heterostructures under extreme conditions of low temperature and large magnetic field, where the quantum Hall phases are archetypes of novel behaviors. We also consider recent light scattering experiments that have probed the excitation spectra of few-electron states in semiconductor quantum dots. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. MBE-grown semiconductor nanostructures with electronic and photonic confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Riis

    In this thesis the realization of semiconductor nanostructures in the InAlGaAs material system with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is described, as well as the characterization of their optical properties. First, the growth conditions used for different materials and surfaces are given, and the gen...... a microcavity is measured and analysed, where a good qualitative agreement with theories for Rayleigh scattering is found, ant he so-called polariton bottleneck is observed....... well is also taken into account, which is demonstrated in a microcavity with a reduced light-matter interaction. For the polariton with the lowest eigenenergy, it is shown that the probability for scattering on lattice vibrations or free carriers is reduced. Finally, the secondary emission from...

  16. Nanopillar arrays on semiconductor membranes as electron emission amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hua; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Blick, Robert H

    2008-03-05

    A new transmission-type electron multiplier was fabricated from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material by integrating an array of one-dimensional (1D) silicon nanopillars onto a two-dimensional (2D) silicon membrane. Primary electrons are injected into the nanopillar-membrane (NPM) system from the flat surface of the membrane, while electron emission from the nanopillars is probed by an anode. The secondary electron yield (SEY) from the nanopillars in the current device is found to be about 1.8 times that of the plain silicon membrane. This gain in electron number is slightly enhanced by the electric field applied from the anode. Further optimization of the dimensions of the NPM and an application of field emission promise an even higher gain for detector applications and allow for probing of electronic/mechanical excitations in an NPM system stimulated by incident particles or radiation.

  17. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1987-01-01

    In-depth exploration of the implications of carrier populations and Fermi energies examines distribution of electrons in energy bands and impurity levels of semiconductors. Also: kinetics of semiconductors containing excess carriers, particularly in terms of trapping, excitation, and recombination.

  18. Electron Band Alignment at Interfaces of Semiconductors with Insulating Oxides: An Internal Photoemission Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri V. Afanas'ev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of the electron energy band alignment at interfaces between different semiconductors and wide-gap oxide insulators is examined using the internal photoemission spectroscopy, which is based on observations of optically-induced electron (or hole transitions across the semiconductor/insulator barrier. Interfaces of various semiconductors ranging from the conventional silicon to the high-mobility Ge-based (Ge, Si1-xGex, Ge1-xSnx and AIIIBV group (GaAs, InxGa1-xAs, InAs, GaP, InP, GaSb, InSb materials were studied revealing several general trends in the evolution of band offsets. It is found that in the oxides of metals with cation radii larger than ≈0.7 Å, the oxide valence band top remains nearly at the same energy (±0.2 eV irrespective of the cation sort. Using this result, it becomes possible to predict the interface band alignment between oxides and semiconductors as well as between dissimilar insulating oxides on the basis of the oxide bandgap width which are also affected by crystallization. By contrast, oxides of light elements, for example, Be, Mg, Al, Si, and Sc exhibit significant shifts of the valence band top. General trends in band lineup variations caused by a change in the composition of semiconductor photoemission material are also revealed.

  19. Predamage threshold electron emission from insulator and semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekhaus, W.J.; Kinney, J.H.; Milam, D.

    1985-01-01

    Predamage electron emission shows a dependence on fluence, bandgap and wavelength consistent with multiphoton excitation across the bandgap and inconsistent with avalanche ionization and thermionic emission models. The electron emission scales with pulselength as 1/√T. 6 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  20. The impact of semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries on downstream perfluorinated chemical contamination in Taiwanese rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lo, Chao-Chun

    2009-01-01

    This study provides the first evidence on the influence of the semiconductor and electronics industries on perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) contamination in receiving rivers. We have quantified ten PFCs, including perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFASs: PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs: PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA) in semiconductor, electronic, and optoelectronic industrial wastewaters and their receiving water bodies (Taiwan's Keya, Touchien, and Xiaoli rivers). PFOS was found to be the major constituent in semiconductor wastewaters (up to 0.13 mg/L). However, different PFC distributions were found in electronics plant wastewaters; PFOA was the most significant PFC, contributing on average 72% to the effluent water samples, followed by PFOS (16%) and PFDA (9%). The distribution of PFCs in the receiving rivers was greatly impacted by industrial sources. PFOS, PFOA and PFDA were predominant and prevalent in all the river samples, with PFOS detected at the highest concentrations (up to 5.4 μg/L). - The semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries are the primary source of PFC contamination in downstream aqueous environments

  1. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    show that this type of conduction is measurable using new types of experimental probes, such as the multi-tip scanning tunnelling microscope and the micro-four-point probe. The resulting electronic transport properties are intriguing, and suggest that semiconductor surfaces should be considered...

  2. Towards quantitative electrostatic potential mapping of working semiconductor devices using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pronounced improvements in the understanding of semiconductor device performance are expected if electrostatic potential distributions can be measured quantitatively and reliably under working conditions with sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we employ off-axis electron...... holography to characterize an electrically-biased Si p-. n junction by measuring its electrostatic potential, electric field and charge density distributions under working conditions. A comparison between experimental electron holographic phase images and images obtained using three-dimensional electrostatic...

  3. Semiconductor inversion contact - a new heterogeneous structure with two-dimensional zero-mass electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, B.A.; Pankratov, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    Semiconductor inversion junction, presenting the contact of materials in which energy levels corresponding to band edges are mutually inverted. At that, the symmetry of wave function of conductivity band in one material coincides with the symmetry of valence band of the other and vice versa. Specificity of the inversion contact is determined by the presence of electron states independent of the transition band type, which are similar to soliton ones in one-dimensional systems. In the region of the junction the states are characterized by linear massless spectrum nondegenerate in spin. Energy spectrum of the inversion junction for semiconductors of the Pb 1-x Sn y Te x type is considered

  4. Transmission electron microscopy in situ investigation of dislocation mobility in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderschaeve, G; Insa, P D T; Caillard, D

    2000-01-01

    TEM in situ straining experiments provide a unique way to investigate in real time the behaviour of individual dislocations under applied stress. The results obtained on a variety of semiconductors are presented: numerous dislocation sources are observed which makes it possible to measure the dislocation velocity as a function of different physical parameters (local shear stress, temperature, dislocation character, length of the moving dislocation, ...). The experimental results are consistent with a dislocation glide governed by the Peierls mechanism, even for II-VI compounds which have a significant degree of ionic character. For compounds, a linear dependence of the dislocation velocity on the length of the moving segment is noticed, whereas for elemental semiconductors a transition between a length-dependent and a length-independent velocity regime is observed. Analysed in the framework of the kink diffusion model (Hirth and Lothe theory), these results allow an estimation of the kink formation and migrat...

  5. Development and application of nuclear radiation detector made from high resistivity silicon and compound semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Honglin; Zhang Xiufeng; Zhang Wanchang; Li Jiang

    1995-11-01

    The development of high resistivity silicon detectors and compound semiconductor detectors as well as their application in nuclear medicine are described. It emphasizes on several key techniques in fabricating detectors in order to meet their application in nuclear medicine. As for a high resistivity silicon detector, its counting rate to 125 I 28.5 keV X-ray has to be improved. So employing a conic mesa structure can increase the thickness of samples, and can raise the electric field of collecting charges under the same bias voltage. As for a GaAs detector, its performance of collecting charges has to be improved. So the thicknesses of GaAs samples are decreased and proper thermal treatment to make Ni-Ge-Au ohmic contacts are employed. Applying a suitable reverse bias voltage can obtain a fully depleted detector, and can obtain a lower forward turn-on voltage and a thinner weak electric field region. After resolving these key techniques, the performance of GaAs detectors has been distinctly improved. The count rate to 125 I X-ray has increased by three or five times under the same testing condition and background circumstance (2 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.)

  6. Pulse-height loss in the signal readout circuit of compound semiconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhostin, M.; Hitomi, K.

    2018-06-01

    Compound semiconductor detectors such as CdTe, CdZnTe, HgI2 and TlBr are known to exhibit large variations in their charge collection times. This paper considers the effect of such variations on the measurement of induced charge pulses by using resistive feedback charge-sensitive preamplifiers. It is shown that, due to the finite decay-time constant of the preamplifiers, the capacitive decay during the signal readout leads to a variable deficit in the measurement of ballistic signals and a digital pulse processing method is employed to correct for it. The method is experimentally examined by using sampled pulses from a TlBr detector coupled to a charge-sensitive preamplifier with 150 μs of decay-time constant and 20 % improvement in the energy resolution of the detector at 662 keV is achieved. The implications of the capacitive decay on the correction of charge-trapping effect by using depth-sensing technique are also considered.

  7. Molding compound development with semiconductor PKGs; Handotai PKG doko to fushi jushi zairyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, I. [NEC Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-05

    This paper describes the semiconductor packaging and molding compound materials. Major constituents of the molding resins are epoxy resin and inorganic silica, to which various additives are added. In order to make thin packages, biphenyl-based resins with low viscosity are often used in response to high fluidity. To fill the clearance less than 100 {mu}m, size adjusting techniques of the inorganic silica are also significant apart from resins. Since it is heated under the water absorption condition for the packaging in substrates, low water absorption, high adhesion, high strength and low stress are required to avoid peeling and cracking due to the vapor pressure of moisture. Generation of voids is also a problem. Improvement of productivity by reducing the processing period is also significant. In response to the strict environmental regulation, disuse of brominated epoxy and antimony oxide which are flame retardants in the molding resins is an urgent problem to be solved. For the epoxy resins, bisphenol A is to be regulated as a mutation substance. The cost reduction is required with keeping current quality kept. 1 fig.

  8. Peculiarities of charge transport in a semiconductor gas discharge electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.; Chivi, M.; Salamov, B.G.; Salamov, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    The memory effect in planar semiconductor gas discharge system at different pressures (15-760) and interelectrode distance (60-445 μm) were experimentally studied. The study was performed on the bases of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) measurements with the time lag of several hours of afterglow periods. The influence of the active space-charge remaining from previous discharge on the breakdown voltage has been analyzed using the CVC method for different conductivity of semiconductor GaAs photocathode. On the other hand, the CVC data for subsequent dates present a correlation of memory effect and hysteresis behaviour. The explanation of such relation is based on the influence of long-lived active charges on the electronic transport mechanism of semiconductor material

  9. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3

  10. Mechanical Properties of Organic Semiconductors for Stretchable, Highly Flexible, and Mechanically Robust Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Samuel E; Savagatrup, Suchol; Printz, Adam D; Rodriquez, Daniel; Lipomi, Darren J

    2017-05-10

    Mechanical deformability underpins many of the advantages of organic semiconductors. The mechanical properties of these materials are, however, diverse, and the molecular characteristics that permit charge transport can render the materials stiff and brittle. This review is a comprehensive description of the molecular and morphological parameters that govern the mechanical properties of organic semiconductors. Particular attention is paid to ways in which mechanical deformability and electronic performance can coexist. The review begins with a discussion of flexible and stretchable devices of all types, and in particular the unique characteristics of organic semiconductors. It then discusses the mechanical properties most relevant to deformable devices. In particular, it describes how low modulus, good adhesion, and absolute extensibility prior to fracture enable robust performance, along with mechanical "imperceptibility" if worn on the skin. A description of techniques of metrology precedes a discussion of the mechanical properties of three classes of organic semiconductors: π-conjugated polymers, small molecules, and composites. The discussion of each class of materials focuses on molecular structure and how this structure (and postdeposition processing) influences the solid-state packing structure and thus the mechanical properties. The review concludes with applications of organic semiconductor devices in which every component is intrinsically stretchable or highly flexible.

  11. Mössbauer studies of two-electron centers with negative correlation energy in crystalline and amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Nemov, S. A.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    The results of the study of donor U − -centers of tin and germanium in lead chalcogenides by Mössbauer emission spectroscopy are discussed. The published data regarding the identification of amphoteric U − -centers of tin in glassy binary arsenic and germanium chalcogenides using Mössbauer emission spectroscopy, and in multicomponent chalcogenide glasses using Mössbauer absorption spectroscopy are considered. Published data concerning the identification of two-atom U − -centers of copper in lattices of semimetal copper oxides by Mössbauer emission spectroscopy are analyzed. The published data on the detection of spatial inhomogeneity of the Bose-Einstein condensate in superconducting semiconductors and semimetal compounds, and on the existence of the correlation between the electron density in lattice sites and the superconducting transition temperature are presented. The principal possibility of using Mössbauer U − -centers as a tool for studying the Bose-Einstein condensation of electron pairs during the superconducting phase transition in semiconductors and semimetals is considered.

  12. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-11-18

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  13. Resonance fluorescence and electron spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yong

    2009-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation contains the first observation of spin-resolved resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot and its application of direct measurement of electron spin dynamics. The Mollow triplet and the Mollow quintuplet, which are the hallmarks of resonance fluorescence, are presented as the non-spin-resolved and spin-resolved resonance fluorescence spectrum, respectively. The negligible laser background contribution, the near pure radiative broadened spectrum and the anti-bunching photon statistics imply the sideband photons are background-free and near transform-limited single photons. This demonstration is a promising step towards the heralded single photon generation and electron spin readout. Instead of resolving spectrum, an alternative spin-readout scheme by counting resonance fluorescence photons under moderate laser power is demonstrated. The measurements of n-shot time-resolved resonance fluorescence readout are carried out to reveal electron spin dynamics of the measurement induced back action and the spin relaxation. Hyperfine interaction and heavy-light hole mixing are identified as the relevant mechanisms for the back action and phonon-assistant spin-orbit interaction dominates the spin relaxation. After a detailed discussion on charge-spin configurations in coupled quantum dots system, the single-shot readout on electron spin are proposed. (orig.)

  14. Opto-electronic and quantum transport properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabathil, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a novel and efficient method for the calculation of the ballistic transport properties of open semiconductor nanostructures connected to external reservoirs is presented. It is based on the Green's function formalism and reduces the effort to obtain the transmission and the carrier density to a single solution of a hermitian eigenvalue problem with dimensions proportional to the size of the decoupled device and the multiple inversion of a small matrix with dimensions proportional to the size of the contacts to the leads. Using this method, the 4-band GaAs hole transport through a 2-dimensional three-terminal T-junction device, and the resonant tunneling current through a 3-dimensional InAs quantum dot molecule embedded into an InP heterostructure have been calculated. The further extension of the method into a charge self-consistent scheme enables the efficient prediction of the IV-characteristics of highly doped nanoscale field effect transistors in the ballistic regime, including the influence of quasi bound states and the exchange-correlation interaction. Buettiker probes are used to emulate the effect of inelastic scattering on the current for simple 1D devices, systematically analyzing the dependence of the density of states and the resulting self-consistent potential on the scattering strength. The second major topic of this work is the modeling of the optical response of quantum confined neutral and charged excitons in single and coupled self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. For this purpose the existing device simulator nextnano{sup 3} has been extended to incorporate particle-particle interactions within the means of density functional theory in local density approximation. In this way the exciton transition energies for neutral and charged excitons as a function of an externally applied electric field have been calculated, revealing a systematic reduction of the intrinsic dipole with the addition of extra holes to the exciton, a finding

  15. Bond charge approximation for valence electron density in elemental semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashenov, V.K.; Gorbachov, V.E.; Marvakov, D.I.

    1985-07-01

    The spatial valence electron distribution in silicon and diamond is calculated in adiabatic bond charge approximation at zero temperature when bond charges have the Gaussian shape and their tensor character is taken into account. An agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved. For this purpose Xia's ionic pseudopotentials and Schulze-Unger's dielectric function are used. By two additional parameters Asub(B) and Zsub(B)sup(') we describe the spatial extent of the bond charge and local-field corrections, respectively. The parameter Zsub(B)sup(') accounts for the ratio between the Coulomb and exchange correlation interactions of the valence electrons and its silicon and diamond values have different signs. (author)

  16. Fundamental models of electronic transport in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1982-01-01

    Significant fundamental questions lie at the heart of our understanding of the electronic and optical properties of semiconducting and insulating glasses. In this article the principal features of the Mott-CFO model and the small-polaron model are described. While the Mott-CFO model seems to apply to the high-mobility electron transport in glassy SiO 2 and Cd 2 As 3 it does not appear applicable to the most frequently studied chalocogenide glasses. Furthermore, the Mott-CFO model does not account for as basic a feature as the sign of the Hall effect. On the other hand, the small-polaron model accounts for the observed d.c. conductivity, Peltier heat and Hall mobility in a very simple and direct manner

  17. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  18. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  19. Electron-energy relaxation in polar semiconductor double quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Khás, Zdeněk; Zdeněk, Petr; Čerňanský, Marian; Lin, C. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 27 (2001), s. 3503-3512 ISSN 0217-9792 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010113; GA MŠk OC P5.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron ic energy relaxation * zero-dimensional nanostructures Subject RIV: BE - The oretical Physics Impact factor: 0.523, year: 2001

  20. Electron structure of amorphous semi-conductor states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiid, D.H.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical properties of amorphous materials are determined by their electron states. Since the electrons are much lighter than the massive ions, the energy levels of the electrons are extremely sensitive to changes in the states of the ions, e.g. a change in their positions. A method has been developed to approximate the positional disorder inthe crystal by a compositional disorder, i.e. the substitution, in a pure crystal, of ions by impurities. The advantage of this lies in the retention of the periodicity of the lattice. This model is linked with an investigation at present under way, in which the mobility, electrical resistance, etc. of a silicon crystal is determined as a function of its amorphous state. It is for instance possible to control the degree of disorder in the crystal, and the problem is to characterise the disorder by a specific parameter. For theoretical calculations such a parameter is essential and it is therefore also the biggest shortcoming in all the theories that, as far as is known, have been developed. It is possible to set up a general phenomenological theory for, for example, electrical resistance, but in view of its complex nature only rough approximations can be made [af

  1. Interlayer electron-hole pair multiplication by hot carriers in atomic layer semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Fatemeh; Grossnickle, Max; Su, Shanshan; Lake, Roger; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel

    Two-dimensional heterostructures composed of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides provide the opportunity to design novel devices for the study of electron-hole pair multiplication. We report on highly efficient multiplication of interlayer electron-hole pairs at the interface of a tungsten diselenide / molybdenum diselenide heterostructure. Electronic transport measurements of the interlayer current-voltage characteristics indicate that layer-indirect electron-hole pairs are generated by hot electron impact excitation. Our findings, which demonstrate an efficient energy relaxation pathway that competes with electron thermalization losses, make 2D semiconductor heterostructures viable for a new class of hot-carrier energy harvesting devices that exploit layer-indirect electron-hole excitations. SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  3. Electronic-state control of amino acids on semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masato; Nakayama, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Electronic structures of amino acids on the Si(1 1 1) surfaces are investigated by using ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations. It is shown that among various polar amino acids, a histidine is the only one that can be positively ionized when hole carriers are supplied in the Si substrate, by transferring the hole charge from Si substrate to an amino acid. This result indicates that the ionization of a histidine, which will activate the protein functions, can be controlled electrically by producing amino acid/Si junctions

  4. Photo-Induced Electron Spin Polarization in a Narrow Band Gap Semiconductor Nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2012-01-01

    Photo-induced spin dependent electron transmission through a narrow gap InSb/InGa x Sb 1−x semiconductor symmetric well is theoretically studied using transfer matrix formulism. The transparency of electron transmission is calculated as a function of electron energy for different concentrations of gallium. Enhanced spin-polarized photon assisted resonant tunnelling in the heterostructure due to Dresselhaus and Rashba spin-orbit coupling induced splitting of the resonant level and compressed spin-polarization are observed. Our results show that Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is dominant for the photon effect and the computed polarization efficiency increases with the photon effect and the gallium concentration

  5. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum wire in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt-Riera, Ri; Nieto Jalil, J M; Riera, R; Betancourt-Riera, Re; Rosas, R

    2008-01-01

    The differential cross-section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum wire in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of confinement is calculated. We assume a single parabolic conduction band. The emission spectra for different scattering configurations and the selection rules for the processes are studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted. The electron Raman scattering studied here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band and subband structure of these confinement systems. The magnetic field distribution is considered constant with value B 0 inside the wire and zero outside

  6. Electronic and optical properties of defect CdIn_2Te_4 chalcopyrite semiconductor: A first principle approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.; Ganguli, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present detailed study of structural, electronic and optical properties of CdIn_2Te_4 compound. The calculations are carried out using Density Functional theory based Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Orbital method. The compound is found to be direct band gap semiconductor with a band gap of 1.03 eV. The band gap is within the limit of LDA underestimation. The calculated structural parameters agree well with the available experimental values. We find a decrements of 9.6% in band gap and significant effects on overall electronic and optical properties due to structural distortions. These effects on optical properties come mainly from the change in transition probability. An-isotropic nature of optical properties get enhanced due to structural distortion. The Calculated real & imaginary parts of dielectric constant and static dielectric constant agree well with the available experimental result. - Highlights: • We present ab-initio calculations of electronic & optical properties of CdIn_2Te_4. • Band gap get reduced by 9.6% due to structural distortion. • Structural distortion has significant effects on optical properties. • Anisotropic nature of optical response functions get enhanced by structural distortion. • Calculated dielectric constant agrees with experimental value.

  7. Electron-phonon interaction in Chevrel-phase compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainer, D.; Pobell, F.

    1981-03-01

    Experiments on the electron-phonon interaction in Chevrel-phase compounds (CPC) and a theoretical discussion of their results are presented. The authors particularly discuss measurements of the isotope effect of the transition temperature in Mo 6 Se 8 and SnMo 6 S 8 and tunneling spectroscopy experiments on Cu 1 . 8 Mo 6 S 8 and PbMo 6 S 8 . These investigations have been performed to get information about the strength of the electron-phonon interaction in CPC, and about the question whether there are phonon modes which couple particularly strongly to the electrons in these compounds. (orig./GSCH)

  8. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-10-19

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  9. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  10. Byproduct-free mass production of compound semiconductor nanowires: zinc phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixi; Polinnaya, Rakesh; Vaddiraju, Sreeram

    2018-05-01

    A method for the mass production of compound semiconductor nanowires that involves the direct reaction of component elements in a chemical vapor deposition chamber (CVD) is presented. This method results in nanowires, without the associated production of any other byproducts such as nanoparticles or three-dimensional (3D) bulk crystals. Furthermore, no unreacted reactants remain mixed with the nanowire product in this method. This byproduct-free nanowire production thus circumvents the need to tediously purify and collect nanowires from a mixture of products/reactants after their synthesis. Demonstration made using zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) material system as an example indicated that the direct reaction of zinc microparticles with phosphorus supplied via the vapor phase results in the production of gram quantities of nanowires. To enhance thermal transport and achieve the complete reaction of zinc microparticles, while simultaneously ensuring that the microparticles do not agglomerate into macroscale zinc particles and partly remain unreacted (owing to diffusion limitations), pellets composed of mixtures of zinc and a sacrificial salt, NH4Cl, were employed as the starting material. The sublimation by decomposition of NH4Cl in the early stages of the reaction leaves a highly porous pellet of zinc composed of only zinc microparticles, which allows for inward diffusion of phosphorus/outward diffusion of zinc and the complete conversion of zinc into Zn3P2 nanowires. NH4Cl also aids in removal of any native oxide layer present on the zinc microparticles that may prevent their reaction with phosphorus. This method may be used to mass produce many other nanowires in a byproduct-free manner, besides Zn3P2.

  11. Heterogeneous semiconductor photocatalysts for hydrogen production from aqueous solutions of electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, E. A.; Parmon, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    Current views on heterogeneous photocatalysts for visible- and near-UV-light-driven production of molecular hydrogen from water and aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic electron donors are analyzed and summarized. Main types of such photocatalysts and methods for their preparation are considered. Particular attention is paid to semiconductor photocatalysts based on sulfides that are known to be sensitive to visible light. The known methods for increasing the quantum efficiency of the target process are discussed, including design of the structure, composition and texture of semiconductor photocatalysts and variation of the medium pH and the substrate and photocatalyst concentrations. Some important aspects of the activation and deactivation of sulfide photocatalysts and the evolution of their properties in the course of hydrogen production processes in the presence of various types of electron donors are analyzed. The bibliography includes 276 references.

  12. Off-axis electron holography for the measurement of active dopants in silicon semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David

    2016-01-01

    There is a need in the semiconductor industry for a dopant profiling technique with nm-scale resolution. Here we demonstrate that off-axis electron holography can be used to provide maps of the electrostatic potential in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. In this paper we will discuss issues regarding the spatial resolution and precision of the technique. Then we will discuss problems with specimen preparation and how this affects the accuracy of the measurements of the potentials. Finally we show results from experimental off-axis electron holography applied to nMOS and pMOS CMOS devices grown on bulk silicon and silicon- on-insulator type devices and present solutions to common problems that are encountered when examining these types of devices. (paper)

  13. Electronic paramagnetic resonance in the Mn In X (X:Te,S) diluted magnetic semiconductor system; Resonancia paramagnetica electronica en el sistema semiconductor magnetico diluido Cd Mn In X (X:Te,S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, Bernardo; Betancourt, Luis; Sagredo, Vicente [Universidad de los Andes, Merida (Venezuela). Dept. de Fisica; Alcala, Rafael [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica de la Materia Condensada

    1997-12-31

    Semiconductor compounds wit the II-III-VI stoichiometry are very interesting materials since they present very good semiconducting characteristics and, along with strong magnetic properties, these II Mn In VI compounds have a great potential as opt and magneto-electronic devices. Among the possible magnetic properties of the materials is the presence of the spin-glass phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance is one of the techniques used to confirm this phase. The chosen crystals were chosen by chemical vapor transport. The absorption lines of these two families with 0.1 x 1 were all Lorentzian in shape and centred at g=2. A large broadening of the resonance line width was observed when lowering the temperature to below 80 K. This behaviour was fitted to the known existing models, and good values of the calculated parameters were obtained (author). 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Tunable electronic transport properties of silicon-fullerene-linked nanowires: Semiconductor, conducting wire, and tunnel diode

    OpenAIRE

    Nishio, Kengo; Ozaki, Taisuke; Morishita, Tetsuya; Mikami, Masuhiro

    2010-01-01

    We explore the possibility of controllable tuning of the electronic transport properties of silicon-fullerene-linked nanowires by encapsulating guest atoms into their cages. Our first-principles calculations demonstrate that the guest-free nanowires are semiconductors, and do not conduct electricity. The iodine or sodium doping improves the transport properties, and makes the nanowires metallic. In the junctions of I-doped and Na-doped NWs, the current travels through the boundary by quantum ...

  15. Semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices on {110} oriented substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2014-08-05

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices on {110} textured substrates are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  16. [100] or [110] aligned, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2015-03-24

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, large-area, [100] or [110] textured, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  17. {100} or 45.degree.-rotated {100}, semiconductor-based, large-area, flexible, electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2012-05-15

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate the same resulting in flexible, {100} or 45.degree.-rotated {100} oriented, semiconductor-based, electronic devices are disclosed. Potential applications of resulting articles are in areas of photovoltaic devices, flat-panel displays, thermophotovoltaic devices, ferroelectric devices, light emitting diode devices, computer hard disc drive devices, magnetoresistance based devices, photoluminescence based devices, non-volatile memory devices, dielectric devices, thermoelectric devices and quantum dot laser devices.

  18. Relaxation of electron energy in the coupled polar semiconductor quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Khás, Zdeněk; Zdeněk, Petr; Čerňanský, Marian; Lin, C. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 49, 10-11 (2001), s. 1011-1018 ISSN 0015-8208 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010113; GA MŠk OC P5.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : coupled polar semiconductor quantum dots * electron energy relaxation Subject RIV: BE - The oretical Physics Impact factor: 1.043, year: 2001

  19. Hot electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: Implications for quantum dot photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, William A., III

    Finding a viable supply of clean, renewable energy is one of the most daunting challenges facing the world today. Solar cells have had limited impact in meeting this challenge because of their high cost and low power conversion efficiencies. Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, are promising materials for use in novel solar cells because they can be processed with potentially inexpensive solution-based techniques and because they are predicted to have novel optoelectronic properties that could enable the realization of ultra-efficient solar power converters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the behavior of highly-excited, or "hot," charge carriers near quantum-dot and semiconductor interfaces, which is of paramount importance to the rational design of high-efficiency devices. The elucidation of these ultrafast hot electron dynamics is the central aim of this Dissertation. I present a theoretical framework for treating the electronic interactions between quantum dots and bulk semiconductor surfaces and propose a novel experimental technique, time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TR-SHG), for probing these interactions. I then describe a series of experimental investigations into hot electron dynamics in specific quantum-dot/semiconductor systems. A two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (2PPE) study of the technologically-relevant ZnO(1010) surface reveals ultrafast (sub-30fs) cooling of hot electrons in the bulk conduction band, which is due to strong electron-phonon coupling in this highly polar material. The presence of a continuum of defect states near the conduction band edge results in Fermi-level pinning and upward (n-type) band-bending at the (1010) surface and provides an alternate route for electronic relaxation. In monolayer films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots, chemical treatment with either hydrazine or 1,2-ethanedithiol results in strong and tunable electronic coupling between neighboring quantum dots

  20. Semiconductor GaAs: electronic paramagnetic resonance new data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchiguer, T.

