WorldWideScience

Sample records for composition model comparison

  1. Model to Test Electric Field Comparisons in a Composite Fairing Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trout, Dawn H.; Burford, Janessa

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating the impact of radio frequency transmission in vehicle fairings is important to sensitive spacecraft. This study shows cumulative distribution function (CDF) comparisons of composite a fairing electromagnetic field data obtained by computational electromagnetic 3D full wave modeling and laboratory testing. This work is an extension of the bare aluminum fairing perfect electric conductor (PEC) model. Test and model data correlation is shown.

  2. Biomechanical comparison of the human cadaveric pelvis with a fourth generation composite model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Brandon L; Attia, Tarik; Backstein, David; Safir, Oleg; Willett, Thomas L; Kuzyk, Paul R T

    2016-02-29

    The use of cadavers for orthopaedic biomechanics research is well established, but presents difficulties to researchers in terms of cost, biosafety, availability, and ease of use. High fidelity composite models of human bone have been developed for use in biomechanical studies. While several studies have utilized composite models of the human pelvis for testing orthopaedic reconstruction techniques, few biomechanical comparisons of the properties of cadaveric and composite pelves exist. The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical properties of cadaveric pelves to those of the 4th generation composite model. An Instron ElectroPuls E10000 mechanical testing machine was used to load specimens with orientation, boundary conditions and degrees of freedom that approximated those occurring during the single legged phase of walking, including hip abductor force. Each specimen was instrumented with strain gauge rosettes. Overall specimen stiffness and principal strains were calculated from the test data. Composite specimens showed significantly higher overall stiffness and slightly less overall variability between specimens (composite K=1448±54N/m, cadaver K=832±62N/m; p<0.0001). Strains measured at specific sites in the composite models and cadavers were similar (but did differ) only when the applied load was scaled to overall construct stiffness. This finding regarding strain distribution and the difference in overall stiffness must be accounted for when using these composite models for biomechanics research. Altering the cortical wall thickness or tuning the elastic moduli of the composite material may improve future generations of the composite model.

  3. Spectral analysis of atmospheric composition: application to surface ozone model-measurement comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdalo, Dene R.; Evans, Mathew J.; Sofen, Eric D.

    2016-07-01

    Models of atmospheric composition play an essential role in our scientific understanding of atmospheric processes and in providing policy strategies to deal with societally relevant problems such as climate change, air quality, and ecosystem degradation. The fidelity of these models needs to be assessed against observations to ensure that errors in model formulations are found and that model limitations are understood. A range of approaches are necessary for these comparisons. Here, we apply a spectral analysis methodology for this comparison. We use the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, a method similar to a Fourier transform, but better suited to deal with the gapped data sets typical of observational data. We apply this methodology to long-term hourly ozone observations and the equivalent model (GEOS-Chem) output. We show that the spectrally transformed observational data show a distinct power spectrum with regimes indicative of meteorological processes (weather, macroweather) and specific peaks observed at the daily and annual timescales together with corresponding harmonic peaks at one-half, one-third, etc., of these frequencies. Model output shows corresponding features. A comparison between the amplitude and phase of these peaks introduces a new comparison methodology between model and measurements. We focus on the amplitude and phase of diurnal and seasonal cycles and present observational/model comparisons and discuss model performance. We find large biases notably for the seasonal cycle in the mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere where the amplitudes are generally overestimated by up to 16 ppbv, and phases are too late on the order of 1-5 months. This spectral methodology can be applied to a range of model-measurement applications and is highly suitable for Multimodel Intercomparison Projects (MIPs).

  4. COMPOSITION STRUCTURE OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM MULTISPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS, MODELING, AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinard, Alysha A. [University of Colorado/Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO 80505 (United States); Lynch, Benjamin J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mulligan, Tamitha, E-mail: alysha.reinard@noaa.gov, E-mail: blynch@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: tamitha.mulligan@aero.org [Space Sciences Department, Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed on 2007 May 21-23 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that, in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientations of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process, which could explain the spatial location of the observed iron enhancements just outside the traditional flux rope magnetic signatures and between the two ICMEs. Detailed comparisons between the simulations and data were more complicated, but a sharp increase in high iron charge states in the ACE and STEREO-A data during the second flux rope corresponds well to similar features in the flux cancellation results. We discuss the prospects of this integrated in situ data analysis and modeling approach to advancing our understanding of the unified CME-to-ICME evolution.

  5. Comparison of composite rotor blade models: A coupled-beam analysis and an MSC/NASTRAN finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Robert V.; Nixon, Mark W.; Rehfield, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology was developed for the structural analysis of composite rotor blades. This coupled-beam analysis is relatively simple to use compared with alternative analysis techniques. The beam analysis was developed for thin-wall single-cell rotor structures and includes the effects of elastic coupling. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the new composite-beam analysis method through comparison of its results with those of an established baseline analysis technique. The baseline analysis is an MSC/NASTRAN finite-element model built up from anisotropic shell elements. Deformations are compared for three linear static load cases of centrifugal force at design rotor speed, applied torque, and lift for an ideal rotor in hover. A D-spar designed to twist under axial loading is the subject of the analysis. Results indicate the coupled-beam analysis is well within engineering accuracy.

  6. Europa's surface composition from near-infrared observations: A comparison of results from linear mixture modeling and radiative transfer modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, James H.; Jamieson, Corey S.; Dalton, J. Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative estimates of the abundance of surface materials and of water ice particle grain sizes at five widely separated locations on the surface of Europa have been obtained by two independent methods in order to search for possible discrepancies that may be attributed to differences in the methods employed. Results of radiative transfer (RT) compositional modeling (also known as intimate mixture modeling) from two prior studies are here employed without modification. Areal (or "checkerboard") mixture modeling, also known as linear mixture (LM) modeling, was performed to allow direct comparisons. The failure to model scattering processes (whose effects may be strongly nonlinear) in the LM approach is recognized as a potential source of errors. RT modeling accounts for nonlinear spectral responses due to scattering but is subject to other uncertainties. By comparing abundance estimates for H2SO4 · nH2O and water ice, obtained through both methods as applied to identical spectra, we may gain some insight into the importance of "volume scattering" effects for investigations of Europa's surface composition. We find that both methods return similar abundances for each location analyzed; linear correlation coefficients of ≥ 0.98 are found between the derived H2SO4 · nH2O and water ice abundances returned by both methods. We thus find no evidence of a significant influence of volume scattering on the compositional solutions obtained by LM modeling for these locations. Some differences in the results obtained for water ice grain sizes are attributed to the limited selection of candidate materials allowed in the RT investigations.

  7. Comparison of the elastic coefficients and Calculation Models of the Mechanical Behavior one- Dimensional Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Alsubari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the mechanical models that are devoted to the elastic properties of one-dimensional composite. We have compared the equivalent coefficients of one-dimensional composite, resulting from different models. The validation of the results was made through effective experiments on a one-dimensional composite consisting of fibers of alumina and a matrix of aluminum. This study allows us to better assess the rigidity of composite structures, and the results of calculation of the mechanical behavior, resulting from each model. It appears that the finite element model is the best suited to the approach of a refined conception. For more insurance, we have chosen to make our calculations by finite element in the three-dimensional case, using the technique of homogenization by asymptotic development.

  8. Comparison of micromechanical models for elastic properties. [for unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Results for the predicted effective elastic properties of unidirectional composites are presented for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy using eight different models. A brief review of each of the models is given along with the final equations in most cases. It is shown that there is wide variation in some predictions for glass/epoxy and that the upper and lower composite cylinder assemblage bounds do not always fall close together for this material.

  9. Comparison of model predictions for the composition of the ionosphere of Mars to MAVEN NGIMS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Paul; Vogt, Marissa; Mayyasi, Majd; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Elrod, Meredith; Bougher, Stephen; Dong, Chuanfei; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Ma, Yingjuan; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft at Mars, the only available measurements of the composition of the planet's ionosphere were those acquired by the two Viking Landers during their atmospheric entries. Many numerical models of the composition of the ionosphere of Mars have been developed, but these have only been validated for species, altitudes, and conditions for which Viking data exist. Here we compare the ionospheric composition and structure predicted by 10 ionospheric models at solar zenith angles of 45-60° against ion density measurements acquired by the MAVEN Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS). The most successful models included three-dimensional plasma transport driven by interactions with the surrounding space environment but had relatively simple ionospheric chemistry.

  10. Electric Composition Cost Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint Committee on Printing, Washington, DC.

    Experience of the U.S. Government Printing Office and others has shown that electronic composition of computer processed data is more economical than printing from camera copy produced by the line printers of digital computers. But electronic composition of data not already being processed by computer is not necessarily economical. This analysis…

  11. Composition Structure of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections From Multispacecraft Observations, Modeling, and Comparison with Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Reinard, Alysha; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed in May 21-23 2007 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation CME initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientation of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process which could explain the spatial location of the...

  12. INMS-derived composition of Titan's upper atmosphere: Analysis methods and model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Brian A.; Waite, J. Hunter; Mandt, Kathleen E.; Westlake, Joseph; Bell, Jared; Gell, David A.

    2009-12-01

    The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has recorded full altitude profile data from 20 low-altitude Titan encounters during the nominal mission (July 2004-2008). These encounters were TA, T5, T16, T18, T19, T21, T23, T25, T26, T28, T29, T30, T32, T36, T37, T39, T40, T41, T42, and T43. In this work we present an analysis of the data observed by INMS during these encounters to derive the neutral composition of Titan's upper atmosphere between 1000 and 1100 km. Analysis methods are described for the determination and correction of instrument effects as well as the composition derivation processes. Results are compared to independent INMS analysis efforts and a selected survey of photochemical models of Titan's upper atmosphere.

  13. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu, L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Ovenvrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter error are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  14. A Comparison of Various Stress Rupture Life Models for Orbiter Composite Pressure Vessels and Confidence Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes-Ledesma, Lorie; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Phoenix, S. Leigh; Glaser, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    In conjunction with a recent NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) investigation of flight worthiness of Kevlar Overwrapped Composite Pressure Vessels (COPVs) on board the Orbiter, two stress rupture life prediction models were proposed independently by Phoenix and by Glaser. In this paper, the use of these models to determine the system reliability of 24 COPVs currently in service on board the Orbiter is discussed. The models are briefly described, compared to each other, and model parameters and parameter uncertainties are also reviewed to understand confidence in reliability estimation as well as the sensitivities of these parameters in influencing overall predicted reliability levels. Differences and similarities in the various models will be compared via stress rupture reliability curves (stress ratio vs. lifetime plots). Also outlined will be the differences in the underlying model premises, and predictive outcomes. Sources of error and sensitivities in the models will be examined and discussed based on sensitivity analysis and confidence interval determination. Confidence interval results and their implications will be discussed for the models by Phoenix and Glaser.

  15. Comparison of Composite Restoration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Katona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly presents the classification, and possible ways of application of composites. Our objective was to compare three different restoration technique in class II cavity preparations, with the aim to determine which technique is the most advantageous in practical point of view. Artificial teeth fabricated from self-curing acrylic resin were used as models. Comparison of marginal sealing was performed macroscopically via direct visual inspection and via tactile control. Two parameters were examined on esthetic evaluation, which were the anatomical shape and the optical appearance. The time required to prepare the restorations were also measured. After the evaluation of the results, the bulk-fill technique was demonstrated to require the shortest time to be performed. This was followed by the oblique (Z technique, whereas the horizontal incremental technique appeared to be the most time-consuming method. Based on the esthetic evaluation, a remarkable difference can be observed between the bulk-fill technique and the other two incremental techniques, while the mean scores for the oblique and the horizontal techniques were comparable. Based on the results of the visual inspection and instrumental examination, there were no differences in terms of marginal sealing between the three applied methods. Based on these, the use of the appropriate incremental technique can reduce the development of secondary caries and increasing the longevity of composite restorations.

  16. Comparison of cytotoxicity test models for evaluating resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S M; Yap, Auj; Loo, Csl; Ng, J; Goh, C Y; Hong, Chl; Toh, W S

    2017-04-01

    This study compared different cytotoxicity test models for evaluating resin-based composites (RBCs) and assessed the biocompatibility of standard and bulk-fill RBCs. A standard (spectrum TPH) and a bulk-fill (smart dentin replacement (SDR)) RBC were selected. Disc-shaped specimens (7 mm diameter) of 2 and 4 mm thickness were polymerized for 20 s with a LED curing light of 700 mW/cm(2) irradiance. The specimens ( n = 5) were subjected to micro-hardness testing and three cytotoxicity test models (direct contact, indirect contact and extract tests) with the established L-929 cell line. Hardness ratios of top and bottom surfaces of specimens were computed to assess the effectiveness of cure. For the direct and indirect contact tests, the cells were stained and zones of inhibition were analyzed after material contact for 24 h. For the extract test, cells were exposed to extracts for 24 h, and cell viability was measured. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance/Scheffe's post hoc test and Pearson's correlation ( p cytotoxicity were observed for TPH at 4 mm. At 4-mm thickness, SDR was found to be biocompatible with all three models. Correlations between hardness ratio and cell viability ranged from r = 0.89-0.96 for the various tests. A significant correlation ( r = 0.97) was also observed between the three test models. Our data indicated consistency between direct contact, indirect contact and extract test models for cytotoxicity testing of RBCs. Bulk placement and curing at 4 mm for the bulk-fill RBC evaluated did not result in undue cytotoxicity.

  17. Comparisons of SHM Sensor Models with Empirical Test Data for Sandwich Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    propagation in a honeycomb sandwich panel was done by Metis Design Inc. in collaboration with ARC NASA . The sandwich panel fabricated for this test...structures. Sandwich type composites are being studied for use in NASAs new heavy lift launch vehicle and flaw detection is crucial for safety and for...and at the Marshall Space Flight Center to examine acoustic wave propagating and the ability to detect intrinsic faults in sandwich type composite

  18. Composite-technicolor standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar Chivukula, B.; Georgi, Howard

    1987-04-01

    We characterize a class of composite models in which the quarks and leptons and technifermions are built from fermions (preons) bound by strong gauge interactions. We argue that if the preon dynamics has as [SU(3) × U(1)] 5 flavor symmetry that is explicitly broken only by preon mass terms proportional to the quark and lepton mass matrices, then the composite-tech-nicolor theory has a GIM mechanism that suppresses dangerous flavor changing neutral current effects. We show that the compositeness scale must be between ≈1 TeV and ≈2.5 TeV, giving rise to observable deviations from the standard electroweak interactions, and that B overlineB mixing and CP violation in K mesons can differ significantly from the standard model predictions. The lepton flavor symmetries may be observable in the near future in the comparison of the compositeness effects in e +e - → μ +μ - with those in e +e - → e +e -.

  19. Compositional Modeling with DPNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Technical Report Compositional Modeling with DPNs 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey Zweig and Stuart Russell 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 298-102 Compositional Modeling With DPNs Geoffrey Zweig Stuart Russell Report No. UCB...Modeling With DPNs Geoffrey Zweig * Stuart Russell * Sept. 8, 1997 Abstract Dynamic probabilistic networks (DPNs) are a powerful and efficient method for

  20. Comparison of Theoretical Models and Finite Element Simulation of ZrO{sub 2}-based Composites for Inert Matrix Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Vivek [Indian Institute of Technology-Kanpur, Kanpur (India); Mistarihi, Qusai M.; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The improvement of thermal properties of ZrO{sub 2} has been investigated in many ways to enhance the performance of inert matrix fuel (IMF). Inert matrix fuel is a useful concept to burn transuranic elements (TRU) without increasing extra plutonium. The addition of reinforcements with a high thermal conductivity has been proposed in the previous studies. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are good candidate materials for the reinforcement because of their high thermal conductivities and low neutron absorption cross sections. Recently, ZrO{sub 2}-based composites reinforced with Mo-wire mesh or carbon foam were fabricated by spark plasma sintering. When the effects of the structures of reinforcements were compared, interconnected structures provided more enhanced thermal conductivity than discrete structures. The effective thermal conductivity of composite materials with various reinforcement structures can be calculated by using the finite element analyses. The finite element analyses presented a good agreement with theoretical models in estimating the effects of the reinforcement on the thermal conductivities of discrete Mo reinforced ZrO{sub 2} nanocomposites. It is found that the effects of interconnected thermal reinforcements on the effective thermal conductivity can be estimated by using the percolation model.

  1. Model comparison in ANOVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouder, Jeffrey N; Engelhardt, Christopher R; McCabe, Simon; Morey, Richard D

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA), the workhorse analysis of experimental designs, consists of F-tests of main effects and interactions. Yet, testing, including traditional ANOVA, has been recently critiqued on a number of theoretical and practical grounds. In light of these critiques, model comparison and model selection serve as an attractive alternative. Model comparison differs from testing in that one can support a null or nested model vis-a-vis a more general alternative by penalizing more flexible models. We argue this ability to support more simple models allows for more nuanced theoretical conclusions than provided by traditional ANOVA F-tests. We provide a model comparison strategy and show how ANOVA models may be reparameterized to better address substantive questions in data analysis.

  2. CCF model comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkinen, U. [VTT Industrial Systems (Finland)

    2004-04-01

    The report describes a simple comparison of two CCF-models, the ECLM, and the Beta-model. The objective of the comparison is to identify differences in the results of the models by applying the models in some simple test data cases. The comparison focuses mainly on theoretical aspects of the above mentioned CCF-models. The properties of the model parameter estimates in the data cases is also discussed. The practical aspects in using and estimating CCFmodels in real PSA context (e.g. the data interpretation, properties of computer tools, the model documentation) are not discussed in the report. Similarly, the qualitative CCF-analyses needed in using the models are not discussed in the report. (au)

  3. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III (.,; )

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  4. Composite Dos Attack Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ramanauskaitė

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for potential threats is one of the most important phases ensuring system security. It allows evaluating possible losses, changes in the attack process, the effectiveness of used countermeasures, optimal system settings, etc. In cyber-attack cases, executing real experiments can be difficult for many reasons. However, mathematical or programming models can be used instead of conducting experiments in a real environment. This work proposes a composite denial of service attack model that combines bandwidth exhaustion, filtering and memory depletion models for a more real representation of similar cyber-attacks. On the basis of the introduced model, different experiments were done. They showed the main dependencies of the influence of attacker and victim’s properties on the success probability of denial of service attack. In the future, this model can be used for the denial of service attack or countermeasure optimization.

  5. General Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Marzocca, David; Shu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    We construct a general class of pseudo-Goldstone composite Higgs models, within the minimal $SO(5)/SO(4)$ coset structure, that are not necessarily of moose-type. We characterize the main properties these models should have in order to give rise to a Higgs mass at around 125 GeV. We assume the existence of relatively light and weakly coupled spin 1 and 1/2 resonances. In absence of a symmetry principle, we introduce the Minimal Higgs Potential (MHP) hypothesis: the Higgs potential is assumed to be one-loop dominated by the SM fields and the above resonances, with a contribution that is made calculable by imposing suitable generalizations of the first and second Weinberg sum rules. We show that a 125 GeV Higgs requires light, often sub-TeV, fermion resonances. Their presence can also be important for the model to successfully pass the electroweak precision tests. Interestingly enough, the latter can be passed also by models with a heavy Higgs around 320 GeV. The composite Higgs models of the moose-type conside...

  6. Organic aerosol concentration and composition over Europe: insights from comparison of regional model predictions with aerosol mass spectrometer factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fountoukis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A detailed three-dimensional regional chemical transport model (PMCAMx was applied over Europe focusing on the formation and chemical transformation of organic matter. Three periods representative of different seasons were simulated, corresponding to intensive field campaigns. An extensive set of AMS measurements was used to evaluate the model and, using factor analysis results, gain more insight into the sources and transformations of organic aerosol (OA. Overall, the agreement between predictions and measurements for OA concentration is encouraging with the model reproducing two thirds of the data (daily average mass concentrations within a factor of two. Oxygenated OA (OOA is predicted to contribute 93% to total OA during May, 87% during winter and 96% during autumn with the rest consisting of fresh primary OA (POA. Predicted OOA concentrations compare well with the observed OOA values for all periods with an average fractional error of 0.53 and a bias equal to −0.07 (mean error = 0.9 μg m−3, mean bias = −0.2 μg m−3. The model systematically underpredicts fresh POA in most sites during late spring and autumn (mean bias up to −0.8 μg m−3. Based on results from a source apportionment algorithm running in parallel with PMCAMx, most of the POA originates from biomass burning (fires and residential wood combustion and therefore biomass burning OA is most likely underestimated in the emission inventory. The model performs well at all sites when the PMF-estimated low volatility OOA is compared against the OA with C* ≤ 0.1 μg m−3 and semivolatile OOA against the OA with C* > 0.1 μg m−3 respectively.

  7. Light fermions in composite models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikov, S. Yu.; Peccei, R. D.

    1993-07-01

    In preon models based on chiral gauge theories, we show that light composite fermions can ensue as a result of gauging a subset of preons in a vectorlike manner. After demonstrating how this mechanism works in a toy example, we construct a one-generation model of quarks which admits a hierarchy between the up and down quark masses as well as between these masses and the compositeness scale. In simple extensions of this model to more generations we discuss the challenges of obtaining any quark mixing. Some possible phenomenological implications of scenarios where quarks and leptons which are heavier are also less pointlike are also considered.

  8. Light fermions in composite models

    CERN Document Server

    Khlebnikov, S Yu

    1993-01-01

    In preon models based on chiral gauge theories, we show that light composite fermions can ensue as a result of gauging a subset of preons in a vector-like manner. After demonstrating how this mechanism works in a toy example, we construct a one generation model of quarks which admits a hierarchy between the up and down quark masses as well as between these masses and the compositeness scale. In simple extensions of this model to more generations we discuss the challenges of obtaining any quark mixing. Some possible phenomenological implications of scenarios where quarks and leptons which are heavier are also less pointlike are also considered.

  9. Compositional and Quantitative Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a survey of a composition model checking methodology and its succesfull instantiation to the model checking of networks of finite-state, timed, hybrid and probabilistic systems with respect; to suitable quantitative versions of the modal mu-calculus [Koz82]. The method is based...

  10. Chondritic Models of 4 Vesta: Comparison of Data from the Dawn Mission with Predicted Internal Structure and Surface Composition/Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Forni, O.; Monnereau, M.; Barrat, J-A.; Prettyman, T. H.; McSween, H. Y.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    While the HEDs provide an extremely useful basis for interpreting data from the Dawn mission, there is no guarantee that they provide a complete vision of all possible crustal (and possibly mantle) lithologies that are exposed at the surface of Vesta. With this in mind, an alternative approach is to identify plausible bulk compositions and use mass-balance and geochemical modelling to predict possible internal structures and crust/mantle compositions and mineralogies. While such models must be consistent with known HED samples, this approach has the potential to extend predictions to thermodynamically plausible rock types that are not necessarily present in the HED collection. Nine chondritic bulk compositions are considered (CI, CV, CO, CM, H, L, LL, EH, EL). For each, relative proportions and densities of the core, mantle, and crust are quantified. This calculation is complicated by the fact that iron may occur in metallic form (in the core) and/or in oxidized form (in the mantle and crust). However, considering that the basaltic crust has the composition of Juvinas and assuming that this crust is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the residual mantle, it is possible to calculate a single solution to this problem for a given bulk composition. Of the nine bulk compositions tested, solutions corresponding to CI and LL groups predicted a negative metal fraction and were not considered further. Solutions for enstatite chondrites imply significant oxidation relative to the starting materials and these solutions too are considered unlikely. For the remaining bulk compositions, the relative proportion of crust to bulk silicate is typically in the range 15 to 20% corresponding to crustal thicknesses of 15 to 20 km for a porosity-free Vesta-sized body. The mantle is predicted to be largely dominated by olivine (greater than 85%) for carbonaceous chondrites, but to be a roughly equal mixture of olivine and pyroxene for ordinary chondrite precursors. All bulk compositions

  11. Comparison of self repair in various composite matrix materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    In a comparison of self repair in graphite composites (for airplane applications) versus epoxy and vinyl ester composites (for building structures or walls) 1 the type of damage that the fiber/matrix is prone to experience is a prime factor in determining which materials self repair well and 2 the flow of energy during damage determines what kinds of damage that can be self repaired well. 1) In brittle composites, repair was successful throughout the composite due to matrix cracking which allowed for optimum chemical flow, whereas in toughened composites that did not crack, the repair chemical flows into a few layers of the composite. 2) If the damage energy is stopped by the composite and goes laterally, it causes delamination which will be repaired; however if the damage energy goes through the composite as with a puncture, then there will be limited delamination, less chemical release and less self repair.

  12. A comparison between the body composition, carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jasper

    The body composition, carcass characteristics and retail cuts of 61 Dormers (21 rams ... rams were more developed in the neck and head area than ewes, while ... 200 volts) the sheep were exsanguinated and the carcasses suspended to bleed. ... After 48 hours in the cooler the carcasses were partitioned into South African ...

  13. Integrated model of a composite propellant rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The combustion of composite solid propellants was investigated and an available numerical model was improved for taking into account the change of pressure, when the process occurs in a confined environment, as inside a rocket. The pressure increase upon ignition is correctly described by the improved model for both sandwich and dispersed particles propellants. In the latter case, self-induced fluctuations in the pressure and in all other computed variables occur, as consequence of the periodic rise and depletion of oxidizer particles from the binder matrix. The comparison with the results of the constant pressure model shows a different fluctuating profile of gas velocity, with a possible second order effect induced by the pressure fluctuations.

  14. Meshfree modeling in laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Simkins, Daniel Craig

    2012-09-27

    A problem of increasing importance in the aerospace industry is in detailed modeling of explicit fracture in laminated composite materials. For design applications, the simulation must be capable of initiation and propagation of changes in the problem domain. Further, these changes must be able to be incorporated within a design-scale simulation. The use of a visibility condition, coupled with the local and dynamic nature of meshfree shape function construction allows one to initiate and explicitly open and propagate holes inside a previously continuous problem domain. The method to be presented naturally couples to a hierarchical multi-scale material model incorporating external knowldege bases to achieve the goal of a practical explicit fracture modeling capability for full-scale problems. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Hierarchical Modeling of Ferromagnetic SMAs and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Chapter 4. Processing of Particulate FSMA Composites ............................ 38 Chapter 5. Processing of FSMA Laminated Composites by Plasma ...shear of a ferromagnetic materia ,tf, and (e) reverse transformation shear stress, Tl. 1.414 1110 . . ...... . . . .... ....... 80 -1.411 414 X •:. ~40...useful comparison parameter. We measured the saturation magnetization(Ms) of Fe-TiNi particulate composites that we processed by using Spark Plasma

  16. Comparison of Statistical Models for Regional Crop Trial Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qun-yuan; KONG Fan-ling

    2002-01-01

    Based on the review and comparison of main statistical analysis models for estimating varietyenvironment cell means in regional crop trials, a new statistical model, LR-PCA composite model was proposed, and the predictive precision of these models were compared by cross validation of an example data. Results showed that the order of model precision was LR-PCA model > AMMI model > PCA model > Treatment Means (TM) model > Linear Regression (LR) model > Additive Main Effects ANOVA model. The precision gain factor of LR-PCA model was 1.55, increasing by 8.4% compared with AMMI.

  17. MCNPX Model/Table Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S. Hendricks

    2003-03-03

    MCNPX is a Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code extending the capabilities of MCNP4C. As with MCNP, MCNPX uses nuclear data tables to transport neutrons, photons, and electrons. Unlike MCNP, MCNPX also uses (1) nuclear data tables to transport protons; (2) physics models to transport 30 additional particle types (deuterons, tritons, alphas, pions, muons, etc.); and (3) physics models to transport neutrons and protons when no tabular data are available or when the data are above the energy range (20 to 150 MeV) where the data tables end. MCNPX can mix and match data tables and physics models throughout a problem. For example, MCNPX can model neutron transport in a bismuth germinate (BGO) particle detector by using data tables for bismuth and oxygen and using physics models for germanium. Also, MCNPX can model neutron transport in UO{sub 2}, making the best use of physics models and data tables: below 20 MeV, data tables are used; above 150 MeV, physics models are used; between 20 and 150 MeV, data tables are used for oxygen and models are used for uranium. The mix-and-match capability became available with MCNPX2.5.b (November 2002). For the first time, we present here comparisons that calculate radiation transport in materials with various combinations of data charts and model physics. The physics models are poor at low energies (<150 MeV); thus, data tables should be used when available. Our comparisons demonstrate the importance of the mix-and-match capability and indicate how well physics models work in the absence of data tables.

  18. Comparison of Autoclave and Out-of-Autoclave Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, James K.; Kenner, W. Scott; Pelham, Larry; Miller, Sandi G.; Polis, Danel L.; Nailadi, Chaitra; Zimmerman, Thomas J.; Lort, Richard D.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Quade, Derek J.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate initiated an Advanced Composite Technology Project through the Exploration Technology Development Program in order to support the polymer composite needs for future heavy lift launch architectures. As an example, the large composite dry structural applications on Ares V inspired the evaluation of autoclave and out-of-autoclave (OOA) composite materials. A NASA and industry team selected the most appropriate materials based on component requirements for a heavy lift launch vehicle. Autoclaved and OOA composites were fabricated and results will highlight differences in processing conditions, laminate quality, as well as initial room temperature thermal and mechanical performance. Results from this study compare solid laminates that were both fiber-placed and hand-laid. Due to the large size of heavy-lift launch vehicle composite structures, there is significant potential that the uncured composite material or prepreg will experience significant out-life during component fabrication. Therefore, prepreg out-life was a critical factor examined in this comparison. In order to rigorously test material suppliers recommended out-life, the NASA/Industry team extended the out-time of the uncured composite prepreg to values that were approximately 50% beyond the manufacturers out-time limits. Early results indicate that the OOA prepreg composite materials suffered in both composite quality and mechanical property performance from their extended out-time. However, the OOA materials performed similarly to the autoclaved composites when processed within a few days of exposure to ambient "shop" floor handling. Follow on studies evaluating autoclave and OOA aluminum honeycomb core sandwich composites are planned.

  19. Composite Model and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushima, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    A fermion-boson-type Composite Model is proposed. Elementary fields are only one kind of spin-1/2 and spin-0 {\\bf preon}. Both are in the global supersymmetric pair with the common electric charge of e/6 and belong to the fundamental representations of (3, 2, 2) under the spontaneously unbroken SU(3)_C\\otimes{SU(2)}_L^{h}\\otimes{SU(2)}_R^{h} gauge symmetry (h means hyper-color gauge). Preons are composed into subquarks which are intermediate clusters towards quarks and leptons. Weak interactions are residual ones of hyper-color gauge interactions. W-and Z-boson are also composite objects of subquarks, which introduces the idea of existence of their scalar partners (S) by hyper-fine-splitting whose masses would be around 110-120 GeV. The mechanism of making higher generations is obtained by adding neutral scalar subquark (y) composed of a preon-antipreon pair. Creation or annihilation of y inside quarks induces the coupling constants of flavor-mixing weak interactions which are all complex numbers (contrary to...

  20. Exploring holographic Composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Croon, Djuna; Huber, Stephan J; Sanz, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Simple Composite Higgs models predict new vector-like fermions not too far from the electroweak scale, yet LHC limits are now sensitive to the TeV scale. Motivated by this tension, we explore the holographic dual of the minimal model, MCHM5, to understand how far naive 4D predictions are from their 5D duals. Interestingly, we find that the usual hierarchy among the vector-like quarks is not generic, hence ameliorating the tuning issue. We also find that lowering the hierarchy of scales in the 5D picture allows for heavier top partners, while keeping the mass of the Higgs boson at its observed value. In the 4D dual this corresponds to increasing the number of colours N. Furthermore, in anticipation of the ongoing efforts at the LHC to put bounds on the top Yukawa, we demonstrate that deviations from the SM can be suppressed or enhanced with respect to what is expected from mere symmetry arguments in 4D. We conclude that the 5D holographic realisation of the MCHM5 with a small hierarchy of scales may not in ten...

  1. A Comparison Between Impedance Measured by a Commercial Analyzer and your Value Adjusted by a Theoretical Model in Body Composition Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    equipment with tetrapolar array set of electrodes is used to realize the bioimpedance measurement . The aim of the present work is to show that the... bioimpedance measured is normally sub-estimated and to develop a correction factor to such values. The comparison between the original bioimpedance ...conducted on 10 male subjects. Besides the bioimpedance analysis, anthropometric measures consisting of height, weight and skinfold-thickness were also

  2. Composite Linear Models | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Stuart G. Baker The composite linear models software is a matrix approach to compute maximum likelihood estimates and asymptotic standard errors for models for incomplete multinomial data. It implements the method described in Baker SG. Composite linear models for incomplete multinomial data. Statistics in Medicine 1994;13:609-622. The software includes a library of thirty examples from the literature. |

  3. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Caries is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. For (direct restaurations of carious lesions, tooth-coloured composite materials are increasingly used. The compulsory health insurance pays for composite fillings in front teeth; in posterior teeth, patients have to bear the extra cost. Scientific background: Amalgam is an alloy of mercury and other metals and has been used in dentistry for more than one hundred and fifty years. Composites consist of a resin matrix and chemically bonded fillers. They have been used for about fifty years in front teeth. Amalgam has a long longevity; the further development of composites has also shown improvements regarding their longevity. Research questions: This HTA-report aims to evaluate the longevity (failure rate, median survival time (MST, median age of direct amalgam fillings in comparison to direct composite fillings in permanent teeth from a medical and economical perspective and discusses the ethical, legal and social aspects of using these filling materials. Methods: The systematic literature search yielded a total of 1,149 abstracts. After a two-step selection process based on defined criteria 25 publications remained to be assessed. Results: The medical studies report a longer longevity for amalgam fillings than for composite fillings. However, the results of these studies show a large heterogeneity. No publication on the costs or the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings exists for Germany. The economic analyses (NL, SWE, GB report higher costs for composite fillings when longevity is assumed equal (for an observation period of five years or longer for amalgam compared to composite fillings. These higher costs are due to the higher complexity of placing composite fillings. Discussion: Due to different study designs and insufficient documentation of study details, a comparison of different studies on longevity of direct amalgam and composite

  4. Composite model with large mixing of neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, N

    1999-01-01

    We suggest a simple composite model that induces the large flavor mixing of neutrino in the supersymmetric theory. This model has only one hyper-color in addition to the standard gauge group, which makes composite states of preons. In this model, {\\bf 10} and {\\bf 1} representations in SU(5) grand unified theory are composite states and produce the mass hierarchy. This explains why the large mixing is realized in the lepton sector, while the small mixing is realized in the quark sector. This model can naturally solve the atmospheric neutrino problem. We can also solve the solar neutrino problem by improving the model.

  5. Food composition database development for between country comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merchant Anwar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nutritional assessment by diet analysis is a two-stepped process consisting of evaluation of food consumption, and conversion of food into nutrient intake by using a food composition database, which lists the mean nutritional values for a given food portion. Most reports in the literature focus on minimizing errors in estimation of food consumption but the selection of a specific food composition table used in nutrient estimation is also a source of errors. We are conducting a large prospective study internationally and need to compare diet, assessed by food frequency questionnaires, in a comparable manner between different countries. We have prepared a multi-country food composition database for nutrient estimation in all the countries participating in our study. The nutrient database is primarily based on the USDA food composition database, modified appropriately with reference to local food composition tables, and supplemented with recipes of locally eaten mixed dishes. By doing so we have ensured that the units of measurement, method of selection of foods for testing, and assays used for nutrient estimation are consistent and as current as possible, and yet have taken into account some local variations. Using this common metric for nutrient assessment will reduce differential errors in nutrient estimation and improve the validity of between-country comparisons.

  6. Hygrothermal modeling and testing of polymers and polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiqun

    2000-10-01

    The dissertation, consisting of four papers, presents the results of the research investigation on environmental effects on polymers and polymer matrix composites. Hygrothermal models were developed that would allow characterization of non-Fickian diffusion coefficients from moisture weight gain data. Hygrothermal testing was also conducted to provide the necessary data for characterizing of model coefficients and model verification. In part 1, a methodology is proposed that would allow characterization of non-Fickian diffusion coefficients from moisture weight gain data for a polymer adhesive below its Tg. Subsequently, these diffusion coefficients are used for predicting moisture concentration profiles through the thickness of a polymer. In part 2, a modeling methodology based on irreversible thermodynamics applied within the framework of composite macro-mechanics is presented, that would allow characterization of non-Fickian diffusion coefficients from moisture weight gain data for laminated composites with distributed uniaxial damage. Comparisons with test data for a 5-harness satin textile composite with uniaxial micro-cracks are provided for model verifications. In part 3, the same modeling methodology based on irreversible thermodynamics is extended to the case of a bi-axially damaged laminate. The model allows characterization of nonFickian diffusion coefficients as well as moisture saturation level from moisture weight gain data for laminates with pre-existing damage. Comparisons with test data for a bi-axially damaged Graphite/Epoxy woven composite are provided for model verifications. Finally, in part 4, hygrothermal tests conducted on AS4/PR500 5HS textile composite laminates are summarized. The objectives of the hygrothermal tests are to determine the diffusivity and maximum moisture content of the laminate.

  7. Chondritic Models of 4 Vesta: Comparison of Predicted Internal Structure and Surface Composition/Mineralogy with Data from the Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Forni, O.; Monnereau, M.; Barrat, J-A.; Prettyman, T. H.; McSween, H. Y.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation of the terrestrial planets remains one of the principal challenges of the Earth and planetary science communities. However, direct traces of the earliest stages of planet building have generally been wiped out on larger bodies such as the Earth or Mars, obscuring our view of how that process occurred. On the other hand, the planet building process would appear to have been arrested prematurely in the region between Mars and Jupiter, now populated by several hundred thousand compositionally diverse objects that escaped accretion into larger planets. Of these, the asteroid 4 Vesta is of particular interest as it is large (520 km diameter), and known to have a basaltic surface dominated by pyroxenes [1, 2]. Furthermore, visible-IR spectra of Vesta obtained by ground and space-based telescopes are remarkably similar to laboratory spectra measured on meteorites of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite clan (HED), leading to the paradigm that the HEDs came from Vesta [2]. Geochemical and petrological studies of the HEDs confirm the differentiated nature of the near-surface region of their parent body, and imply that crust extraction occurred well within the first 10Ma of solar system history [3]. Vesta is therefore a prime target for studies that aim to constrain the earliest stages of planet building, and for that reason it is currently the subject of the Dawn mission [4].

  8. Modelling the regional climate and isotopic composition of Svalbard precipitation using REMOiso : a comparison with available GNIP and ice core data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divine, D. V.; Sjolte, J.; Isaksson, E.; Meijer, H. A. J.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.; Sturm, C.; Godtliebsen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of a regional (approx. 50 km resolution) circulation model REMOiso with embedded stable water isotope module covering the period 1958-2001 are compared with the two instrumental climate and four isotope series (d18O) from western Svalbard. We examine the data from ice cores drilled on Sv

  9. Modelling the regional climate and isotopic composition of Svalbard precipitation using REMOiso : a comparison with available GNIP and ice core data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divine, D. V.; Sjolte, J.; Isaksson, E.; Meijer, H. A. J.; van de Wal, R. S. W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.; Sturm, C.; Godtliebsen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of a regional (approx. 50 km resolution) circulation model REMOiso with embedded stable water isotope module covering the period 1958-2001 are compared with the two instrumental climate and four isotope series (d18O) from western Svalbard. We examine the data from ice cores drilled on Sv

  10. Modelling the regional climate and isotopic composition of Svalbard precipitation using REMOiso: a comparison with available GNIP and ice core data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Divine, D.V.; Sjolte, J.; Isaksson, E.; Meijer, H.A.J.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.; Sturm, C.; Godtliebsen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of a regional (approx. 50 km resolution) circulation model REMOiso with embedded stable water isotope module covering the period 1958-2001 are compared with the two instrumental climate and four isotope series (δ18O) from western Svalbard. We examine the data from ice cores drilled on Sv

  11. Composite Models of Quarks and Leptons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chaoqiang

    1987-09-01

    We review the various constraints on composite models of quarks and leptons. Some dynamical mechanisms for chiral symmetry breaking in chiral preon models are discussed. We have constructed several "realistic candidate" chiral preon models satisfying complementarity between the Higgs and confining phases. The models predict three to four generations of ordinary quarks and leptons.

  12. Modelling of composite propellant properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizers, H.L.J.; Hordijk, A.C.; Vliet, L.D. van; Bouquet, F.

    2000-01-01

    State-of-the-art composite propellants are based on solid particles (AP, Aluminium) in a polymeric HTPB based binder system. The usability of a propellant for a particular application is dependent on a large number of properties. These different properties sometimes result in contradictory requireme

  13. Mechanical Model Development for Composite Structural Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Trenton M.; Lacy, Thomas E., Jr.; Santiago, Diana; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Novel composite structural supercapacitor concepts have recently been developed as a means both to store electrical charge and to provide modest mechanical load carrying capability. Double-layer composite supercapacitors are often fabricated by impregnating a woven carbon fiber fabric, which serves as the electrodes, with a structural polymer electrolyte. Polypropylene or a glass fabric is often used as the separator material. Recent research has been primarily limited to evaluating these composites experimentally. In this study, mechanical models based on the Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells (MSGMC) were developed and used to calculate the shear and tensile properties and response of two composite structural supercapacitors from the literature. The modeling approach was first validated against traditional composite laminate data. MSGMC models for composite supercapacitors were developed, and accurate elastic shear/tensile properties were obtained. It is envisioned that further development of the models presented in this work will facilitate the design of composite components for aerospace and automotive applications and can be used to screen candidate constituent materials for inclusion in future composite structural supercapacitor concepts.

  14. Mathematical model predicts the elastic behavior of composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoroastro de Miranda Boari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have found that the non-uniform distribution of reinforcing elements in a composite material can markedly influence its characteristics of elastic and plastic deformation and that a composite's overall response is influenced by the physical and geometrical properties of its reinforcing phases. The finite element method, Eshelby's method and dislocation mechanisms are usually employed in formulating a composite's constitutive response. This paper discusses a composite material containing SiC particles in an aluminum matrix. The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between a composite material's particle distribution and its resistance, and to come up with a mathematical model to predict the material's elastic behavior. The proposed formulation was applied to establish the thermal stress field in the aluminum-SiC composite resulting from its fabrication process, whereby the mixture is prepared at 600 °C and the composite material is used at room temperature. The analytical results, which are presented as stress probabilities, were obtained from the mathematical model proposed herein. These results were compared with the numerical ones obtained by the FEM method. A comparison of the results of the two methods, analytical and numerical, reveals very similar average thermal stress values. It is also shown that Maxwell-Boltzmann's distribution law can be applied to identify the correlation between the material's particle distribution and its resistance, using Eshelby's thermal stresses.

  15. Comparisons of venus surface compositions with terrestrial ocean floor rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvin, J.B.; Bryan, W.B.

    1987-10-01

    Statistical comparison of Venera and Vega lander x-ray fluorescence spectrometer measurements of the composition of the Venus surface with an extensive database of compositional data for terrestrial ocean floor rocks indicates that the Venera 14 data matches certain tholeiitic basalts from the Kane Fracture Zone (KFZ) in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (22-25/sup 0/N) at high confidence levels. The tholeiites most similar to the Venera measurements are very primitive, low-calcium, high-alumina pillow basalts depleted in clinopyroxene, and are relatively unique to certain fracture zones in oceanic regions. If the Venera 14 analogy is valid, the implication is that certain Venus basaltic magmas have lost clinopyroxene at relatively high pressures by fractionation, perhaps within a deep source region. Comparisons of Venera 13 and Vega 2 data with oceanic rocks yield poorer matches. Venera 13 matches Loihi seamount alkali basalts, as well as potassic mafic rocks from oceanic island such as Tristan de Cunha. The best analogy to Vega 2 may be altered gabbros or basic lavas from terrestrial basic intrusions such as the Troodos ophiolite. The close similarity of a representative sample of Venera 14 material with distinctive ocean floor tholeiitic basalts suggests that deep magma storage regions exist on Venus, and that derivation of both tholeiitic and alkalic magmas from a single primitive parent may be an important process on Venus.

  16. A conjugate thermo-electric model for a composite medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Chávez

    Full Text Available Electrical transmission signals have been used for decades to characterize the internal structure of composite materials. We theoretically analyze the transmission of an electrical signal through a composite material which consists of two phases with different chemical compositions. We assume that the temperature of the biphasic system increases as a result of Joule heating and its electrical resistivity varies linearly with temperature; this last consideration leads to simultaneously study the electrical and thermal effects. We propose a nonlinear conjugate thermo-electric model, which is solved numerically to obtain the current density and temperature profiles for each phase. We study the effect of frequency, resistivities and thermal conductivities on the current density and temperature. We validate the prediction of the model with comparisons with experimental data obtained from rock characterization tests.

  17. Modelling the crush behaviour of thermoplastic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Wei; Falzon, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoplastic composites are likely to emerge as the preferred solution for meeting the high-volume production demands of passenger road vehicles. Substantial effort is currently being directed towards the development of new modelling techniques to reduce the extent of costly and time consuming physical testing. Developing a high-fidelity numerical model to predict the crush behaviour of composite laminates is dependent on the accurate measurement of material properties as well as a thorough ...

  18. Mathematical methods and models in composites

    CERN Document Server

    Mantic, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a representative selection of the most relevant, innovative, and useful mathematical methods and models applied to the analysis and characterization of composites and their behaviour on micro-, meso-, and macroscale. It establishes the fundamentals for meaningful and accurate theoretical and computer modelling of these materials in the future. Although the book is primarily concerned with fibre-reinforced composites, which have ever-increasing applications in fields such as aerospace, many of the results presented can be applied to other kinds of composites. The topics cover

  19. Preclinical Models in Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-28

    Animal models for basic and translational research in reconstructive transplantation . Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. 2012;96(1):39–50. Curr Transpl Rep ... transplants have been performed worldwide; however, this treatment remains experimental. Things system- atically tried in the clinic should follow...Keywords Vascularized composite allotransplantation . Animal models . Hand transplantation . Face transplantation . Preclinical models

  20. Benchmarking of Computational Models for NDE and SHM of Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kevin; Leckey, Cara; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Juarez, Peter; Timucin, Dogan; Schuet, Stefan; Hafiychuk, Halyna

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave phenomena constitute the leading physical mechanism for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of solid composite materials such as carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates. Computational models of ultrasonic guided-wave excitation, propagation, scattering, and detection in quasi-isotropic laminates can be extremely valuable in designing practically realizable NDE and SHM hardware and software with desired accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and coverage. This paper presents comparisons of guided-wave simulations for CFRP composites implemented using three different simulation codes: two commercial finite-element analysis packages, COMSOL and ABAQUS, and a custom code implementing the Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT). Comparisons are also made to experimental laser Doppler vibrometry data and theoretical dispersion curves.

  1. Compositional encoding for bounded model checking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun SUN; Yang LIU; Jin Song DONG; Jing SUN

    2008-01-01

    Verification techniques like SAT-based bounded model checking have been successfully applied to a variety of system models. Applying bounded model checking to compositional process algebras is, however, a highly non-trivial task. One challenge is that the number of system states for process algebra models is not statically known, whereas exploring the full state space is computa-tionally expensive. This paper presents a compositional encoding of hierarchical processes as SAT problems and then applies state-of-the-art SAT solvers for bounded model checking. The encoding avoids exploring the full state space for complex systems so as to deal with state space explosion. We developed an automated analyzer which combines complementing model checking tech-niques (I.e., bounded model checking and explicit on-the-fly model checking) to validate system models against event-based temporal properties. The experiment results show the analyzer handles large systems.

  2. UV complete composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Agugliaro, Alessandro; Becciolini, Diego; De Curtis, Stefania; Redi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We study confining gauge theories with fermions vectorial under the SM that produce a Higgs doublet as a Nambu-Goldstone boson. The vacuum misalignment required to break the electro-weak symmetry is induced by an elementary Higgs doublet with Yukawa couplings to the new fermions. The physical Higgs is a linear combination of elementary and composite Higgses while the SM fermions remain elementary. The full theory is renormalizable and the SM Yukawa couplings are generated from the ones of the elementary Higgs allowing to eliminate all flavour problems but with interesting effects for Electric Dipole Moments of SM particles. We also discuss how ideas on the relaxation of the electro-weak scale could be realised within this framework.

