WorldWideScience

Sample records for composite resin restoration

  1. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Materials and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age...... 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments...... up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...

  2. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth......-structure and with minimal risk of pulpal complication. In addition, it offers an aesthetic solution to the patient immediately after an injury, which may bring a little comfort in a sad situation. The resin composite build-up is often changed or repaired a couple of times, before the tooth is restored with a porcelain...... present an aesthetic problem due to exposure of un-aesthetic crown-margins. The invasive permanent crown restorations are therefore often not suc-cessful on a long-term scale. On the other hand, a conservative direct restoration of an extensively fractured incisor crown with resin composite may...

  3. Extended Resin Composite Restorations: Techniques and Procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Hilton, T.

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the state of the art of different restorative treatment procedures and techniques needed for placing extended posterior resin composite restorations. Clinical aspects related to the procedure are discussed and reviewed based on the current literature, such as the

  4. Versatile composite resins simplifying the practice of restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margeas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    After decades of technical development and refinement, composite resins continue to simplify the practice of restorative dentistry, offering clinicians versatility, predictability, and enhanced physical properties. With a wide range of products available today, composite resins are a reliable, conservative, multi-functional restorative material option. As manufacturers strive to improve such properties as compression strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, water sorption, and wear resistance, several classification systems of composite resins have been developed.

  5. Composite Resin – A Versatile Restorative Tool | Koleoso | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the use of composite resin restorations as a treatment option in several situations where conventional aesthetic restorations such as porcelain veneers, crowns and cream-metal crown could otherwise be placed. Methods and Materials: Patients who presented with restoration aesthetic challenges over a six months period ...

  6. Fracture strength of cusp replacing resin composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuys, R.H.; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kreulen, C.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Burgersdijk, R.C.W.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of an additional shoulder preparation on the fracture strength of a cusp-replacing direct resin composite restoration in a premolar that previously had an amalgam MOD restoration followed by fracture of a cusp. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two preparation designs were

  7. Class II composite resin restorations: faster, easier, predictable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R D

    2016-11-18

    Composite resin continues to displace amalgam as the preferred direct restorative material in developed countries. Even though composite materials have evolved to include nanoparticles with high physical properties and low shrinkage stress, dentists have been challenged to efficiently create quality, long lasting, predictable restorations. Unlike amalgam, composite resin cannot be condensed making the establishment of a predictable, proper contact more difficult. In addition, composite requires an understanding of adhesives and an appreciation for their exacting application. These facts combined with the precise adaptation and light-curing of multiple layers makes placement of quality Class II composite restorations tedious and time-consuming. For private practicing dentists, it can also have an effect on economic productivity. Clinicians have always wanted an easier, efficient placement technique for posterior composite restorations that rivals that for amalgam. It appears that advances in instrumentation, materials and technology have finally delivered it.

  8. Restorative service patterns in Australia: amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, D S; Spencer, A J

    2003-12-01

    To examine the provision of amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer restorations, and to assess whether these main restorative services varied by patient, visit and oral health characteristics. A cross-sectional survey incorporating a log of service items provided on a typical day. Australian private general practice. Data on services and patients were collected by a mailed survey from a random sample of dentists from each State/Territory in Australia in 1998-99 with a response rate of 71%. Rates per visit of amalgam, composite resin and glass ionomer restorations among dentate adults who had received a restoration. Analysis showed older patients had lower amalgam rates but higher glass ionomer rates, composite resin rates were lower at emergency visits, capital city patients had higher amalgam rates but lower composite resin rates, patients with decayed teeth had higher amalgam and composite resin rates, and use of restorative materials varied by clinical problem. Despite widespread use of alternative materials, amalgam rates remained high in circumstances such as replacement restorations and restorations involving more than one surface. Other restorative materials also had specific applications. Both amalgam and composite resins were provided at higher rates to patients with active caries but composite resins were also used at higher rates for aesthetic problems. Glass ionomer restorations were used at higher rates for initial and one-surface restorations, and for conditions such as root caries and dentinal sensitivity.

  9. Ten-year Clinical Performance of Posterior Resin Composite Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Norbert; Reinelt, Christian; Frankenberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the clinical behavior of two different resin-based restorative systems in Class II cavities in a controlled prospective split-mouth study over 10 years. Thirty patients received 68 resin composite restorations (Solobond M + Grandio: n = 36; Syntac + Tetric Ceram: n = 32) by one dentist in a private practice. 35% of cavities revealed no enamel at the bottom of the proximal box, 48% of cavities provided Grandio restoration suffered marginal fracture with exposed dentin and one Tetric Ceram restoration failed due to cusp fracture. After 10 years, Grandio showed higher surface roughness (p = 0.03) and less color match (p = 0.024; Mann-Whitney U-test). Molar restorations performed worse than premolar fillings regarding marginal integrity (4 and 10 years), filling integrity (4, 8, and 10 years), and tooth integrity (4, 8, and 10 years). The main reasons for degradation of resin composites were chipping and cracks in molar restorations after 8 years. Beyond the 4-year recall, marginal staining increased (43% bravo for stained margins at four years, 52% at 8 years, and 71% at 10 years). Tooth integrity deteriorated significantly due to more enamel cracks and chipping over time (9% at baseline and 89% after 10 years (p<0.05). Direct resin composite restorations performed satisfactorily over 10 years of clinical service.

  10. Radiopacity of 28 Composite Resins for Teeth Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitz, Ricardo; Moruzzi, Patrizia Dubinskas; Vieira, Glauco; Fenyo-Pereira, Marlene

    2016-02-01

    Radiopacity is a fundamental requisite to check marginal adaptation of restorations. Our objective was to assess the radiopacity of 28 brands of light-cured composite resins and compare their radiopacity with that of enamel, dentin, and aluminum of equivalent thickness. Composite resin disks (0.2, 0.5, and 1 mm) were radiographed by the digital method, together with an aluminum penetrometer and a human tooth equivalent tooth section. The degree of radiopacity of each image was quantified using digital image processing. Wilcoxon nonparametric test was used for comparison of the mean thickness of each material. All of the materials tested had an equal or greater radiopacity than that of aluminum of equivalent thickness. Similar results for enamel were found with the exception of Durafill, which was less radiopaque than enamel (p composite resins comply with specification #27 of the American Dental Association. The radiopacity of Amelogen Plus, Aph, Brilhiante, Charisma, Concept Advanced, Evolux X, Exthet X, Inten S, Llis, Master Fill, Natural Look, Opallis, P60, Tetric, Tph, Z100, and Z250 was significantly higher than that of enamel (p composites, it is possible to observe the boundaries between restoration and tooth structure, thus allowing clinicians to establish the presence of microleakage or restoration gap. Suitable radiopacity is an essential requisite for good-quality esthetic restorative materials. We demonstrate that only some composites have the sufficient radiopacity to observe the boundaries between restoration and tooth structure, which is the main cause of restoration failure.

  11. Repair of Defective Composite Resin Restoration: Current Trend ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Repair of defective composite resins restorations is being increasingly recognized as a viable alternative to replacement. there is however no consensus yet on the treatment protocol. Objective: To determine the views and practice of specialists in Conservative Dentistry in Nigeria as regard to repair procedure ...