    1994-04-01

    The topic of this study was to put to the fore, thanks to our electron spin resonance experiments, one charge transfer process, which was optically induced between the deep donor As + G a and the different acceptors, which were present in the material. We described these processes through a theoretical model, which we named charge transfer model. With this latter, we were able to trace a graph network, representing the As + G a concentration kinetics. Then we verified the compatibility of our model with one transport experiment. One experimental verification of our model were delivered, thanks to neutronic transmutation doping. The following stage was the study of defects, induced by thermal strains, to which the crystal was submitted during the cooling phase. At last we wanted to get round the non solved super hyperfine structure problem for GaAs by studying another III-V material for which she was resolved, namely gallium phosphide. (MML). 150 refs., 72 figs., 16 tabs., 3 annexes

  1. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  2. The impact of semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries on downstream perfluorinated chemical contamination in Taiwanese rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lo, Chao-Chun

    2009-04-01

    This study provides the first evidence on the influence of the semiconductor and electronics industries on perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) contamination in receiving rivers. We have quantified ten PFCs, including perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFASs: PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs: PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA) in semiconductor, electronic, and optoelectronic industrial wastewaters and their receiving water bodies (Taiwan's Keya, Touchien, and Xiaoli rivers). PFOS was found to be the major constituent in semiconductor wastewaters (up to 0.13 mg/L). However, different PFC distributions were found in electronics plant wastewaters; PFOA was the most significant PFC, contributing on average 72% to the effluent water samples, followed by PFOS (16%) and PFDA (9%). The distribution of PFCs in the receiving rivers was greatly impacted by industrial sources. PFOS, PFOA and PFDA were predominant and prevalent in all the river samples, with PFOS detected at the highest concentrations (up to 5.4 microg/L).

  3. Electronic structure calculations on nitride semiconductors and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugdale, D.

    2000-09-01

    Calculations of the electronic properties of AIN, GaN, InN and their alloys are presented. Initial calculations are performed using the first principles pseudopotential method to obtain accurate lattice constants. Further calculations then investigate bonding in the nitrides through population analysis and density of state calculations. The empirical pseudopotential method is also used in this work. Pseudopotentials for each of the nitrides are constructed using a functional form that allows strained material and alloys to be studied. The conventional k.p valence band parameters for both zincblende and wurtzite are obtained from the empirical band structure using two different methods. A Monte-Carlo fitting of the k.p band structure to the pseudopotential data (or an effective mass method for the zincblende structure) is used to produce one set. Another set is obtained directly from the momentum matrix elements and energy eigenvalues at the centre of the Brillouin zone. Both methods of calculating k.p parameters produce band structure in excellent agreement with the original empirical band calculations near the centre of the Brillouin zone. The advantage of the direct method is that it produces consistent sets of parameters, and can be used in studies involving a series of alloy compositions. Further empirical pseudopotential method calculations are then performed for alloys of the nitrides. In particular, the variation of the band gap with alloy composition is investigated, and good agreement with theory and experiment is found. The direct method is used to obtain k.p parameters for the alloys, and is contrasted with the fitting approach. The behaviour of the nitrides under strain is also studied. In particular. valence band offsets for nitride heterojunctions are calculated, and a strong forward- backward asymmetry in the band offset is found, in good agreement with other results in the literature. (author)

  4. Crystal step edges can trap electrons on the surfaces of n-type organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Wu, Yanfei; D'Avino, Gabriele; Schmidt, Elliot; Stolte, Matthias; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David; Ruden, P Paul; Würthner, Frank; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2018-05-30

    Understanding relationships between microstructure and electrical transport is an important goal for the materials science of organic semiconductors. Combining high-resolution surface potential mapping by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) with systematic field effect transport measurements, we show that step edges can trap electrons on the surfaces of single crystal organic semiconductors. n-type organic semiconductor crystals exhibiting positive step edge surface potentials display threshold voltages that increase and carrier mobilities that decrease with increasing step density, characteristic of trapping, whereas crystals that do not have positive step edge surface potentials do not have strongly step density dependent transport. A device model and microelectrostatics calculations suggest that trapping can be intrinsic to step edges for crystals of molecules with polar substituents. The results provide a unique example of a specific microstructure-charge trapping relationship and highlight the utility of surface potential imaging in combination with transport measurements as a productive strategy for uncovering microscopic structure-property relationships in organic semiconductors.

  5. Lead Halide Perovskites as Charge Generation Layers for Electron Mobility Measurement in Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John A; Feuerstein, Markus; Wolff, Christian M; Facchetti, Antonio; Neher, Dieter

    2017-12-06

    Hybrid lead halide perovskites are introduced as charge generation layers (CGLs) for the accurate determination of electron mobilities in thin organic semiconductors. Such hybrid perovskites have become a widely studied photovoltaic material in their own right, for their high efficiencies, ease of processing from solution, strong absorption, and efficient photogeneration of charge. Time-of-flight (ToF) measurements on bilayer samples consisting of the perovskite CGL and an organic semiconductor layer of different thickness are shown to be determined by the carrier motion through the organic material, consistent with the much higher charge carrier mobility in the perovskite. Together with the efficient photon-to-electron conversion in the perovskite, this high mobility imbalance enables electron-only mobility measurement on relatively thin application-relevant organic films, which would not be possible with traditional ToF measurements. This architecture enables electron-selective mobility measurements in single components as well as bulk-heterojunction films as demonstrated in the prototypical polymer/fullerene blends. To further demonstrate the potential of this approach, electron mobilities were measured as a function of electric field and temperature in an only 127 nm thick layer of a prototypical electron-transporting perylene diimide-based polymer, and found to be consistent with an exponential trap distribution of ca. 60 meV. Our study furthermore highlights the importance of high mobility charge transporting layers when designing perovskite solar cells.

  6. Advanced understanding on electronic structure of molecular semiconductors and their interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Kouki

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of organic semiconductors and their interfaces is critical to optimizing functionalities for electronics applications, by rational chemical design and appropriate combination of device constituents. The unique electronic structure of a molecular solid is characterized as (i) anisotropic electrostatic fields that originate from molecular quadrupoles, (ii) interfacial energy-level lineup governed by simple electrostatics, and (iii) weak intermolecular interactions that make not only structural order but also energy distributions of the frontier orbitals sensitive to atmosphere and interface growth. This article shows an overview on these features with reference to the improved understanding of the orientation-dependent electronic structure, comprehensive mechanisms of molecular doping, and energy-level alignment. Furthermore, the engineering of ionization energy by the control of the electrostatic fields and work function of practical electrodes by contact-induced doping is briefly described for the purpose of highlighting how the electronic structure impacts the performance of organic devices.

  7. Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography with improved lateral resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickmann, Jan, E-mail: jan.sickmann@triebenberg.de [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Formanek, Petr; Linck, Martin [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Muehle, Uwe [Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Technische Universitaet Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Lichte, Hannes [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute of Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Electron holography is the highest resolving tool for dopant profiling at nanometre-scale resolution. In order to measure the object areas of interest in a hologram, both a wide field of view and a sufficient lateral resolution are required. The usual path of rays for recording holograms with an electron biprism using the standard objective lens does not meet these requirements, because the field of view amounts to some 10 nm only, however, at a resolution of 0.1 nm better than needed here. Therefore, instead of the standard objective lens, the Lorentz lens is widely used for holography of semiconductors, since it provides a field of view up to 1000 nm at a sufficient lateral resolution of about 10 nm. Since the size of semiconductor structures is steadily shrinking, there is now a need for better lateral resolution at an appropriate field of view. Therefore, additional paths of rays for recording holograms are studied with special emphasis on the parameters field of view and lateral resolution. The findings allow an optimized scheme with a field of view of 200 nm and a lateral resolution of 3.3 nm filling the gap between the existing set-ups. In addition, the Lorentz lens is no longer required for investigation of non-magnetic materials, since the new paths of rays are realized with the standard objective lens and diffraction lens. An example proves the applicability of this arrangement for future semiconductor technology. -- Research highlights: {yields} Imaging modes for potential mapping in semiconductor devices by electron holography. {yields} Using objective and diffraction lens for imaging instead of Lorentz lens. {yields} Detailed investigation of four different paths of rays and its basic parameters for holographic application: field of view, lateral resolution, signal resolution. {yields} Measuring the phase profile of a field effect transistor with 3 nm lateral resolution at field of view of 200 nm.

  8. X-ray electron investigation of technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, V.N.; Kryuchkov, S.V.; Kuzina, A.F.; Kulakov, V.M.; Pirozhkov, S.V.; Spitsyn, V.I.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    1982-01-01

    Investigation results of a number of technetium compounds using the method of X-ray electron spectroscopy have been presented for the first time. Calculation of effective charge for compounds without Tc-Tc bond and cluster complexes with strong Tc-Tc bond is made. Strong interdependence of effective charge and properties of technetium clusters is shown. Binding energies for certain cluster complexes of technetium with halides are given

  9. Defect-driven interfacial electronic structures at an organic/metal-oxide semiconductor heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, Paul; Schirra, Laura K; Cornil, David; Li, Hong; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Ndione, Paul F; Sigdel, Ajaya K; Ginley, David S; Berry, Joseph J; Shim, Jaewon; Kim, Hyungchui; Kippelen, Bernard; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Monti, Oliver L A

    2014-07-16

    The electronic structure of the hybrid interface between ZnO and the prototypical organic semiconductor PTCDI is investigated via a combination of ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS/XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The interfacial electronic interactions lead to a large interface dipole due to substantial charge transfer from ZnO to 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide (PTCDI), which can be properly described only when accounting for surface defects that confer ZnO its n-type properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dosimetry with semiconductor diodes in the application to the full-length irradiation technique of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid G, O. A.; Rivera M, T.

    2012-10-01

    The use of charged particles as electrons for the tumor-like lesions treatment to total surface of skin is not very frequent, the types of fungo id mycosis and cutaneous lymphomas compared with other neoplasms they are relatively scarce, however for the existent cases a non conventional technique should be contemplated as treatment alternative that can reach an effective control. In this work the variables of more influence with ionization chamber and semiconductor diodes are studied for to determine the quality of an electrons beam. (Author)

  11. Quantum computation in semiconductor quantum dots of electron-spin asymmetric anisotropic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiang; Zhu Shiqun

    2007-01-01

    The universal quantum computation is obtained when there exists asymmetric anisotropic exchange between electron spins in coupled semiconductor quantum dots. The asymmetric Heisenberg model can be transformed into the isotropic model through the control of two local unitary rotations for the realization of essential quantum gates. The rotations on each qubit are symmetrical and depend on the strength and orientation of asymmetric exchange. The implementation of the axially symmetric local magnetic fields can assist the construction of quantum logic gates in anisotropic coupled quantum dots. This proposal can efficiently use each physical electron spin as a logical qubit in the universal quantum computation

  12. Nanoscopic diffusion studies on III-V compound semiconductor structures: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Debs, Mariam

    The electronic structure of multilayer semiconductor heterostructures is affected by the detailed compositional profiles throughout the structure and at critical interfaces. The extent of interdiffusion across these interfaces places limits on both the processing time and temperatures for many applications based on the resultant compositional profile and associated electronic structure. Atomic and phenomenological methods were used in this work through the combination of experiment and theory to understand the nanoscopic mechanisms in complex heterostructures. Two principal studies were conducted. Tin diffusion in GaAs was studied by fitting complex experimental diffusion profiles to a phenomenological model which involved the diffusion of substitutional and interstitial dopant atoms. A methodology was developed combining both the atomistic model and the use of key features within these experimentally-obtained diffusion profiles to determine meaningful values of the transport and defect reaction rate parameters. Interdiffusion across AlSb/GaSb multi-quantum well interfaces was also studied. The chemical diffusion coefficient characterizing the AlSb/GaSb diffusion couple was quantitatively determined by fitting the observed photoluminescence (PL) peak shifts to the solution of the Schrodinger equation using a potential derived from the solution of the diffusion equation to quantify the interband transition energy shifts. First-principles calculations implementing Density Functional Theory were performed to study the thermochemistry of point defects as a function of local environment, allowing a direct comparison of interfacial and bulk diffusion phenomena within these nanoscopic structures. Significant differences were observed in the Ga and Al vacancy formation energies at the AlSb/GaSb interface when compared to bulk AlSb and GaSb with the largest change found for Al vacancies. The AlSb/GaSb structures were further studied using positron annihilation spectroscopy

  13. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  14. Energy resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for electronic structure mapping in organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nádaždy, V., E-mail: nadazdy@savba.sk; Gmucová, K. [Institute of Physics SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Schauer, F. [Faculty of Education, Trnava University in Trnava, 918 43 Trnava (Slovakia); Faculty of Applied Informatics, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, 760 05 Zlin (Czech Republic)

    2014-10-06

    We introduce an energy resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to map the electronic density of states (DOS) in organic semiconductor materials. The method consists in measurement of the charge transfer resistance of a semiconductor/electrolyte interface at a frequency where the redox reactions determine the real component of the impedance. The charge transfer resistance value provides direct information about the electronic DOS at the energy given by the electrochemical potential of the electrolyte, which can be adjusted using an external voltage. A simple theory for experimental data evaluation is proposed, along with an explanation of the corresponding experimental conditions. The method allows mapping over unprecedentedly wide energy and DOS ranges. Also, important DOS parameters can be determined directly from the raw experimental data without the lengthy analysis required in other techniques. The potential of the proposed method is illustrated by tracing weak bond defect states induced by ultraviolet treatment above the highest occupied molecular orbital in a prototypical σ-conjugated polymer, poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene]. The results agree well with those of our previous DOS reconstruction by post-transient space-charge-limited-current spectroscopy, which was, however, limited to a narrow energy range. In addition, good agreement of the DOS values measured on two common π-conjugated organic polymer semiconductors, polyphenylene vinylene and poly(3-hexylthiophene), with the rather rare previously published data demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  15. Electronic Transport Parameter of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor On-Tube Heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Nanotubes research is one of the top five hot research topics in physics since 2006 because of its unique properties and functionalities, which leads to wide-range applications. One of the most interesting potential applications is in term of nanoelectronic device. It has been modeled carbon nanotubes heterojunction, which was built from two different carbon nanotubes, that one is metallic and the other one is semiconducting. There are two different carbon nanotubes metal-semiconductor heterojunction. The first one is built from CNT(10,10 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (17,0 as semiconductor carbon nanotube. The other one is built from CNT (5,5 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (8,0. All of the semiconducting carbon nanotubes are assumed to be a pyridine-like N-doped. Those two heterojunctions are different in term of their structural shape and diameter. It has been calculated their charge distribution and potential profile, which would be useful for the simulation of their electronic transport properties. The calculations are performed by using self-consistent method to solve Non-Homogeneous Poisson’s Equation with aid of Universal Density of States calculation method for Carbon Nanotubes. The calculations are done by varying the doping fraction of the semiconductor carbon nanotubes The electron tunneling transmission coefficient, for low energy region, also has been calculated by using Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB approximation. From the calculation results, it is obtained that the charge distribution as well as the potential profile of this device is doping fraction dependent. It is also inferred that the WKB method is fail to be used to calculate whole of the electron tunneling coefficient in this system. It is expected that further calculation for electron tunneling coefficient in higher energy region as well as current-voltage characteristic of this system will become an interesting issue for this carbon nanotube based

  16. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt-Riera, Re.; Betancourt-Riera, Ri.; Nieto Jalil, J. M.; Riera, R.

    2015-01-01

    We study the electron states and the differential cross section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum well wire of cylindrical ring geometry. The electron Raman scattering developed here can be used to provide direct information about the electron band structures of these confinement systems. We assume that the system grows in a GaAs/Al 0.35 Ga 0.65 As matrix. The system is modeled by considering T = 0 K and also a single parabolic conduction band, which is split into a sub-band system due to the confinement. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations, and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. Singularities in the spectra are found and interpreted. (paper)

  17. Highly solvatochromic emission of electron donor-acceptor compounds containing propanedioato boron electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Bakker, N.A.C.; Wiering, P.G.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Light-induced electron transfer occurs in bifunctional compounds consisting of 1,3-diphenylpropanedioato boron oxalate or fluoride electron acceptors and simple aromatic electron-donor groups, linked by a methylene bridge; fluorescence from the highly polar charge-transfer excited state is

  18. Ferromagnetic semiconductor-metal transition in heterostructures of electron doped europium monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stollenwerk, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, we develop and solve a self-consistent theory for the description of the simultaneous ferromagnetic semiconductor-metal transition in electron doped Europium monoxide. We investigate two different types of electron doping, Gadolinium impurities and Oxygen vacancies. Besides the conduction band occupation, we can identify low lying spin fluctuations on magnetic impurities as the driving force behind the doping induced enhancement of the Curie temperature. Moreover, we predict the signatures of these magnetic impurities in the spectra of scanning tunneling microscope experiments. By extending the theory to allow for inhomogeneities in one spatial direction, we are able to investigate thin films and heterostructures of Gadolinium doped Europium monoxide. Here, we are able to reproduce the experimentally observed decrease of the Curie temperature with the film thickness. This behavior is attributed to missing coupling partners of the localized 4f moments as well as to an electron depletion at the surface which leads to a reduction of the number of itinerant electrons. By investigating the influence of a metallic substrate onto the phase transition in Gadolinium doped Europium monoxide, we find that the Curie temperature can be increased up to 20%. However, as we show, the underlying mechanism of metal-interface induced charge carrier accumulation is inextricably connected to a suppression of the semiconductor-metal transition.

  19. Ferromagnetic semiconductor-metal transition in heterostructures of electron doped europium monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stollenwerk, Tobias

    2013-09-15

    In the present work, we develop and solve a self-consistent theory for the description of the simultaneous ferromagnetic semiconductor-metal transition in electron doped Europium monoxide. We investigate two different types of electron doping, Gadolinium impurities and Oxygen vacancies. Besides the conduction band occupation, we can identify low lying spin fluctuations on magnetic impurities as the driving force behind the doping induced enhancement of the Curie temperature. Moreover, we predict the signatures of these magnetic impurities in the spectra of scanning tunneling microscope experiments. By extending the theory to allow for inhomogeneities in one spatial direction, we are able to investigate thin films and heterostructures of Gadolinium doped Europium monoxide. Here, we are able to reproduce the experimentally observed decrease of the Curie temperature with the film thickness. This behavior is attributed to missing coupling partners of the localized 4f moments as well as to an electron depletion at the surface which leads to a reduction of the number of itinerant electrons. By investigating the influence of a metallic substrate onto the phase transition in Gadolinium doped Europium monoxide, we find that the Curie temperature can be increased up to 20%. However, as we show, the underlying mechanism of metal-interface induced charge carrier accumulation is inextricably connected to a suppression of the semiconductor-metal transition.

  20. Binding energies and chemical shifts of least bound core electron excitations in cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechstedt, F.; Enderlein, R.; Wischnewski, R.

    1981-01-01

    Core electron binding energies Esup(B) with respect to the vacuum level and their chemical shifts are calculated for the least bound core levels of cations and anions of cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors. Starting from the HF-binding energy of the free atom absolute values of Esup(B) are obtained by adding core level shifts and relaxation energies. Core level shifts are calculated by means of an electrostatic model with ionic and bond charges according to Phillips' bond charge model. For the calculation of relaxation energies the linear dielectric theory of electronic polarization is applied. Valence and core electrons, and diagonal and non-diagonal screening are taken into account. The theoretical results for chemical shifts of binding energies are compared with experimental values from XPS-measurements corrected by work function data. Good agreement is obtained in all cases within the error limit of about one eV. Chemical and atomic trends of core level shifts, relaxation energies, and binding energies are discussed in terms of changes of atomic and solid state parameters. Chemical shifts and relaxation energies are predicted for various ternary Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) compounds. (author)

  1. Binding of two-electron metastable states in semiconductor quantum dots under a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garagiola, Mariano; Pont, Federico M.; Osenda, Omar

    2018-04-01

    Applying a strong enough magnetic field results in the binding of few-electron resonant states. The mechanism was proposed many years ago but its verification in laboratory conditions is far more recent. In this work we study the binding of two-electron resonant states. The electrons are confined in a cylindrical quantum dot which is embedded in a semiconductor wire. The geometry considered is similar to the one used in actual experimental setups. The low-energy two-electron spectrum is calculated numerically from an effective-mass approximation Hamiltonian modelling the system. Methods for binding threshold calculations in systems with one and two electrons are thoroughly studied; in particular, we use quantum information quantities to assess when the strong lateral confinement approximation can be used to obtain reliable low-energy spectra. For simplicity, only cases without bound states in the absence of an external field are considered. Under these conditions, the binding threshold for the one-electron case is given by the lowest Landau energy level. Moreover, the energy of the one-electron bounded resonance can be used to obtain the two-electron binding threshold. It is shown that for realistic values of the two-electron model parameters it is feasible to bind resonances with field strengths of a few tens of tesla.

  2. Dynamics of photoexcited quasiparticles in heavy electron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demsar, Jure; Sarrao, John L; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond real-time spectroscopy is an emerging new tool for studying low energy electronic structure in correlated electron systems. Motivated by recent advances in understanding the nature of relaxation phenomena in various correlated electron systems (superconductors, density wave systems) the technique has been applied to heavy electron compounds in comparison with their non-magnetic counterparts. While the dynamics in their non-magnetic analogues are similar to the dynamics observed in noble metals (only weak temperature dependences are observed) and can be treated with a simple two-temperature model, the photoexcited carrier dynamics in heavy electron systems show dramatic changes as a function of temperature and excitation level. In particular, below some characteristic temperature the relaxation rate starts to decrease, dropping by more than two orders of magnitude upon cooling down to liquid He temperatures. This behaviour has been consistently observed in various heavy fermion metals as well as Kondo insulators, and is believed to be quite general. In order to account for the experimental observations, two theoretical models have been proposed. The first treats the heavy electron systems as simple metals with very flat electron dispersion near the Fermi level. An electron-phonon thermalization scenario can account for the observed slowing down of the relaxation provided that there exists a mechanism for suppression of electron-phonon scattering when both the initial and final electronic states lie in the region of flat dispersion. An alternative scenario argues that the relaxation dynamics in heavy electron systems are governed by the Rothwarf-Taylor bottleneck, where the dynamics are governed by the presence of a narrow gap in the density of states near the Fermi level. The so-called hybridization gap results from hybridization between localized moments and the conduction electron background. Remarkable agreement with the model suggests that carrier

  3. Electronic Structure of GdCuGe Intermetallic Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Knyazev, Yu. V.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic structure of GdCuGe intermetallic compound has been studied. Spin-polarized energy spectrum calculations have been performed by the band method with allowance for strong electron correlations in the 4 f-shell of gadolinium ions. Antiferromagnetic ordering of GdCuGe at low temperatures has been obtained in a theoretical calculation, with the value of the effective magnetic moment of gadolinium ions reproduced in fair agreement with experimental data. The electronic density of states has been analyzed. An optical conductivity spectrum has been calculated for GdCuGe; it reveals specific features that are analogous to the ones discovered previously in the GdCuSi compound with a similar hexagonal structure.

  4. Berry phase dependent quantum trajectories of electron-hole pairs in semiconductors under intense terahertz fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2013-03-01

    Quantum evolution of particles under strong fields can be approximated by the quantum trajectories that satisfy the stationary phase condition in the Dirac-Feynmann path integrals. The quantum trajectories are the key concept to understand strong-field optics phenomena, such as high-order harmonic generation (HHG), above-threshold ionization (ATI), and high-order terahertz siedeband generation (HSG). The HSG in semiconductors may have a wealth of physics due to the possible nontrivial ``vacuum'' states of band materials. We find that in a spin-orbit-coupled semiconductor, the cyclic quantum trajectories of an electron-hole pair under a strong terahertz field accumulates nontrivial Berry phases. We study the monolayer MoS2 as a model system and find that the Berry phases are given by the Faraday rotation angles of the pulse emission from the material under short-pulse excitation. This result demonstrates an interesting Berry phase dependent effect in the extremely nonlinear optics of semiconductors. This work is supported by Hong Kong RGC/GRF 401512 and the CUHK Focused Investments Scheme.

  5. A novel method for simultaneous observations of plasma ion and electron temperatures using a semiconductor-detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Numakura, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Minami, R.; Watanabe, H.; Sasuga, T.; Nishizawa, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Nagashima, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Ogura, K.; Tamano, T.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.

    2002-01-01

    A new method for a simultaneous observation of both plasma ion and electron temperatures is proposed using one semiconductor-detector array alone. This method will provide a new application of semiconductor-detector arrays for monitoring the key parameter set of nuclear-fusion triple product (i.e., ion temperatures, densities, and confinement time) as well as for clarifying physics mechanisms of energy transport between plasma ions and electrons under various plasma confining conditions. This method is developed on the basis of an alternative 'positive' use of a semiconductor 'dead layer'; that is, an SiO 2 layer is employed as a reliable ultra-thin energy analysis filter for low-energy charge-exchanged neutral particles from plasmas ranging in ion temperatures from 0.1 to several tens of kilo-electron-volts. Using recent fabrication techniques for the thin and uniform SiO 2 layers of the order of tens to hundreds of angstrom, our computer simulation and its experimental verification show the availability of such semiconductors for distinguishing neutral particles (for ion temperatures) from X-rays (for electron temperatures). These are simultaneously emitted from the plasmas into semiconductor detectors; however, we employ their quite different penetration lengths and the resultant different deposition depths and profiles in semiconductor materials. As a result, their output signals are distinguishable for these two different and fundamental species of plasmas

  6. Hot-electron-based solar energy conversion with metal-semiconductor nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Lee, Changhwan; Hwang, Euyheon; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Energy dissipation at metal surfaces or interfaces between a metal and a dielectric generally results from elementary excitations, including phonons and electronic excitation, once external energy is deposited to the surface/interface during exothermic chemical processes or an electromagnetic wave incident. In this paper, we outline recent research activities to develop energy conversion devices based on hot electrons. We found that photon energy can be directly converted to hot electrons and that hot electrons flow through the interface of metal-semiconductor nanodiodes where a Schottky barrier is formed and the energy barrier is much lower than the work function of the metal. The detection of hot electron flow can be successfully measured using the photocurrent; we measured the photoyield of photoemission with incident photons-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE). We also show that surface plasmons (i.e. the collective oscillation of conduction band electrons induced by interaction with an electromagnetic field) are excited on a rough metal surface and subsequently decay into secondary electrons, which gives rise to enhancement of the IPCE. Furthermore, the unique optical behavior of surface plasmons can be coupled with dye molecules, suggesting the possibility for producing additional channels for hot electron generation.

  7. Self-consistent electronic structure of spin-polarized dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. P.; Yi, K. S.; Quinn, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The electronic properties of spin-symmetry-broken dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum wells are investigated self-consistently at zero temperature. The spin-split subband structure and carrier concentration of modulation-doped quantum wells are examined in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The effects of exchange and correlations of electrons are included in a local-spin-density-functional approximation. We demonstrate that exchange correlation of electrons decreases the spin-split subband energy but enhances the carrier density in a spin-polarized quantum well. We also observe that as the magnetic field increases, the concentration of spin-down (majority) electrons increases but that of spin-up (minority) electrons decreases. The effect of orbital quantization on the in-plane motion of electrons is also examined and shows a sawtoothlike variation in subband electron concentrations as the magnetic-field intensity increases. The latter variation is attributed to the presence of ionized donors acting as the electron reservoir, which is partially responsible for the formation of the integer quantum Hall plateaus. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  8. Two-dimensional collective electron magnetotransport, oscillations, and chaos in a semiconductor superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carretero, M.; Segura, A.

    2017-12-01

    When quantized, traces of classically chaotic single-particle systems include eigenvalue statistics and scars in eigenfuntions. Since 2001, many theoretical and experimental works have argued that classically chaotic single-electron dynamics influences and controls collective electron transport. For transport in semiconductor superlattices under tilted magnetic and electric fields, these theories rely on a reduction to a one-dimensional self-consistent drift model. A two-dimensional theory based on self-consistent Boltzmann transport does not support that single-electron chaos influences collective transport. This theory agrees with existing experimental evidence of current self-oscillations, predicts spontaneous collective chaos via a period doubling scenario, and could be tested unambiguously by measuring the electric potential inside the superlattice under a tilted magnetic field.

  9. Two-dimensional collective electron magnetotransport, oscillations, and chaos in a semiconductor superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Segura, A

    2017-12-01

    When quantized, traces of classically chaotic single-particle systems include eigenvalue statistics and scars in eigenfuntions. Since 2001, many theoretical and experimental works have argued that classically chaotic single-electron dynamics influences and controls collective electron transport. For transport in semiconductor superlattices under tilted magnetic and electric fields, these theories rely on a reduction to a one-dimensional self-consistent drift model. A two-dimensional theory based on self-consistent Boltzmann transport does not support that single-electron chaos influences collective transport. This theory agrees with existing experimental evidence of current self-oscillations, predicts spontaneous collective chaos via a period doubling scenario, and could be tested unambiguously by measuring the electric potential inside the superlattice under a tilted magnetic field.

  10. Atomic origin of high-temperature electron trapping in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shen@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Dhar, Sarit [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Pantelides, Sokrates T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    MOSFETs based on wide-band-gap semiconductors are suitable for operation at high temperature, at which additional atomic-scale processes that are benign at lower temperatures can get activated, resulting in device degradation. Recently, significant enhancement of electron trapping was observed under positive bias in SiC MOSFETs at temperatures higher than 150 °C. Here, we report first-principles calculations showing that the enhanced electron trapping is associated with thermally activated capturing of a second electron by an oxygen vacancy in SiO{sub 2} by which the vacancy transforms into a structure that comprises one Si dangling bond and a bond between a five-fold and a four-fold Si atoms. The results suggest a key role of oxygen vacancies and their structural reconfigurations in the reliability of high-temperature MOS devices.