  3. Partially composite two-Higgs doublet model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dong-Won Jung

    2007-11-01

    In the extra dimensional scenarios with gauge fields in the bulk, the Kaluza-Klein (KK) gauge bosons can induce Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) type attractive four-fermion interactions, which can break electroweak symmetry dynamically with accompanying composite Higgs fields. We consider a possibility that electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) is triggered by both a fundamental Higgs and a composite Higgs arising in a dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism induced by a new strong dynamics. The resulting Higgs sector is a partially composite two-Higgs doublet model with specific boundary conditions on the coupling and mass parameters originating at a compositeness scale . The phenomenology of this model is discussed including the collider phenomenology at LHC and ILC.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  5. Compositional and Quantitative Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2010-01-01

    on the existence of a quotient construction, allowing a property phi of a parallel system phi/A to be transformed into a sufficient and necessary quotient-property yolA to be satisfied by the component 13. Given a model checking problem involving a network Pi I and a property yo, the method gradually move (by...

  6. Component Composition Using Feature Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Michael; Klose, Karl; Mitschke, Ralf;

    2010-01-01

    In general, components provide and require services and two components are bound if the first component provides a service required by the second component. However, certain variability in services - w.r.t. how and which functionality is provided or required - cannot be described using standard...... interface description languages. If this variability is relevant when selecting a matching component then human interaction is required to decide which components can be bound. We propose to use feature models for making this variability explicit and (re-)enabling automatic component binding. In our...... approach, feature models are one part of service specifications. This enables to declaratively specify which service variant is provided by a component. By referring to a service's variation points, a component that requires a specific service can list the requirements on the desired variant. Using...

  7. The Composite OLAP-Object Data Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourabbas, Elaheh; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-12-07

    In this paper, we define an OLAP-Object model that combines the main characteristics of OLAP and Object data models in order to achieve their functionalities in a common framework. We classify three different object classes: primitive, regular and composite. Then, we define a query language which uses the path concept in order to facilitate data navigation and data manipulation. The main feature of the proposed language is an anchor. It allows us to fix dynamically an object class (primitive, regular or composite) along the paths over the OLAP-Object data model for expressing queries. The queries can be formulated on objects, composite objects and combination of both. The power of the proposed query language is investigated through multiple query examples. The semantic of different clauses and syntax of the proposed language are investigated.

  8. Dynamical CP violation in composite Higgs models

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, S.; Inagaki, Tomohiro; Muta, Taizo

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical origin of the CP violation in electroweak theory is investigated in composite Higgs models. The mechanism of the spontaneous CP violation proposed in other context by Dashen is adopted to construct simple models of the dynamical CP violation. Within the models the size of the neutron electric dipole moment is estimated and the constraint on the $\\varepsilon$-parameter in K-meson decays is discussed.

  9. Flavor and CP invariant composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, Michele [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; INFN, Firenze (Italy); Weiler, Andreas [CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The flavor protection in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness is known to be insufficient. We explore the possibility to alleviate the tension with CP odd observables by assuming that flavor or CP are symmetries of the composite sector, broken by the coupling to Standard Model fields. One realization is that the composite sector has a flavor symmetry SU(3) or SU(3){sub U} x SU(3){sub D} which allows us to realize Minimal Flavor Violation. We show how to avoid the previously problematic tension between a flavor symmetric composite sector and electro-weak precision tests. Some of the light quarks are substantially or even fully composite with striking signals at the LHC. We discuss the constraints from recent dijet mass measurements and give an outlook on the discovery potential. We also present a different protection mechanism where we separate the generation of flavor hierarchies and the origin of CP violation. This can eliminate or safely reduce unwanted CP violating effects, realizing effectively ''Minimal CP Violation'' and is compatible with a dynamical generation of flavor at low scales. (orig.)

  10. Finite element modeling of consolidation of composite laminates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangqiao Yan

    2006-01-01

    Advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites have been increasingly applied to various structural corn-ponents.One of the important processes to fabricate high performance laminated composites is an autoclave assisted prepreg lay-up.Since the quality of laminated composites is largely affected by the cure cycle,selection of an appropriate cure cycle for each application is important and must be opti-mized.Thus.some fundamental model of the consolidation and cure processes is necessary for selecting suitable param-eters for a specific application.This article is concerned with the "flow-compaction" model during the autoclave process-ing of composite materials.By using a weighted residual method,two-dimensional finite element formulation for the consolidation process of thick thermosetting composites is presented and the corresponding finite element code is developed.Numerical examples.including comparison of the present numerical results with one-dimensional and two-dimensional analytical solutions,are given to illustrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed finite element formulation.In addition,a consolidation simulation of As4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminate is carried out and compared with the experimental results available in the literature.

  11. Consolidation modelling for thermoplastic composites forming simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, H.; Rusanov, A.; Hamila, N.; Boisse, P.

    2016-10-01

    Pre-impregnated thermoplastic composites are widely used in the aerospace industry for their excellent mechanical properties, Thermoforming thermoplastic prepregs is a fast manufacturing process, the automotive industry has shown increasing interest in this manufacturing processes, in which the reconsolidation is an essential stage. The model of intimate contact is investigated as the consolidation model, compression experiments have been launched to identify the material parameters, several numerical tests show the influents of the temperature and pressure applied during processing. Finally, a new solid-shell prismatic element has been presented for the simulation of consolidation step in the thermoplastic composites forming process.

  12. Material Models Used to Predict Spring-in of Composite Elements: a Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galińska, Anna

    2017-02-01

    There have been several approaches used in the modelling of the process-induced deformations of composite parts developed so far. The most universal and most frequently used approach is the FEM modelling. In the scope of the FEM modelling several material models have been used to model the composite behaviour. In the present work two of the most popular material models: elastic and CHILE (cure hardening instantaneous linear elastic) are used to model the spring-in deformations of composite specimens and a structure fragment. The elastic model is more effective, whereas the CHILE model is considered more accurate. The results of the models are compared with each other and with the measured deformations of the real composite parts. Such a comparison shows that both models allow to predict the deformations reasonably well and that there is little difference between their results. This leads to a conclusion that the use of the simpler elastic model is a valid engineering practice.

  13. Yukawa Interaction from a SUSY Composite Model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, N

    1998-01-01

    We present a composite model that is based on non-perturbative effects of N=1 supersymmetric SU(N_C) gauge theory with N_f=N_C+1 flavors. In this model, we consider N_C=7, where all matter fields in the supersymmetric standard model, that is, quarks, leptons and Higgs particles are bound states of preons and anti-preons. When SU(7)_H hyper-color coupling becomes strong, Yukawa couplings of quarks and leptons are generated dynamically. We show one generation model at first, and next we show models of three generations.

  14. Progressive Damage Modeling of Notched Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitharaju, Venkat; Aashat, Satvir; Kia, Hamid; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased interest in using non-crimp fabric reinforced composites for primary and secondary structural weight savings in high performance automobile applications. However, one of the main challenges in implementing these composites is the lack of understanding of damage progression under a wide variety of loading conditions for general configurations. Towards that end, researchers at GM and NASA are developing new damage models to predict accurately the progressive failure of these composites. In this investigation, the developed progressive failure analysis model was applied to study damage progression in center-notched and open-hole tension specimens for various laminate schemes. The results of a detailed study with respect to the effect of element size on the analysis outcome are presented.

  15. Fracture resistance of zirconia-composite veneered crowns in comparison with zirconia-porcelain crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadon, Omar; Patrick, David; Johnson, Anthony; Pollington, Sarah; Wood, Duncan

    2017-02-11

    The objectives were to evaluate the fracture resistance and stress concentration in zirconia/composite veneered crowns in comparison to zirconia/porcelain crowns using occlusal fracture resistance and by stress analysis using finite element analysis method. Zirconia substructures were divided into two groups based on the veneering material. A static load was applied occlusally using a ball indenter and the load to fracture was recorded in Newtons (N). The same crown design was used to create 3D crown models and evaluated using FEA. The zirconia/composite crowns subjected to static occlusal load showed comparable results to the zirconia/porcelain crowns. Zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress on the zirconia substructure at 63.6 and 50.9 MPa on the zirconia substructure veneered with porcelain. In conclusion, zirconia/composite crowns withstood high occlusal loads similar to zirconia/porcelain crowns with no significant difference. However, the zirconia/composite crowns showed higher stress values than the zirconia/porcelain crowns at the zirconia substructure.

  16. Fabrication, characterization, and modeling of microvascular composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas J.

    Composite laminates of glass fiber and epoxy pre-preg were fabricated with microvascular channels. The channels were created using polylactic acid (PLA) filament that evaporates at a temperature of 392 °F (200 °C) above the resin cure temperature of 250 °F (121 °C). After the composite is cured, the panel was removed from the oven and allowed to cool to room temperature. The panel is then reheated to 392 °F to vaporize the filament, leaving a cylindrical channel. A microvascular channel can be used for withdrawing heat, damage detection and self-healing. However, increasing the temperatures of the laminate above the cure temperature of the resin causes excess cross linking, potentially decreasing the mechanical properties. Tensile and flexural mechanical tests were performed on composite specimens and tensile tests were performed on neat resin specimens. A three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) was developed to study the progressive deformation and damage mechanics under tensile loading. The load carrying capacity of the microvascular composite was shown to decrease by 40% from a standard composite material. This paper will present the details of the fabrication, characterization and modeling techniques that were used in this study.

  17. VARTM Process Modeling of Aerospace Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Lan; Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional model was developed to simulate the VARTM composite manufacturing process. The model considers the two important mechanisms that occur during the process: resin flow, and compaction and relaxation of the preform. The model was used to simulate infiltration of a carbon preform with an epoxy resin by the VARTM process. The model predicted flow patterns and preform thickness changes agreed qualitatively with the measured values. However, the predicted total infiltration times were much longer than measured most likely due to the inaccurate preform permeability values used in the simulation.

  18. Dark Matter constraints on composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nayara; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich; Lessa, Andre; Lopez-Honorez, Laura

    2015-06-01

    In composite Higgs models the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) nature of the Higgs field is an interesting alternative for explaining the smallness of the electroweak scale with respect to the beyond the Standard Model scale. In non-minimal models additional pNGB states are present and can be a Dark Matter (DM) candidate, if there is an approximate symmetry suppressing their decay. Here we assume that the low energy effective theory (for scales much below the compositeness scale) corresponds to the Standard Model with a pNGB Higgs doublet and a pNGB DM multiplet. We derive general effective DM Lagrangians for several possible DM representations (under the SM gauge group), including the singlet, doublet and triplet cases. Within this framework we discuss how the DM observables (relic abundance, direct and indirect detection) constrain the dimension-6 operators induced by the strong sector assuming that DM behaves as a Weakly Interacting Particle (WIMP) and that the relic abundance is settled through the freeze-out mechanism. We also apply our general results to two specific cosets: SO(6)/SO(5) and SO(6)/SO(4)×SO(2), which contain a singlet and doublet DM candidate, respectively. In particular we show that if compositeness is a solution to the little hierarchy problem, representations larger than the triplet are strongly disfavored. Furthermore, we find that composite models can have viable DM candidates with much smaller direct detection cross-sections than their non-composite counterparts, making DM detection much more challenging.

  19. Comparison of cloud models for Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Ch; Allard, F; Dehn, M; Hauschildt, P; Homeier, D; Lodders, K; Marley, M; Rietmeijer, F; Tsuji, T; Woitke, P

    2007-01-01

    A test case comparison is presented for different dust cloud model approaches applied in brown dwarfs and giant gas planets. We aim to achieve more transparency in evaluating the uncertainty inherent to theoretical modelling. We show in how far model results for characteristic dust quantities vary due to different assumptions. We also demonstrate differences in the spectral energy distributions resulting from our individual cloud modelling in 1D substellar atmosphere simulations

  20. E6 inspired composite Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2015-01-01

    We consider a composite Higgs model embedded into a Grand Unified Theory(GUT) based on the E_6 gauge group. The phenomenological viability of this E_6 inspired composite Higgs model (E6CHM) implies that standard model (SM) elementary fermions with different baryon or lepton number should stem from different 27 representations of E_6. We present a six-dimensional orbifold GUT model in which the E_6 gauge symmetry is broken to the SM gauge group so that the appropriate splitting of the bulk 27-plets takes place. In this model the strongly coupled sector is localised on one of the branes and possesses an SU(6) global symmetry that contains the SU(3)_C\\times SU(2)_W\\times U(1)_Y subgroup. In this case the approximate gauge coupling unification can be attained if the right-handed top quark is a composite state and the elementary sector involves extra exotic matter beyond the SM which ensures anomaly cancellation. The breakdown of the approximate SU(6) symmetry at low energies in this model results in a set of the ...

  1. Modeling the VARTM Composite Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Lan; Loos, Alfred C.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hubert, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive simulation model of the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Modeling (VARTM) composite manufacturing process has been developed. For isothermal resin infiltration, the model incorporates submodels which describe cure of the resin and changes in resin viscosity due to cure, resin flow through the reinforcement preform and distribution medium and compaction of the preform during the infiltration. The accuracy of the model was validated by measuring the flow patterns during resin infiltration of flat preforms. The modeling software was used to evaluate the effects of the distribution medium on resin infiltration of a flat preform. Different distribution medium configurations were examined using the model and the results were compared with data collected during resin infiltration of a carbon fabric preform. The results of the simulations show that the approach used to model the distribution medium can significantly effect the predicted resin infiltration times. Resin infiltration into the preform can be accurately predicted only when the distribution medium is modeled correctly.

  2. Viscous and thermal modelling of thermoplastic composites forming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Eduardo; Liang, Biao; Hamila, Nahiene; Boisse, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Thermoforming thermoplastic prepregs is a fast manufacturing process. It is suitable for automotive composite parts manufacturing. The simulation of thermoplastic prepreg forming is achieved by alternate thermal and mechanical analyses. The thermal properties are obtained from a mesoscopic analysis and a homogenization procedure. The forming simulation is based on a viscous-hyperelastic approach. The thermal simulations define the coefficients of the mechanical model that depend on the temperature. The forming simulations modify the boundary conditions and the internal geometry of the thermal analyses. The comparison of the simulation with an experimental thermoforming of a part representative of automotive applications shows the efficiency of the approach.

  3. Composite Higgs models, Dark Matter and Lambda

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Cruz, J Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    We suggest that dark matter can be identified with a stable composite fermion X^0, that arises within the holographic AdS/CFT models, where the Higgs boson emerges as a composite pseudo-goldstone boson. The predicted properties of X^0 satisfies the cosmological bounds, with m_X = O(TeV). Thus, through a deeper understanding of the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, a resolution of the Dark Matter enigma is found. Furthermore, by proposing a discrete structure of the Higgs vacuum, one can get a distinct approach to the cosmological constant problem.

  4. Composite Failures: A Comparison of Experimental Test Results and Computational Analysis Using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    availability of measurement techniques, experimental testing of composite materials has largely outpaced the computational modeling ability, forcing...Reinforced Composites Finite-Element Method Fracture Mechanics Physics- Based Modeling Extended Finite-Element...7 PHYSICS- BASED MODELING

  5. MCNPX Model/Table Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Hendricks, J S

    2003-01-01

    MCNPX is a Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code extending the capabilities of MCNP4C. As with MCNP, MCNPX uses nuclear data tables to transport neutrons, photons, and electrons. Unlike MCNP, MCNPX also uses (1) nuclear data tables to transport protons; (2) physics models to transport 30 additional particle types (deuterons, tritons, alphas, pions, muons, etc.); and (3) physics models to transport neutrons and protons when no tabular data are available or when the data are above the energy range (20 to 150 MeV) where the data tables end. MCNPX can mix and match data tables and physics models throughout a problem. For example, MCNPX can model neutron transport in a bismuth germinate (BGO) particle detector by using data tables for bismuth and oxygen and using physics models for germanium. Also, MCNPX can model neutron transport in UO sub 2 , making the best use of physics models and data tables: below 20 MeV, data tables are used; above 150 MeV, physics models are used; between 20 and 150 MeV, data t...

  6. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale......-Mandel’s energy principle is used to find macroscopic operators based on micro-mechanical analyses using the finite element method under generalized plane strain condition. A phenomenologically macroscopic model for metal matrix composites is developed based on constitutive operators describing the elastic...... behavior and the trapped free energy in the material, in addition to the plastic behavior in terms of the anisotropic development of the yield surface. It is shown that a generalization of Hill’s anisotropic yield criterion can be used to model the Bauschinger effect, in addition to the pressure and size...

  7. Survey on Services Composition Synthesis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahima Kalil Toure

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current web services development tools are more sophisticated though ease of use, which leverage the creation of more web services thereof. This is the fact that, web services are being created and updated frequently, this multiplication of web services cannot be easily controlled by human being because it is almost impossible to analyze them and generate the composition plan. Composition of web services is the issue of synthesizing a new composite web service, obtained by combining a set of available (component services, when a client request cannot be satisfied by available web services. To address this issue, three main models have been proposed as a solution. The OWL-S model, the Conversational model and the Roman model which is investigated here. In this paper, we propose a survey on the so-called Roman model and present the framework and all its extension. We also underline its drawback, shortcomings and some advantages, and then try to provide some research direction.

  8. Nonextensive local composition models in theories of solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Ernesto P

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic models present binary interaction parameters, based on the Boltzmann weight. Discrepancies from experimental data lead to empirically consider temperature dependence of the parameters, but these modifications keep unchanged the exponential nature of the equations. We replace the Boltzmann weight by the nonextensive Tsallis weight, and generalize three models for nonelectrolyte solutions that use the local composition hypothesis, namely Wilson's, NRTL, and UNIQUAC models. The proposed generalizations present a nonexponential dependence on the temperature, and relies on a theoretical basis of nonextensive statistical mechanics. The $q$-models present one extra binary parameter $q_{ij}$, that recover the original cases in the limit $q_{ij} \\to 1$. Comparison with experimental data is illustrated with two examples of the activity coefficient of ethanol, infinitely diluted in toluene, and in decane.

  9. Body composition in patients with schizophrenia: Comparison with healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara Norio

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a relationship between obesity and schizophrenia has been reported. Although fat- mass and fat free mass have been shown to be more predictive of health risk than body mass index, there are limited findings about body composition among patients suffering from schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to compare the body composition of schizophrenia patients with that of healthy subjects in Japan. Methods We recruited patients (n = 204, aged 41.3 ± 13.8 (mean ± SD years old with the DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia who were admitted to psychiatric hospital using a cross-sectional design. Subjects' anthropometric measurements including weight, height, body mass index (BMI, and medications were also collected. Body fat, percent (% body fat, fat- free mass, muscle mass, and body water were measured using the bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA method. Comparative analysis was performed with schizophrenic subjects and 204 healthy control individuals. Results In a multiple regression model with age, body mass index, and dose in chlorpromazine equivalents, schizophrenia was a significantly linked with more body fat, higher % body fat, lower fat- free mass, lower muscle mass, and lower body water among males. In females, schizophrenia had a significant association with lower % body fat, higher fat- free mass, higher muscle mass, and higher body water. Conclusions Our data demonstrate gender differences with regard to changes in body composition in association with schizophrenia. These results indicate that intervention programs designed to fight obesity among schizophrenic patients should be individualized according to gender.

  10. Comparison between observations and model

    OpenAIRE

    Claußnitzer, Antje

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the development of numerical weather prediction models has shown great progress in the short-term and medium-range forecast of temperature, wind speed or direction and cloud coverage, but only little success in the quantitative precipitation forecast. Rainfall is one of the most difficult forecasting meteorological variable. To improve the numerical models, it is necessary to understand the rainfall processes. This thesis contributes towards an understanding since the precipit...

  11. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio, E-mail: feruglio@pd.infn.it; Paradisi, Paride, E-mail: paride.paradisi@pd.infn.it [Sezione di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ‘G. Galilei’, INFN, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea, E-mail: pattori@physik.uzh.ch [Physik-Institut, Universität Zürich, 8057, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-08

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ→e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis.

  12. Lepton flavour violation in composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' G. Galilei' , Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Pattori, Andrea [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    We discuss in detail the constraints on the partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In the first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sector the mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged leptons, μ → e conversion in nuclei and the electric dipole moment of the electron. In the second part we explicitly compute the Wilson coefficients of the relevant dimension-six operators in the so-called two-site model, embodying the symmetry breaking pattern discussed in our first part, and we compare the results with those of the general spurion analysis. (orig.) 7.

  13. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  14. A topological model of composite preons

    CERN Document Server

    Bilson-Thompson, S O

    2005-01-01

    We present a modification of the preon model proposed independently by Shupe and Harari. A basic dynamics is developed by treating the binding of preons as topological in nature and identifying the substructure of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons with elements of the braid group B_3. Topological considerations and a straightforward set of assumptions lead directly to behaviour consistent with much of the known phenomenology of the Standard Model. The preons of this model may be viewed as composite in nature, and composed of sub-preons, representing exactly two levels of substructure within quarks and leptons.

  15. Standard-model coupling constants from compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Besprosvany, J

    2003-01-01

    A coupling-constant definition is given based on the compositeness property of some particle states with respect to the elementary states of other particles. It is applied in the context of the vector-spin-1/2-particle interaction vertices of a field theory, and the standard model. The definition reproduces Weinberg's angle in a grand-unified theory. One obtains coupling values close to the experimental ones for appropriate configurations of the standard-model vector particles, at the unification scale within grand-unified models, and at the electroweak breaking scale.

  16. Are all Linear Paired Comparison Models Equivalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Previous authors (Jackson and Fleckenstein 1957, Mosteller 1958, Noether 1960) have found that different models of paired comparisons data lead to simi...ponential distribution with a location parameter (Mosteller 1958, Noether 1960). Formal statements describing the limiting behavior of the gamma...that are not convolu- tion type linear models (the uniform model considered by Smith (1956), Mosteller (1958), Noether (1960)) and other convolution

  17. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  18. Bayesian Model comparison of Higgs couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstrom, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) to the Higgs couplings, in the light of the LHC data. The work is performed within an interim framework where the magnitude of the Higgs production and decay rates are rescaled though Higgs coupling scale factors. We perform Bayesian parameter inference on these scale factors, concluding that there is good compatibility with the SM. Furthermore, we carry out Bayesian model comparison on all models where any combination of scale factors can differ from their SM values and find that typically models with fewer free couplings are strongly favoured. We consider the evidence that each coupling individually equals the SM value, making the minimal assumptions on the other couplings. Finally, we make a comparison of the SM against a single "not-SM" model, and find that there is moderate to strong evidence for the SM.

  19. Spectrophotometric comparison of translucent composites and natural enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Xu, B T; Li, R; Wang, Y N

    2010-01-01

    To compare the optical characters of four translucent composites and natural enamel. Thirty natural enamel slabs and 120 composite replicas (n=30) using four brands of translucent composites (Polofil Supra, Brilliant Esthetic, Gradia Direct, and Vit-l-escence) were evaluated at the thicknesses of 1.0mm and 0.8mm. The colors of the enamel slabs or corresponding composite specimens placed on an A3 shade, white and black backgrounds were measured using a spectrophotometer. Color differences (ΔE*) of the enamel-composite pairs and translucency parameter (TP) of each specimen were calculated. Reflection spectrums were recorded in the wavelength from 380nm to 780nm. Paired-t tests were performed to evaluate the differences of color coordinates (L*, a*, and b*) and TP values between the translucent composites and natural enamel. There were significant differences of color coordinates (L*, a*, and b*) between the enamel and translucent composites (Pcomposite pairs with Polofil Supra and Brilliant Esthetic composites. The main peaks of the reflectance spectrums of the enamel are different from the four brands of the translucent composites. A reddish shifting of the main reflection peaks was observed, while the thickness of the composite specimens decreasing from 1.0mm to 0.8mm. Whereas, the main reflection peak was not changed in the teeth enamel. The color and the translucency of translucent composites are different from the teeth enamel. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Micromechanical models for graded composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, T; Dvorak, G.J.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1997-01-01

    Elastic response of selected plane-array models of graded composite microstructures is examined under both uniform and linearly varying boundary tractions and displacements, by means of detailed finite element studies of large domains containing up to several thousand inclusions. Models consisting...... fields are predicted by Mori-Tanaka estimates. On the other hand, the response of graded materials with a skeletal microstructure in a wide transition zone between clearly defined matrix phases is better approximated by the self-consistent estimates. Certain exceptions are noted for loading by overall...

  1. Laminated composites modeling in ADAGIO/PRESTO.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerand, Daniel Carl

    2004-05-01

    A linear elastic constitutive equation for modeling fiber-reinforced laminated composites via shell elements is specified. The effects of transverse shear are included using first-order shear deformation theory. The proposed model is written in a rate form for numerical evaluation in the Sandia quasi-statics code ADAGIO and explicit dynamics code PRESTO. The equation for the critical time step needed for explicit dynamics is listed assuming that a flat bilinear Mindlin shell element is used in the finite element representation. Details of the finite element implementation and usage are given. Finally, some of the verification examples that have been included in the ADAGIO regression test suite are presented.

  2. Flux balance analysis of plant metabolism: the effect of biomass composition and model structure on model predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili eYuan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The biomass composition represented in constraint-based metabolic models is a key component for predicting cellular metabolism using flux balance analysis (FBA. Despite major advances in analytical technologies, it is often challenging to obtain a detailed composition of all major biomass components experimentally. Studies examining the influence of the biomass composition on the predictions of metabolic models have so far mostly been done on models of microorganisms. Little is known about the impact of varying biomass composition on flux prediction in FBA models of plants, whose metabolism is very versatile and complex because of the presence of multiple subcellular compartments. Also, the published metabolic models of plants differ in size and complexity. In this study, we examined the sensitivity of the predicted fluxes of plant metabolic models to biomass composition and model structure. These questions were addressed by evaluating the sensitivity of predictions of growth rates and central carbon metabolic fluxes to varying biomass compositions in three different genome-/large-scale metabolic models of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results showed that fluxes through the central carbon metabolism were robust to changes in biomass composition. Nevertheless, comparisons between the predictions from three models using identical modelling constraints and objective function showed that model predictions were sensitive to the structure of the models, highlighting large discrepancies between the published models.

  3. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warpinski, N.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abou-Sayed, I.S. [Mobil Exploration and Production Services (United States); Moschovidis, Z. [Amoco Production Co. (US); Parker, C. [CONOCO (US)

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  4. A Comparison of Different Machine Transliteration Models

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, K; Oh, J; 10.1613/jair.1999

    2011-01-01

    Machine transliteration is a method for automatically converting words in one language into phonetically equivalent ones in another language. Machine transliteration plays an important role in natural language applications such as information retrieval and machine translation, especially for handling proper nouns and technical terms. Four machine transliteration models -- grapheme-based transliteration model, phoneme-based transliteration model, hybrid transliteration model, and correspondence-based transliteration model -- have been proposed by several researchers. To date, however, there has been little research on a framework in which multiple transliteration models can operate simultaneously. Furthermore, there has been no comparison of the four models within the same framework and using the same data. We addressed these problems by 1) modeling the four models within the same framework, 2) comparing them under the same conditions, and 3) developing a way to improve machine transliteration through this com...

  5. Comparison of Present SST Gravity Field Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Jia; SHI Chuang; ZOU Xiancai; WANG Haihong

    2006-01-01

    Taking the main land of Europe as the region to be studied, the potential of the new satellite gravity technique: satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) and improving the accuracy of regional gravity field model with the SST models are investigated. The drawbacks of these models are discussed. With GPM98C as the reference, the gravity anomaly residuals of several other models, the latest SST global gravity field models (EIGEN series and GGM series), were computed and compared. The results of the comparison show that in the selected region, some systematic errors with periodical properties exist in the EIGEN and GGM's S series models in the high degree and order. Some information that was not shown in the classic gravity models is detected in the low and middle degree and order of EIGEN and GGM's S series models. At last, the effective maximum degrees and orders of SST models are suggested.

  6. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  7. Dynamic fiber debonding and push-out in model composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaopeng

    2003-10-01

    When a crack propagates in a fiber-reinforced composite material, a substantial part of energy is dissipated in the debonding and sliding of the bridging fibers located behind the advancing crack front. Because of the important effect they have on the fracture toughness of a composite, these processes have been the subject of extensive experimental, analytical and numerical work. However, the vast majority of existing work on this topic has been limited to quasi-static loading situations. The few investigations performed on various composite systems involving higher loading rates seem to indicate that the fiber sliding process presents some unusual and sometimes contradictory rate-dependent characteristics. To enhance the current understanding of dynamic fiber debonding and push-out in model fiber-reinforced composites, a combined experimental and numerical investigation was carried out. A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used to perform high-rate fiber push-out experiments on an aluminum/epoxy model composite system. An axisymmetric cohesive/volumetric finite element scheme was developed to simulate the push-out process. Effects of several important parameters such as interfacial strength, interfacial fracture toughness and fiber/matrix friction coefficient were investigated. Interface cohesive properties were extracted by comparison between experimental and numerical results. The comparison between numerics and experiments was made as close as possible by (a) simulating the entire experimental apparatus; (b) using loading directly measured in the experiments as input to the finite element analysis (FEA) code; (c) using measured material properties in the FEA simulations; and (d) accounting for effects such as large deformations, residual stresses (through a quasi-static pre-loading scheme), spontaneous crack formation (through a cohesive failure formulation) and dynamic frictional sliding. Details of the physical process were discussed by numerically

  8. Dark Matter Constraints on Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Nayara; Lessa, Andre; Lopez-Honorez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In composite Higgs models the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) nature of the Higgs field is an interesting alternative for explaning the smallness of the electroweak scale with respect to the beyond the Standard Model scale. In non-minimal models additional pNGB states are present and can be a Dark Matter (DM) candidate, if there is an approximate symmetry suppressing their decay. Here we assume that the low energy effective theory (for scales much below the compositeness scale) corresponds to the Standard Model with a pNGB Higgs doublet and a pNGB DM multiplet. We derive general effective DM Lagrangians for several possible DM representations (under the SM gauge group), including the singlet, doublet and triplet cases. Within this framework we discuss how the DM observables (relic abundance, direct and indirect detection) constrain the dimension-6 operators induced by the strong sector assuming that DM behaves as a Weakly Interacting Particle (WIMP) and that the relic abundance is settled through the free...

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fracture Behaviour for Random Short Wood Fibres Reinforced Composites, Comparison with Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, M.; Touchard, F.; Bezine, G.; Brillaud, J.

    2010-06-01

    The work is to predict fracture behaviour of bio-composites from the tensile properties of its components. In this work, we have realized a direct numerical simulation of fracture behaviour for random short spruce fibers reinforced composites. For calculations, wood fibers have been considered as linear elastic bodies, polypropylene matrix as an elastic-plastic material. Then, numerical results have been compared with experimental results that have been obtained by digital image correlation. This comparison indicates that random fiber FE model of random short spruce fibers reinforced composites can be able to fairly reflect the influence of random fibers microstructure in the composite on its fracture behavior. The calculation of both random fiber and homogeneous FE model and their comparison with experiments show that the average values of J-integral in a region in the front of the crack tip from both numerical FE models are in good agreement with the average J value of DIC experiment in the same region when the numerical and experimental CT specimens of the short spruce fiber reinforced composite are subjected to the same extension at their loading point.

  10. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fracture Behaviour for Random Short Wood Fibres Reinforced Composites, Comparison with Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brillaud J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is to predict fracture behaviour of bio-composites from the tensile properties of its components. In this work, we have realized a direct numerical simulation of fracture behaviour for random short spruce fibers reinforced composites. For calculations, wood fibers have been considered as linear elastic bodies, polypropylene matrix as an elastic-plastic material. Then, numerical results have been compared with experimental results that have been obtained by digital image correlation. This comparison indicates that random fiber FE model of random short spruce fibers reinforced composites can be able to fairly reflect the influence of random fibers microstructure in the composite on its fracture behavior. The calculation of both random fiber and homogeneous FE model and their comparison with experiments show that the average values of J-integral in a region in the front of the crack tip from both numerical FE models are in good agreement with the average J value of DIC experiment in the same region when the numerical and experimental CT specimens of the short spruce fiber reinforced composite are subjected to the same extension at their loading point.

  11. Combustion response modeling for composite solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A computerized mathematical model of the combustion response function of composite solid propellants was developed with particular attention to the contributions of the solid phase heterogeneity. The one-dimensional model treats the solid phase as alternating layers of ammonium perchlorate and binder, with an exothermic melt layer at the surface. Solution of the Fourier heat equation in the solid provides temperature and heat flux distributions with space and time. The problem is solved by conserving the heat flux at the surface from that produced by a suitable model of the gas phase. An approximation of the BDP flame model is utilized to represent the gas phase. By the use of several reasonable assumptions, it is found that a significant portion of the problem can be solved in closed form. A method is presented by which the model can be applied to tetramodal particle size distributions. A computerized steady-state version of the model was completed, which served to validate the various approximations and lay a foundation for the combustion response modeling. The combustion response modeling was completed in a form which does not require an iterative solution, and some preliminary results were acquired.

  12. Modeling of 3D Woven Composites Containing Multiple Delaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    researchers 3D woven composites shows better damage tolerance than laminated textile composites without z-yarns such as plain woven composites even...modeling of quasi-static short beam shear test of plain woven laminated composites. Cohesive elements were used in regions where transverse cracks and...Title ABSTRACT In this paper we present FE modeling of quasi-static short beam shear test of plain woven laminated composites. Cohesive elements were

  13. Software Testing Method Based on Model Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiao-dong; LU Yan-sheng; MAO Cheng-yin

    2008-01-01

    A model comparison based software testing method (MCST) is proposed. In this method, the requirements and programs of software under test are transformed into the ones in the same form, and described by the same model describe language (MDL).Then, the requirements are transformed into a specification model and the programs into an implementation model. Thus, the elements and structures of the two models are compared, and the differences between them are obtained. Based on the diffrences, a test suite is generated. Different MDLs can be chosen for the software under test. The usages of two classical MDLs in MCST, the equivalence classes model and the extended finite state machine (EFSM) model, are described with example applications. The results show that the test suites generated by MCST are more efficient and smaller than some other testing methods, such as the path-coverage testing method, the object state diagram testing method, etc.

  14. Modeling creep behavior of fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. L.; Sun, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    A micromechanical model for the creep behavior of fiber composites is developed based on a typical cell consisting of a fiber and the surrounding matrix. The fiber is assumed to be linearly elastic and the matrix nonlinearly viscous. The creep strain rate in the matrix is assumed to be a function of stress. The nominal stress-strain relations are derived in the form of differential equations which are solved numerically for off-axis specimens under uniaxial loading. A potential function and the associated effective stress and effective creep strain rates are introduced to simplify the orthotropic relations.

  15. Variational asymptotic modeling of composite dimensionally reducible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbin

    A general framework to construct accurate reduced models for composite dimensionally reducible structures (beams, plates and shells) was formulated based on two theoretical foundations: decomposition of the rotation tensor and the variational asymptotic method. Two engineering software systems, Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional Analysis (VABS, new version) and Variational Asymptotic Plate and Shell Analysis (VAPAS), were developed. Several restrictions found in previous work on beam modeling were removed in the present effort. A general formulation of Timoshenko-like cross-sectional analysis was developed, through which the shear center coordinates and a consistent Vlasov model can be obtained. Recovery relations are given to recover the asymptotic approximations for the three-dimensional field variables. A new version of VABS has been developed, which is a much improved program in comparison to the old one. Numerous examples are given for validation. A Reissner-like model being as asymptotically correct as possible was obtained for composite plates and shells. After formulating the three-dimensional elasticity problem in intrinsic form, the variational asymptotic method was used to systematically reduce the dimensionality of the problem by taking advantage of the smallness of the thickness. The through-the-thickness analysis is solved by a one-dimensional finite element method to provide the stiffnesses as input for the two-dimensional nonlinear plate or shell analysis as well as recovery relations to approximately express the three-dimensional results. The known fact that there exists more than one theory that is asymptotically correct to a given order is adopted to cast the refined energy into a Reissner-like form. A two-dimensional nonlinear shell theory consistent with the present modeling process was developed. The engineering computer code VAPAS was developed and inserted into DYMORE to provide an efficient and accurate analysis of composite plates and

  16. Water Diffusion Modelling of CFB Fly Ash Thermoset Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villa Ralph P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The shift in coal-fired power plants from pulverized coal (PC boiler technology into the greener circulating fluidized bed (CFB boiler technology resulted into a major deviation in the properties of the waste fly ash generated making it less suitable for its previous application as additives for construction materials. A new market for CFB fly ash had to be found for it not to end up as a zero value by-product. Using CFB fly ash as filler for thermoset composites is a new and remarkable application. Only a few studies, however, have been done to characterize the properties of this new material. Further experimentation and analysis may be costly and time-consuming since common procedures are material destructive. A computer-aided modeling of the composite’s water sorption behavior was done. The effect of particle loading, size and shape were considered. These properties were varied and the resulting overall diffusivities were compared to previous experimental studies. The comparison of the model and experimental diffusivity values showed satisfactory results. This model may then provide a cheaper and more time-efficient method for the characterization of the water sorption properties of CFB fly ash thermoset composites. In the future, this may lead to further studies on its application as a green material.

  17. Bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of short fiber-reinforced resin composite in comparison with other composite restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) and surface free-energy (SFE) of short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC), using different adhesive systems, in comparison with other composite restoratives. The resin composites used were everX Posterior (EP), Clearfil AP-X (CA), and Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal Restorative (FS). The adhesive systems used were Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SM), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), and G-Premio Bond (GB). Resin composite was bonded to dentin, and SBS was determined after 24 h of storage in distilled water and after 10,000 thermal cycles (TCs). The SFEs of the resin composites and the adhesives were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids. The SFE values and SFE characteristics were not influenced by the type of resin composite, but were influenced by the type of adhesive system. The results of this study suggest that the bonding performance and interfacial characteristics of SFRC are the same as for other composite restoratives, but that these parameters are affected by the type of adhesive system. The bonding performance of SFRC was enhanced by thermal cycling in a manner similar to that for other composite restoratives.

  18. GCSS Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, David OC.; Benedetti, Angela; Boehm, Matt; Brown, Philip R. A.; Gierens, Klaus; Girard, Eric; Giraud, Vincent; Jakob, Christian; Jensen, Eric; Khvorostyanov, Vitaly; hide

    2000-01-01

    The GCSS Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (WG2) is conducting a systematic comparison and evaluation of cirrus cloud models. This fundamental activity seeks to support the improvement of models used for climate simulation and numerical weather prediction through assessment and improvement of the "process" models underlying parametric treatments of cirrus cloud processes in large-scale models. The WG2 Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project is an initial comparison of cirrus cloud simulations by a variety of cloud models for a series of idealized situations with relatively simple initial conditions and forcing. The models (16) represent the state-of-the-art and include 3-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) models, two-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs), and single column model (SCM) versions of GCMs. The model microphysical components are similarly varied, ranging from single-moment bulk (relative humidity) schemes to fully size-resolved (bin) treatments where ice crystal growth is explicitly calculated. Radiative processes are included in the physics package of each model. The baseline simulations include "warm" and "cold" cirrus cases where cloud top initially occurs at about -47C and -66C, respectively. All simulations are for nighttime conditions (no solar radiation) where the cloud is generated in an ice supersaturated layer, about 1 km in depth, with an ice pseudoadiabatic thermal stratification (neutral). Continuing cloud formation is forced via an imposed diabatic cooling representing a 3 cm/s uplift over a 4-hour time span followed by a 2-hour dissipation stage with no cooling. Variations of these baseline cases include no-radiation and stable-thermal-stratification cases. Preliminary results indicated the great importance of ice crystal fallout in determining even the gross cloud characteristics, such as average vertically-integrated ice water path (IWP). Significant inter-model differences were found. Ice water fall speed is directly

  19. Electromechanical modelling of tapered ionic polymer metal composites transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesha Chandra Dash

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs are relatively new smart materials that exhibit a bidirectional electromechanical coupling. IPMCs have large number of important engineering applications such as micro robotics, biomedical devices, biomimetic robotics etc. This paper presents a comparison between tapered and uniform cantilevered Nafion based IPMCs transducer. Electromechanical modelling is done for the tapered beam. Thickness can be varied according to the requirement of force and deflection. Numerical results pertaining to the force and deflection characteristics of both type IPMCs transducer are obtained. It is shown that the desired amount of force and deflections for tapered IPMCs can be achieved for a given voltage. Different fixed end (t0 and free end (t1 thickness values have been taken to justify the results using MATLAB.

  20. Models of electromagnetic properties of composite media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin

    Electromagnetic composite materials have attracted much interest in recent years, due to their desirable microwave and optical applications. One class of these is negative refractive index materials, or double negative materials, in which both permittivity and permeability of materials are simultaneously negative. Many exciting potential applications of double negative materials have been proposed, such as the perfect lens and the cloaking device. Here, a simple-cubic lattice of identical, homogeneous or coated non-metallic spherical particles embedded in a matrix is analyzed. One contribution of this work is the derivation of an analytical formula for the threshold dielectric loss angle of spherical inclusions, above which DNG behavior of the system is extinguished. In addition, analytical formulas are derived from which double negative bandwidth of a simple-cubic lattice of identical, magnetodielectric homogeneous or coated spheres can be determined. Another case of interest is nanocomposites, which commonly consist of nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix. These materials show superior dielectric or mechanical performance by taking advantage of the merits of their individual non-hybrid components. In one manifestation, diblock copolymers can be utilized to spatially separate nanoparticles by incorporating them in one block, preferentially, to form a long-range ordered structure. By designing this structure, the electromagnetic properties can be tailored for potential applications in novel devices. Here, molecular dynamics of polymer matrices and nanocomposites is analyzed by parametric modeling of their dielectric spectra, supporting design of a composite with desired electromagnetic properties.

  1. Modal characterization of composite flat plate models using piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, É. L.; Maia, N. M. M.; Marto, A. G.; da Silva, R. G. A.; Afonso, F. J.; Suleman, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to estimate the modal parameters of composite flat plate models through Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) using piezoelectric transducers. The flat plates are composed of three ply carbon-epoxy fibers oriented in the same direction. Five specimens with different unidirectional fiber nominal orientations θk (0o, 30o, 45o, 60o and 90o) were tested. These models were instrumented with one PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) actuator and one PVDF (Polyvinylidene Fluoride) sensor and an EMA was performed. The natural frequencies and damping factors estimated using only a single PVDF response were compared with the estimated results using twelve measurement points acquired by laser doppler vibrometry. For comparison purposes, the percentage error of each natural frequency estimation and the percentage error of the damping factor estimations were computed, as well as their averages. Even though the comparison was made between a SISO (Single-Input, Single-Output) and a SIMO (Single-Input, Multiple-Output) techniques, both results are very close. The vibration modes were estimated by means of laser measurements and were used in the modal validation. In order to verify the accuracy of the modal parameters, the Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) was employed and a high correlation among mode shapes was observed.

  2. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite with different flowable composites to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Erkmen Almaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable resin composite with different flowable composites to dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 extracted teeth were divided randomly into four groups, and dentin surfaces were exposed. Following materials were applied to dentin surfaces; Group I: VF (self-adhering flowable composite, Group II: CSE Bond (two-step self-etch adhesive + CMF (conventional flowable composite, Group III: AB SE (one-step self-etch adhesive + AF (conventional flowable composite, Group IV: AEO (one-step self-etch adhesive + FUF (conventional flowable composite. The specimens were subjected to shear loading using a universal testing machine. The type of failure was detected with an illuminated microscope. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparison test were used to determine statistical significance differences between groups. Results: Mean shear bond strength values were ranked as follows; Group II > Group IV > Group III > Group I. Statistically significant differences were found among all groups (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Group I; the self-adhering flowable resin composite had the lowest shear bond strength values while Group II; showed the highest shear bond strength among the materials tested.

  3. Multilevel modelling of mechanical properties of textile composites: ITOOL Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broucke, Bjorn; Drechsler, Klaus; Hanisch, Vera; Hartung, Daniel; Ivanov, Dimitry S.; Koissin, Vitaly E.; Lomov, Stepan V.; Middendorf, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the multi-level modelling of textile composites in the ITOOL project, focusing on the models of textile reinforcements, which serve as a basis for micromechanical models of textile composites on the unit cell level. The modelling is performed using finite element an

  4. Top Partners Searches and Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Wulzer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  5. Top partners searches and composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii; Panico, Giuliano; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  6. Top partner searches and Composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsedonskyi, Oleksii [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Panico, Giuliano [Barcelona Univ. Autonoma (Spain). IFAE; Wulyer, Andrea [Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomia; INFN, Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Colored fermionic partners of the top quark are well-known signatures of the Composite Higgs scenario and for this reason they have been and will be subject of an intensive experimental study at the LHC. Performing an assessment of the theoretical implications of this experimental effort is the goal of the present paper. We proceed by analyzing a set of simple benchmark models, characterized by simple two-dimensional parameter spaces where the results of the searches are conveniently visualized and their impact quantified. We only draw exclusion contours, in the hypothesis of no signal, but of course our formalism could equally well be used to report discoveries in a theoretically useful format.

  7. Comparison of breast milk composition among lactating women in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broka Līga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although benefits of breast-feeding have been known for a long time and breast milk is considered as ideal nutrition for infants, the composition of breast milk is still being studied, since breast milk differs among mothers and populations, as well as during different times of lactation. Further, no study has been performed among lactating women in Latvia during recent years. The objective of the study was to determine the breast milk composition and influencing factors among lactating women in Latvia in different lactation periods, as well as to compare the results with data from other countries. Fifty breast milk samples were obtained from 44 mothers (on the 5th-7th and 11th-28th day of lactation, whose neonates were treated in the Neonatal Care Unit, Children’s Clinical University Hospital, Rīga. Milk analysis (pH, density, protein, fat, and lactose concentration was performed in the Latvia University of Agriculture. Breast milk composition among lactating women in Latvia on the 5th-7th lactation day more resembled transitional milk containing a higher amount of protein and a lower amount of fat. The composition of the studied milk samples on the 11th-28th lactation day was comparable to data from other countries. Concentration of lactose was correlated with neonatal weight and not gestational age.

  8. The Educational Composition of the Labour Force: An International Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psacharopoulos, George; Arriagada, Ana Maria

    1986-01-01

    Argues that although the school enrollment ratio among countries is an available statistic, it may not be the most important indicator for setting investment priorities in education. Offers statistics on the educational composition of the labor force as a more sensitive human capital index. (JOW)

  9. Dental composite polymerization: a three different sources comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, Michele; Fornaini, Carlo; Lagori, Giuseppe; Merigo, Elisabetta; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Vescovi, Paolo; Selleri, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of photo-activators, with absorption spectra in the violet region, in composite resins raised interest in the use of 405 nm diode lasers for polymerization. The purpose of this research is the evaluation of the resins polymerization by means of violet diode laser compared to traditional lamps. Two different resins have been used for the experiments: Filtek Supreme XT flow (3M ESPE, USA) and Tetric Evo flow (Ivoclar, Vivadent). The photo-activator used is Camphoroquinone, alone, or in combination with Lucirin TPO. The resins have been cured with an halogen lamp (Heliolux DXL, Vivadent Ivoclar, Austria), a broadband LED curing light (Valo Ultradent, USA) and a 405 nm laser (Euphoton, Italy). The measure of cure depth, of the volumetric shrinkage, and the conversion degree (DC%) of the double bond during the curing process have been evaluated. A composite layer of 3 mm was cured in Filtek Supreme resin (Camphoroquinone activator), lower if compared to the use of the other two light sources. Tests on Tetric Evo (Camphoroquinone + Lucirin) didn't show any improvement of the use of laser compared to the halogen lamp and the broadband LED. By measuring the volumetric shrinkage the laser induced the lower change with both the composites. In terms of DC% the lower performance was obtained with the laser. Considering that the polymerization process strongly depends on the kind of composite used the effectiveness of 405 nm laser proved to be lower than halogen lamps and broadband LEDs.

  10. Zen & the Art of Composition: A Comparison of Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitt, Philip Jay

    A perceived relationship between the teaching methods of traditional Zen Buddhism and those of process-based English composition is explored. It is noted that the four main processes of Zen teaching (meditation, physical work, personal interviews, and group lectures) focus on process, not product, as in process writing. Characteristics that Zen…

  11. Abaca fibre reinforced PP composites and comparison with jute and flax fibre PP composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abaca fibre reinforced PP composites were fabricated with different fibre loadings (20, 30, 40, 50wt% and in some cases 35 and 45 wt%. Flax and jute fibre reinforced PP composites were also fabricated with 30 wt% fibre loading. The mechanical properties, odour emission and structure properties were investigated for those composites. Tensile, flexural and Charpy impact strengths were found to increase for fibre loadings up to 40 wt% and then decreased. Falling weight impact tests were also carried out and the same tendency was observed. Owing to the addition of coupling agent (maleated polypropylene -MAH-PP, the tensile, flexural and falling weight impact properties were found to increase in between 30 to 80% for different fibre loadings. When comparing jute and flax fibre composites with abaca fibre composites, jute fibre composites provided best tensile properties but abaca fibre polypropylene composites were shown to provide best notch Charpy and falling weight impact properties. Odours released by flax fibre composites were smaller than jute and abaca fibre composites.