  12. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  13. The interaction between lining materials and composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, G L; Davies, E H; Von Fraunhofer, J A

    1981-03-01

    The effects of four lining materials, Dycal, Procal, Cavitec and Poly F cement on Adaptic and Concise have been investigated in vitro. The parameters studied were surface roughness, hardness and colour both with and without an intermediate (or bonding) resin being present between the restorative material and the liner. The effects of the four liners on the composites varied both between the lining materials themselves and with the composite resin. Two materials, Procal and Dycal, had little interaction with the composites, provided an intermediate resin was used with the latter. Cavitec appeared to have an adverse reaction with the composites and Poly F, whilst having no effect on the colour of the composites, did increase surface roughness. The adverse effects of linig materials were ascribed to minor constituents, particularly methyl salicylate, present in the formulation.

  14. Evaluation of Resin-Resin Interface in Direct Composite Restoration Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoleriu, S.; Andrian, S.; Pancu, G.; Nica, I.; Iovan, G.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resin-resin interface when a universal bonding agent was used in two different strategies in direct restoration repair. Two composite resins (a micro-filled hybrid and a nano-filled hybrid) as old restorations that have to be repair, a universal bonding agent and a micro-filled hybrid composite resin (different then that aged) as new material for repair were chosen for the study. Non-aged samples were used as control and aged samples were used as study groups. The universal bonding agent was applied in etch-and-rinse and in self-etch strategies. The interface between old and new composite resins was evaluated by SEM and the microleakage was assessed by scoring the dye penetration. Very good adaptation of the two different composite resins placed in direct contact in non-aged samples was recorded. No gaps or defects were visible and strong resin-resin contact was observed. After aging, enlargement of resin-resin junction were observed in most of the samples and a increased dye penetration was recorded irrespective of the strategy (etch-and-rinse or self-etch) used for bonding agent application.

  15. Restoring proximal integrity in posterior composite resin restorations: innovations using Ceromers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, W H

    1998-03-01

    Clinicians are increasingly being called upon to satisfy the restorative demands of patients requesting tooth coloured restorations but unable to afford an optimum indirect restorative option. Consequently, in clinical practice the envelope of what was hitherto considered the limit of appropriate application of the direct posterior composite resin technique is increasingly being stretched. Although our aesthetic endeavours are fairly easily accomplished in the posterior dentition, interproximal integrity is in many instances wanting and a major cause of restorative failure. This report highlights some of the authors innovations using Ceromers which satisfy the complex variables of clinical practice optimizing proximal contour, allowing for the successful utilization of posterior composite resin in the posterior dentition.

  16. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Priyo Prasetyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand for esthetic treatment, dentists must aware of the esthetics and basic principle of conserving tooth which should retain tooth longevity. Purpose: This article showed that a simple and less invasive composite resin restoration can successfully restore anterior esthetic and function of fractured teeth which generally treated with more invasive treatment options. Case: A 19 year-old female patient came with fracture on 21 and 22. This patient had a previous history of dental trauma about nine years before and was brought to a local dentist for debridement and was given analgesic, the involved teeth were not given any restorative treatment. Case management: The fractured 21 and 22 were conventionally restored with simple composite resin restoration. Conclusion: Fracture anterior teeth would certainly disturbs patient’s appearance, but these teeth could be managed conservatively and economically by simple composite resin restoration.Latar belakang: Dalam praktek sehari-hari pada umumnya dokter gigi merawat fraktur dengan restorasi invasif seperti mahkota, veneer dan jembatan yang semuanya memerlukan pengambilan jaringan gigi lebih banyak, sedangkan saat ini trend perawatan gigi lebih menuju kearah invasif minimal yang mempertahankan jaringan gigi sebanyak mungkin. Keadaan ini ditunjang oleh tersedianya berbagai macam bahan dan peralatan kedokteran gigi di pasaran, termasuk bahan restorasi. Dengan tersedianya bahan dan peralatan yang mendukung serta tingginya

  17. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  18. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Mário Fernando de GÓES; Marcelo GIANNINI

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  19. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with extensive composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Buono, Laura; Grande, Nicola M; Lamorgese, Vincenzo; Somma, Francesco

    2008-03-01

    When cuspal coverage is required, there is no evidence that indirect composite resin restorations are superior to direct restorations in terms of biomechanical behavior. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture resistance of cusp-replacing direct and indirect composite resin restorations in endodontically treated molars. Forty-five human mandibular molars were selected and divided into 3 groups (n=15): DIR specimens, restored with direct composite resin (Estelite Sigma) restorations; IND specimens, restored with indirect composite resin (Estelite Sigma) restorations, and control specimens, which remained intact. Endodontic treatment was performed using NiTi ProTaper rotary instruments, and teeth were filled using lateral condensation of gutta-percha and sealer. Extensive Class II MO cavities were prepared, and the 2 mesial cusps were reduced, allowing a 2-mm layer of composite resin. All teeth were prepared to the same dimensions, considering reasonable human variation. Specimens were loaded to failure and the fracture loads were recorded (N). The mode of fracture was determined using a stereomicroscope and classified as favorable or unfavorable failure. The data were subjected to a Kruskal-Wallis test, multiple-comparison Mann-Whitney test, and a chi-square test (alpha=.05). Significant differences (P<.001) were observed between the control group and both DIR and IND groups. However, no significant difference was found between the DIR and IND groups. The chi-square test did not show a significant difference in the frequencies of favorable/unfavorable failure modes among the 3 groups (P=.981). No significant difference was observed in the fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored to original contours with an extensive cusp-replacing direct or indirect composite resin restoration.

  20. In vitro two-body wear of inlay-onlay composite resin restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, A R; Nicholls, J I; Brudvik, J S

    1991-02-01

    Inlay-onlay composite resin restorations have been introduced to the profession as alternatives to amalgam and direct composite resins. Two-body wear testing was performed on three inlay-onlay resins and one direct composite resins using a machine designed to produce sliding wear. The composite resins were opposed by human enamel, type III gold alloy, and porcelain. Of the investigated materials, the homogeneously microfilled inlay-onlay material showed significantly less wear. The direct composite resin showed significantly the greatest wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins showed intermediate wear. The hybrid inlay-onlay resins and the direct composite (small particle, heavily filled) resin created wear tracks in the opposing surfaces while the homogeneous microfill inlay-onlay resin did not. The depth of the observed wear tracks in the opposing surface was sufficiently substantial to warrant further investigation into the wear of materials that oppose composite resin restorations.

  1. Restoration techniques and marginal overhang in Class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to compare in vitro interproximal overhang formation of Class II composite resin restoration when using different matrix systems. METHODS: 240 lower left molar phantom head teeth with an MO-preparation were divided into 12 groups (n=20). In six groups a

  2. Color of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcigil, Çağatay; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Özarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Dündar, Ayşe; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-09-28

    To evaluate the color stability of novel bulk-fill composite resins. Color measurements of a nanohybrid composite resin (Z550) and 3 bulk-fill composite resins (BLK, AFX, XTF; n = 45) were performed before polymerization. After polymerization, color measurements were repeated and specimens were immersed in distilled water or red wine, or coffee. Color change [CIEDE2000 (ΔE 00 )] was calculated after 24 h, 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Color changes observed after polymerization were significant for all groups. Color changes observed in distilled water for Z550 and AFX were significant. Color changes after stored in red wine and coffee were significant for all groups. Bulk-fill composite resin color change increased over time for all groups in red wine and coffee (P composite resin and bulk-fill composite resins. AFX had the highest color change in distilled water. The color of tested bulk-fill composite resins significantly changed after immersion in beverages and over time. Color change observed with the nanohybrid composite resin after 1 week was stable. Clinicians should keep in mind that tested composite resins may change color when exposed to water and significantly change color immediately after they are polymerized. In addition, the color change continues over time should the patient is a coffee and/or red wine consumer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Repair of bis-acryl provisional restorations using flowable composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M; Garcia, Lily T

    2004-11-01

    Provisional restorations provide interim coverage for prepared teeth while fixed definitive restorations are fabricated. Several types of autopolymerizing acrylic resins have been used for many years to fabricate provisional restorations. In recent years, bis-acryl resin composite material has gained popularity among clinicians for the direct fabrication of provisional fixed restorations. Occasionally, deficiencies may occur while fabricating a direct provisional restoration and require chairside repair. This article describes an effective procedure for the use of light-polymerized flowable composite resin for the intraoral repair of bis-acryl provisional restorations.