  11. Position sensitive detector with semiconductor and image electron tube comprising such a detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roziere, Guy.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns a position sensitive detector comprising a semiconducting substrate. It also concerns the electron tubes in which the detector may be incorporated in order to obtain an image formed at the tube input by an incident flux of particles or radiation. When a charged particle or group of such particles, electrons in particular, enter the space charge region of an inversely biased semiconductor diode, the energy supplied by these particles releases in the diode a certain number of electron-hole pairs which move in the field existing in the area towards the diode contacts. A corresponding current arises in the connections of this diode which constitutes the signal corresponding to the incident energy. Such a tube or chain of tubes is employed in nuclear medicine for observing parts of the human body, particularly by gamma radiation [fr

  12. Flexible Electronics: Integration Processes for Organic and Inorganic Semiconductor-Based Thin-Film Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio F. Vidor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible and transparent electronics have been studied intensively during the last few decades. The technique establishes the possibility of fabricating innovative products, from flexible displays to radio-frequency identification tags. Typically, large-area polymeric substrates such as polypropylene (PP or polyethylene terephthalate (PET are used, which produces new requirements for the integration processes. A key element for flexible and transparent electronics is the thin-film transistor (TFT, as it is responsible for the driving current in memory cells, digital circuits or organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs. In this paper, we discuss some fundamental concepts of TFT technology. Additionally, we present a comparison between the use of the semiconducting organic small-molecule pentacene and inorganic nanoparticle semiconductors in order to integrate TFTs suitable for flexible electronics. Moreover, a technique for integration with a submicron resolution suitable for glass and foil substrates is presented.

  13. Atomic Emission Spectra Diagnosis and Electron Density Measurement of Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hongyan; Zhu Shunguan; Zhang Lin; Wan Xiaoxia; Li Yan; Shen Ruiqi

    2010-01-01

    Emission spectra of a semiconductor bridge (SCB) plasma in a visible range was studied in air. The electron density was measured in a conventional way from the broadening of the A1 I 394.4 nm Stark width. Based on the Saha equation, a system for recording the intensity of Si I 390.5 nm and Si II 413.1 nm was designed. With this technique, the SCB plasma electron density was measured well and accurately. Moreover, the electron density distribution Vs time was acquired from one SCB discharge. The individual result from the broadening of the Al I 394.4 nm Stark width and Saha equation was all in the range of 10 15 cm -3 to 10 16 cm -3 . Finally the presumption of the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was validated.

  14. Current instabilities under HF electron gas heating in semiconductors with negative differential conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurevich, Yu. G.; Logvinov, G. N. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Laricheva, N. [Datmouth College, New Hampshire (United States); Mashkevich, O. L. [Kharkov University, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2001-10-01

    A nonlinear temperature dependence of the kinetic coefficients of semiconductor plasma can result in the appearance of regions of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in both the high-frequency (HF) and static current-voltage characteristics (CVC). In the present paper the formation of the static NDC under simultaneous electron gas heating by HF and static electric field is studied. As is shown below, in this case the heating electromagnetic wave has a pronounced effect on the appearance of NDC caused by the overheating mechanisms and the type of the static CVC as a whole. [Spanish] Una dependencia no lineal de la temperatura de los coeficientes cineticos del plasma del semiconductor puede llevar a la aparicion de regiones con conductividad diferencial negativa (CDN) en las caracteristicas corriente voltaje (CCV) de alta frecuencia (AF) y estatica. En este articulo se estudia la formacion de la CDN estatica bajo la accion simultanea del calentamiento del gas de electrones por AF y el campo electrico estatico. Como se muestra mas adelante, en este caso la onda electromagnetica que calienta a los electrones ejerce un fuerte efecto en la aparicion de la CDN; que se obtiene por mecanismos de sobrecalentamiento, y en el tipo de CCV estatica.

  15. Indium oxide—a transparent, wide-band gap semiconductor for (opto)electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierwagen, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The present review takes a semiconductor physics perspective to summarize the state-of-the art of In 2 O 3 in relation to applications. After discussing conventional and novel applications, the crystal structure, synthesis of single-crystalline material, band-structure and optical transparency are briefly introduced before focussing on the charge carrier transport properties. The issues of unintentional n-type conductivity and its likely causes, the surface electron accumulation, and the lack of p-type conductivity will be presented. Intentional doping will be demonstrated to control the electron concentration and resistivity over a wide range, but is also subject to compensation. The control of the surface accumulation in relation to Schottky and ohmic contacts will be demonstrated. In the context of scattering mechanisms, the electron mobility and its limits will be discussed. Finally, the Seebeck coefficient and its significance will be shown, and ferromagnetic doping of In 2 O 3 will be critically discussed. With this overview most if not all ingredients for the use of In 2 O 3 as semiconductor material in novel or improved conventional devices will be given. (invited review)

  16. Chemical engineering in the electronics industry: progress towards the rational design of organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Clancy, Paulette

    2012-01-01

    We review the current status of heterojunction design for combinations of organic semiconductor materials, given its central role in affecting the device performance for electronic devices and solar cell applications. We provide an emphasis on recent progress towards the rational design of heterojunctions that may lead to higher performance of charge separation and mobility. We also play particular attention to the role played by computational approaches and its potential to help define the best choice of materials for solar cell development in the future. We report the current status of the field with respect to such goals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Chemical engineering in the electronics industry: progress towards the rational design of organic semiconductor heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Clancy, Paulette

    2012-05-01

    We review the current status of heterojunction design for combinations of organic semiconductor materials, given its central role in affecting the device performance for electronic devices and solar cell applications. We provide an emphasis on recent progress towards the rational design of heterojunctions that may lead to higher performance of charge separation and mobility. We also play particular attention to the role played by computational approaches and its potential to help define the best choice of materials for solar cell development in the future. We report the current status of the field with respect to such goals. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Eendebak, P. T. [QuTech, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the double quantum dots into the single-electron regime. The algorithm only requires (1) prior knowledge of the gate design and (2) the pinch-off value of the single gate T that is shared by all the quantum dots. This work significantly alleviates the user effort required to tune multiple quantum dot devices.

  19. Theoretical modelling of semiconductor surfaces microscopic studies of electrons and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, G P

    1999-01-01

    The state-of-the-art theoretical studies of ground state properties, electronic states and atomic vibrations for bulk semiconductors and their surfaces by the application of the pseudopotential method are discussed. Studies of bulk and surface phonon modes have been extended by the application of the phenomenological bond charge model. The coverage of the material, especially of the rapidly growing and technologically important topics of surface reconstruction and chemisorption, is up-to-date and beyond what is currently available in book form. Although theoretical in nature, the book provides

  20. The influence of pressure on the birefringence in semiconductor compounds ZnS, CuGaS2, and InPS4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrentyev, A.A.; Gabrelian, B.V.; Kulagin, B.B.; Nikiforov, I.Ya.; Sobolev, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Using the modified method of augmented plane waves and the code WIEN2k the calculations of the electron band structure, densities of electron states, and imaginary part of dielectric response function were carried out for different polarization of the vector of electrical field ε xx and ε zz for the semiconductor compounds ZnS, CuGaS 2 , and InPS 4 . The calculations were performed both for undisturbed crystals and for distorted crystals due to the applied pressure. The compounds studied have the similar crystallographic structures: ZnS - sphalerite, CuGaS 2 - chalcopyrite, and InPS 4 - twice defective chalcopyrite. It is known, that in cubic ZnS there is no birefringence, whereas in CuGaS 2 and InPS 4 there is one. But CuGaS 2 has so called isotropic point (where ε xx =ε zz ) in the visible optical range, and InPS 4 has no such point. Our calculations of ε xx and ε zz have shown that in ZnS under the pressure the isotropic points arise, but in InPS 4 they do not exist. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Structural and electronic properties of the V-V compounds isoelectronic to GaN and isostructural to gray arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Han, Dan; Chen, Guohong; Chen, Shiyou

    2018-03-01

    The III-V binary compound semiconductors such as GaN, GaP, InN and InP have extensive applications in various optoelectronic, microwave and power-electronic devices. Using first-principles calculation, we systematically studied the structural and electronic properties of the V-V binary compounds (BiN, BiP, SbN and SbP) that are isoelectronic to GaN, GaP, InN and InP if Bi and Sb are in the +3 valence state. Interestingly, we found that the ground-state structures of BiP, SbN and SbP have the R-3m symmetry and are isostructural to the layered structure of gray arsenic, whereas BiN prefers a different ground-state structure with the C2 symmetry. Electronic structure calculations showed that the bulk BiN is a narrow bandgap semiconductor for its bandgap is about 0.2 eV. In contrast, BiP, SbN and SbP are metallic. The layered ground-state structure of the V-V binary compounds motivates us to study the electronic properties of their few-layer structures. As the structure becomes monolayer, their bandgaps increase significantly and are all in the range from about 1 eV to 1.7 eV, which are comparative to the bandgap of the monolayer gray arsenic. The monolayer BiP, SbN and SbP have indirect bandgaps, and they show a semiconductor-metal transition as the number of layers increase. Interestingly, the monolayer BiP has the largest splitting (350 meV) of the CBM valley, and thus may have potential application in novel spintronics and valleytronics devices.

  2. PREFACE: 19th International Conference on Electron Dynamics in Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON'19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, T.; Martín-Martínez, M. J.; Mateos, J.

    2015-10-01

    The 19th International Conference on Electron Dynamics in Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON'19) was held at the Hospedería Fonseca (Universidad de Salamanca, Spain), on 29 June - 2 July, 2015, and was organized by the Electronics Area from the University of Salamanca. The Conference is held biannually and covers the recent progress in the field of electron dynamics in solid-state materials and devices. This was the 19th meeting of the international conference series formerly named Hot Carriers in Semiconductors (HCIS), first held in Modena in 1973. In the edition of 1997 in Berlin the name of the conference changed to International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors, keeping the same acronym, HCIS; and finally in the edition of Montpellier in 2009 the name was again changed to the current one, International Conference on Electron Dynamics in Semiconductors, Optoelectronics and Nanostructures (EDISON). The latest editions took place in Santa Barbara, USA, in 2011 and Matsue, Japan, in 2013. Research work on electron dynamics involves quite different disciplines, and requires both fundamental and technological scientific efforts. Attendees to the conference come mostly from academic institutions, belonging to both theoretical and experimental groups working in a variety of fields, such as solid-state physics, electronics, optics, electrical engineering, material science, laser physics, etc. In this framework, events like the EDISON conference become a basic channel for the progress in the field. Here, researchers working in different areas can meet, present their latest advances and exchange their ideas. The program of EDISON'19 included 13 invited papers, 61 oral contributions and 73 posters. These contributions originated from scientists in more than 30 different countries. The Conference gathered 140 participants, coming from 24 different countries, most from Europe, but also with a significant participation

  3. Detection of secondary electrons with pixelated hybrid semiconductor detectors; Sekundaerelektronennachweis mit pixelierten hybriden Halbleiterdetektoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebert, Ulrike Sonja

    2011-09-14

    Within the scope of this thesis, secondary electrons were detected with a pixelated semiconductor detector named Timepix. The Timepix detector consists of electronics and a sensor made from a semiconductor material. The connection of sensor and electronics is done for each pixel individually using bump bonds. Electrons with energies above 3 keV can be detected with the sensor. One electron produces a certain amount of electron-hole pairs according to its energy. The charge then drifts along an electric field to the pixel electronics, where it induces an electric signal. Even without a sensor it is possible to detect an electric signal from approximately 1000 electrons directly in the pixel electronics. Two different detector systems to detect secondary electrons using the Timepix detector were investigated during this thesis. First of all, a hybrid photon detector (HPD) was used to detect single photoelectrons. The HPD consists of a vacuum vessel with an entrance window and a cesium iodine photocathode at the inner surface of the window. Photoelectrons are released from the photocathode by incident light and are accelerated in an electric field towards the Timepix detector, where the point of interaction and the arrival time of the electron is determined. With a proximity focusing setup, a time resolution of 12 ns (with an acceleration voltage of 20 kV between photocathode and Timepix detector) was obtained. The HPD examined in this thesis showed a strong dependence of the dark rate form the acceleration voltage and the pressure in the vacuum vessel. At a pressure of few 10{sup -5} mbar and an acceleration voltage of 20 kV, the dark rate was about 800 Hz per mm{sup 2} area of the read out photocathode. One possibility to reduce the dark rate is to identify ion feedback events. With a slightly modified setup it was possible to reduce the dark rate to 0.5 Hz/mm{sup 2}. To achieve this, a new photocathode was mounted in a shorter distance to the detector. The

  4. Magnetic and electronic properties of some actinide intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaar, Ilan

    1992-06-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the light actinide intermetallic compounds are often related to interplay between localized and itinerant (band like) behavior of the 5f- electrons. In the present work, the properties of some actinide, mainly Np, intermetallic compounds were studied by Mossbauer effect, ac and dc susceptibility, X-ray and Neutron diffraction techniques. 1. NpX 2 (X=Ga,Si) - Both compounds order ferromagnetically at TC=55(2) and 48(2) K respectively. A comparison of our data with the results for other NpX 2 (X=Al,As,Sb,Tl) compounds indicates that NpGa 2 is a highly localized 5f electron system, whereas in NpSi 2 the 5f electrons are partially delocalized. The magnetic properties of NpX 2 compounds can neither be consistently explained within the conventional crystal electric field picture (CEF) nor by takink into account hybridization dressing of local spin density models. 2. NpX 3 (X=Ga,Si,In,Al) in the cubic AuCu 3 (Pm3m) crystallographic structure - From the Mossbauer isomer shift (IS) data we argue that the Np ion in the NpX 3 family is close to the formal 3+ (5I 4 ) charge state. The magnetic moment of the Np in NpSi 3 is totally suppressed whereas in NpGa 3 and NpAl 3 a localized (narrow band) moment is established. However, in NpIn 3 at 4.2 K, a modulated magnetic moment (0-1.5μB) is observed. Comparing the magnetic behavior of the NpX 3 family (X=Si,Ge,Ga, Al,In and Sn), we find an impressive variation of the magnetic properties, from temperature independent paramagnetism (TIP), localized and modulated ordered moments, to the formation of a concentrated Kondo lattice. Hybridization of 5f electrons with ligand electrons appears to play a crucial role in establishing these magnetic properties. However, at present a consistent theoretical picture can not be drawn. 3. XFe 4 Al 8 (X=Ho,Np,U) spin galss (SG) systems in the ThMn 12 (I 4 /mmm) crystallographic structure - Localized and itinerant behaviour of the f electrons

  5. Effect of disorder on the magnetic and electronic structure of a prospective spin-gapless semiconductor MnCrVAl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kharel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent discovery of a new class of materials, spin-gapless semiconductors (SGS, has attracted considerable attention in the last few years, primarily due to potential applications in the emerging field of spin-based electronics (spintronics. Here, we investigate structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of one potential SGS compound, MnCrVAl, using various experimental and theoretical techniques. Our calculations show that this material exhibits ≈ 0.5 eV band gap for the majority-spin states, while for the minority-spin it is nearly gapless. The calculated magnetic moment for the completely ordered structure is 2.9 μB/f.u., which is different from our experimentally measured value of almost zero. This discrepancy is explained by the structural disorder. In particular, A2 type disorder, where Mn or Cr atoms exchange their positions with Al atoms, results in induced antiferromagnetic exchange coupling, which, at a certain level of disorder, effectively reduces the total magnetic moment to zero. This is consistent with our x-ray diffraction measurements which indicate the presence of A2 disorder in all of our samples. In addition, we also show that B2 disorder does not result in antiferromagnetic exchange coupling and therefore does not significantly reduce the total magnetic moment.

  6. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on fullerenes and fullerene compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, J.

    1996-03-01

    A few years ago, a new form of pure carbon, the fullerenes, has been discovered, which shows many fascinating properties. Within this work the spatial and electronic structure of some selected fullerene compounds have been investigated by electron-energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. Phase pure samples of alkali intercalated fullerides A x C 60 (A=Na, K, Cs) have been prepared using vacuum distillation. Measruements of K 3 C 60 show a dispersion of the charge carrier plasmon close to zero. This can be explained by calculations, which take into account both band structure and local-field (inhomogeneity) effects. The importance of the molecular structure can also be seen from the A 4 C 60 compounds, where the non-metallic properties are explained by a splitting of the t 1u and t 1g derived bands that is caused by electron-correlation and Jahn-Teller effects. First measurements of the electronic structure of Na x C 60 (x>6) are presented and reveal a complete transfer from the sodium atoms but an incomplete transfer onto the C 60 molecules. This behaviour can be explained by taking into account additional electronic states that are situated between the sodium atoms in the octahedral sites and are predicted by calculations using local density approximation. The crystal structure of the higher fullerenes C 76 and C 84 is found to be face-centered cubic

  7. Jumping magneto-electric states of electrons in semiconductor multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, Pawel; Zawadzki, Wlodek

    2011-01-01

    Orbital and spin electron states in semiconductor multiple quantum wells in the presence of an external magnetic field transverse to the growth direction are considered. Rectangular wells of GaAs/GaAlAs and InAs/AlSb are taken as examples. It is shown that, in addition to magneto-electric states known from one-well systems, there appear magneto-electric states having a much stronger dependence of energies on a magnetic field and exhibiting an interesting anti-crossing behavior. The origin of these states is investigated and it is shown that the strong field dependence of the energies is related to an unusual 'jumping' behavior of their wavefunctions between quantum wells as the field increases. The ways of investigating the jumping states by means of interband magneto-luminescence transitions or intraband cyclotron-like transitions are considered and it is demonstrated that the jumping states can be observed. The spin g factors of electrons in the jumping states are calculated using the real values of the spin–orbit interaction and bands' nonparabolicity for the semiconductors in question. It is demonstrated that the jumping states offer a wide variety of the spin g factors

  8. Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Semiconductor Micro- And Nanocrystals: From Colloidal Syntheses to (Opto-)Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Organic pigments such as indigos, quinacridones, and phthalocyanines are widely produced industrially as colorants for everyday products as various as cosmetics and printing inks. Herein we introduce a general procedure to transform commercially available insoluble microcrystalline pigment powders into colloidal solutions of variously sized and shaped semiconductor micro- and nanocrystals. The synthesis is based on the transformation of the pigments into soluble dyes by introducing transient protecting groups on the secondary amine moieties, followed by controlled deprotection in solution. Three deprotection methods are demonstrated: thermal cleavage, acid-catalyzed deprotection, and amine-induced deprotection. During these processes, ligands are introduced to afford colloidal stability and to provide dedicated surface functionality and for size and shape control. The resulting micro- and nanocrystals exhibit a wide range of optical absorption and photoluminescence over spectral regions from the visible to the near-infrared. Due to excellent colloidal solubility offered by the ligands, the achieved organic nanocrystals are suitable for solution processing of (opto)electronic devices. As examples, phthalocyanine nanowire transistors as well as quinacridone nanocrystal photodetectors, with photoresponsivity values by far outperforming those of vacuum deposited reference samples, are demonstrated. The high responsivity is enabled by photoinduced charge transfer between the nanocrystals and the directly attached electron-accepting vitamin B2 ligands. The semiconducting nanocrystals described here offer a cheap, nontoxic, and environmentally friendly alternative to inorganic nanocrystals as well as a new paradigm for obtaining organic semiconductor materials from commercial colorants. PMID:25253644

  9. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kardynał, B.E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barnes, C.H.W. [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E., E-mail: rafaldb@gmail.com [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute 5, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness.

  10. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somodi, P K; Twitchett-Harrison, A C; Midgley, P A; Kardynał, B E; Barnes, C H W; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p-n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p-n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A.; Kardynał, B.E.; Barnes, C.H.W.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness

  12. Band structure of semiconductor compounds of Mg sub 2 Si and Mg sub 2 Ge with strained crystal lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Krivosheeva, A V; Shaposhnikov, V L; Krivosheev, A E; Borisenko, V E

    2002-01-01

    The effect of isotopic and unaxial deformation of the crystal lattice on the electronic band structure of indirect band gap semiconductors Mg sub 2 Si and Mg sub 2 Ge has been simulated by means of the linear augmented plane wave method. The reduction of the lattice constant down to 95 % results in a linear increase of the direct transition in magnesium silicide by 48%. The stresses arising under unaxial deformation shift the bands as well as result in splitting of degenerated states. The dependence of the interband transitions on the lattice deformation is nonlinear in this case

  13. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi; Wang, Cheng-Yin; Rose, Bradley Daniel; Jiang, Yundi; Chang, Mincheol; Chu, Ping-Hsun; Yuan, Zhibo; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Bernard, Kippelen; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Collard, David M.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  14. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi

    2015-04-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  15. Curvature effects on the electronic and transport properties of semiconductor films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, F. F.; Chaves, Andrey; da Costa, D. R.; Farias, G. A.

    2018-05-01

    Within the effective mass approximation, we study the curvature effects on the electronic and transport properties of semiconductor films. We investigate how the geometry-induced potential resulting exclusively from periodic ripples in the film induces electronic confinement and a superlattice band structure. For fixed curvature parameters, such a confinement can be easily tuned by an external electric field, hence features of the superlattice band structure such as its energy gaps and band curvature can be controlled by an external parameter. We also show that, for some values of curvature and electric field, it is possible to obtain massless Dirac bands for a smooth curved structure. Moreover, we use a wave packet propagation method to demonstrate that the ripples are responsible for a significant inter-sub-band transition, specially for moderate values of the ripple height.

  16. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Cao, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation

  17. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Wang, F; Cao, J C

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  18. Terahertz radiation induced chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattices with a tilted magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C., E-mail: cwang@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, F.; Cao, J. C., E-mail: jccao@mail.sim.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Terahertz Solid-State Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Chaotic electron transport in semiconductor superlattice induced by terahertz electric field that is superimposed on a dc electric field along the superlattice axis are studied using the semiclassical motion equations including the effect of dissipation. A magnetic field that is tilted relative to the superlattice axis is also applied to the system. Numerical simulation shows that electrons in superlattice miniband exhibit complicate nonlinear oscillating modes with the influence of terahertz radiation. Transitions between frequency-locking and chaos via pattern forming bifurcations are observed with the varying of terahertz amplitude. It is found that the chaotic regions gradually contract as the dissipation increases. We attribute the appearance of complicate nonlinear oscillation in superlattice to the interaction between terahertz radiation and internal cooperative oscillating mode relative to Bloch oscillation and cyclotron oscillation.

  19. Dissolution chemistry and biocompatibility of silicon- and germanium-based semiconductors for transient electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Kyun; Park, Gayoung; Kim, Kyungmin; Hwang, Suk-Won; Cheng, Huanyu; Shin, Jiho; Chung, Sangjin; Kim, Minjin; Yin, Lan; Lee, Jeong Chul; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A

    2015-05-06

    Semiconducting materials are central to the development of high-performance electronics that are capable of dissolving completely when immersed in aqueous solutions, groundwater, or biofluids, for applications in temporary biomedical implants, environmentally degradable sensors, and other systems. The results reported here include comprehensive studies of the dissolution by hydrolysis of polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, silicon-germanium, and germanium in aqueous solutions of various pH values and temperatures. In vitro cellular toxicity evaluations demonstrate the biocompatibility of the materials and end products of dissolution, thereby supporting their potential for use in biodegradable electronics. A fully dissolvable thin-film solar cell illustrates the ability to integrate these semiconductors into functional systems.

  20. Lattice Location of Radioactive Probes in Semiconductors and Metals by Electron and Positron Channelling

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The channelling effect of decay-electrons and positrons is used for the localization of radioactive impurities implanted into single crystals. Because of the low implantation doses and the variety of different isotopes available at ISOLDE, this technique is especially suited for applications in semiconducting materials. \\\\ \\\\ Channelling measurements in Si, GaAs and GaP implanted with In-, Cd- and Xe-isotopes have demonstrated that impurity lattice sites can be studied directly after implantation without any annealing. The electron-channelling technique can be ideally combined with hyperfine interaction techniques like Moessbauer s This was shown for the formation of In-vacancy complexes in ion-implanted Ni. \\\\ \\\\ We intend to continue the lattice location measurements in semiconductors implanted with various radioactive impurities of Cd, In, Sn, Sb and Te.

  1. On the impact of isoelectric impurities on band bowing and disorder of compound semiconductors; Ueber den Einfluss von isoelektronischen Stoerstellen auf Bandbiegung und Unordnung in Verbindungshalbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcher, Christian

    2012-03-16

    Isolectronic impurities and their impact on the properties of compound semiconductors is discussed in two systems: Nitrogen in Ga(As,P) quantum wells on the one hand and Sulfur and Selenium in bulk ZnTe. The properties are reduced to two experimentally observable aspects: Band Bowing, i.e. the non-linearity of the band gap of the compound semiconductor and disorder, i.e. in particular the formation of a strongly localized density of states beneath the fundamental band gap. Apart of the pure experimental studies an insight into the theoretical model of disorder-induced temperature dependent luminescence properties of the compound semiconductors by means of Monte Carlo Simulations is given.

  2. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hyunjin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  3. Synchrotron-based measurements of the electronic structure of the organic semiconductor copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) is a prototypical molecular organic semiconductor that is currently used in the construction of many organic electronic devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Although the material is currently being used, and despite many experimental and theoretical studies, it's detailed electronic structure is still not completely understood. This is likely due to two key factors. Firstly, the interaction of the Cu 3d and phthalocyanine ligand 2p electrons leads to the formation of a complex arrangement of localized and delocalized states near the Fermi level. Secondly, thin films of the material are subject to damage by the photon beam used to make measurements of their electronic structure. Using the synchrotron-based techniques of soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we have measured the detailed electronic structure of in-situ grown thin film samples of CuPc. Beam damage was minimized by continuous translation of the sample during data acquisition. The results obtained differ significantly from previous XES and ultraviolet photoemission measurements, but are in excellent agreement with recent density functional calculations. The reasons for these discrepancies will be explained, and their implications for future measurements on similar materials will be explored

  4. On one peculiarity of the model describing the interaction of the electron beam with the semiconductor surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepovich, M. A.; Amrastanov, A. N.; Seregina, E. V.; Filippov, M. N.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of heat distribution in semiconductor materials irradiated with sharply focused electron beams in the absence of heat exchange between the target and the external medium is considered by mathematical modeling methods. For a quantitative description of energy losses by probe electrons a model based on a separate description of the contributions of absorbed in the target and backscattered electrons and applicable to a wide class of solids and a range of primary electron energies is used. Using the features of this approach, the nonmonotonic dependence of the temperature of the maximum heating in the target on the energy of the primary electrons is explained. Some modeling results are illustrated for semiconductor materials of electronic engineering.

  5. Geometrical effects on the electron residence time in semiconductor nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koochi, Hakimeh; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh

    2014-09-07

    We have used random walk (RW) numerical simulations to investigate the influence of the geometry on the statistics of the electron residence time τ(r) in a trap-limited diffusion process through semiconductor nano-particles. This is an important parameter in coarse-grained modeling of charge carrier transport in nano-structured semiconductor films. The traps have been distributed randomly on the surface (r(2) model) or through the whole particle (r(3) model) with a specified density. The trap energies have been taken from an exponential distribution and the traps release time is assumed to be a stochastic variable. We have carried out (RW) simulations to study the effect of coordination number, the spatial arrangement of the neighbors and the size of nano-particles on the statistics of τ(r). It has been observed that by increasing the coordination number n, the average value of electron residence time, τ̅(r) rapidly decreases to an asymptotic value. For a fixed coordination number n, the electron's mean residence time does not depend on the neighbors' spatial arrangement. In other words, τ̅(r) is a porosity-dependence, local parameter which generally varies remarkably from site to site, unless we are dealing with highly ordered structures. We have also examined the effect of nano-particle size d on the statistical behavior of τ̅(r). Our simulations indicate that for volume distribution of traps, τ̅(r) scales as d(2). For a surface distribution of traps τ(r) increases almost linearly with d. This leads to the prediction of a linear dependence of the diffusion coefficient D on the particle size d in ordered structures or random structures above the critical concentration which is in accordance with experimental observations.