  12. Challenges for models with composite states

    CERN Document Server

    Cline, James M; Moore, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    Composite states of electrically charged and QCD-colored hyperquarks (HQs) in a confining SU(N_HC) hypercolor gauge sector are a plausible extension of the standard model at the TeV scale, and have been widely considered as an explanation for the tentative LHC diphoton excess. Additional new physics is required to avoid a stable charged hyperbaryon in such theories. We classify renormalizable models allowing the decay of this unwanted relic directly into standard model states, showing that they are significantly restricted if the new scalar states needed for UV completion are at the TeV scale. Alternatively, if hyperbaryon number is conserved, the charged relic can decay into a neutral hyperbaryon. Such theories are strongly constrained by direct detection, if the neutral constituent hyperquark carries color or weak isospin, and by LHC searches for leptoquarks if it is a color singlet. We show that the neutral hyperbaryon can have the observed relic abundance if the confinement scale and the hyperquark mass a...

  13. Challenges for models with composite states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, James M.; Huang, Weicong; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-09-01

    Composite states of electrically charged and QCD-colored hyperquarks (HQs) in a confining SU (NHC) hypercolor gauge sector are a plausible extension of the standard model at the TeV scale and have been widely considered as an explanation for the tentative LHC diphoton excess. Additional new physics is required to avoid a stable charged hyperbaryon in such theories. We classify renormalizable models allowing the decay of this unwanted relic directly into standard model states, showing that they are significantly restricted if the new scalar states needed for UV completion are at the TeV scale. Alternatively, if hyperbaryon number is conserved, the charged relic can decay into a neutral hyperbaryon. Such theories are strongly constrained by direct detection, if the neutral constituent hyperquark carries color or weak isospin, and by LHC searches for leptoquarks if it is a color singlet. We show that the neutral hyperbaryon can have the observed relic abundance if the confinement scale and the hyperquark mass are above TeV scale, even in the absence of any hyperbaryon asymmetry.

  14. Comparison of Photovoltaic Models in the System Advisor Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, N. J.; Dobos, A. P.; Gilman, P.

    2013-08-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is free software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for predicting the performance of renewable energy systems and analyzing the financial feasibility of residential, commercial, and utility-scale grid-connected projects. SAM offers several options for predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems. The model requires that the analyst choose from three PV system models, and depending on that choice, possibly choose from three module and two inverter component models. To obtain meaningful results from SAM, the analyst must be aware of the differences between the model options and their applicability to different modeling scenarios. This paper presents an overview the different PV model options and presents a comparison of results for a 200-kW system using different model options.

  15. Comparison of Spatiotemporal Fusion Models: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously capturing spatial and temporal dynamics is always a challenge for the remote sensing community. Spatiotemporal fusion has gained wide interest in various applications for its superiority in integrating both fine spatial resolution and frequent temporal coverage. Though many advances have been made in spatiotemporal fusion model development and applications in the past decade, a unified comparison among existing fusion models is still limited. In this research, we classify the models into three categories: transformation-based, reconstruction-based, and learning-based models. The objective of this study is to (i compare four fusion models (STARFM, ESTARFM, ISTAFM, and SPSTFM under a one Landsat-MODIS (L-M pair prediction mode and two L-M pair prediction mode using time-series datasets from the Coleambally irrigation area and Poyang Lake wetland; (ii quantitatively assess prediction accuracy considering spatiotemporal comparability, landscape heterogeneity, and model parameter selection; and (iii discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the three categories of spatiotemporal fusion models.

  16. COMPARISON OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DATE PALM FIBER- POLYETHYLENE COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mahdavi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Date Palm Fiber (DPF is one of the most available natural fibers in the Middle East, especially in Iran and the Persian Gulf region. This research provides a new insight into DPF, with consideration of morphological, chemical characteristics, and bulk density, as well as morphological and mechanical properties of DPF/HDPE wood plastic composite. There are three parts of date palm that are used for producing fiber, the trunk, rachis, and petiole. Results indicated that there is significant difference between trunk and petiole on fiber length but rachis has no significant differences relative to the other parts. The aspect ratios have significant differences among of three parts, with the highest and lowest values measured for the petiole and trunk, respectively. The chemical composition of various parts of the date palm tree differed significantly; with the highest amounts of cellulose and lignin content belong to rachis. Bulk density was measured for three parts of date palm, and the lowest amount was 0.082 g/cm3. The highest strengths were achieved in composites with 30 and 40% fiber content, depended on which original parts of the tree were used.

  17. Scalar-Composite Model in 6 - 2\\epsilon Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Akama, K; Akama, Keiichi; Hattori, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    We study the model of a composite-scalar made of a pair of scalar fields in 6-2 epsilon dimensions, using equivalence to the renormalizable three-elementary-scalar model under the "compositeness condition." In this model, the composite-scalar field is induced by the quantum effects through the vacuum polarization of elementary-scalar fields with 2N species. We first investigate scale dependences of the coupling constant and masses, in the renormalizable three-elementary-scalar model, and derive the results for the composite model by imposing the compositeness condition. The model exhibits the formerly found general property that the coupling constant of the composite field is independent of the scale.

  18. Model Lung Surfactant Films: Why Composition Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selladurai, Sahana L.; Miclette Lamarche, Renaud; Schmidt, Rolf; DeWolf, Christine E.

    2016-10-18

    Lung surfactant replacement therapies, Survanta and Infasurf, and two lipid-only systems both containing saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and one containing additional palmitic acid were used to study the impact of buffered saline on the surface activity, morphology, rheology, and structure of Langmuir monolayer model membranes. Isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy show that buffered saline subphases induce a film expansion, except when the cationic protein, SP-B, is present in sufficient quantities to already screen electrostatic repulsion, thus limiting the effect of changing pH and adding counterions. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate an expansion not only of the liquid expanded phase but also an expansion of the lattice of the condensed phase. The film expansion corresponded in all cases with a significant reduction in the viscosity and elasticity of the films. The viscoelastic parameters are dominated by liquid expanded phase properties and do not appear to be dependent on the structure of the condensed phase domains in a phase separated film. The results highlight that the choice of subphase and film composition is important for meaningful interpretations of measurements using model systems.

  19. Modelling compression sensing in ionic polymer metal composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpini, Valentina; Bardella, Lorenzo; Rodella, Andrea; Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2017-03-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) consist of an ionomeric membrane, including mobile counterions, sandwiched between two thin noble metal electrodes. IPMCs find application as sensors and actuators, where an imposed mechanical loading generates a voltage across the electrodes, and, vice versa, an imposed electric field causes deformation. Here, we present a predictive modelling approach to elucidate the dynamic sensing response of IPMCs subject to a time-varying through-the-thickness compression (‘compression sensing’). The model relies on the continuum theory recently developed by Porfiri and co-workers, which couples finite deformations to the modified Poisson–Nernst–Planck (PNP) system governing the IPMC electrochemistry. For the ‘compression sensing’ problem we establish a perturbative closed-form solution along with a finite element (FE) solution. The systematic comparison between these two solutions is a central contribution of this study, offering insight on accuracy and mathematical complexity. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is employed to find the analytical solution. To this end, we uncouple the force balance from the modified PNP system and separately linearise the PNP equations in the ionomer bulk and in the boundary layers at the ionomer–electrode interfaces. Comparison with FE results for the fully coupled nonlinear system demonstrates the accuracy of the analytical solution to describe IPMC sensing for moderate deformation levels. We finally demonstrate the potential of the modelling scheme to accurately reproduce experimental results from the literature. The proposed model is expected to aid in the design of IPMC sensors, contribute to an improved understanding of IPMC electrochemomechanical response, and offer insight into the role of nonlinear phenomena across mechanics and electrochemistry.

  20. A supersymmetric composite model of quarks and leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luty, Markus A.; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    1997-02-01

    We present a class of supersymmetric models with complete generations of composite quarks and leptons using recent non-perturbative results for the low energy dynamics of supersymmetric QCD. In these models, the quarks arise as composite ``mesons'' and the leptons emerge as composite ``baryons''. The quark and lepton flavor symmetries are linked at the preon level. Baryon number violation is automatically suppressed by accidental symmetries. We give some speculations on how this model might be made realistic.

  1. Multiscale Modeling of Graphite/CNT/Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0154 Multiscale Modeling of Graphite/CNT/Epoxy Hybrid Composites Gregory Odegard MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY Final Report...SUBTITLE Multiscale Modeling of Graphite/CNT/Epoxy Hybrid Composites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0030 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. Final Report Multiscale Modeling of Graphite/CNT/Epoxy Hybrid Composites Grant FA9550-13-1-0030 PI

  2. Women's and Men's Career Referents: How Gender Composition and Comparison Level Shape Career Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Donald E. Gibson; Lawerence, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how women’s and men’s career referents, the people they see as having similar careers, affect career expectations. We raise two questions. First, what is the relative effect of the gender composition and comparison level of career referents on such expectations? Second, what happens to career expectations when women and men identify career referents at the same comparison level? Current research suggests that women have lower career expectations than men because they compa...

  3. ACOUSTIC EMISSION MODEL WITH THERMOACTIVATIVE DESTRUCTION OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Filonenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of acoustic emission energy during the composite material machining for termoactivativemodel of acoustic radiation is simulated. The regularities of resultant signals energy parameters change dependingon composite materials machining speed are determined. Obtained regularities with their statistical characteristicsare described. Sensitivity of acoustic emission energy parameters to the change of composite material machiningspeed is shown.

  4. School Processes Mediate School Compositional Effects: Model Specification and Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongqiang; Van Damme, Jan; Gielen, Sarah; Van Den Noortgate, Wim

    2015-01-01

    School composition effects have been consistently verified, but few studies ever attempted to study how school composition affects school achievement. Based on prior research findings, we employed multilevel mediation modeling to examine whether school processes mediate the effect of school composition upon school outcomes based on the data of 28…

  5. Statistical Model of the 3-D Braided Composites Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Laiyuan; ZUO Weiwei; CAI Ganwei; LIAO Daoxun

    2007-01-01

    Based on the statistical model for the tensile statistical strength of unidirectional composite materials and the stress analysis of 3-D braided composites, a new method is proposed to calculate the tensile statistical strength of the 3-D braided composites. With this method, the strength of 3-D braided composites can be calculated with very large accuracy, and the statistical parameters of 3-D braided composites can be determined. The numerical result shows that the tensile statistical strength of 3-D braided composites can be predicted using this method.

  6. Finite elements modeling of delaminations in composite laminates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiotti, m.; Rizzo, C.M.; Branner, Kim;

    2011-01-01

    The application of composite materials in many structures poses to engineers the problem to create reliable and relatively simple methods, able to estimate the strength of multilayer composite structures. Multilayer composites, like other laminated materials, suffer from layer separation, i.e., d...... by finite elements using different techniques. Results obtained with different finite element models are compared and discussed.......The application of composite materials in many structures poses to engineers the problem to create reliable and relatively simple methods, able to estimate the strength of multilayer composite structures. Multilayer composites, like other laminated materials, suffer from layer separation, i...... of the buckling strength of composite laminates containing delaminations. Namely, non-linear buckling and post-buckling analyses are carried out to predict the critical buckling load of elementary composite laminates affected by rectangular delaminations of different sizes and locations, which are modelled...

  7. Evaluation and comparison of a lightweight bamboo composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Andreas; Berwing, Michael; Förster, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The demand for fast changing production lines and other facilities needs new lightweight and stable systems for partitioning walls. There is also a need for ecological products for this application. The wood like grass bamboo provides a wide potential to substitute conventional wood. A composite lightweight honeycomb like bamboo board was developed and compared with reinforced and unreinforced plywood specimen. The acquired mechanical properties gave a promising result for the usability of bamboo as basis material for wide span boards. It can be manufactured with minimal technical investments, that suits also well for regions with little industry. The ecological assessment of the structure is very positive.

  8. The Frontier Fields Lens Modeling Comparison Project

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Coe, D; Contini, E; De Lucia, G; Giocoli, C; Acebron, A; Borgani, S; Bradac, M; Diego, J M; Hoag, A; Ishigaki, M; Johnson, T L; Jullo, E; Kawamata, R; Lam, D; Limousin, M; Liesenborgs, J; Oguri, M; Sebesta, K; Sharon, K; Williams, L L R; Zitrin, A

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational lensing by clusters of galaxies offers a powerful probe of their structure and mass distribution. Deriving a lens magnification map for a galaxy cluster is a classic inversion problem and many methods have been developed over the past two decades to solve it. Several research groups have developed techniques independently to map the predominantly dark matter distribution in cluster lenses. While these methods have all provided remarkably high precision mass maps, particularly with exquisite imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the reconstructions themselves have never been directly compared. In this paper, we report the results of comparing various independent lens modeling techniques employed by individual research groups in the community. Here we present for the first time a detailed and robust comparison of methodologies for fidelity, accuracy and precision. For this collaborative exercise, the lens modeling community was provided simulated cluster images -- of two clusters Are...

  9. Model selection and comparison for independents sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2014-01-01

    this method by considering the problem in a full Bayesian framework instead of the approximate formulation, on which the asymptotic MAP criterion is based. This leads to a new model selection and comparison method, the lp-BIC, whose computational complexity is of the same order as the asymptotic MAP criterion......In the signal processing literature, many methods have been proposed for estimating the number of sinusoidal basis functions from a noisy data set. The most popular method is the asymptotic MAP criterion, which is sometimes also referred to as the BIC. In this paper, we extend and improve....... Through simulations, we demonstrate that the lp-BIC outperforms the asymptotic MAP criterion and other state of the art methods in terms of model selection, de-noising and prediction performance. The simulation code is available online....

  10. Component-based event composition modeling for CPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhonghai; Chu, Yanan

    2017-06-01

    In order to combine event-drive model with component-based architecture design, this paper proposes a component-based event composition model to realize CPS’s event processing. Firstly, the formal representations of component and attribute-oriented event are defined. Every component is consisted of subcomponents and the corresponding event sets. The attribute “type” is added to attribute-oriented event definition so as to describe the responsiveness to the component. Secondly, component-based event composition model is constructed. Concept lattice-based event algebra system is built to describe the relations between events, and the rules for drawing Hasse diagram are discussed. Thirdly, as there are redundancies among composite events, two simplification methods are proposed. Finally, the communication-based train control system is simulated to verify the event composition model. Results show that the event composition model we have constructed can be applied to express composite events correctly and effectively.

  11. Cumulative Damage Model for Advanced Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    ultimately used an exponential in the present example for added simplicity) and we norma - lize the function so that it becomes the modifier that determines...Testing and Design (Second Conference), ASTM STP 497, ASTM (1972) pp. 170-188. 5. Halpin, J. C., et al., "Characterization of Composites for the...Graphite Epoxy Composites," Proc. Symposium on Composite Materials: Testing and Design, ASTM , (Ma’rch 20, 1978) New Orleans, LA. 18. Hashin, Z. and Rotem

  12. Comparison of Wear Resistance Between Innovative Composites and Nano- and Microfilled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asefi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the most common causes of failure in class 2 posterior composite restorations is occlusal and proximal wear. Estelite composites used supra-nano monodispersing spherical fillers and a new photoinitiator, and the manufacturer claimed that the wear of these composites is less than 1 mm3 volumetric wear. Objectives Compare the wear resistance of new Estelite composites with that of other composites generations. Materials and Methods Thirty-five specimens were evaluated in five groups: three kinds of Estelite composites (Estelite Sigma Quick, Estelite Flow Quick, and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow, Filtek Z350, and Filtek Z250. All specimens were prepared in 25 mm disks and cured with laboratory light for 120 seconds (60 s for each side. Then, they were polished by 600 grit sand paper and stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature. We used a two-body abrasion test and the pin-on-disk method with distilled water as medium. All specimens were worn under 15 N load, 0.05 m/seconds speed, 100 m distance, and steatite ceramic balls antagonists. After wearing, we measured wear volume by calculating the wear track cross-section area with a profilometer and analyzed the data with the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test. Results The wear amounts of the composites are as follows in order: Estelite sigma quick (1886.9 ± 518.5 μm2, Estelite flow quick (2708.9 ± 578.1 μm2, Estelite high flow (3206 ± 2445.1 μm2, Filtek Z350 (3840 ± 1963.4 μm2, and Filtek Z250 (4667.2 ± 2351.1 μm2. No statistical difference was found among the groups (P value > 0.05. Conclusions Estelite sigma quick composite had wear resistance similar to that of nano- and microfilled composites. Estelite flowable composites demonstrated similar wear resistance to that of a posterior composite.

  13. Validation and modeling of earthquake strong ground motion using a composite source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Zeng et al. (1994) have proposed a composite source model for synthetic strong ground motion prediction. In that model, the source is taken as a superposition of circular subevents with a constant stress drop. The number of subevents and their radius follows a power law distribution equivalent to the Gutenberg and Richter's magnitude-frequency relation for seismicity. The heterogeneous nature of the composite source model is characterized by its maximum subevent size and subevent stress drop. As rupture propagates through each subevent, it radiates a Brune's pulse or a Sato and Hirasawa's circular crack pulse. The method has been proved to be successful in generating realistic strong motion seismograms in comparison with observations from earthquakes in California, eastern US, Guerrero of Mexico, Turkey and India. The model has since been improved by including scattering waves from small scale heterogeneity structure of the earth, site specific ground motion prediction using weak motion site amplification, and nonlinear soil response using geotechnical engineering models. Last year, I have introduced an asymmetric circular rupture to improve the subevent source radiation and to provide a consistent rupture model between overall fault rupture process and its subevents. In this study, I revisit the Landers, Loma Prieta, Northridge, Imperial Valley and Kobe earthquakes using the improved source model. The results show that the improved subevent ruptures provide an improved effect of rupture directivity compared to our previous studies. Additional validation includes comparison of synthetic strong ground motions to the observed ground accelerations from the Chi-Chi, Taiwan and Izmit, Turkey earthquakes. Since the method has evolved considerably when it was first proposed, I will also compare results between each major modification of the model and demonstrate its backward compatibility to any of its early simulation procedures.

  14. Survey of composite particle models of electroweak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    1992-05-01

    Models of composite weak bosons, the top-condensate model of electroweak interaction and related models we surveyed. Composite weak bosons must be tightly bound with a high compositeness scale in order to generate approximate puge symmetry dynamically. However, naturalness argument suggests that the compositeness scale is low at least in toy models. In the top-condensate model, where a composite Higgs doublet is formed with a very high scale, the prediction of the model is insensitive to details of the model and almost model-independent Actually, the numerical prediction of the t-quark and Higgs boson masses does not test compositeness of the Higgs boson nor condensation of the t-quark field. To illustrate the point, a composite t{sub R}-quark model is discussed which leads to the same numerical prediction as the top-condensate model. However, different constraints an imposed on the structure of the Higgs sector, depending on which particles are composite. The attempt to account the large t-b mass splitting by the high compositeness scale of the top-condensate model is reinterpreted in terms of fine tuning of more than one vacuum expectation value. It is difficult to lower, without a fourth generation, the t-quark mass in the composite particle models in general because the Yukawa coupling of the i-quark to the Higgs boson, {sub t}{sub 2}/4{pi} = 0.1 for m{sub t} = 200 GeV, is too small for a coupling of a composite particle.

  15. Comparison of the Effects of Two Different Drinks on Microhardness of a Silorane-based Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Sadat HashemiKamangar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Acidic foods and drinks can erode composite resins. Silorane-based composite is a new low shrinkage composite with higher hydrophobicity which might resist the erosive effect of beverages. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 100% orange juice and non-alcoholic carbonated beer on microhardness of a silorane-based composite in comparison with two methacrylate-based composite resins. Materials and Method: Ninety disc-shaped composite specimens were fabricated of Filtek P90, Filtek Z350 XT Enamel and Filtek Z250 (3M-ESPE (n=30 and randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 10.Group 1 was immersed in distilled water, group 2 in 100% orange juice, and group 3 in non-alcoholic beer for 3 h/day. Primary, secondary and final Vickers microhardness tests were performed at the beginning of the study and 7 and 28 days later. Surface of 2 specimens in each group was evaluated under scanning electron microscope on day 28. Data were analyzed using repeated measures of ANOVA model (α=0.05. Results: The primary and secondary microhardness of P90 was significantly lower than that of Z350, and Z250 (p 0.05. Conclusion: Although 28 days of immersion in 100% orange juice and non-alcoholic beer decreased the microhardness of all specimens, P90 experienced the greatest reduction of microhardness and non-alcoholic beer had the highest effect on reducing microhardness.

  16. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  17. PORTFOLIO COMPOSITION WITH MINIMUM VARIANCE: COMPARISON WITH MARKET BENCHMARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menezes Cavalcante

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio optimization strategies are advocated as being able to allow the composition of stocks portfolios that provide returns above market benchmarks. This study aims to determine whether, in fact, portfolios based on the minimum variance strategy, optimized by the Modern Portfolio Theory, are able to achieve earnings above market benchmarks in Brazil. Time series of 36 securities traded on the BM&FBOVESPA have been analyzed in a long period of time (1999-2012, with sample windows of 12, 36, 60 and 120 monthly observations. The results indicated that the minimum variance portfolio performance is superior to market benchmarks (CDI and IBOVESPA in terms of return and risk-adjusted return, especially in medium and long-term investment horizons.

  18. IMP 8 magnetosheath field comparisons with models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kaymaz

    Full Text Available This study presents cross-sectional vector maps of the magnetic field derived from IMP 8 magnetometer in the magnetosheath at 30 Re behind the Earth. In addition the vector patterns of the magnetosheath field for northward, southward, and east-west interplanetary magnetic field (IMF directions are qualitatively compared with those obtained from the Spreiter-Stahara gas dynamic (GD and Fedder-Lyon magnetohydrodynamic models (MHD. The main purpose is to display the cross-sectional differences in relation to the dayside merging with different IMF directions, allowing the reader to make direct visual comparisons of the vector patterns. It is seen that for east-west IMF directions, the data-based and MHD-based patterns differ noticeably in a similar way from the GD model, presumably reflecting the influence of dayside magnetic merging of the Earth's magnetic field with the y-component of the interplanetary magnetic field. All three northward IMF cross sections show comparable field draping patterns as expected for a closed magnetosphere. For southward IMF case, on the other hand, differences between the three cross-sectional patterns are greater as seen in the field vector sizes and directions, especially closer to the magnetopause where more disturbed magnetospheric conditions are known to be exist. The data comparisons with the MHD and GD models show that the differences result from the magnetic field-flow coupling and that the effects of dayside reconnection are present in IMP 8 magnetic field measurements.

    Keywords. Vector maps · IMP 8 magnetometer · Inter-planetary magnetic fields

  19. Lepton Flavour Violation in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Pattori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We discuss in detail the constraints on partial compositeness coming from flavour and CP violation in the leptonic sector. In a first part we present a formulation of partial compositeness in terms of a flavour symmetry group and a set of spurions, whose background values specify the symmetry breaking pattern. In such a framework we construct the complete set of dimension-six operators describing lepton flavour violation and CP violation. By exploiting the existing bounds, we derive limits on the compositeness scale in different scenarios, characterised by increasing restrictions on the spurion properties. We confirm that in the most general case the compositeness scale should lie well-above 10 TeV. However, if in the composite sectors mass parameters and Yukawa couplings are universal, such a bound can be significantly lowered, without necessarily reproducing the case of minimal flavour violation. The most sensitive processes are decays of charged leptons either of radiative type or into three charged lepton...

  20. Quantitative modelling of viscoelasticity of isotropic fibrous composites with viscoelastic matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Despite the wide usage of isotropic fibrous composites with a viscoelastic polymer matrix,no analytic model for their mechanical behaviour is known.This paper develops such a model for time-dependent Young's modulus,showing that for typical constituents the time constants of composites are up to about 6% greater than the matrix shear time constant.Viscoelasticity is strongly suppressed for stiff fibres even at modest fibre volume fractions.Comparison with known results for particle and oriented fibre compos...

  1. Constitutive models of ferroelectric composites with a viscoelastic and dielectric relaxation matrix (Ⅱ)——Experiment, calculation and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江冰; 方岱宁; 黄克智

    2000-01-01

    Experimental analysis of ferroelectric composites with a viscoelastic and dieiectric relax-ation matrix is carried out, and the electromechanical coupling behavior of the ferroelectric composites is calculated by means of the constitutive model proposed in this paper. Comparisons between the ex-perimental results and the calculations show that the constitutive model can reflect the electromechanical coupling behavior of the ferroelectric composites. The analysis indicates that the effect of viscoelas-ticity and dieiectric relaxation of the matrix on the electromechanical coupling behavior of ferroelectric composites cannot be neglected.

  2. A Comparison of Central Composite Design and Taguchi Method for Optimizing Fenton Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anam Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a comparison of central composite design (CCD and Taguchi method was established for Fenton oxidation. Dyeini, Dye : Fe+2, H2O2 : Fe+2, and pH were identified control variables while COD and decolorization efficiency were selected responses. L9 orthogonal array and face-centered CCD were used for the experimental design. Maximum 99% decolorization and 80% COD removal efficiency were obtained under optimum conditions. R squared values of 0.97 and 0.95 for CCD and Taguchi method, respectively, indicate that both models are statistically significant and are in well agreement with each other. Furthermore, Prob > F less than 0.0500 and ANOVA results indicate the good fitting of selected model with experimental results. Nevertheless, possibility of ranking of input variables in terms of percent contribution to the response value has made Taguchi method a suitable approach for scrutinizing the operating parameters. For present case, pH with percent contribution of 87.62% and 66.2% was ranked as the most contributing and significant factor. This finding of Taguchi method was also verified by 3D contour plots of CCD. Therefore, from this comparative study, it is concluded that Taguchi method with 9 experimental runs and simple interaction plots is a suitable alternative to CCD for several chemical engineering applications.

  3. A comparison of central composite design and Taguchi method for optimizing Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Anam; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a comparison of central composite design (CCD) and Taguchi method was established for Fenton oxidation. [Dye]ini, Dye:Fe(+2), H2O2:Fe(+2), and pH were identified control variables while COD and decolorization efficiency were selected responses. L 9 orthogonal array and face-centered CCD were used for the experimental design. Maximum 99% decolorization and 80% COD removal efficiency were obtained under optimum conditions. R squared values of 0.97 and 0.95 for CCD and Taguchi method, respectively, indicate that both models are statistically significant and are in well agreement with each other. Furthermore, Prob > F less than 0.0500 and ANOVA results indicate the good fitting of selected model with experimental results. Nevertheless, possibility of ranking of input variables in terms of percent contribution to the response value has made Taguchi method a suitable approach for scrutinizing the operating parameters. For present case, pH with percent contribution of 87.62% and 66.2% was ranked as the most contributing and significant factor. This finding of Taguchi method was also verified by 3D contour plots of CCD. Therefore, from this comparative study, it is concluded that Taguchi method with 9 experimental runs and simple interaction plots is a suitable alternative to CCD for several chemical engineering applications.

  4. Modeling the Stress Strain Behavior of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    Woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites represent one of the most mature composite systems to date. Future components fabricated out of these woven ceramic matrix composites are expected to vary in shape, curvature, architecture, and thickness. The design of future components using woven ceramic matrix composites necessitates a modeling approach that can account for these variations which are physically controlled by local constituent contents and architecture. Research over the years supported primarily by NASA Glenn Research Center has led to the development of simple mechanistic-based models that can describe the entire stress-strain curve for composite systems fabricated with chemical vapor infiltrated matrices and melt-infiltrated matrices for a wide range of constituent content and architecture. Several examples will be presented that demonstrate the approach to modeling which incorporates a thorough understanding of the stress-dependent matrix cracking properties of the composite system.

  5. Item Response Modeling of Paired Comparison and Ranking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Brown, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The comparative format used in ranking and paired comparisons tasks can significantly reduce the impact of uniform response biases typically associated with rating scales. Thurstone's (1927, 1931) model provides a powerful framework for modeling comparative data such as paired comparisons and rankings. Although Thurstonian models are generally…

  6. MDA based-approach for UML Models Complete Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Chaouni, Samia Benabdellah; Mouline, Salma

    2011-01-01

    If a modeling task is distributed, it will frequently be necessary to integrate models developed by different team members. Problems occur in the models integration step and particularly, in the comparison phase of the integration. This issue had been discussed in several domains and various models. However, previous approaches have not correctly handled the semantic comparison. In the current paper, we provide a MDA-based approach for models comparison which aims at comparing UML models. We develop an hybrid approach which takes into account syntactic, semantic and structural comparison aspects. For this purpose, we use the domain ontology as well as other resources such as dictionaries. We propose a decision support system which permits the user to validate (or not) correspondences extracted in the comparison phase. For implementation, we propose an extension of the generic correspondence metamodel AMW in order to transform UML models to the correspondence model.

  7. How can model comparison help improving species distribution models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Emmanuel Stephan; Gaucherel, Cédric; Crespo-Perez, Maria-Veronica; Chuine, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Today, more than ever, robust projections of potential species range shifts are needed to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Such projections are so far provided almost exclusively by correlative species distribution models (correlative SDMs). However, concerns regarding the reliability of their predictive power are growing and several authors call for the development of process-based SDMs. Still, each of these methods presents strengths and weakness which have to be estimated if they are to be reliably used by decision makers. In this study we compare projections of three different SDMs (STASH, LPJ and PHENOFIT) that lie in the continuum between correlative models and process-based models for the current distribution of three major European tree species, Fagussylvatica L., Quercusrobur L. and Pinussylvestris L. We compare the consistency of the model simulations using an innovative comparison map profile method, integrating local and multi-scale comparisons. The three models simulate relatively accurately the current distribution of the three species. The process-based model performs almost as well as the correlative model, although parameters of the former are not fitted to the observed species distributions. According to our simulations, species range limits are triggered, at the European scale, by establishment and survival through processes primarily related to phenology and resistance to abiotic stress rather than to growth efficiency. The accuracy of projections of the hybrid and process-based model could however be improved by integrating a more realistic representation of the species resistance to water stress for instance, advocating for pursuing efforts to understand and formulate explicitly the impact of climatic conditions and variations on these processes.

  8. Bed composition generation for morphodynamic modeling: Case study of San Pablo Bay in California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wegen, M.; Dastgheib, A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Roelvink, D.

    2011-01-01

    Applications of process-based morphodynamic models are often constrained by limited availability of data on bed composition, which may have a considerable impact on the modeled morphodynamic development. One may even distinguish a period of "morphodynamic spin-up" in which the model generates the bed level according to some ill-defined initial bed composition rather than describing the realistic behavior of the system. The present paper proposes a methodology to generate bed composition of multiple sand and/or mud fractions that can act as the initial condition for the process-based numerical model Delft3D. The bed composition generation (BCG) run does not include bed level changes, but does permit the redistribution of multiple sediment fractions over the modeled domain. The model applies the concept of an active layer that may differ in sediment composition above an underlayer with fixed composition. In the case of a BCG run, the bed level is kept constant, whereas the bed composition can change. The approach is applied to San Pablo Bay in California, USA. Model results show that the BCG run reallocates sand and mud fractions over the model domain. Initially, a major sediment reallocation takes place, but development rates decrease in the longer term. Runs that take the outcome of a BCG run as a starting point lead to more gradual morphodynamic development. Sensitivity analysis shows the impact of variations in the morphological factor, the active layer thickness, and wind waves. An important but difficult to characterize criterion for a successful application of a BCG run is that it should not lead to a bed composition that fixes the bed so that it dominates the "natural" morphodynamic development of the system. Future research will focus on a decadal morphodynamic hindcast and comparison with measured bathymetries in San Pablo Bay so that the proposed methodology can be tested and optimized. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  9. Micromechanics Models for Viscoelastic Plain-Weave Composite Tape Springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of polymer composites decreases the deployment force and the postdeployment shape accuracy of composite deployable space structures. This paper presents a viscoelastic model for single-ply cylindrical shells (tape springs) that are deployed after being held folded...... for a given period of time. The model is derived from a representative unit cell of the composite material, based on the microstructure geometry. Key ingredients are the fiber volume density in the composite tows and the constitutive behavior of the fibers (assumed to be linear elastic and transversely...

  10. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  11. An automatic composition model of Chinese folk music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaomei; Li, Dongyang; Wang, Lei; Shen, Lin; Gao, Yanyuan; Zhu, Yuanyuan

    2017-03-01

    The automatic composition has achieved rich results in recent decades, including Western and some other areas of music. However, the automatic composition of Chinese music is less involved. After thousands of years of development, Chinese folk music has a wealth of resources. To design an automatic composition mode, learn the characters of Chinese folk melody and imitate the creative process of music is of some significance. According to the melodic features of Chinese folk music, a Chinese folk music composition based on Markov model is proposed to analyze Chinese traditional music. Folk songs with typical Chinese national characteristics are selected for analysis. In this paper, an example of automatic composition is given. The experimental results show that this composition model can produce music with characteristics of Chinese folk music.

  12. Composite GUTs: models and expectations at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Frigerio, Michele; Varagnolo, Alvise

    2011-01-01

    We investigate grand unified theories (GUTs) in scenarios where electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking is triggered by a light composite Higgs, arising as a Nambu-Goldstone boson from a strongly interacting sector. The evolution of the standard model (SM) gauge couplings can be predicted at leading order, if the global symmetry of the composite sector is a simple group G that contains the SM gauge group. It was noticed that, if the right-handed top quark is also composite, precision gauge unification can be achieved. We build minimal consistent models for a composite sector with these properties, thus demonstrating how composite GUTs may represent an alternative to supersymmetric GUTs. Taking into account the new contributions to the EW precision parameters, we compute the Higgs effective potential and prove that it realizes consistently EW symmetry breaking with little fine-tuning. The G group structure and the requirement of proton stability determine the nature of the light composite states accompanying the Hi...

  13. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of chloroprene rubber surface topography upon composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žukienė, Kristina, E-mail: kristina.zukiene@ktu.lt [Department of Clothing and Polymer Products Technology, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu St. 56, LT-51424 Kaunas (Lithuania); Jankauskaitė, Virginija [Department of Clothing and Polymer Products Technology, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu St. 56, LT-51424 Kaunas (Lithuania); Petraitienė, Stase [Department of Applied Mathematics, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2014-02-15

    In this study the effect of polymer blend composition on the surface roughness has been investigated and simulated. Three-dimensional modeling of chloroprene rubber film surface upon piperylene-styrene copolymer content was conducted. The efficiency of various surface roughness modeling methods, including Monte Carlo, surface growth and proposed method, named as parabolas, were compared. The required parameters for modeling were obtained from atomic force microscopy topographical images of polymer films surface. It was shown that experimental and modeled surfaces have the same correlation function. The quantitative comparison of function parameters was made. It was determined that novel parabolas method is suitable for three-dimensional polymer blends surface roughness description.

  15. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides in...

  16. Contemporary Choreographers as Models for Teaching Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Traditional composition classes teach the tools of choreographic craft, yet leave students in an odd limbo in which they create a special breed of "college dance" that has little to do with the current dance world. In the twenty-first century, choreography teachers must go beyond an emphasis on traditional craft and help students find their own…

  17. Multidimensional IRT Models for Composite Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shu Jing; Walker, Leah

    2007-01-01

    Tests of English Language Proficiency are often designed such that each section of the test measures a single latent ability. For instance an English Proficiency Assessment might consist of sections measuring Speaking, Listening, and Reading ability. However, Overall English Proficiency and composite abilities are naturally multidimensional. This…

  18. DC modeling of composite MOS transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, P.; de Haan, P.E.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; van Leeuwen, M.G.; Wallinga, Hans

    1995-01-01

    Mixed-signal circuit design on sea-of-gates arrays requires the use of composite MOSTs, combinations of in-series and in-parallel connected unit MOSTs. To avoid an increase in circuit simulation complexity these are in general replaced by artificial single MOSTs. The analysis in this paper shows

  19. A model for the burning rates of composite propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical model of the steady-state burning of composite solid propellants is presented. An improved burning rate model is achieved by incorporating an improved AP monopropellant model, a separate energy balance for the binder in which a portion of the diffusion flame is used to heat the binder, proper use of the binder regression rate in the model, and a model for the combustion of the energetic binder component of CMDB propellants. Also, an improved correlation and model of aluminum agglomeration is developed which properly describes compositional trends.

  20. Reo: A Channel-based Coordination Model for Component Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present Reo, which forms a paradigm for composition of software components based on the notion of mobile channels. Reo is a channel-based exogenous coordination model in which complex coordinators, called connectors, are compositionally built out of simpler ones. The simplest conne

  1. A channel-based coordination model for component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present $P epsilon omega$, a paradigm for composition of software components based on the notion of mobile channels. $P repsilon omega$ is a channel-based exogenous coordination model wherein complex coordinators, called {em connectors are compositionally built out of simpler ones.

  2. A compositional modelling framework for exploring MPSoC systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg-Hansen, Anders Sejer; Madsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel compositional framework for system level performance estimation and exploration of Multi-Processor System On Chip (MPSoC) based systems. The main contributions are the definition of a compositional model which allows quantitative performance estimation to be carried ou...

  3. Heuristic Model Of The Composite Quality Index Of Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarov, A. N.; Knyaginin, A. A.; Bondarenko, D. V.; Shepet, I. P.; Korolkova, L. N.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to present the heuristic model of the composite environmental quality index based on the integrated application of the elements of utility theory, multidimensional scaling, expert evaluation and decision-making. The composite index is synthesized in linear-quadratic form, it provides higher adequacy of the results of the assessment preferences of experts and decision-makers.

  4. Salt Composition Derived from Veazey Composition by Thermodynamic Modeling and Predicted Composition of Drum Contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisbrod, Kirk Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clark, David Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-11

    This report describes the derivation of the salt composition from the Veazey salt stream analysis. It also provides an estimate of the proportions of the kitty litter, nitrate salt and neutralizer that was contained in drum 68660. While the actinide content of waste streams was judiciously followed in the 1980s in TA-55, no record of the salt composition could be found. Consequently, a salt waste stream produced from 1992 to 1994 and reported by Gerry Veazey provided the basis for this study. While chemical analysis of the waste stream was highly variable, an average analysis provided input to the Stream Analyzer software to calculate a composition for a concentrated solid nitrate salt and liquid waste stream. The calculation predicted the gas / condensed phase compositions as well as solid salt / saturated liquid compositions. The derived composition provides an estimate of the nitrate feedstream to WIPP for which kinetic measurements can be made. The ratio of salt to Swheat in drum 68660 contents was estimated through an overall mass balance on the parent and sibling drums. The RTR video provided independent confirmation concerning the volume of the mixture. The solid salt layer contains the majority of the salt at a ratio with Swheat that potentially could become exothermic.

  5. A double inclusion model for multiphase piezoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yirong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2010-03-01

    A novel active structural fiber (ASF; Lin and Sodano 2008 Compos. Sci. Technol. 68 1911-8) was developed that can be embedded in a composite material in order to perform sensing and actuation, in addition to providing load bearing functionality. In order to fully understand the electroelastic properties of the material, this paper will introduce a three-dimensional micromechanics model for estimating the effective electroelastic properties of the multifunctional composites with different design parameters. The three-dimensional model is formulated by extending the double inclusion model to multiphase composites with piezoelectric constituents. The double inclusion model has been chosen for the ASF studied here because it is designed to model composites reinforced by inclusions with multilayer coatings. The accuracy of our extended double inclusion model will be evaluated through a three-dimensional finite element analysis of a representative volume element of the ASF composite. The results will demonstrate that the micromechanics model developed here can very accurately predict the electroelastic properties of the multifunctional composites.

  6. Nanostructured energetic composites: synthesis, ignition/combustion modeling, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Torabi, Mohsen; Lu, Jian; Shen, Ruiqi; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-03-12

    Nanotechnology has stimulated revolutionary advances in many scientific and industrial fields, particularly in energetic materials. Powder mixing is the simplest and most traditional method to prepare nanoenergetic composites, and preliminary findings have shown that these composites perform more effectively than their micro- or macro-sized counterparts in terms of energy release, ignition, and combustion. Powder mixing technology represents only the minimum capability of nanotechnology to boost the development of energetic material research, and it has intrinsic limitations, namely, random distribution of fuel and oxidizer particles, inevitable fuel pre-oxidation, and non-intimate contact between reactants. As an alternative, nanostructured energetic composites can be prepared through a delicately designed process. These composites outperform powder-mixed nanocomposites in numerous ways; therefore, we comprehensively discuss the preparation strategies adopted for nanostructured energetic composites and the research achievements thus far in this review. The latest ignition and reaction models are briefly introduced. Finally, the broad promising applications of nanostructured energetic composites are highlighted.

  7. Preliminary characterization and modeling of SMA-based textile composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Arata; Ni, Qing-Qing; Sone, Akira; Zhang, Run-Xin; Yamamura, Takahiko

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we conduct a feasibility study to investigate the future potential of textile composites with shape memory alloys. Two different types of SMA-based textile composites are presented. First, a composite plate with embedded woven SMA layer is fabricated, and the stiffness tuning capability is evaluated by impact vibration tests. The results are not favorable, but may be improved by increasing the volume fraction of SMA, and by controlling the prestrain more accurately during the lamination process. The modeling and analysis methodology for woven SMA-based composites are briefly discussed. Then, the possibility of textile composites with SMA stitching is discussed, that is expected to give the composites multi-functions such as tunable stiffness, shape control and sensing capability, selectively distributed on demand.

  8. Supersymmetric Composite Models on Intersecting D-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Kitazawa, N

    2004-01-01

    We construct supersymmetric composite models of quarks and leptons from type IIA T^6/(Z_2 x Z_2) orientifolds with intersecting D6-branes. In case of T^6 = T^2 x T^2 x T^2 with no tilted T^2, a composite model of the supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory with three generations is constructed. In case of that one T^2 is tilted, a composite model with SU(3)_c x SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y gauge symmetry with three generations is constructed. These models are not realistic, but contain fewer additional exotic particles and U(1) gauge symmetries due to the introduction of the compositeness of quarks and leptons. The mu-term of Higgs fields can be naturally generated through the exponentially suppressed Yukawa interaction among "preons".

  9. Modeling and Testing of the Viscoelastic Properties of a Graphite Nanoplatelet/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate the interpretation of experimental data, a micromechanical modeling procedure is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties of a graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composite as a function of volume fraction and nanoplatelet diameter. The predicted storage and loss moduli for the composite are compared to measured values from the same material using three test methods; Dynamical Mechanical Analysis, nanoindentation, and quasi-static tensile tests. In most cases, the model and experiments indicate that for increasing volume fractions of nanoplatelets, both the storage and loss moduli increase. Also, the results indicate that for nanoplatelet sizes above 15 microns, nanoindentation is capable of measuring properties of individual constituents of a composite system. Comparison of the predicted values to the measured data helps illustrate the relative similarities and differences between the bulk and local measurement techniques.

  10. Coordination-theoretic approach to modelling grid service composition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qian; Zhong Liu; Jing Wang; Li Yao; Weiming Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A grid service composite process is made up of complex coordinative activities.Developing the appropriate model of grid service coordinative activities is an important foundation for the grid service composition.According to the coordination theory,this paper elaborates the process of the grid service composition by using UML 2.0,and proposes an approach to modelling the grid service composition process based on the coordination theory.This approach helps not only to analyze accurately the task activities and relevant dependencies among task activities,but also to facilitate the adaptability of the grid service orchestration to further realize the connectivity,timeliness,appropriateness and expansibility of the grid service composition.

  11. A Numerical Model for Torsion Analysis of Composite Ship Hulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Chirica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology based on a macroelement model proposed for torsional behaviour of the ship hull made of composite material is proposed in this paper. A computer program has been developed for the elastic analysis of linear torsion. The results are compared with the FEM-based licensed soft COSMOS/M results and measurements on the scale simplified model of a container ship, made of composite materials.

  12. Measuring size and composition of species pools: a comparison of dark diversity estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bello, Francesco; Fibich, Pavel; Zelený, David; Kopecký, Martin; Mudrák, Ondřej; Chytrý, Milan; Pyšek, Petr; Wild, Jan; Michalcová, Dana; Sádlo, Jiří; Šmilauer, Petr; Lepš, Jan; Pärtel, Meelis

    2016-06-01

    Ecological theory and biodiversity conservation have traditionally relied on the number of species recorded at a site, but it is agreed that site richness represents only a portion of the species that can inhabit particular ecological conditions, that is, the habitat-specific species pool. Knowledge of the species pool at different sites enables meaningful comparisons of biodiversity and provides insights into processes of biodiversity formation. Empirical studies, however, are limited due to conceptual and methodological difficulties in determining both the size and composition of the absent part of species pools, the so-called dark diversity. We used >50,000 vegetation plots from 18 types of habitats throughout the Czech Republic, most of which served as a training dataset and 1083 as a subset of test sites. These data were used to compare predicted results from three quantitative methods with those of previously published expert estimates based on species habitat preferences: (1) species co-occurrence based on Beals' smoothing approach; (2) species ecological requirements, with envelopes around community mean Ellenberg values; and (3) species distribution models, using species environmental niches modeled by Biomod software. Dark diversity estimates were compared at both plot and habitat levels, and each method was applied in different configurations. While there were some differences in the results obtained by different methods, particularly at the plot level, there was a clear convergence, especially at the habitat level. The better convergence at the habitat level reflects less variation in local environmental conditions, whereas variation at the plot level is an effect of each particular method. The co-occurrence agreed closest the expert estimate, followed by the method based on species ecological requirements. We conclude that several analytical methods can estimate species pools of given habitats. However, the strengths and weaknesses of different methods

  13. Comparison of brass alloys composition by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and self-organizing maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagnotta, Stefano; Grifoni, Emanuela; Legnaioli, Stefano [Applied and Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, ICCOM-CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Lezzerini, Marco [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Pisa, Via S. Maria 53, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Lorenzetti, Giulia [Applied and Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, ICCOM-CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Applied and Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, ICCOM-CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Department of Civilizations and Forms of Knowledge, University of Pisa, Via L. Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we face the problem of assessing similarities in the composition of different metallic alloys, using the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. The possibility of determining the degree of similarity through the use of artificial neural networks and self-organizing maps is discussed. As an example, we present a case study involving the comparison of two historical brass samples, very similar in their composition. The results of the paper can be extended to many other situations, not necessarily associated with cultural heritage and archeological studies, where objects with similar composition have to be compared. - Highlights: • A method for assessing the similarity of materials analyzed by LIBS is proposed. • Two very similar fragments of historical brass were analyzed. • Using a simple artificial neural network the composition of the two alloys was determined. • The composition of the two brass alloys was the same within the experimental error. • Using self-organizing maps, the probability of the alloys to have the same composition was assessed.

  14. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts frequently generate an observable "flash" of light with two components: a short-duration spike due to emissions from vaporized material, and a long-duration peak due to thermal emissions from expanding hot debris. The intensity and duration of these peaks depend on the impact velocity, angle, and the target and projectile mass and composition. Thus remote sensing measurements of planetary impact flashes have the potential to constrain the properties of impacting meteors and improve our understanding of impact flux and cratering processes. Interpreting impact flash measurements requires a thorough understanding of how flash characteristics correlate with impact conditions. Because planetary-scale impacts cannot be replicated in the laboratory, numerical simulations are needed to provide this insight for the solar system. Computational hydrocodes can produce detailed simulations of the impact process, but they lack the radiation physics required to model the optical flash. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) developed a model to calculate the optical signature from the hot debris cloud produced by an impact. While the phenomenology of the optical signature is understood, the details required to accurately model it are complicated by uncertainties in material and optical properties and the simplifications required to numerically model radiation from large-scale impacts. Comparisons with laboratory impact experiments allow us to validate our approach and to draw insight regarding processes that occur at all scales in impact events, such as melt generation. We used Sandia National Lab's CTH shock physics hydrocode along with the optical signature model developed at APL to compare with a series of laboratory experiments conducted at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. The experiments used Pyrex projectiles to impact pumice powder targets with velocities ranging from 1 to 6 km/s at angles of 30 and 90 degrees with respect to

  15. Flavor Changing Neutral Currents in a Realistic Composite Technicolor Model

    CERN Document Server

    Carone, C D; Carone, Christopher D.; Hamilton, Rowan T.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a composite technicolor model proposed recently by Georgi. Composite technicolor interactions produce four-quark operators in the low energy theory that contribute to flavor changing neutral current processes. While we expect operators of this type to be induced at the compositeness scale by the flavor-symmetry breaking effects of the preon mass matrices, the Georgi model also includes operators from higher scales that are not GIM-suppressed. Since these operators are potentially large, we study their impact on flavor changing neutral currents and CP violation in the neutral $B$, $D$, and $K$ meson systems.