  4. The effectiveness of different polymerization protocols for class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L.C.G. de; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Geitenbeek, B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of reduced light exposure times on Vickers hardness (VH) of class II composite resin restorations. METHODS: Class II restorations were made in vitro in three 2mm thick increments in a human molar. Two composite resins (Clearfil AP-X; Esthet-X) were polymerized

  5. Five-year clinical performance of posterior resin composite restorations placed by dental students.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the survival over a five-year period of posterior resin composite restorations placed by students. METHODS: Class I and II resin composite restorations placed by second-fourth year dental students were evaluated. Patients attended the dental school every 6 months for a

  6. Microleakage of four composite resin systems in class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, A; Osman, Y I; Al-Omari, T

    2009-11-01

    To compare the microleakage at the enamel and dentine/cementum margins of three nanocomposites and a microhybrid composite in Class II restorations. Four light-cured dental resin restorative materials in combination with their respective bonding agents were investigated. Eighty non-carious, extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups of 20 teeth each. The apices of the teeth were sealed with a resin modified glass ionomer cement. Standardized Class II slot cavities were prepared on the proximal surfaces of each tooth. Each group had an equal number of cavities with gingival margins on enamel and on dentine/cementum. Restorations were placed as indicated: Group 1 (G1): Ceram-X mono/Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply), G2: Premise/ OptiBond Solo Plus (Kerr), G3: Grandio/Admira Bond (VOCO), G4: Z100/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M ESPE). After thermocycling and immersion in 0.5% methylene blue dye solution, the teeth were sectioned and dye penetration was scored on a scale of 0 to 3 on both the enamel and dentine/cementum margins. The data were analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test of ranks (significance at p Grandio/Admira Bond showed significantly lower microleakage when compared to the other materials tested while Z100/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose showed the largest microleakage (p Grandio/Admira Bond showing the least microleakage when compared to the other three materials tested. At the enamel margins, all materials tested performed reasonably well.

  7. Prevalence of cusp fractures in teeth restored with amalgam and with resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J; Schmitt, Margaret M; Overton, Donald A; Gordon, M Kathleen

    2004-08-01

    Complete cusp fracture in restored teeth is a common problem observed in general dental practice. Many dentists believe that teeth restored with amalgam are more likely to be associated with cusp fractures than are those restored with resin-based composite. METHODS. The authors noted the condition of 10,869 posterior teeth with amalgam or resin-based composite restorations with at least one cusp present, unrestored or missing in 1,902 consecutively seen adult patients in a private general dental practice. For each patient, the authors recorded age, type of restorations, number of surfaces of each restoration, and presence or absence of a complete cusp fracture and of caries. There was a lower percentage of cusp fractures in younger subjects than in older subjects and in teeth with a single restored surface than in those with more than one restored surface. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of cusp fracture rates in amalgam-restored teeth versus composite-restored teeth in subjects aged 18 through 54 years. In subjects aged 55 through 96 years, there was a marginally significantly greater cusp fracture rate in composite-restored teeth than in those restored with amalgam. Overall, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of cusp fracture in teeth restored with amalgam (1.88 percent) versus composite-restored teeth (2.29 percent). The prevalence of cusp fractures in amalgam-restored teeth and resin-based composite-restored teeth is not significantly different. Teeth with more than one surface restored with either resin-based composite or amalgam and teeth in older subjects were more likely to suffer a cusp fracture. Teeth restored with amalgam and with resin-based composite exhibited equally low cusp fracture prevalence. When choosing between amalgam and resin-based composite in consideration of the likelihood of a future cusp fracture, either restorative material is acceptable.

  8. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland) embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland).

  9. Variations in survival time for amalgam and resin composite restorations: a population based cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, S; Price, R; Andreou, P; Jones, G; Portolesi, A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the association between the restorative material used and time to further treatment across population cohorts with universal coverage for dental treatment. Cohort study of variation in survival time for tooth restorations over time and by restoration material used based on an Accelerated Failure Time model. Primary dental care clinics. Members of Canada's First Nations and Inuit population covered by the Non-Insured Health Benefits program of Health Canada for the period April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2012. Tooth restorations using resin composite or amalgam material. Survival time of restoration to further treatment. Median survival time for resin composite was 51 days longer than amalgam, for restorations placed in 1999-2000. This difference was not statistically significant (p⟩0.05). Median survival times were lower for females, older subjects. Those visiting the dentist annually, and decreased monotonically over time from 11.2 and 11.3 years for resin composite and amalgam restorations respectively placed in 1999-2000 to 6.9 and 7.0 years for those placed in 2009-10. Resin composite restorations performed no better than amalgams over the study period, but cost considerably more. With the combination of the overall decrease in survival times for both resin composite and amalgam restorations and the increase in use of resin composite, the costs of serving Health Canada's Non-Insured Health Benefits population will rise considerably, even without any increase in the incidence of caries. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd

  10. Microtensile bond strengths to cavity floor dentin in indirect composite restorations using resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Makoto; Nikaido, Toru; Maruoka, Rena; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of a resin coating on the microtensile bond strengths (mu-TBSs) of indirect composite restorations bonded to dentin with resin cement and (2) to compare the mu-TBSs with that of a directly placed composite. Class I cavities were prepared in extracted human molars. The specimens were divided into five groups: For the indirect restorations, the cavity surfaces of the control group were left uncoated (group 1), while the surfaces of the experimental groups were resin coated with a dentin bonding system, Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; groups 2 and 3), or with a combination of PB and a flowable resin composite, Protect Liner F (PLF; group 4). The cavities were temporized for 1 day. Indirect composite restorations (Estenia) were cemented with a resin cement (Panavia F). Pretreatment with ED Primer II was performed in the groups 1, 3, and 4. For the direct restorations, the cavities were restored with PB and a direct composite (Clearfil AP-X; group 5). After 24 hours of water storage, mu-TBSs were measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Sheffe's test (p resin coating consisting of a self-etching primer dentin bonding system and a flowable resin composite significantly improved the mu-TBS of indirect restorations bonded to dentin using resin cement. A resin coating should be required to improve dentin bonding performance of Panavia F in indirect restorations. However, direct composite restorations still provide higher bond strength compared to indirect restorations.