  6. Some physical properties of GaX (X=P, As and Sb) semiconductor compounds using higher-order perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jivani, A.R.; Trivedi, H.J.; Gajjar, P.N.; Jani, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    Recently proposed model potential for describing the electron-ion interaction is employed to calculate total energy, energy band gap at Jones-zone face at X, equation of state and bulk modulus of GaP, GaAs and GaSb compounds using higher-order perturbation theory. The covalent correction term corresponding to third- and fourth-order perturbation energy terms are used to take account of covalent bonding effect in such semiconductors. The significant value of the covalent bonding term shows the essentiality of higher-order correction for zincblende-type crystals. We have employed five different screening functions along with the latest screening function proposed by Sarkar et al. in the present work. The numerical results for the total energy, energy band gap at Jones-zone face and bulk modulus of these compounds are in good agreement with the experimental data and found better than other such theoretical findings. The pressure and bulk modulus at different volumes are obtained by using such higher-order perturbation theory with the application of our model potential. The pressure obtained by this method is compared with pressure obtained by equations proposed by Murnarghan and Vinet et al. The present study also shows that the incorporation of different screening functions generates distinct effects

  7. Carrier transport and electronic structure in amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-InGaZnO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Akihiro; Nomura, Kenji; Ohta, Hiromichi; Yanagi, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Toshio; Hirano, Masahiro; Hosono, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Carrier transport properties in amorphous oxide semiconductor InGaZnO 4 (a-IGZO) thin films were investigated in detail using temperature dependence of Hall measurements. It was found that Hall mobility increased distinctly as carrier concentration increased. Unlikely conventional amorphous semiconductors such as a-Si/H, definite normal Hall voltage signals were observed on the films with carrier concentrations (N e )>10 16 cm -3 , and Hall mobilities as large as 15 cm 2 (Vs) -1 were attained in the films with N e >10 20 cm -3 . When N e was less than 10 19 cm -3 , the temperature dependence of Hall mobility showed thermally-activated behavior in spite that carrier concentration was independent of temperature. While, it changed to almost degenerate conduction at N e >10 18 cm -3 . These behaviors are similar to those observed in single-crystalline IGZO, and are explained by percolation conduction through distributed potential barriers which are formed in the vicinity of the conduction band bottom due to the randomness of the amorphous structure. The effective mass of a-IGZO was estimated to be ∼0.34 m e (m e is the mass of free electron) from optical data, which is almost the same as that of crystalline IGZO (∼0.32 m e )

  8. Wide-gap layered oxychalcogenide semiconductors: Materials, electronic structures and optoelectronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazushige; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hirano, Masahiro; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    Applying the concept of materials design for transparent conductive oxides to layered oxychalcogenides, several p-type and n-type layered oxychalcogenides were proposed as wide-gap semiconductors and their basic optical and electrical properties were examined. The layered oxychalcogenides are composed of ionic oxide layers and covalent chalcogenide layers, which bring wide-gap and conductive properties to these materials, respectively. The electronic structures of the materials were examined by normal/inverse photoemission spectroscopy and energy band calculations. The results of the examinations suggested that these materials possess unique features more than simple wide-gap semiconductors. Namely, the layered oxychalcogenides are considered to be extremely thin quantum wells composed of the oxide and chalcogenide layers or 2D chalcogenide crystals/molecules embedded in an oxide matrix. Observation of step-like absorption edges, large band gap energy and large exciton binding energy demonstrated these features originating from 2D density of states and quantum size effects in these layered materials

  9. The detection of electron-beam-induced current in junctionless semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Chee Chin; Ong, Vincent K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope is a versatile tool and its electron beam techniques have been widely used in semiconductor material and device characterizations. One of these electron beam techniques is the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. One of the limitations of the conventional EBIC technique is that it requires charge collecting junctions which may not be readily available in junctionless samples such as bare substrates unless some special sample preparation procedure such as the fabrication of a diffused junction is done on the junctionless sample. In this paper, the technique of detecting EBIC current in junctionless samples with the use of a two-point probe is presented. It is found that the EBIC current is independent from its physical parameter when the sample thickness is greater than 4L; the width to the right of probe 2 and the width to the left of probe 1 are greater than 2L and 8L, respectively. The parameters affecting this technique of detecting the EBIC current such as the depth of the generation volume, probe spacing, and the applied bias are also discussed in this paper. A commercially available two-dimensional device simulator was used to verify this technique.

  10. Gas-Solid Reaction Properties of Fluorine Compounds and Solid Adsorbents for Off-Gas Treatment from Semiconductor Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Yasui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have been developing a new dry-type off-gas treatment system for recycling fluorine from perfluoro compounds present in off-gases from the semiconductor industry. The feature of this system is to adsorb the fluorine compounds in the exhaust gases from the decomposition furnace by using two types of solid adsorbents: the calcium carbonate in the upper layer adsorbs HF and converts it to CaF2, and the sodium bicarbonate in the lower layer adsorbs HF and SiF4 and converts them to Na2SiF6. This paper describes the fluorine compound adsorption properties of both the solid adsorbents—calcium carbonate and the sodium compound—for the optimal design of the fixation furnace. An analysis of the gas-solid reaction rate was performed from the experimental results of the breakthrough curve by using a fixed-bed reaction model, and the reaction rate constants and adsorption capacity were obtained for achieving an optimal process design.

  11. PEALD grown high-k ZrO{sub 2} thin films on SiC group IV compound semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, A. G., E-mail: agkhairnar@gmail.com; Patil, V. S.; Agrawal, K. S.; Salunke, R. S.; Mahajan, A. M., E-mail: ammahajan@nmu.ac.in [North Maharashtra University, Department of Electronics, School of Physical Sciences (India)

    2017-01-15

    The study of ZrO{sub 2} thin films on SiC group IV compound semiconductor has been studied as a high mobility substrates. The ZrO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using the Plasma Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition System. The thickness of the thin films were measured using ellipsometer and found to be 5.47 nm. The deposited ZrO{sub 2} thin films were post deposition annealed in rapid thermal annealing chamber at temperature of 400°Ð¡. The atomic force microscopy and X-гау photoelectron spectroscopy has been carried out to study the surface topography, roughness and chemical composition of thin film, respectively.

  12. Attachment to a mass spectrometer for studying the processes of semiconductor compound deposition from a gaseous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, V.I.; Zhuravlev, G.I.; Popenko, N.I.; Novozhilov, A.F.; Matveev, I.V.; Murav'ev, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    An attachment to the mass spectrometer for studying the processes of semiconductor compounds deposition from a gaseous phase at the pressure of 1x10 5 Pa and the temperature of 400-1300 K is described. The attachment consists of the Neer ion source with ionization section cooled upto the temperature of liquid nitrogen, a two-zone vacuum furnace, and a quartz epitaxy reactor of the horzontal type.The attachment is equipped with the systems of process gas distribution in 5 flows and temperature stabilization. The rate of mass spectrum recording constitutes 2 mass/s at the resolution being equal to 1000 at the 10% level. The sensitivity at the steam-gas mixture components partial pressure determination constitutes 1x10 -4 Pa

  13. Electron and nuclear magnetic resonances in compounds and metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasil Filho, N.

    1985-11-01

    Proton pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements were performed on the metallic hydrides ZrCr 2 H x (x = 2, 3, 4) and ZrV 2 H y (y = 2, 3, 4, 5) as a function of temperature between 180 and 400K. The ultimate aim was the investigation of the relaxation mechanisms in these systems by means of the measurement of both the proton ( 1 H) spin-lattice (T 1 ) and spin-spin (T 2 ) relaxation times and to use these data to obtain information about the diffusive motion of the hydrogen atoms. The diffusional activation energies, the jump frequencies and the Korringa constant, C k , related with the conduction electron contribution to the 1 H relaxation were determined for the above hydrides as a function of hydrogen concentration. Our results were analysed in terms of the relaxation models described by Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP model) and by Torrey. The Korringa type relaxation due to the conduction electrons in metallic systems was also used to interpret the experimental results. We also present the Electron Paramagnetic Ressonance (EPR) study of Gd 3+ , Nd 3+ and Er 3+ ions as impurities in several AB 3 intermetallic compounds where A = LA, Ce, Y, Sc, Th, Zr and B = Rh, Ir, Pt. The results were analysed in terms of the multiband model previously suggested to explain the behaviour of the resonance parameter in AB 2 Laves Phase compounds. (author) [pt

  14. Study of semiconductor valence plasmon line shapes via electron energy-loss spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundmann, M.K.

    1988-11-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra of the semiconductors Si, AlAs, GaAs, InAs, InP, and Ge are examined in detail in the regime of outer-shell and plasmon energy losses (0--100eV). Particular emphasis is placed on modeling and analyzing the shapes of the bulk valence plasmon lines. A line shape model based on early work by Froehlich is derived and compared to single-scattering probability distributions extracted from the measured spectra. Model and data are found to be in excellent agreement, thus pointing the way to systematic characterization of the plasmon component of EELS spectra. The model is applied to three separate investigations. 82 refs

  15. Elucidating the electron transport in semiconductors via Monte Carlo simulations: an inquiry-driven learning path for engineering undergraduates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adorno, Dominique Persano; Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Within the context of higher education for science or engineering undergraduates, we present an inquiry-driven learning path aimed at developing a more meaningful conceptual understanding of the electron dynamics in semiconductors in the presence of applied electric fields. The electron transport in a nondegenerate n-type indium phosphide bulk semiconductor is modelled using a multivalley Monte Carlo approach. The main characteristics of the electron dynamics are explored under different values of the driving electric field, lattice temperature and impurity density. Simulation results are presented by following a question-driven path of exploration, starting from the validation of the model and moving up to reasoned inquiries about the observed characteristics of electron dynamics. Our inquiry-driven learning path, based on numerical simulations, represents a viable example of how to integrate a traditional lecture-based teaching approach with effective learning strategies, providing science or engineering undergraduates with practical opportunities to enhance their comprehension of the physics governing the electron dynamics in semiconductors. Finally, we present a general discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of using an inquiry-based teaching approach within a learning environment based on semiconductor simulations. (paper)

  16. Elucidating the electron transport in semiconductors via Monte Carlo simulations: an inquiry-driven learning path for engineering undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persano Adorno, Dominique; Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Within the context of higher education for science or engineering undergraduates, we present an inquiry-driven learning path aimed at developing a more meaningful conceptual understanding of the electron dynamics in semiconductors in the presence of applied electric fields. The electron transport in a nondegenerate n-type indium phosphide bulk semiconductor is modelled using a multivalley Monte Carlo approach. The main characteristics of the electron dynamics are explored under different values of the driving electric field, lattice temperature and impurity density. Simulation results are presented by following a question-driven path of exploration, starting from the validation of the model and moving up to reasoned inquiries about the observed characteristics of electron dynamics. Our inquiry-driven learning path, based on numerical simulations, represents a viable example of how to integrate a traditional lecture-based teaching approach with effective learning strategies, providing science or engineering undergraduates with practical opportunities to enhance their comprehension of the physics governing the electron dynamics in semiconductors. Finally, we present a general discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of using an inquiry-based teaching approach within a learning environment based on semiconductor simulations.

  17. Numerical study of the electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of defect quaternary semiconductor CuGaSnSe4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kesheng; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Xianzhou; Jiao, Zhaoyong

    2018-06-01

    The electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of the defect quaternary semiconductor CuGaSnSe4 in I 4 bar structure are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations. We summarize and discuss some of the studies on CuGaSnSe4 in partially ordered chalcopyrite structure and find that there are three atomic arrangements so far, but it is still uncertain which is the most stable. Through detailed simulation and comparison with the corresponding literature, we get three models and predict that M1 model should be the most stable. The band structure and optical properties of compound CuGaSnSe4, including dielectric constant, refractive index and absorption spectrum, are drawn for a more intuitive understanding. The elastic constants are also calculated, which not only prove that CuGaSnSe4 in I 4 bar structure is stable naturally but also help solve the problem of no data to accurately predict axial thermal expansion coefficients. The calculated values of the zero frequency dielectric constant and refractive index are comparable to those of the corresponding chalcopyrite structure but slightly larger.

  18. Alpha-ray spectrometry at high temperature by using a compound semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Han Soo

    2013-11-01

    The use of conventional radiation detectors in harsh environments is limited by radiation damage to detector materials and by temperature constraints. We fabricated a wide-band gap semiconductor radiation detector based on silicon carbide. All the detector components were considered for an application in a high temperature environment like a nuclear reactor core. The radiation response, especially to alpha particles, was measured using an (241)Am source at variable operating voltages at room temperature in the air. The temperature on detector was controlled from 30°C to 250°C. The alpha-particle spectra were measured at zero bias operation. Even though the detector is operated at high temperature, the energy resolution as a function of temperature is almost constant within 3.5% deviation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Electronic structure and properties of uranyl compounds. Problems of electron-donor conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glebov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of the series of the ligand mutual substitution in the uranyl compounds with the ligand series of d-elements and with the uranyl ''covalent model'', is made. The data on ionization potentials of the ligand higher valent levels and on the structure of some uranyl nitrate compounds are considered. It is concluded that the mechanism of the ligand effect on the properties of uranyl grouping is more complex, than it is supposed in the traditional representations on the nature of electron-donor interactions in the uranyl compounds

  20. Changes in the surface electronic states of semiconductor fine particles induced by high energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asai, Keisuke; Ishigure, Kenkichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Shibata, Hiromi

    1997-03-01

    The changes in the surface electronic states of Q-sized semiconductor particles in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, induced by high energy ion irradiation, were examined by observation of ion induced emission and photoluminescence (PL). Various emission bands attributed to different defect sites in the band gap were observed at the initial irradiation stage. As the dose increased, the emissions via the trapping sites decreased in intensity while the band-edge emission developed. This suggests that the ion irradiation would remove almost all the trapping sites in the band gap. The low energy emissions, which show a multiexponential decay, were due to a donor-acceptor recombination between the deeply trapped carriers. It was found that the processes of formation, reaction, and stabilization of the trapping sites would predominantly occur under the photooxidizing conditions. (author)

  1. Electron Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum wire in external magnetic field: Froehlich interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancourt-Riera, Ri.; Nieto Jalil, J.M.; Betancourt-Riera, Re.; Riera, R.

    2009-01-01

    The differential cross-section for an electron Raman scattering process in a semiconductor quantum wire in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of confinement regarding phonon-assisted transitions, is calculated. We assume single parabolic conduction band and present a description of the phonon modes of cylindrical structures embedded in another material using the Froehlich phonon interaction. To illustrate the theory we use a GaAs/Al 0.35 Ga 0.75 As system. The emission spectra are discussed for different scattering configurations and the selection rules for the processes are also studied. The magnetic field distribution is considered constant with value B 0 inside of the wire, and zero outside.

  2. Collisional spin-oriented Sherman function in electron-hole semiconductor plasmas: Landau damping effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2018-04-01

    The influence of Landau damping on the spin-oriented collisional asymmetry is investigated in electron-hole semiconductor plasmas. The analytical expressions of the spin-singlet and the spin-triplet scattering amplitudes as well as the spin-oriented asymmetry Sherman function are obtained as functions of the scattering angle, the Landau parameter, the effective Debye length, and the collision energy. It is found that the Landau damping effect enhances the spin-singlet and spin-triplet scattering amplitudes in the forward and back scattering domains, respectively. It is also found that the Sherman function increases with an increase in the Landau parameter. In addition, the spin-singlet scattering process is found to be dominant rather than the spin-triplet scattering process in the high collision energy domain.

  3. Interaction between extended and localized electronic states in the region of the metal to insulator transition in semiconductor alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teubert, Joerg

    2008-07-01

    The first part of this work addresses the influence of those isovalent localized states on the electronic properties of (B,Ga,In)As. Most valuable were the measurements under hydrostatic pressure that revealed a pressure induced metal-insulator transition. One of the main ideas in this context is the trapping of carriers in localized B-related cluster states that appear in the bandgap at high pressure. The key conclusion that can be drawn from the experimental results is that boron atoms seem to have the character of isovalent electron traps, rendering boron as the first known isovalent trap induced by cationic substitution. In the second part, thermoelectric properties of (B,Ga,In)As and (Ga,In)(N,As) are studied. It was found that although the electric-field driven electronic transport in n-type (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As differs considerably from that of n-type GaAs, the temperature-gradient driven electronic transport is very similar for the three semiconductors, despite distinct differences in the conduction band structure of (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As compared to GaAs. The third part addresses the influence of magnetic interactions on the transport properties near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Here, two scenarios are considered: Firstly the focus is set on ZnMnSe:Cl, a representative of so called dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this material Mn(2+) ions provide a large magnetic moment due to their half filled inner 3d-shell. It is shown that magnetic interactions in conjunction with disorder effects are responsible for the unusual magnetotransport behavior found in this and other II-Mn-VI semiconductor alloys. In the second scenario, a different magnetic compound, namely InSb:Mn, is of interest. It is a representative of the III-Mn-V DMS, where the magnetic impurity Mn serves both as the source of a large localized magnetic moment and as the source of a loosely bound hole due to its acceptor character. Up to now, little is known about

  4. Interaction between extended and localized electronic states in the region of the metal to insulator transition in semiconductor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubert, Joerg

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this work addresses the influence of those isovalent localized states on the electronic properties of (B,Ga,In)As. Most valuable were the measurements under hydrostatic pressure that revealed a pressure induced metal-insulator transition. One of the main ideas in this context is the trapping of carriers in localized B-related cluster states that appear in the bandgap at high pressure. The key conclusion that can be drawn from the experimental results is that boron atoms seem to have the character of isovalent electron traps, rendering boron as the first known isovalent trap induced by cationic substitution. In the second part, thermoelectric properties of (B,Ga,In)As and (Ga,In)(N,As) are studied. It was found that although the electric-field driven electronic transport in n-type (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As differs considerably from that of n-type GaAs, the temperature-gradient driven electronic transport is very similar for the three semiconductors, despite distinct differences in the conduction band structure of (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As compared to GaAs. The third part addresses the influence of magnetic interactions on the transport properties near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Here, two scenarios are considered: Firstly the focus is set on ZnMnSe:Cl, a representative of so called dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this material Mn(2+) ions provide a large magnetic moment due to their half filled inner 3d-shell. It is shown that magnetic interactions in conjunction with disorder effects are responsible for the unusual magnetotransport behavior found in this and other II-Mn-VI semiconductor alloys. In the second scenario, a different magnetic compound, namely InSb:Mn, is of interest. It is a representative of the III-Mn-V DMS, where the magnetic impurity Mn serves both as the source of a large localized magnetic moment and as the source of a loosely bound hole due to its acceptor character. Up to now, little is known about

  5. The effects of heavy doping on the electronic states in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sernelius, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of semiconductors is reviewed. Topics included in the discussion are energy of the dopant system (kinetic energy in a many-valley semiconductor, exchange energy in an ellipsoidal Fermi volume, energy in a polar semiconductor), self energy shifts, band-gap narrowing, and piezo experiments. 31 refs., 27 figs

  6. Electron beam treatment of toxic volatile organic compounds and dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji

    2006-01-01

    Considerations of wastes based on the reduction, reuse and recycle in daily life are primary measures to conserve our environment, but the control technology is necessary to support these measures. The electron beam (EB) process is promising as an advanced purification process having advantages such as a quick treatment of big volume gas, applicability even for very low concentration pollutants as the further purification at the downstream of existing process, and decomposition of pollutants into non-toxic substances by one process. The EB technology has been developed for treatment of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ventilation gas and dioxins in solid waste incineration flue gas. (author)

  7. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Hongying; Fu Jieying; Wang Xiaoli; Zheng Shi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Irradiation of photons with energies more than the band gap generates electron–hole pairs. ► Electron tunneling probability is dependent on the electron mobility. ► Tunneling electrons are captured by charge deficient atoms. ► Unpaired electrons induce cleavages of chemical bonds. - Abstract: Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ = 355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO 2 nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry.

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of intermetallic compound YCo5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.W.; Feng, Y.P.; Ong, C.K.

    1998-01-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the intermetallic compound YCo 5 have been studied using density functional theory with the local spin density approximation. The calculated magnetic moments of Y, Co(2c) and Co(3g) are -0.61, 1.68 and 2.04 μ B , respectively, and the total magnetic moment is about 8.87 μ B per formula unit, which agrees well with the previous experimental results. The dependence of the magnetic moments of Y, Co(2c) and Co(3g) on the lattice spacing has been investigated. The local electronic structure of Y, Co(2c) and Co(3g) are discussed in detail. The local magnetic susceptibilities of Y, Co(2c) and Co(3g) are calculated. Based on our results, YCo 5 was found to have characteristic of a strong ferromagnet. (orig.)

  9. Deep electron traps in HfO_2-based metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomone, L. Sambuco; Lipovetzky, J.; Carbonetto, S.H.; García Inza, M.A.; Redin, E.G.; Campabadal, F.

    2016-01-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO_2) is currently considered to be a good candidate to take part as a component in charge-trapping nonvolatile memories. In this work, the electric field and time dependences of the electron trapping/detrapping processes are studied through a constant capacitance voltage transient technique on metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with atomic layer deposited HfO_2 as insulating layer. A tunneling-based model is proposed to reproduce the experimental results, obtaining fair agreement between experiments and simulations. From the fitting procedure, a band of defects is identified, located in the first 1.7 nm from the Si/HfO_2 interface at an energy level E_t = 1.59 eV below the HfO_2 conduction band edge with density N_t = 1.36 × 10"1"9 cm"−"3. A simplified analytical version of the model is proposed in order to ease the fitting procedure for the low applied voltage case considered in this work. - Highlights: • We characterized deep electron trapping/detrapping in HfO_2 structures. • We modeled the experimental results through a tunneling-based model. • We obtained an electron trap energy level of 1.59 eV below conduction band edge. • We obtained a spatial trap distribution extending 1.7 nm within the insulator. • A simplified tunneling front model is able to reproduce the experimental results.

  10. Experimental installation for excitation of semiconductors and dielectrics by picosecond pulsed electron beam and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasibov, A.S.; Berezhnoj, K.V.; Shapkin, P.V.; Reutova, A.G.; Shunajlov, S.A.; Yalandin, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental facility for shaping high-voltage pulses with amplitudes of 30-250 kV and durations of 100-500 ps and electron beams with a current density of up to 1000 A/cm -2 is described. The facility was built using the principle of energy compression of a pulse from a nanosecond high-voltage generator accompanied by the subsequent pulse sharpening and cutting. The setup is equipped with two test coaxial chambers for radiation excitation in semiconductor crystals by an electron beam or an electric field in air at atmospheric pressure and T = 300 K. Generation of laser radiation in the visible range under field and electron pumping was attained in ZnSSe, ZnSe, ZnCdS, and CdS (462, 480, 515, and 525 nm, respectively). Under the exposure to an electric field (up to 10 6 V x cm -1 ), the laser generation region is as large as 300-500 μm. The radiation divergence was within 5 Deg C. The maximum integral radiation power (6 kW at λ = 480 nm) was obtained under field pumping of a zinc selenide sample with a single dielectric mirror [ru

  11. Low-voltage organic electronics based on a gate-tunable injection barrier in vertical graphene-organic semiconductor heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Htay; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Carta, Fabio; Nam, Chang-Yong; Barton, Rob A; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2015-01-14

    The vertical integration of graphene with inorganic semiconductors, oxide semiconductors, and newly emerging layered materials has recently been demonstrated as a promising route toward novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we report organic thin film transistors based on vertical heterojunctions of graphene and organic semiconductors. In these thin heterostructure devices, current modulation is accomplished by tuning of the injection barriers at the semiconductor/graphene interface with the application of a gate voltage. N-channel devices fabricated with a thin layer of C60 show a room temperature on/off ratio >10(4) and current density of up to 44 mAcm(-2). Because of the ultrashort channel intrinsic to the vertical structure, the device is fully operational at a driving voltage of 200 mV. A complementary p-channel device is also investigated, and a logic inverter based on two complementary transistors is demonstrated. The vertical integration of graphene with organic semiconductors via simple, scalable, and low-temperature fabrication processes opens up new opportunities to realize flexible, transparent organic electronic, and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Epitaxial Growth, Surface, and Electronic Properties of Unconventional Semiconductors: RE-V/III-V Nanocomposites and Semiconducting Half Heusler Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    10.1103/PhysRevLett.45.494. [2] D.C. Tsui, H.L. Stormer , and A.C. Gossard. Two-dimensional magnetotransport in the extreme quantum limit. Phys. Rev. Lett...5] R. Dingle, H. L. Stormer , A. C. Gossard, and W. Wiegmann. Electron mobil- ities in modulation-doped semiconductor heterojunction superlattices

  13. Electronic properties of III-nitride semiconductors: A first-principles investigation using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Rafael B.; Almeida, J. S. de; Ferreira da Silva, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we use density functional theory to investigate the influence of semilocal exchange and correlation effects on the electronic properties of III-nitride semiconductors considering zinc-blende and wurtzite crystal structures. We find that the inclusion of such effects through the use of the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential yields an excellent description of the electronic structures of these materials giving energy band gaps which are systematically larger than the ones obtained with standard functionals such as the generalized gradient approximation. The discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical band gaps is then significantly reduced with semilocal exchange and correlation effects. However, the effective masses are overestimated in the zinc-blende nitrides, but no systematic trend is found in the wurtzite compounds. New results for energy band gaps and effective masses of zinc-blende and wurtzite indium nitrides are presented

  14. Fast Etching of Molding Compound by an Ar/O2/CF4 Plasma and Process Improvements for Semiconductor Package Decapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, J.; Gruber, D.; Schelen, J.B.J.; Funke, H.J.; Beenakker, C.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Decapsulation of a SOT23 semiconductor package with 23 um copper wire bonds is conducted with an especially designed microwave induced plasma system. It is found that a 30%-60% CF4 addition in the O2/CF4 etchant gas results in high molding compound etching rate. Si3N4 overetching which is

  15. Chemical method for producing nanoscale semiconductor compound CdS in a polymer matrix; Khimicheskij metod polucheniya nanorazmernogo poluprovodnikovogo soedineniya CdS v polimernoj matritse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goglidze, Natalia; Dement' ev, Igor' ; Zadorozhnyj, Aleksandru; Koval' , Andrej; Gashin, Petr [Moldavskij gosudarstvennyj univ., Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Gutsul, Tatiana; Taraburkin, Aleksandr [Academiya nauk Moldovy, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    The results of cadmium sulfide synthesis in a polymer matrix from cadmium stearate and tiourea are given. Luminescent properties of the obtained materials were studied. It was shown that the elaborated method allows to efficiently synthesize 2-6 semiconductor compounds with the nano-granulated particles in various organic media including biopolymers. (authors)

  16. Initiation of explosive conversions in energy-saturated nanoporous silicon-based compounds with fast semiconductor switches and energy-releasing elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenkov, G. G.; Kardo-Sysoev, A. F.; Zegrya, A. G.; Os'kin, I. A.; Bragin, V. A.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2017-10-01

    The first findings concerning the initiation of explosive conversions in energy-saturated nanoporous silicon-based compounds via the electrical explosion of a semiconductor bridge are presented. The obtained results indicate that the energy parameters of an explosive conversion depend on the mass of a combustible agent—namely, nanoporous silicon—and the silicon-doping type.

  17. The structural, elastic, electronic and dynamical properties of chalcopyrite semiconductor BeGeAs{sub 2} from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, Yasemin Oe. [Gazi University Teknikokullar, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara (Turkey); Evecen, Meryem; Aldirmaz, Emine [Amasya University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Amasya (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    First-principles calculations for the structural, elastic, electronic and vibrational properties of BeGeAs{sub 2} with chalcopyrite structure have been reported in the frame work of the density functional theory. The calculated ground state properties are in good agreement with the available data. By considering the electronic band structure and electronic density of states calculation, it is found that this compound is a semiconductor which confirmed the previous work. Single-crystal elastic constants and related properties such as Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, shear modulus and bulk modulus have been predicted using the stress-finite strain technique. It can be seen from the calculated elastic constants that this compound is mechanically stable in the chalcopyrite structure. Pressure dependences of elastic constants and band gap are also reported. Finally, the phonon dispersion curves and total and partial density of states were calculated and discussed. The calculated phonon frequencies BeGeAs{sub 2} are positive, indicating the dynamical stability of the studied compound. (orig.)

  18. Electroluminescence color tuning between green and red from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices fabricated by spin-coating of rare-earth (terbium + europium) organic compounds on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Toshihiro; Hattori, Fumihiro; Iwata, Hideyuki; Ohzone, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    Color tunable electroluminescence (EL) from metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with the rare-earth elements Tb and Eu is reported. Organic compound liquid sources of (Tb + Ba) and Eu with various Eu/Tb ratios from 0.001 to 0.4 were spin-coated on an n+-Si substrate and annealed to form an oxide insulator layer. The EL spectra had only peaks corresponding to the intrashell Tb3+/Eu3+ transitions in the spectral range from green to red, and the intensity ratio of the peaks was appropriately tuned using the appropriate Eu/Tb ratios in liquid sources. Consequently, the EL emission colors linearly changed from yellowish green to yellowish orange and eventually to reddish orange on the CIE chromaticity diagram. The gate current +I G current also affected the EL colors for the medium-Eu/Tb-ratio device. The structure of the surface insulator films analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has four layers, namely, (Tb4O7 + Eu2O3), [Tb4O7 + Eu2O3 + (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x ], (Tb/Eu/Ba)SiO x , and SiO x -rich oxide. The EL mechanism proposed is that electrons injected from the Si substrate into the SiO x -rich oxide and Tb/Eu/Ba-silicate layers become hot electrons accelerated in a high electric field, and then these hot electrons excite Tb3+ and Eu3+ ions in the Tb4O7/Eu2O3 layers resulting in EL emission from Tb3+ and Eu3+ intrashell transitions.

  19. Processing of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for thermal management of wide-bandgap semiconductor power electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindaraju, N.; Singh, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Studied effect of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) deposition on device metallization. → Deposited NCD on to top of High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) and Si devices. → Temperatures below 290 deg. C for Si devices and 320 deg. C for HEMTs prevent metal damage. → Development of novel NCD-based thermal management for power electronics feasible. - Abstract: High current densities in wide-bandgap semiconductor electronics operating at high power levels results in significant self-heating of devices, which necessitates the development thermal management technologies to effectively dissipate the generated heat. This paper lays the foundation for the development of such technology by ascertaining process conditions for depositing nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) on AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs) with no visible damage to device metallization. NCD deposition is carried out on Si and GaN HEMTs with Au/Ni metallization. Raman spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy are used to evaluate the quality of the deposited NCD films. Si device metallization is used as a test bed for developing process conditions for NCD deposition on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Results indicate that no visible damage occurs to the device metallization for deposition conditions below 290 deg. C for Si devices and below 320 deg. C for the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. Possible mechanisms for metallization damage above the deposition temperature are enumerated. Electrical testing of the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs indicates that it is indeed possible to deposit NCD on GaN-based devices with no significant degradation in device performance.