  16. Compositional design and reuse of a generic agent model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brazier, F.M.T.; Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2000-01-01

    This article introduces a formally specified design of a compositional generic agent model (GAM). This agent model abstracts from specific application domains; it provides a unified formal definition of a model for weak agenthood. It can be (re) used as a template or pattern for a large variety of a

  17. Bayesian inference model for fatigue life of laminated composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Kiureghian, Armen Der; Berggreen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A probabilistic model for estimating the fatigue life of laminated composite plates is developed. The model is based on lamina-level input data, making it possible to predict fatigue properties for a wide range of laminate configurations. Model parameters are estimated by Bayesian inference...

  18. Blast Testing and Modelling of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giversen, Søren

    The motivation for this work is based on a desire for finding light weight alternatives to high strength steel as the material to use for armouring in military vehicles. With the use of high strength steel, an increase in the level of armouring has a significant impact on the vehicle weight......, affecting for example the manoeuvrability and top speed negatively, which ultimately affects the safety of the personal in the vehicle. Strong and light materials, such as fibre reinforced composites, could therefore act as substitutes for the high strength steel, and minimize the impact on the vehicle...

  19. Comparison of time-dependent changes in the surface hardness of different composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Suat; Yikilgan, Ihsan; Uctasli, Mine Betul; Bala, Oya; Kurklu, Zeliha Gonca Bek

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in surface hardness of silorane-based composite resin (Filtek Silorane) in time and compare the results with the surface hardness of two methacrylate-based resins (Filtek Supreme and Majesty Posterior). Materials and Methods: From each composite material, 18 wheel-shaped samples (5-mm diameter and 2-mm depth) were prepared. Top and bottom surface hardness of these samples was measured using a Vicker's hardness tester. The samples were then stored at 37°C and 100% humidity. After 24 h and 7, 30 and 90 days, the top and bottom surface hardness of the samples was measured. In each measurement, the rate between the hardness of the top and bottom surfaces were recorded as the hardness rate. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance, multiple comparisons by Tukey's test and binary comparisons by t-test with a significance level of P = 0.05. Results: The highest hardness values were obtained from each two surfaces of Majesty Posterior and the lowest from Filtek Silorane. Both the top and bottom surface hardness of the methacrylate based composite resins was high and there was a statistically significant difference between the top and bottom hardness values of only the silorane-based composite, Filtek Silorane (P < 0.05). The lowest was obtained with Filtek Silorane. The hardness values of all test groups increased after 24 h (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although silorane-based composite resin Filtek Silorane showed adequate hardness ratio, the use of incremental technic during application is more important than methacrylate based composites. PMID:24966724

  20. Finite element modeling and analysis of piezo-integrated composite structures under large applied electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Tarun, S.; Schmidt, R.; Schröder, K.-U.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we focus on static finite element (FE) simulation of piezoelectric laminated composite plates and shells, considering the nonlinear constitutive behavior of piezoelectric materials under large applied electric fields. Under the assumptions of small strains and large electric fields, the second-order nonlinear constitutive equations are used in the variational principle approach, to develop a nonlinear FE model. Numerical simulations are performed to study the effect of material nonlinearity for piezoelectric bimorph and laminated composite plates as well as cylindrical shells. In comparison to the experimental investigations existing in the literature, the results predicted by the present model agree very well. The importance of the present nonlinear model is highlighted especially in large applied electric fields, and it is shown that the difference between the results simulated by linear and nonlinear constitutive FE models cannot be omitted.

  1. A Model for Semi-Automatic Composition of Educational Content from Open Repositories of Learning Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Rodríguez Marín

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning objects (LOs repositories are important in building educational content and should allow search, retrieval and composition processes to be successfully developed to reach educational goals. However, such processes require so much time-consuming and not always provide the desired results. Thus, the aim of this paper is to propose a model for the semiautomatic composition of LOs, which are automatically recovered from open repositories. For the development of model, various text similarity measures are discussed, while for calibration and validation some comparison experiments were performed using the results obtained by teachers. Experimental results show that when using a value of k (number of LOs selected of at least 3, the percentage of similarities between the model and such made by experts exceeds 75%. To conclude, it can be established that the model proposed allows teachers to save time and effort for LOs selection by performing a pre-filter process.

  2. Vector-like bottom quarks in composite Higgs models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillioz, M.; Grober, R.; Kapuvari, A.

    2014-01-01

    Like many other models, Composite Higgs Models feature the existence of heavy vector-like quarks. Mixing effects between the Standard Model fields and the heavy states, which can be quite large in case of the top quark, imply deviations from the SM. In this work we investigate the possibility...... be applied to other models with similar particle content. Furthermore, the constraints from direct searches for heavy states at the LHC and from the Higgs search results have been included in our analysis. The best agreement with all the considered constraints is achieved for medium to large compositeness...

  3. Load Composition Model Workflow (BPA TIP-371 Deliverable 1A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Cezar, Gustavo V.; /SLAC

    2017-07-17

    This project is funded under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Strategic Partnership Project (SPP) 17-005 between BPA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The project in a BPA Technology Improvement Project (TIP) that builds on and validates the Composite Load Model developed by the Western Electric Coordinating Council's (WECC) Load Modeling Task Force (LMTF). The composite load model is used by the WECC Modeling and Validation Work Group to study the stability and security of the western electricity interconnection. The work includes development of load composition data sets, collection of load disturbance data, and model development and validation. This work supports reliable and economic operation of the power system. This report was produced for Deliverable 1A of the BPA TIP-371 Project entitled \\TIP 371: Advancing the Load Composition Model". The deliverable documents the proposed work ow for the Composite Load Model, which provides the basis for the instrumentation, data acquisition, analysis and data dissemination activities addressed by later phases of the project.

  4. Computational modeling of failure in composite laminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, F.P.

    2010-01-01

    There is no state of the art computational model that is good enough for predictive simulation of the complete failure process in laminates. Already on the single ply level controversy exists. Much work has been done in recent years in the development of continuum models, but these fail to predict t

  5. Enzymes/non-enzymes classification model complexity based on composition, sequence, 3D and topological indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Cristian Robert; González-Díaz, Humberto; Magalhães, Alexandre L

    2008-09-21

    The huge amount of new proteins that need a fast enzymatic activity characterization creates demands of protein QSAR theoretical models. The protein parameters that can be used for an enzyme/non-enzyme classification includes the simpler indices such as composition, sequence and connectivity, also called topological indices (TIs) and the computationally expensive 3D descriptors. A comparison of the 3D versus lower dimension indices has not been reported with respect to the power of discrimination of proteins according to enzyme action. A set of 966 proteins (enzymes and non-enzymes) whose structural characteristics are provided by PDB/DSSP files was analyzed with Python/Biopython scripts, STATISTICA and Weka. The list of indices includes, but it is not restricted to pure composition indices (residue fractions), DSSP secondary structure protein composition and 3D indices (surface and access). We also used mixed indices such as composition-sequence indices (Chou's pseudo-amino acid compositions or coupling numbers), 3D-composition (surface fractions) and DSSP secondary structure amino acid composition/propensities (obtained with our Prot-2S Web tool). In addition, we extend and test for the first time several classic TIs for the Randic's protein sequence Star graphs using our Sequence to Star Graph (S2SG) Python application. All the indices were processed with general discriminant analysis models (GDA), neural networks (NN) and machine learning (ML) methods and the results are presented versus complexity, average of Shannon's information entropy (Sh) and data/method type. This study compares for the first time all these classes of indices to assess the ratios between model accuracy and indices/model complexity in enzyme/non-enzyme discrimination. The use of different methods and complexity of data shows that one cannot establish a direct relation between the complexity and the accuracy of the model.

  6. A Review on the Mechanical Modeling of Composite Manufacturing Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Cinar, Kenan; Ersoy, Nuri;

    2016-01-01

    approaches. The process models as well as applications focusing on the prediction of residual stresses and shape distortions taking place in composite manufacturing are discussed in this study. The applications on both thermoset and thermoplastic based composites are reviewed in detail.......The increased usage of fiber reinforced polymer composites in load bearing applications requires a detailed understanding of the process induced residual stresses and their effect on the shape distortions. This is utmost necessary in order to have more reliable composite manufacturing since...... the residual stresses alter the internal stress level of the composite part during the service life and the residual shape distortions may lead to not meeting the desired geometrical tolerances. The occurrence of residual stresses during the manufacturing process inherently contains diverse interactions...

  7. Moisture Absorption Model of Composites Considering Water Temperature Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of water temperature on composite moisture absorption parameters was investigated in temperature-controlled water bath. Experiments of carbon fiber/bismaleimide resin composites immersed in water of 60℃, 70℃and 80℃ were developed respectively. According to the moisture content-time curves obtained from the experimental results, the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content of the composites immersed in different water temperature could be calculated. What's more, the effect of water temperature on the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content were discussed too. According to the Arrhenius equation and the law of Fick, a moisture absorption model was proposed to simulate the hygroscopic behaviour of the composite laminates immersed in different water temperature which can predict the absorption rate of water of the composites immersed in distilled water of 95℃ at any time precisely and can calculate how long it will take to reach the specific absorption rate.

  8. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (Pcomposite resin. RMGIs have significantly lower SBS compared to composite resin for orthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range.

  9. Multiscale modeling of PVDF matrix carbon fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greminger, Michael; Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh

    2017-06-01

    Self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced composites have the potential to enable structural health monitoring that is inherent to the composite material rather than requiring external or embedded sensors. It has been demonstrated that a self-sensing carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite can be created by using the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) as the matrix material and using a Kevlar layer to separate two carbon fiber layers. In this configuration, the electrically conductive carbon fiber layers act as electrodes and the Kevlar layer acts as a dielectric to prevent the electrical shorting of the carbon fiber layers. This composite material has been characterized experimentally for its effective d 33 and d 31 piezoelectric coefficients. However, for design purposes, it is desirable to obtain a predictive model of the effective piezoelectric coefficients for the final smart composite material. Also, the inverse problem can be solved to determine the degree of polarization obtained in the PVDF material during polarization by comparing the effective d 33 and d 31 values obtained in experiment to those predicted by the finite element model. In this study, a multiscale micromechanics and coupled piezoelectric-mechanical finite element modeling approach is introduced to predict the mechanical and piezoelectric performance of a plain weave carbon fiber reinforced PVDF composite. The modeling results show good agreement with the experimental results for the mechanical and electrical properties of the composite. In addition, the degree of polarization of the PVDF component of the composite is predicted using this multiscale modeling approach and shows that there is opportunity to drastically improve the smart composite’s performance by improving the polarization procedure.

  10. Comparison of STRUCTURAL-ACOUSTIC Control Designs on AN Active Composite Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    BINGHAM, B.; ATALLA, M. J.; HAGOOD, N. W.

    2001-07-01

    This work presents a comparison of three technologies for structural-acoustic control that, while prevalent in the literature, had not been compared on a single structure. The comparison is generalizable because the techniques are implemented on a panel structure representative of a more complex structure (e.g., an aircraft fuselage, a submarine vehicle hull, a satellite payload shroud, etc.). The test-bed used for this comparison is a carbon-fiber composite panel manufactured with embedded active fiber composite actuators. Since such integrated structures constitute a continued avenue of research, the manufacturing and performance of this structure is illustrated. The design of the test-bed is guided by an effort to achieve a dynamic response similar to a single panel in a typical aircraft or rotorcraft fuselage.Existing active control architectures for broadband acoustic radiation reduction are compared both analytically and experimentally on a representative structure to quantify the capabilities and limitations of the existing control methodologies. Specifically, three broad categories of control are compared: classical feedback (rate feedback), optimal feedback (linear quadratic Gaussian), and adaptive feedforward control (x -filtered least mean square). The control architectures implemented during this study are all single-input/single-output in order to allow a fair comparison of the issues involved in the design, as well as the use and performance of each approach. Both the vibration and the acoustic performance are recorded for each experiment under equivalent conditions to allow a generalizable comparison. Experimental results lead to conclusions pertaining to the application of active structural-based control to improve the acoustic performance of more complex structures.

  11. Multiple ontologies in action: composite annotations for biosimulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, John H; Neal, Maxwell L; Galdzicki, Michal; Cook, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    There now exists a rich set of ontologies that provide detailed semantics for biological entities of interest. However, there is not (nor should there be) a single source ontology that provides all the necessary semantics for describing biological phenomena. In the domain of physiological biosimulation models, researchers use annotations to convey semantics, and many of these annotations require the use of multiple reference ontologies. Therefore, we have developed the idea of composite annotations that access multiple ontologies to capture the physics-based meaning of model variables. These composite annotations provide the semantic expressivity needed to disambiguate the often-complex features of biosimulation models, and can be used to assist with model merging and interoperability. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of composite annotations for model merging by describing their use within SemGen, our semantics-based model composition software. More broadly, if orthogonal reference ontologies are to meet their full potential, users need tools and methods to connect and link these ontologies. Our composite annotations and the SemGen tool provide one mechanism for leveraging multiple reference ontologies.

  12. Cross-continental comparison of the functional composition and carbon allocation of two altitudinal forest transects in Ecuador and Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; Bauters, Marijn; Bruneel, Stijn; Demol, Miro; Taveirne, Cys; Van Der Heyden, Dries; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Cizungu, Landry; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Tropical forests are key actors in the global carbon cycle. Predicting future responses of these forests to global change is challenging, but important for global climate models. However, our current understanding of such responses is limited, due to the complexity of forest ecosystems and the slow dynamics that inherently form these systems. Our understanding of ecosystem ecology and functioning could greatly benefit from experimental setups including strong environmental gradients in the tropics, as found on altitudinal transects. We setup two such transects in both South-America and Central Africa, focussing on shifts in carbon allocation, forest structure, nutrient cycling and functional composition. The Ecuadorian transect has 16 plots (40 by 40 m) and ranges from 400 to 3000 m.a.s.l., and the Rwandan transect has 20 plots (40 by 40 m) from 1500 to 3000 m.a.s.l. All plots were inventoried and canopy, litter and soil were extensively sampled. By a cross-continental comparison of both transects, we will gain insight in how different or alike both tropical forests biomes are in their responses, and how universal the observed altitudinal adaption mechanisms are. This could provide us with vital information of the ecological responses of both biomes to future global change scenarios. Additionally, comparison of nutrient shifts and trait-based functional composition allows us to compare the biogeochemical cycles of African and South-American tropical forests.

  13. Fallacies of composition in nonlinear marketing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischi, Gian Italo; Cerboni Baiardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider some nonlinear discrete-time dynamic models proposed in the literature to represent marketing competition, and we use these models to critically discuss the statement, often made in economic literature, that identical agents behave identically and quasi-identical ones behave in a similar way. We show, through examples and some general mathematical statements, that the one-dimensional model of a representative agent, whose dynamics summarize the common behavior of identical interacting agents, may be misleading. In order to discuss these topics some simple methods for the study of local stability and bifurcations are employed, as well as numerical examples where some results taken from the literature on chaos synchronization are applied to two-dimensional marketing models that exhibit riddling, blowout and other global phenomena related to the existence of measure-theoretic attractors.

  14. Computational modeling and impact analysis of textile composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Hae-Kyu

    This study is devoted to the development of an integrated numerical modeling enabling one to investigate the static and the dynamic behaviors and failures of 2-D textile composite as well as 3-D orthogonal woven composite structures weakened by cracks and subjected to static-, impact- and ballistic-type loads. As more complicated modeling about textile composite structures is introduced, some of homogenization schemes, geometrical modeling and crack propagations become more difficult problems to solve. To overcome these problems, this study presents effective mesh-generation schemes, homogenization modeling based on a repeating unit cell and sinusoidal functions, and also a cohesive element to study micro-crack shapes. This proposed research has two: (1) studying behavior of textile composites under static loads, (2) studying dynamic responses of these textile composite structures subjected to the transient/ballistic loading. In the first part, efficient homogenization schemes are suggested to show the influence of textile architectures on mechanical characteristics considering the micro modeling of repeating unit cell. Furthermore, the structures of multi-layered or multi-phase composites combined with different laminar such as a sub-laminate, are considered to find the mechanical characteristics. A simple progressive failure mechanism for the textile composites is also presented. In the second part, this study focuses on three main phenomena to solve the dynamic problems: micro-crack shapes, textile architectures and textile effective moduli. To obtain a good solutions of the dynamic problems, this research attempts to use four approaches: (I) determination of governing equations via a three-level hierarchy: micro-mechanical unit cell analysis, layer-wise analysis accounting for transverse strains and stresses, and structural analysis based on anisotropic plate layers, (II) development of an efficient computational approach enabling one to perform transient

  15. Modeling of Alternative Compositions of Recycled Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkijan, Varužan

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, a significant part of postconsumed wrought aluminum scrap is still used for the production of comparatively cheaper cast alloys, in that way losing an important part of the potential added value. The share of postconsumed scrap in wrought aluminum alloys could be increased either by sorting to fractions with the required chemical composition and/or by broadening the standard compositional tolerance limits of alloying elements. The first solution requires hand or automatic sorting of postconsumed scrap as alloys or groups of alloys to the degree of separation sufficient to enable the blending of standard compositions of wrought alloys; the second solution is much more radical, predicting changes in the existing standards for wrought aluminum alloys toward nonstandard alloys but yet having properties acceptable for customers. In this case, the degree of separation of incoming postconsumed scrap required is much less demanding. The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and nonstandard recycling-friendly) compositions and properties of wrought aluminum alloys with significantly increased amounts of postconsumed scrap. The following two routes were modeled in detail: (I) the blending of standard and nonstandard compositions of wrought aluminum alloys starting from postconsumed aluminum scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model and (II) changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminum alloys to nonstandard "recycling-friendly" ones, with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements and without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance. The applied algorithms were found to be very useful in the industrial design of both procedures: (I) the computation of the required chemical composition of the scrap streams obtained by sorting (or, in other words, the postconsumed scrap sorting level), necessary for achieving the standard wrought alloy composition and (II) the

  16. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  17. Modeling the Permittivity of Ferrite-Dielectric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Astakhov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the model of ferrite-dielectric (ferroelectric composites with semiconductive powder fillers. Such media have the potential for designing systems with controlled frequency dispersion. Experimentally observed significant increase of effective dielectric permittivity in Mn-Zn ferrite composites with the semiconductor pellet is explained on the basis of the capacitance effect. Composites based on Ni-Zn ferrite, which have significantly higher electrical resistance, do not exhibit such phenomena and their behavior is described in the framework of the traditional models of effective medium approximation. There is proposed an analytical solution for the dielectric constant of the composite, based on consideration of the impedances of equivalent circuit involving initial materials (matrix and filler.

  18. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayo, W. S.; Urrutia, J. D.; Temple, J. M. F.; Sandoval, J. R. D.; Sanglay, J. E. A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a time series model of the Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index and its volatility using the finite mixture of ARIMA model with conditional variance equations such as ARCH, GARCH, EG ARCH, TARCH and PARCH models. Also, the study aimed to find out the reason behind the behaviorof PSEi, that is, which of the economic variables - Consumer Price Index, crude oil price, foreign exchange rate, gold price, interest rate, money supply, price-earnings ratio, Producers’ Price Index and terms of trade - can be used in projecting future values of PSEi and this was examined using Granger Causality Test. The findings showed that the best time series model for Philippine Stock Exchange Composite index is ARIMA(1,1,5) - ARCH(1). Also, Consumer Price Index, crude oil price and foreign exchange rate are factors concluded to Granger cause Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index.

  19. Flavor changing neutral currents in a realistic composite technicolor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Hamilton, Rowan T.

    1993-03-01

    We consider the phenomenology of a composite technicolor model proposed recently by Georgi. Composite technicolor interactions produce four-quark operators in the low energy theory that contribute to flavor changing neutral current processes. While we expect operators of this type to be induced at the compositeness scale by the flavor-symmetry breaking effects of the preon mass matrices, the Georgi model also includes operators from higher scales that are not GIM-suppressed. Since these operators are potentially large, we study their impact on flavor changing neutral currents and CP violation in the neutral K, B, and D meson systems. Notably, we find that this model gives rise to a typical value for {ɛ‧}/{ɛ} that is much smaller than most standard model estimates.

  20. A physically-based abrasive wear model for composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gun Y.; Dharan, C.K.H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2001-05-01

    A simple physically-based model for the abrasive wear of composite materials is presented based on the mechanics and mechanisms associated with sliding wear in soft (ductile) matrix composites containing hard (brittle) reinforcement particles. The model is based on the assumption that any portion of the reinforcement that is removed as wear debris cannot contribute to the wear resistance of the matrix material. The size of this non-contributing portion of the reinforcement is estimated by modeling the three primary wear mechanisms, specifically plowing, interfacial cracking and particle removal. Critical variables describing the role of the reinforcement, such as its relative size and the nature of the matrix/reinforcement interface, are characterized by a single contribution coefficient, C. Predictions are compared with the results of experimental two-body (pin-on drum) abrasive wear tests performed on a model aluminum particulate-reinforced epoxy matrix composite material.

  1. Composite modelling of interactions between beaches and structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerritsen, Herman; Sutherland, James; Deigaard, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    An overview of Composite Modelling (CM) is presented, as elaborated in the EU/HYDRALAB joint research project Composite Modelling of the Interactions Between Beaches and Structures. An introduction and a review of the main literature on CM in the hydraulic community are given. In Section 3...... in the various case studies. The related subject of Good Modelling Practice is summarized in Section 5. Then guidelines are given on how to decide if CM may be beneficial, and how to set up a CM experiment. It is concluded that CM in the hydraulic community is still in its infancy but involves challenging...... research with significant potential....

  2. A Local Composition Model for Paraffinic Solid Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, A.P. João; Knudsen, Kim; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    1996-01-01

    The description of the solid-phase non-ideality remains the main obstacle in modelling the solid-liquid equilibrium of hydrocarbons. A theoretical model, based on the local composition concept, is developed for the orthorhombic phase of n-alkanes and tested against experimental data for binary sy...... systems. It is shown that it can adequately predict the experimental phase behaviour of paraffinic mixtures. This work extends the applicability of local composition models to the solid phase. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  3. Numerical evaluation of bulk material properties of dental composites using two-phase finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianying; Li, Haiyan; Fok, Alex S L; Watts, David C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to numerically evaluate the effects of filler contents and resin properties on the material properties of dental composites utilizing realistic 3D micromechanical finite element models. 3D micromechanical finite element models of dental composites containing irregular fillers with non-uniform sizes were created based on a large-scale, surrogate mixture fabricated from irregularly shaped stones and casting resin. The surrogate mixture was first scanned with a micro-CT scanner, and the images reassembled to produce a 3D finite element model. Different filler fractions were achieved by adjusting the matrix volume while keeping the fillers unchanged. Polymerization shrinkage, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and viscosity of the model composites were predicted using the finite element models, and their dependence on the filler fraction and material properties of the resin matrix were considered. Comparison of the numerical predictions with available experimental data and analytical models from the literature was performed. Increased filler fraction resulted in lower material shrinkage, higher Young's modulus, lower Poisson's ratio and higher viscosity in the composite. Predicted shrinkage and Young's modulus agreed well with the experimental data and analytical predictions. The McGee-McCullough model best fit the shrinkage and Young's modulus predicted by the finite element method. However, a new parameter, used as the exponent of the filler fraction, had to be introduced to the McGee-McCullough model to better match the predicted viscosity and Poisson's ratio with those from the finite element analysis. Realistic micro-structural finite element models were successfully applied to study the effects of filler fraction and matrix properties on a wide range of mechanical properties of dental composites with irregular fillers. The results can be used to direct the design of such materials to achieve the desired mechanical properties. Published by

  4. Implications of a Light Higgs in Composite Models

    CERN Document Server

    Redi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We study the Higgs mass in composite Higgs models with partial compositeness, extending the results of Ref. [1] to different representations of the composite sector for SO(5)/SO(4) and to the coset SO(6)/SO(5). For a given tuning we find in general a strong correlation between the mass of the top partners and the Higgs mass, akin to the one in supersymmetry. If the theory is natural a Higgs mass of 125 GeV typically requires fermionic partners below TeV which might be within the reach of the present run of LHC. A discussion of CP properties of both cosets is also presented.

  5. A model for biodegradation of composite materials made of polyesters and tricalcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jingzhe; Han, Xiaoxiao; Niu, Wenjuan; Cameron, Ruth E

    2011-03-01

    A saturation behaviour has been observed when incorporating tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in various polyesters to control the degradation rate. This paper presents an understanding of this behaviour using a mathematical model. The coupled process of hydrolysis reaction of the ester bonds, acid dissociation of the carboxylic end groups, dissolution of the calcium phosphates and buffering reactions by the dissolved phosphate ions is modelled together using a set of differential equations. Two non-dimensional groups of the material and chemical parameters are identified which control the degradation rate of the composites. An effectiveness map is established to show the conditions under which incorporating TCP into polyesters is effective, saturated or ineffective. Comparisons are made between the model predictions and existing experimental data in the literature. The map provides a useful tool to guide the design of polyester/TCP composites for tissue engineering and orthopaedic fixation applications.

  6. Imitation model of destruction of aviation fibrous polymeric composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Синеглазов

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered are models imitating influence of lighting on dielectric construction materials with elements of lighting protection. Described are models of current spreading in multilayer materials and thermal destruction of fibrous polymeric composite materials caused by lighting current flowing on such materials

  7. Physical and Model Uncertainty for Fatigue Design of Composite Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    The main aim of the present report is to establish stochastic models for the uncertainties related to fatigue design of composite materials. The uncertainties considered are the physical uncertainty related to the static and fatigue strength and the model uncertainty related to Miners rule...

  8. Modelling and arrangement of composite panels in modernized freight cars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płaczek Marek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A process of modelling in a CAD system and designing of arrangement of composite panels used for freight cars’ body shell protection against corrosion and for easier unloading of transported cargo in winter conditions is presented in this work. Arrangement of used composite panels was designing in order to fulfil assumed criteria and thus to improve the process of freight cars modernization during periodic repairs.

  9. Violation of lepton flavour universality in composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Niehoff, Christoph; Straub, David M

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether the the $2.6\\sigma$ deviation from lepton flavour universality in $B^+\\to K^+\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays recently observed at the LHCb experiment can be explained in minimal composite Higgs models. We show that a visible departure from universality is indeed possible if left-handed muons have a sizable degree of compositeness. Constraints from $Z$-pole observables are avoided by a custodial protection of the muon coupling.

  10. Pyrolysis of reinforced polymer composites: Parameterizing a model for multiple compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Geraldine E.

    A single set of material properties was developed to describe the pyrolysis of fiberglass reinforced polyester composites at multiple composition ratios. Milligram-scale testing was performed on the unsaturated polyester (UP) resin using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to establish and characterize an effective semi-global reaction mechanism, of three consecutive first-order reactions. Radiation-driven gasification experiments were conducted on UP resin and the fiberglass composites at compositions ranging from 41 to 54 wt% resin at external heat fluxes from 30 to 70 kW m -2. The back surface temperature was recorded with an infrared camera and used as the target for inverse analysis to determine the thermal conductivity of the systematically isolated constituent species. Manual iterations were performed in a comprehensive pyrolysis model, ThermaKin. The complete set of properties was validated for the ability to reproduce the mass loss rate during gasification testing.

  11. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  12. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Beekmann, M.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Curci, G.; Foret, G.; Hodzic, A.; Mailler, S.; Meleux, F.; Monge, J.-L.; Pison, I.; Turquety, S.; Valari, M.; Vautard, R.; Vivanco, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources), stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM). The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  13. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM. The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  14. Asymptotic curved interface models in piezoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpilli, Michele

    2016-10-01

    We study the electromechanical behavior of a thin interphase, constituted by a piezoelectric anisotropic shell-like thin layer, embedded between two generic three-dimensional piezoelectric bodies by means of the asymptotic analysis in a general curvilinear framework. After defining a small real dimensionless parameter ε, which will tend to zero, we characterize two different limit models and their associated limit problems, the so-called weak and strong piezoelectric curved interface models, respectively. Moreover, we identify the non-classical electromechanical transmission conditions at the interface between the two three-dimensional bodies.

  15. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard;

    2008-01-01

    and variations in water chemistry that are caused by large scale geochemical processes taking place at the timescale of thousands of years. The most important geochemical processes are ion exchange (Valreas and Aveiro) where freshwater solutes are displacing marine ions from the sediment surface, and carbonate...... dissolution (East Midlands, Valreas and Aveiro). Reactive transport models, employing the code PHREEQC, which included these geochemical processes and one-dimensional solute transport were able to duplicate the observed patterns in water quality. These models may provide a quantitative understanding...

  16. Comparison of dark energy models after Planck 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yue-Yao

    2016-01-01

    We make a comparison for ten typical, popular dark energy models according to theirs capabilities of fitting the current observational data. The observational data we use in this work include the JLA sample of type Ia supernovae observation, the Planck 2015 distance priors of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the direct measurement of the Hubble constant. Since the models have different numbers of parameters, in order to make a fair comparison, we employ the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria to assess the worth of the models. The analysis results show that, according to the capability of explaining observations, the cosmological constant model is still the best one among all the dark energy models. The generalized Chaplygin gas model, the constant $w$ model, and the $\\alpha$ dark energy model are worse than the cosmological constant model, but still are good models compared to others. The holographic dark energy model, the new generalized Chaply...

  17. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    Reactive transport models, were developed to explore the evolution in groundwater chemistry along the flow path in three aquifers; the Triassic East Midland aquifer (UK), the Miocene aquifer at Valreas (F) and the Cretaceous aquifer near Aveiro (P). All three aquifers contain very old groundwaters...... of the evolution in natural baseline properties in groundwater....

  18. Comparison of Fatigue Life Between C/SiC and SiC/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the comparison of fatigue life between C/SiC and SiC/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) at room and elevated temperatures has been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of cross-ply, 2D and 3D C/SiC and SiC/SiC composites at room temperature, 550 °C in air, 750 °C in dry and humid condition, 800 °C in air, 1000 °C in argon and air, 1100 °C, 1300 °C and 1500 °C in vacuum, have been predicted. At room temperature, the fatigue limit of 2D C/SiC composite with ECFL of 20 % lies between 0.78 and 0.8 tensile strength; and the fatigue limit of 2D SiC/SiC composite with ECFL of 20 % lies between 0.75 and 0.85 tensile strength. The fatigue limit of 2D C/SiC composite increases to 0.83 tensile strength with ECFL increasing from 20 to 22.5 %, and the fatigue limit of 3D C/SiC composite is 0.85 tensile strength with ECFL of 37 %. The fatigue performance of 2D SiC/SiC composite is better than that of 2D C/SiC composite at elevated temperatures in oxidative environment.

  19. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  20. Independent scattering model and velocity dispersion in trabecular bone: comparison with a multiple scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïat, G; Naili, S

    2011-02-01

    Speed of sound measurements are used clinically to assess bone strength. Trabecular bone is an attenuating composite material in which negative values of velocity dispersion have been measured; this behavior remaining poorly explained physically. The aim of this work is to describe the ultrasonic propagation in trabecular bone modeled by infinite cylinders immersed in a saturating matrix and to derive the physical determinants of velocity dispersion. An original homogenization model accounting for the coupling of independent scattering and absorption phenomena allows the computation of phase velocity and of dispersion while varying bone properties. The first step of the model consists in the computation of the attenuation coefficient at all frequencies. The second step of the model corresponds to the application of the general Kramers-Krönig relationship to derive the frequency dependence of phase velocity. The model predicts negative values of velocity dispersion in agreement with experimental results obtained in phantoms mimicking trabecular bone. In trabecular bone, only negative values of velocity dispersion are predicted by the model, which span within the range of values measured experimentally. However, the comparison of the present results with results obtained in Haiat et al. (J Acoust Soc Am 124:4047-4058, 2008) assuming multiple scattering indicates that accounting for multiple scattering phenomena leads to a better prediction of velocity dispersion in trabecular bone.

  1. Loss of accuracy using smeared properties in composite beam modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning

    Advanced composite materials have broad, proven applications in many engineering systems ranging from sports equipment sectors to components on the space shuttle because of their lightweight characteristics and significantly high stiffness. Together with this merit of composite materials is the challenge of improving computational simulation process for composites analysis. Composite structures, particularly composite laminates, usually consist of many layers with different lay-up angles. The anisotropic and heterogeneous features render 3D finite element analysis (FEA) computationally expensive in terms of the computational time and the computing power. At the constituent level, composite materials are heterogeneous. But quite often one homogenizes each layer of composites, i.e. lamina, and uses the homogenized material properties as averaged (smeared) values of those constituent materials for analysis. This is an approach extensively used in design and analysis of composite laminates. Furthermore, many industries tempted to use smeared properties at the laminate level to further reduce the model of composite structures. At this scale, smeared properties are averaged material properties that are weighted by the layer thickness. Although this approach has the advantage of saving computational time and cost of modeling significantly, the prediction of the structural responses may not be accurate, particularly the pointwise stress distribution. Therefore, it is important to quantify the loss of accuracy when one uses smeared properties. In this paper, several different benchmark problems are carefully investigated in order to exemplify the effect of the smeared properties on the global behavior and pointwise stress distribution of the composite beam. In the classical beam theory, both Newtonian method and variational method include several ad hoc assumptions to construct the model, however, these assumptions are avoided if one uses variational asymptotic method. VABS

  2. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  3. BMX bicycles: accident comparison with other models.

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A comparison has been made between BMX bicycle accidents and those occurring when children ride other types of bicycle. The injuries sustained are compared to see if the clinical impressions that BMX are more dangerous, and produce more facial injuries, are correct. This was found not to be true as half the children involved rode BMX bicycles, and the injuries sustained were similar to those occurring to non BMX riders. BMX riders had a lower proportion of serious injuries than riders of raci...

  4. Comparison of performance of simulation models for floor heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    only the floor construction, the differences can be directly compared. In this comparison, a two-dimensional model of a slab-on-grade floor including foundation is used as reference. The other models include a one-dimensional model and a thermal network model including the linear thermal transmittance......This paper describes the comparison of performance of simulation models for floor heating with different level of detail in the modelling process. The models are compared in an otherwise identical simulation model containing room model, walls, windows, ceiling and ventilation system. By exchanging...... of the foundation. The result can be also be found in the energy consumption of the building, since up to half the energy consumption is lost through the ground. Looking at the different implementations it is also found, that including a 1m ground volume below the floor construction under a one-dimensional model...

  5. Consistent Static Models of Local Thermospheric Composition Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Picone, J M; Drob, D P

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigate the ideal, nondriven multifluid equations of motion to identify consistent (i.e., truly stationary), mechanically static models for composition profiles within the thermosphere. These physically faithful functions are necessary to define the parametric core of future empirical atmospheric models and climatologies. Based on the strength of interspecies coupling, the thermosphere has three altitude regions: (1) the lower thermosphere (herein z ~200 km), in which the species flows are approximately uncoupled; and (3) a transition region in between, where the effective species particle mass and the effective species vertical flow interpolate between the solutions for the upper and lower thermosphere. We place this view in the context of current terminology within the community, i.e., a fully mixed (lower) region and an upper region in diffusive equilibrium (DE). The latter condition, DE, currently used in empirical composition models, does not represent a truly static composition profile ...

  6. Modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with the finite volume method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, Valentin; Dawson, Francis P; Pugh, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric devices, such as piezoelectric traveling- wave rotary ultrasonic motors, have composite piezoelectric structures. A composite piezoelectric structure consists of a combination of two or more bonded materials, at least one of which is a piezoelectric transducer. Piezoelectric structures have mainly been numerically modeled using the finite element method. An alternative approach based on the finite volume method offers the following advantages: 1) the ordinary differential equations resulting from the discretization process can be interpreted directly as corresponding circuits; and 2) phenomena occurring at boundaries can be treated exactly. This paper presents a method for implementing the boundary conditions between the bonded materials in composite piezoelectric structures modeled with the finite volume method. The paper concludes with a modeling example of a unimorph structure.

  7. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  8. Prokaryote phylogeny meets taxonomy: An exhaustive comparison of composition vector trees with systematic bacteriology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Lei; QI; Ji; SUN; JianDong; HAO; BaiLin

    2007-01-01

    We perform an exhaustive, taxon by taxon, comparison of the branchings in the composition vector trees (CVTrees) inferred from 432 prokaryotic genomes available on 31 December 2006, with the bacteriologists' taxonomy-primarily the latest online Outline of the Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. The CVTree phylogeny agrees very well with the Bergey's taxonomy in majority of fine branchings and overall structures. At the same time most of the differences between the trees and the Manual have been known to biologists to some extent and may hint at taxonomic revisions. Instead of demonstrating the overwhelming agreement this paper puts emphasis on the biological implications of the differences.

  9. Influence of Heterogeneous OH Oxidation on the Evaporation Behavior and Composition of a Model Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, K. R.; Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneously oxidized squalane particles are used here as a model system to investigate the interplay between chemical composition and particle volatility. Reaction of squalane particles by OH radicals leads to the production of oxygenated products. Here we use the vacuum ultra-violet Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (VUV-AMS) at beamline 9.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source to monitor the evolution of specific oxidation products that result from increasing OH exposures, and how the composition changes as the oxidized particles evaporate. The soft ionization in the VUV-AMS allows us to uniquely track the parent squalane molecule and the various oxidation products over multiple generations of oxidation. Compositional changes of the oxidized particles resulting from evaporation have been measured in three sets of laboratory experiments. In the first set, a thermodenuder at varying temperatures was used to induce evaporation of particles at a fixed OH exposure. Second, the OH exposure was varied along with temperature to create a cross-sectional observation of particle composition at 50% mass fraction remaining for ten different oxidation levels. The combination of these two experiments provides information as to the compositional changes that occur during evaporation due to heating. In the third set of experiments, VUV-AMS spectra of oxidized squalane particles following dilution-induced evaporation were measured for comparison with the thermodenuder experiments. These experiments provide insights into the relationships between particle oxidation, composition and evaporation kinetics.

  10. Analysis of the body composition of Paralympic athletes: Comparison of two methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Valdir De Aquino; Alves, Eduardo Da Silva; Schwingel, Paulo Adriano; Rosa, João Paulo Pereira; Silva, Andressa Da; Winckler, Ciro; Vital, Roberto; De Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Tufik, Sergio; De Mello, Marco Túlio

    2016-11-01

    Body composition is a physiological variable associated with physical activity and, in some cases, is related to athletic performance. Our objectives were to describe the body composition of participants in three distinct Paralympic sports and to compare the values of body density and estimated body fat obtained from the Paralympic athletes on the National Team by air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) and by the anthropometric method (skinfolds (SFs)). The sample consisted of 70 volunteers of both genders. The body composition of the volunteers was evaluated using the ADP in a Bod Pod(®) and seven SFs. There were no significant differences between the values obtained by ADP and SF for body fat percentage (p = .58) and body density (p = .49). Analysis by Bland-Altman plots showed mean differences of 0.56 ± 4.94 (-9.12-10.23) and -0.0017 ± 0.0113 (-0.024-0.020) for body fat percentage and body density, respectively. In conclusion, body composition analyses of Paralympic athletes by the ADP and SF methods show similar results, and ADP should be used as the first option when available. When the use of ADP is not possible, estimating body density and fat percentage by SF is a viable alternative for Paralympic athletes when future comparisons will use the same analysis method.

  11. Micromechanical modeling of unidirectional composites with uneven interfacial strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials under loads normal to the fiber orientation often fail due to debonding between fibers and matrix. In this paper a micromechanical model is developed to study the interfacial and geometrical effects in fiber-reinforced composites using generalized plane strain by means......, a trapezoidal cohesive zone model is used. A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the influence of the interfacial properties, fiber position and fiber volume fraction on the overall stressestrain response as well as the end-crack opening displacement and the opening crack angle. All the results...

  12. Modeling of Magnetoelectric Interaction in Magnetostrictive-Piezoelectric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Bichurin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper dwells on the theoretical modeling of magnetoelectric (ME effect in layered and bulk composites based on magnetostrictive and piezoelectric materials. Our analysis rests on the simultaneous solution of elastodynamic or elastostatic and electro/magnetostatic equations. The expressions for ME coefficients as the functions of material parameters and volume fractions of components are obtained. Longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane cases are considered. The use of the offered model has allowed to present the ME effect in ferrite cobalt-barium titanate, ferrite cobalt-PZT, ferrite nickel-PZT, and lanthanum strontium manganite-PZT composites adequately.

  13. Composite two-Higgs model with dynamical CP-violation

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, A A; Yudichev, V L

    1996-01-01

    Quark models with four-fermion interaction including derivatives of fields are exploited as prototypes for composite-Higgs extensions of the Standard Model. In the non-trivial case of two- and four-derivative insertions the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry occurs in two channels, giving rise to two composite Higgs doublets. For special configuration of four-fermion coupling constants the dynamical CP-violation in the Higgs sector appears as a result of complexity of two v.e.v. for Higgs doublets. In this scenario the second Higgs doublet is regarded as a radial excitation of the first one.

  14. Bayesian modelling of compositional heterogeneity in molecular phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, Sarah E; Nye, Tom M W; Boys, Richard J; Williams, Tom A; Embley, T Martin

    2014-10-01

    In molecular phylogenetics, standard models of sequence evolution generally assume that sequence composition remains constant over evolutionary time. However, this assumption is violated in many datasets which show substantial heterogeneity in sequence composition across taxa. We propose a model which allows compositional heterogeneity across branches, and formulate the model in a Bayesian framework. Specifically, the root and each branch of the tree is associated with its own composition vector whilst a global matrix of exchangeability parameters applies everywhere on the tree. We encourage borrowing of strength between branches by developing two possible priors for the composition vectors: one in which information can be exchanged equally amongst all branches of the tree and another in which more information is exchanged between neighbouring branches than between distant branches. We also propose a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for posterior inference which uses data augmentation of substitutional histories to yield a simple complete data likelihood function that factorises over branches and allows Gibbs updates for most parameters. Standard phylogenetic models are not informative about the root position. Therefore a significant advantage of the proposed model is that it allows inference about rooted trees. The position of the root is fundamental to the biological interpretation of trees, both for polarising trait evolution and for establishing the order of divergence among lineages. Furthermore, unlike some other related models from the literature, inference in the model we propose can be carried out through a simple MCMC scheme which does not require problematic dimension-changing moves. We investigate the performance of the model and priors in analyses of two alignments for which there is strong biological opinion about the tree topology and root position.

  15. Search Strategies for Top Partners in Composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben; Parker, M A; Sutherland, Dave

    2014-01-01

    We consider how best to search for top partners in generic composite Higgs models. We begin by classifying the possible group representations carried by top partners in models with and without a custodial $SU(2)\\times SU(2) \\rtimes \\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry protecting the rate for $Z \\rightarrow b\\overline{b}$ decays. We identify a number of minimal models whose top partners only have electric charges of $\\frac{1}{3}, \\frac{2}{3},$ or $\\frac{4}{3}$ and thus decay to top or bottom quarks via a single Higgs or electroweak gauge boson. We develop an inclusive search for these based on a top veto, which we find to be more effective than existing searches. Less minimal models feature light states that can be sought in final states with like-sign leptons and so we find that 2 straightforward LHC searches give a reasonable coverage of the gamut of composite Higgs models.

  16. Experimental Validation of a Thermoelastic Model for SMA Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2001-01-01

    This study presents results from experimental validation of a recently developed model for predicting the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, composite structures with an embedded SMA constituent. The model captures the material nonlinearity of the material system with temperature and is capable of modeling constrained, restrained, or free recovery behavior from experimental measurement of fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model and analysis procedures is given, followed by an overview of a parallel effort to fabricate and characterize the material system of SMAHC specimens. Static and dynamic experimental configurations for the SMAHC specimens are described and experimental results for thermal post-buckling and random response are presented. Excellent agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted results, fully validating the theoretical model for constrained recovery behavior of SMAHC structures.

  17. Radiation Belt Modeling for Spacecraft Design: Model Comparisons for Common Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Barth, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the current status of radiation belt modeling, providing model details and comparisons with AP-8 and AE-8 for commonly used orbits. Improved modeling of the particle environment enables smarter space system design.

  18. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  19. Turbulent Chemical Interaction Models in NCC: Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a scalar PDF hydrogen-air combustion model in predicting a complex reacting flow is evaluated. In addition the results are compared to those obtained by running the same case with the so-called laminar chemistry model and also a new model based on the concept of mapping partially stirred reactor data onto perfectly stirred reactor data. The results show that the scalar PDF model produces significantly different results from the other two models, and at a significantly higher computational cost.

  20. Cross-continental comparison of the functional composition and carbon allocation of two altitudinal forest transects in Ecuador and Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Marijn; Bruneel, Stijn; Demol, Miro; Taveirne, Cys; Van Der Heyden, Dries; Boeckx, Pascal; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Cizungu, Landry; Verbeeck, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are key actors in the global carbon cycle. Predicting future responses of these forests to global change is challenging, but important for global climate models. However, our current understanding of such responses is limited, due to the complexity of forest ecosystems and the slow dynamics that inherently form these systems. Our understanding of ecosystem ecology and functioning could greatly benefit from experimental setups including strong environmental gradients in the tropics, as found on altitudinal transects. We setup two such transects in both South-America and Africa, focussing on shifts in carbon allocation, forest structure and functional composition. By a cross-continental comparison of both transects, we will gain insight in how different or alike both tropical forests biomes are in their responses, and how universal the observed adaption mechanisms are.

  1. A Comparison of Metallic, Composite and Nanocomposite Optimal Transonic Transport Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Graeme J.; Kenway, Gaetan K. W.; Martins, Joaquim R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future composite material technologies have the potential to greatly improve the performance of large transport aircraft. However, the coupling between aerodynamics and structures makes it challenging to design optimal flexible wings, and the transonic flight regime requires high fidelity computational models. We address these challenges by solving a series of high-fidelity aerostructural optimization problems that explore the design space for the wing of a large transport aircraft. We consider three different materials: aluminum, carbon-fiber reinforced composites and an hypothetical composite based on carbon nanotubes. The design variables consist of both aerodynamic shape (including span), structural sizing, and ply angle fractions in the case of composites. Pareto fronts with respect to structural weight and fuel burn are generated. The wing performance in each case is optimized subject to stress and buckling constraints. We found that composite wings consistently resulted in lower fuel burn and lower structural weight, and that the carbon nanotube composite did not yield the increase in performance one would expect from a material with such outstanding properties. This indicates that there might be diminishing returns when it comes to the application of advanced materials to wing design, requiring further investigation.

  2. Plastic flow in a composite : a comparison of nonlocal continuum and discrete dislocation predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassani, J.L.; Needleman, A.; Giessen, E. van der

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional model composite with elastic reinforcements in a crystalline matrix subject to macroscopic shear is considered using both discrete dislocation plasticity and a nonlocal continuum crystal plasticity theory. Only single slip is permitted in the matrix material. The discrete dislocati

  3. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  4. Modeling transport properties of inhomogeneous superconductor-metal composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borroto, A.; Altshuler, E., E-mail: ealtshuler@fisica.uh.cu [Superconductivity Laboratory and “Henri Poincarè” Group of Complex Systems, Physics Faculty-IMRE, University of Havana, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Del Río, L. [Superconductivity Laboratory and “Henri Poincarè” Group of Complex Systems, Physics Faculty-IMRE, University of Havana, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arronte, M. [BRALAX, S. de RL., Tampico, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Technological Laser Laboratory, IMRE, University of Havana, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Johansen, T. H. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, 0316 Oslo (Norway); Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2014-11-17

    We propose a model for a superconductor-metal composite that allows to derive intrinsic transport properties of the superconducting phase based on 2D images of its cross section, and a minimal set of parameters. The method is tested experimentally by using, as model composite, a “transversal bridge” made on a Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10+x} (BSCCO)-Ag multi-filamentary tape. It is shown that the approach allows to predict the measured I−〈E〉 curves of the filaments. In addition, one can determine the critical current anisotropy between the longitudinal and transverse directions of the Ag-BSCCO tape, and also of its superconducting filaments separately, which emphasizes the role of the morphology of the composite in the transport properties.