  11. The effect of proximal contour on marginal ridge fracture of Class II composite resin restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Kuijs, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the marginal ridge fracture strength of Class II composite resin restorations placed with a straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity. METHODS: In 60 artificial first molars standardized MO-preparations were ground. Two

  12. Cross-sectional radiographic survey of amalgam and resin-based composite posterior restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran; Coval, Marius; Geiger, Selly B

    2007-06-01

    To compare the failure rate of posterior interproximal amalgam restorations to resin-based composite restorations in a random young adult population. Bilateral bitewing radiographs of 459 young adults were screened. A total of 14,140 interproximal surfaces were examined, recorded, and statistically analyzed. Rate of failure was determined by the number of restorations with radiographic evidence of secondary caries and/or overhanging margins. Of the 650 restored interproximal surfaces (5% of all clearly demarcated interproximal surfaces), 86 (13%) demonstrated distinct interproximal secondary caries and 22 (3%) had overhanging margins. Of the 557 amalgam and 93 resin-based composite interproximal restorations, secondary caries were shown in 46 (8%) and 40 (43%), respectively, and overhanging margins in 21 (4%) and only 1 (1%), respectively. Generally, when secondary caries and overhanging margins were considered, the failure rate of amalgam and resin-based composite interproximal restorations was 12% and 44%, respectively. Higher failure rates were observed in resin-based composite restorations than in amalgam restorations. Secondary caries was the main reason for failure. Overhanging margins were not a primary factor in restoration failure. The vast use of posterior interproximal resin-based composite restorations should be reconsidered, and their limited long-term performance should be kept in mind.

  13. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.......4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4...... mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly...

  14. Durability of a low shrinkage TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective trial was to evaluate the durability of a low shrinkage and TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system in posterior restorations in a 6-year follow up. Material and methods: 139 Class II restorations were placed in 67 patients...... with a mean age of 53 years (range 29-82). Each participant received at random two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. In the first cavity of each pair the TEGDMA/HEMA-free resin composite system was placed with its 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (cmf-els). In the second cavity a 1-step HEMA...... for failure were fracture followed by recurrent caries. Most fractures and all caries lesions were found in high risk participants. Significance: The tested Class II resin composite restorations performed with the new TEGDMA/HEMA-free low shrinkage resin composite system showed good durability over six years....

  15. Fatigue resistance and failure mode of adhesively restored custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boff, Luís Leonildo; Oderich, Elisa; Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Magne, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the fatigue resistance and failure mode of composite resin and porcelain onlays and crowns bonded to premolar custom metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments. Sixty composite resin mesostructures were fabricated with computer assistance with two preparation designs (crown vs onlay) and bonded to a metal implant abutment. Following insertion into an implant with a tapered abutment interface (Titamax CM), each metal-composite resin abutment was restored with either composite resin (Paradigm MZ100) or ceramic (Paradigm C) (n = 15) and attached with adhesive resin (Optibond FL) and a preheated light-curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was then simulated, starting with 5,000 cycles at a load of 50 N, followed by stages of 200, 400, 600, 800, 1,000, 1,200, and 1,400 N (25,000 cycles each). Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 180,000 cycles. The four groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log-rank test). Previously published data using zirconia abutments of the same design were included for comparison. Paradigm C and MZ100 specimens fractured at average loads of 1,133 N and 1,266 N, respectively. Survival rates ranged from 20% to 33.3% (ceramic crowns and onlays) to 60% (composite resin crowns and onlays) and were significantly different (pooled data for restorative material). There were no restoration failures, but there were adhesive failures at the connection between the abutment and the mesostructure. The survival of the metal-composite resin premolar abutments was inferior to that of identical zirconia abutments from a previous study (pooled data for abutment material). Composite resin onlays/crowns bonded to metal-composite resin premolar implant abutments presented higher survival rates than comparable ceramic onlays/crowns. Zirconia abutments outperformed the metal-composite resin premolar abutments.

  16. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    OpenAIRE

    Desmond Ng; Jimmy C. M. Hsiao; Keith C. T. Tong; Harry Kim; Yanjie Mai; Keith H. S. Chan

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin ...

  17. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  18. A randomized controlled 30 years follow up of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this 30 year randomized controlled study was to evaluate, by intrain-dividual comparisons, the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class IIrestorations. Methods. Each of 30 participants, 21 female and 9 male (mean age 30 years, range 20–43),received at least...... three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate size.After cavity preparation, the three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with twochemical-cured (P10, Miradapt) and one light-cured resin composite (P30). A chemical-curedenamel bonding agent was applied after etching...... resin composites (p = 0.45).The variables tooth type, cavity size, age, and gender of the participants did not significantlyaffect the probability of failure. Significance. The three conventional resin composites showed good clinical performance dur-ing the 30 year evaluation. The chemical cured resin...

  19. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Presin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  20. Physical Property Investigation of Two Recently Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Huysmans  MCDNJM.  12-­‐year   Survival  of   Composite  vs.   Amalgam  Restorations.  J  Dent  Res  2010;  89:1063-­‐   1067...Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials 7. Intended publication/meeting: International Association of Dental Research Annual Meeting 8...Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials Major Marcus P. Kropf APPROVED; Colo71 Howard W. Roberts Date APPROVED: Col Drew W. Fallis Dean, Air

  1. Alternative methods for determining shrinkage in restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo Monteiro, Gabriela Queiroz; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassú Resende; Rolim, Tiago Vieira; de Oliveira Mota, Cláudia Cristina Brainer; de Barros Correia Kyotoku, Bernardo; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage of resin composites using a coordinate measuring machine, optical coherence tomography and a more widely known method, such as Archimedes Principle. Two null hypothesis were tested: (1) there are no differences between the materials tested; (2) there are no differences between the methods used for polymerization shrinkage measurements. Polymerization shrinkage of seven resin-based dental composites (Filtek Z250™, Filtek Z350™, Filtek P90™/3M ESPE, Esthet-X™, TPH Spectrum™/Dentsply 4 Seasons™, Tetric Ceram™/Ivoclar-Vivadent) was measured. For coordinate measuring machine measurements, composites were applied to a cylindrical Teflon mold (7 mm × 2 mm), polymerized and removed from the mold. The difference between the volume of the mold and the volume of the specimen was calculated as a percentage. Optical coherence tomography was also used for linear shrinkage evaluations. The thickness of the specimens was measured before and after photoactivation. Polymerization shrinkage was also measured using Archimedes Principle of buoyancy (n=5). Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Games-Howell test. The results show that polymerization shrinkage values vary with the method used. Despite numerical differences the ranking of the resins was very similar with Filtek P90 presenting the lowest shrinkage values. Because of the variations in the results, reported values could only be used to compare materials within the same method. However, it is possible rank composites for polymerization shrinkage and to relate these data from different test methods. Independently of the method used, reduced polymerization shrinkage was found for silorane resin-based composite. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  3. Factors affecting marginal integrity of class II bulk-fill composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Ghiasvand, Negar; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2017-01-01

    Background. Bulk-fill composite resins are a new type of resin-based composite resins, claimed to have the capacity to be placed in thick layers, up to 4 mm. This study was carried out to evaluate factors affecting gap formation in Cl II cavities restored using the bulk-fill technique. Methods. A total of 60 third molars were used in this study. Two Cl II cavities were prepared in each tooth, one on the mesial aspect 1 mm coronal to the CEJ and one on the distal aspect 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: A: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with Filtek P90 composite resin and its adhesive system and light-cured with quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. B: The cavities were restored similar to that in group A but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. C: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with X-tra Fil composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive system and light-cured with a QTH curing unit. D: The cavities were restored similar to that in group C but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. The gaps were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×60. Data were analyzed with General Linear Model test. In cases of statistical significance (Pcomposite resin type and margin location (Pcomposite resin type were not significant; however, the cumulative effect of composite rein type*gingival margin was significant (P=0.04) Conclusion. X-tra Fil composite exhibited smaller gaps compared with Filtek P90 composite with both light-curing units. Both composite resins exhibited smaller gaps at enamel margins. PMID:28748051