  20. Ab initio electronic band structure study of III-VI layered semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín, Daniel; Rubio-Ponce, Alberto; Cantarero, Andrés

    2013-08-01

    We present a total energy study of the electronic properties of the rhombohedral γ-InSe, hexagonal ɛ-GaSe, and monoclinic GaTe layered compounds. The calculations have been done using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method, including spin-orbit interaction. The calculated valence bands of the three compounds compare well with angle resolved photoemission measurements and a discussion of the small discrepancies found has been given. The present calculations are also compared with recent and previous band structure calculations available in the literature for the three compounds. Finally, in order to improve the calculated band gap value we have used the recently proposed modified Becke-Johnson correction for the exchange-correlation potential.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of GaAs and GaP semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Anita [Guru Nanak College for girls, Sri Muktsar Sahib, Punjab (India); Kumar, Ranjan [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The Structural and Electronic properties of Zinc Blende phase of GaAs and GaP compounds are studied using self consistent SIESTA-code, pseudopotentials and Density Functional Theory (DFT) in Local Density Approximation (LDA). The Lattice Constant, Equillibrium Volume, Cohesive Energy per pair, Compressibility and Band Gap are calculated. The band gaps calcultated with DFT using LDA is smaller than the experimental values. The P-V data fitted to third order Birch Murnaghan equation of state provide the Bulk Modulus and its pressure derivatives. Our Structural and Electronic properties estimations are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data.

  2. Organic-inorganic semiconductor devices and 3, 4, 9, 10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride: an early history of organic electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, S R

    2003-01-01

    The demonstration, over 20 years ago, of an organic-inorganic heterojunction (OI HJ) device along with investigations of the growth and physical properties of the archetypal crystalline molecular organic semiconductor 3, 4, 9, 10 perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride are discussed. Possible applications of OI HJ devices are introduced and the dramatic change in conductive properties of these materials when exposed to high-energy ion beams is described. The past and future prospects for hybrid organic-on-inorganic semiconductor structures for use in electronic and photonic applications are also presented

  3. Passivation of Si solar cells by hetero-epitaxial compound semiconductor coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, S. M.; Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.; Haven, V. E.; Sekula, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    A development status evaluation is made for high efficiency Si solar cells, with emphasis on the suppression of the deleterious effects of surface recombination. ZnS(0.9)Se(0.1) and GaP are identified as candidates for the reduction of surface recombination. Attention is given to methods developed for the deposition of heteroepitaxial compounds designed to block minority carrier transport to the Si solar cell surface without interfering with the majority carrier flow.

  4. Electron-hole liquid in semiconductors and low-dimensional structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeldin, N. N.

    2017-11-01

    The condensation of excitons into an electron-hole liquid (EHL) and the main EHL properties in bulk semiconductors and low-dimensional structures are considered. The EHL properties in bulk materials are discussed primarily in qualitative terms based on the experimental results obtained for germanium and silicon. Some of the experiments in which the main EHL thermodynamic parameters (density and binding energy) have been obtained are described and the basic factors that determine these parameters are considered. Topics covered include the effect of external perturbations (uniaxial strain and magnetic field) on EHL stability; phase diagrams for a nonequilibrium exciton-gas-EHL system; information on the size and concentration of electron-hole drops (EHDs) under various experimental conditions; the kinetics of exciton condensation and of recombination in the exciton-gas-EHD system; dynamic EHD properties and the motion of EHDs under the action of external forces; the properties of giant EHDs that form in potential wells produced by applying an inhomogeneous strain to the crystal; and effects associated with the drag of EHDs by nonequilibrium phonons (phonon wind), including the dynamics and formation of an anisotropic spatial structure of the EHD cloud. In discussing EHLs in low-dimensional structures, a number of studies are reviewed on the observation and experimental investigation of phenomena such as spatially indirect (dipolar) electron-hole and exciton (dielectric) liquids in GaAs/AlGaAs structures with double quantum wells (QWs), EHDs containing only a few electron-hole pairs (dropletons), EHLs in type-I silicon QWs, and spatially direct and dipolar EHLs in type-II silicon-germanium heterostructures.

  5. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  6. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-09-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure-property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost.

  7. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O

    2013-01-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure–property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost. (paper)

  8. Study of the parameters of nanoscale layers in nanoheterostructures based on II–VI semiconductor compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, M. B., E-mail: estonianchameleon@gmail.com; Kirilenko, D. A.; Ivanova, E. V.; Popova, T. B.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Sedova, I. V.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Wide-gap ZnSe-based nanoheterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy are studied by local cathodoluminescence and X-ray microanalysis. It is shown that the used methods allow nondestructive determination of the depth, elemental composition, and geometrical parameters of the nanoscale ZnCdSe layer. The accuracy of the results is verified by transmission electron microscopy. The research techniques are based on the possibility of varying the primary electron-beam energy, which results in changes in the regions of characteristic X-ray and cathodoluminescence generation.

  9. Electrostatic separation for recycling conductors, semiconductors, and nonconductors from electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mianqiang; Yan, Guoqing; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

    2012-10-02

    Electrostatic separation has been widely used to separate conductors and nonconductors for recycling e-waste. However, the components of e-waste are complex, which can be classified as conductors, semiconductors, and nonconductors according to their conducting properties. In this work, we made a novel attempt to recover the mixtures containing conductors (copper), semiconductors (extrinsic silicon), and nonconductors (woven glass reinforced resin) by electrostatic separation. The results of binary mixtures separation show that the separation of conductor and nonconductor, semiconductor and nonconductor need a higher voltage level while the separation of conductor and semiconductor needs a higher roll speed. Furthermore, the semiconductor separation efficiency is more sensitive to the high voltage level and the roll speed than the conductor separation efficiency. An integrated process was proposed for the multiple mixtures separation. The separation efficiency of conductors and semiconductors can reach 82.5% and 88%, respectively. This study contributes to the efficient recycling of valuable resources from e-waste.

  10. Theoretical Crystal-Field Calculations for Rare-Earth Ions in III-V semiconductor Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    22209 Director Director US Army Electronics Warfare Laboratory Defense Nuclear Agency Attn AMSEL-DD Attn Tech Library Attn AMSEL-DD, J. Charlton 6801...Washougal, WA 98671 Attn SLCHD-NW-TN, Chief Attn SLCHD-NW-TS, Chief Departmento Quimica Fundamental Attn SLCHD-PO, Chief Universidade Federal de

  11. Semiconductor interfaces of polycrystalline CdTe thin-film solar cells. Characterization and modification of electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsche, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis for the first time the electronic properties of the semiconductor interfaces in polycrystalline CdTe thin-film solar cells, as well as the morphological and electronic properties of the single semiconductor surfaces were systematically characterized by surface-sensitive measuring methods. The morphological surface properties were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. As substrate materials with SnO 2 /ITO covered glass was applied, where the CdS and CdTe layers were deposited. Furthermore the electronic and morphological material properties of differently treated SnO 2 surfaces were characterized. Beside the studies with scanning force microscopy sputtering depth profiles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were measured

  12. TDPAC study of complex structure semiconductor compounds; The case of niobium pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shitu, J.; Renteria, M.; Massolo, C.P.; Bibiloni, A.G.; Desimonni, J. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. No. 67, 1900 La Plata (AR))

    1992-07-20

    In this paper, a new method for analyzing Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation spectra is presented and applied to study the hyperfine interaction of {sup 100}Rh in the high temperature modification of niobium pentoxide. The measured quadrupole interactions are assigned to about 80% of the radioactive probes replacing niobium atoms in the lattice and about 20% located in perturbed sites. The origin of this perturbation, producing a high frequency component in the measured spectra is discussed and temptatively assigned to remaining radiation damage in the compound. The hyperfine interaction of {sup 111}Cd probes, introduced through thermal diffusion into niobium pentoxide, is also presented. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine parameters in this case is studied in the temperature range RT-800{degrees} C. The spectral analyzing method employed allows a direct comparison of experimental data with point charge model calculations and a simultaneous evaluation of the antishielding factor {beta}. The obtained values (27 for {sup 100}Rh and 15 for {sup 111}Cd) are discussed in terms of the compound and probe's characteristics.

  13. TDPAC study of complex structure semiconductor compounds; The case niobium pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shitu, J.; Renteria, M.; Massolo, C.P.; Bibiloni, A.G.; Desimoni, J. (Dept. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Univ. Nacional de La Plata, C.C. No. 67, 1900 La Plata (AR))

    1992-07-10

    In this paper, a new method for analyzing Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation spectra is presented and applied to study the hyperfine interaction of {sup 100}Rh in the high temperature modification of niobium pentoxide. The measured quadrupole interactions are assigned to about 80% of the radioactive probes replacing niobium atoms in the lattice and about 20% located in perturbed sites. The origin of this perturbation, producing a high frequency component in the measured spectra is discussed and temptatively assigned to remaining radiation damage in the compound. The hyperfine interaction of {sup 111}Cd probes, introduced through thermal diffusion into niobium pentoxide, is also presented. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine parameters in this case is studied in the temperature range RT-800{degrees}C. The spectral analyzing method employed allows a direct comparison of experimental data with point charge model calculations and a simultaneous evaluation of the anti-shielding factor {beta}. The obtained values (27 for {sup 100}Rh and 15 for {sup 111}Cd) are discussed in terms of the compound and probe's characteristics.

  14. Dynamic behavior of correlated electrons in the insulating doped semiconductor Si:P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, Elvira

    2009-06-04

    At low energy scales charge transport in the insulating Si:P is dominated by activated hopping between the localized donor electron states. Theoretical models for a disordered electronic system with a long-range Coulomb interaction are appropriate to interpret the electric conductivity spectra. With a novel and advanced method we perform broadband phase sensitive measurements of the reflection coefficient from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz, employing a vector network analyzer with a 2.4 mm coaxial sensor, which is terminated by the sample under test. While the material parameters (conductivity and permittivity) can be easily extracted from the obtained impedance data if the sample is metallic, no direct solution is possible if the material under investigation is an insulator. Focusing on doped semiconductors with largely varying conductivity and dielectric function, we present a closed calibration and evaluation procedure with an optimized theoretical and experimental complexity, based on the rigorous solution for the electromagnetic field inside the insulating sample, combined with the variational principle. Basically no limiting assumptions are necessary in a strictly defined parameter range. As an application of our new method, we have measured the complex broadband microwave conductivity of Si:P in a broad range of phosphorus concentration n/n{sub c} from 0.56 to 0.9 relative to the critical value n{sub c}=3.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} of the metal-insulator transition driven by doping at temperatures down to 1.1 K, and studied unresolved issues of fundamental research concerning the electronic correlations and the metal-insulator transition. (orig.)

  15. A step towards molecular electronics. The ferrocene molecule on a metal-semiconductor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeidel, Jedrzej Piotr

    2012-05-14

    In the first part, the domain walls on Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) are investigated and structural and electronic model are introduced and discussed. Furthermore, the temperature dependence is investigated, showing the Peierls-type transition along the domain wall chain. In the second part, the high resolution STM data of the local adsorption geometry of FDT on Ag {radical}(3)< x {radical}(3) are presented. The comparison of theoretical results obtained for the molecule, on Ag(lll) and Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) surfaces, with STM measurement at RT, support the chemisorption with thiolate bonds to the Ag trimers on the HCT surface. The molecule is aligned with the Cp-Fe-Cp axis parallel to the surface, while the rotational freedom of the molecule is limited due to chemisorption. The presented adsorption model is supported by experiment and simulation. In the third part, the perfect Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) is prepared and investigated by means of STM, focusing on structural and electronic characteristics. The different reconstructions and amounts of Ag on Si are investigated; the submonolayer amounts, Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) wetting layers, perfect epitaxial layers and multilayer systems. The influence of wetting layer on electronic character of deposited Ag nanostructures is studied. The occurrence of effective single and double barriers in tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy for the Ag {radical}(3) x <{radical}(3) system is investigated in the monolayer regime by varying the measurement and preparation conditions. The Coulomb Blockade oscillations are found for granular multilayer Ag films, whereas similar structures with existence of Ag {radical}(3) x {radical}(3) show only a single barrier characteristic. The vertical transport properties in this metal/ semiconductor system depend on the structure and bonding on the atomic scale and on the lateral two-dimensional properties of the interface.

  16. A comprehensive study of g-factors, elastic, structural and electronic properties of III-V semiconductors using hybrid-density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Sipahi, Guilherme M.; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2018-02-01

    Despite the large number of theoretical III-V semiconductor studies reported every year, our atomistic understanding is still limited. The limitations of the theoretical approaches to yield accurate structural and electronic properties on an equal footing, is due to the unphysical self-interaction problem that mainly affects the band gap and spin-orbit splitting (SOC) in semiconductors and, in particular, III-V systems with similar magnitude of the band gap and SOC. In this work, we report a consistent study of the structural and electronic properties of the III-V semiconductors by using the screening hybrid-density functional theory framework, by fitting the α parameters for 12 different III-V compounds, namely, AlN, AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaN, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InN, InP, InAs, and InSb, to minimize the deviation between the theoretical and experimental values of the band gap and SOC. Structural relaxation effects were also included. Except for AlP, whose α = 0.127, we obtained α values that ranged from 0.209 to 0.343, which deviate by less than 0.1 from the universal value of 0.25. Our results for the lattice parameter and elastic constants indicate that the fitting of α does not affect those structural parameters when compared with the HSE06 functional, where α = 0.25. Our analysis of the band structure based on the k ṡ p method shows that the effective masses are in agreement with the experimental values, which can be attributed to the simultaneous fitting of the band gap and SOC. Also, we estimate the values of g-factors, extracted directly from the band structure, which are close to experimental results, which indicate that the obtained band structure produced a realistic set of k ṡ p parameters.

  17. Solid spectroscopy: semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1983-01-01

    Photoemission as technique of study of the semiconductor electronic structure is shortly discussed. Homogeneous and heterogeneous semiconductors, where volume and surface electronic structure, core levels and O and H chemisorption in GaAs, Schottky barrier are treated, respectively. Amorphous semiconductors are also discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  18. Electronic structure of magnesium diboride and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduani, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, UFSC, Florianopolis, CEP 88040-900, SC (Brazil)

    2003-11-01

    The electronic structure of AlB{sub 2}-type diborides and related compounds has been investigated in first-principles calculations with the molecular cluster discrete variational method. For MgB{sub 2} was studied the effect of the lattice relaxation on the total density of states at the Fermi energy (N({epsilon}{sub F})). The results indicated that a contraction of about 2% in the lattice spacings a and c can lead to a slight increase of N({epsilon}{sub F}) for boron. In the MB{sub 2} diborides, M=Al, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta, the largest contributions to N({epsilon}{sub F}) is observed for Cr, Mo and Nb. TiB{sub 2} possess the highest chemical stability in the series. The electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} also is calculated for the diborides. The method is employed to obtain the partial B2p contribution to the total DOS at the Fermi level with the introduction of a monolayer of solute atoms as a substitution for Mg atoms of Na, Al, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta in layered superstructures.. /M/B{sub 2}/Mg/B{sub 2}/.. A stronger covalent bonding between boron atoms is identified in these cases. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Electronic structure of magnesium diboride and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paduani, C.

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of AlB 2 -type diborides and related compounds has been investigated in first-principles calculations with the molecular cluster discrete variational method. For MgB 2 was studied the effect of the lattice relaxation on the total density of states at the Fermi energy (N(ε F )). The results indicated that a contraction of about 2% in the lattice spacings a and c can lead to a slight increase of N(ε F ) for boron. In the MB 2 diborides, M=Al, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta, the largest contributions to N(ε F ) is observed for Cr, Mo and Nb. TiB 2 possess the highest chemical stability in the series. The electronic specific heat coefficient γ also is calculated for the diborides. The method is employed to obtain the partial B2p contribution to the total DOS at the Fermi level with the introduction of a monolayer of solute atoms as a substitution for Mg atoms of Na, Al, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta in layered superstructures.. /M/B 2 /Mg/B 2 /.. A stronger covalent bonding between boron atoms is identified in these cases. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Structural, optical and vibrational studies of Na{sup +} doped Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}S semiconductor compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yellaiah, G., E-mail: johngolluri@yahoo.com; Hadasa, K.; Nagabhushanam, M., E-mail: mamidala_nb@yahoo.com

    2013-12-25

    Graphical abstract: FTIR spectra of Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}S: N{sub x} (x = 0.2 mol%). Highlights: •The energy band gaps of Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 02}S: Nasamples were estimated. •Density and porosity percentages were calculated. •From the FTIR study CdS and ZnS stretching bonds were detected. -- Abstract: Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}S semiconductor powders doped with different amounts of sodium have been synthesized by controlled co-precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Optical absorption and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) studies have been done on all these samples. XRD studies have revealed that the samples are polycrystalline with an average crystallite size ranging from 29 to 55 nm and they crystallize in the hexagonal form with wurtzite structure. The optical measurements revealed that the samples possess direct band gap and the band gap increases with an increase in the dopant concentration. The vibrational modes of Cd–S and Zn–S were obtained from FTIR studies and found to be at 812–618 cm{sup −1} respectively. Experimental and theoretical (XRD) densities were calculated and analyzed. Density from XRD and porosity in percentage varied from 92% to 94% and 5% to 8% respectively. The elemental analysis of the compounds was done by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and found that the cadmium, zinc, sulphur and sodium elements were present in the compound as per the composition taken. From the theoretical estimations it is understood that the dopant (Na) occupies the interstitial of CdZnS.

  1. Characterization of Electrostatic Potential and Trapped Charge in Semiconductor Nanostructures using Off-Axis Electron Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhaofeng

    Off-axis electron holography (EH) has been used to characterize electrostatic potential, active dopant concentrations and charge distribution in semiconductor nanostructures, including ZnO nanowires (NWs) and thin films, ZnTe thin films, Si NWs with axial p-n junctions, Si-Ge axial heterojunction NWs, and Ge/Li xGe core/shell NW. The mean inner potential (MIP) and inelastic mean free path (IMFP) of ZnO NWs have been measured to be 15.3V+/-0.2V and 55+/-3nm, respectively, for 200keV electrons. These values were then used to characterize the thickness of a ZnO nano-sheet and gave consistent values. The MIP and IMFP for ZnTe thin films were measured to be 13.7+/-0.6V and 46+/-2nm, respectively, for 200keV electrons. A thin film expected to have a p-n junction was studied, but no signal due to the junction was observed. The importance of dynamical effects was systematically studied using Bloch wave simulations. The built-in potentials in Si NWs across the doped p-n junction and the Schottky junction due to Au catalyst were measured to be 1.0+/-0.3V and 0.5+/-0.3V, respectively. Simulations indicated that the dopant concentrations were ~1019cm-3 for donors and ~1017 cm-3 for acceptors. The effects of positively charged Au catalyst, a possible n+-n --p junction transition region and possible surface charge, were also systematically studied using simulations. Si-Ge heterojunction NWs were studied. Dopant concentrations were extracted by atom probe tomography. The built-in potential offset was measured to be 0.4+/-0.2V, with the Ge side lower. Comparisons with simulations indicated that Ga present in the Si region was only partially activated. In situ EH biasing experiments combined with simulations indicated the B dopant in Ge was mostly activated but not the P dopant in Si. I-V characteristic curves were measured and explained using simulations. The Ge/LixGe core/shell structure was studied during lithiation. The MIP for LixGe decreased with time due to increased Li

  2. A Furan-Thiophene-Based Quinoidal Compound: A New Class of Solution-Processable High-Performance n-Type Organic Semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yu; Tao, Jingwei; Wang, Ruihao; Qiao, Xiaolan; Yang, Xiaodi; Wang, Deliang; Wu, Hongzhuo; Li, Hongxiang

    2016-07-01

    The furan-thiophene-based quinoidal organic semiconductor, TFT-CN, is designed and synthesized. TFT-CN displays a high electron mobility of 7.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , two orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding thiophene-based derivative. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Thermoelectric properties of thin film and superlattice structure of IV-VI and V-VI compound semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumers, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The basic material property governing the efficiency of thermoelectric applications is the thermoelectric figure of merit Z=S 2 .σ/k, where S is the Seebeck-coefficient, σ is the electrical conductivity and k the thermal conductivity. A promising concept of increasing Z by one and two dimensional quantum well superlattices (QW-SL) was introduced in the early 1990s in terms of theoretical predictions. The realization of such low dimensional systems is done by use of semiconductor compounds with different energy gaps. The ambition of the Nitherma project was to investigate the thermoelectric properties of superlattices and Multi-Quantum-Well-structures (MQW) made of Pb 1-x Sr x Te and Bi 2 (Se x Te 1-x ) 3 , respectively. Therefore SL- and MQW-structures of this materials were grown and Z was determined by measuring of S, σ and κ parallel to the layer planes. Aim of this thesis is the interpretation of the transport measurements (S,σ,κ) of low dimensional structures and the improvement of preparation and measurement techniques. The influence of low dimensionality on the thermal conductivity in SL- and MQW-structures was investigated by measurements on structures with different layer thicknesses. In addition, measurements of the Seebeck-coefficient were performed, also to verify the results of the participating groups.

  4. Method to quantify the delocalization of electronic states in amorphous semiconductors and its application to assessing charge carrier mobility of p -type amorphous oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2018-01-01

    Amorphous semiconductors are usually characterized by a low charge carrier mobility, essentially related to their lack of long-range order. The development of such material with higher charge carrier mobility is hence challenging. Part of the issue comes from the difficulty encountered by first-principles simulations to evaluate concepts such as the electron effective mass for disordered systems since the absence of periodicity induced by the disorder precludes the use of common concepts derived from condensed matter physics. In this paper, we propose a methodology based on first-principles simulations that partially solves this problem, by quantifying the degree of delocalization of a wave function and of the connectivity between the atomic sites within this electronic state. We validate the robustness of the proposed formalism on crystalline and molecular systems and extend the insights gained to disordered/amorphous InGaZnO4 and Si. We also explore the properties of p -type oxide semiconductor candidates recently reported to have a low effective mass in their crystalline phases [G. Hautier et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 2292 (2013), 10.1038/ncomms3292]. Although in their amorphous phase none of the candidates present a valence band with delocalization properties matching those found in the conduction band of amorphous InGaZnO4, three of the seven analyzed materials show some potential. The most promising candidate, K2Sn2O3 , is expected to possess in its amorphous phase a slightly higher hole mobility than the electron mobility in amorphous silicon.

  5. Fast front-end electronics for semiconductor tracking detectors: Trends and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivetti, Angelo

    2014-11-21

    In the past few years, extensive research efforts pursued by both the industry and the academia have lead to major improvements in the performance of Analog to Digital Converters (ADCs) and Time to Digital Converters (TDCs). ADCs achieving 8–10 bit resolution, 50–100 MHz conversion frequency and less than 1 mW power consumption are the today's standard, while TDCs have reached sub-picosecond time resolution. These results have been made possible by architectural upgrades combined with the use of ultra deep submicron CMOS technologies with minimum feature size of 130 nm or smaller. Front-end ASICs in which a prompt digitization is followed by signal conditioning in the digital domain can now be envisaged also within the tight power budget typically available in high density tracking systems. Furthermore, tracking detectors embedding high resolution timing capabilities are gaining interest. In the paper, ADC's and TDC's developments which are of particular relevance for the design front-end electronics for semiconductor trackers are discussed along with the benefits and challenges of exploiting such high performance building blocks in implementing the next generation of ASICs for high granularity particle detectors.

  6. Electronic properties of InAs-based metal-insulator-semiconductor structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kuryshev, G L; Valisheva, N A

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of electronic processes in InAs-based MIS structures operating in the charge injection device mode and using as photodetectors in spectral range 2.5-3.05 mu m are investigated. A two-layer system consisting of anodic oxide and low-temperature silicon dioxide is used as an insulator. It is shown that fluoride-containing components that is introduced into the electrolyte decreases the value of the built-in charge and the surface state static density down to minimal measurable values <= 2 x 10 sup 1 sup 0 cm sup - sup 2 eV sup - sup 2. Physical and chemical characteristics of the surface states at the InAs-dielectric interface are discussed on the basis of data on phase composition of anodic oxides obtained by means of X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy. Anomalous field generation was also observed under the semiconductor non-equilibrium depletion. The processes of tunnel generation and the noise behavior of MIS structures under non-equilibrium depletion are investigated

  7. Effects of electromagnetic shielding cases for semiconductor-type electronic personal dosimeters on preventing electromagnetic interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deji, Shizuhiko; Ito, Shigeki; Nishizawa, Kunihide; Saze, Takuya; Mori, Kazuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Performance of electromagnetic shielding cases for preventing malfunction of semiconductor-type electronic personal dosimeters (SEPDs) caused by high frequency electromagnetic fields emitted from a digital cellular telephone (cell phone) and a card reader of access control system were analyzed. The cases were handcrafted by using cloth of activated carbon fiber, polyester film laminated metal, and two kinds of metal netting. Five kinds of SEPDs put in the cases were exposed to the high frequency electromagnetic fields for 50 sec or 1 min. The cases prevented perfectly the malfunction due to the cell phone. The cases shortened distances required to prevent the malfunction due to the card reader, but did not prevent the malfunction. The electromagnetic immunity level of SEPD inserted in the cases increased from greater than 11.2 to greater than 18.7 times for the cell phone and from 1.1 to greater than 4.3 times for the card reader. The maximum of electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of each case was greater than 18.7 times for the cell phone and greater than 4.3 times for the card reader. (author)

  8. X-ray photoemission electron microscopy for the study of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Simone; Stammler, Thomas; Padmore, Howard A.; Terminello, Louis J.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Stoehr, Joachim; Diaz, Javier; Cossy-Favre, Aline; Singh, Sangeet

    1998-01-01

    Photoemission Electron Microscopy using X-rays (X-PEEM) is a novel combination of two established materials analysis techniques--PEEM using UV light, and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. This combination allows the study of elemental composition and bonding structure of the sample by NEXAFS spectroscopy with a high spatial resolution given by the microscope. A simple, two lens, 10 kV operation voltage PEEM has been used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley to study various problems including materials of interest for the semiconductor industry. In the present paper we give a short overview over the method and the instrument which was used, and describe in detail a number of applications. These applications include the study of the different phases of titanium disilicide, various phases of boron nitride, and the analysis of small particles. A brief outlook is given on possible new fields of application of the PEEM technique, and the development of new PEEM instruments

  9. Electronic, elastic and optical properties of ZnGeP{sub 2} semiconductor under hydrostatic pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, S.K.; Kumar, V., E-mail: vkumar52@hotmail.com

    2014-03-15

    The electronic, elastic and optical properties of zinc germanium phosphide, ZnGeP{sub 2}, semiconductor have been studied using local density approximation (LDA) method within the density functional theory (DFT). The lattice constants (a and c), band structure, density of states (DOS), bulk modulus (B) and pressure derivative of bulk modulus (B′) have been discussed. The value of pseudo-direct band gap (E{sub g}) at Γ point has been calculated. The pressure dependences of elastic stiffness coefficients (C{sub ij}), Zener anisotropy factor (A), Poisson's ratio (ν), Young modulus (Y) and shear modulus (G) have also been calculated. The ratio of B/G shows that that ZnGeP{sub 2} is ductile in nature. The optical properties have been discussed in detail under three different pressures in the energy range 0–22 eV. The calculated values of all parameters are compared with the available experimental values and the values reported by different workers. Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between them.

  10. Electronic effects of substituents in o-hydroxyazo compounds and azoquinone-hydrazone tautomerism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raikhshtat, M.M.; Zhogina, V.V.; Savvin, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have investigated the electronic structure of p-substituted phenylazonaphthol and some o-hydroxyazo compounds of the general structure X-N=N-Y. The influence of structural changes of the X and Y radicals on the electronic structure of the o-hydroxyazo group was studied. The results are compared with experimental data, obtained by NMR 13 C, by tautomerism of these compounds in solution in CDCl 3 . The electronic structure of o-hydroxyazo compounds was calculated by the PPDP/2 method. This method satisfactorily describes the electronic structure of organic compounds and correctly reproduces electronic effects of the substituents

  11. Using Polymer Semiconductors and a 3-in-1 Plastic Electronics STEM Education Kit to Engage Students in Hands-On Polymer Inquiry Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, Jessica L.; Marin, Dawn M.; Walter, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    To improve polymer education for 9-12 and undergraduate students, a plastic electronics laboratory kit using polymer semiconductors has been developed. The three-module kit and curriculum use polymer semiconductors to provide hands-on inquiry activities with overlapping themes of electrical conductivity, light emission, and light-harvesting solar…

  12. A Review of Ultrahigh Efficiency III-V Semiconductor Compound Solar Cells: Multijunction Tandem, Lower Dimensional, Photonic Up/Down Conversion and Plasmonic Nanometallic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells are a promising renewable, carbon-free electric energy resource to address the fossil fuel shortage and global warming. Energy conversion efficiencies around 40% have been recently achieved in laboratories using III-V semiconductor compounds as photovoltaic materials. This article reviews the efforts and accomplishments made for higher efficiency III-V semiconductor compound solar cells, specifically with multijunction tandem, lower-dimensional, photonic up/down conversion, and plasmonic metallic structures. Technological strategies for further performance improvement from the most efficient (AlInGaP/(InGaAs/Ge triple-junction cells including the search for 1.0 eV bandgap semiconductors are discussed. Lower-dimensional systems such as quantum well and dot structures are being intensively studied to realize multiple exciton generation and multiple photon absorption to break the conventional efficiency limit. Implementation of plasmonic metallic nanostructures manipulating photonic energy flow directions to enhance sunlight absorption in thin photovoltaic semiconductor materials is also emerging.