  5. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  6. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S; Brodholt, John P

    2014-05-27

    Earth's core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain "light elements," such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe-Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle.

  7. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  8. Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composite deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, N. N.; Kuvyrkin, G. N.

    2016-09-01

    Mathematical models of carbon-carbon composites (CCC) intended for describing the processes of deformation of structures produced by using CCC under high-temperature loading are considered. A phenomenological theory of CCC inelastic deformation is proposed, where such materials are considered as homogeneous ones with effective characteristics and where their high anisotropy of mechanical characteristics and different ways of resistance to extension and compression are taken into account. Micromechanical models are proposed for spatially reinforced CCC, where the difference between mechanical characteristics of components and the reinforcement scheme are taken into account. Themodel parameters are determined from the results of experiments of composite macrospecimens in the directions typical of the material. A version of endochronictype theory with several internal times "launched" for each composite component and related to some damage accumulation mechanisms is proposed for describing the inelastic deformation. Some practical examples are considered.

  9. Integrating regional and continental scale comparisons of tree composition in Amazonian terra firme forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorio Coronado, E. N.; Baker, T. R.; Phillips, O. L.; Pitman, N. C. A.; Pennington, R. T.; Vásquez Martínez, R.; Monteagudo, A.; Mogollón, H.; Dávila Cardozo, N.; Ríos, M.; García-Villacorta, R.; Valderrama, E.; Ahuite, M.; Huamantupa, I.; Neill, D. A.; Laurance, W. F.; Nascimento, H. E. M.; Soares de Almeida, S.; Killeen, T. J.; Arroyo, L.; Núñez, P.; Freitas Alvarado, L.

    2009-01-01

    We contrast regional and continental-scale comparisons of the floristic composition of terra firme forest in South Amazonia, using 55 plots across Amazonia and a subset of 30 plots from northern Peru and Ecuador. Firstly, we examine the floristic patterns using both genus- or species-level data and find that the species-level analysis more clearly distinguishes different plot clusters. Secondly, we compare the patterns and causes of floristic differences at regional and continental scales. At a continental scale, ordination analysis shows that species of Lecythidaceae and Sapotaceae are gradually replaced by species of Arecaceae and Myristicaceae from eastern to western Amazonia. These floristic gradients are correlated with gradients in soil fertility and to dry season length, similar to previous studies. At a regional scale, similar patterns are found within north-western Amazonia, where differences in soil fertility distinguish plots where species of Lecythidaceae, characteristic of poor soils, are gradually replaced by species of Myristicaceae on richer soils. The main coordinate of this regional-scale ordination correlates mainly with concentrations of available calcium and magnesium. Thirdly, we ask at a regional scale within north-western Amazonia, whether soil fertility or other distance dependent processes are more important for determining variation in floristic composition. A Mantel test indicates that both soils and geographical distance have a similar and significant role in determining floristic similarity across this region. Overall, these results suggest that regional-scale variation in floristic composition can rival continental scale differences within Amazonian terra firme forests, and that variation in floristic composition at both scales is dependent on a range of processes that include both habitat specialisation related to edaphic conditions and other distance-dependent processes. To fully account for regional scale variation in continental

  10. Integrating regional and continental scale comparisons of tree composition in Amazonian terra firme forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Honorio Coronado

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We contrast regional and continental-scale comparisons of the floristic composition of terra firme forest in South Amazonia, using 55 plots across Amazonia and a subset of 30 plots from northern Peru and Ecuador. Firstly, we examine the floristic patterns using both genus- or species-level data and find that the species-level analysis more clearly distinguishes different plot clusters. Secondly, we compare the patterns and causes of floristic differences at regional and continental scales. At a continental scale, ordination analysis shows that species of Lecythidaceae and Sapotaceae are gradually replaced by species of Arecaceae and Myristicaceae from eastern to western Amazonia. These floristic gradients are correlated with gradients in soil fertility and to dry season length, similar to previous studies. At a regional scale, similar patterns are found within north-western Amazonia, where differences in soil fertility distinguish plots where species of Lecythidaceae, characteristic of poor soils, are gradually replaced by species of Myristicaceae on richer soils. The main coordinate of this regional-scale ordination correlates mainly with concentrations of available calcium and magnesium. Thirdly, we ask at a regional scale within north-western Amazonia, whether soil fertility or other distance dependent processes are more important for determining variation in floristic composition. A Mantel test indicates that both soils and geographical distance have a similar and significant role in determining floristic similarity across this region. Overall, these results suggest that regional-scale variation in floristic composition can rival continental scale differences within Amazonian terra firme forests, and that variation in floristic composition at both scales is dependent on a range of processes that include both habitat specialisation related to edaphic conditions and other distance-dependent processes. To fully account for regional scale

  11. Physiological models of body composition and human obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapses Sue A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The body mass index (BMI is the standard parameter for predicting body fat fraction and for classifying degrees of obesity. Currently available regression equations between BMI and fat are based on 2 or 3 parameter empirical fits and have not been validated for highly obese subjects. We attempt to develop regression relations that are based on realistic models of body composition changes in obesity. These models, if valid, can then be extrapolated to the high fat fraction of the morbidly obese. Methods The analysis was applied to 3 compartment (density and total body water measurements of body fat. The data was collected at the New York Obesity Research Center, Body Composition Unit, as part of ongoing studies. A total of 1356 subjects were included, with a BMI range of 17 to 50 for males and 17 to 65 for females. The body composition model assumes that obese subjects can be represented by the sum of a standard lean reference subject plus an extra weight that has a constant adipose, bone and muscle fraction. Results There is marked age and sex dependence in the relationship between BMI and fat fraction. There was no significant difference among Caucasians, Blacks and Hispanics while Asians had significantly greater fat fraction for the same BMI. A linear relationship between BMI and fat fraction provides a good description for men but overestimates the fat fraction in morbidly obese women for whom a non-linear regression should be used. New regression relations for predicting body fat just from experimental measurements of body density are described that are more accurate then those currently used. From the fits to the experimental BMI and density data, a quantitative description of the bone, adipose and muscle body composition of lean and obese subjects is derived. Conclusion Physiologically realistic models of body composition provide both accurate regression relations and new insights about changes in body composition in

  12. Data Analysis A Model Comparison Approach, Second Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Charles M; Ryan, Carey S

    2008-01-01

    This completely rewritten classic text features many new examples, insights and topics including mediational, categorical, and multilevel models. Substantially reorganized, this edition provides a briefer, more streamlined examination of data analysis. Noted for its model-comparison approach and unified framework based on the general linear model, the book provides readers with a greater understanding of a variety of statistical procedures. This consistent framework, including consistent vocabulary and notation, is used throughout to develop fewer but more powerful model building techniques. T

  13. Comparison of sparse point distribution models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbou, Søren Gylling Hemmingsen; Vester-Christensen, Martin; Larsen, Rasmus;

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares several methods for obtaining sparse and compact point distribution models suited for data sets containing many variables. These are evaluated on a database consisting of 3D surfaces of a section of the pelvic bone obtained from CT scans of 33 porcine carcasses. The superior...... model w.r.t. sparsity, reconstruction error and interpretability is found to be a varimax rotated model with a threshold applied to small loadings. The models describe the biological variation in the database and is used for developing robotic tools when automating labor intensive procedures...

  14. Comprehensive model for predicting elemental composition of coal pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricahrds, Andrew P. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Shutt, Tim [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Fletcher, Thomas H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-04-23

    Large-scale coal combustion simulations depend highly on the accuracy and utility of the physical submodels used to describe the various physical behaviors of the system. Coal combustion simulations depend on the particle physics to predict product compositions, temperatures, energy outputs, and other useful information. The focus of this paper is to improve the accuracy of devolatilization submodels, to be used in conjunction with other particle physics models. Many large simulations today rely on inaccurate assumptions about particle compositions, including that the volatiles that are released during pyrolysis are of the same elemental composition as the char particle. Another common assumption is that the char particle can be approximated by pure carbon. These assumptions will lead to inaccuracies in the overall simulation. There are many factors that influence pyrolysis product composition, including parent coal composition, pyrolysis conditions (including particle temperature history and heating rate), and others. All of these factors are incorporated into the correlations to predict the elemental composition of the major pyrolysis products, including coal tar, char, and light gases.

  15. Bistatic Reverberation in Shallow Water: Modelling and Data Comparison

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李风华; 刘建军

    2002-01-01

    Bistatic and monostatic reverberation data were recorded in the 2001 Asian Sea International Acoustic Experiment (ASIAEX). A model based on the normal mode theory has been developed to calculate bistatic bottom reverberation in shallow water and to explain the recorded data. The comparisons between the monostatic and bistatic reverberation data are discussed, and the comparisons between model predictions and measured bistatic reverberation data are also presented. The numerical and experimental results show that the numericalpredictions from the bistatic reverberation model fit the experimental data well, and the long-range bistatic reverberation with a time delay can be approximately expressed by the monostatic reverberation data.

  16. Extended propagation model for interfacial crack in composite material structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫相桥; 冯希金

    2002-01-01

    An interfacial crack is a common damage in a composite material structure . An extended propaga-tion model has been established for an interfacial crack to study the dependence of crack growth on the relativesizes of energy release rates at left and right crack tips and the properties of interfacial material characterize thegrowth of interfacial crack better.

  17. Compositional Modeling and Minimization of Time-Inhomogeneous Markov Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, T.; Katoen, J.P.; Mereacre, A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a compositional framework for the modeling of interactive continuous-time Markov chains with time-dependent rates, a subclass of communicating piecewise deterministic Markov processes. A poly-time algorithm is presented for computing the coarsest quotient under strong bisimulatio

  18. Model-driven development of service compositions for enterprise interoperability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khadka, Ravi; Sapkota, Brahmananda; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Sinderen, van Marten; Jansen, Slinger; Sinderen, van Marten; Johnson, Pontus

    2011-01-01

    Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) has emerged as an architectural style to foster enterprise interoperability, as it claims to facilitate the flexible composition of loosely coupled enterprise applications and thus alleviates the heterogeneity problem among enterprises. Meanwhile, Model-Driven Arc

  19. FibreChain: characterization and modeling of thermoplastic composites processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, A.D.; Niazi, M.S.; Akkerman, R.; Lomov, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermoplastic composites feature the advantage of melting and shaping. The material properties during processing and the final product properties are to a large extent determined by the thermal history of the material. The approach in the FP7-project FibreChain for process chain modeling of thermopl

  20. FibreChain: characterization and modeling of thermoplastic composites processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietman, Bert; Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Akkerman, Remko; Lomov, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermoplastic composites feature the advantage of melting and shaping. The material properties during processing and the final product properties are to a large extent determined by the thermal history of the material. The approach in the FP7-project FibreChain for process chain modeling of

  1. Nonlinear Thermoelastic Model for SMAs and SMA Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2004-01-01

    A constitutive mathematical model has been developed that predicts the nonlinear thermomechanical behaviors of shape-memory-alloys (SMAs) and of shape-memory-alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, which are composite-material structures that contain embedded SMA actuators. SMAHC structures have been investigated for their potential utility in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for static or dynamic control of the shapes of structures, control of the thermoelastic responses of structures, or control of noise and vibrations. The present model overcomes deficiencies of prior, overly simplistic or qualitative models that have proven ineffective or intractable for engineering of SMAHC structures. The model is sophisticated enough to capture the essential features of the mechanics of SMAHC structures yet simple enough to accommodate input from fundamental engineering measurements and is in a form that is amenable to implementation in general-purpose structural analysis environments.

  2. Experimental Support for a Categorical Compositional Distributional Model of Meaning

    CERN Document Server

    Grefenstette, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Modelling compositional meaning for sentences using empirical distributional methods has been a challenge for computational linguists. We implement the abstract categorical model of Coecke et al. (arXiv:1003.4394v1 [cs.CL]) using data from the BNC and evaluate it. The implementation is based on unsupervised learning of matrices for relational words and applying them to the vectors of their arguments. The evaluation is based on the word disambiguation task developed by Mitchell and Lapata (2008) for intransitive sentences, and on a similar new experiment designed for transitive sentences. Our model matches the results of its competitors in the first experiment, and betters them in the second. The general improvement in results with increase in syntactic complexity showcases the compositional power of our model.

  3. Amorphous track models: a numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Hahn, Ute;

    Amorphous track models such as Katz' Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach [1, 2] or the Local Effect Model (LEM) [3, 4] had reasonable success in predicting the response of solid state dosimeters and radiobiological systems. LEM is currently applied in radiotherapy for biological dose optimization in ca...

  4. Amorphous track models: A numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, L.; Bassler, N.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an open-source code library for amorphous track modelling which is suppose to faciliate the application and numerical comparability as well as serve as a frame-work for the implementation of new models. We show an example of using the library indicating the choice of submodels has a si...

  5. Dynamic energy-demand models. A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Feng [Department of Economics, Goeteborg University, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    This paper compares two second-generation dynamic energy demand models, a translog (TL) and a general Leontief (GL), in the study of price elasticities and factor substitutions of nine Swedish manufacturing industries: food, textiles, wood, paper, printing, chemicals, non-metallic minerals, base metals and machinery. Several model specifications are tested with likelihood ratio test. There is a disagreement on short-run adjustments; the TL model accepts putty-putty production technology of immediate adjustments, implying equal short- and long-run price elasticities of factors, while the GL model rejects immediate adjustments, giving out short-run elasticities quite different from the long-run. The two models also disagree in substitutability in many cases. 21 refs.

  6. A low composite scale preon model with complementarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, C. Q.; Marshak, R. E.

    1987-12-01

    We have constructed the first “realistic candidate” preon model with low composite scale satisfying complementarity between the Higgs and confining phases. The model is based on SU(4) metacolor and predicts four generations of ordinary quarks and leptons together with heavy neutrinos at the level of the standard gauge group SU(3) c × SU(2) L × U(1) Y . There are no exotic massless fermions. The global family group is SU(2)× U(1).

  7. Properties of the W boson in some composite models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girardi, G. (Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules); Narison, S. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Perrottet, M. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 13 - Marseille (France). Centre de Physique Theorique)

    1983-12-15

    We analyze the effects of some electroweak interaction models with a composite W at present energies. We find that the width of the W into pairs of pseudoscalar bosons can be appreciable and may reduce its leptonic branching ratio by about 20%. The front-back asymmetry of leptons at the proton-antiproton collider is similar to the one obtained in the standard model.

  8. Physiological models of body composition and human obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Shapses Sue A; Pierson Richard N; Heymsfield Steven B; Levitt David G; Kral John G

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The body mass index (BMI) is the standard parameter for predicting body fat fraction and for classifying degrees of obesity. Currently available regression equations between BMI and fat are based on 2 or 3 parameter empirical fits and have not been validated for highly obese subjects. We attempt to develop regression relations that are based on realistic models of body composition changes in obesity. These models, if valid, can then be extrapolated to the high fat fraction...

  9. A comparison of graphite/epoxy tape laminates and 2-D braided composites mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguet, Pierre J.

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of the mechanical properties of unidirectional composite tape laminates and of two-dimensional triaxially braided composite was conducted. The tape laminate layups were designed to match the percentage of axial fibers and the angle of the bias tows in the braided composite. The materials system used for the laminates is AS4/3501-6 which was chosen as the closest available match to As4/1895 used for the braids. The strength and stiffness properties measured here include tension, open-hole tension, filled-hole tension, compression and open-hole compression, all of these in both the longitudinal and transverse direction. Results show that the longitudinal modulus of both material forms is quite similar, but that the transverse modulus of the braids is lower. In terms of strength, the longitudinal unnotched strength of the braids is lower than that of the laminates, while the transverse strength is significantly lower. For both strength and stiffness, the crimp in the bias tows of the braid is probably the main cause for reduced properties. On the other hand, a very significant increase in open-hole and filled-hole tension strength was observed for the braids compared to the tape laminates. However, this was not observed in compression where all the braid properties are lower than for the laminates.

  10. Modeling and Characterization of a Graphite Nanoplatelet/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Chasiotis, I.; Chen, Q.; Gates, T. S.

    2004-01-01

    A micromechanical modeling procedure is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties of a graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composite as a function of volume fraction and nanoplatelet diameter. The predicted storage and loss moduli from the model are compared to measured values from the same material using Dynamical Mechanical Analysis, nanoindentation, and tensile tests. In most cases, the model and experiments indicate that for increasing volume fractions of nanoplatelets, both the storage and loss moduli increase. Also, in most cases, the model and experiments indicate that as the nanoplatelet diameter is increased, the storage and loss moduli decrease and increase, respectively.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Double-Steel Plate Composite Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Elmatzoglou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Double-steel plate concrete composite shear walls are being used for nuclear plants and high-rise buildings. They consist of thick concrete walls, exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement and shear connectors, which guarantee the composite action between the two different materials. Several researchers have used the Finite Element Method to investigate the behaviour of double-steel plate concrete walls. The majority of them model every element explicitly leading to a rather time-consuming solution, which cannot be easily used for design purposes. In the present paper, the main objective is the introduction of a three-dimensional finite element model, which can efficiently predict the overall performance of a double-steel plate concrete wall in terms of accuracy and time saving. At first, empirical formulations and design relations established in current design codes for shear connectors are evaluated. Then, a simplified finite element model is used to investigate the nonlinear response of composite walls. The developed model is validated using results from tests reported in the literature in terms of axial compression and monotonic, cyclic in-plane shear loading. Several finite element modelling issues related to potential convergence problems, loading strategies and computer efficiency are also discussed. The accuracy and simplicity of the proposed model make it suitable for further numerical studies on the shear connection behaviour at the steel-concrete interface.

  12. The Advantages of Four Dimensions for Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgart, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    We examine the relationship between little Higgs and 5d composite models with identical symmetry structures. By performing an "extreme" deconstruction, one can reduce any warped composite model to a little Higgs theory on a handful of sites. This allows us to use 4d intuition and the powerful constraints of nonlinear sigma models to elucidate obscure points in the original setup. We find that the finiteness of the Higgs potential in 5d is due to the same collective symmetry breaking as in the little Higgs. We compare a 4d and a 5d model with the same symmetry to the data. Reviewing the constraints on models related to the Minimal Composite Higgs (hep-ph/0412089), we see that it has difficulty in producing acceptable values for S, T, and m_{top} simultaneously. By contrast, in a global analysis, the Minimal Moose with custodial symmetry is viable in a large region of its parameter space and suffers from no numeric tunings. We conjecture that this result is generic for 4d and 5d models with identical symmetries...

  13. Context-aware Workflow Model for Supporting Composite Workflows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong-sun CHOI; Jae-young CHOI; Yong-yun CHO

    2010-01-01

    -In recent years,several researchers have applied workflow technologies for service automation on ubiquitous computing environments.However,most context-aware oprkflows do not offer a method to compose several workflows in order to get more large-scale or complicated workflow.They only provide a simple workflow model,not a composite workflow model.In this paper,the autorhs propose a context-aware worrkflow model to support composite workflows by expanding the patterns of the existing context-aware workflows,which support the basic workflow patterns.The suggested worklow modei offers composite workflow patterns for a context-aware workflow,which consists of various flow patterns,such as simple,split,parallel flows,and subflow.With the suggested model,the model can easily reuse few of existing workflows to make a new workflow.As a result,it can save the development efforts and time of cantext-aware workflows and increase the workflow reusability.Therefore,the suggested model is expected to make it easy to develop applications related to context-aware workflow services on ubiquitous computing environments.

  14. Modeling of carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestre, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book contains ten chapters, authored by world experts in the field of simulation at nano-scale and aims to demonstrate the potentialities of computational techniques to model the mechanical behavior of nano-materials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and their composites. A large part of the research currently being conducted in the fields of materials science and engineering mechanics is devoted to carbon nanotubes, graphene and their applications. In this process, computational modeling is a very attractive research tool due to the difficulties in manufacturing and testing of nano-materials. Both atomistic modeling methods, such as molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics, and continuum modeling methods are being intensively used. Continuum modeling offers significant advantages over atomistic modeling such as the reduced computational effort, the capability of modeling complex structures and bridging different analysis scales, thus enabling modeling from the nano- to the macro-scale. On the oth...

  15. Comparison of cursive models for handwriting instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsdottir, R

    1997-12-01

    The efficiency of four different cursive handwriting styles as model alphabets for handwriting instruction of primary school children was compared in a cross-sectional field experiment from Grade 3 to 6 in terms of the average handwriting speed developed by the children and the average rate of convergence of the children's handwriting to the style of their model. It was concluded that styles with regular entry stroke patterns give the steadiest rate of convergence to the model and styles with short ascenders and descenders and strokes with not too high curvatures give the highest handwriting speed.

  16. Multi-Scale Modeling of an Integrated 3D Braided Composite with Applications to Helicopter Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diantang; Chen, Li; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Yifan; Qian, Kun

    2017-01-01

    A study is conducted with the aim of developing multi-scale analytical method for designing the composite helicopter arm with three-dimensional (3D) five-directional braided structure. Based on the analysis of 3D braided microstructure, the multi-scale finite element modeling is developed. Finite element analysis on the load capacity of 3D five-directional braided composites helicopter arm is carried out using the software ABAQUS/Standard. The influences of the braiding angle and loading condition on the stress and strain distribution of the helicopter arm are simulated. The results show that the proposed multi-scale method is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical properties of 3D braided composites, validated by the comparison the stress-strain curves of meso-scale RVCs. Furthermore, it is found that the braiding angle is an important factor affecting the mechanical properties of 3D five-directional braided composite helicopter arm. Based on the optimized structure parameters, the nearly net-shaped composite helicopter arm is fabricated using a novel resin transfer mould (RTM) process.

  17. A forecast comparison of volatility models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2005-01-01

    We compare 330 ARCH-type models in terms of their ability to describe the conditional variance. The models are compared out-of-sample using DM-$ exchange rate data and IBM return data, where the latter is based on a new data set of realized variance. We find no evidence that a GARCH(1,1) is outpe......We compare 330 ARCH-type models in terms of their ability to describe the conditional variance. The models are compared out-of-sample using DM-$ exchange rate data and IBM return data, where the latter is based on a new data set of realized variance. We find no evidence that a GARCH(1...

  18. Comparison of dark energy models after Planck 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yue-Yao [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Zhang, Xin [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    We make a comparison for ten typical, popular dark energy models according to their capabilities of fitting the current observational data. The observational data we use in this work include the JLA sample of type Ia supernovae observation, the Planck 2015 distance priors of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the direct measurement of the Hubble constant. Since the models have different numbers of parameters, in order to make a fair comparison, we employ the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria to assess the worth of the models. The analysis results show that, according to the capability of explaining observations, the cosmological constant model is still the best one among all the dark energy models. The generalized Chaplygin gas model, the constant w model, and the α dark energy model are worse than the cosmological constant model, but still are good models compared to others. The holographic dark energy model, the new generalized Chaplygin gas model, and the Chevalliear-Polarski-Linder model can still fit the current observations well, but from an economically feasible perspective, they are not so good. The new agegraphic dark energy model, the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model, and the Ricci dark energy model are excluded by the current observations. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of dark energy models after Planck 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue-Yao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-11-01

    We make a comparison for ten typical, popular dark energy models according to their capabilities of fitting the current observational data. The observational data we use in this work include the JLA sample of type Ia supernovae observation, the Planck 2015 distance priors of cosmic microwave background observation, the baryon acoustic oscillations measurements, and the direct measurement of the Hubble constant. Since the models have different numbers of parameters, in order to make a fair comparison, we employ the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria to assess the worth of the models. The analysis results show that, according to the capability of explaining observations, the cosmological constant model is still the best one among all the dark energy models. The generalized Chaplygin gas model, the constant w model, and the α dark energy model are worse than the cosmological constant model, but still are good models compared to others. The holographic dark energy model, the new generalized Chaplygin gas model, and the Chevalliear-Polarski-Linder model can still fit the current observations well, but from an economically feasible perspective, they are not so good. The new agegraphic dark energy model, the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model, and the Ricci dark energy model are excluded by the current observations.

  20. New NIR Calibration Models Speed Biomass Composition and Reactivity Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining accurate chemical composition and reactivity (measures of carbohydrate release and yield) information for biomass feedstocks in a timely manner is necessary for the commercialization of biofuels. This highlight describes NREL's work to use near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares multivariate analysis to develop calibration models to predict the feedstock composition and the release and yield of soluble carbohydrates generated by a bench-scale dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis assay. This highlight is being developed for the September 2015 Alliance S&T Board meeting.

  1. Silkworm cocoons inspire models for random fiber and particulate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fujia; Porter, David; Vollrath, Fritz

    2010-10-01

    The bioengineering design principles evolved in silkworm cocoons make them ideal natural prototypes and models for structural composites. Cocoons depend for their stiffness and strength on the connectivity of bonding between their constituent materials of silk fibers and sericin binder. Strain-activated mechanisms for loss of bonding connectivity in cocoons can be translated directly into a surprisingly simple yet universal set of physically realistic as well as predictive quantitative structure-property relations for a wide range of technologically important fiber and particulate composite materials.

  2. Bayesian comparisons of codon substitution models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Lartillot, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé

    2008-11-01

    In 1994, Muse and Gaut (MG) and Goldman and Yang (GY) proposed evolutionary models that recognize the coding structure of the nucleotide sequences under study, by defining a Markovian substitution process with a state space consisting of the 61 sense codons (assuming the universal genetic code). Several variations and extensions to their models have since been proposed, but no general and flexible framework for contrasting the relative performance of alternative approaches has yet been applied. Here, we compute Bayes factors to evaluate the relative merit of several MG and GY styles of codon substitution models, including recent extensions acknowledging heterogeneous nonsynonymous rates across sites, as well as selective effects inducing uneven amino acid or codon preferences. Our results on three real data sets support a logical model construction following the MG formulation, allowing for a flexible account of global amino acid or codon preferences, while maintaining distinct parameters governing overall nucleotide propensities. Through posterior predictive checks, we highlight the importance of such a parameterization. Altogether, the framework presented here suggests a broad modeling project in the MG style, stressing the importance of combining and contrasting available model formulations and grounding developments in a sound probabilistic paradigm.

  3. Modeling Lightning Impact Thermo-Mechanical Damage on Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Delgado, Sofía; González, Carlos; López-Romano, Bernardo; Wang, De-Yi; LLorca, Javier

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers, used in primary structures for aircraft due to an excellent strength-to-weight ratio when compared with conventional aluminium alloy counterparts, may nowadays be considered as mature structural materials. Their use has been extended in recent decades, with several aircraft manufacturers delivering fuselages entirely manufactured with carbon composites and using advanced processing technologies. However, one of the main drawbacks of using such composites entails their poor electrical conductivity when compared with aluminium alloy competitors that leads to lightning strikes being considered a significant threat during the service life of the aircraft. Traditionally, this problem was overcome with the use of a protective copper/bronze mesh that added additional weight and reduced the effectiveness of use of the material. Moreover, this traditional sizing method is based on vast experimental campaigns carried out by subjecting composite panels to simulated lightning strike events. While this method has proven its validity, and is necessary for certification of the structure, it may be optimized with the aid provided by physically based numerical models. This paper presents a model based on the finite element method that includes the sources of damage observed in a lightning strike, such as thermal damage caused by Joule overheating and electromagnetic/acoustic pressures induced by the arc around the attachment points. The results of the model are compared with lightning strike experiments carried out in a carbon woven composite.

  4. Comparison Of Arrival Models In The Context Of Urban Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endri Raço

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling a random process requires a careful analysis and a correct interpretation of the behavior of the process. In different contexts, different statistical distributions may be eligible for the same model obtained in the study. In response to this situation created quite often in practice, we make use of statistical analysis methods to make possible comparison and decision making regarding the selection of the most appropriate model. In our study the usage of such methods is illustrated by comparing two of models commonly mentioned in literature when it comes to bus headway times modeling. Models under consideration are Gaussian model and Poisson model. To evaluate the performance of these models visual and analytical methods are used in this study. The simulation of these processes is made possible using the power of R language. Although both models have their practicability in a certain degree, tests showed that the Gaussian model fits best with the real model

  5. Hospital Case Cost Estimates Modelling - Algorithm Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Andru, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ontario (Canada) Health System stakeholders support the idea and necessity of the integrated source of data that would include both clinical (e.g. diagnosis, intervention, length of stay, case mix group) and financial (e.g. cost per weighted case, cost per diem) characteristics of the Ontario healthcare system activities at the patient-specific level. At present, the actual patient-level case costs in the explicit form are not available in the financial databases for all hospitals. The goal of this research effort is to develop financial models that will assign each clinical case in the patient-specific data warehouse a dollar value, representing the cost incurred by the Ontario health care facility which treated the patient. Five mathematical models have been developed and verified using real dataset. All models can be classified into two groups based on their underlying method: 1. Models based on using relative intensity weights of the cases, and 2. Models based on using cost per diem.

  6. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Zámborszky, Judit; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.6

    2010-01-01

    Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model buildin...

  7. Electromagnetomechanical elastodynamic model for Lamb wave damage quantification in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2014-03-01

    Physics-based wave propagation computational models play a key role in structural health monitoring (SHM) and the development of improved damage quantification methodologies. Guided waves (GWs), such as Lamb waves, provide the capability to monitor large plate-like aerospace structures with limited actuators and sensors and are sensitive to small scale damage; however due to the complex nature of GWs, accurate and efficient computation tools are necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for dispersion, coupling, and interaction with damage. In this paper, the local interaction simulation approach (LISA) coupled with the sharp interface model (SIM) solution methodology is used to solve the fully coupled electro-magneto-mechanical elastodynamic equations for the piezoelectric and piezomagnetic actuation and sensing of GWs in fiber reinforced composite material systems. The final framework provides the full three-dimensional displacement as well as electrical and magnetic potential fields for arbitrary plate and transducer geometries and excitation waveform and frequency. The model is validated experimentally and proven computationally efficient for a laminated composite plate. Studies are performed with surface bonded piezoelectric and embedded piezomagnetic sensors to gain insight into the physics of experimental techniques used for SHM. The symmetric collocation of piezoelectric actuators is modeled to demonstrate mode suppression in laminated composites for the purpose of damage detection. The effect of delamination and damage (i.e., matrix cracking) on the GW propagation is demonstrated and quantified. The developed model provides a valuable tool for the improvement of SHM techniques due to its proven accuracy and computational efficiency.

  8. Macro Scale Independently Homogenized Subcells for Modeling Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinzler, Brina J.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to analyze the impact response of triaxially braided carbon fiber composites, including the penetration velocity and impact damage patterns. In the analytical model, the triaxial braid architecture is simulated by using four parallel shell elements, each of which is modeled as a laminated composite. Currently, each shell element is considered to be a smeared homogeneous material. The commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA is used to conduct the simulations, and a continuum damage mechanics model internal to LS-DYNA is used as the material constitutive model. To determine the stiffness and strength properties required for the constitutive model, a top-down approach for determining the strength properties is merged with a bottom-up approach for determining the stiffness properties. The top-down portion uses global strengths obtained from macro-scale coupon level testing to characterize the material strengths for each subcell. The bottom-up portion uses micro-scale fiber and matrix stiffness properties to characterize the material stiffness for each subcell. Simulations of quasi-static coupon level tests for several representative composites are conducted along with impact simulations.

  9. Comparison of Different Mathematical Models of Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota HOMA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation occurs during the flow when local pressure drops to the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. It includes both evaporation and condensation of the vapor bubbles, which occur alternately with high frequency. Cavitation can be very dangerous, especially for pumps, because it leads to break of flow continuity, noise, vibration, erosion of blades and change in pump’s characteristics. Therefore it is very important for pump designers and users to avoid working in cavitation conditions. Simulation of flow can be very useful in that and can indicate if there is risk of cavitating flow occurrence. As this is a multiphase flow and quite complicated phenomena, there are a few mathematical models describing it. The aim of this paper is to make a short review of them and describe their approach to model cavitation. It is desirable to know differences between them to model this phenomenon properly.

  10. Composite modeling method in dynamics of planar mechanical system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a composite modeling method of the forward dynamics in general planar mechanical system. In the modeling process, the system dynamic model is generated by assembling the model units which are kinematical determinate in planar mechanisms rather than the body/joint units in multi-body system. A state space formulation is employed to model both the unit and system models. The validation and feasibility of the method are illustrated by a case study of a four-bar mechanism. The advantage of this method is that the models are easier to reuse and the system is easier to reconfigure. The formulation reveals the relationship between the topology and dynamics of the planar mechanism to some extent.

  11. Composite modeling method in dynamics of planar mechanical system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; LIN ZhongQin; LAI XinMin

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a composite modeling method of the forward dynamics in general planar mechanical system.In the modeling process,the system dynamic model is generated by assembling the model units which are kinematical determi-nate in planar mechanisms rather than the body/joint units in multi-body system.A state space formulation is employed to model both the unit and system models.The validation and feasibility of the method are illustrated by a case study of a four-bar mechanism.The advantage of this method is that the models are easier to reuse and the system is easier to reconfigure.The formulation reveals the rela-tionship between the topology and dynamics of the planar mechanism to some extent.

  12. Comparison of Prediction-Error-Modelling Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2007-01-01

    is a realization of a continuous-discrete multivariate stochastic transfer function model. The proposed prediction error-methods are demonstrated for a SISO system parameterized by the transfer functions with time delays of a continuous-discrete-time linear stochastic system. The simulations for this case suggest......Single and multi-step prediction-error-methods based on the maximum likelihood and least squares criteria are compared. The prediction-error methods studied are based on predictions using the Kalman filter and Kalman predictors for a linear discrete-time stochastic state space model, which...... computational resources. The identification method is suitable for predictive control....

  13. Comparison of Different Fuel Temperature Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weddig, Beatrice

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to improve the performance of the core calculation system used in Ringhals for in-core fuel management. It has been observed that, whereas the codes yield results that are in good agreement with measurements when the core operates at full nominal power, this agreement deteriorates noticeably when the reactor is running at reduced power. This deficiency of the code system was observed by comparing the calculated and measured boron concentrations in the moderator of the PWR. From the neutronic point of view, the difference between full power and reduced power in the same core is the different temperature of the fuel and the moderator. Whereas the coolant temperature can be measured and is thus relatively well known, the fuel temperature is only inferred from the moderator temperature as well as neutron physics and heat transfer calculations. The most likely reason for the above mentioned discrepancy is therefore the uncertainty of the fuel temperature at low power, and hence the incorrect calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity feedback through the so called Doppler effect. To obtain the fuel temperature at low power, usually some semi-empirical relations, sometimes called correlations, are used. The above-mentioned inaccuracy of the core calculation procedures can thus be tracked down to the insufficiency of these correlations. Therefore, the suggestion is that the above mentioned deficiency of the core calculation codes can be eliminated or reduced if the fuel temperature correlations are improved. An improved model, called the 30% model, is implemented in SIMULATE-3, the core calculation code used at Ringhals. The accuracy of the 30% model was compared to that of the present model by considering a number of cases, where measured values of the boron concentration at low power were available, and comparing them with calculated values using both the present and the new model. It was found that on the whole, the new fuel temperature

  14. Comparison of two different modelling tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Wiebke; Elmegaard, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a test case is solved using two different modelling tools, Engineering Equation Solver (EES) and WinDali, in order to compare the tools. The system of equations solved, is a static model of an evaporator used for refrigeration. The evaporator consists of two parallel channels......, and it is investigated how a non-uniform airflow influences the refrigerant mass flow rate distribution and the total cooling capacity of the heat exchanger. It is shown that the cooling capacity decreases significantly with increasing maldistribution of the airflow. Comparing the two simulation tools it is found...

  15. Tow collapse model for compression strength of textile composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emehel, T.C.; Shivakumar, K.N. [North Carolina A and T State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The unidirectional composite compression strength model based on microbuckling of fibers embedded in a rigid-plastic matrix was extended to multiaxial laminates and textile composites. The resulting expression is a function of matrix yield strength under the fiber constraint, fiber misalignment angle, fiber volume fraction, and the area fractions of various sets of inclined tows. The analysis was verified by experimentation. Compression tests were conducted on laminated, three-dimensional triaxially braided and orthogonally woven composites using the IITRI test specimen. The laminate specimens were made up of AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy composite with (0){sub 24}, (0/30/0/{minus}30){sub 3S}, and ((0/90)6/0){sub S} stacking sequence. Textile composites were made of BASF G30-500 graphite fiber tows (tow size is 6K) and Dow Chemicals Tactix 123 matrix. Fiber preform architecture of braided and woven composites before resin consolidation was 0/{+-}17 and 0/90, respectively and after consolidation it was about (7/{+-}20) and (5/90/90), respectively. The analysis agreed reasonably well with the test data for all cases considered. The axial fiber/tow misalignment angle for laminated, braided, and woven composites were about 4, 7, and 5 degrees, respectively. The compression strength was found to be strongly dependent on the percentage of axial tows and its misalignment angle. A small variation in the off-axis fiber/tow orientation had marginal effect on the compression strength. Hence, the off axis tow misalignment angle can be assumed to be same as the initial laminate or the two orientation angle.

  16. A generalized methodology to characterize composite materials for pyrolysis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Mark B.

    The predictive capabilities of computational fire models have improved in recent years such that models have become an integral part of many research efforts. Models improve the understanding of the fire risk of materials and may decrease the number of expensive experiments required to assess the fire hazard of a specific material or designed space. A critical component of a predictive fire model is the pyrolysis sub-model that provides a mathematical representation of the rate of gaseous fuel production from condensed phase fuels given a heat flux incident to the material surface. The modern, comprehensive pyrolysis sub-models that are common today require the definition of many model parameters to accurately represent the physical description of materials that are ubiquitous in the built environment. Coupled with the increase in the number of parameters required to accurately represent the pyrolysis of materials is the increasing prevalence in the built environment of engineered composite materials that have never been measured or modeled. The motivation behind this project is to develop a systematic, generalized methodology to determine the requisite parameters to generate pyrolysis models with predictive capabilities for layered composite materials that are common in industrial and commercial applications. This methodology has been applied to four common composites in this work that exhibit a range of material structures and component materials. The methodology utilizes a multi-scale experimental approach in which each test is designed to isolate and determine a specific subset of the parameters required to define a material in the model. Data collected in simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry experiments were analyzed to determine the reaction kinetics, thermodynamic properties, and energetics of decomposition for each component of the composite. Data collected in microscale combustion calorimetry experiments were analyzed to

  17. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  18. Designing experiments and analyzing data a model comparison perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Through this book's unique model comparison approach, students and researchers are introduced to a set of fundamental principles for analyzing data. After seeing how these principles can be applied in simple designs, students are shown how these same principles also apply in more complicated designs. Drs. Maxwell and Delaney believe that the model comparison approach better prepares students to understand the logic behind a general strategy of data analysis appropriate for various designs; and builds a stronger foundation, which allows for the introduction of more complex topics omitt

  19. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Geeta; Trehan, Mridula; Sharma, Sunil

    2013-09-01

    To measure and compare the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of light-cure composite. (Enlight, Ormco.) and dual-cure composite (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho). Sixty extracted human premolar teeth were divided into two groups: group I (blue): conventional light cure composite resin. (Enlight, Ormco.) and group II (green): dual cure composite resin. (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho.) with 30 teeth in each group. These samples were tested on the universal testing machine to measure the shear bond strength. Student t-test showed that the mean shear bond strength of the conventional light cure group (8.54 MPa - 10.42 MPa) was significantly lower than dual cure group (10.45 MPa -12.17 MPa). These findings indicate that the shear bond strength of dual-cure composite resin (Phase II dual cure, Reliance Ortho) is comparatively higher than conventional light-cure composite resin (Enlight, Ormco). In the majority of the samples, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were 4 and 5 in both the groups whereas score 1 is attained by the least number of samples in both the groups. How to cite this article: Verma G, Trehan M, Sharma S. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength and Estimation of Adhesive Remnant Index between Light-cure Composite and Dual-cure Composite: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):166-170.

  20. Global comparison of three greenhouse climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bavel, van C.H.M.; Takakura, T.; Bot, G.P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Three dynamic simulation models for calculating the greenhouse climate and its energy requirements for both heating and cooling were compared by making detailed computations for each of seven sets of data. The data sets ranged from a cold winter day, requiring heating, to a hot summer day, requiring

  1. Climate impact of transportation A model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girod, B.; Vuuren, D.P. van; Grahn, M.; Kitous, A.; Kim, S.H.; Kyle, P.

    2013-01-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global

  2. Climate impact of transportation A model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girod, B.; Vuuren, D.P. van; Grahn, M.; Kitous, A.; Kim, S.H.; Kyle, P.

    2013-01-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global servic

  3. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite with different flowable composites to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Merve Erkmen Almaz; Aylin Akbay Oba; Işıl Şaroğlu Sönmez; Deniz Sönmez

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable resin composite with different flowable composites to dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 extracted teeth were divided randomly into four groups, and dentin surfaces were exposed. Following materials were applied to dentin surfaces; Group I: VF (self-adhering flowable composite), Group II: CSE Bond (two-step self-etch adhesive) + CMF (conventional flowable composite), Gro...

  4. Modeling HVDC links in composite reliability evaluation: issues and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Lineu B. de [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Ramos, Dorel S. [Centrais Eletricas de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Morozowski Filho, Marciano [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    1992-12-31

    This paper deals with theoretical and practical aspects of HVDC link modeling for composite (generation and transmission) system reliability evaluation purposes. The conceptual framework used in the analysis, as well as the practical aspects, are illustrated through an application example. Initially, two distinct HVDC link operation models are described: synchronous and asynchronous. An analysis of the most significant internal failure modes and their effects on HVDC link transmission capability is presented and a reliability model is proposed. Finally, a historical performance data of the Itaipu HVDC system is shown. 6 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. A lumped model for rotational modes in periodic solid composites

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2013-10-01

    We present a lumped model to study the rotational modes in a type of two-dimensional periodic solid composites comprised of a square array of rubber-coated steel cylinders embedded in an epoxy matrix. The model captures the physical essence of rotational modes in such systems for various combinations of material parameters, and, therefore it is able to describe the transition behaviour when the system is gradually adjusted from an elastic metamaterial to an elastic phononic crystal. From the model, we can define a transition zone which separates the typical elastic metamaterials and the phononic crystals.

  6. Modelling the behaviour of composite sandwich structures when subject to air-blast loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Arora

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP and carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP sandwich structures (1.6 m x 1.3 m were subject to explosive air blast (100 kg TNT equivalent at stand-off distances of 14 m. Digital image correlation (DIC was used to obtain full-field data for the rear-face of each deforming target. A steel plate of comparable mass per unit area was also subjected to the same blast conditions for comparison. The experimental data was then verified with finite element models generated in Abaqus/Explicit. Close agreement was obtained between the numerical and experimental results, confirming that the CFRP panels had a superior blast performance to the GFRP panels. Moreover all composite targets sustained localised failures (that were more severe in the GFRP targets but retained their original shape post blast. The rear-skins remained intact for each composite target with core shear failure present.

  7. A micromechanical model for the failure and damage assessment of woven composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Wael Gamal Eldin

    A micromechanical model is advanced in order to study the stress transfer and associated damage and failure in classes of conventional and textile type fibrous composites. Unidirectionally reinforced matrix with straight and undulated fibers define the repeating constructing cell for conventional and textile composites, respectively. Starting with the case of straight reinforcement, we approximate and model the actual discrete composite as a concentric cylindrical system. For axisymmetric loading, and upon adopting some appropriate restrictions on the radial behavior of some field quantities, an elasticity-based procedure reduces the two-dimensional field equations, which hold in both fiber and matrix components together with the appropriate interface, symmetry and boundary conditions, to a quasi-one-dimensional system. This analysis is further extended to cases involving undulated fibers. Based upon local directions (slopes) of the undulated fibers, the linear transformation is used to obtain local stress distributions along the undulated fibers. The total stress field is found to be combinations of these local stresses and the inherent contributions obtained from the transformations of the normal loads along the undulated directions in the absence of reinforcement. This simple system retains total account of the system's physics and presents itself in the form of coupled partial differential equations in the longitudinal displacements and stresses of both the fiber and matrix components. According to this model, damage is simulated in the form of stress free boundary conditions. Perpetuation of damage is based upon the maximum normal stress criterion. The adverse effect of such damage on the stiffness properties of the composite is predicted. Results show the favorable effect of undulation in decreasing the rate of property degradation with increasing damage. The model is quite general and has been applied to several situations. These include response to static

  8. [Comparison of two spectral mixture analysis models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-Jun; Lin, Qi-Zhong; Li, Ming-Xiao; Wang, Li-Ming

    2009-10-01

    A spectral mixture analysis experiment was designed to compare the spectral unmixing effects of linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) and constraint linear spectral mixture analysis (CLSMA). In the experiment, red, green, blue and yellow colors were printed on a coarse album as four end members. Thirty nine mixed samples were made according to each end member's different percent in one pixel. Then, field spectrometer was located on the top of the mixed samples' center to measure spectrum one by one. Inversion percent of each end member in the pixel was extracted using LSMA and CLSMA models. Finally, normalized mean squared error was calculated between inversion and real percent to compare the two models' effects on spectral unmixing. Results from experiment showed that the total error of LSMA was 0.30087 and that of CLSMA was 0.37552 when using all bands in the spectrum. Therefore, LSMA was 0.075 less than that of CLSMA when the whole bands of four end members' spectra were used. On the other hand, the total error of LSMA was 0.28095 and that of CLSMA was 0.29805 after band selection. So, LSMA was 0.017 less than that of CLSMA when bands selection was performed. Therefore, whether all or selected bands were used, the accuracy of LSMA was better than that of CLSMA because during the process of spectrum measurement, errors caused by instrument or human were introduced into the model, leading to that the measured data could not mean the strict requirement of CLSMA and therefore reduced its accuracy: Furthermore, the total error of LSMA using selected bands was 0.02 less than that using the whole bands. The total error of CLSMA using selected bands was 0.077 less than that using the whole bands. So, in the same model, spectral unmixing using selected bands to reduce the correlation of end members' spectra was superior to that using the whole bands.

  9. MicroShield/ISOCS gamma modeling comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, Kenneth R

    2013-08-01

    Quantitative radiological analysis attempts to determine the quantity of activity or concentration of specific radionuclide(s) in a sample. Based upon the certified standards that are used to calibrate gamma spectral detectors, geometric similarities between sample shape and the calibration standards determine if the analysis results developed are qualitative or quantitative. A sample analyzed that does not mimic a calibrated sample geometry must be reported as a non-standard geometry and thus the results are considered qualitative and not quantitative. MicroShieldR or ISOCSR calibration software can be used to model non-standard geometric sample shapes in an effort to obtain a quantitative analytical result. MicroShieldR and Canberras ISOCSR software contain several geometry templates that can provide accurate quantitative modeling for a variety of sample configurations. Included in the software are computational algorithms that are used to develop and calculate energy efficiency values for the modeled sample geometry which can then be used with conventional analysis methodology to calculate the result. The response of the analytical method and the sensitivity of the mechanical and electronic equipment to the radionuclide of interest must be calibrated, or standardized, using a calibrated radiological source that contains a known and certified amount of activity.

  10. Composite model of quark-leptons and duality

    CERN Document Server

    Das, C R; Laperashvili, Larisa

    2006-01-01

    In the present investigation the model of preons and their composites is constructed in the framework of the superstring-inspired flipped E_6\\times \\tilde E_6 gauge group of symmetry which reveals a generalized dual symmetry. We assume that preons are dyons, which in our model are confined by hyper-magnetic strings - composite N = 1 supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. We show that the six types of strings having fluxes \\Phi_n = n\\Phi_0 (n = \\pm 1,\\pm 2,\\pm 3) produce three generations of composite quark-leptons and bosons. We give an explanation of hierarchies of masses in the Standard Model. The following values of masses obtained in our preonic model: m_t\\approx 173 GeV, m_c\\approx 1 GeV and m_u\\approx 4 MeV, m_b \\approx 4 GeV, m_s\\approx 140 MeV and m_d\\approx 4 MeV, m_\\tau\\approx 2 GeV \\quad and m_\\mu \\approx 100 MeV, are in agreement with the experimentally known results. The following left-handed neutrino masses are predicted: m_1\\approx 1....