  4. Twelve-year survival of 2-surface composite resin and amalgam premolar restorations placed by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghipur, Safa; Pesun, Igor; Nowakowski, Anthony; Kim, Aaron

    2016-09-01

    Composite resin and amalgam restorations are indicated for the restoration of posterior teeth. With increased esthetic demands, long-term clinical studies are required to evaluate the restorative success and reasons for failure of these materials. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the survival and reasons for failure of directly placed 2-surface composite resin restorations and directly placed 2-surface amalgam restorations on premolars placed by Canadian dental students. Using The University of Manitoba's dental management software and paper charts, all 2-surface composite resin and 2-surface amalgam restorations placed on premolars between January 1, 2002, and May 30, 2014, were included. Short-term failure (within 2 years), long-term failure, and reasons for failure were collected. A Kaplan-Meier survival estimate with an associated P value comparing composite resin to amalgam restoration curves was performed using SPSS statistical software. Over 12 years, 1695 composite resin and 1125 amalgam 2-surface premolar restorations were placed. Of these restorations, 134 composite resins (7.9%) and 66 amalgams (5.9%) failed. Short-term failures (2 years or less) consisted of 57 composite resin (4%) and 23 amalgam (2.3%) restorations. Long-term failures (greater than 2 years) consisted of 77 composite resin (4.5%) and 43 amalgam (3.8%) restorations. After 12 years of service, the survival probability of composite resin restorations was 86% and that of amalgam restorations 91.5%. The differences in composite resin and amalgam survival curves were also found to be statistically significant (P=.009 for Log-rank test). The main reasons for failure were recurrent caries and fracture of the tooth being restored. Within the limitations of this study, both composite resin and amalgam restorations had acceptable success rates and similar failure modes. Recurrent caries was still the most common reason for failure. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for

  5. A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCracken, Michael S; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations....

  6. A randomized controlled 27 years follow up of three resin composites in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the durability of three conventional resin composites in Class II restorations during 27 years. Methods: Thirty participants, 25 female and 5 male (mean age 38.2 years, range 25–63), received at least three (one set) as similar as possible Class II restorations of moderate...... size. The three cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a chemical-cured (Clearfil Posterior) and two visible light-cured resin composites (Adaptic II, Occlusin). A chemical-cured enamel bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) was applied after Ca(OH)2 covering of dentin and enamel etch. Marginal......: Class II restorations of the three conventional resin composites showed an acceptable success rate during the 27 year evaluation....

  7. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  8. [Evaluation of porosity in the restorations of light-cured resin composite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-yi; Zhang, Wu; Lee, Sean; Roggenkamp, Clyde; Lu, Mei; Li, Yi-ming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the consistency of resin composite and insertion techniques on the homogeneity of the Class I restorations. Standardized Class I cavities were prepared in polymethyl methyacrylate (PMMA) blocks and restored with three resin composites (Prodigy, Tetric EvoCeram and Tetric Ceram HB) using either a packing or an injection technique by six operators. Then the restorations were sectioned longitudinally and inspected for the presence of porosities and voids with microscope. The consistence of the three resins was tested using an area method. There is little porosity in original resin. After insertion, large numbers of porosities were observed in restorations, with Tetric EvoCeram presented much more porosities (1137.1 +/- 365.0 for packing and 566.1 +/- 206.4 for injection) than Prodigy (241.0 +/- 116.1, 195.8 +/- 28.7) and Tetric Ceram HB (193.1 +/- 35.8, 156.3 +/- 33.0). Tetric Ceram HB showed the highest consistency, followed by Tetric EvoCeram and Prodigy. No linear correlation was found between the consistency of the composite and the porosity of their restorations. For Tetric EvoCeram, the restorations inserted with packing showed significant more porosity than that with injection. Contrastively, the restorations of Prodigy or Tetric Ceram HB presented no apparent difference for the two filling techniques. The porosity in restoration was primarily created during the insertion. There was no linear correlation between the consistency of the composite and the porosity of their restorations. The porosity of composite resin is material-brand dependent. The influence of filling techniques on the porosity of restoration is depending on the composite used.

  9. The effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A; Nakajima, M; Seki, N; Foxton, R M; Tagami, J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations in human teeth. Twenty extracted human premolars with an A2 shade, extracted for orthodontic reasons from younger patients (20-28yrs) (younger teeth) and periodontal reasons from older patients (45-69yrs) (older teeth), were used in this study. Cylindrical shaped cavities (3.0mm depth; 2.0mm diameter) were prepared in the centre of the crowns on the buccal surface. One of four resin composites of A2 shade (Kalore, KA; Solare, SO; Clearfil Majesty, MJ; Beautifil II, BF) was placed in the cavity, and the colour was measured at four areas (0.4mm×0.4mm) on the restored teeth (area 1; tooth area 1.0mm away from the border of resin composite restoration: area 2; tooth border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 3; resin composite border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 4; resin composite area at the centre of resin composite restoration) using a spectrophotometer (Crystaleye). The colour of each area was determined according to the CIELAB colour scale. Colour differences (ΔE*) between the areas of 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4 and 1 and 4 were calculated, and also the ratio of ΔE*area2-3 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area2-3/1-4), ΔE*area3-4 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area3-4/1-4) and ΔE*area1-2 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area1-2/1-4) as a parameter of the colour shift in resin composite restoration, were determined. Moreover, the light transmission characteristics of the resin materials and dentine discs from the younger and older teeth were measured using a goniophotometer. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, and Dunnett's T3 and t-test for the post hoc test. ΔE*area2-3 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth at the border) and ΔE*area1-4 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth) of the older teeth groups were significantly larger than those of younger

  10. Direct restoration of severely damaged incisors using short fiber-reinforced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the static load-bearing capacity and the failure mode of endodontically treated maxillary incisors restored with complete crowns made of experimental composite resin (FC) with short fiber fillers, with and without root canal posts. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) on the failure mode of the restoration. The experimental composite resin (FC) was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt.% of short E-glass fibers (3mm in length) and 22.5 wt.% of semi-interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) resin with 55 wt.% of silane treated silica fillers. The clinical crowns of 30 human extracted maxillary incisors were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction. Five groups of direct complete crowns were fabricated (n=6); Group A: made from particulate filler composite resin (PFC) (Grandio Caps, VOCO, control), Group B: PFC with fiber post (everStick, StickTeck), Group C: made from PFC with everStick fiber post and FRC-substructure, Group D: made from FC, Group E: made from FC with FRC-substructure. The root canals were prepared and posts were cemented with resin cement (ParaCem Universal). All restored teeth were stored in water at room temperature for 24h before they were statically loaded with speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p=0.05). Failure modes were visually examined. ANOVA revealed that restorations made from experimental fiber composite resin had higher load-bearing capacity (349N) (p0.05). Restorations made from short glass fiber containing composite resin with IPN-polymer matrix showed better load-bearing capacity than those made with either plain PFC or PFC reinforced with fiber post.

  11. Marginal leakage of compacted gold, composite resin, and high-copper amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormati, A A; Chan, K C

    1980-10-01

    Amalgam and compacted gold were found to have the least marginal leakage in Class V cavities. Composite resin with acid etching performed at an acceptable level. Without acid etching the marginal seal was unsatisfactory. The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. High-copper amalgam and compacted gold are the materials of choice for Class V restorations when esthetics are not of primary concern. 2. If composite resins are to be used, they should be placed with an acid-etch technique.