  13. Theoretical studies of structural and electronic properties of overlayers on semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakmak, M.

    1999-06-01

    In this thesis we report the results of ab initio density functional calculations of equilibrium atomic geometry, electronic states and chemical bonding for the adsorption of elemental S and H 2 S on chosen semiconductor surfaces. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental results and indicate the need for further experimental work. In Chapter 2 of this thesis, I describe the formalism of the ab initio pseudopotential theory and the computational procedures which are used in this thesis. In the following chapter, a few experimental techniques are discussed, which we subsequently use their results to compare with our theoretical calculated results. In Chapter 4 the passivation of S on InP(110) is investigated. Two sets of geometries are used; non-reacted geometries and reacted geometries. For non-reacted full-monolayer coverage, the epitaxially continued layer structure is found to be the most energetically favourable and it exhibits a good semiconducting nature. For an ordered reacted model with the adsorbate S atoms exchanged with their neighbouring P atoms, the average vertical distance between the top two layers is in agreement with x-ray standing wave analysis, but is characterized by a small band gap. In Chapter 5 adsorption of the H 2 S molecule on the InP(110), GaAs(110) and GaP(110) surfaces is investigated within a dissociative adsorption model. In general the adsorption of H 2 S on the three semiconductors shows similar behaviour. In Chapter 6 the adsorption of elemental S on Si(001) is investigated using three adsorption models; hemisulfide-(2 x 1) structure, monosulfide-(1 x 1) structure, and disulfide-(1 x 1) structure. An analysis of the surface free energy suggests that the monosulfide structure is more stable than the hemisulfide and disulfide structures. This result is also used to investigate the adsorption of elemental S on the Ge(001) surface. In Chapter 7, the adsorption of the H 2 S molecule on the Si(001) and Ge(001

  14. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.

    2015-01-02

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  15. Ultrafast Electron Transfer at Organic Semiconductor Interfaces: Importance of Molecular Orientation

    KAUST Repository

    Ayzner, Alexander L.; Nordlund, Dennis; Kim, Do-Hwan; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Much is known about the rate of photoexcited charge generation in at organic donor/acceptor (D/A) heterojunctions overaged over all relative arrangements. However, there has been very little experimental work investigating how the photoexcited electron transfer (ET) rate depends on the precise relative molecular orientation between D and A in thin solid films. This is the question that we address in this work. We find that the ET rate depends strongly on the relative molecular arrangement: The interface where the model donor compound copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. Our results suggest that the D/A electronic coupling is significantly enhanced in the face-on case, which agrees well with theoretical predictions, underscoring the importance of controlling the relative interfacial molecular orientation.

  16. Ab initio description of the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs: Ferromagnetism, electronic structure, and optical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craco, L.; Laad, M. S.; Müller-Hartmann, E.

    2003-12-01

    Motivated by a study of various experiments describing the electronic and magnetic properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs, we investigate its physical response in detail using a combination of first-principles band structure with methods based on dynamical mean field theory to incorporate strong, dynamical correlations, and intrinsic as well as extrinsic disorder in one single theoretical picture. We show how ferromagnetism is driven by double exchange (DE), in agreement with very recent observations, along with a good quantitative description of the details of the electronic structure, as probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and optical conductivity. Our results show how ferromagnetism can be driven by DE even in diluted magnetic semiconductors with small carrier concentration.

  17. Planning the electron traffic in semiconductor networks: A mesoscopic analog of the Braess paradox encountered in road networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huant, S.; Liu, P.; Sellier, H.; Baltazar, S.; Hackens, B.; Martins, F.; Bayot, V.; Wallart, X.; Desplanque, L.; Pala, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    By combining quantum simulations of electron transport and scanning-gate microscopy, we have shown that the current transmitted through a semiconductor two-path rectangular network in the ballistic and coherent regimes of transport can be paradoxically degraded by adding a third path to the network. This is analogous to the Braess paradox occurring in classical networks. Simulations reported here enlighten the role played by congestion in the network

  18. Electronic structure of ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs probed by sub-gap magneto-optical spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Acbas, G.; Kim, M. -H.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Scarpulla, M. A.; Dubon, O. D.; Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, Jairo; Cerne, J.

    2009-01-01

    We employ Faraday and Kerr effect spectroscopy in the infrared range to investigate the electronic structure of Ga1-xMnxAs near the Fermi energy. The band structure of this archetypical dilute-moment ferromagnetic semiconductor has been a matter of controversy, fueled partly by previous measurements of the unpolarized infrared absorption and their phenomenological impurity-band interpretation. The infrared magneto-optical effects we study arise directly from the spin-splitting of the carrier ...

  19. Highly stable and imperceptible electronics utilizing photoactivated heterogeneous sol-gel metal-oxide dielectrics and semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kang, Jin-Gu; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ko, Hyungduk; Kim, Jiwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-02-18

    Incorporation of Zr into an AlOx matrix generates an intrinsically activated ZAO surface enabling the formation of a stable semiconducting IGZO film and good interfacial properties. Photochemically annealed metal-oxide devices and circuits with the optimized sol-gel ZAO dielectric and IGZO semiconductor layers demonstrate the high performance and electrically/mechanically stable operation of flexible electronics fabricated via a low-temperature solution process. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Mn-doped Ga(As,P) and (Al,Ga)As ferromagnetic semiconductors: electronic structure calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašek, Jan; Kudrnovský, Josef; Máca, František; Sinova, J.; MacDonald, A. H.; Champion, R.P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 4 (2007), 045202/1-045202/6 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575; GA ČR GA202/04/0583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * electronic structure calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2007

  1. Semiconductor spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, J.; Abiague, A.M.; Ertler, Ch.; Stano, P.; Zutic, I.

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics refers commonly to phenomena in which the spin of electrons in a solid state environment plays the determining role. In a more narrow sense spintronics is an emerging research field of electronics: spintronics devices are based on a spin control of electronics, or on an electrical and optical control of spin of magnetism. While metal spintronics has already found its niche in the computer industry - giant magnetoresistance systems are used as hard disk read heads - semiconductor spintronics is vet demonstrate its full potential. This review presents selected themes of semiconductor spintronics, introducing important concepts in spin transport, spin transport, spin injection. Silsbee-Johnson spin-charge coupling, and spin-dependent tunneling, as well as spin relaxation and spin dynamics. The most fundamental spin-dependent interaction in nonmagnetic semiconductors is spin-orbit coupling. Depending on the crystal symmetries of the material, as well as on the structural properties of semiconductor based heterostructures, the spin-orbit coupling takes on different functional forms, giving a nice playground of effective spin-orbit Hamiltonians. The effective Hamiltonians for the most relevant classes of materials and heterostructures are derived here from realistic electronic band structure descriptions. Most semiconductor device systems are still theoretical concepts, waiting for experimental demonstrations. A review of selected proposed, and a few demonstrated devices is presented, with detailed description of two important classes: magnetic resonant tunnel structures and bipolar magnetic diodes and transistors. In view of the importance of ferromagnetic semiconductor material, a brief discussion of diluted magnetic semiconductors is included. In most cases the presentation is of tutorial style, introducing the essential theoretical formalism at an accessible level, with case-study-like illustrations of actual experimental results, as well as with brief

  2. Dosimetry with semiconductor diodes in the application to the full-length irradiation technique of electrons; Dosimetria con diodos semiconductores en la aplicacion a la tecnica de irradiacion de cuerpo entero de electrones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid G, O. A.; Rivera M, T. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Calz. Legaria No. 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The use of charged particles as electrons for the tumor-like lesions treatment to total surface of skin is not very frequent, the types of fungo id mycosis and cutaneous lymphomas compared with other neoplasms they are relatively scarce, however for the existent cases a non conventional technique should be contemplated as treatment alternative that can reach an effective control. In this work the variables of more influence with ionization chamber and semiconductor diodes are studied for to determine the quality of an electrons beam. (Author)

  3. A study of a few compounds with unpaired f electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulie, Edgar.

    1977-07-01

    Ligand field theory is applied to compounds of uranium (V) (configuration f 1 ), uranium (IV) (f 2 ), and to hexagonal neodymium sesquioxide A-Nd 2 O 3 (f 3 ). The reinterpretation of the electronic absorption and paramagnetic resonance spectra of UF 6 Cs allows a determination of the spin-orbit coupling constant, the Newman intrinsic crystal field parameters, and the orbital angular momentum reduction factors, pointing to a degree of sigma covalence for the 5f orbitals. Raman diffusion and carbon 13 SMR spectra of U(NCS) 8 [N(C 2 H 5 ) 4 ] 4 dissolved in CD 3 NO 2 show that cubical coordination for uranium, known for the solid, is maintained in solution. Thermal variation of the magnetic susceptibility of this complex, quantitatively interpreted, leads to the description of the energy levels of f 2 configuration. For U(CH 3 -CO-CH-CO-CH 3 ) 4 the interpretation of the susceptibility curve results into the prediction of the susceptibility anisotropy, and the calculation of the unpaired spin density on the methin proton. Last, it was shown by proton magnetic resonance that U(CF 3 -CO-CH-CO-C 6 H 5 ) 4 behaves as a chemical shift reagent [fr

  4. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the thermoelectric properties of the ɛ-polytype of InSe, GaSe, and InGaSe2 semiconductor compounds: an ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, H.; Olguín, D.; Cantarero, A.

    2017-12-01

    This work presents an ab initio study of the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the Seebeck coefficients and thermoelectric power factors of the ɛ-polytype of InSe, GaSe, and InGaSe2 semiconductor compounds. Our study is performed using the semi-classical Boltzmann theory and the rigid band approach. The electronic band structures of these materials are calculated using the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. The obtained thermoelectric properties are discussed in terms of the results of the electronic structure calculations. As we will show, our calculated Seebeck coefficient values indicate that these materials are good alternatives to other well-studied thermoelectric systems.

  5. Investigation of the nature of the unpaired electron states in the organic semiconductor N-methyl-N-ethylmorpholinium-tetracyanoquinodimethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, M. J.; Yartsev, V. M.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1980-01-01

    The nature of the unpaired electron states in the dimerized phase of the crystalline organic semiconductor N-methyl-N-ethylmorpholinium-tetracyanoquinodimethane [MEM(TCNQ)2] is investigated by the combined means of polarized-optical-reflectance measurements and microscopic theoretical analysis....... It is found that each unpaired electron is localized on a dimeric TCNQ unit, and it is demonstrated that the two-site molecular orbital (MO) which accommodates the unpaired electron involves internal molecular distortion of the dimeric unit. Experimental values are deduced for the intradimer π MO hopping...... integral, the TCNQ monomer ag molecular-vibration frequencies and linear-electron-molecular-vibration coupling constants, and the difference in energy of the slightly nonequivalent TCNQ monomer π MO's. The dimer charge oscillation associated with the extremely weak coupling of the unpaired electron...

  6. New real space correlated-basis-functions approach for the electron correlations of the semiconductor inversion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Weiguo; Wang Hongwei; Wu Xiang

    1989-12-01

    Based on the real space Correlated-Basis-Functions theory and the collective oscillation behaviour of the electron gas with effective Coulomb interaction, the many body wave function is obtained for the quasi-two-dimensional electron system in the semiconductor inversion layer. The pair-correlation function and the correlation energy of the system have been calculated by the integro-differential method in this paper. The comparison with the other previous theoretical results is also made. The new theoretical approach and its numerical results show that the pair-correlation functions are definitely positive and satisfy the normalization condition. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs

  7. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been studied using electron microscopy since the early days of nanowire growth, e.g. [1]. A common approach for analysing nanowires using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves removing them from their substrate and subsequently transferring them onto carbon...... with CBED and NBED [4,5] have shown a high degree of consistency. Strain has previously only been measured in nanowires removed from their substrate [6], or only using GPA [7]. The sample used for the present investigation was an InP nanowire grown on a Si substrate using metal organic vapor phase...

  8. Holistic electronic response underlying the development of magnetism in co-doped diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu

    2018-05-01

    A systematic analysis of the properties of codoped diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) reveals the role and the effect of the codopants in dictating the magnetic features of the DMSs. Our results indicate that the magnetic features of a codoped DMS is the outcome of synergistic electronic processes of the whole system rather than a local hybridization process isolated from the rest of the system. Specifically, the d-orbital hybridization of the (co)dopants and the introduction of their impurity bands lead to the readjustment of the position of the p-band center of the host’s anions and that of the valence band maximum (VBM). The overall effect of these is to pull the hybridized d-bands of the (co)dopants relative to the Fermi energy, E F , which in turn dictate the value of the magnetic moment of both the dopant as well as the codopant. More precisely, the magnetic moment of a dopant shows an almost linearly increasing (decreasing) variation as the dopant’s d-band center (the latter dictated by the codopant) moves away from (gets closer to) E F . Our results thus suggest a completely new approach in the investigation and understanding of the origin of the defect induced magnetism and support previous reports suggesting the Fermi-energy engineering as a mean for developing high T C DMSs. These trends are demonstrated with results obtained for GaN, GaP, and CdS doped with one of the V, Mn, Co and Cu dopants and codoped with the transition metals of the 3d-series.

  9. First principles electronic structure and optical properties of the Zintl compound Eu3In2P4

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2011-01-01

    We have performed full-potential calculations of the electronic structure and optical properties of the newly found Zintl compound Eu3In 2P4. Eu3In2P4 turns out to be a small gap semiconductor with an energy gap of 0.42 eV, which is in agreement with the experimental value of 0.452 eV. The peaks of the optical spectra originate mainly from transitions between occupied Eu 4f states in the valence band and unoccupied Eu 5d states in the conduction band. A considerable anisotropy is observed for the parallel and perpendicular components in the frequency dependent optical spectra. The spectral features are explained in terms of the band structure. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. First principles electronic structure and optical properties of the Zintl compound Eu3In2P4

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Nirpendra

    2011-05-01

    We have performed full-potential calculations of the electronic structure and optical properties of the newly found Zintl compound Eu3In 2P4. Eu3In2P4 turns out to be a small gap semiconductor with an energy gap of 0.42 eV, which is in agreement with the experimental value of 0.452 eV. The peaks of the optical spectra originate mainly from transitions between occupied Eu 4f states in the valence band and unoccupied Eu 5d states in the conduction band. A considerable anisotropy is observed for the parallel and perpendicular components in the frequency dependent optical spectra. The spectral features are explained in terms of the band structure. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  12. Electronic properties of the layer III-VI semiconductors. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depeursinge, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The electronic properties of the family of layer compounds InSe, GaSe and GaS by the empirical pseudopotential method have been studied. Both atomic positions, which are not accurately known from experiment, and atomic pseudopotentials are adjusted to fit the main optical and photoemission data with the further constraint that the same Se potential should be valid for InSe and GaSe, and the same Ga potential for GaS and GaSe. The charge densities have also been calculated and show that the ionicity of InSe is greater than that of GaS and GaSe, in good agreement with the Phillips electronegativity scale which predicts that InSe is 1.2 and 1.3 times more ionic than GaS and GaSe, respectively. The calculated band structures and charge densities allow a detailed discussion of the integrated and angle-resolved photoemission data as well as of the optical properties of these compounds. (author)

  13. Phonon-electron coupling and tunneling effect on charge transport in organic semi-conductor crystals of Cn-BTBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yecheng; Deng, Wei-Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2016-09-01

    Cn-[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]-benzothiophene (BTBT) crystals show very high hole mobilities in experiments. These high mobilities are beyond existing theory prediction. Here, we employed different quantum chemistry methods to investigate charge transfer in Cn-BTBT crystals and tried to find out the reasons for the underestimation in the theory. It was found that the hopping rate estimated by the Fermi Golden Rule is higher than that of the Marcus theory due to the high temperature approximation and failure at the classic limit. More importantly, molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the phonon induced fluctuation of electronic transfer integral is much larger than the average of the electronic transfer integral itself. Mobilities become higher if simulations implement the phonon-electron coupling. This conclusion indicates that the phonon-electron coupling promotes charge transfer in organic semi-conductors at room temperature.

  14. Chiral-like tunneling of electrons in two-dimensional semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Yee Sin; Ma, Zhongshui; Zhang, C

    2014-01-21

    The unusual tunneling effects of massless chiral fermions (mCF) and massive chiral fermions (MCF) in a single layer graphene and bilayer graphene represent some of the most bizarre quantum transport phenomena in condensed matter system. Here we show that in a two-dimensional semiconductor with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (R2DEG), the real-spin chiral-like tunneling of electrons at normal incidence simultaneously exhibits features of mCF and MCF. The parabolic branch of opposite spin in R2DEG crosses at a Dirac-like point and has a band turning point. These features generate transport properties not found in usual two-dimensional electron gas. Albeit its π Berry phase, electron backscattering is present in R2DEG. An electron mimics mCF if its energy is in the vicinity of the subband crossing point or it mimics MCF if its energy is near the subband minima.

  15. Design of nanophotonic, hot-electron solar-blind ultraviolet detectors with a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-01-01

    Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection refers to photon detection specifically in the wavelength range of 200 nm–320 nm. Without background noises from solar radiation, it has broad applications from homeland security to environmental monitoring. The most commonly used solid state devices for this application are wide band gap (WBG) semiconductor photodetectors (Eg > 3.5 eV). However, WBG semiconductors are difficult to grow and integrate with Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we design a nanophotonic metal-oxide-semiconductor structure on Si for solar-blind UV detectors. Instead of using semiconductors as the active absorber, we use Sn nano-grating structures to absorb UV photons and generate hot electrons for internal photoemission across the Sn/SiO 2 interfacial barrier, thereby generating photocurrent between the metal and the n-type Si region upon UV excitation. Moreover, the transported hot electron has an excess kinetic energy >3 eV, large enough to induce impact ionization and generate another free electron in the conduction band of n-Si. This process doubles the quantum efficiency. On the other hand, the large metal/oxide interfacial energy barrier (>3.5 eV) also enables solar-blind UV detection by blocking the less energetic electrons excited by visible photons. With optimized design, ∼75% UV absorption and hot electron excitation can be achieved within the mean free path of ∼20 nm from the metal/oxide interface. This feature greatly enhances hot electron transport across the interfacial barrier to generate photocurrent. The simple geometry of the Sn nano-gratings and the MOS structure make it easy to fabricate and integrate with Si ROICs compared to existing solar-blind UV detection schemes. The presented device structure also breaks through the conventional notion that photon absorption by metal is always a loss in solid-state photodetectors, and it can potentially be extended to other active metal photonic devices. (paper)

  16. Electronic structure of chromium-doped lead telluride-based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipetrov, E.P.; Pichugin, N.A.; Slyn'ko, E.I.; Slyn'ko, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure, composition, galvanomagnetic and oscillatory properties of the Pb 1-x-y Sn x Cr y Te (x = 0, 0.05-0.30, y ≤ 0.01) alloys have been investigated with varying matrix composition and chromium impurity concentration. It is shown that the chromium impurity atoms dissolve in the crystal lattice at least up to 1 mol.%. The following increase of the chromium concentration leads to the appearance of microscopic regions enriched with chromium and inclusions of Cr-Te compounds. A decrease of the hole concentration, a p-n-conversion of the conductivity type and a pinning of the Fermi level by the chromium resonant level are observed with increasing chromium content. Initial rates of changes in the free carrier concentration on doping are determined. The dependences of electron concentration and Fermi level on tin content are calculated by the two-band Kane dispersion relation. A diagram of electronic structure rearrangement for the chromium-doped alloys with varying the matrix composition is proposed.

  17. Tl{sub 4}CdI{sub 6} – Wide band gap semiconductor: First principles modelling of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasecki, M., E-mail: m.piasecki@ajd.czest.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Brik, M.G. [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14C, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kityk, I.V. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czestochowa University of Technology, Armii Krajowej 17, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2015-08-01

    A novel infrared optoelectronic material Tl{sub 4}CdI{sub 6} was studied using the density functional theory (DFT)-based techniques. Its structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were all calculated in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof (PBE) and the local density approximation (LDA) with the Ceperley-Alder–Perdew-Zunger (CA–PZ) functionals. The studied material is a direct band gap semiconductor with the calculated band gaps of 2.043 eV (GGA) and 1.627 eV (LDA). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index was fitted to the Sellmeier equation in the spectral range from 400 to 2000 nm. Good agreement between the GGA-calculated values of refractive index and experimental data was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first consistent theoretical description of the title compound, which includes calculations and analysis of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Infrared optoelectronic material Tl{sub 4}CdI{sub 6} was studied using ab initio methods. • Structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were calculated. • Independent components of the elastic constants tensor were calculated. • Good agreement with available experimental results was achieved.

  18. Tl4CdI6 – Wide band gap semiconductor: First principles modelling of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piasecki, M.; Brik, M.G.; Kityk, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel infrared optoelectronic material Tl 4 CdI 6 was studied using the density functional theory (DFT)-based techniques. Its structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were all calculated in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof (PBE) and the local density approximation (LDA) with the Ceperley-Alder–Perdew-Zunger (CA–PZ) functionals. The studied material is a direct band gap semiconductor with the calculated band gaps of 2.043 eV (GGA) and 1.627 eV (LDA). The wavelength dependence of the refractive index was fitted to the Sellmeier equation in the spectral range from 400 to 2000 nm. Good agreement between the GGA-calculated values of refractive index and experimental data was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first consistent theoretical description of the title compound, which includes calculations and analysis of the structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Infrared optoelectronic material Tl 4 CdI 6 was studied using ab initio methods. • Structural, electronic, optical and elastic properties were calculated. • Independent components of the elastic constants tensor were calculated. • Good agreement with available experimental results was achieved

  19. Quantum dynamical simulation of photoinduced electron transfer processes in dye-semiconductor systems: theory and application to coumarin 343 at TiO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingrui; Kondov, Ivan; Wang, Haobin; Thoss, Michael

    2015-04-10

    A recently developed methodology to simulate photoinduced electron transfer processes at dye-semiconductor interfaces is outlined. The methodology employs a first-principles-based model Hamiltonian and accurate quantum dynamics simulations using the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree approach. This method is applied to study electron injection in the dye-semiconductor system coumarin 343-TiO2. Specifically, the influence of electronic-vibrational coupling is analyzed. Extending previous work, we consider the influence of Dushinsky rotation of the normal modes as well as anharmonicities of the potential energy surfaces on the electron transfer dynamics.

  20. Technique for magnetic susceptibility determination in the highly doped semiconductors by electron spin resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.; Semenikhin, P. V. [Ioffe Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-20

    A method for determining the magnetic susceptibility in the highly doped semiconductors is considered. It is suitable for the semiconductors near the metal - insulator transition when the conductivity changes very quickly with the temperature and the resonance line form distorts. A procedure that is based on double integration of the positive part of the derivative of the absorption line having a Dyson shape and takes into account the depth of the skin layer is described. Analysis is made for the example of arsenic-doped germanium samples at a rather high concentration corresponding to the insulator-metal phase transition.

  1. Multiple trapping on a comb structure as a model of electron transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibatov, R. T.; Morozova, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    A model of dispersive transport in disordered nanostructured semiconductors has been proposed taking into account the percolation structure of a sample and joint action of several mechanisms. Topological and energy disorders have been simultaneously taken into account within the multiple trapping model on a comb structure modeling the percolation character of trajectories. The joint action of several mechanisms has been described within random walks with a mixture of waiting time distributions. Integral transport equations with fractional derivatives have been obtained for an arbitrary density of localized states. The kinetics of the transient current has been calculated within the proposed new model in order to analyze time-of-flight experiments for nanostructured semiconductors

  2. Detection of the scintillation light emitted from direct-bandgap compound semiconductors by a Si avalanche photodiode at 150 mK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumune, Takashi; Takayama, Nobuyasu; Maehata, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kenji; Umeno, Takahiro

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the direct-bandgap compound semiconductor materials are irradiated by α particles emitted from 241 Am for the detection of scintillation light at the temperature of 150 mK. For the irradiation experiment, two disk shaped samples were fabricated from an epoxy resin mixed with the powder of PbI 2 and CuI, respectively. Each disk-samples was cooled down to 150 mK by a compact liquid helium-free dilution refrigerator. A Si avalanche photodiode (APD) was employed for detecting the scintillation light emitted from the disk-sample inside the refrigerator. The detection signal current of Si APD was converted into the voltage pulses by a charge sensitive preamplifier. The voltage pulses of the scintillation light emitted from the direct-bandgap semiconductors were observed at the temperature of 150 mK. (author)

  3. Defect formation energies and homogeneity ranges of rock salt-, pyrite-, chalcopyrite- and molybdenite-type compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechter, S. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, Berlin D-14109 (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Employing the generalisation of Van Vechten's cavity model, formation energies of neutral point defects in pyrites (FeS{sub 2}, RuS{sub 2}), chalcopyrites (II-IV-V{sub 2} and I-III-VI{sub 2}) as well as molybdenites (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) have been estimated. As input parameters the fundamental band gaps, work functions, electron affinities, surface energies, coordination numbers, covalent or ionic radii and unit cell parameters were used. The values calculated for tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated compounds agreed well with measured values. The data obtained can be used to calculate point defect concentrations and homogeneity ranges as a function of partial pressure and temperature. Introducing charged vacancies, the conductivity type can be predicted.

  4. Semiconductor statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Blakemore, J S

    1962-01-01

    Semiconductor Statistics presents statistics aimed at complementing existing books on the relationships between carrier densities and transport effects. The book is divided into two parts. Part I provides introductory material on the electron theory of solids, and then discusses carrier statistics for semiconductors in thermal equilibrium. Of course a solid cannot be in true thermodynamic equilibrium if any electrical current is passed; but when currents are reasonably small the distribution function is but little perturbed, and the carrier distribution for such a """"quasi-equilibrium"""" co

  5. Determination of the electron-hole pair creation energy for semiconductors from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Scholze, F; Kuschnerus, P; Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G

    2000-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be detected by the measurement of the charge carriers produced in a detector. The improved semiconductor technology now allows detectors operating near the physical limits of the detector materials to be designed. The mean energy required for producing an electron-hole pair, W, is a material property of the semiconductor. Here, the determination of W from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes is demonstrated. Using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation, different types of semiconductor photodiodes have been examined in the UV-, VUV-, and soft X-ray spectral range. Their spectral responsivity was determined with relative uncertainties between 0.4% and 1% using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer as primary detector standard. Results are presented for silicon n-on-p junction photodiodes and for GaAsP/Au Schottky diodes at room temperature. The investigations for silicon covered the complete spectral range from 3 to 1500 eV, yielding a constant value W=(3.66+-0.03) eV fo...

  6. Computer-automated tuning of semiconductor double quantum dots into the single-electron regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, T.A.; Eendebak, P.T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the computer-automated tuning of gate-defined semiconductor double quantum dots in GaAs heterostructures. We benchmark the algorithm by creating three double quantum dots inside a linear array of four quantum dots. The algorithm sets the correct gate voltages for all the gates to tune the

  7. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure.

  8. Paramagnetic resonance and electronic conduction in organic semiconductors; Resonance paramagnetique et conduction electroniques dans les semi-conducteurs organiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nechtschein, M. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Laboratoire de Resonance Magnetique (France)

    1963-07-01

    As some organic bodies simultaneously display semi-conducting properties and a paramagnetism, this report addresses the study of conduction in organic bodies. The author first briefly recalls how relationships between conductibility and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) can be noticed in a specific case (mineral and metallic semiconductors). He discusses published results related to paramagnetism and conductibility in organic bodies. He reviews various categories of organic bodies in which both properties are simultaneously present. He notably addresses radical molecular crystals, non-radical molecular crystals, charge transfer complexes, pyrolyzed coals, and pseudo-ferromagnetic organic structures. He discusses the issue of relationships between conduction (charge transfer by electrons) and ERP (which reveals the existence of non-paired electrons which provide free spins)

  9. First-principles electronic structure of Mn-doped GaAs, GaP, and GaN semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, T C [Computer Science and Mathematics Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States); Temmerman, W M [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Szotek, Z [Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Svane, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petit, L [Computer Science and Mathematics Division and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6164 (United States)

    2007-04-23

    We present first-principles electronic structure calculations of Mn-doped III-V semiconductors based on the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) as well as the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD). We find that it is crucial to use a self-interaction free approach to properly describe the electronic ground state. The SIC-LSD calculations predict the proper electronic ground state configuration for Mn in GaAs, GaP, and GaN. Excellent quantitative agreement with experiment is found for the magnetic moment and p-d exchange in (GaMn)As. These results allow us to validate commonly used models for magnetic semiconductors. Furthermore, we discuss the delicate problem of extracting binding energies of localized levels from density functional theory calculations. We propose three approaches to take into account final state effects to estimate the binding energies of the Mn d levels in GaAs. We find good agreement between computed values and estimates from photoemission experiments.