  11. Tapered composite likelihood for spatial max-stable models

    KAUST Repository

    Sang, Huiyan

    2014-05-01

    Spatial extreme value analysis is useful to environmental studies, in which extreme value phenomena are of interest and meaningful spatial patterns can be discerned. Max-stable process models are able to describe such phenomena. This class of models is asymptotically justified to characterize the spatial dependence among extremes. However, likelihood inference is challenging for such models because their corresponding joint likelihood is unavailable and only bivariate or trivariate distributions are known. In this paper, we propose a tapered composite likelihood approach by utilizing lower dimensional marginal likelihoods for inference on parameters of various max-stable process models. We consider a weighting strategy based on a "taper range" to exclude distant pairs or triples. The "optimal taper range" is selected to maximize various measures of the Godambe information associated with the tapered composite likelihood function. This method substantially reduces the computational cost and improves the efficiency over equally weighted composite likelihood estimators. We illustrate its utility with simulation experiments and an analysis of rainfall data in Switzerland.

  12. Crush testing, characterizing, and modeling the crashworthiness of composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, David Michael, Jr.

    Research in the field of crashworthiness of composite materials is presented. A new crush test method was produced to characterize the crush behavior of composite laminates. In addition, a model of the crush behavior and a method for rank ordering the energy absorption capability of various laminates were developed. The new crush test method was used for evaluating the crush behavior of flat carbon/epoxy composite specimens at quasi-static and dynamic rates. The University of Utah crush test fixture was designed to support the flat specimen against catastrophic buckling. A gap, where the specimen is unsupported, allowed unhindered crushing of the specimen. In addition, the specimen's failure modes could be clearly observed during crush testing. Extensive crush testing was conducted wherein the crush force and displacement data were collected to calculate the energy absorption, and high speed video was captured during dynamic testing. Crush tests were also performed over a range of fixture gap heights. The basic failure modes were buckling, crack growth, and fracture. Gap height variations resulted in poorly, properly, and overly constrained specimens. In addition, guidelines for designing a composite laminate for crashworthiness were developed. Modeling of the crush behavior consisted of the delamination and fracture of a single ply or group of like plies during crushing. Delamination crack extension was modeled using the mode I energy release rate, G lc, where an elastica approach was used to obtain the strain energy. Variations in Glc were briefly explored with double cantilever beam tests wherein crack extension occurred along a multidirectional ply interface. The model correctly predicted the failure modes for most of the test cases, and offered insight into how the input parameters affect the model. The ranking method related coefficients of the laminate and sublaminate stiffness matrices, the ply locations within the laminate, and the laminate thickness. The

  13. Comparison and Analysis of Geometric Correction Models of Spaceborne SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weihao; Yu, Anxi; Dong, Zhen; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-06-25

    Following the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR), SAR images have become increasingly common. Many researchers have conducted large studies on geolocation models, but little work has been conducted on the available models for the geometric correction of SAR images of different terrain. To address the terrain issue, four different models were compared and are described in this paper: a rigorous range-doppler (RD) model, a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC) model, a revised polynomial (PM) model and an elevation derivation (EDM) model. The results of comparisons of the geolocation capabilities of the models show that a proper model for a SAR image of a specific terrain can be determined. A solution table was obtained to recommend a suitable model for users. Three TerraSAR-X images, two ALOS-PALSAR images and one Envisat-ASAR image were used for the experiment, including flat terrain and mountain terrain SAR images as well as two large area images. Geolocation accuracies of the models for different terrain SAR images were computed and analyzed. The comparisons of the models show that the RD model was accurate but was the least efficient; therefore, it is not the ideal model for real-time implementations. The RPC model is sufficiently accurate and efficient for the geometric correction of SAR images of flat terrain, whose precision is below 0.001 pixels. The EDM model is suitable for the geolocation of SAR images of mountainous terrain, and its precision can reach 0.007 pixels. Although the PM model does not produce results as precise as the other models, its efficiency is excellent and its potential should not be underestimated. With respect to the geometric correction of SAR images over large areas, the EDM model has higher accuracy under one pixel, whereas the RPC model consumes one third of the time of the EDM model.

  14. Comparison and Analysis of Geometric Correction Models of Spaceborne SAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihao Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR, SAR images have become increasingly common. Many researchers have conducted large studies on geolocation models, but little work has been conducted on the available models for the geometric correction of SAR images of different terrain. To address the terrain issue, four different models were compared and are described in this paper: a rigorous range-doppler (RD model, a rational polynomial coefficients (RPC model, a revised polynomial (PM model and an elevation derivation (EDM model. The results of comparisons of the geolocation capabilities of the models show that a proper model for a SAR image of a specific terrain can be determined. A solution table was obtained to recommend a suitable model for users. Three TerraSAR-X images, two ALOS-PALSAR images and one Envisat-ASAR image were used for the experiment, including flat terrain and mountain terrain SAR images as well as two large area images. Geolocation accuracies of the models for different terrain SAR images were computed and analyzed. The comparisons of the models show that the RD model was accurate but was the least efficient; therefore, it is not the ideal model for real-time implementations. The RPC model is sufficiently accurate and efficient for the geometric correction of SAR images of flat terrain, whose precision is below 0.001 pixels. The EDM model is suitable for the geolocation of SAR images of mountainous terrain, and its precision can reach 0.007 pixels. Although the PM model does not produce results as precise as the other models, its efficiency is excellent and its potential should not be underestimated. With respect to the geometric correction of SAR images over large areas, the EDM model has higher accuracy under one pixel, whereas the RPC model consumes one third of the time of the EDM model.

  15. A COMPARISON OF SEMANTIC SIMILARITY MODELS IN EVALUATING CONCEPT SIMILARITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. X. Xu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The semantic similarities are important in concept definition, recognition, categorization, interpretation, and integration. Many semantic similarity models have been established to evaluate semantic similarities of objects or/and concepts. To find out the suitability and performance of different models in evaluating concept similarities, we make a comparison of four main types of models in this paper: the geometric model, the feature model, the network model, and the transformational model. Fundamental principles and main characteristics of these models are introduced and compared firstly. Land use and land cover concepts of NLCD92 are employed as examples in the case study. The results demonstrate that correlations between these models are very high for a possible reason that all these models are designed to simulate the similarity judgement of human mind.

  16. Comparison of aerodynamic models for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, C. Simão; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Barone, M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-megawatt Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are experiencing an increased interest for floating offshore applications. However, VAWT development is hindered by the lack of fast, accurate and validated simulation models. This work compares six different numerical models for VAWTS: a multiple...... streamtube model, a double-multiple streamtube model, the actuator cylinder model, a 2D potential flow panel model, a 3D unsteady lifting line model, and a 2D conformal mapping unsteady vortex model. The comparison covers rotor configurations with two NACA0015 blades, for several tip speed ratios, rotor...... solidity and fixed pitch angle, included heavily loaded rotors, in inviscid flow. The results show that the streamtube models are inaccurate, and that correct predictions of rotor power and rotor thrust are an effect of error cancellation which only occurs at specific configurations. The other four models...

  17. a Comparison of Semantic Similarity Models in Evaluating Concept Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q. X.; Shi, W. Z.

    2012-08-01

    The semantic similarities are important in concept definition, recognition, categorization, interpretation, and integration. Many semantic similarity models have been established to evaluate semantic similarities of objects or/and concepts. To find out the suitability and performance of different models in evaluating concept similarities, we make a comparison of four main types of models in this paper: the geometric model, the feature model, the network model, and the transformational model. Fundamental principles and main characteristics of these models are introduced and compared firstly. Land use and land cover concepts of NLCD92 are employed as examples in the case study. The results demonstrate that correlations between these models are very high for a possible reason that all these models are designed to simulate the similarity judgement of human mind.

  18. Mare’s milk: composition and protein fraction in comparison with different milk species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Kuterovac

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The usage of the mare’s milk as functional food especial for children intolerant to cow’s milk, with neurodermitis, allergies and similar disorders desiring to improve the quality of life is fiercely debated for last decades but there were no scientific studies to suggest such use of mare’s milk based on scientific research. The objectives of this study were to determine similarities of mare’s milk in comparison with milk of ruminants (cattle, sheep and goat and human milk in terms of milk composition and protein fraction as whey proteins, caseins and micelles size. All differences were discussed regarding usage of mare’s milk in human diet and compared to milk which is usually used in human nutrition. Regarding composition, the mare’s milk is similar to human milk in of crude protein, salt and lactose content, but it has significantly lower content of fat. Fractions of main proteins are similar between human and mare’s milk, except nitrogen casein (casein N which has twice lower content in human than in mare’s milk. Content of casein N from all ruminants’ milk differ much more. Just for true whey N and non-protein nitrogen (NPN similar content as human and mare’s milk has also goat milk. The casein content is the lowest in human milk; this content is three times greater in mare’s milk and six to seven times greater in goat’s and cow’s milk, while in sheep’s milk it is more than 10 times grater. In many components and fractions mare’s milk is more similar to human milk than milk of ruminants. A detail comparison of protein fraction shows quite large differences between milk of different species. More study and clinical research are needed that can recommend usage of mare’s milk in human diet as functional food on scientific bases.

  19. A Comparison Between Five Models Of Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Mohammed Ali Munassar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with a vital and important issue in computer world. It is concerned with the software management processes that examine the area of software development through the development models, which are known as software development life cycle. It represents five of the development models namely, waterfall, Iteration, V-shaped, spiral and Extreme programming. These models have advantages and disadvantages as well. Therefore, the main objective of this research is to represent different models of software development and make a comparison between them to show the features and defects of each model.

  20. A compositional and dynamic model for face aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Jinli; Zhu, Song-Chun; Shan, Shiguang; Chen, Xilin

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present a compositional and dynamic model for face aging. The compositional model represents faces in each age group by a hierarchical And-Or graph, in which And nodes decompose a face into parts to describe details (e.g., hair, wrinkles, etc.) crucial for age perception and Or nodes represent large diversity of faces by alternative selections. Then a face instance is a transverse of the And-Or graph-parse graph. Face aging is modeled as a Markov process on the parse graph representation. We learn the parameters of the dynamic model from a large annotated face data set and the stochasticity of face aging is modeled in the dynamics explicitly. Based on this model, we propose a face aging simulation and prediction algorithm. Inversely, an automatic age estimation algorithm is also developed under this representation. We study two criteria to evaluate the aging results using human perception experiments: 1) the accuracy of simulation: whether the aged faces are perceived of the intended age group, and 2) preservation of identity: whether the aged faces are perceived as the same person. Quantitative statistical analysis validates the performance of our aging model and age estimation algorithm.

  1. Mathematical Modelling of Bonded Fibre-Composite Repairs to Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Library Qantas Airways Limited Civil Aviation Authority Hawker de Havilland Aust Pty Ltd, Victoria, Library Hawker de Havilland Aust Pty Ltd...1 2. THE END-TAPERED DOUBLE-LAP JOINT ............................................. 2 2.1 Elastic Analysis 2.1.1. Analytical Development 2.1.2...Comparison of the Elastic Model with an FE Analysis 2.1.3. An Approximate Analytical Solution: a First-Order Perturbation Solution 2.2. Elastic/Perfectly

  2. Becker and Lomnitz rheological models: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Francesco; Spada, Giorgio

    2012-07-01

    The viscoelastic material functions for the Becker and the Lomnitz rheological models, sometimes employed to describe the transient flow of rocks, are studied and compared. Their creep functions, which are known in a closed form, share a similar time dependence and asymptotic behavior. This is also found for the relaxation functions, obtained by solving numerically a Volterra equation of the second kind. We show that the two rheologies constitute a clear example of broadly similar creep and relaxation patterns associated with neatly distinct retardation spectra, for which analytical expressions are available.

  3. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite Modeled as a Function of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Cawley, James D.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation model simulates the oxidation of the reinforcing carbon fibers within a ceramic matrix composite material containing as-fabricated microcracks. The physics-based oxidation model uses theoretically and experimentally determined variables as input for the model. The model simulates the ingress of oxygen through microcracks into a two-dimensional plane within the composite material. Model input includes temperature, oxygen concentration, the reaction rate constant, the diffusion coefficient, and the crack opening width as a function of the mechanical and thermal loads. The model is run in an iterative process for a two-dimensional grid system in which oxygen diffuses through the porous and cracked regions of the material and reacts with carbon in short time steps. The model allows the local oxygen concentrations and carbon volumes from the edge to the interior of the composite to be determined over time. Oxidation damage predicted by the model was compared with that observed from microstructural analysis of experimentally tested composite material to validate the model for two temperatures of interest. When the model is run for low-temperature conditions, the kinetics are reaction controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur relatively slowly. Therefore, oxygen can bypass the carbon near the outer edge and diffuse into the interior so that it saturates the entire composite at relatively high concentrations. The kinetics are limited by the reaction rate between carbon and oxygen. This results in an interior that has high local concentrations of oxygen and a similar amount of consumed carbon throughout the cross section. When the model is run for high-temperature conditions, the kinetics are diffusion controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur very quickly. The carbon consumes oxygen as soon as it is supplied. The kinetics are limited by the relatively slow rate at which oxygen is supplied in comparison to the relatively fast rate at which carbon and

  4. Modelling of a Multi-Temperature Plasma Composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. Liani; R.Benallal; Z.Bentalha

    2005-01-01

    @@ Knowledge of plasma composition is very important for various plasma applications and prediction of plasma properties. We use the Saha equation and Debye length equation to calculate the non-local thermodynamicequilibrium plasma composition. It has been shown that the model to 2T with T representing the temperature (electron temperature and heavy-particle temperature) described by Chen and Han [J. Phys. D 32 (1999)1711]can be applied for a mixture of gases, where each atomic species has its own temperature, but the model to 4T is more general because it can be applicable to temperatures distant enough of the heavy particles. This can occur in a plasma composed of big- or macro-molecules. The electron temperature Te varies in the range 8000*20000 K at atmospheric pressure.

  5. Modeling of solidification of MMC composites during gravity casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zagórski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with computer simulation of gravity casting of the metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramics (MMC into sand mold. The subject of our interest is aluminum matrix composite (AlMMC reinforced with ceramic particles i.e. silicon carbide SiC and glass carbon Cg. The created model describes the process taking into account solidification and its influence on the distribution of reinforcement particles. The computer calculation has been carried out in 2D system with the use of Navier-Stokes equations using ANSYS FLUENT 13. The Volume of Fluid approach (VOF and enthalpy method have been used to model the air-fluid free surface (and also volume fraction of particular continuous phases and the solidification of the cast, respectively.

  6. Buckling induced delamination of graphene composites through hybrid molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of graphene-based composites relies on mechanical stability and cooperativity, whereby separation of layers (i.e., delamination) can severely hinder performance. Here we study buckling induced delamination of mono- and bilayer graphene-based composites, utilizing a hybrid full atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics approach. The coarse-grain model allows exploration of an idealized model material to facilitate parametric variation beyond any particular molecular structure. Through theoretical and simulation analyses, we show a critical delamination condition, where ΔD∝kL4, where ΔD is the change in bending stiffness (eV), k the stiffness of adhesion (eV/Å4), and L the length of the adhered section (Å).

  7. A new model for analysing thermal stress in granular composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑茂盛; 金志浩; 浩宏奇

    1995-01-01

    A double embedding model of inletting reinforcement grain and hollow matrix ball into the effective media of the particulate-reinforced composite is advanced. And with this model the distributions of thermal stress in different phases of the composite during cooling are studied. Various expressions for predicting elastic and elastoplastic thermal stresses are derived. It is found that the reinforcement suffers compressive hydrostatic stress and the hydrostatic stress in matrix zone is a tensile one when temperature decreases; when temperature further decreases, yield area in matrix forms; when the volume fraction of reinforcement is enlarged, compressive stress on grain and tensile hydrostatic stress in matrix zone decrease; the initial temperature difference of the interface of reinforcement and matrix yielding rises, while that for the matrix yielding overall decreases.

  8. Modeling oxidation damage of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Peng Yang; Gui-Qiong Jiao; Bo Wang

    2011-01-01

    For fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), oxidation of the constituents is a very important damage type for high temperature applications. During the oxidizing process, the pyrolytic carbon interphase gradually recesses from the crack site in the axial direction of the fiber into the interior of the material. Carbon fiber usually presents notch-like or local neck-shrink oxidation phenomenon, causing strength degradation. But, the reason for SiC fiber degradation is the flaw growth mechanism on its surface. A micromechanical model based on the above mechanisms was established to simulate the mechanical properties of CMCs after high temperature oxidation. The statistic and shearlag theory were applied and the calculation expressions for retained tensile modulus and strength were deduced, respectively. Meanwhile, the interphase recession and fiber strength degradation were considered. And then, the model was validated by application to a C/SiC composite.

  9. A Comparison of Tension and Compression Creep in a Polymeric Composite and the Effects of Physical Aging on Creep Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Veazie, David R.; Brinson, L. Catherine

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and analytical methods were used to investigate the similarities and differences of the effects of physical aging on creep compliance of IM7/K3B composite loaded in tension and compression. Two matrix dominated loading modes, shear and transverse, were investigated for two load cases, tension and compression. The tests, run over a range of sub-glass transition temperatures, provided material constants, material master curves and aging related parameters. Comparing results from the short-term data indicated that although trends in the data with respect to aging time and aging temperature are similar, differences exist due to load direction and mode. The analytical model used for predicting long-term behavior using short-term data as input worked equally as well for the tension or compression loaded cases. Comparison of the loading modes indicated that the predictive model provided more accurate long term predictions for the shear mode as compared to the transverse mode. Parametric studies showed the usefulness of the predictive model as a tool for investigating long-term performance and compliance acceleration due to temperature.

  10. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Isabelle [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Joseph, Innocent [Energy Solutions, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gilbo, Konstantin [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  11. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in the composite-vector-boson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garavaglia, T.

    1986-11-15

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking is discussed in the Abelian, QED-like, composite-vector-boson model. When the auxiliary vector field has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, a global symmetry, Lorentz invariance, is broken. It is shown that the regularization of the saddle-point conditions for the quantum fluctuation generating functional is consistent only with a spacelike vacuum expectation value for the auxiliary vector field.

  12. CHIMERE 2013: a model for regional atmospheric composition modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, kinetics and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative contribution to the pollutants budgets can be quantified with chemistry-transport models. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is dedicated to regional atmospheric pollution event studies. Since it has now reached a certain level a maturity, the new stable version, CHIMERE 2013, is described to provide a reference model paper. The successive developments of the model are reviewed on the basis of published investigations that are referenced in order to discuss the scientific choices and to provide an overview of the main results.

  13. Interactive comparison of hypothesis tests for statistical model checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Reijsbergen, D.P.; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a web-based interactive comparison of hypothesis tests as are used in statistical model checking, providing users and tool developers with more insight into their characteristics. Parameters can be modified easily and their influence is visualized in real time; an integrated simulation

  14. Multiple comparisons in genetic association studies: a hierarchical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Mallick, Himel

    2014-02-01

    Multiple comparisons or multiple testing has been viewed as a thorny issue in genetic association studies aiming to detect disease-associated genetic variants from a large number of genotyped variants. We alleviate the problem of multiple comparisons by proposing a hierarchical modeling approach that is fundamentally different from the existing methods. The proposed hierarchical models simultaneously fit as many variables as possible and shrink unimportant effects towards zero. Thus, the hierarchical models yield more efficient estimates of parameters than the traditional methods that analyze genetic variants separately, and also coherently address the multiple comparisons problem due to largely reducing the effective number of genetic effects and the number of statistically "significant" effects. We develop a method for computing the effective number of genetic effects in hierarchical generalized linear models, and propose a new adjustment for multiple comparisons, the hierarchical Bonferroni correction, based on the effective number of genetic effects. Our approach not only increases the power to detect disease-associated variants but also controls the Type I error. We illustrate and evaluate our method with real and simulated data sets from genetic association studies. The method has been implemented in our freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/).

  15. Tip Studies using CFD and Comparison with Tip Loss Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    2004-01-01

    of the averaged axial induction factor and the normal and tangential loads are compared with those of a standard blade element momentum code using 2D calibrated airfoil data for a wind speed of 9 m s(-1), where the agreement in computed power is good. Further, a comparison with a new tip loss model proposed...

  16. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zámborszky

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model building in stochastic process algebras are discussed. A biological example on circadian clock is presented as a case study of BlenX compositionality.

  17. Searching for Composite Higgs Models at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacke, Thomas

    Composite Higgs models have the potential to provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and a dynamical explanation for the generation of the Higgs potential. They can be tested at the LHC as the new sector which underlies electroweak symmetry breaking must become strong in the TeV regime, which implies additional bound states beyond the Higgs. In this paper, we first discuss prospects and search strategies for top partners (and other quark partners) in the strongly coupled sector, which we study in an effective field theory setup. In the second part of the proceedings, we go beyond the effective field theory approach. We discuss potential UV embeddings for composite Higgs models which contain a Higgs as well as top partners. We show that in all of these models, additional pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons beyond the Higgs are present. In particular, all of the models contain a pseudoscalar which couples to the Standard Model gauge fields through Wess-Zumino-Witten terms, providing a prime candidate for a di-boson (including a di-photon) resonance. The models also contain colored pNGBs which can be searched for at the LHC.

  18. Searching for composite Higgs models at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacke, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Composite Higgs models have the potential to provide a solution to the hierarchy problem and a dynamical explanation for the generation of the Higgs potential. They can be tested at the LHC as the new sector which underlies electroweak symmetry breaking must become strong in the TeV regime, which implies additional bound states beyond the Higgs. In this paper, we first discuss prospects and search strategies for top partners (and other quark partners) in the strongly coupled sector, which we study in an effective field theory setup. In the second part of the proceedings, we go beyond the effective field theory approach. We discuss potential UV embeddings for composite Higgs models which contain a Higgs as well as top partners. We show that in all of these models, additional pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons beyond the Higgs are present. In particular, all of the models contain a pseudoscalar which couples to the Standard Model gauge fields through Wess-Zumino-Witten terms, providing a prime candidate for a di-boson (including a di-photon) resonance. The models also contain colored pNGBs which can be searched for at the LHC.

  19. A Wear Geometry Model of Plain Woven Fabric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Dapeng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper g describes a model meant for analysis of the wear geometry of plain woven fabric composites. The referred model consists of a mathematical description of plain woven fabric based on Peirce’s model coupled with a stratified method for the solution of the wear geometry. The evolutions of the wear area ratio of weft yarn, warp yarn and matrix resin on the worn surface are simulated by MatLab software in combination of warp and weft yarn diameters, warp and weft yarn-to-yarn distances, fabric structure phases (SPs. By comparing theoretical and experimental results from the PTFE/Kevlar fabric wear experiment, it can be concluded that the model can present a trend of the component area ratio variations along with the thickness of fabric, but has a inherently large error in quantitative analysis as an idealized model.

  20. Expert model process control of composite materials in a press

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Tony E.; Quinter, Suzanne R.; Abrams, Frances L.

    An expert model for the control of the press processing of thermoset composite materials has been developed. The knowledge base written using the PC PLUS expert system shell was interfaced with models written in FORTRAN. The expert model, which is running on a single computer with a single processor, takes advantage of the symbol-crunching capability of LISP and the number crunching capability of FORTRAN. The Expert Model control system is a qualitative-quantitative process automation (QQPA) system since it includes both quantitative model-based and qualitative rule-based expert system operations. Various physical and mechanical properties were measured from panels processed using the two cycles. Using QQPA, processing time has been reduced significantly without altering product quality.

  1. Micromechanical Modeling of the Thermal Expansion of Graphite/copper Composites with Nonuniform Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1994-01-01

    Two micromechanical models were developed to investigate the thermal expansion of graphite/copper (Gr/Cu) composites. The models incorporate the effects of temperature-dependent material properties, matrix inelasticity, initial residual stresses due to processing history, and nonuniform fiber distribution. The first model is based on the multiple concentric cylinder geometry, with each cylinder treated as a two-phase composite with a characteristic fiber volume fractions. By altering the fiber volume fraction of the individual cylinders, unidirectional composites with radially nonuniform fiber distributions can be investigated using this model. The second model is based on the inelastic lamination theory. By varying the fiber content in the individual laminae, composites with nonuniform fiber distribution in the thickness direction can be investigated. In both models, the properties of the individual regions (cylinders or laminae) are calculated using the method of cells micromechanical model. Classical incremental plasticity theory is used to model the inelastic response of the copper matrix at the microlevel. The models were used to characterize the effects of nonuniform fiber distribution on the thermal expansion of Gr/Cu. These effects were compared to the effects of matrix plasticity, choice of stress-free temperature, and slight fiber misalignment. It was found that the radially nonuniform fiber distribution has little effect on the thermal expansion of Gr/Cu but could become significant for composites with large fiber-matrix transverse CTE and Young's modulus mismatch. The effect of nonuniform fiber distribution in the through-thickness direction of a laminate was more significant, but only approached that of the stress-free temperature for the most extreme cases that include large amounts of bending. Subsequent comparison with experimental thermal expansion data indicated the need for more accurate characterization of the graphite fiber thermomechanical

  2. A web service for service composition to aid geospatial modelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, L.; Santoro, M.; Roncella, R.; Mazzetti, P.

    2012-04-01

    The identification of appropriate mechanisms for process reuse, chaining and composition is considered a key enabler for the effective uptake of a global Earth Observation infrastructure, currently pursued by the international geospatial research community. In the Earth and Space Sciences, such a facility could primarily enable integrated and interoperable modeling, for what several approaches have been proposed and developed, over the last years. In fact, GEOSS is specifically tasked with the development of the so-called "Model Web". At increasing levels of abstraction and generalization, the initial stove-pipe software tools have evolved to community-wide modeling frameworks, to Component-Based Architecture solution, and, more recently, started to embrace Service-Oriented Architectures technologies, such as the OGC WPS specification and the WS-* stack of W3C standards for service composition. However, so far, the level of abstraction seems too low for implementing the Model Web vision, and far too complex technological aspects must still be addressed by both providers and users, resulting in limited usability and, eventually, difficult uptake. As by the recent ICT trend of resource virtualization, it has been suggested that users in need of a particular processing capability, required by a given modeling workflow, may benefit from outsourcing the composition activities into an external first-class service, according to the Composition as a Service (CaaS) approach. A CaaS system provides the necessary interoperability service framework for adaptation, reuse and complementation of existing processing resources (including models and geospatial services in general) in the form of executable workflows. This work introduces the architecture of a CaaS system, as a distributed information system for creating, validating, editing, storing, publishing, and executing geospatial workflows. This way, the users can be freed from the need of a composition infrastructure and

  3. Modelling of volumetric composition and mechanical properties of unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites - Effect of enzymatic fibre treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ming; Thygesen, Anders; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    the changes in volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites when differently treated hemp fibres are used. The decrease in the fibre correlated porosity factor with the enzymatic fibre treatments shows that the removal of pectin by pectinolytic enzymes results in a better fibre......The objective of the present study is to assess the effect of enzymatic fibre treatments on the fibre performance in unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites by modelling the volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites. It is shown that the applied models can well predict...... efficiency exponent is set equal to 2. Altogether, it is demonstrated that the applied models provide a concept to be used for the evaluation of performance of treated fibres in composites....

  4. COMPARISON BETWEEN MODELS FOR CALCULATION OF INDUSTRIAL HOT ROLLING LOADS

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Augusto Gorni; Marcos Roberto Soares da Silva

    2012-01-01

    An evaluation is made about the precision of hot strip rolling mill loads at the F1 stand calculated according to the theoretical models of Orowan, Sims, Alexander-Ford, Orowan-Pascoe, Ekelund and Tselikov in comparison to real values got for carbon-manganese steels. In the deterministic approach, without any fit of the calculated values to real data, Orowan, Sims and Alexander-Models show best levels of precision, as expected from the information got in the literature. However, i...

  5. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    densities of the tested specimens.Two types of FE model were developed using a commercially available program. The first type was designed to analyse the model composite materials for comparison with mechanical test data for the purpose of validation of the FE model. Elastic moduli predicted by this type of FE model showed good agreement with the experimentally measured elastic moduli of the model composite materials. This result suggested that the use of layered FE models, which rely upon an isostrain assumption between the layers, can be useful in predicting the elastic properties of different lay-ups of the disc brake material.The second type of FE model analysed disc brake segments, using the experimentally measured bulk mechanical properties of the disc brake material. This FE model approximated the material as a continuum with in-plane isotropy but with different properties in the through-thickness direction. In order to validate this modelling approach, the results of the FE analysis were compared with mechanical tests on disc brake segments, which were loaded by their drive tenons in a manner intended to simulate in-service loading. The FE model showed good agreement with in-plane strains measured on the disc tenon face close to the swept area of the disc, but predicted significantly higher strains than those experimentally measured on the tenon fillet curve. This discrepancy was attributed to the existence of a steep strain gradient on the fillet curve.

  6. Comparison of the Beckmann model with bidirectional reflectance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The Beckmann model is compared with recently reported bidirectional reflectance measurements. Comparisons revealed that monochromatic specular and bidirectional reflectance measurements are not adequately described by corresponding results evaluated from the model using mechanically acquired surface roughness parameters (rms height and rms slope). Significant improvement between measurements and predictions of the model is observed when optically acquired surface roughness parameters are used. Specular reflectance measurements for normal to intermediate polar angles of incidence are adequately represented by the model provided values of optical roughness multiplied by cosine of polar angle of incidence are less than 27 times average optical rms slope.

  7. nIFTy Cosmology: Comparison of Galaxy Formation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Knebe, Alexander; Thomas, Peter A; Benson, Andrew; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bower, Richard; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cora, Sofia A; Croton, Darren J; Cui, Weiguang; Cunnama, Daniel; De Lucia, Gabriella; Devriendt, Julien E; Elahi, Pascal J; Font, Andreea; Fontanot, Fabio; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Gargiulo, Ignacio D; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Helly, John; Henriques, Bruno; Hirschmann, Michaela; Lee, Jaehyun; Mamon, Gary A; Monaco, Pierluigi; Onions, Julian; Padilla, Nelson D; Power, Chris; Pujol, Arnau; Skibba, Ramin A; Somerville, Rachel S; Srisawat, Chaichalit; Vega-Martinez, Cristian A; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investig...

  8. Resin infusion of large composite structures modeling and manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, A.C. [Michigan State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The resin infusion processes resin transfer molding (RTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) are cost effective techniques for the fabrication of complex shaped composite structures. The dry fibrous preform is placed in the mold, consolidated, resin impregnated and cured in a single step process. The fibrous performs are often constructed near net shape using highly automated textile processes such as knitting, weaving and braiding. In this paper, the infusion processes RTM, RFI and VARTM are discussed along with the advantages of each technique compared with traditional composite fabrication methods such as prepreg tape lay up and autoclave cure. The large number of processing variables and the complex material behavior during infiltration and cure make experimental optimization of the infusion processes costly and inefficient. Numerical models have been developed which can be used to simulate the resin infusion processes. The model formulation and solution procedures for the VARTM process are presented. A VARTM process simulation of a carbon fiber preform was presented to demonstrate the type of information that can be generated by the model and to compare the model predictions with experimental measurements. Overall, the predicted flow front positions, resin pressures and preform thicknesses agree well with the measured values. The results of the simulation show the potential cost and performance benefits that can be realized by using a simulation model as part of the development process. (au)

  9. Body composition and somatotype of judo athletes and untrained male students as a reference group for comparison in sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buśko Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study was to determine the body composition and somatotype of untrained male students studying at Warsaw University of Technology in 2011, in order to create a current reference group for comparison, and to investigate the difference in body build of male judoists compared with the non-athlete group.

  10. A Composite Modelling Approach to Decision Support by the Use of the CBA-DK Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Michael Bruhn; Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a decision support system for assessment of transport infrastructure projects. The composite modelling approach, COSIMA, combines a cost-benefit analysis by use of the CBA-DK model with multi-criteria analysis applying the AHP and SMARTER techniques. The modelling uncertainties...

  11. Development and validation of a liquid composite molding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayldon, John Michael

    2007-12-01

    In composite manufacturing, Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) is becoming increasingly important as a cost effective manufacturing method of structural composites. In this process the dry preform (reinforcement) is placed on a rigid tool and covered by a flexible film to form an airtight vacuum bag. Liquid resin is drawn under vacuum through the preform inside the vacuum bag. Modeling of this process relies on a good understanding of closely coupled phenomena. The resin flow depends on the preform permeability, which in turn depends on the local fluid pressure and the preform compaction behavior. VARTM models for predicting the flow rate in this process do exist, however, they are not able to properly predict the flow for all classes of reinforcement material. In this thesis, the continuity equation used in VARTM models is reexamined and a modified form proposed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the preform in both saturated and dry states is studied in detail and new models are proposed for the compaction behavior. To assess the validity of the proposed models, the shadow moire method was adapted and used to perform full field measurement of the preform thickness during infusion, in addition to the usual measurements of flow front position. A new method was developed and evaluated for the analysis of the moire data related to the VARTM process, however, the method has wider applicability to other full field thickness measurements. The use of this measurement method demonstrated that although the new compaction models work well in the characterization tests, they do not properly describe all the preform features required for modeling the process. In particular the effect of varying saturation on the preform's behavior requires additional study. The flow models developed did, however, improve the prediction of the flow rate for the more compliant preform material tested, and the experimental techniques have shown where additional test methods

  12. Development of a Subcell Based Modeling Approach for Modeling the Architecturally Dependent Impact Response of Triaxially Braided Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the high velocity impact response of polymer matrix composites with complex architectures is critical to many aerospace applications, including engine fan blade containment systems where the structure must be able to completely contain fan blades in the event of a blade-out. Despite the benefits offered by these materials, the complex nature of textile composites presents a significant challenge for the prediction of deformation and damage under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. The relatively large mesoscale repeating unit cell (in comparison to the size of structural components) causes the material to behave like a structure rather than a homogeneous material. Impact experiments conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown the damage patterns to be a function of the underlying material architecture. Traditional computational techniques that involve modeling these materials using smeared homogeneous, orthotropic material properties at the macroscale result in simulated damage patterns that are a function of the structural geometry, but not the material architecture. In order to preserve heterogeneity at the highest length scale in a robust yet computationally efficient manner, and capture the architecturally dependent damage patterns, a previously-developed subcell modeling approach where the braided composite unit cell is approximated as a series of four adjacent laminated composites is utilized. This work discusses the implementation of the subcell methodology into the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.). Verification and validation studies are also presented, including simulation of the tensile response of straight-sided and notched quasi-static coupons composed of a T700/PR520 triaxially braided [0deg/60deg/-60deg] composite. Based on the results of the verification and validation studies, advantages and limitations of the methodology as well as plans for future work

  13. Arima model and exponential smoothing method: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Ahmad, Wan Kamarul Ariffin; Ahmad, Sabri

    2013-04-01

    This study shows the comparison between Autoregressive Moving Average (ARIMA) model and Exponential Smoothing Method in making a prediction. The comparison is focused on the ability of both methods in making the forecasts with the different number of data sources and the different length of forecasting period. For this purpose, the data from The Price of Crude Palm Oil (RM/tonne), Exchange Rates of Ringgit Malaysia (RM) in comparison to Great Britain Pound (GBP) and also The Price of SMR 20 Rubber Type (cents/kg) with three different time series are used in the comparison process. Then, forecasting accuracy of each model is measured by examinethe prediction error that producedby using Mean Squared Error (MSE), Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE), and Mean Absolute deviation (MAD). The study shows that the ARIMA model can produce a better prediction for the long-term forecasting with limited data sources, butcannot produce a better prediction for time series with a narrow range of one point to another as in the time series for Exchange Rates. On the contrary, Exponential Smoothing Method can produce a better forecasting for Exchange Rates that has a narrow range of one point to another for its time series, while itcannot produce a better prediction for a longer forecasting period.

  14. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Sepulveda, Nicasio; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater provides much of the fresh drinking water to more than 1.5 billion people in the world (Clarke et al., 1996) and in the United States more that 50 percent of citizens rely on groundwater for drinking water (Solley et al., 1998). As aquifer systems are developed for water supply, the hydrologic system is changed. Water pumped from the aquifer system initially can come from some combination of inducing more recharge, water permanently removed from storage, and decreased groundwater discharge. Once a new equilibrium is achieved, all of the pumpage must come from induced recharge and decreased discharge (Alley et al., 1999). Further development of groundwater resources may result in reductions of surface water runoff and base flows. Competing demands for groundwater resources require good management. Adequate data to characterize the aquifers and confining units of the system, like hydrologic boundaries, groundwater levels, streamflow, and groundwater pumping and climatic data for recharge estimation are to be collected in order to quantify the effects of groundwater withdrawals on wetlands, streams, and lakes. Once collected, three-dimensional (3D) groundwater flow models can be developed and calibrated and used as a tool for groundwater management. The main hydraulic parameters that comprise a regional or subregional model of an aquifer system are the hydraulic conductivity and storage properties of the aquifers and confining units (hydrogeologic units) that confine the system. Many 3D groundwater flow models used to help assess groundwater/surface-water interactions require calculating ?effective? or composite hydraulic properties of multilayered lithologic units within a hydrogeologic unit. The calculation of composite hydraulic properties stems from the need to characterize groundwater flow using coarse model layering in order to reduce simulation times while still representing the flow through the system accurately. The accuracy of flow models with

  15. Modeling the in-plane tension failure of composite plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinh, K.V. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Structural and Thermomechanical Modeling Dept.

    1997-11-01

    This study developed a modeling method to predict the final failure load of laminated composite plates which may contain cutouts and are subjected to quasi-static in-plane tensile loads. This study focused on overcoming numerical problems often encountered in analyses that exhibit significant stable damage growth in the composite materials. To keep the computational cost at a reasonable level, the modeling method uses a quasi-static solution procedure to solve composite plate problems with quasi-static load. The numerical problems in the quasi-static analyses are nonconvergence problems caused by the discontinuous material behavior from brittle fiber failure. This study adds artificial damping to the material model to suppress the discontinuous material behavior. The artificial damping essentially changes the material behavior, and could adversely change the final failure load prediction. Thus, a selective scheme for adding the damping was developed to minimize adverse damping effects. In addition, this modeling method uses multiple analyses at different levels of artificial damping to determine damping effects on the failure load prediction. Fracture strength experimental data for small coupons with small cutouts and large panels with larger cutouts available in the literature were selected and used to verify failure predictions of the developed modeling method. Results show that, without the artificial damping treatment, progressive damage analyses reasonably predicted the fracture strength of the small coupons, but severely underpredicted the fracture strength of the large panels. With the artificial damping treatment, the analyses predicted the failure load of both the small coupons and the large panels reasonably well.

  16. A comparison of model view controller and model view presenter

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, M. Rizwan Jameel; Sabir, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Web application frameworks are managed by using different design strategies. Design strategies are applied by using different design processes. In each design process, requirement specifications are changed in to different design model that describe the detail of different data structure, system architecture, interface and components. Web application frame work is implemented by using Model View Controller (MVC) and Model View Presenter (MVP). These web application models are used to provide ...

  17. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase "composite nanoglass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kelly, S. D.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Balasubramanian, M.; Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Ayyub, Pushan

    2016-02-01

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu55Nb45. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  18. Local structure, composition, and crystallization mechanism of a model two-phase “composite nanoglass”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro [CSRRI-IIT, MRCAT, Sector 10, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (United States); Balasubramanian, M. [Sector 20 XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Srinivasan, S. G.; Du, Jincheng; Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2016-02-14

    We report a detailed study of the local composition and structure of a model, bi-phasic nanoglass with nominal stoichiometry Cu{sub 55}Nb{sub 45}. Three dimensional atom probe data suggest a nanoscale-phase-separated glassy structure having well defined Cu-rich and Nb-rich regions with a characteristic length scale of ≈3 nm. However, extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates subtle differences in the local environments of Cu and Nb. While the Cu atoms displayed a strong tendency to cluster and negligible structural order beyond the first coordination shell, the Nb atoms had a larger fraction of unlike neighbors (higher chemical order) and a distinctly better-ordered structural environment (higher topological order). This provides the first experimental indication that metallic glass formation may occur due to frustration arising from the competition between chemical ordering and clustering. These observations are complemented by classical as well as ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our study indicates that these nanoscale phase-separated glasses are quite distinct from the single phase nanoglasses (studied by Gleiter and others) in the following three respects: (i) they contain at least two structurally and compositionally distinct, nanodispersed, glassy phases, (ii) these phases are separated by comparatively sharp inter-phase boundaries, and (iii) thermally induced crystallization occurs via a complex, multi-step mechanism. Such materials, therefore, appear to constitute a new class of disordered systems that may be called a composite nanoglass.

  19. Theoretical model of a piezoelectric composite spinal fusion interbody implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaben, Nicholas E; Domann, John P; Arnold, Paul M; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    Failure rates of spinal fusion are high in smokers and diabetics. The authors are investigating the development of a piezoelectric composite biomaterial and interbody device design that could generate clinically relevant levels of electrical stimulation to help improve the rate of fusion for these patients. A lumped parameter model of the piezoelectric composite implant was developed based on a model that has been utilized to successfully predict power generation for piezoceramics. Seven variables (fiber material, matrix material, fiber volume fraction, fiber aspect ratio, implant cross-sectional area, implant thickness, and electrical load resistance) were parametrically analyzed to determine their effects on power generation within reasonable implant constraints. Influences of implant geometry and fiber aspect ratio were independent of material parameters. For a cyclic force of constant magnitude, implant thickness was directly and cross-sectional area inversely proportional to power generation potential. Fiber aspect ratios above 30 yielded maximum power generation potential while volume fractions above 15% showed superior performance. This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of using composite piezoelectric biomaterials in medical implants to generate therapeutic levels of direct current electrical stimulation. The piezoelectric spinal fusion interbody implant shows promise for helping increase success rates of spinal fusion.

  20. A Composite Model Predictive Control Strategy for Furnaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Zang; Hongguang Li; Jingwen Huang; Jia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Tube furnaces are essential and primary energy intensive facilities in petrochemical plants. Operational optimi-zation of furnaces could not only help to improve product quality but also benefit to reduce energy consumption and exhaust emission. Inspired by this idea, this paper presents a composite model predictive control (CMPC) strategy, which, taking advantage of distributed model predictive control architectures, combines tracking nonlinear model predictive control and economic nonlinear model predictive control metrics to keep process running smoothly and optimize operational conditions. The control ers connected with two kinds of communi-cation networks are easy to organize and maintain, and stable to process interferences. A fast solution algorithm combining interior point solvers and Newton's method is accommodated to the CMPC realization, with reason-able CPU computing time and suitable online applications. Simulation for industrial case demonstrates that the proposed approach can ensure stable operations of furnaces, improve heat efficiency, and reduce the emission effectively.

  1. Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

  2. A new model of composite interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Voshchinnikov, N V; Henning, T; Dubkova, D N; Henning, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The approach to model composite interstellar dust grains, using the exact solution to the light scattering problem for multi-layered spheres as suggested by Voshchinnikov & Mathis (1999), is further developed. Heterogeneous scatteres are represented by particles with very large number of shells, each including a homogeneous layer per material considered (amorphous carbon, astronomical silicate and vacuum). The applicability of the effective medium theory (EMT) mostly utilized earlier to approximate inhomogeneous interstellar grains is examined on the basis of the new model. It is shown that the EMT rules generally have an accuracy of several percent in the whole range of particle sizes provided the porosity does not exceed about 50%. For larger porosity, the EMT rules give wrong results. Using the model, we reanalyze various basic features of cosmic dust -- interstellar extinction, scattered radiation, infrared radiation, radiation pressure, etc. As an example of the potential of the model, it is applied ...

  3. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  4. On fractional order composite model reference adaptive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yiheng; Sun, Zhenyuan; Hu, Yangsheng; Wang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel composite model reference adaptive control approach for a class of fractional order linear systems with unknown constant parameters. The method is extended from the model reference adaptive control. The parameter estimation error of our method depends on both the tracking error and the prediction error, whereas the existing method only depends on the tracking error, which makes our method has better transient performance in the sense of generating smooth system output. By the aid of the continuous frequency distributed model, stability of the proposed approach is established in the Lyapunov sense. Furthermore, the convergence property of the model parameters estimation is presented, on the premise that the closed-loop control system is stable. Finally, numerical simulation examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  5. A comparison of food crispness based on the cloud model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghui; Sun, Yonghai; Hou, Jumin; Wang, Xia; Bai, Xue; Wu, Chunhui; Yu, Libo; Yang, Jie

    2017-08-23

    The cloud model is a typical model which transforms the qualitative concept into the quantitative description. The cloud model has been used less extensively in texture studies before. The purpose of this study was to apply the cloud model in food crispness comparison. The acoustic signals of carrots, white radishes, potatoes, Fuji apples, and crystal pears were recorded during compression. And three time-domain signal characteristics were extracted, including sound intensity, maximum short-time frame energy, and waveform index. The three signal characteristics and the cloud model were used to compare the crispness of the samples mentioned above. The crispness based on the Ex value of the cloud model, in a descending order, was carrot > potato > white radish > Fuji apple > crystal pear. To verify the results of the acoustic signals, mechanical measurement and sensory evaluation were conducted. The results of the two verification experiments confirmed the feasibility of the cloud model. The microstructures of the five samples were also analyzed. The microstructure parameters were negatively related with crispness (p cloud model method can be used for crispness comparison of different kinds of foods. The method is more accurate than the traditional methods such as mechanical measurement and sensory evaluation. The cloud model method can also be applied to other texture studies extensively. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Model comparison for the density structure along solar prominence threads

    CERN Document Server

    Arregui, I

    2015-01-01

    Quiescent solar prominence fine structures are typically modelled as density enhancements, called threads, which occupy a fraction of a longer magnetic flux tube. The profile of the mass density along the magnetic field is however unknown and several arbitrary alternatives are employed in prominence wave studies. We present a comparison of theoretical models for the field-aligned density along prominence fine structures. We consider Lorentzian, Gaussian, and parabolic profiles. We compare their theoretical predictions for the period ratio between the fundamental transverse kink mode and the first overtone to obtain estimates for the ratio of densities between the central part of the tube and its foot-points and to assess which one would better explain observed period ratio data. Bayesian parameter inference and model comparison techniques are developed and applied. Parameter inference requires the computation of the posterior distribution for the density gradient parameter conditional on the observable period...

  7. Modeling and simulation of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bheemreddy, Venkata

    Finite element modeling framework based on cohesive damage modeling, constitutive material behavior using user-material subroutines, and extended finite element method (XFEM), are developed for studying the failure behavior of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) by the example of a silicon carbide matrix reinforced with silicon carbide fiber (SiC/SiCf) composite. This work deals with developing comprehensive numerical models for three problems: (1) fiber/matrix interface debonding and fiber pull-out, (2) mechanical behavior of a CFCC using a representative volume element (RVE) approach, and (3) microstructure image-based modeling of a CFCC using object oriented finite element analysis (OOF). Load versus displacement behavior during a fiber pull-out event was investigated using a cohesive damage model and an artificial neural network model. Mechanical behavior of a CFCC was investigated using a statistically equivalent RVE. A three-step procedure was developed for generating a randomized fiber distribution. Elastic properties and damage behavior of a CFCC were analyzed using the developed RVE models. Scattering of strength distribution in CFCCs was taken into account using a Weibull probability law. A multi-scale modeling framework was developed for evaluating the fracture behavior of a CFCC as a function of microstructural attributes. A finite element mesh of the microstructure was generated using an OOF tool. XFEM was used to study crack propagation in the microstructure and the fracture behavior was analyzed. The work performed provides a valuable procedure for developing a multi-scale framework for comprehensive damage study of CFCCs.

  8. A Comparison of Approximation Modeling Techniques: Polynomial Versus Interpolating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Anthony A.; Watson, Layne T.

    1998-01-01

    Two methods of creating approximation models are compared through the calculation of the modeling accuracy on test problems involving one, five, and ten independent variables. Here, the test problems are representative of the modeling challenges typically encountered in realistic engineering optimization problems. The first approximation model is a quadratic polynomial created using the method of least squares. This type of polynomial model has seen considerable use in recent engineering optimization studies due to its computational simplicity and ease of use. However, quadratic polynomial models may be of limited accuracy when the response data to be modeled have multiple local extrema. The second approximation model employs an interpolation scheme known as kriging developed in the fields of spatial statistics and geostatistics. This class of interpolating model has the flexibility to model response data with multiple local extrema. However, this flexibility is obtained at an increase in computational expense and a decrease in ease of use. The intent of this study is to provide an initial exploration of the accuracy and modeling capabilities of these two approximation methods.