  12. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trends in material choice for posterior restorations in an Israeli dental school: composite resin versus amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gal, Gilad; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-12-01

    According to a recent American Dental Association survey, posterior composite resin restorations now outnumber amalgam restorations in the United States. Dental schools around the world vary considerably in the extent to which they teach the use of composite resins. We aimed to determine if there has been an increase in the placement of posterior composite restorations in an Israeli dental school and if faculty experience affects the type of posterior restoration placed. In this retrospective study, we recorded and analyzed all the restorations performed by undergraduate students in the last five academic years at the Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine in Jerusalem. All clinical records of student treatments between 2004 and 2009 were screened, and direct restorations were registered. Out of 6,094 posterior restorations performed during the study period, 42.3 percent were made of composite resin, increasing from 36.8 percent in 2004-05 to 48.5 percent in 2008-09, an increase of 11.7 percent. When clinical instructors were asked to state their preference if they themselves were to undergo posterior restoration, similar results were obtained. Instructors with less than ten years' experience preferred posterior composite resin restorations in 54.8 percent of the hypothetical situations, compared with 37.2 percent preferred by instructors with ten years of experience or more. It appears that the use of composite resin was influenced mainly by the prevailing trend and was not based on scientific evidence. Dental faculties should define criteria, based on up-to-date clinical studies, for using new materials, taking into consideration differences among instructors regarding treatment concept.

  14. Characterization of Bis-Acryl Composite Resins for Provisional Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantz, Júlia K; Oliveira-Ogliari, Aline; Meereis, Carine T; Leal, Fernanda B; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Moraes, Rafael R

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the in vitro performance of the commercial bis-acryl composite resins Systemp C&B II (SYS, Ivoclar Vivadent), Protemp 4 (PT4, 3M ESPE), Structur 2C (ST2, Voco) and ProviPlast (PVP, Biodinamica). Characterization involved optical (color stability, translucency parameter, fluorescence), surface (roughness, morphology and elemental composition), physical-chemical (viscosity, polymerization kinetics) and mechanical analyses (Poisson ratio, biaxial flexural strength, flexural modulus). Most tests were carried out after 24 h, but optical and mechanical analyses were carried out after storage in water at 37 °C for 1, 15, and 30 days. Data were statistically analyzed (a=0.05). Most results were material dependent. SYS and PT4 showed stability in color and translucency over time. All materials had similar or higher fluorescence than human enamel. SC2 and PVP showed rougher surfaces than the other bis-acryl composites. Smaller filler particles were observed on the surface of PT4 and PVP compared with the coarser particles from ST2 and SYS. Viscosity readings indicated a thixotropic behavior for all tested materials. SYS had the lowest and PT4 the highest degree of C=C conversion after 10 min. In the polymerization kinetics, PT4 had the highest maximum polymerization rate and reached earlier the transition between polymerization autoacceleration and autodeceleration. PT4 and SYS had significantly higher flexural strength and modulus than ST2 and PVP for most storage times. Results for Poisson ratio varied between materials. Longer storage periods were generally associated with higher frequency of catastrophic failures in the flexural tests. In conclusion, the performance of bis-acryl composite resins varied largely among materials.

  15. Alternative technique for class V resin composite restorations with minimum finishing/polishing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Cesar Reis

    2010-01-01

    Class V restorations are a very common occurrence in clinics. Some reasons include an increase in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL), root caries and the elderly population. Unfortunately, Class V restorations also represent one of the less durable types of restorations and have a high index of loss of retention, marginal excess and secondary caries. Some causes for these problems include difficulties in isolation, insertion, contouring, finishing and polishing procedures. This technique demonstrates an alternative isolation and insertion method using photocured gingival barrier in association with a flowable resin and hybrid resin composite to recreate the gingival wall with minimum or no excess.

  16. Endodontic complications in teeth with vital pulps restored with composite resins: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, V S; Amjad, S; Fransson, H

    2015-07-01

    Composite resin is used extensively for restoration of teeth with vital pulps. Although cell culture studies have disclosed harmful effects on pulpal cells, any untoward clinical effects, manifest as adverse pulpal responses, have yet to be determined. This study comprises a systematic review, designed to address the question of whether the risk of endodontic complications is greater with composite resin restorations than with other restorative materials, such as amalgam. The study methodology involved (i) formulation of the research question, (ii) construction and conduct of an extensive literature search with (iii) interpretation and assessment of the retrieved literature. A search of the medical database PubMed was complemented with a search of the Controlled Trials Register (CENTRAL). The initial search yielded 1043 publications, the abstracts of which were read independently by the authors. After additional searches, 10 studies were included in the review. In all the included studies, the level of evidence was assessed as low. No conclusions could therefore be drawn. The included studies reported few, if any, endodontic complications. Little or no differences emerged between teeth restored with composite resins and those restored with amalgam. To determine whether composite resin restorations of teeth with vital pulps are associated with an increased risk for development of endodontic complications such as apical periodontitis, further evidence is needed, from well-constructed studies with a large number of participants. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Bacterial adhesion on direct and indirect dental restorative composite resins: An in vitro study on a natural biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Vano, Michele; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Both direct and indirect techniques are used for dental restorations. Which technique should be preferred or whether they are equivalent with respect to bacterial adhesion is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the affinity of bacterial biofilm to dental restorative composite resins placed directly and indirectly. Five direct composite resins for restorations (Venus Diamond, Adonis, Optifil, Enamel Plus HRi, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic) and 3 indirect composite resins (Gradia, Estenia, Signum) were selected. The materials were incubated in unstimulated whole saliva for 1 day. The biofilms grown were collected and their bacterial cells counted. In parallel, the composite resin surface morphology was analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Both bacterial cell count and surface topography parameters were subjected to statistical analysis (α=.05). Indirect composite resins showed significantly lower levels than direct composite resins for bacterial cell adhesion, (Pcomposite resins (P>.05). However, within the indirect composite resins a significantly lower level was found for Gradia than Estenia or Signum (Pcomposite resin roughness and bacterial adhesion when the second and particularly the third-order statistical moments of the composite resin height distributions were considered. Indirect dental restorative composite resins were found to be less prone to biofilm adhesion than direct composite resins. A correlation of bacterial adhesion to surface morphology exists that is described by kurtosis; thus, advanced data analysis is required to discover possible insights into the biologic effects of morphology. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Ng

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  19. Review: Resin Composite Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Keith H. S.; Mai, Yanjie; Kim, Harry; Tong, Keith C. T.; Ng, Desmond; Hsiao, Jimmy C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The leading cause of oral pain and tooth loss is from caries and their treatment include restoration using amalgam, resin, porcelain and gold, endodontic therapy and extraction. Resin composite restorations have grown popular over the last half a century because it can take shades more similar to enamel. Here, we discuss the history and use of resin, comparison between amalgam and resin, clinical procedures involved and finishing and polishing techniques for resin restoration. Although resin composite has aesthetic advantages over amalgam, one of the major disadvantage include polymerization shrinkage and future research is needed on reaction kinetics and viscoelastic behaviour to minimize shrinkage stress.

  20. Fracture frequency and longevity of fractured resin composite, polyacid-modified resin composite, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement class IV restorations: an up to 14 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture frequency and longevity of fractured class IV resin composite (RC), polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer; PMRC), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) restorations in a longitudinal long-term follow-up. Eighty-five class IV RC (43...