  10. First-principles electronic structure of Mn-doped GaAs, GaP, and GaN semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulthess, T C; Temmerman, W M; Szotek, Z; Svane, A; Petit, L

    2007-01-01

    We present first-principles electronic structure calculations of Mn-doped III-V semiconductors based on the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) as well as the self-interaction corrected local spin-density method (SIC-LSD). We find that it is crucial to use a self-interaction free approach to properly describe the electronic ground state. The SIC-LSD calculations predict the proper electronic ground state configuration for Mn in GaAs, GaP, and GaN. Excellent quantitative agreement with experiment is found for the magnetic moment and p-d exchange in (GaMn)As. These results allow us to validate commonly used models for magnetic semiconductors. Furthermore, we discuss the delicate problem of extracting binding energies of localized levels from density functional theory calculations. We propose three approaches to take into account final state effects to estimate the binding energies of the Mn d levels in GaAs. We find good agreement between computed values and estimates from photoemission experiments

  11. Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    International Acer Incorporated, Hsin Chu, Taiwan Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation, Taichung, Taiwan American Institute of Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan...Singapore and Malaysia .5 - 4 - The largest market for semiconductor products is the high technology consumer electronics industry that consumes up...Singapore, and Malaysia . A new semiconductor facility costs around $3 billion to build and takes about two years to become operational

  12. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Swagat K; Fonari, Alexandr; Risko, Chad; Yesudas, Kada; Moudgil, Karttikay; Delcamp, Jared H; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R; Barlow, Stephen

    2014-11-17

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the X-ray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central CC σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these CC bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2 ]2 , rather similar (-1.97 to -2.15 V vs. FeCp2 (+/0) in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: Crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Mohapatra, Swagat Kumar

    2014-10-03

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/ arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the Xray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central C-C σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these C-C bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2]2, rather similar (-1.97 to-2.15 V vs. FeCp2 +/0 in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed.

  14. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: Crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Mohapatra, Swagat Kumar; Fonari, Alexandr; Risko, Chad; Yesudas, Kada; Moudgil, Karttikay; Delcamp, Jared Heath; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R.; Barlow, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/ arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the Xray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central C-C σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these C-C bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2]2, rather similar (-1.97 to-2.15 V vs. FeCp2 +/0 in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed.

  15. Exchange Enhancement of the Electron-Phonon Interaction: The Case of Weakly Doped Two-Dimensional Multivalley Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamuk, Betül; Zoccante, Paolo; Baima, Jacopo; Mauri, Francesco; Calandra, Matteo

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the exchange interaction on the vibrational properties and on the electron-phonon coupling were investigated in several recent works. In most of the cases, exchange tends to enhance the electron-phonon interaction, although the motivations for such behaviour are not completely understood. Here we consider the class of weakly doped two-dimensional multivalley semiconductors and we demonstrate that a more global picture emerges. In particular we show that in these systems, at low enough doping, even a moderate electron-electron interaction enhances the response to any perturbation inducing a valley polarization. If the valley polarization is due to the electron-phonon coupling, the electron-electron interaction results in an enhancement of the superconducting critical temperature. We demonstrate the applicability of the theory by performing random phase approximation and first principles calculations in transition metal chloronitrides. We find that exchange is responsible for the enhancement of the superconducting critical temperature in LixZrNCl and that much larger Tcs could be obtained in intercalated HfNCl if the synthesis of cleaner samples could remove the Anderson insulating state competing with superconductivity.

  16. Electron mobilities of n-type organic semiconductors from time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method: pentacenequinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WeiWei; Zhong, XinXin; Zhao, Yi

    2012-11-26

    The electron mobilities of two n-type pentacenequinone derivative organic semiconductors, 5,7,12,14-tetraaza-6,13-pentacenequinone (TAPQ5) and 1,4,8,11-tetraaza-6,13-pentacenequinone (TAPQ7), are investigated with use of the methods of electronic structure and quantum dynamics. The electronic structure calculations reveal that the two key parameters for the control of electron transfer, reorganization energy and electronic coupling, are similar for these two isomerization systems, and the charge carriers essentially display one-dimensional transport properties. The mobilities are then calculated by using the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion approach in which the dynamic fluctuations of the electronic couplings are incorporated via their correlation functions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The predicted mobility of TAPQ7 crystal is about six times larger than that of TAPQ5 crystal. Most interestingly, Fermi's golden rule predicts the mobilities very close to those from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method, even though the electronic couplings are explicitly large enough to make the perturbation theory invalid. The possible reason is analyzed from the dynamic fluctuations.

  17. Influences of semiconductor morphology on the mechanical fatigue behavior of flexible organic electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Joo; Yeon, Han-Wool; Shin, Hae-A-Seul; Joo, Young-Chang, E-mail: ycjoo@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 151-744 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Uk Lee, Yong; Evans, Louise A. [Center for Process Innovation Limited, Thomas Wright Way, NETPark, Sedgefield, TS21 3FG County Durham (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-09

    The influence of crystalline morphology on the mechanical fatigue of organic semiconductors (OSCs) was investigated using 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) as a crystalline OSC and poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) as an amorphous OSC. During cyclic bending, resistances of the OSCs were monitored using the transmission-line method on a metal-semiconductor-metal structure. The resistance of the TIPS-pentacene increased under fatigue damage in tensile-stress mode, but no such degradation was observed in the PTAA. Both OSCs were stable under compressive bending fatigue. The formation of intergranular cracks at the domain boundaries of the TIPS-pentacene was responsible for the degradation of its electrical properties under tensile bending fatigue.

  18. The electronic structure of ordered binary Co-Pt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootte, A.; Haas, C.; Groot, R.A. de

    1991-01-01

    In this article we present the results of spin-polarized band-structure calculations on the ordered binary compounds of Co-Pt. Comparison is made with experimental values for the magnetic moments. The results of our calculations show a non-local magnetic moment behaviour in these systems.

  19. Trapped electrons in irradiated single crystals of polyhydroxy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G.; Potter, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The intermolecular trapping of electrons has been observed in single crystals of dulcitol and L(+) arabinose x-irradiated at 4.2 0 K. Attribution of a major component of the ESR absorption to trapped electrons is based upon the character of the hyperfine pattern, which arises from multiple anisotropic hyperfine interactions with exchangeable protons, and on the g value of the absorption, which is always less than the free spin value. The removal of the trapped electron absorption upon irradiation with visible light has also been demonstrated. In these experiments all of the electrons are trapped in identical sites. This circumstance provides some important advantages in the study of the factors affecting the stabilization of charge in an environment of polarizable molecules

  20. Electron spectroscopy on high-temperature superconductors and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knupfer, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the last two classes of materials have been discovered which distinguish themselves due to a transition into the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures. These are the cuprate superconductors and the alkali metal doped fullerenes. In this work the electronic structure of representatives of these materials, undoped and Ca-doped YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 and A 3 C 60 (A=K, Rb), has been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and photoemission spectroscopy. (orig.) [de

  1. Secondary electron emission from lithium and lithium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capece, A. M., E-mail: capecea@tcnj.edu [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey 08628 (United States); Patino, M. I.; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Koel, B. E. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    In this work, measurements of electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) yields of lithium as a function of composition are presented. The results are particularly relevant for magnetic fusion devices such as tokamaks, field-reversed configurations, and stellarators that consider Li as a plasma-facing material for improved plasma confinement. SEE can reduce the sheath potential at the wall and cool electrons at the plasma edge, resulting in large power losses. These effects become significant as the SEE coefficient, γ{sub e}, approaches one, making it imperative to maintain a low yield surface. This work demonstrates that the yield from Li strongly depends on chemical composition and substantially increases after exposure to oxygen and water vapor. The total yield was measured using a retarding field analyzer in ultrahigh vacuum for primary electron energies of 20–600 eV. The effect of Li composition was determined by introducing controlled amounts of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O vapor while monitoring film composition with Auger electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. The results show that the energy at which γ{sub e} = 1 decreases with oxygen content and is 145 eV for a Li film that is 17% oxidized and drops to less than 25 eV for a fully oxidized film. This work has important implications for laboratory plasmas operating under realistic vacuum conditions in which oxidation significantly alters the electron emission properties of Li walls.

  2. Secondary electron emission from lithium and lithium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capece, A. M.; Patino, M. I.; Raitses, Y.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, measurements of electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) yields of lithium as a function of composition are presented. The results are particularly relevant for magnetic fusion devices such as tokamaks, field-reversed configurations, and stellarators that consider Li as a plasma-facing material for improved plasma confinement. SEE can reduce the sheath potential at the wall and cool electrons at the plasma edge, resulting in large power losses. These effects become significant as the SEE coefficient, γ e , approaches one, making it imperative to maintain a low yield surface. This work demonstrates that the yield from Li strongly depends on chemical composition and substantially increases after exposure to oxygen and water vapor. The total yield was measured using a retarding field analyzer in ultrahigh vacuum for primary electron energies of 20–600 eV. The effect of Li composition was determined by introducing controlled amounts of O 2 and H 2 O vapor while monitoring film composition with Auger electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. The results show that the energy at which γ e  = 1 decreases with oxygen content and is 145 eV for a Li film that is 17% oxidized and drops to less than 25 eV for a fully oxidized film. This work has important implications for laboratory plasmas operating under realistic vacuum conditions in which oxidation significantly alters the electron emission properties of Li walls.

  3. The Non-Equilibrium Statistical Distribution Function for Electrons and Holes in Semiconductor Heterostructures in Steady-State Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Jόzwikowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work is to determine a statistical non-equilibrium distribution function for the electron and holes in semiconductor heterostructures in steady-state conditions. Based on the postulates of local equilibrium, as well as on the integral form of the weighted Gyarmati’s variational principle in the force representation, using an alternative method, we have derived general expressions, which have the form of the Fermi–Dirac distribution function with four additional components. The physical interpretation of these components has been carried out in this paper. Some numerical results of a non-equilibrium distribution function for an electron in HgCdTe structures are also presented.

  4. Single-electron-occupation metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dots formed from efficient poly-silicon gate layout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; rochette, sophie; Rudolph, Martin; Roy, A. -M.; Curry, Matthew Jon; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Carr, Stephen M; Ward, Daniel Robert; Lilly, Michael; pioro-ladriere, michel

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot structure that achieves dot-reservoir tunnel coupling control without a dedicated barrier gate. The elementary structure consists of two accumulation gates separated spatially by a gap, one gate accumulating a reservoir and the other a quantum dot. Control of the tunnel rate between the dot and the reservoir across the gap is demonstrated in the single electron regime by varying the reservoir accumulation gate voltage while compensating with the dot accumulation gate voltage. The method is then applied to a quantum dot connected in series to source and drain reservoirs, enabling transport down to the single electron regime. Finally, tuning of the valley splitting with the dot accumulation gate voltage is observed. This split accumulation gate structure creates silicon quantum dots of similar characteristics to other realizations but with less electrodes, in a single gate stack subtractive fabrication process that is fully compatible with silicon foundry manufacturing.

  5. Single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI semiconductors: Structural stability, electronic structures, optical properties, and photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-He; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, single-layer group III monochalcogenides have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest at their potential applications in photonic devices, electronic devices, and solar energy conversion. Excited by this, we theoretically design two kinds of highly stable single-layer group IV-V (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P) and group V-IV-III-VI (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P; III =Al ,Ga , and In; VI =O and S) compounds with the same structures with single-layer group III monochalcogenides via first-principles simulations. By using accurate hybrid functional and quasiparticle methods, we show the single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI are indirect bandgap semiconductors with their bandgaps and band edge positions conforming to the criteria of photocatalysts for water splitting. By applying a biaxial strain on single-layer group IV-V, single-layer group IV nitrides show a potential on mechanical sensors due to their bandgaps showing an almost linear response for strain. Furthermore, our calculations show that both single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI have absorption from the visible light region to far-ultraviolet region, especially for single-layer SiN-AlO and SnN-InO, which have strong absorption in the visible light region, resulting in excellent potential for solar energy conversion and visible light photocatalytic water splitting. Our research provides valuable insight for finding more potential functional two-dimensional semiconductors applied in optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and photocatalytic water splitting.

  6. Insight into the structural, electronic, elastic and optical properties of the alkali hydride compounds, XH (X = Rb and Cs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradat, Raed; Abu-Jafar, Mohammed; Abdelraziq, Issam; Mousa, Ahmad; Ouahrani, Tarik; Khenata, Rabah

    2018-04-01

    The equilibrium structural parameters, electronic and optical properties of the alkali hydrides RbH and CsH compounds in rock-salt (RS) and cesium chloride (CsCl) structures have been studied using the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. Wu and Cohen generalized gradient approximation (WC-GGA) was used for the exchange-correlation potential to compute the equilibrium structural parameters, such as the lattice constant (a0), the bulk modulus (B) and bulk modulus first order pressure derivative (B'). In addition to the WC-GGA, the modified Becke Johnson (mBJ) scheme has been also used to overcome the underestimation of the band gap energies. RbH and CsH compounds are found to be semiconductors (wide energy-band gap) using the WC-GGA method, while they are insulators using the mBJ-GGA method. Elastic constants, mechanical and thermodynamic properties were obtained by using the IRelast package. RbH and CsH compounds at ambient pressure are mechanically stable in RS and CsCl structures; they satisfy the Born mechanical stability criteria. Elastic constants (Cij), bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (S) and Debye temperatures (θD) of RbH and CsH compounds decrease as the alkali radius increases. The RS structure of these compounds at ambient conditions is mechanically stronger than CsCl structure. RbH and CsH in RS and CsCl structures are suitable as dielectric compounds. The wide direct energy band gap for these compounds make them promising compounds for optoelectronic UV device applications. Both RbH and CsH have a wide absorption region, on the other hand RbH absorption is very huge compared to the CsH absorption, RbH is an excellent absorbent material, maximum absorption regions are located in the middle ultraviolet (MUV) region and far ultraviolet (FUV) region. The absorption coefficient α (w), imaginary part of the dielectric constant ɛ2(w) and the extinction coefficient k(w) vary in the same way. The present calculated results are in

  7. Removal of chlorinated organic compounds from gas phase using electron beam technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.; Bulka, S.; Zimek, A. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Chmielewski, A. G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Selected chlorinated organic compounds (Cl-HC), which are emitted from coal fired power plants, waste incinerators, chemical industry etc., are very harmful to the environment and human’s health. Some of them are listed as carcinogenic compounds by USA EPA. Recent studies show that some chlorinated organic compounds are suspected to be precursors for dioxins formation. Chlorinated organic compounds decomposition in air in an electron beam (EB) generated plasma reactor technology was studied. We selected cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE), 1,4-dichlorobenznene(1,4-DCB), 1-chloronaphthalene as studied objects. It is found that chlorinated organic compounds can be decomposed in an electron beam generated plasma reactor. The order of decomposition efficiency of these compounds are: cis-DCE > 1,4-DCB> 1-chloronaphthalene. (author)

  8. Quasi-particle electronic band structure and alignment of the V-VI-VII semiconductors SbSI, SbSBr, and SbSeI for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, Keith T. [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); McKechnie, Scott; Azarhoosh, Pooya; Schilfgaarde, Mark van [Department of Physics, Kings College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Scanlon, David O. [University College London, Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Walsh, Aron, E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Global E" 3 Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-14

    The ternary V-VI-VII chalcohalides consist of one cation and two anions. Trivalent antimony—with a distinctive 5s{sup 2} electronic configuration—can be combined with a chalcogen (e.g., S or Se) and halide (e.g., Br or I) to produce photoactive ferroelectric semiconductors with similarities to the Pb halide perovskites. We report—from relativistic quasi-particle self-consistent GW theory—that these materials have a multi-valley electronic structure with several electron and hole basins close to the band extrema. We predict ionisation potentials of 5.3–5.8 eV from first-principles for the three materials, and assess electrical contacts that will be suitable for achieving photovoltaic action from these unconventional compounds.

  9. Transient state of electron transport in semiconductors: over velocity and ballistic effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, S.

    1984-01-01

    As the dimensions of the active regions of electronic components are reduced, transient effects must be considered when electrons encounter a high electric field gradient. The electron velocity can overshoot its stationary value over a few tenths of a micron and during about one picosecond. This has been observed experimentally and permits to forecast new ultrafast electronic devices [fr

  10. X-ray induced production and yield kinetics of photo- and Auger Electrons in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregudov, V.I.; Pashaev, Eh.M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to theoretical and experimental analysis of the mechanism of indirect excitation of soft Auger-electrons due to atom electron ionization using Ge crystal exposed to MoK α radiation as an example. Process of generation of these Auger-electrons is considered in detail, solution of kinetic equation for electrons, as well as, experimental data proving crucial role of indirect processes in generation of soft Auger-electrons are given

  11. Formulation of a Mesoscopic Electron Beam Splitter with Application in Semiconductor Based Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Shanker, A.; Bhowmik, D.; Bhattacharya, T. K.

    2010-01-01

    We aim to analytically arrive at a beam splitter formulation for electron waves. The electron beam splitter is an essential component of quantum logical devices. To arrive at the beam splitter structure, the electrons are treated as waves, i.e. we assume the transport to be ballistic. Ballistic electrons are electrons that travel over such short distances that their phase coherence is maintained. For mesoscopic devices with size smaller than the mean free path, the phase relaxation length and...

  12. Electronic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeglund, J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of band-structure calculations for studying thermodynamic properties of solids. We discuss 3d-, 4d- and 5d-transition metal carbides and nitrides. Through a detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results, we draw conclusions on the character of the atomic bonds in these materials. We show how electronic structure calculations can be used to give accurate predictions for bonding energies. Part of the thesis is devoted to the application of the generalized gradient approximation in electronic structure calculations on transition metals. For structures with vibrational disorder, we present a method for calculating averaged phonon frequencies without using empirical information. For magnetic excitations, we show how a combined use of theoretical results and experimental data can yield information on magnetic fluctuations at high temperatures. The main results in the thesis are: Apart for an almost constant shift, theoretically calculated bonding energies for transition metal carbides and nitrides agree with experimental data or with values from analysis of thermochemical information. The electronic spectrum of transition metal carbides and nitrides can be separated into bonding, antibonding and nonbonding electronic states. The lowest enthalpy of formation for substoichiometric vanadium carbide VC 1-X at zero temperature and pressure occurs for a structure containing vacancies (x not equal to 0). The generalized gradient approximation improves theoretical calculated cohesive energies for 3d-transition metals. Magnetic phase transitions are sensitive to the description of exchange-correlation effects in electronic structure calculations. Trends in Debye temperatures can be successfully analysed in electronic structure calculations on disordered lattices. For the elements, there is a clear dependence on the crystal structure (e.g., bcc, fcc or hcp). Chromium has fluctuating local magnetic moments at temperatures well above

  13. Contribution to the study of electronic structure of crystalline semiconductors (Si, Ge, GaAs, Gap, ZnTe, ZnSe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhafs B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The band structure of semiconductors was described by several theorists since the Fifties. The main objective of the present paper is to do a comparative study between various families of semi-conductors IV (Si,Ge, III-V (GaAs, GaP and II-VI (ZnSe, ZnTe with both methods; tight Binding1 method and pseudo potential method2. This work enables us to understand as well as the mechanism of conduction process in these semiconductors and powers and limits of the above methods. The obtained results allow to conclude that both methods are in a good agreement to describe the morphology of band structures of the cited semiconductors. This encourages us to study in the future the electronic behaviour through the structure of bands for more complex systems such as the heterostructures.

  14. Itinerant f-electron behavior in Ce and U compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabtree, G.W.

    1985-04-01

    The experimentally observed Fermi surface properties in URh 3 , UIr 3 , UGe 3 , CeSn 3 , CeB 6 , U 3 As 4 , U 3 P 4 , and CeSb are reviewed. For the compounds with no magnetic order, band structure models of the Fermi surface geometry are confirmed and f-ligand hybridization is found to be dominant. For CeB 6 , U 3 As 4 , and U 3 P 4 the experiments show that both local moments and f hybridization are important. In CeSb new data can be explained by a purely local model with no f-hybridization

  15. π-Extended Isoindigo-Based Derivative: A Promising Electron-Deficient Building Block for Polymer Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Xiao, Mingchao; Yang, Jie; Xiao, Jian; Yi, Zhengran; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-11-22

    The exploration of novel electron-deficient building blocks is a key task for developing high-performance polymer semiconductors in organic thin-film transistors. In view of the situation of the lack of strong electron-deficient building blocks, we designed two novel π-extended isoindigo-based electron-deficient building blocks, IVI and F 4 IVI. Owing to the strong electron-deficient nature and the extended π-conjugated system of the two acceptor units, their copolymers, PIVI2T and PF 4 IVI2T, containing 2,2'-bithiophene donor units, are endowed with deep-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels and strong intermolecular interactions. In comparison to PIVI2T, the fluorinated PF 4 IVI2T exhibits stronger intra- and intermolecular interactions, lower HOMO/LUMO energy levels up to -5.74/-4.17 eV, and more ordered molecular packing with a smaller π-π stacking distance of up to 3.53 Å, resulting in an excellent ambipolar transporting behavior and a promising application in logic circuits for PF 4 IVI2T in ambient with hole and electron mobilities of up to 1.03 and 1.82 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , respectively. The results reveal that F 4 IVI is a promising and strong electron-deficient building unit to construct high-performance semiconducting polymers, which provides an insight into the structure-property relationships for the exploration and molecular engineering of excellent electron-deficient building blocks in the field of organic electronics.

  16. Electronic Properties of a 1D Intrinsic/p-Doped Heterojunction in a 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Zhibo; Schultz, Thorsten; Ding, Zijing; Lei, Bo; Han, Cheng; Amsalem, Patrick; Lin, Tingting; Chi, Dongzhi; Wong, Swee Liang; Zheng, Yu Jie; Li, Ming-yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Wei; Koch, Norbert; Huang, Yu Li; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors offer a convenient platform to study 2D physics, for example, to understand doping in an atomically thin semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication and unravel the electronic properties of a lateral doped/intrinsic heterojunction in a single-layer (SL) tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a prototype semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD), partially covered with a molecular acceptor layer, on a graphite substrate. With combined experiments and theoretical modeling, we reveal the fundamental acceptor-induced p-doping mechanism for SL-WSe2. At the 1D border between the doped and undoped SL-WSe2 regions, we observe band bending and explain it by Thomas-Fermi screening. Using atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, the screening length is determined to be in the few nanometer range, and we assess the carrier density of intrinsic SL-WSe2. These findings are of fundamental and technological importance for understanding and employing surface doping, for example, in designing lateral organic TMD heterostructures for future devices.

  17. Electronic Properties of a 1D Intrinsic/p-Doped Heterojunction in a 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Zhibo

    2017-07-28

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors offer a convenient platform to study 2D physics, for example, to understand doping in an atomically thin semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication and unravel the electronic properties of a lateral doped/intrinsic heterojunction in a single-layer (SL) tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a prototype semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD), partially covered with a molecular acceptor layer, on a graphite substrate. With combined experiments and theoretical modeling, we reveal the fundamental acceptor-induced p-doping mechanism for SL-WSe2. At the 1D border between the doped and undoped SL-WSe2 regions, we observe band bending and explain it by Thomas-Fermi screening. Using atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, the screening length is determined to be in the few nanometer range, and we assess the carrier density of intrinsic SL-WSe2. These findings are of fundamental and technological importance for understanding and employing surface doping, for example, in designing lateral organic TMD heterostructures for future devices.

  18. Electron inelastic scattering by compound nuclei and giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavadov, A.V.; Mukhtarov, A.I.; Mirabutalybov, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Multipole giant resonances in heavy nuclei have been investigated with the application of the Danos-Greiner dynamic collective theory to the Tassi model. The monopole giant resonance has been studied in 158 Gd, 166 Er, 184 W, 232 Th and 238 V nuclei at the incident electron energy E=200 MeV. Dependences of the form factor square of electron scattering by a 166 Er nucleus on the scattering angle obtained in the distorted-wave high-energy approximation (DWHEA) are presented. Giant dipole and quadrupole resonances in 60 Ni and 90 Zr nuclei have been studied. A comparison has been made of theoretical results obtained in the DWHEA for the dependence of the form factor square on the effective momentum transfer with the experimental data. The analysis of the obtained results led to the following conclusions. To draw a conclusion about the validity of one or another nuclear model and methods for calculating form factors, it is necessary to investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, electron scattering at great angles (THETA>=70 deg). To obtain a good agreement it is necessary to take account of the actual proton and neutron distributions in the ground state and their dynamic properties in an excited state [ru

  19. The Effects of Surface Reconstruction and Electron-Positron Correlation on the Annihilation Characteristics of Positrons Trapped at Semiconductor Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazleev, N. G.; Jung, E.; Weiss, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) data from Ge(100) and Ge(111) surfaces display several strong Auger peaks corresponding to M 4,5 N 1 N 2,3 , M 2,3 M 4,5 M 4,5 , M 2,3 M 4,5 V, and M 1 M 4,5 M 4,5 Auger transitions. The integrated peak intensities of Auger transitions have been used to obtain experimental annihilation probabilities for the Ge 3d and 3p core electrons. The experimental data were analyzed by performing theoretical studies of the effects of surface reconstructions and electron-positron correlations on image potential induced surface states and annihilation characteristics of positrons trapped at the reconstructed Ge(100) and Ge(111) surfaces. Calculations of positron surface states and annihilation characteristics have been performed for Ge(100) surface with (2x1), (2x2), and (4x2) reconstructions, and for Ge(111) surface with c(2x8) reconstruction. Estimates of the positron binding energy and annihilation characteristics reveal their sensitivity to the specific atomic structure of the topmost layers of the semiconductor and to the approximations used to describe electron-positron correlations. The results of these theoretical studies are compared with the ones obtained for the reconstructed Si(100)-(2x1) and Si(111)-(7x7) surfaces.

  20. Organic materials for semiconductor. Epoxy molding compound for IC encapsulation; Handotai kanren no yuki zairyo. Handotai fushiyo epoxy seikei zairyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusuhara, A. [Sumitomo Bakelite Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-05

    This paper describes organic materials for semiconductor. Based on the composition and raw material, typical materials are epoxy resins, curing agents including phenol-novolak resins, fillers including silica and alumina, flame retardants including brominated epoxy resin and antimony oxide, hardening accelerators including amine compounds and phosphorus compounds, coupling agents including silane compounds and titanate compounds, and the others including colorants and mold lubricants. Raw materials are heated and kneaded after mixing, and produced as tablets after cooling and crushing. Recently, the packages have changed from insertion type to surface mounting type for the small thin IC package and for improving the efficiency of soldering during the incorporation of IC package on the print circuit substrate. High temperature of 260degC has been employed from the conventional limit of 100degC. Reduction of water absorption, improvement of adhesion, reduction of thermal expansion coefficient, and reduction of elastic modulus during heating are promoted for avoiding the peeling and cracking due to the sudden evaporation of adsorbed moisture. This paper also describes the organic materials for BGA. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Carrier concentration induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Story, T.

    2007-01-01

    In semiconductor spintronics the key materials issue concerns ferromagnetic semiconductors that would, in particular, permit an integration (in a single multilayer heterostructure) of standard electronic functions of semiconductors with magnetic memory function. Although classical semiconductor materials, such as Si or GaAs, are nonmagnetic, upon substitutional incorporation of magnetic ions (typically of a few atomic percents of Mn 2+ ions) and very heavy doping with conducting carriers (at the level of 10 20 - 10 21 cm -3 ) a ferromagnetic transition can be induced in such diluted magnetic semiconductors (also known as semimagnetic semiconductors). In the lecture the spectacular experimental observations of carrier concentration induced ferromagnetism will be discussed for three model semiconductor crystals. p - Ga 1-x Mn x As currently the most actively studied and most perspective ferromagnetic semiconductor of III-V group, in which ferromagnetism appears due to Mn ions providing both local magnetic moments and acting as acceptor centers. p - Sn 1-x Mn x Te and p - Ge 1-x Mn x Te classical diluted magnetic semiconductors of IV-VI group, in which paramagnet-ferromagnet and ferromagnet-spin glass transitions are found for very high hole concentration. n - Eu 1-x Gd x Te mixed magnetic crystals, in which the substitution of Gd 3+ ions for Eu 2+ ions creates very high electron concentration and transforms antiferromagnetic EuTe (insulating compound) into ferromagnetic n-type semiconductor alloy. For each of these materials systems the key physical features will be discussed concerning: local magnetic moments formation, magnetic phase diagram as a function of magnetic ions and carrier concentration as well as Curie temperature and magnetic anisotropy engineering. Various theoretical models proposed to explain the effect of carrier concentration induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors will be briefly discussed involving mean field approaches based on Zener and RKKY

  2. Effects of density imbalance on the BCS-BEC crossover in semiconductor electron-hole bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieri, P.; Strinati, G. C.; Neilson, D.