  9. Modelling of volumetric composition and mechanical properties of unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites - Effect of enzymatic fibre treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Thygesen, A.; Meyer, AS; Madsen, B.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the effect of enzymatic fibre treatments on the fibre performance in unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites by modelling the volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites. It is shown that the applied models can well predict the changes in volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites when differently treated hemp fibres are used. The decrease in the fibre correlated porosity factor with the enzymatic fibre treatments shows that the removal of pectin by pectinolytic enzymes results in a better fibre impregnation by the epoxy matrix, and the mechanical properties of the composites are thereby increased. The effective fibre stiffness and strength established from the modelling show that the enzymatic removal of pectin also leads to increased mechanical properties of the fibres. Among the investigated samples, the composites with hydrothermally pre-treated and enzymatically treated fibres have the lowest porosity factor of 0.08 and the highest mechanical properties. In these composites, the effective fibre stiffness and strength are determined to be 83 GPa and 667 MPa, respectively, when the porosity efficiency exponent is set equal to 2. Altogether, it is demonstrated that the applied models provide a concept to be used for the evaluation of performance of treated fibres in composites.

  10. Modeling of Bullet Penetration in Explosively Welded Composite Armor Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Carney, Theodore C.

    2006-07-01

    Normal impact of high-speed armor piercing bullet on titanium-steel composite has been investigated using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The objective is to understand the effects of impact during the ballistic testing of explosively welded armor plates. These plates have significant microstructural differences within the weld region, heat-affected zone and the base metal. The variances result in substantial ductility, hardness and strength differences, important criteria in determining the failure mode, specifically whether it occurs at the joint or within the virgin base metal. Several configurations of composite plates with different material combinations were modeled. The results were used to modify the heat treatment process of explosively welded plates, making them more likely to survive impact.

  11. A Deformation Model for Dispersely Failing Elastoplastic Unidirectionally Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagzdins, A.

    2001-09-01

    A calculation model is proposed for unidirectionally reinforced elastoplastic composites capable of gradually accumulating disperse microdamages under loading. The composite is assumed to be a homogeneous transversely isotropic solid. To describe its elastoplastic behavior, an incremental plasticity theory with a nonlinear combined hardening mechanism is invoked. At each point of the solid, its damage is characterized by a centrally symmetric scalar function on a unit sphere. This function is approximated by a fourth-rank tensor, which is used for describing the degradation of the elastic properties of the solid due to the accumulation of disperse microdamages. It is shown how to determine, using the known experimental data, all material constants appearing in the theoretical relations suggested.

  12. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    CERN Document Server

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fèvre, Olivier Le; Ilić, Stéphane; Piazza, Federico; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model ($\\Lambda$CDM) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO, can be well reproduced by both $\\Lambda$CDM and power law expansion models with $n \\sim 1.5$, while the constant expansion rate model ($n = 1$) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data is well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular through the position of the first peak of the temperature ...

  13. Comparison of four different models of vortex generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, U.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed comparison between four different models of vortex generators is presented in this paper. To that end, a single Vortex Generator on a flat plate test case has been designed and solved by the following models. The first one is the traditional mesh-resolved VG and the second one, called...... Actuator Vortex Generator Model (AcVG), is based on the lifting force theory of Bender, Anderson and Yagle, the BAY Model, which provides an efficient method for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of flow with VGs, and the forces are applied into the computational domain using the actuator shape...... model. This AcVG Model enables to simulate the effects of the Vortex Generators without defining the geometry of the vortex generator in the mesh and makes it easier for researchers the investigations of different vortex generator lay outs. Both models have been archived by the in house EllipSys CFD...

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Damage in Fibrous Composites Using a Micromechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    polymer matrix composite laminate with a center hole in order to study the progression of damage and final failure during tensile loading. The comparisons between the present predictions and the experimental results for the previous examples are very

  15. NUMERICAL MODELLING OF PROGRESSIVE FAILURE IN PARTICULATE COMPOSITES LIKE SANDSTONE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The beam-particle model is presented for analyzing the progressive failure of particulate composites such as sandstone and concrete. In the model, the medium is schematized as an assembly of particles which are linked through a network of brittle-breaking beam elements. The mechanical behaviour of particle elements is governed by the distinct element method and finite element method. The propagation of the cracking process in particulate composites is mimicked by removing the beam element from the mesh as soon as the stress in the beam exceeds the strength assigned to that particular beam. The new model can be utilized at a meso-scale and in different loading conditions. Two physical experiments are performed to verify the numerical results. The crack patterns and load-displacement response obtained with the proposed numerical model are in good agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, the influence of heterogeneity on crack patterns is also discussed and the correlation existing between the fracture evolution and the loads imposed on the specimen is characterized by fractal dimensions.

  16. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serenelli, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Villante, Francesco L.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger & Zurbuchen (2016, vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009, hereafter AGSS09). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with spectroscopic abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted 8B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and 7Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances are worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present astrophysical and spectroscopic arguments showing the vSZ16 composition to be an implausible representation of the solar interior, identifying the first ionization potential effect in the outer solar atmosphere and wind as the likely culprit.

  17. Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violi, Angela [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Michelsen, Hope [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, Nils [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, Kevin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-07

    In order to provide the scientific foundation to enable technology breakthroughs in transportation fuel, it is important to develop a combustion modeling capability to optimize the operation and design of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The goal of this proposal is to develop a validated predictive model to describe the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles in premixed and diffusion flames. Atomistic studies in conjunction with state-of-the-art experiments are the distinguishing characteristics of this unique interdisciplinary effort. The modeling effort has been conducted at the University of Michigan by Prof. A. Violi. The experimental work has entailed a series of studies using different techniques to analyze gas-phase soot precursor chemistry and soot particle production in premixed and diffusion flames. Measurements have provided spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other gas-phase species and size and composition of incipient soot nanoparticles for comparison with model results. The experimental team includes Dr. N. Hansen and H. Michelsen at Sandia National Labs' Combustion Research Facility, and Dr. K. Wilson as collaborator at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's Advanced Light Source. Our results show that the chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles affect the coagulation behavior in soot formation, and our results on an experimentally validated, predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles will not only enhance our understanding of soot formation since but will also allow the prediction of particle size distributions under combustion conditions. These results provide a novel description of soot formation based on physical and chemical properties of the particles for use in the next generation of soot models and an enhanced capability for facilitating the design of alternative fuels and the engines they will power.

  18. EDITORIAL: Modelling and simulation in polymer and composites processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Josè M.

    2004-05-01

    The general theme of this special section is modelling and simulation in polymer and composite processing. Composite processing in general involves reactive processing. During the last decade there have been numerous advances in modelling and simulation in both thermoplastic and reactive processing. This fact, coupled with the enormous advances in computing capability, has made Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) a reality. Industry nowadays depends on CAE to improve and/or develop new processes. There is no excuse not to take advantage of modelling and simulation. Another tendency is a clear move towards environmentally benign manufacturing; thus several papers in this issue discuss environmentally benign alternatives to traditional manufacturing for both composite and thermoplastics. The first two papers are a review of modelling and simulation; the first paper by Castro, Cabrera Rios and Mount-Campbell focuses on reactive processing, while the second by Kim and Turng discusses thermoplastics moulding. Another important issue is the need to use empirical modelling for cases where physics-based models are not available or are too cumbersome to use. For that reason the paper by Castro et al focuses on empirical modelling and the paper by Kim and Turng discusses exclusively physics-based modelling. The next three papers, two by Advani and collaborators and the third by Srinivasagupta and Kardos, refer to composite manufacturing. Advani's papers cover recent advances in Reactive Liquid Moulding, a process that has gained great acceptance as an environmentally benign alternative to open moulding. The paper by Srinivasagupta and Kardos covers the important issue of addressing simultaneously both environmental and economical design. In general the environmental optimum does not coincide with the economic optimum; this gives rise to the need to compromise. The Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique, discussed in the first paper, can be used to identify the best set of

  19. Towards more accurate isoscapes encouraging results from wine, water and marijuana data/model and model/model comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Cerling, T.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding how the biosphere responds to change it at the heart of biogeochemistry, ecology, and other Earth sciences. The dramatic increase in human population and technological capacity over the past 200 years or so has resulted in numerous, simultaneous changes to biosphere structure and function. This, then, has lead to increased urgency in the scientific community to try to understand how systems have already responded to these changes, and how they might do so in the future. Since all biospheric processes exhibit some patchiness or patterns over space, as well as time, we believe that understanding the dynamic interactions between natural systems and human technological manipulations can be improved if these systems are studied in an explicitly spatial context. We present here results of some of our efforts to model the spatial variation in the stable isotope ratios (δ2H and δ18O) of plants over large spatial extents, and how these spatial model predictions compare to spatially explicit data. Stable isotopes trace and record ecological processes and as such, if modeled correctly over Earth's surface allow us insights into changes in biosphere states and processes across spatial scales. The data-model comparisons show good agreement, in spite of the remaining uncertainties (e.g., plant source water isotopic composition). For example, inter-annual changes in climate are recorded in wine stable isotope ratios. Also, a much simpler model of leaf water enrichment driven with spatially continuous global rasters of precipitation and climate normals largely agrees with complex GCM modeling that includes leaf water δ18O. Our results suggest that modeling plant stable isotope ratios across large spatial extents may be done with reasonable accuracy, including over time. These spatial maps, or isoscapes, can now be utilized to help understand spatially distributed data, as well as to help guide future studies designed to understand ecological change across

  20. Materials and electromagnetism. The modeling of composite materials; Materiaux en electromagnetisme. Modelisation des materiaux composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priou, A. [Institut Universitaire de Technologie, 92 - Ville-d' Avray (France)

    1999-01-01

    Maxwell laws are briefly described and the different types of electromagnetic materials are presented. Composite materials are made up of at least 2 phases: a host phase and an inclusion. The inclusion is a discontinuous phase coming from a conducting material (metal, carbon based material, semi-conductor, solid electrolytes or conducting polymers) and is spread within the host phase either in an aleatory or organized way. The modeling of such media can be made by 3 different approaches. In the multi-diffusion approach, the size of the particles enclosed in the host material and their mutual interactions are taken into account. The quasi-static approach allows the definition of an equivalent medium in order to describe percolation phenomena. The approach based on cluster theory gives a complete mathematical description of composite materials. The modeling of dielectric-conducting multilayer is also presented. The last part of the article is dedicated to the characteristics and applications of chiral media and of last generation electromagnetic materials. (A.C.)

  1. Comparison of different efficiency criteria for hydrological model assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Krause

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of hydrologic model behaviour and performance is commonly made and reported through comparisons of simulated and observed variables. Frequently, comparisons are made between simulated and measured streamflow at the catchment outlet. In distributed hydrological modelling approaches, additional comparisons of simulated and observed measurements for multi-response validation may be integrated into the evaluation procedure to assess overall modelling performance. In both approaches, single and multi-response, efficiency criteria are commonly used by hydrologists to provide an objective assessment of the "closeness" of the simulated behaviour to the observed measurements. While there are a few efficiency criteria such as the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, coefficient of determination, and index of agreement that are frequently used in hydrologic modeling studies and reported in the literature, there are a large number of other efficiency criteria to choose from. The selection and use of specific efficiency criteria and the interpretation of the results can be a challenge for even the most experienced hydrologist since each criterion may place different emphasis on different types of simulated and observed behaviours. In this paper, the utility of several efficiency criteria is investigated in three examples using a simple observed streamflow hydrograph.

  2. Measurement of the optical density of packable composites: comparison between direct and indirect digital systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziottin Luiz Felipe Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the optical density of four packable composite resins with widths of 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm, by means of Digora® (direct and DentScan DentView® (indirect digital imaging systems, in order to compare both methods. Twenty acrylic plates, with the proposed thicknesses, were used, each one containing a sample of each resin. Each acrylic plate was radiographed three times, under a standardized technique. For the Digora® system, an optical plate was used under each resin sample, and, for the DentScan DentView® system, occlusal films were employed, totalizing 60 exposures for each system. Optical plates and films were scanned and three consecutive optical readouts were carried out, totalizing 1,440 readouts. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and revealed that the average optical density of the four resins always increased as thickness increased. Regarding the comparisons between the composite resins, in both analysis the resin with the greater optical density was SurefilTM followed by ProdigyTM Condensable, AlertTM and Solitaire®. The correlations between the results of Digora® and DentScan DentView® were significant for the different thicknesses and materials. The observed tendency is that as the values obtained with the Digora® system increase, so do the values obtained with DentScan DentView®. While thickness increased, the values of optical density in both Digora® and DentScan DentView® tended to approach each other. The Digora® system presented smaller amplitude between the results obtained in adjacent thicknesses.

  3. Transparent composite model for DCT coefficients: design and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, En-Hui; Yu, Xiang; Meng, Jin; Sun, Chang

    2014-03-01

    The distributions of discrete cosine transform (DCT) coefficients of images are revisited on a per image base. To better handle, the heavy tail phenomenon commonly seen in the DCT coefficients, a new model dubbed a transparent composite model (TCM) is proposed and justified for both modeling accuracy and an additional data reduction capability. Given a sequence of the DCT coefficients, a TCM first separates the tail from the main body of the sequence. Then, a uniform distribution is used to model the DCT coefficients in the heavy tail, whereas a different parametric distribution is used to model data in the main body. The separate boundary and other parameters of the TCM can be estimated via maximum likelihood estimation. Efficient online algorithms are proposed for parameter estimation and their convergence is also proved. Experimental results based on Kullback-Leibler divergence and χ(2) test show that for real-valued continuous ac coefficients, the TCM based on truncated Laplacian offers the best tradeoff between modeling accuracy and complexity. For discrete or integer DCT coefficients, the discrete TCM based on truncated geometric distributions (GMTCM) models the ac coefficients more accurately than pure Laplacian models and generalized Gaussian models in majority cases while having simplicity and practicality similar to those of pure Laplacian models. In addition, it is demonstrated that the GMTCM also exhibits a good capability of data reduction or feature extraction-the DCT coefficients in the heavy tail identified by the GMTCM are truly outliers, and these outliers represent an outlier image revealing some unique global features of the image. Overall, the modeling performance and the data reduction feature of the GMTCM make it a desirable choice for modeling discrete or integer DCT coefficients in the real-world image or video applications, as summarized in a few of our further studies on quantization design, entropy coding design, and image understanding

  4. A Supersymmetric Composite Model with Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Kitazawa, N; Kitazawa, Noriaki; Okada, Nobuchika

    1997-01-01

    We present a supersymmetric composite model with dynamical supersymmetry breaking. The model is based on the gauge group $SU(2)_S \\times SU(2)_H \\times SU(3)_c \\times SU(2)_L \\times U(1)_Y$. Supersymmetry is dynamically broken by the non-perturbative effect of the $SU(2)_S$ `supercolor' interaction. The large top Yukawa coupling is naturally generated by the $SU(2)_H$ `hypercolor' interaction as recently proposed by Nelson and Strassler. The supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the standard model sector by a new mechanism. The electroweak symmetry breaking is caused by the radiative correction due to the large top Yukawa coupling with the supersymmetry breaking. This is the `radiative breaking scenario', which originates from the dynamics of the supercolor and hypercolor gauge interactions.

  5. COMPARISON BETWEEN MODELS FOR CALCULATION OF INDUSTRIAL HOT ROLLING LOADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Augusto Gorni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation is made about the precision of hot strip rolling mill loads at the F1 stand calculated according to the theoretical models of Orowan, Sims, Alexander-Ford, Orowan-Pascoe, Ekelund and Tselikov in comparison to real values got for carbon-manganese steels. In the deterministic approach, without any fit of the calculated values to real data, Orowan, Sims and Alexander-Models show best levels of precision, as expected from the information got in the literature. However, in the semi-empirical approach, after a linear fit between calculated values and real data, Tselikov and Ekelund models show better adequacy to the industrial data, a fact that can be attributed to more significant errors occurring in the sub-models of temperature, tribology and hot strength than in the rolling load models. For its turn, neural network models show the best levels of precision which make very attractive the adoption of this approach.

  6. 2-D Composite Model for Numerical Simulations of Nonlinear Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    - A composite model, which is the combination of Boussinesq equations and Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, has been developed for 2-D time-domain computations of nonlinear waves in a large region. The whole computational region Ω is divided into two subregions. In the near-field around a structure, Ω2, the flow is governed by 2-D Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a turbulence closure model of k-ε equations and numerically solved by the improved VOF method; whereas in the subregion Ω1 (Ω1 = Ω - Ω2) the flow is governed by one-D Boussinesq equations and numerically solved with the predictor-corrector algorithm. The velocity and the wave surface elevation are matched on the common boundary of the two subregions. Numerical tests have been conducted for the case of wave propagation and interaction with a wave barrier. It is shown that the composite model can help perform efficient computation of nonlinear waves in a large region with the complicated flow fields near structures taken into account.

  7. Hysteresis and creep: Comparison between a power-law model and Kuhnen's model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveri, Alberto; Stellino, Flavio; Parodi, Mauro; Storace, Marco, E-mail: marco.storace@unige.it

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some properties of a recently proposed model of hysteresis and creep (related to a circuit model, whose only nonlinear element is based on a power law) and compare it with the well-known Kuhnen's model. A first qualitative comparison relies on the analysis of the behavior of the elementary cell of each model. Their responses to step inputs (which allow to better evidence the creep effect) are analyzed and compared. Then, a quantitative comparison is proposed, based on the fitting performances of the two models on experimental data measured from a commercial piezoelectric actuator.

  8. A Composite Model of Quarks with the `Effective Supersymmetry'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, N.

    1998-04-01

    We present a composite model of quarks with `effective supersymmetry'. The model is based on the gauge group (SU(2)S × SU(2)M) × (SU(2)U × SU(2)C × SU(2)T) × SU(5)SM , where SU(5)SM is the standard model gauge group. In the dynamical supersymmetry breaking sector based on the gauge group SU(2)S × SU(2)M , supersymmetry is dynamically broken. The preon sector is constructed by the model proposed by Nelson and Strassler. The fermion mass hierarchy among the up-type quarks originates from the SU(2)U × SU(2)C × SU(2)T gauge dynamics. The supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the minimal supersymmetric standard model sector by the `preon' superfields which compose the quarks in the first two generations. To obtain an experimentally acceptable mass spectrum, the scalar quarks in the first two generations need masses of order 10 TeV, while the other superpartners need masses less than 1 TeV. Therefore, the mass spectrum in our model is one example of the `effective supersymmetry' model proposed by Cohen, Kaplan and Nelson.

  9. A Composite Model of Quarks with the "Effective Supersymmetry"

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, N

    1998-01-01

    We present a composite model of quarks with the `effective supersymmetry'. The model is based on the gauge group $(SU(2)_S \\times SU(2)_M) \\times (SU(2)_U standard model gauge group. In the dynamical supersymmetry breaking sector based on the gauge group $ SU(2)_S \\times SU(2)_M $, the supersymmetry is dynamically broken. The preon sector is constructed by the model proposed by Nelson and Strassler. The fermion mass hierarchy among the up-type quarks originates from the $ SU(2)_U \\times SU(2)_C \\times SU(2)_T $ gauge dynamics. The supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the minimal supersymmetric standard model sector by the `preon' superfields which compose the quarks in the first two generations. To obtain the experimentally acceptable mass spectrum, the scalar quarks in the first two generations have masses of order 10 TeV, while the other superpartners have masses of order 100 GeV. Therefore, the mass spectrum in our model is one of the type of the `effective supersymmetry' model proposed by Cohen, Kaplan a...

  10. Proposal of a Novel Approach to Developing Material Models for Micro-scale Composites Based on Testing and Modeling of Macro-scale Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schembri, Philip Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory's Weapon Systems Engineering division's Advanced Engineering Analysis group employs material constitutive models of composites for use in simulations of components and assemblies of interest. Experimental characterization, modeling and prediction of the macro-scale (i.e. continuum) behaviors of these composite materials is generally difficult because they exhibit nonlinear behaviors on the meso- (e.g. micro-) and macro-scales. Furthermore, it can be difficult to measure and model the mechanical responses of the individual constituents and constituent interactions in the composites of interest. Current efforts to model such composite materials rely on semi-empirical models in which meso-scale properties are inferred from continuum level testing and modeling. The proposed approach involves removing the difficulties of interrogating and characterizing micro-scale behaviors by scaling-up the problem to work with macro-scale composites, with the intention of developing testing and modeling capabilities that will be applicable to the mesoscale. This approach assumes that the physical mechanisms governing the responses of the composites on the meso-scale are reproducible on the macro-scale. Working on the macro-scale simplifies the quantification of composite constituents and constituent interactions so that efforts can be focused on developing material models and the testing techniques needed for calibration and validation. Other benefits to working with macro-scale composites include the ability to engineer and manufacture—potentially using additive manufacturing techniques—composites that will support the application of advanced measurement techniques such as digital volume correlation and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging, which would aid in observing and quantifying complex behaviors that are exhibited in the macro-scale composites of interest. Ultimately, the goal of this new approach is to develop a meso

  11. Integrated Modeling of Polymer Composites Under High Energy Laser Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Nano- Copper Particles and the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes. Composites, Part A 2014, 57, 1−7. (11) Gharagozloo-Hubmann, K.; Boden, A.; Czempiel, G. J...2013, 85, 1295−1326. (55) Varshney, V.; Patnaik, S. S.; Roy, A. K.; Froudakis, G.; Farmer, B. L. Modeling of Thermal Transport in Pillared -Graphene...8.5 × 37.5 × 2.2 mm and heated it at one end with a hot stage while cooling at the opposite end with a copper coldfinger immersed in water. We

  12. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  13. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  14. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  15. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for scattering anisotropy coefficient determination in dental-resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Carrasco, Irene M.; Ghinea, Razvan; Pérez, María M.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and its applications. Among the key optical properties of biological media is the angular distribution of the scattered light, characterized by the average cosine of the scattering angle, called the scattering anisotropy coefficient (g). The value of g can be determined by experimentally irradiating the material with a laser beam and making angular-scattering measurements in a goniometer. In this work, an experimental technique was used to determine g by means of goniometric measurements of the laser light scattered off two different dental-resin composites (classified as nano and hybrid). To assess the accuracy of the experimental method, a Mie theory-based computational model was used. Independent measurements were used to determine some of the required input parameters for computation of the theoretical model. The g values estimated with the computational method (nano-filled: 0.9399; hybrid: 0.8975) and the values calculated with the experimental method presented (nano-filled: 0.98297 +/- 0.00021; hybrid: 0.95429 +/- 0.00014) agreed well for both dental resins, with slightly higher experimental values. The higher experimental values may indicate that the scattering particle causes more narrow-angle scattering than does a perfect sphere of equal volume, assuming that with more spherical scattering particles the scattering anisotropy coefficient increases. Since g represents the angular distribution of the scattered light, values provided by both the experimental and the computational methods show a strongly forward-directed scattering in the dental resins studied, more pronounced in the nano-filled composite than in the hybrid composite.

  16. Modelling of composite concrete block pavement systems applying a cohesive zone model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar, Asmus; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of the fracture behaviour of the cement bound base material in composite concrete block pavement systems, using a cohesive zone model. The functionality of the proposed model is tested on experimental and numerical investigations of beam bending tests...

  17. Distributed hydrological models: comparison between TOPKAPI, a physically based model and TETIS, a conceptually based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, E.; Guna, V.

    2009-04-01

    The present work aims to carry out a comparison between two distributed hydrological models, the TOPKAPI (Ciarapica and Todini, 1998; Todini and Ciarapica, 2001) and TETIS (Vélez, J. J.; Vélez J. I. and Francés, F, 2002) models, obtaining the hydrological solution computed on the basis of the same storm events. The first model is physically based and the second one is conceptually based. The analysis was performed on the 21,4 km2 Goodwin Creek watershed, located in Panola County, Mississippi. This watershed extensively monitored by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Sediment Laboratory (NSL) has been chosen because it offers a complete database compiling precipitation (16 rain gauges), runoff (6 discharge stations) and GIS data. Three storm events were chosen to evaluate the performance of the two models: the first one was chosen to calibrate the models, and the other two to validate them. Both models performed a satisfactory hydrological response both in calibration and validation events. While for the TOPKAPI model it wasn't a real calibration, due to its really good performance with parameters modal values derived of watershed characteristics, for the TETIS model it has been necessary to perform a previous automatic calibration. This calibration was carried out using the data provided by the observed hydrograph, in order to adjust the modeĺs 9 correction factors. Keywords: TETIS, TOPKAPI, distributed models, hydrological response, ungauged basins.

  18. Comparison of Damage Path Predictions for Composite Laminates by Explicit and Standard Finite Element Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogert, Philip B.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Chunchu, Prasad B.

    2006-01-01

    Splitting, ultimate failure load and the damage path in center notched composite specimens subjected to in-plane tension loading are predicted using progressive failure analysis methodology. A 2-D Hashin-Rotem failure criterion is used in determining intra-laminar fiber and matrix failures. This progressive failure methodology has been implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit and Abaqus/Standard finite element codes through user written subroutines "VUMAT" and "USDFLD" respectively. A 2-D finite element model is used for predicting the intra-laminar damages. Analysis results obtained from the Abaqus/Explicit and Abaqus/Standard code show good agreement with experimental results. The importance of modeling delamination in progressive failure analysis methodology is recognized for future studies. The use of an explicit integration dynamics code for simple specimen geometry and static loading establishes a foundation for future analyses where complex loading and nonlinear dynamic interactions of damage and structure will necessitate it.

  19. Comparison of the elemental composition of office document paper: evidence in a homicide case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Lindsay D; Francis, Rod B; Tinggi, Ujang

    2002-05-01

    Fraudulent substitution of a page within a multiple page document such as a will or business contract, the counterfeit manufacture of paper banknotes, and linking ransom or extortion notes have all been the focus of criminal investigations at one time or another. In a recent homicide investigation, document examiners were requested to compare a threatening letter received by a business partner of the deceased with paper samples seized under warrant from a suspect's house. Through a quantitative elemental analysis of the concentrations of nine elements (Na, Mg, Al, Mn, Sr, Y, Ba, La, and Ce) within the questioned and specimen documents, determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), it was concluded that (i) the paper of the threatening letter originated from a different source to that of the paper seized from the suspect's house and (ii) all six pages of paper seized from the suspect's house originated from the same source. This discrimination of paper is presented as both a statistical t-test analysis (99.9% confidence limit) as well as construction of an elemental fingerprint for individual replicates within the questioned and specimen sample populations. This is the first reported use of the comparison of the elemental composition of document paper, determined by ICP-MS, to assist in a criminal investigation.

  20. Interspecies comparison of the mechanical properties and biochemical composition of byssal threads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Zeineb; Genard, Bertrand; Ibrahim, Neilly; Carrington, Emily; Babarro, José M F; Lok, Aynur; Flores, Augusto A V; Pellerin, Christian; Tremblay, Réjean; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2017-03-15

    Several bivalve species produce byssus threads to provide attachment to substrates, with mechanical properties highly variable among species. Here, we examined the distal section of byssal threads produced by a range of bivalve species (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus trossulus, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus californianus, Pinna nobilis, Perna perna, Xenostrobus securis, Brachidontes solisianus and Isognomon bicolor) collected from different nearshore environments. Morphological and mechanical properties were measured, and biochemical analyses were performed. Multivariate redundancy analyses on mechanical properties revealed that byssal threads of M. californianus, M. galloprovincialis and P. nobilis have very distinct mechanical behaviours compared with the remaining species. Extensibility, strength and force were the main variables separating these species groups, which were highest for M. californianus and lowest for P. nobilis Furthermore, the analysis of the amino acid composition revealed that I. bicolor and P. nobilis threads are significantly different from the other species, suggesting a different underlying structural strategy. Determination of metal contents showed that the individual concentration of inorganic elements varies, but that the dominant elements are conserved between species. Altogether, this bivalve species comparison suggests some molecular bases for the biomechanical characteristics of byssal fibres that may reflect phylogenetic limitations.

  1. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  2. Analysing earthquake slip models with the spatial prediction comparison test

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2014-11-10

    Earthquake rupture models inferred from inversions of geophysical and/or geodetic data exhibit remarkable variability due to uncertainties in modelling assumptions, the use of different inversion algorithms, or variations in data selection and data processing. A robust statistical comparison of different rupture models obtained for a single earthquake is needed to quantify the intra-event variability, both for benchmark exercises and for real earthquakes. The same approach may be useful to characterize (dis-)similarities in events that are typically grouped into a common class of events (e.g. moderate-size crustal strike-slip earthquakes or tsunamigenic large subduction earthquakes). For this purpose, we examine the performance of the spatial prediction comparison test (SPCT), a statistical test developed to compare spatial (random) fields by means of a chosen loss function that describes an error relation between a 2-D field (‘model’) and a reference model. We implement and calibrate the SPCT approach for a suite of synthetic 2-D slip distributions, generated as spatial random fields with various characteristics, and then apply the method to results of a benchmark inversion exercise with known solution. We find the SPCT to be sensitive to different spatial correlations lengths, and different heterogeneity levels of the slip distributions. The SPCT approach proves to be a simple and effective tool for ranking the slip models with respect to a reference model.

  3. Genetic comparison of milk production and composition in three maternal rabbit lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Gamal Fawzy EL Nagar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare 3 Spanish maternal rabbit lines (A, V and LP in terms of milk production and composition. These lines were founded on different criteria but selected for litter size at weaning. A total of 194 mature does in their third or higher parity were used. The milk yield of does was recorded at 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16 and 17 d post-partum (dpp. The milk production traits studied were weekly milk yield (WMY; g/wk and milk conversion ratio (MCR; grams of litter gain per grams of milk suckled during the first 21  dpp. The milk composition traits studied were fat (%, protein  (%, ash (%, lactose (% and total solids (%. The milk samples to be analysed were collected from each doe at 18 dpp. Data were analysed using single trait mixed and fixed models with and without covariates; the covariates were number born alive (NBA and doe weight at kindling (DW. The overall mean of WMY, during the first 3 wk, was 1547±16 g/wk. Milk yields during the different lactation weeks were for line A 872±39, 1503±39 and 1865±39 g for first, second and third lactation weeks, respectively. In line V, the corresponding values were 919±35, 1633±35 and 2004±35  g, and in line LP, they were 1043±36, 1819±36 and 2254±36  g. Means of MCR were 0.41±0.01, 0.41±0.01 and 0.42±0.01 for A, V and LP lines, respectively. Overall means of fat, protein, ash, lactose and total solids (% were 14.62±0.17, 11.10±0.07, 1.89±0.04, 2.67±0.12 and 30.27±0.24, respectively. The differences between lines for milk production traits were significant except for MCR, while the differences between lines for milk composition traits were not significant. NBA had significant effects on all milk yield traits but had no significant effects on milk composition traits. DW only had a significant effect on weekly milk yield. The parity order had no significant effect either for milk production traits or milk composition traits in multiparous does, except

  4. Meridional Winds derived from ionosonde measurements: comparison of different models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katamzi, Zama; Bosco Habarulema, John; Aruliah, Anasuya

    2016-07-01

    Thermospheric meridional winds are derived from ionospheric F2 region peak parameters (i.e. F2 maximum density, NmF2, and F2 peak height, hmF2) obtained using South African ionosonde for solar maximum (2001 and 2014) and solar minimum (2009). The study uses several different techniques and models to investigate the climatology behaviour of the winds in order to understand wind variability over South Africa. Detailed solar cycle, seasonal and diurnal trends will help establish how the winds influence ionospheric behaviour at this latitude. Comparisons of ionosonde derived neutral winds with empirical and numerical models such as the Coupled Middle Atmosphere Thermosphere Model (CMAT2) and Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) are important to understand the validity of theoretical and empirical models.

  5. On the structure of anomalous composite Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripaios, Ben; Nardecchia, Marco; You, Tevong

    2017-01-01

    We describe the anomaly structure of a composite Higgs model in which the SO(5) / SO(4) coset structure of the minimal model is extended by an additional, non-linearly realised U(1)_{η }. In addition, we show that the effective Lagrangian admits a term that, like the Wess-Zumino-Witten term in the chiral Lagrangian for QCD, is not invariant under the non-linearly realised symmetries, but rather changes by a total derivative. This term is unlike the Wess-Zumino-Witten term in that it does not arise from anomalies. If present, it may give rise to the rare decay η → h W^+ W^-Z. The phenomenology of the singlet in this model differs from that in a model based on SO(6) / SO(5), in that couplings to both gluons and photons, arising via anomalies, are present. We show that while some tuning is needed to accommodate flavour and electroweak precision constraints, the model is no worse than the minimal model in this regard.

  6. Inter-comparison of experimental catchment data and hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailesh Kumar; Ibbitt, Richard; Srinivasan, M. S.; Shankar, Ude

    2017-07-01

    Hydrological models account for the storage, flow of water and water balance in a catchment, including exchanges of water and energy with the ground, atmosphere and oceans. Because of the need to simplify hydrological models, parameters are often included to help with modelling hydrological processes. Generally the parameters of lumped, semi or distributed hydrological models depend on the values estimated at a gauged location, generally at outlet of the catchment (mostly using discharge). In this approach it is hard to judge how well a model represents internal catchment processes of the hydrological cycle as well as also ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of the catchment. The purpose of the paper is to assess, and potentially improve, the ability of a physically-based semi-distributed hydrological model, TopNet, using a spatially and temporally detailed set of field measurements of catchment responses to diverse weather conditions. The TopNet rainfall-runoff model was applied to the Waipara catchment located in the South Island of New Zealand. Observations from field experiments were compared with the simulation results of uncalibrated TopNet model. The total amount of simulated runoff showed reasonable agreement with observations. However, the model overestimated baseflow and underestimated surface flow. The results show that soil moisture variation within the catchment is well represented by the model. However, comparison of the observed water balance with model results show that there is a deficiency in the calculation of evapotranspiration.

  7. Bias-dependent model of the electrical impedance of ionic polymer-metal composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze the charge dynamics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) in response to voltage inputs composed of a large dc bias and a small superimposed time-varying voltage. The IPMC chemoelectrical behavior is described through the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck framework, in which steric effects are taken into consideration. The physics of charge build-up and mass transfer in the proximity of the high surface electrodes is modeled by schematizing the IPMC as the stacked sequence of five layers, in which the ionomeric membrane is separated from the metal electrodes by two composite layers. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a semianalytical solution for the concentration of mobile counterions and the electric potential in the IPMC, which is, in turn, used to establish an equivalent circuit model for the IPMC electrical response. The circuit model consists of the series connection of a resistor and two complex elements, each constituted by the parallel connection of a capacitor and a Warburg impedance. The resistor is associated with ion transport in the ionomeric membrane and is independent of the dc bias. The capacitors and the Warburg impedance idealize charge build-up and mass transfer in the vicinity of the electrodes and their value is controlled by the dc bias. The proposed approach is validated against experimental results on in-house fabricated IPMCs and the accuracy of the equivalent circuit is assessed through comparison with finite element results.

  8. Effects of model layer simplification using composite hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Nicasio; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of simplifying hydraulic property layering within an unconfined aquifer and the underlying confining unit were assessed. The hydraulic properties of lithologic units within the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were computed by analyzing the aquifer-test data using radial, axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) flow. Time-varying recharge to the unconfined aquifer and pumping from the confined Upper Floridan aquifer (USA) were simulated using 3D flow. Conceptual flow models were developed by gradually reducing the number of lithologic units in the unconfined aquifer and confining unit by calculating composite hydraulic properties for the simplified lithologic units. Composite hydraulic properties were calculated using either thickness-weighted averages or inverse modeling using regression-based parameter estimation. No significant residuals were simulated when all lithologic units comprising the unconfined aquifer were simulated as one layer. The largest residuals occurred when the unconfined aquifer and confining unit were aggregated into a single layer (quasi-3D), with residuals over 100% for the leakage rates to the confined aquifer and the heads in the confining unit. Residuals increased with contrasts in vertical hydraulic conductivity between the unconfined aquifer and confining unit. Residuals increased when the constant-head boundary at the bottom of the Upper Floridan aquifer was replaced with a no-flow boundary.

  9. Direct and indirect signals of natural composite Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Niehoff, Christoph; Straub, David M

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive numerical analysis of a four-dimensional model with the Higgs as a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson that features a calculable Higgs potential and protective custodial and flavour symmetries to reduce electroweak fine-tuning. We employ a novel numerical technique that allows us for the first time to study constraints from radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, Higgs physics, electroweak precision tests, flavour physics, and direct LHC bounds on fermion and vector boson resonances in a single framework. We consider four different flavour symmetries in the composite sector, one of which we show to not be viable anymore in view of strong precision constraints. In the other cases, all constraints can be passed with a sub-percent electroweak fine-tuning. The models can explain the excesses recently observed in $WW$, $WZ$, $Wh$ and $\\ell^+\\ell^-$ resonance searches by ATLAS and CMS and the anomalies in angular observables and branching ratios of rare semi-leptonic $B$ decays obser...

  10. Long Fibre Composite Modelling Using Cohesive User's Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozák, Vladislav; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2010-09-01

    The development glass matrix composites reinforced by unidirectional long ceramic fibre has resulted in a family of very perspective structural materials. The only disadvantage of such materials is relatively high brittleness at room temperature. The main micromechanisms acting as toughening mechanism are the pull out, crack bridging, matrix cracking. There are other mechanisms as crack deflection etc. but the primer mechanism is mentioned pull out which is governed by interface between fibre and matrix. The contribution shows a way how to predict and/or optimise mechanical behaviour of composite by application of cohesive zone method and write user's cohesive element into the FEM numerical package Abaqus. The presented results from numerical calculations are compared with experimental data. Crack extension is simulated by means of element extinction algorithms. The principal effort is concentrated on the application of the cohesive zone model with the special traction separation (bridging) law and on the cohesive zone modelling. Determination of micro-mechanical parameters is based on the combination of static tests, microscopic observations and numerical calibration procedures.

  11. Perturbative Unitarity Bounds in Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Models

    CERN Document Server

    De Curtis, Stefania; Yagyu, Kei; Yildirim, Emine

    2016-01-01

    We study bounds from perturbative unitarity in a Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Model (C2HDM) based on the spontaneous breakdown of a global symmetry $SO(6)\\to SO(4)\\times SO(2)$ at the compositeness scale $f$. The eight pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons (pNGBs) emerging from such a dynamics are identified as two isospin doublet Higgs fields. We calculate the $S$-wave amplitude for all possible 2-to-2-body elastic (pseudo)scalar boson scatterings at energy scales $\\sqrt{s}$ reachable at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and beyond it, including the longitudinal components of weak gauge boson states as the corresponding pNGB states. In our calculation, the Higgs potential is assumed to have the same form as that in the Elementary 2-Higgs Doublet Model (E2HDM) with a discrete $Z_2$ symmetry, which is expected to be generated at the one-loop level via the Coleman-Weinberg (CW) mechanism. We find that the $S$-wave amplitude matrix can be block-diagonalized with maximally $2\\times 2$ submatrices in a way similar to the E2HDM...

  12. Damage Prediction Models for Advanced Materials and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Ahmad, Jalees; Grady, Joseph E. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the assessment and evaluation of various acoustic tile designs were conducted using three-dimensional finite element analysis, which included static analysis, thermal analysis and modal analysis of integral and non-integral tile design options. Various benchmark specimens for acoustic tile designs, including CMC integral T-joint and notched CMC plate, were tested in both room and elevated temperature environment. Various candidate ceramic matrix composite materials were used in the numerical modeling and experimental study. The research effort in this program evolved from numerical modeling and concept design to a combined numerical analysis and experimental study. Many subjects associated with the design and performance of the acoustic tile in jet engine exhaust nozzle have been investigated.

  13. Percolation modeling of self-damaging of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Privman, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    We propose the concept of autonomous self-damaging in “smart” composite materials, controlled by activation of added nanosize “damaging” capsules. Percolation-type modeling approach earlier applied to the related concept of self-healing materials, is used to investigate the behavior of the initial material's fatigue. We aim at achieving a relatively sharp drop in the material's integrity after some initial limited fatigue develops in the course of the sample's usage. Our theoretical study considers a two-dimensional lattice model and involves Monte Carlo simulations of the connectivity and conductance in the high-connectivity regime of percolation. We give several examples of local capsule-lattice and capsule-capsule activation rules and show that the desired self-damaging property can only be obtained with rather sophisticated “smart” material's response involving not just damaging but also healing capsules.

  14. Dispersion Relations for Electroweak Observables in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Contino, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive dispersion relations for the electroweak oblique observables measured at LEP in the context of $SO(5)/SO(4)$ composite Higgs models. It is shown how these relations can be used and must be modified when modeling the spectral functions through a low-energy effective description of the strong dynamics. The dispersion relation for the parameter $\\epsilon_3$ is then used to estimate the contribution from spin-1 resonances at the 1-loop level. Finally, it is shown that the sign of the contribution to the $\\hat S$ parameter from the lowest-lying spin-1 states is not necessarily positive definite, but depends on the energy scale at which the asymptotic behavior of current correlators is attained.

  15. Sphalerons in composite and non-standard Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson and the rather precise measurement of all electroweak boson's masses the local structure of the electroweak symmetry breaking potential is already quite well established. However, despite being a key ingredient to a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, the global structure of the electroweak potential remains entirely unknown. The existence of sphalerons, unstable solutions of the classical action of motion that are interpolating between topologically distinct vacua, is a direct consequence of the Standard Model's $\\mathrm{SU}(2)_L$ gauge group. Nevertheless, the sphaleron energy depends on the shape of the Higgs potential away from the minimum and can therefore be a litmus test for its global structure. Focusing on two scenarios, the minimal composite Higgs model $\\mathrm{SO}(5)/\\mathrm{SO}(4)$ or an elementary Higgs with a deformed electroweak potential, we calculate the change of the sphaleron energy compared to the S...

  16. Comparison of tropospheric chemistry schemes for use within global models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Emmerson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Methane and ozone are two important climate gases with significant tropospheric chemistry. Within chemistry-climate and transport models this chemistry is simplified for computational expediency. We compare the state of the art Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM with six tropospheric chemistry schemes (CRI-reduced, GEOS-CHEM and a GEOS-CHEM adduct, MOZART, TOMCAT and CBM-IV that could be used within composition transport models. We test the schemes within a box model framework under conditions derived from a composition transport model and from field observations from a regional scale pollution event. We find that CRI-reduced provides much skill in simulating the full chemistry, yet with greatly reduced complexity. We find significant variations between the other chemical schemes, and reach the following conclusions. 1 The inclusion of a gas phase N2O5+H2O reaction in some schemes and not others is a large source of uncertainty in the inorganic chemistry. 2 There are significant variations in the calculated concentration of PAN between the schemes, which will affect the long range transport of reactive nitrogen in global models. 3 The representation of isoprene chemistry differs hugely between the schemes, leading to significant uncertainties on the impact of isoprene on composition. 4 Night-time chemistry is badly represented with significant disagreements in the ratio of NO3 to NOx. Resolving these four issues through further investigative laboratory studies will reduce the uncertainties within the chemical schemes of global tropospheric models.

  17. Chromatographic comparison of bupivacaine imprinted polymers prepared in crushed monolith, microsphere, silica-based composite and capillary monolith formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxelbark, Joakim; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Aureliano, Carla S A; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Schillinger, Eric; Sellergren, Börje; Courtois, Julien; Irgum, Knut; Dambies, Laurent; Cormack, Peter A G; Sherrington, David C; De Lorenzi, Ersilia

    2007-08-10

    A comprehensive comparison of five chromatographic stationary phases based on molecularly imprinted polymers is presented. Efficiency, imprinting factors, water compatibility and batch-to-batch reproducibility are discussed for crushed monolith, microspheres, two silica-based composites and capillary monoliths, all imprinted with the local anaesthetic bupivacaine. Synthesis protocol and chromatographic test conditions have been kept fixed within certain limits, in order to provide further insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the different formats. Excluding microparticles, all formats give satisfactory performance, especially in aqueous mobile phases. An assessment of batch-to-batch reproducibility in different mobile phases adds further value to this comparison study.

  18. Fabrication and comparison of PMN-PT single crystal, PZT and PZT-based 1-3 composite ultrasonic transducers for NDE applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Bok; Hsu, David K; Ahn, Bongyoung; Kim, Young-Gil; Barnard, Daniel J

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes fabrication and comparison of PMN-PT single crystal, PZT, and PZT-based 1-3 composite ultrasonic transducers for NDE applications. As a front matching layer between test material (Austenite stainless steel, SUS316) and piezoelectric materials, alumina ceramics was selected. The appropriate acoustic impedance of the backing materials for each transducer was determined based on the results of KLM model simulation. Prototype ultrasonic transducers with the center frequencies of approximately 2.25 and 5MHz for contact measurement were fabricated and compared to each other. The PMN-PT single crystal ultrasonic transducer shows considerably improved performance in sensitivity over the PZT and PZT-based 1-3 composite ultrasonic transducers.

  19. Analytical Modeling for Mechanical Strength Prediction with Raman Spectroscopy and Fractured Surface Morphology of Novel Coconut Shell Powder Reinforced: Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Savita; Singh, Alok; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an analytical modeling and prediction of tensile and flexural strength of three dimensional micro-scaled novel coconut shell powder (CSP) reinforced epoxy polymer composites have been reported. The novel CSP has a specific mixing ratio of different coconut shell particle size. A comparison is made between obtained experimental strength and modified Guth model. The result shows a strong evidence for non-validation of modified Guth model for strength prediction. Consequently, a constitutive modeled equation named Singh model has been developed to predict the tensile and flexural strength of this novel CSP reinforced epoxy composite. Moreover, high resolution Raman spectrum shows that 40 % CSP reinforced epoxy composite has high dielectric constant to become an alternative material for capacitance whereas fractured surface morphology revealed that a strong bonding between novel CSP and epoxy polymer for the application as light weight composite materials in engineering.

  20. The comparison of immobility time in experimental rat swimming models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calil, Caroline Morini; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein

    2006-09-27

    Rat swimming models have been used in studies about stress and depression. However, there is no consensus about interpreting immobility (helplessness or adaptation) in the literature. In the present study, immobility time, glucose and glycogen mobilization, corticosterone and the effect of desipramine and diazepam were investigated in two different models: swimming stress and the forced swimming test. Immobility time was lower in swimming stress than in the forced swimming test. Both swimming models increased corticosterone levels in comparison with control animal levels. Moreover, swimming stress induced higher corticosterone levels than the forced swimming test did [F(2,14)=59.52; pswimming stressswimming testswimming stress in comparison with the forced swimming test and control. The immobility time was recorded and measured in another group treated with desipramine and diazepam in two protocols: a single session of forced swimming test or swimming stress and two sessions (pre- and retest) of forced swimming model or swimming stress. Desipramine decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test in both the single [F(2,25)=20.63; pswimming session, without changes in the swimming stress model. Diazepam increased the immobility time in the swimming stress but not in the forced swimming test during the single [F(2,26)=11.24; p=0.0003] and retest sessions [F(2,38)=4.17; p=0.02]. It was concluded that swimming stress and the forced swimming test induced different behavior, hormonal and metabolic responses and represented different situations to the animal.

  1. A Comparison of Evolutionary Computation Techniques for IIR Model Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Cuevas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available System identification is a complex optimization problem which has recently attracted the attention in the field of science and engineering. In particular, the use of infinite impulse response (IIR models for identification is preferred over their equivalent FIR (finite impulse response models since the former yield more accurate models of physical plants for real world applications. However, IIR structures tend to produce multimodal error surfaces whose cost functions are significantly difficult to minimize. Evolutionary computation techniques (ECT are used to estimate the solution to complex optimization problems. They are often designed to meet the requirements of particular problems because no single optimization algorithm can solve all problems competitively. Therefore, when new algorithms are proposed, their relative efficacies must be appropriately evaluated. Several comparisons among ECT have been reported in the literature. Nevertheless, they suffer from one limitation: their conclusions are based on the performance of popular evolutionary approaches over a set of synthetic functions with exact solutions and well-known behaviors, without considering the application context or including recent developments. This study presents the comparison of various evolutionary computation optimization techniques applied to IIR model identification. Results over several models are presented and statistically validated.

  2. A Model-Model and Data-Model Comparison for the Early Eocene Hydrological Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Matthew J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Huber, Matthew; Heinemann, Malte; Kiehl, Jeffrey; LeGrande, Allegra; Loptson, Claire A.; Roberts, Chris D.; Sagoo, Navjit; Shields, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A range of proxy observations have recently provided constraints on how Earth's hydrological cycle responded to early Eocene climatic changes. However, comparisons of proxy data to general circulation model (GCM) simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P - E distributions within the extended EoMIP ensemble (Eocene Modelling Intercomparison Project; Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure, and precipitation-relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to the preindustrial conditions. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, resulting in elevated temperatures, although the effects of differences in paleogeography and ice sheets are also important in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP=dT ) display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa, and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that GCMs generally underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes, although a possible seasonal bias of the proxies cannot be excluded. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated CO2 or by varying poorly constrained model parameter values, are most successful in simulating a

  3. Comparison of induced velocity models for helicopter flight mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.E.; Houston, S.S.