  1. Reducing composite restoration polymerization shrinkage stress through resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, S J; Mutzelburg, P R; Shumack, T G; Thode, Djg; Martin, F E; Ellakwa, A E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether employing resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives can reduce polymerization contraction stress generated at the interface of restorative composite adhesive systems. Five resin based adhesives (G Bond, Optibond-All-in-One, Optibond-Solo, Optibond-XTR and Scotchbond-Universal) and two resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesives (Riva Bond-LC, Fuji Bond-LC) were analysed. Each adhesive was applied to bond restorative composite Filtek-Z250 to opposing acrylic rods secured within a universal testing machine. Stress developed at the interface of each adhesive-restorative composite system (n = 5) was calculated at 5-minute intervals over 6 hours. The resin based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RBA-RCS) demonstrated similar interface stress profiles over 6 hours; initial rapid contraction stress development (0-300 seconds) followed by continued contraction stress development ≤0.02MPa/s (300 seconds - 6 hours). The interface stress profile of the resin modified glass-ionomer based adhesive-restorative composite systems (RMGIBA-RCS) differed substantially to the RBA-RCS in several ways. Firstly, during 0-300 seconds the rate of contraction stress development at the interface of the RMGIBA-RCS was significantly (p glass-ionomer based adhesives can significantly reduce the magnitude and rate of polymerization contraction stress developed at the interface of adhesive-restorative composite systems. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  2. Factors affecting marginal integrity of class II bulk-fill composite resin restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Savadi Oskoee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bulk-fill composite resins are a new type of resin-based composite resins, claimed to have the capacity to be placed in thick layers, up to 4 mm. This study was carried out to evaluate factors affecting gap formation in Cl II cavities restored using the bulk-fill technique. Methods. A total of 60 third molars were used in this study. Two Cl II cavities were prepared in each tooth, one on the mesial aspect 1 mm coronal to the CEJ and one on the distal aspect 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: A: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with Filtek P90 composite resin and its adhesive system and light-cured with quartz tungsten halogen (QTH light-curing unit. B: The cavities were restored similar to that in group A but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. C: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with X-tra Fil composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive system and light-cured with a QTH curing unit. D: The cavities were restored similar to that in group C but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. The gaps were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×60. Data were analyzed with General Linear Model test. In cases of statistical significance (P<0.05, post hoc Bonferroni test was used for further analyses. Results. The light-curing unit type had no effect on gap formation. However, the results were significant in relation to the composite resin type and margin location (P<0.001. The cumulative effects of light-curing unit*gingival margin and light-curing unit*composite resin type were not significant; however, the cumulative effect of composite rein type*gingival margin was significant (P=0.04 Conclusion. X-tra Fil composite exhibited smaller gaps compared with Filtek P90 composite with both light-curing units. Both composite resins exhibited smaller gaps at enamel margins.

  3. A Randomized 10-year Prospective Follow-up of Class II Nanohybrid and Conventional Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the 10-year durability of a nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations in a randomized controlled intraindividual comparison with its conventional hybrid resin composite predecessor. Materials and Methods: Each of 52 participants received at least two Class II...... restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a nanohybrid resin composite (Excite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n = 61) and a conventional hybrid (Excite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n = 61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria...... investigated resin composites. Conclusion: The nanohybrid and the conventional hybrid resin composite showed good clinical effectiveness in extensive Class II restorations during the 10-year study....

  4. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  5. Cuspal Deflection of Premolars Restored with Bulk-Fill Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behery, Haytham; El-Mowafy, Omar; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Saleh, Belal; Nabih, Sameh

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study compared cuspal deflection of premolars restored with three bulk-fill composite resins to that of incrementally-restored ones with a low-shrinkage silorane-based restorative material. Forty freshly-extracted intact human upper premolars were used. Reference points at buccal and palatal cusp tips were acid-etched and composite rods were horizontally bonded to them (TPH-Spectra-HV, Dentsply). Two acrylic resin guiding paths were made for each premolar to guide beaks of a digital micrometer used for cuspal deflection measurements. Standardized MOD cavities, 3 mm wide bucco-lingually and 3.5 mm deep, were prepared on each premolar. Prepared teeth were then equally divided into four groups (n = 10) and each group was assigned to one of four composite resin (QuiXX, Dentsply; X-tra fil, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar Vivadent; low-shrinkage Filtek LS, 3M/ESPE). Adper Single Bond-Plus, 3M/ESPE was used with all bulk-fill restoratives. LS-System Adhesive, 3M/ESPE was used with Filtek LS. For each prepared premolar, cuspal deflection was measured in microns as the difference between two readings between reference points before and after restoration completion. Means and SDs were calculated and data statistically-analyzed using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Filtek LS showed the lowest mean cuspal deflection value 6.4(0.84)μm followed by Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill 10.1(1.2) μm and X-tra fil 12.4(1.35)μm, while QuiXX showed the highest mean 13(1.05)μm. ANOVA indicated significant difference among mean values of groups (p composite resins tested. Filtek LS had the lowest significant mean cuspal deflection in comparison to all tested bulk-fill restoratives. The use of Tetric EvoCeram Bulk fill composite resin restorative for class II MOD cavities resulted in reduced cuspal deflection in comparison to the two other bulk-fill composite resins tested. The silorane-based Filtek LS restorative resulted in the least cuspal deflection in

  6. Evaluation of proximal contact tightness of Class II resin composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saber, M.H.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Zohairy, A. El; Dorfer, C.E.; El-Badrawy, W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the current study was to compare in-vitro the proximal contact tightness (PCT) of Class II resin composite restorations (RCR) placed with different established and new placement techniques. METHODS: 105 ivorine lower left first molars with standardized MO cavities were

  7. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: a microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Daniela Araújo Veloso; Gonçalves, Fabiana Santos; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Mjör, Ivar A

    2011-01-01

    Total replacement is the most common technique for defective amalgam restorations, and it represents a major part of restorative dental treatment. Repair is an alternative option for amalgam restorations with localized defects. This study compared microleakage of amalgam restorations repaired by bonded amalgam or composite resin. Thirty extracted human pre-molars were prepared and restored with class I amalgam. A simulated defect was prepared that included the cavosurface margin on restorations, and the pre-molars were assigned to two treatment groups (n=15): In group 1, premolars were treated by composite resin (34% Tooth Conditioner Gel + Adper Single Bond 2 + Z100) and in group 2, premolars were repaired by bonded amalgam (34% Tooth Conditioner Gel + Prime and Bond 2.1 + Permite C). The teeth were immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution, thermocycled, sectioned longitudinally and then observed by three examiners using a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was evaluated using a 0-4 scale for dye penetration, and data was analyzed by Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests. Neither of the two methods eliminated microleakage completely. Composite resin was significantly the most effective for repair/tooth interface sealing (score 0 = 80.0%; P=0.0317). For the repair/restoration interface, composite resin was also statistically more effective as a sealant (score 0=66%; P=0.0005) when compared to the bonded amalgam technique (score 0=13%; P=0.0005). The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  8. 56-month clinical performance of Class I and II resin composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Bittencourt Pazinatto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the 56-month clinical performance of Class I and II resin composite restorations. Filtek P60 was compared with Filtek Z250, which are both indicated for posterior restorations but differ in terms of handling characteristics. The null hypothesis tested was that there is no difference in the clinical performance of the two resin composites in posterior teeth. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients were treated by the same operator, who prepared 48 Class I and 42 Class II cavities, which were restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z250 or Single Bond/Filtek P60 restorative systems. Restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners at baseline and after 56 months, using the modified USPHS criteria. Data were analyzed statistically using Chi-square and Fisher's Exact tests (a=0.05. RESULTS: After 56 months, 25 patients (31 Class I and 36 Class II were analyzed. A 3% failure rate occurred due to secondary caries and excessive loss of anatomic form for P60. For both restorative systems, there were no significant differences in secondary caries and postoperative sensitivity. However, significant changes were observed with respect to anatomic form, marginal discoloration, and marginal adaptation. Significant decreases in surface texture were observed exclusively for the Z250 restorations. CONCLUSIONS: Both restorative systems can be used for posterior restorations and can be expected to perform well in the oral environment.