    2007-01-01

    We study the occurrence of excitonic superfluidity in electron-hole bilayers at zero temperature. We not only identify the crossover in the phase diagram from the BCS limit of overlapping pairs to the BEC limit of nonoverlapping tightly bound pairs but also, by varying the electron and hole densities independently, we can analyze a number of phases that occur mainly in the crossover region. With different electron and hole effective masses, the phase diagram is asymmetric with respect to excess electron or hole densities. We propose, as the criterion for the onset of superfluidity, the jump of the electron and hole chemical potentials when their densities cross

  3. Superconducting transition temperature and the formation of closed electron shells in the atoms of superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapnik, I.M.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the regularities in the tansition temperature (T/sub c/) values in analogous compounds (having the same structure and stoichiometry) and the formation of the closed electron shells outside inert gas shells in the atoms of the variable component of the 158 intermetallic superconducting compounds has been discussed. The T/sub c/ data for compounds of the elements from the first long period of the Periodic Table (K to Se) are compared with the T/sub c/ data for the analogous compounds of the elements from the second long period (Rb to Te)

  4. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Packing Density on Electronic Polarization in the Bulk and at Surfaces of Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The polarizable environment surrounding charge carriers in organic semiconductors impacts the efficiency of the charge transport process. Here, we consider two representative organic semiconductors, tetracene and rubrene, and evaluate

  5. The electronic density of states of disordered compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geertsma, W.; Dijkstra, J.

    1984-11-01

    Recently, the electronic properties of liquid alkali (Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs)-group IV (Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) alloys have been discussed by the present authors using a tight-binding model. Only anion orbitals (= group IV) are taken into account. Disorder is described by a pseudo lattice, which takes into account local coordination in one of the sublattices (cation or anion) only. In the first part of this paper it is shown that this approximation is consistent with the usual valence rules used by structural chemists for crystalline structures. In the second part of the paper the solutions for the density of states of the tight-binding Hamiltonian are studied for a number of pseudolattices. The infinite set of Green function equations is solved by using the effective transfer method, which replaces the famous Block condition. It is shown that such a model can explain the formation of bandgaps in disordered systems. By choosing the proper smallest cluster(s) of transfer loops to model the real structure by a pseudolattice, a density of states is obtained which represents properly that of the corresponding crystalline structure. Structures reminiscent to those caused by van Hove singularities already appear in the electronic density of states when relatively small cluster(s) of transfer loops are used. The approach outlined in this paper is capable of describing the electronic density of states due to various degrees of local order in a sublattice. Some of the peculiarities occurring in the solution of the density of states of certain pseudolattices, such as poles outside the band, are discussed in an appendix. (author)

  6. Alloying effect on the electronic structures of hydrogen storage compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, H.; Moringa, M.; Takahashi, Y. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mater. Sci. and Eng.

    1997-05-20

    The electronic structures of hydrogenated LaNi{sub 5} containing various 3d transition elements were investigated by the DV-X{alpha} molecular orbital method. The hydrogen atom was found to form a strong chemical bond with the Ni rather than the La atoms. The alloying modified the chemical bond strengths between atoms in a small metal octahedron containing a hydrogen atom at the center, resulting in the change in the hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of LaNi{sub 5} with alloying. (orig.) 7 refs.

  7. Contacts to semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tove, P.A.

    1975-08-01

    Contacts to semiconductors play an important role in most semiconductor devices. These devices range from microelectronics to power components, from high-sensitivity light or radiation detectors to light-emitting of microwave-generating components. Silicon is the dominating material but compound semiconductors are increasing in importance. The following survey is an attempt to classify contact properties and the physical mechanisms involved, as well as fabrication methods and methods of investigation. The main interest is in metal-semiconductor type contacts where a few basic concepts are dealt with in some detail. (Auth.)

  8. Measurement of minute local strain in semiconductor materials and electronic devices by using a highly parallel X-ray microbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Matsui, J; Yokoyama, K; Takeda, S; Katou, M; Kurihara, H; Watanabe, K; Kagoshima, Y; Kimura, S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an X-ray microbeam with a small angular divergence by adopting X-ray optics with successive use of asymmetric Bragg reflection from silicon crystals for the both polarizations of the synchrotron X-rays. The microbeam actually obtained is several microns in size and possesses an angular divergence of less than 2 arcsec which enables us to measure the strain of 10 sup - sup 5 -10 sup - sup 6. By scanning the sample against the microbeam, distribution of the minute local strain in various regions of semiconductor crystals for electronic devices, e.g., the strain around the SiO sub 2 /Si film edge in silicon devices, the strain in an InGaAsP/InP stripe laser were measured.

  9. Measurement of minute local strain in semiconductor materials and electronic devices by using a highly parallel X-ray microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, J.; Tsusaka, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Takeda, S.; Katou, M.; Kurihara, H.; Watanabe, K.; Kagoshima, Y.; Kimura, S.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an X-ray microbeam with a small angular divergence by adopting X-ray optics with successive use of asymmetric Bragg reflection from silicon crystals for the both polarizations of the synchrotron X-rays. The microbeam actually obtained is several microns in size and possesses an angular divergence of less than 2 arcsec which enables us to measure the strain of 10 -5 -10 -6 . By scanning the sample against the microbeam, distribution of the minute local strain in various regions of semiconductor crystals for electronic devices, e.g., the strain around the SiO 2 /Si film edge in silicon devices, the strain in an InGaAsP/InP stripe laser were measured

  10. Terahertz radiation by subpicosecond spin-polarized photocurrent originating from Dirac electrons in a Rashba-type polar semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuto; Kida, Noriaki; Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Kanou, Manabu; Sasagawa, Takao; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2018-04-01

    The spin-splitting energy bands induced by the relativistic spin-orbit interaction in solids provide a new opportunity to manipulate the spin-polarized electrons on the subpicosecond timescale. Here, we report one such example in a bulk Rashba-type polar semiconductor BiTeBr. Strong terahertz electromagnetic waves are emitted after the resonant excitation of the interband transition between the Rashba-type spin-splitting energy bands with a femtosecond laser pulse circularly polarized. The phase of the emitted terahertz waves is reversed by switching the circular polarization. This suggests that the observed terahertz radiation originates from the subpicosecond spin-polarized photocurrents, which are generated by the asymmetric depopulation of the Dirac state. Our result provides a way for the current-induced terahertz radiation and its phase control by the circular polarization of incident light without external electric fields.

  11. Measurement of minute local strain in semiconductor materials and electronic devices by using a highly parallel X-ray microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, J. E-mail: matsui@sci.himeji-tech.ac.jp; Tsusaka, Y.; Yokoyama, K.; Takeda, S.; Katou, M.; Kurihara, H.; Watanabe, K.; Kagoshima, Y.; Kimura, S

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an X-ray microbeam with a small angular divergence by adopting X-ray optics with successive use of asymmetric Bragg reflection from silicon crystals for the both polarizations of the synchrotron X-rays. The microbeam actually obtained is several microns in size and possesses an angular divergence of less than 2 arcsec which enables us to measure the strain of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -6}. By scanning the sample against the microbeam, distribution of the minute local strain in various regions of semiconductor crystals for electronic devices, e.g., the strain around the SiO{sub 2}/Si film edge in silicon devices, the strain in an InGaAsP/InP stripe laser were measured.

  12. Monocrystal growth and characterization of HgI2 semiconductor compound for using in X and gamma spectrometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    Mercury Iodide (HgI 2 ) platelets were grown from the vapor phase in the presence of polymers. These platelets are convenient to be used as room temperature operating semiconductor radiation detectors. Experiments demonstrate that the growth of platelets depends on a two-stage mass transport instead of depending on just one, as it has been thought. HgI 2 platelets 30 mm 2 large and 90 μm thick were obtained in a sealed evacuated fused quartz tube and were characterized by etch pit density measurements. (author) [pt

  13. Growth and characterization of monocrystals from HgI2 semiconductor compound for using in X and gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, L.O. de.

    1987-09-01

    Mercury Iodide (HgI 2 ) platelets were grown from the vapor phase in the presence of polymers. These platelets are convenient to be used as room temperature operating semiconductor radiation detectors. Experiments demonstrate that the growth of platelets depends on a two-stage mass transport instead of depending on just one, as it has been thought. HgI 2 platelets 30 mm 2 large and 90 μm thick were obtained in a sealed evacuated fused quartz tube and were characterized by etch pit density measurements. (author)

  14. Analysis of volatile organic compounds of ‘Fuji’ apples following electron beam irradiation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hyun-Pa; Shim, Sung-Lye; Lee, Sun-Im; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Kyong-Su

    2012-01-01

    The volatile organic compounds of non-irradiated and electron-beam irradiated ‘Fuji’ apples (Malus domestica Borkh.) at 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy were isolated through simultaneous distillation extractions and analyzed using gas chromatograph–mass spectrometry. A total of 53 volatile organic compounds were characterized in 0 and 1 kGy irradiated samples, whereas two more compounds related to ketone and terpenoid group were identified in 0.5 kGy irradiated samples. The contents of volatile compounds were 24.33, 36.49, and 35.28 mg/kg in 0, 0.5, and 1 kGy irradiated samples, respectively. The major compounds identified were butanol, hexanal, [E]-2-hexenal, and hexanol in all samples. The relative content of alcohol increased after 30 days of storage in all samples, whereas that of aldehyde decreased. Although the contents of some volatile compounds were changed by electron-beam irradiation, the total yield and major flavor compounds of irradiated ‘Fuji’ apples were similar to, or even greater than, those of the control. Therefore, the application of e-beam irradiation if required for microbial decontamination of ‘Fuji’ apples is an acceptable method as it does not bring about any major quantitative changes of volatile organic compounds. - Highlights: ► We analyzed the volatile organic compounds of electron beam irradiated Fuji apples. ► The major compounds of samples were butanol, hexanal, [E]-2-hexenal, and hexanol. ► The contents of major flavor compounds of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were similar.

  15. Determination of one-electron reduction potentials of some radiosensitive compounds by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Zhihua; Yao Side; Li Hucheng; Lin Nianyun; Jin Yizun

    1994-01-01

    One-electron reduction potential (E 7 1 ) is one of the important parameters of radiosensitive compound with high electron affinity. In this work one-electron reduction potentials of some radiosensitizers, such as Miso, 911, CMNa, SMU-1, SMU-2, SMD, SNN, S 3 and BSO, were determined pulse radiolytically by using anthraquinone-2-sulfate (AQS), duroquinone (DQ) and methyl viologen (MV 2+ ) as references

  16. Producing p-type conductivity in self-compensating semiconductor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vechten, J.A. van; Woodall, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This relates to compound type semiconductor materials that exhibit self-compensated n-type conductivity. The process described imparts p-type conductivity to a body of normally n-conductivity self-compensated compound semiconductor material by bombarding it with charged particles, either electrons, protons or ions. Other possible steps include introducing an acceptor impurity and applying a coating onto the crystal body. This technique will allow new semiconductor structures to be made. For example, there are some compound semiconductor materials that exhibit n-conductivity only that have energy gap widths that would permit electrical to light conversion at frequency and colours not readily achieved in semiconductor devices. (U.K.)

  17. Limitation and suppression of hot electron fluctuations in submicron semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochelap, V.A.; Zahleniuk, N.A.; Sokolov, V.N.

    1992-09-01

    We present theoretical investigations of fluctuations of hot electrons in submicron active regions, where the dimensions 2 d of the region is comparable to the electron energy relaxation length L ε . The new physical phenomenon is reported; the fluctuations depend on the sample thickness, with 2d ε a suppression of fluctuations arises in the range of fluctuation frequencies ω much less than T -1 ε , T ε is the electron energy relaxation time. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs

  18. Method of doping a semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.Y.; Rapp, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A method is disclosed for doping semiconductor material. An interface is established between a solid electrolyte and a semiconductor to be doped. The electrolyte is chosen to be an ionic conductor of the selected impurity and the semiconductor material and electrolyte are jointly chosen so that any compound formed from the impurity and the semiconductor will have a free energy no lower than the electrolyte. A potential is then established across the interface so as to allow the impurity ions to diffuse into the semiconductor. In one embodiment the semiconductor and electrolyte may be heated so as to increase the diffusion coefficient

  19. Calibration of a silicon semiconductor detecter using a 2 MeV electron accelerator beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleurot, N.; Gouard, P.; Mazataud, E.; Nail, M.; Savy, C.; Bayer, C.; Cauchois, Y.; Kherouf, R.; Mathieu, D.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the current mode calibration, carried out on a 2 MeV electron accelerator, of PIN detectors involved in electron spectrum measurements for laser-matter interaction experiments. A theoretical analysis simulating the interaction between the incident electrons and the irradiated medium has been carried out using the FOTELEC code. It accounts well for the experimental results giving a reasonable value for the mean electron-hole pair formation energy when back-scattering corrections are included. This work provides the transfer function data required for a plasma diagnostic spectrometer. (orig.)

  20. Electronic structure of elements and compounds and electronic phases of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadykto, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The paper reviews technique and computed energies for various electronic states of many-electron multiply charged ions, molecular ions, and electronic phases of solids. The model used allows computation of the state energy for free many-electron multiply charged ions with relative accuracy ∼10 -4 suitable for analysis of spectroscopy data

  1. Collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices and plasma modes of a two-dimensional electron gas with spatially modulated charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    The theory of collective excitations in semiconductor superlattices is formulated by using linear response theory. Different kinds of collective excitations in type I (GaAs-GaAlAs) and type II (GaSb-InAs) superlattices are surveyed. Special attention is paid to the presence of surface and finite-size effects. In calculating the dielectric matrix, the effect of different approximations of the system is discussed. The theory for inelastic length scattering (Raman scattering), and for Electron Energy Loss (EEL) due to collective excitations, is formulated. Calculations for several model systems are presented and the main features of the spectra are discussed. In part II the theory of collective excitations of a two-dimensional electron gas with a spatially periodic equilibrium density is formulated. As a first example a periodic array of two-dimensional electron gas strips with constant equilibrium density is studied. The integral equation that describes the charge fluctuations on the strips is derived and solved numerically. The spatial dependence of the density fluctuation across a single strip can be in the form of either propagating or evanescent waves

  2. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  3. Semiconductor Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Klingshirn, Claus F

    2012-01-01

    This updated and enlarged new edition of Semiconductor Optics provides an introduction to and an overview of semiconductor optics from the IR through the visible to the UV, including linear and nonlinear optical properties, dynamics, magneto and electrooptics, high-excitation effects and laser processes, some applications, experimental techniques and group theory. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered extend from physics to materials science and optoelectronics. Significantly updated chapters add coverage of current topics such as electron hole plasma, Bose condensation of excitons and meta materials. Over 120 problems, chapter introductions and a detailed index make it the key textbook for graduate students in physics. The mathematics is kept as elementary as possible, sufficient for an intuitive understanding of the experimental results and techniques treated. The subjects covered ...

  4. Development of an electron paramagnetic resonance methodology for studying the photo-generation of reactive species in semiconductor nano-particle assembled films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardoch, Marek; Messai, Youcef; Vileno, Bertrand; Hoarau, Yannick; Mekki, Djamel E.; Felix, Olivier; Turek, Philippe; Weiss, Jean; Decher, Gero; Martel, David

    2018-06-01

    An experimental approach involving electron paramagnetic resonance is proposed for studying photo-generated reactive species in semiconductor nano-particle-based films deposited on the internal wall of glass capillaries. This methodology is applied here to nano-TiO2 and allows a semi-quantitative analysis of the kinetic evolutions of radical production using a spin scavenger probe.

  5. Electron spin polarization induced by spin Hall effect in semiconductors with a linear in the momentum spin-orbit splitting of conduction band

    OpenAIRE

    Korenev, V. L.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that spin Hall effect creates uniform spin polarization of electrons in semiconductor with a linear in the momentum spin splitting of conduction band. In turn, the profile of the non-uniform spin polarization accumulated at the edge of the sample oscillates in space even in the absence of an external magnetic field.

  6. Lanthanide 4f-electron binding energies and the nephelauxetic effect in wide band gap compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Employing data from luminescence spectroscopy, the inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6, A) in Eu 2+/3+ impurities together with the 5d-centroid energy shift ϵ c (1,3+,A) in Ce 3+ impurities in 40 different fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, oxide, sulfide, and nitride compounds has been determined. This work demonstrates that the chemical environment A affects the two energies in a similar fashion; a fashion that follows the anion nephelauxetic sequence F, O, Cl, Br, N, I, S, Se. One may then calculate U(6, A) from well established and accurate ϵ c (1,3+,A) values which are then used as input to the chemical shift model proposed in Dorenbos (2012) [19]. As output it provides the chemical shift of 4f-electron binding energy and therewith the 4f-electron binding energy relative to the vacuum energy. In addition this method provides a tool to routinely establish the binding energy of electrons at the top of the valence band (work function) and the bottom of the conduction band (electron affinity) throughout the entire family of inorganic compounds. How the electronic structure of the compound and lanthanide impurities therein change with type of compound and type of lanthanide is demonstrated. -- Highlights: ► A relationship between 5d centroid shift and 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy is established. ► Information on the absolute 4f-electron binding energy of lanthanides in 40 compounds is provided. ► A new tool to determine absolute binding energies of electrons in valence and conduction bands is demonstrated

  7. Weak antilocalization induced by Rashba spin-orbit interaction in layered III-VI compound semiconductor GaSe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasuna, Shoichi; Shiogai, Junichi; Matsuzaka, Shunichiro; Kohda, Makoto; Oyama, Yutaka; Nitta, Junsaku

    2017-10-01

    Magnetoconductance (MC) at low temperature was measured to investigate spin-related transport affected by spin-orbit interaction (SOI) in III-VI compound n -type GaSe thin films. Results reveal that MC shows weak antilocalization (WAL). Its temperature and gate voltage dependences reveal that the dominant spin relaxation is governed by the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism associated with the Rashba SOI. The estimated Rashba SOI strength in GaSe is much stronger than that of III-V compound GaAs quantum wells, although the energy gap and spin split-off band in GaSe closely resemble those in GaAs. The angle dependence of WAL amplitude in the in-plane magnetic field direction is almost isotropic. This isotropy indicates that the strength of the Dresselhaus SOI is negligible compared with the Rashba SOI strength. The SOI effect in n -GaSe thin films differs greatly from those of III-V compound semiconductors and transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  8. Electron - polar acoustical phonon interactions in nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well via hot electron magnetotransport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, Ankur; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the hot electron transport properties like carrier energy and momentum scattering rates and electron energy loss rates are calculated via interactions of electrons with polar acoustical phonons for Mn doped BN quantum well in BN nanosheets via piezoelectric scattering and deformation potential mechanisms at low temperatures with high electric field. Electron energy loss rate increases with the electric field. It is observed that at low temperatures and for low electric field the phonon absorption is taking place whereas, for sufficient large electric field, phonon emission takes place. Under the piezoelectric (polar acoustical phonon) scattering mechanism, the carrier scattering rate decreases with the reduction of electric field at low temperatures wherein, the scattering rate variation with electric field is limited by a specific temperature beyond which there is no any impact of electric field on such scattering

  9. Efficient, Broadband and Wide-Angle Hot-Electron Transduction using Metal-Semiconductor Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Sakhdari, Maryam; Hajizadegan, Mehdi; Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Hot-electron devices are emerging as promising candidates for the transduction of optical radiation into electrical current, as they enable photodetection and solar/infrared energy harvesting at sub-bandgap wavelengths. Nevertheless, poor

  10. Efficient, Broadband and Wide-Angle Hot-Electron Transduction using Metal-Semiconductor Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Sakhdari, Maryam

    2016-05-20

    Hot-electron devices are emerging as promising candidates for the transduction of optical radiation into electrical current, as they enable photodetection and solar/infrared energy harvesting at sub-bandgap wavelengths. Nevertheless, poor photoconversion quantum yields and low bandwidth pose fundamental challenge to fascinating applications of hot-electron optoelectronics. Based on a novel hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) structure, we theoretically propose a vertically-integrated hot-electron device that can efficiently couple plasmonic excitations into electron flows, with an external quantum efficiency approaching the physical limit. Further, this metamaterial-based device can have a broadband and omnidirectional response at infrared and visible wavelengths. We believe that these findings may shed some light on designing practical devices for energy-efficient photodetection and energy harvesting beyond the bandgap spectral limit.

  11. Intrinsic electronic defects and multiple-atom processes in the oxidic semiconductor Ga2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeißer, Dieter; Henkel, Karsten

    2018-04-01

    We report on the electronic structure of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) single crystals as studied by resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (resPES). We identify intrinsic electronic defects that are formed by mixed-atomic valence states. We differentiate three coexisting defect states that differ in their electronic correlation energy and their spatial localization lengths. Their relative abundance is described by a fractional ionicity with covalent and ionic bonding contributions. For Ga2O3, our analyses of the resPES data enable us to derive two main aspects: first, experimental access is given to determine the ionicity based on the original concepts of Pauling and Phillips. Second, we report on multi-atomic energy loss processes in the Ga2p core level and X-ray absorption data. The two experimental findings can be explained consistently in the same context of mixed-atomic valence states and intrinsic electronic defects.

  12. A highly accurate and simple expression of electron drift velocity in gases and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalleri, G.

    1975-01-01

    The drift velocity for electrons (or holes) in a scattering medium is obtained as the sum of usual first order expression plus a correction term. Both terms are expressed as integrals over a single variable and the integrands are known functions of the electron collision frequency and the scattering angle. Since the correction term is small compared with the principal, usual term, the expression obtained is in practice equivalent to an explicit rigorous solution. (Auth.)

  13. Electronic computer prediction of properties of binary refractory transition metal compounds on the base of their simplificated electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutolin, S.A.; Kotyukov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to obtain calculation equations of macroscopic physico-chemical properties of transition metal refractory compounds (density, melting temperature, Debye characteristic temperature, microhardness, standard formation enthalpy, thermo-emf) using the method of the regression analysis. Apart from the compound composition the argument of the regression equation is the distribution of electron bands of d-transition metals, created by the energy electron distribution in the simplified zone structure of transition metals and approximated by Chebishev polynoms, by the position of Fermi energy on the map of distribution of electron band energy depending upon the value of quasi-impulse, multiple to the first, second and third Brillouin zone for transition metals. The maximum relative error of the regressions obtained as compared with the literary data is 15-20 rel.%

  14. Synthesis of electronically modified carbon nitride from a processable semiconductor, 3-aminotriazole-1,2,4 oligomer, via a topotactic-like phase transition

    OpenAIRE

    Savateev, A.; Pronkin, S.; Epping, J.; Willinger, M.; Antonietti, M.; Dontsova, D.

    2017-01-01

    The thermally induced topotactic transformation of organic polymeric semiconductors is achieved using similarity of the chemical structures of the two C,N,H-containing materials. Namely, the oligomer of 3-aminotriazole-1,2,4 (OATA) is transformed into an electronically modified graphitic carbon nitride (OATA-CN) upon heating at 550 °C. During the transition, the flat band potential of the organic semiconductor is only slightly shifted from -0.11 eV to -0.06 eV, while the optical band gap is s...

  15. The lattice dynamical studies of rare earth compounds: electron-phonon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Prafulla K.; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Singh, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    During the last two decades chalcogenides and pnictides of rare earth (RE) atoms have drawn considerable attention of the solid state physicists because of their peculiar electronic, magnetic, optical and phonon properties. Some of these compounds e.g. sulphides and selenides of cerium (Ce), samarium (Sm), yttrium (Y), ytterbium (Yb), europium (Eu) and thulium (Tm) and their alloys show nonintegral valence (between 2 and 3), arising due to f-d electron hybridization at ambient temperature and pressure. The rare earth mixed valence compounds (MVC) reviewed in this article crystallize in simple cubic structure. Most of these compounds show the existence of strong electron-phonon coupling at half way to the zone boundary. This fact manifests itself through softening of the longitudinal acoustic mode, negative value of elastic constant C 12 etc. The purpose of this contribution is to review some of the recent activities in the fields of lattice dynamics and allied properties of rare earth compounds. The present article is primarily devoted to review the effect of electron-phonon interactions on the dynamical properties of rare earth compounds by using the lattice dynamical model theories based on charged density deformations and long-range many body forces. While the long range charge transfer effect arises due to f-d hybridization of nearly degenerate 4f-5d bands of rare earth ions, the density deformation comes into the picture of breathing motion of electron shells. These effects of charge transfer and charge density deformation when considered in the lattice dynamical models namely the three body force rigid ion model (TRM) and breathing shell model (BSM) are quite successful in explaining the phonon anomalies in these compounds and undoubtedly unraveled many important physical process governing the phonon anomalies in rare earth compounds

  16. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dyakonov, Mikhail I

    2008-01-01

    This book describes beautiful optical and transport phenomena related to the electron and nuclear spins in semiconductors with emphasis on a clear presentation of the physics involved. Recent results on quantum wells and quantum dots are reviewed. The book is intended for students and researchers in the fields of semiconductor physics and nanoelectronics.

  17. Electron transport in erbium arsenide:indium gallium(aluminum)arsenide metal/semiconductor nanocomposites for thermoelectric power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahk, Je-Hyeong

    Electron transport in thin film ErAs:InGa(Al)As metal/semiconductor nanocomposite materials grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated experimentally and theoretically for efficient thermoelectric power generation. Thermoelectric properties such as the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical conductivity, and the thermal conductivity are measured for the various compositions of the material up to 840 K. A special sample preparation method is proposed to protect the thin films from damage and/or decomposition, and prevent the parasitic substrate conduction effect during the high temperature measurements. The sample preparation method includes surface passivation, high temperature metallization with a diffusion barrier, and the covalent oxide bonding technique for substrate removal. The experimental results for the nanocomposite materials are analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation under the relaxation time approximation. The scattering characteristics of free electrons in the InGa(Al)As is defined by four major scattering mechanisms such as the polar optical phonon scattering, the ionized impurity scattering, the alloy scattering, and the acoustic phonon deformation potential scattering. Combining these scattering mechanisms, the electron transport model successfully fits the temperature-dependent thermoelectric properties of Si-doped InGaAlAs materials, and predicts the figure of merits at various doping levels in various Al compositions. The nanoparticle-electron interaction is modeled as a momentum scattering for free electrons caused by the electrostatic potential perturbation around nanoparticles and the band offset at the interface. The ErAs nanoparticles are assumed to be semi-metals that can donate electrons to the matrix, and positively charged after the charge transfer to build up the screened coulomb potential outside them. The nanoparticle scattering rate is calculated for this potential profile using the partial wave method, and used to analyze

  18. Variable magnification dual lens electron holography for semiconductor junction profiling and strain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.Y., E-mail: wangyy@us.ibm.com [IBM Micro-electronics Division, Zip 40E, Hudson Valley Research Park, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States); Li, J.; Domenicucci, A. [IBM Micro-electronics Division, Zip 40E, Hudson Valley Research Park, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States); Bruley, J. [IBM TJ Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Route 134 Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Dual lens operation for electron holography, which was developed previously (Wang et al., Ultramicroscopy 101 (2004) 63-72; US patent: 7,015,469 B2 (2006)), is re-investigated for bright field (junction profiling) and dark field (strain mapping) electron holography using FEI instrumentation (i.e. F20 and Titan). It is found that dual lens operation provides a wide operational range for electron holography. In addition, the dark field image tilt increases at high objective lens current to include Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 0 4 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket diffraction spot. Under the condition of high spatial resolution (1 nm fringe spacing), a large field of view (450 nm), and high fringe contrast (26%) with dual lens operation, a junction map is obtained and strain maps of Si device on Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 2 2 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 0 4 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket diffraction are acquired. In this paper, a fringe quality number, N Prime , which is number of fringe times fringe contrast, is proposed to estimate the quality of an electron hologram and mathematical reasoning for the N Prime number is provided. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual lens electron holography is implemented on FEI instruments (Titan and F20). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wide range of field of view (0.1-0.9 {mu}m) and fringe spacing (0.5-6 nm) is achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fringe quality number is proposed to quantify the quality of an electron hologram. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Junction map at high spatial resolution is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain maps along Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 2 2 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket and Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 0 0 4 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket direction of Si by dark field electron holography are reported.

  19. Variable magnification dual lens electron holography for semiconductor junction profiling and strain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Li, J.; Domenicucci, A.; Bruley, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dual lens operation for electron holography, which was developed previously (Wang et al., Ultramicroscopy 101 (2004) 63–72; US patent: 7,015,469 B2 (2006)), is re-investigated for bright field (junction profiling) and dark field (strain mapping) electron holography using FEI instrumentation (i.e. F20 and Titan). It is found that dual lens operation provides a wide operational range for electron holography. In addition, the dark field image tilt increases at high objective lens current to include Si 〈0 0 4〉 diffraction spot. Under the condition of high spatial resolution (1 nm fringe spacing), a large field of view (450 nm), and high fringe contrast (26%) with dual lens operation, a junction map is obtained and strain maps of Si device on 〈2 2 0〉 and 〈0 0 4〉 diffraction are acquired. In this paper, a fringe quality number, N′, which is number of fringe times fringe contrast, is proposed to estimate the quality of an electron hologram and mathematical reasoning for the N′ number is provided. -- Highlights: ► Dual lens electron holography is implemented on FEI instruments (Titan and F20). ► Wide range of field of view (0.1–0.9 μm) and fringe spacing (0.5–6 nm) is achieved. ► Fringe quality number is proposed to quantify the quality of an electron hologram. ► Junction map at high spatial resolution is provided. ► Strain maps along 〈2 2 0〉 and 〈0 0 4〉 direction of Si by dark field electron holography are reported.

  20. Wave mechanics applied to semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastard, G.

    1990-01-01

    This book examines the basic electronic and optical properties of two dimensional semiconductor heterostructures based on III-V and II-VI compounds. The book explores various consequences of one-dimensional size-quantization on the most basic physical properties of heterolayers. Beginning with basic quantum mechanical properties of idealized quantum wells and superlattices, the book discusses the occurrence of bound states when the heterostructure is imperfect or when it is shone with near bandgap light