    2002-07-01

    Modeling of rotor-induced velocity receives continued attention in the literature as the rotorcraft community addresses limitations in the fidelity of simulations of helicopter stability, control, and handling qualities. A comparison is presented of results obtained using a rigid-blade rotor-fuselage model configured with two induced velocity models: a conventional, first-order, finite state, dynamic inflow model and a wake model that solves a vorticity transport equation on a computational mesh enclosing the rotorcraft. Differences between the two models are quantified by comparing predictions of trimmed rotor blade flap, lag and feather angles, airframe pitch and roll attitudes, cross-coupling derivatives, response to control inputs, and airframe vibration. Results are presented in the context of measurements taken on a Puma aircraft in steady flight from hover to high speed. More accurate predictions of the cross-coupling derivatives, response to control, and airframe vibration obtained using the vorticity transport model suggest that incorporation of real flowfield effects is important to extending the bandwidth of applicability of helicopter simulation models. Unexpectedly small differences in some of the trim predictions obtained using the two wake models suggest that an overall improvement in simulation fidelity may not be achieved without equivalent attention to the rotor dynamic model. (Author)

  4. Using Virtual Observatories for Data-Model Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, A.; de Zeeuw, D.

    2007-12-01

    Global models of the geospace environment allow researchers to better understand how the environment behaves under different conditions. In order to trust whether the model is accurate, it is crucial to compare the model results to data - i.e., validate the model. Also, models are very good at placing measurements into a global context, so the data can be better understood. With the advent of Virtural Observatories, it will become much easier to conduct data-model comparisons. This is because the model results will have similar descriptors as the data, and reside in model repositories (similar to data repositories), allowing the data and the model results to be cross-linked. In this presentation, we will describe our efforts on creating an environment in which data and models can be easily compared. We will provide real-world examples of how this can be used to better understand the geospace environment, and out progress in realizing the goal of creating such an environment.

  5. Variation Regulation and Models of Raw Milk Composition of Chinese Holstein Cattle in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang; YANG; Yi; MA; Zhihong; PANG; Miao; YI; Qin; YANG; Benhai; XIONG

    2013-01-01

    Based on raw milk DHI data of Chinese Holstein cattle in northern China,milk composition (milk protein percentage and milk fat percentage) of lactating cow is grouped into parity 1 to 4. After preprocessing original data,6114 data records of milk protein percentage and 5871 data records of milk fat percentage were obtained. This study discusses effects of natural months,lactation parity and their interaction on changes of milk protein percentage and milk fat percentage,and the model is established using GLM procedure of SAS software. At last,results are as follows: (i) Duncan multiple comparison of natural months,regardless of parity (only parity 1 to 4) ,indicates that milk composition takes on significant difference between different months (P < 0. 05) . And milk protein percentage reaches highest in September (3. 187%), drops to the lowest in July (3. 016%); the milk fat percentage reaches highest in February (4. 137%),and drops to the lowest in July (3.845%) . (ii) Duncan multiple comparison of different parity,regardless months (January to December) ,shows that milk composition of different parity also takes on significant difference (P < 0. 05) although the difference between parities are not significant; milk protein percentage reaches highest in the 2nd parity (3. 114%)and drops to the lowest in the 4th parity (3. 066%); milk fat percentage reaches highest in the 2nd and 3rd parity (3. 983% and 3. 973%),and drops to the lowest in the 4th parity (3. 923%). (iii) Using Wood model,the relational expression between milk protein percentage (MPP,%)and milk fat percentage (MFP,%)of different parity and natural month,i. e. MPP = 3. 094x - 0. 046 4 × e 0. 011 7x and MFP = 4. 211 6x - 0. 034 4 × e 0. 027 6x (x stands for month) . According to the above results,it is concluded that natural months,lactation parity and their interaction significantly influence milk protein percentage and milk fat percentage (P < 0. 001) ,and milk protein percentage and milk fat

  6. Model comparison for the density structure along solar prominence threads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, I.; Soler, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Quiescent solar prominence fine structures are typically modelled as density enhancements, called threads, which occupy a fraction of a longer magnetic flux tube. This is justified from the spatial distribution of the imaged plasma emission or absorption of prominences at small spatial scales. The profile of the mass density along the magnetic field is unknown, however, and several arbitrary alternatives are employed in prominence wave studies. The identification and measurement of period ratios from multiple harmonics in standing transverse thread oscillations offer a remote diagnostics method to probe the density variation of these structures. Aims: We present a comparison of theoretical models for the field-aligned density along prominence fine structures. They aim to imitate density distributions in which the plasma is more or less concentrated around the centre of the magnetic flux tube. We consider Lorentzian, Gaussian, and parabolic profiles. We compare theoretical predictions based on these profiles for the period ratio between the fundamental transverse kink mode and the first overtone to obtain estimates for the density ratios between the central part of the tube and its foot-points and to assess which one would better explain observed period ratio data. Methods: Bayesian parameter inference and model comparison techniques were developed and applied. To infer the parameters, we computed the posterior distribution for the density gradient parameter that depends on the observable period ratio. The model comparison involved computing the marginal likelihood as a function of the period ratio to obtain the plausibility of each density model as a function of the observable. We also computed the Bayes factors to quantify the relative evidence for each model, given a period ratio observation. Results: A Lorentzian density profile, with plasma density concentrated around the centre of the tube, seems to offer the most plausible inversion result. A

  7. Modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation in composite laminates with realistic discontinuity representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Schorer, Nora; Sause, Markus G R

    2017-06-20

    This paper presents a method for embedding realistic defect geometries of a fiber reinforced material in a finite element modeling environment in order to simulate active ultrasonic inspection. When ultrasonic inspection is used experimentally to investigate the presence of defects in composite materials, the microscopic defect geometry may cause signal characteristics that are difficult to interpret. Hence, modeling of this interaction is key to improve our understanding and way of interpreting the acquired ultrasonic signals. To model the true interaction of the ultrasonic wave field with such defect structures as pores, cracks or delamination, a realistic three dimensional geometry reconstruction is required. We present a 3D-image based reconstruction process which converts computed tomography data in adequate surface representations ready to be embedded for processing with finite element methods. Subsequent modeling using these geometries uses a multi-scale and multi-physics simulation approach which results in quantitative A-Scan ultrasonic signals which can be directly compared with experimental signals. Therefore, besides the properties of the composite material, a full transducer implementation, piezoelectric conversion and simultaneous modeling of the attached circuit is applied. Comparison between simulated and experimental signals provides very good agreement in electrical voltage amplitude and the signal arrival time and thus validates the proposed modeling approach. Simulating ultrasound wave propagation in a medium with a realistic shape of the geometry clearly shows a difference in how the disturbance of the waves takes place and finally allows more realistic modeling of A-scans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope

  9. Model inter-comparison on transport and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, P. [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (Italy); Meirink, J.F. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI, De Bilt (Netherlands); Mueller, J.F. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Koerner, S.; Heimann, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemie, Jena (Germany); Bousquet, P.; Ramonet, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environment LSCE, Gif sur Yvette (France); Dlugokencky, E.J. [NOAA Earth Science Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Kaminski, U. [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Meteorologisches Observatorium Hohenpeissenberg (Germany); Vecchi, R.; Marcazzan, G. [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); Meinhardt, F. [Umweltbundesamt, Messstelle Schauinsland, Kirchzarten (Germany); Sartorius, H. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Freiburg (Germany); Zahorowski, W. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    A comprehensive inter-comparison of 5 atmospheric chemistry transport models (TM5, TM4, TM3, IMAGES, and LMDZ) has been performed. The main objective was to analyze differences in model transport, in particular vertical mixing (boundary layer and convective transport), synoptic variations, and large scale global circulation (including inter-hemispheric exchange and stratospheric tropospheric exchange (STE)). For this purpose simulations of various tracers with very different atmospheric lifetimes {tau} have been carried out: 222Rn ({tau} = 3.8 days), SF6 ({tau} {approx}3000 years), and CH4 ({tau} = {approx}9 years), using prescribed boundary conditions for all models. Furthermore, OH fields from various model simulations with full chemistry have been compared.

  10. Bayesian Model Comparison With the g-Prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Cemgil, Ali Taylan

    2014-01-01

    Model comparison and selection is an important problem in many model-based signal processing applications. Often, very simple information criteria such as the Akaike information criterion or the Bayesian information criterion are used despite their shortcomings. Compared to these methods, Djuric......’s asymptotic MAP rule was an improvement, and in this paper we extend the work by Djuric in several ways. Specifically, we consider the elicitation of proper prior distributions, treat the case of real- and complex-valued data simultaneously in a Bayesian framework similar to that considered by Djuric......, and develop new model selection rules for a regression model containing both linear and non-linear parameters. Moreover, we use this framework to give a new interpretation of the popular information criteria and relate their performance to the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. By use of simulations, we also...

  11. Bayesian inference and model comparison for metallic fatigue data

    KAUST Repository

    Babuška, Ivo

    2016-02-23

    In this work, we present a statistical treatment of stress-life (S-N) data drawn from a collection of records of fatigue experiments that were performed on 75S-T6 aluminum alloys. Our main objective is to predict the fatigue life of materials by providing a systematic approach to model calibration, model selection and model ranking with reference to S-N data. To this purpose, we consider fatigue-limit models and random fatigue-limit models that are specially designed to allow the treatment of the run-outs (right-censored data). We first fit the models to the data by maximum likelihood methods and estimate the quantiles of the life distribution of the alloy specimen. To assess the robustness of the estimation of the quantile functions, we obtain bootstrap confidence bands by stratified resampling with respect to the cycle ratio. We then compare and rank the models by classical measures of fit based on information criteria. We also consider a Bayesian approach that provides, under the prior distribution of the model parameters selected by the user, their simulation-based posterior distributions. We implement and apply Bayesian model comparison methods, such as Bayes factor ranking and predictive information criteria based on cross-validation techniques under various a priori scenarios.

  12. Empirical Bayes Model Comparisons for Differential Methylation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiang Teng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of empirical Bayes models (each with different statistical distribution assumptions have now been developed to analyze differential DNA methylation using high-density oligonucleotide tiling arrays. However, it remains unclear which model performs best. For example, for analysis of differentially methylated regions for conservative and functional sequence characteristics (e.g., enrichment of transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs, the sensitivity of such analyses, using various empirical Bayes models, remains unclear. In this paper, five empirical Bayes models were constructed, based on either a gamma distribution or a log-normal distribution, for the identification of differential methylated loci and their cell division—(1, 3, and 5 and drug-treatment-(cisplatin dependent methylation patterns. While differential methylation patterns generated by log-normal models were enriched with numerous TFBSs, we observed almost no TFBS-enriched sequences using gamma assumption models. Statistical and biological results suggest log-normal, rather than gamma, empirical Bayes model distribution to be a highly accurate and precise method for differential methylation microarray analysis. In addition, we presented one of the log-normal models for differential methylation analysis and tested its reproducibility by simulation study. We believe this research to be the first extensive comparison of statistical modeling for the analysis of differential DNA methylation, an important biological phenomenon that precisely regulates gene transcription.

  13. Structure and composition of calcareous sponge spicules: a review and comparison to structurally related biominerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethmann, Ingo; Wörheide, Gert

    2008-01-01

    , the current knowledge about the structure, composition, and formation of calcareous sponge spicules is summarised and discussed. Comparisons of calcareous sponge spicules with the amorphous silica spicules of sponges of the classes Hexactinellida and Demospongiae, as well as with calcitic skeletal elements of echinoderms are drawn. Despite the variety of poriferan spicule mineralogy and the distant phylogenetic relationship between sponges and echinoderms, all of these biominerals share similarities regarding their nano-scale construction. Furthermore, echinoderm skeletal elements resemble calcareous sponge spicules in that they represent magnesium-bearing calcite single-crystals with extremely complex morphologies.

  14. COMPLEX PROGRAMS FOR MODELING HIGHWAY: PARK, PROFILE AND COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iu. Smirnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main part of developing computer-aided design of roads are simulation systems to see the road in action. Modeling of the functioning of the road in such a simulation system - this test road design in the computer. This article describes three modules: PARK, PROFILE, COMPOSITION and comprising a set of process simulation programs functioning road. A significant increase in the accuracy of simulation results provides software parks established normative reference database of technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the stream. Completeness framework allows continuous adjustment and constant up-dating of the parameters types of cars in different scales calculation excludes construction and operating costs in justifying economic calculations optimality design solutions and increases the reliability of evaluating the effectiveness of capital investments in the construction and reconstruction of roads. Optimization of the design solutions in general, as a single continuous sequence of combinations of elements contributes to road profile program that analyzes the geometric elements of the plan, longitudinal section, compressing the geometry information of the way for the subsequent modeling of the functioning of the road. Program PROFILE (and built on its basis BASIS program, PROFILE is a nexus between the projecting programs and programs that simulate traffic. Transport and road performance computer modeled for a particular stream of automobile. Technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the flow (up to 20, which is sufficient for practical and research tasks and their percentage in the flow of the program selects COMPOSITION regulatory reference framework articulated earlier PARK module and writes them to a working file for their subsequent use module RIDE.

  15. Comparison between analytical and numerical solution of mathematical drying model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahari, N.; Rasmani, K.; Jamil, N.

    2016-02-01

    Drying is often related to the food industry as a process of shifting heat and mass inside food, which helps in preserving food. Previous research using a mass transfer equation showed that the results were mostly concerned with the comparison between the simulation model and the experimental data. In this paper, the finite difference method was used to solve a mass equation during drying using different kinds of boundary condition, which are equilibrium and convective boundary conditions. The results of these two models provide a comparison between the analytical and the numerical solution. The result shows a close match between the two solution curves. It is concluded that the two proposed models produce an accurate solution to describe the moisture distribution content during the drying process. This analysis indicates that we have confidence in the behaviour of moisture in the numerical simulation. This result demonstrated that a combined analytical and numerical approach prove that the system is behaving physically. Based on this assumption, the model of mass transfer was extended to include the temperature transfer, and the result shows a similar trend to those presented in the simpler case.

  16. Lindley-Shannon Information for Comparison of Priors Under Paired Comparisons Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main differences between classical statistics and Bayesian statistics is that the latter can utilise prior information in a formal way. This information can be quantified in terms of a probability distribution which is known as the prior distribution. If there is no relevant prior information available then there are ways to derive a 'non-informative' prior distribution. In this study, the informative and non-informative prior distributions for the parameters of the Bradley-Terry model for paired comparison data are compared.

  17. Numerical Comparison of Solutions of Kinetic Model Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Frolova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The collision integral approximation by different model equations has created a whole new trend in the theory of rarefied gas. One widely used model is the Shakhov model (S-model obtained by expansion of inverse collisions integral in a series of Hermite polynomials up to the third order. Using the same expansion with another value of free parameters leads to a linearized ellipsoidal statistical model (ESL.Both model equations (S and ESL have the same properties, as they give the correct relaxation of non-equilibrium stress tensor components and heat flux vector, the correct Prandtl number at the transition to the hydrodynamic regime and do not guarantee the positivity of the distribution function.The article presents numerical comparison of solutions of Shakhov equation, ESL- model and full Boltzmann equation in the four Riemann problems for molecules of hard spheres.We have considered the expansion of two gas flows, contact discontinuity, the problem of the gas counter-flows and the problem of the shock wave structure. For the numerical solution of the kinetic equations the method of discrete ordinates is used.The comparison shows that solution has a weak sensitivity to the form of collision operator in the problem of expansions of two gas flows and results obtained by the model and the kinetic Boltzmann equations coincide.In the problem of the contact discontinuity the solution of model equations differs from full kinetic solutions at the point of the initial discontinuity. The non-equilibrium stress tensor has the maximum errors, the error of the heat flux is much smaller, and the ESL - model gives the exact value of the extremum of heat flux.In the problems of gas counter-flows and shock wave structure the model equations give significant distortion profiles of heat flux and non-equilibrium stress tensor components in front of the shock waves. This behavior is due to fact that in the models under consideration there is no dependency of the

  18. Comparison of results from different NDE techniques from ceramic matrix composites with varying porosity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Imelda; Ojard, Greg; Santhosh, Unni; Ahmad, Jalees; Gowayed, Yasser

    2015-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC's) are attractive materials for use in advanced turbine engines. Due to the nature of available processing techniques, however, the amount and distribution of porosity in CMC's can vary greatly. This can be particularly true in parts with complex geometries. It is therefore important to characterize the porosity with non-destructive techniques and understand its effect on properties. A series of CMC samples were fabricated with varying levels of porosity and analyzed with different NDE techniques. The results were categorized and analyzed with respect to ease of interpretation and degree to which they could be quantified and used in models to determine the effects of defects. The results were also correlated with microstructural examination and mechanical properties.

  19. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    CERN Document Server

    Serenelli, Aldo; Villante, Francesco L; Vincent, Aaron C; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Pena-Garay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger \\& Zurbuchen (2016; vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically-inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with established abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted $^8$B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and $^7$Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances fare much worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present ast...

  20. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  1. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  2. Modeling the Jovian subnebula: II - Composition of regular satellites ices

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Mousis, Olivier; Alibert, Yann

    2005-01-01

    We use the evolutionary turbulent model of Jupiter's subnebula described by Alibert et al. (2005a) to constrain the composition of ices incorporated in its regular icy satellites. We consider CO2, CO, CH4, N2, NH3, H2S, Ar, Kr, and Xe as the major volatile species existing in the gas-phase of the solar nebula. All these volatile species, except CO2 which crystallized as a pure condensate, are assumed to be trapped by H2O to form hydrates or clathrate hydrates in the solar nebula. Once condensed, these ices were incorporated into the growing planetesimals produced in the feeding zone of proto-Jupiter. Some of these solids then flowed from the solar nebula to the subnebula, and may have been accreted by the forming Jovian regular satellites. We show that ices embedded in solids entering at early epochs into the Jovian subdisk were all vaporized. This leads us to consider two different scenarios of regular icy satellites formation in order to estimate the composition of the ices they contain. In the first scenar...

  3. Use of dental adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Piva, Evandro; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Resin adhesives (RA) have been applied between resin composite (RC) increments, but there is no consensus on the impact of this technique on the properties of the final restoration. This study evaluated the effect of the presence of RA between RC layers on physical properties, translucency and long-term color stability of the restorative material. Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose (bond, 3M ESPE) and Adper™ Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) were used as RA, and Filtek™ Z350 (3M ESPE) as RC. Specimens containing RA were prepared by applying 3 layers of the adhesive between 4 increments of RC; adhesive-free specimens were also used (control). Tests of water sorption and solubility, mechanical performance (microtensile cohesive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, after immediate and long-term water storage), and translucency and color stability (after immediate and 1, 7, 90, and 180 days of water or wine storage) were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were also taken from the fractured specimens (flexural strength test). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (padhesive resin (SBMP). This study is the first to show positive results from the use of resin adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composite, which is common in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in aquachannel simulations: 1. Propagation speeds, composite structures, and comparison with aquaplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Joaquín. E.; Nolan, David S.; Tulich, Stefan N.

    2016-10-01

    Convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) represent a significant contribution to the total variability of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). This study analyzes the structure and propagation of CCKWs simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using two types of idealized domains. These are the "aquachannel," a flat rectangle on a beta plane with zonally periodic boundary conditions and length equal to the Earth's circumference at the equator, and the "aquapatch," a square domain with zonal extent equal to one third of the aquachannel's length. A series of simulations are performed, including a doubly nested aquapatch, in which convection is solved explicitly along the equator. The model intercomparison is carried out throughout the use of several techniques such as power spectra, filtering, wave tracking, and compositing, and it is extended to some simulations from the Aquaplanet Experiment (APE). Results show that despite the equatorial superrotation bias produced by the WRF simulations, the CCKWs simulated with this model propagate with similar phase speeds (relative to the low-level mean flow) as the corresponding waves from the APE simulations. Horizontal and vertical structures of the CCKWs simulated with aquachannels are also in overall good agreement with those from aquaplanet simulations and observations, although there is a distortion of the zonal extent of anomalies when the shorter aquapatch is used.

  5. Refreezing on the Greenland ice sheet: a model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Christian; Reijmer, Carleen; van den Broeke, Michiel; Ligtenberg, Stefan; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Noël, Brice

    2016-04-01

    Mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is an important contributor to global sea level rise. Besides calving, surface melt is the dominant source of mass loss. However, only part of the surface melt leaves the ice sheet as runoff whereas the other part percolates into the snow cover and refreezes. Due to this process, part of the meltwater is (intermediately) stored. Refreezing thus impacts the surface mass balance of the ice sheet but it also affects the vertical structure of the snow cover due to transport of mass and energy. Due to the sparse availability of in situ data and the demand of future projections, it is inevitable to use numerical models to simulate refreezing and related processes. Currently, the magnitude of refrozen mass is neither well constrained nor well validated. In this study, we model the snow and firn layer, and compare refreezing on the GrIS as modelled with two different numerical models. Both models are forced with meteorological data from the regional climate model RACMO 2 that has been shown to simulate realistic conditions for Greenland. One model is the UU/IMAU firn densification model (FDM) that can be used both in an on- and offline mode with RACMO 2. The other model is SNOWPACK; a model originally designed to simulate seasonal snow cover in alpine conditions. In contrast to FDM, SNOWPACK accounts for snow metamorphism and microstructure and contains a more physically based snow densification scheme. A first comparison of the models indicates that both seem to be able to capture the general spatial and temporal pattern of refreezing. Spatially, refreezing occurs mostly in the ablation zone and decreases in the accumulation zone towards the interior of the ice sheet. Below the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) where refreezing occurs in seasonal snow cover on bare ice, the storage effect is only intermediate. Temporal patterns on a seasonal range indicate two peaks in refreezing; one at the beginning of the melt season where

  6. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  7. Derivation of in situ opalinus clay porewater compositions from experimental and geochemical modelling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    Many countries are considering argillaceous sedimentary rocks as potential formations for the disposal of high level radioactive waste. One of the main attractions of such formations from a waste management viewpoint are their generally low groundwater flow rates. However, porewater chemistry constitutes an important basic data set for performance assessment studies and the low transmissivities often mean that it is very difficult, or even impossible, to obtain good in situ water samples. This report describes procedures based on physico-chemical characterisation of whole rock samples and geochemical modelling which were developed as an additional tool for determining porewater compositions in low porosity/permeability clay rich systems. The methodology was applied to core samples of opalinus clay within the framework of an international investigation being carried out at Mt. Terri, Canton Jura, Switzerland. The calculated porewater compositions are described and discussed in relation to experimental data from the analyses of borehole seepage water and water samples obtained from squeezing tests. Because the latter two waters were clearly out of the equilibrium, only a comparison based on general aqueous features was attempted. In all three cases the groundwaters were high ionic strength Na-Cl types. The experimentally determined pH values were in the range 7.5-8 whereas for the modelled porewater a value near 6 was calculated. This discrepancy was explained by postulating that the sampled waters lost dissolved CO{sub 2} through out-gassing. (author) 5 figs., 11 tabs., refs.

  8. Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Nanosheet Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Rongwei; Wong, C. P.

    2010-03-01

    Recent experiments demonstrated a very high thermal conductivity in graphite nanosheet (GNS)/epoxy nanocomposites; however, theoretical analysis is lacking. In this letter, an effective medium model has been used to analyze the effective thermal conductivity of the GNS/polymer nanocomposites and has shown good validity. Strong influences of the aspect ratio and the orientation of the GNS are evident. As expected, interfacial thermal resistance still plays a role in determining the overall thermal transport in the GNS/polymer nanocomposites. In comparison with the interfacial thermal resistance between carbon nanotubes and polymers, the interfacial thermal resistance between GNS and polymers is about one order of magnitude lower, the reason for which is discussed.

  9. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbante, Paolo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano - Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32 - 20133 Milano (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano - Via La Masa 34 - 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  10. A COMPARISON BETWEEN THREE PREDICTIVE MODELS OF COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUMITRU CIOBANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Time series prediction is an open problem and many researchers are trying to find new predictive methods and improvements for the existing ones. Lately methods based on neural networks are used extensively for time series prediction. Also, support vector machines have solved some of the problems faced by neural networks and they began to be widely used for time series prediction. The main drawback of those two methods is that they are global models and in the case of a chaotic time series it is unlikely to find such model. In this paper it is presented a comparison between three predictive from computational intelligence field one based on neural networks one based on support vector machine and another based on chaos theory. We show that the model based on chaos theory is an alternative to the other two methods.

  11. Comparison of Uncertainty of Two Precipitation Prediction Models

    CERN Document Server

    Shield, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Meteorological inputs are an important part of subsurface flow and transport modeling. The choice of source for meteorological data used as inputs has significant impacts on the results of subsurface flow and transport studies. One method to obtain the meteorological data required for flow and transport studies is the use of weather generating models. This paper compares the difference in performance of two weather generating models at Technical Area 54 of Los Alamos National Lab. Technical Area 54 is contains several waste pits for low-level radioactive waste and is the site for subsurface flow and transport studies. This makes the comparison of the performance of the two weather generators at this site particularly valuable.

  12. Comparison of linear modes in kinetic plasma models

    CERN Document Server

    Camporeale, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We compare, in an extensive and systematic way, linear theory results obtained with the hybrid (ion-kinetic and electron-fluid), the gyrokinetic and the fully-kinetic plasma models. We present a test case with parameters that are relevant for solar wind turbulence at small scales, which is a topic now recognized to need a kinetic treatment, to a certain extent. We comment on the comparison of low-frequency single modes (Alfv\\'{e}n/ion-cyclotron, ion-acoustic, and fast modes) for a wide range of propagation angles, and on the overall spectral properties of the linear operators, for quasi-perpendicular propagation. The methodology and the results presented in this paper will be valuable when choosing which model should be used in regimes where the assumptions of each model are not trivially satisfied.

  13. The cosmological Janus model: comparison with observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jean-Pierre; Dagostini, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    In 2014 we presented a model based on a system of two coupled field equations to describe two populations of particles, one positive and the other mass of negative mass. The analysis of this system by Newtonian approximation show that the masses of the same signs attract according to Newton's law while the masses of opposite signs repel according to an anti-Newton law. This eliminates the runaway phenomenon. It uses the time-dependent exact solution of this system to build the bolometric magnitude distribution of the red-shift. Comparing the prediction of our model -which requires adjustment with a single parameter- with the data from 740 supernovae highlighting the acceleration of the universe gives an excellent agreement. The comparison is then made with the multi-parametric Λ CDM model.

  14. Multiphysics modeling and uncertainty quantification for an active composite reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lee D.; Bradford, S. C.; Schiermeier, John E.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Basinger, Scott A.

    2013-09-01

    A multiphysics, high resolution simulation of an actively controlled, composite reflector panel is developed to extrapolate from ground test results to flight performance. The subject test article has previously demonstrated sub-micron corrected shape in a controlled laboratory thermal load. This paper develops a model of the on-orbit performance of the panel under realistic thermal loads, with an active heater control system, and performs an uncertainty quantification of the predicted response. The primary contribution of this paper is the first reported application of the Sandia developed Sierra mechanics simulation tools to a spacecraft multiphysics simulation of a closed-loop system, including uncertainty quantification. The simulation was developed so as to have sufficient resolution to capture the residual panel shape error that remains after the thermal and mechanical control loops are closed. An uncertainty quantification analysis was performed to assess the predicted tolerance in the closed-loop wavefront error. Key tools used for the uncertainty quantification are also described.

  15. Hysteresis in Magnetic Shape Memory Composites: Modeling and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Sergio; Rumpf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between a structural phase transition and magnetic one. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the transformation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the phase boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimali...

  16. Modeling of the flexural behavior of ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of matrix cracking and fiber breakage on the flexural behavior of ceramic composite beams. A model has been proposed to represent the damage evolution of the beam, of which the matrix fracture strain is smaller than that of the fibers. Close form solutions of the critical loads for the initiation of matrix cracking and fiber breakage in the tension side of the beam have been found. The effects of thermal residual stresses and fiber/matrix debonding have been taken into account. The initial deviation of the load-deflection curve from linearity is due to matrix cracking, while fiber breakages are responsible for the drop in the load carrying capacity of the beam. The proportional limit as well as the nonlinear behavior of the beam deflection have been identified. The growth of the damaged zone has also been predicted. A three-point bending case is given as a numerical example.

  17. Multiresolution comparison of precipitation datasets for large-scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, K. P.; Sapriza Azuri, G.; Davison, B.; DeBeer, C. M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Gridded precipitation datasets are crucial for driving large-scale models which are related to weather forecast and climate research. However, the quality of precipitation products is usually validated individually. Comparisons between gridded precipitation products along with ground observations provide another avenue for investigating how the precipitation uncertainty would affect the performance of large-scale models. In this study, using data from a set of precipitation gauges over British Columbia and Alberta, we evaluate several widely used North America gridded products including the Canadian Gridded Precipitation Anomalies (CANGRD), the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis, the Water and Global Change (WATCH) project, the thin plate spline smoothing algorithms (ANUSPLIN) and Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA). Based on verification criteria for various temporal and spatial scales, results provide an assessment of possible applications for various precipitation datasets. For long-term climate variation studies (~100 years), CANGRD, NCEP, WATCH and ANUSPLIN have different comparative advantages in terms of their resolution and accuracy. For synoptic and mesoscale precipitation patterns, CaPA provides appealing performance of spatial coherence. In addition to the products comparison, various downscaling methods are also surveyed to explore new verification and bias-reduction methods for improving gridded precipitation outputs for large-scale models.

  18. A Formal Model for Compliance Verification of Service Compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groefsema, Heerko; van Beest, Nick; Aiello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Business processes design and execution environments increasingly need support from modular services in service compositions to offer the flexibility required by rapidly changing requirements. With each evolution, however, the service composition must continue to adhere to laws and regulations, resu

  19. A Formal Model for Compliance Verification of Service Compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groefsema, Heerko; van Beest, Nick; Aiello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Business processes design and execution environments increasingly need support from modular services in service compositions to offer the flexibility required by rapidly changing requirements. With each evolution, however, the service composition must continue to adhere to laws and regulations,

  20. Spectrophotometry and organic matter on Iapetus. 1: Composition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter D.; Sagan, Carl

    1995-01-01

    Iapetus shows a greater hemispheric albedo asymmetry than any other body in the solar system. Hapke scattering theory and optical constants measured in the laboratory are used to identify possible compositions for the dark material on the leading hemisphere of Iapetus. The materials considered are poly-HCN, kerogen, Murchison organic residue, Titan tholin, ice tholin, and water ice. Three-component mixtures of these materials are modeled in intraparticle mixture of 25% poly-HCN, 10% Murchison residue, and 65% water ice is found to best fit the spectrum, albedo, and phase behavior of the dark material. The Murchison residue and/or water ice can be replaced by kerogen and ice tholin, respectively, and still produce very good fits. Areal and particle mixtures of poly-HCN, Titan tholin, and either ice tholin or Murchison residue are also possible models. Poly-HCN is a necessary component in almost all good models. The presence of poly-HCN can be further tested by high-resolution observations near 4.5 micrometers.

  1. LHC Phenomenology of Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Models

    CERN Document Server

    De Curtis, Stefania; Yagyu, Kei; Yildirim, Emine

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of Composite 2-Higgs Doublet Models (C2HDMs) of various Yukawa types based on the global symmetry breaking $SO(6)\\to SO(4)\\times SO(2)$. The kinetic term and the Yukawa Lagrangian are constructed in terms of the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) matrix and a 6-plet of fermions under $SO(6)$. The scalar potential is assumed to be the same as that of the Elementary 2-Higgs Doublet Model (E2HDM) with a softly-broken discrete $Z_2$ symmetry. We then discuss the phenomenological differences between the E2HDM and C2HDM by focusing on the deviations from Standard Model (SM) couplings of the discovered Higgs state ($h$) as well as on the production cross sections and Branching Ratios (BRs) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of extra Higgs bosons. We find that, even if the same deviation in the $hVV$ ($V=W,Z$) coupling is assumed in both scenarios, there appear significant differences between E2HDM and C2HDM from the structure of the Yukawa couplings, so that production and decay fea...

  2. Modelling and Fuzzy Control of an Efficient Swimming Ionic Polymer-metal Composite Actuated Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Shen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, analytical techniques and fuzzy logic methods are applied to the dynamic modelling and efficient swimming control of a biomimetic robotic fish, which is actuated by an ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC. A physical-based model for the biomimetic robotic fish is proposed. The model incorporates both the hydrodynamics of the IPMC tail and the actuation dynamics of the IPMC. The comparison of the results of the simulations and experiments shows the feasibility of the dynamic model. By using this model, we found that the harmonic control of the actuation frequency and voltage amplitude of the IPMC is a principal mechanism through which the robotic fish can obtain high thrust efficiency while swimming. The fuzzy control method, which is based on the knowledge of the IPMC fish’s dynamic behaviour, successfully utilized this principal mechanism. By comparing the thrust performance of the robotic fish with other control methods via simulation, we established that the fuzzy controller was able to achieve faster acceleration compared with what could be achieved with a conventional PID controller. The thrust efficiency during a steady state was superior to that with conventional control methods. We also found that when using the fuzzy control method the robotic fish can always swim near a higher actuation frequency, which could obtain both the desired speed and high thrust efficiency.

  3. Power law cosmology model comparison with CMB scale information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutusaus, Isaac; Lamine, Brahim; Blanchard, Alain; Dupays, Arnaud; Zolnierowski, Yves; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Ealet, Anne; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Ilić, Stéphane; Pisani, Alice; Plaszczynski, Stéphane; Sakr, Ziad; Salvatelli, Valentina; Schücker, Thomas; Tilquin, André; Virey, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model (Λ CDM ) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius, R (t )∝tn, has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO can be well reproduced by both Λ CDM and power law expansion models with n ˜1.5 , while the constant expansion rate model (n =1 ) is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data are well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular, through the position of the first peak of the temperature angular power spectrum, corresponding to the sound horizon at recombination, a scale physically related to the BAO scale. Models with n ≥1 lead to a divergence of the sound horizon and do not naturally provide the relevant scales for the BAO and the CMB. We retain an empirical footing to overcome this issue: we let the data choose the preferred values for these scales, while we recompute the ionization history in power law models, to obtain the distance to the CMB. In doing so, we find that the scale coming from the BAO data is not consistent with the observed position of the first peak of the CMB temperature angular power spectrum for any power law cosmology. Therefore, we conclude that when the three standard probes (SNIa, BAO, and CMB) are combined, the Λ CDM model is very strongly favored over any of these alternative models, which are then essentially ruled out.

  4. ENSO Forecasts in the North American Multi-Model Ensemble: Composite Analysis and Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we examine precipitation and temperature forecasts during El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events in six models in the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME), including the CFSv2, CanCM3, CanCM4, FLOR, GEOS5, and CCSM4 models, by comparing the model-based ENSO composites to the observed. The composite analysis is conducted using the 1982-2010 hindcasts for each of the six models with selected ENSO episodes based on the seasonal Ocean Nino Index (ONI) just prior to the date the forecasts were initiated. Two sets of composites are constructed over the North American continent: one based on precipitation and temperature anomalies, the other based on their probability of occurrence in a tercile-based system. The composites apply to monthly mean conditions in November, December, January, February, and March, respectively, as well as to the five-month aggregates representing the winter conditions. For the anomaly composites, we use the anomaly correlation coefficient and root-mean-square error against the observed composites for evaluation. For the probability composites, unlike conventional probabilistic forecast verification assuming binary outcomes to the observations, both model and observed composites are expressed in probability terms. Performance metrics for such validation are limited. Therefore, we develop a probability anomaly correlation measure and a probability score for assessment, so the results are comparable to the anomaly composite evaluation. We found that all NMME models predict ENSO precipitation patterns well during wintertime; however, some models have large discrepancies between the model temperature composites and the observed. The skill is higher for the multi-model ensemble, as well as the five-month aggregates. Comparing to the anomaly composites, the probability composites have superior skill in predicting ENSO temperature patterns and are less sensitive to the sample used to construct the composites, suggesting that

  5. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all....... Please DOWNLOAD them to see/hear them in full length! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You may for non-commercial purposes use and distribute it, performance instructions as well as specially designated recordings, as long as the author is mentioned. Please see http...

  6. A constitutive model for particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites subjected to high strain rates and high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Wei-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-static and dynamic tension tests were conducted to study the mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites at strain rates ranging from 0.0001/s to 1000/s and at temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 650 °C Based on the experimental results, a constitutive model, which considers the effects of strain rate and temperature on hot deformation behavior, was proposed for particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites subjected to high strain rates and high temperatures by using Zener-Hollomon equations including Arrhenius terms. All the material constants used in the model were identified by fitting Zener-Hollomon equations against the experimental results. By comparison of theoretical predictions presented by the model with experimental results, a good agreement was achieved, which indicates that this constitutive model can give an accurate and precise estimate for high temperature flow stress for the studied titanium matrix composites and can be used for numerical simulations of hot deformation behavior of the composites.

  7. Architecture in motion: A model for music composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variego, Jorge Elias

    2011-12-01

    Speculations regarding the relationship between music and architecture go back to the very origins of these disciplines. Throughout history, these links have always reaffirmed that music and architecture are analogous art forms that only diverge in their object of study. In the 1 st c. BCE Vitruvius conceived Architecture as "one of the most inclusive and universal human activities" where the architect should be educated in all the arts, having a vast knowledge in history, music and philosophy. In the 18th c., the German thinker Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, described Architecture as "frozen music". More recently, in the 20th c., Iannis Xenakis studied the similar structuring principles between Music and Architecture creating his own "models" of musical composition based on mathematical principles and geometric constructions. The goal of this document is to propose a compositional method that will function as a translator between the acoustical properties of a room and music, to facilitate the creation of musical works that will not only happen within an enclosed space but will also intentionally interact with the space. Acoustical measurements of rooms such as reverberation time, frequency response and volume will be measured and systematically organized in correspondence with orchestrational parameters. The musical compositions created after the proposed model are evocative of the spaces on which they are based. They are meant to be performed in any space, not exclusively in the one where the acoustical measurements were obtained. The visual component of architectural design is disregarded; the room is considered a musical instrument, with its particular sound qualities and resonances. Compositions using the proposed model will not result as sonified shapes, they will be musical works literally "tuned" to a specific space. This Architecture in motion is an attempt to adopt scientific research to the service of a creative activity and to let the aural properties of

  8. Measurement and model on thermal properties of sintered diamond composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, Tala, E-mail: Tala.moussa@univ-nantes.fr [Laboratoire de Thermocinetique UMR CNRS 6607, Polytech, Universite de nantes, BP 50609, rue Christian Pauc, 44306 Nantes (France); Garnier, Bertrand; Peerhossaini, Hassan [Laboratoire de Thermocinetique UMR CNRS 6607, Polytech, Universite de nantes, BP 50609, rue Christian Pauc, 44306 Nantes (France)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal properties of sintered diamond used for grinding is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flash method with infrared temperature measurement is used to investigate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal conductivity increases with the amount of diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is very sensitive to binder conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results agree with models assuming imperfect contact between matrix and particles. - Abstract: A prelude to the thermal management of grinding processes is measurement of the thermal properties of working materials. Indeed, tool materials must be chosen not only for their mechanical properties (abrasion performance, lifetime Horizontal-Ellipsis ) but also for thermal concerns (thermal conductivity) for efficient cooling that avoids excessive temperatures in the tool and workpiece. Sintered diamond is currently used for grinding tools since it yields higher performances and longer lifetimes than conventional materials (mineral or silicon carbide abrasives), but its thermal properties are not yet well known. Here the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density of sintered diamond are measured as functions of the diamond content in composites and for two types of metallic binders: hard tungsten-based and soft cobalt-based binders. The measurement technique for thermal conductivity is derived from the flash method. After pulse heating, the temperature of the rear of the sample is measured with a noncontact method (infrared camera). A parameter estimation method associated with a three-layer nonstationary thermal model is used to obtain sample thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient and absorbed energy. With the hard metallic binder, the thermal conductivity of sintered diamond increased by up to 64% for a diamond content increasing from 0 to 25%. The increase is much less for the soft binder: 35% for diamond volumes up to 25%. In addition, experimental data

  9. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  10. Comparison of rainfall-runoff models for flood forecasting. Part 2: Calibration and evaluation of models

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, V. A.; Carrington, D.S.; Moore, R J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the project “Comparison of Rainfall-Runoff Models for Flood Forecasting” is to provide guidance to the Environment Agency on the choice of rainfall-runoff model for use in different catchments for flood forecasting purposes. A literature review of models presented in the Part 1 Report recognised that whilst there is a plethora of “brand-name” models there is much similarity between many of them. A rather small set of model functions is common to many models and they differ in t...

  11. Scale invariant cosmology III: dynamical models and comparisons with observations

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We examine the properties of the scale invariant cosmological models, also making the specific hypothesis of the scale invariance of the empty space at large scales. Numerical integrations of the cosmological equations for different values of the curvature parameter k and of the density parameter Omega_m are performed. We compare the dynamical properties of the models to the observations at different epochs. The main numerical data and graphical representations are given for models computed with different curvatures and density parameters. The models with non-zero density start explosively with first a braking phase followed by a continuously accelerating expansion. The comparison of the models with the recent observations from supernovae SN Ia, BAO and CMB data from Planck 2015 shows that the scale invariant model with k=0 and Omega_m=0.30 very well fits the observations in the usual Omega_m vs. Omega_Lambda plane and consistently accounts for the accelerating expansion or dark energy. The expansion history ...

  12. Glass Transition Temperature- and Specific Volume- Composition Models for Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report provides models for predicting composition-properties for tellurite glasses, namely specific gravity and glass transition temperature. Included are the partial specific coefficients for each model, the component validity ranges, and model fit parameters.

  13. A COMPARISON OF WEIGHT LOSS, BODY COMPOSITION AND SOME MINERAL LEVELS BEFORE COMPETITION IN ELITE WRE STLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Berkan ALPAY

    2015-08-01

    601 model hormone auto analyzer with brand of Roche Hitachi. Testing of normality of the data obtained is carried by Shapiro Wilk Test and the relations among the variables with normal distribution are examined with correlation analysis. Independent Sampl es T Test for two groups while one way variance analysis (One Way ANOVA was used for the groups more than two groups. Also; in order to determine what caused the differences obtained as the result of variance analysis; LSD test, which is one of the multip le comparison tests, was used. It is determined that there are not statistically significant differences among demographic variables (age, height, weight and body mass index of the group that has loss of weight and the one that have not (p>0,05. When the body compositions are compared, statistically significant differences between free fat mass and total body water is determined (p 0,05. When the difference of mineral levels of groups is examined, there is statistically significant difference in the BUN, Na + and P Osm levels (p0,05. In conclusion, it was found that the wrestlers who have weight loss increased total body water and free fat mass levels and therefore, BUN, Na + and P Osm levels increased.

  14. Comparison of evolutionary algorithms in gene regulatory network model inference.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The evolution of high throughput technologies that measure gene expression levels has created a data base for inferring GRNs (a process also known as reverse engineering of GRNs). However, the nature of these data has made this process very difficult. At the moment, several methods of discovering qualitative causal relationships between genes with high accuracy from microarray data exist, but large scale quantitative analysis on real biological datasets cannot be performed, to date, as existing approaches are not suitable for real microarray data which are noisy and insufficient. RESULTS: This paper performs an analysis of several existing evolutionary algorithms for quantitative gene regulatory network modelling. The aim is to present the techniques used and offer a comprehensive comparison of approaches, under a common framework. Algorithms are applied to both synthetic and real gene expression data from DNA microarrays, and ability to reproduce biological behaviour, scalability and robustness to noise are assessed and compared. CONCLUSIONS: Presented is a comparison framework for assessment of evolutionary algorithms, used to infer gene regulatory networks. Promising methods are identified and a platform for development of appropriate model formalisms is established.

  15. Fitting and Comparison of Models of Radio Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolic, Bojan

    2009-01-01

    I describe an approach to fitting and comparison of radio spectra based on Bayesian analysis and realised using a new implementation of the nested sampling algorithm. Such an approach improves on the commonly used maximum-likelihood fitting of radio spectra by allowing objective model selection, calculation of the full probability distributions of the model parameters and provides a natural mechanism for including information other than the measured spectra through priors. In this paper I cover the theoretical background, the algorithms used and the implementation details of the computer code. I also briefly illustrate the method with some previously published data for three near-by galaxies. In forthcoming papers we will present the results of applying this analysis larger data sets, including some new observations, and the physical conclusions that can be made. The computer code as well as the overall approach described here may also be useful for analysis of other multi-chromatic broad-band observations an...

  16. Comparison of particular logistic models' adoption in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbová, Petra; Cempírek, Václav

    2016-12-01

    Managing inventory is considered as one of the most challenging tasks facing supply chain managers and specialists. Decisions related to inventory locations along with level of inventory kept throughout the supply chain have a fundamental impact on the response time, service level, delivery lead-time and the total cost of the supply chain. The main objective of this paper is to identify and analyse the share of a particular logistic model adopted in the Czech Republic (Consignment stock, Buffer stock, Safety stock) and also compare their usage and adoption according to different industries. This paper also aims to specify possible reasons of particular logistic model preferences in comparison to the others. The analysis is based on quantitative survey held in the Czech Republic.

  17. Data-model comparison using FORWARD and CoMP

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package is a community resource for model-data comparison, with a particular emphasis on analyzing coronal magnetic fields. FORWARD allows the synthesis of coronal polarimetric signals at visible, infrared, and radio frequencies, and will soon be augmented for ultraviolet polarimetry. In this paper we focus on observations of the infrared (IR) forbidden lines of Fe XIII, and describe how FORWARD may be used to directly access these data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (MLSO/CoMP), to put them in the context of other space- and ground-based observations, and to compare them to synthetic observables generated from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models.

  18. A predictive model of music preference using pairwise comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjørn Sand; Gallego, Javier Saez; Larsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Music recommendation is an important aspect of many streaming services and multi-media systems, however, it is typically based on so-called collaborative filtering methods. In this paper we consider the recommendation task from a personal viewpoint and examine to which degree music preference can...... be elicited and predicted using simple and robust queries such as pairwise comparisons. We propose to model - and in turn predict - the pairwise music preference using a very flexible model based on Gaussian Process priors for which we describe the required inference. We further propose a specific covariance...... function and evaluate the predictive performance on a novel dataset. In a recommendation style setting we obtain a leave-one-out accuracy of 74% compared to 50% with random predictions, showing potential for further refinement and evaluation....

  19. Mathematical Foundations for a Compositional Distributional Model of Meaning

    CERN Document Server

    Coecke, Bob; Clark, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for a unification of the distributional theory of meaning in terms of vector space models, and a compositional theory for grammatical types, for which we rely on the algebra of Pregroups, introduced by Lambek. This mathematical framework enables us to compute the meaning of a well-typed sentence from the meanings of its constituents. Concretely, the type reductions of Pregroups are `lifted' to morphisms in a category, a procedure that transforms meanings of constituents into a meaning of the (well-typed) whole. Importantly, meanings of whole sentences live in a single space, independent of the grammatical structure of the sentence. Hence the inner-product can be used to compare meanings of arbitrary sentences, as it is for comparing the meanings of words in the distributional model. The mathematical structure we employ admits a purely diagrammatic calculus which exposes how the information flows between the words in a sentence in order to make up the meaning of the whole se...

  20. Fine Tuning in the Holographic Minimal Composite Higgs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Archer, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    In the minimal composite Higgs model (MCHM), the size of the Higgs mass and vacuum expectation value is determined, via the Higgs potential, by the size of operators that violate the global SO(5) symmetry. In 5D holographic realisations of this model, this translates into the inclusion of brane localised operators. However, the inclusion of all such operators results in a large and under-constrained parameter space. In this paper we study the level of fine-tuning involved in such a parameter space, focusing on the MCHM${}_5$. It is demonstrated that the gauge contribution to the Higgs potential can be suppressed by brane localised kinetic terms, but this is correlated with an enhancement to the S parameter. The fermion contribution, on the other hand, can be enhanced or suppressed. However this does not significantly improve the level of fine tunings, since the Higgs squared term, in the potential, requires a cancellation between the fermion and gauge contributions. Although we focus on the MCHM${}_5$, the fe...