  9. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  10. Effect of Refurbishing Amalgam and Resin Composite Restorations After 12 Years: Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estay, J; Martín, J; Vildosola, P; Mjor, I A; Oliveira, O B; Andrade, M F; Moncada, G; Gordan, V V; Fernández, E

    The aim of this study was to clinically evaluate posterior amalgam and resin composite restorations refurbished over a period of 12 years by investigating the influence of refurbishing on the survival of restorations and comparing their behaviors with respect to controls. Thirty-four patients were enrolled, ages 18 to 80 years, with 174 restorations, 48 restorations of resin composite (RC), and 126 restorations of amalgam (AM). Restorations with localized defects in anatomy, roughness, luster, or marginal staining that were clinically judged as suitable for refurbishing according to US Public Health Service (USPHS) Ryge criteria were assigned to group A-refurbishing (n=85; 67 AM, 18 RC)-or group B-control (n=89; 59 AM, 30 RC); the quality of the restorations was evaluated blindly according to the modified USPHS criteria. Two observers conducted evaluations at the initial state (k=0.74) and after one to five, 10, and 12 years (k=0.88). Wilcoxon, Friedman, and Mantel-Cox tests were performed to compare the groups, respectively. After 12 years, both groups experienced a similar decline, except for an evidently better performance in marginal adaptation in RC control (p=0.043) and in anatomy in AM refurbished (p=0.032). After 12 years, no difference was found in the clinical condition and longevity of the refurbished restorations compared to the control group.

  11. Restoring anterior guidance by use of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, L J

    1996-07-01

    Occlusal therapy has been noted for removing tooth structure by means of occlusal equilibration to eliminate destructive forces. Anterior guidance, the protective mechanism in occlusion, frequently can be restored in order to correct malocclusion. The article presented describes a simple, non-invasive, reversible and inexpensive restoration of anterior guidance. The rationale, research and technique shown include a case presentation.

  12. Effect of resin cements and aging on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaverry, Aurélio; Borges, Gilberto Antonio; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett Júnior, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of resin cements and aging on cuspal deflection, fracture resistance, and mode of failure of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Seventy-two maxillary premolars were divided into 6 groups: 1: sound teeth as control (C); 2: preparations without restoration (WR); 3: inlays luted with RelyX ARC (ARC); 4: inlays luted with RelyX Unicem (RLXU); 5: inlays luted with Maxcem Elite (MCE); 6: inlays luted with SeT (ST). Groups 2 to 6 received mesio-occlusal-distal preparations and endodontic treatment. Stone casts were made for groups 3 to 6. Composite resin inlays were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200-N load was applied on the occlusal aspect and the cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer before and after 500,000 cycles of fatigue loading (200 N; 500,000 cycles). The specimens were then submitted to an axial load until failure. The median cuspal deflection (µm) and median fracture resistance (N) were calculated and statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p inlays luted with RelyX ARC maintained cuspal deflection stability and showed higher fracture resistance of the teeth than did inlays luted with the other cements tested.

  13. Effect of two abrasive systems on resin bonding to laboratory-processed indirect resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouschlicher, M R; Cobb, D S; Vargas, M A

    1999-01-01

    This study compared two methods of surface roughening or preparation, with or without the use of proprietary surface wetting agents, to evaluate their effect on resin cement adhesion to the following laboratory-processed, indirect restorations: Artglass (AG), belleGlass HP (BG), Concept (C), and Targis (T). Methods of surface roughening or preparation included microetching with aluminum oxide (AO): 50 microns at 34 psi and silanized silica coating, CoJet-Sand (CJ): 30 microns at 34 psi. Artglass and Concept were tested with and without the use of their respective surface wetting agents: Artglass Liquid (AGL) and Special Bond II (SB). One hundred twenty specimens, each consisting of a pair of cylinders (7.0 x 3 mm and 4.3 x 3 mm) were fabricated. The larger cylinder or base was embedded in self-curing resin in a phenolic ring, and bonding surfaces were finished with 320-grit silicon carbide paper. Specimen pairs for each restorative material were randomly assigned to treatment groups (n = 10) and received the following surface treatments prior to cementation: group 1 (AG/AO/+AGL), group 2 (AG/AO/-AGL), group 3 (AG/CJ/+AGL), group 4 (AG/CJ/-AGL), group 5 (BG/AO), group 6 (BG/CJ), group 7 (C/AO/+SB), group 8 (C/AO/-SB), group 9 (C/CJ/+SB), group 10 (C/CJ/-SB), group 11 (T/AO), and group 12 (T/CJ). Specimen pairs were cemented with a dual-cure resin cement (Dual) and a standardized force of 1 MPa. Specimens were light-cured 40 seconds per side (80 s total), then thermocycled 300 times at between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C. Shear bond strengths (MPa) were determined using a Zwick Materials Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm per minute. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test (alpha = 0.05) by restoration type indicated no significant differences in shear bond strength between BG group 5 (29.8 +/- 5.8), BG group 6 (28.3 +/- 4.3), T group 11 (29.3 +/- 4.9), and T group 12 (29.0 +/- 4.4). Shear bond strength in AG group 3 (35.9 +/- 3

  14. Resistance to maxillary premolar fractures after restoration of class II preparations with resin composite or ceromer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Cláudia Regina Buainain; Miranda, Maria Isabel Serra; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Flores, Victor Humberto Orbegoso; Vaz, Luís Geraldo; Guimarães, Catanzaro

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to fracture of intact and restored human maxillary premolars. Thirty noncarious human maxillary premolars, divided into three groups of 10, were submitted to mechanical tests to evaluate their resistance to fracture. Group 1 consisted of intact teeth. Teeth in group 2 received mesio-occlusodistal cavity preparations and were restored with direct resin composite restorations. Teeth in group 3 received mesio-occlusodistal cavity preparations and were restored with ceromer inlays placed with the indirect technique. After restoration, teeth were stored at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and then thermocycled for 500 cycles at temperatures of 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. Statistical analysis revealed that group 3 (178.765 kgf) had a significantly greater maximum rupture load than did group 1 (120.040 kgf). There was no statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 or between groups 2 and 3. Class II cavity preparations restored with indirect ceromer inlays offered greater resistance to fracture than did intact teeth. The fracture resistance of teeth restored with resin composite was not significantly different from that of either the ceromer or intact teeth.

  15. Marginal quality and wear of extended posterior resin composite restorations: Eight-year results in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Norbert; Küssner, Pierre; Motmaen, Ila; Köhl, Michael; Wöstmann, Bernd; Frankenberger, Roland

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate wear and marginal quality of resin composite restorations over eight years of clinical service in vivo. 30 patients received 68 resin composite restorations (36 Grandio, 32 Tetric Ceram) in the course of a prospective clinical trial. 3-D evaluation of 36 selected teeth involving 144 epoxy replicas was carried out using a special 3-D scanning device with an accuracy of U1=2.5+L/350 μm; U3=3+L/300 μm. In vivo replicas were sputter-coated with gold and examined under a SEM at 200× magnification. Marginal integrity between resin composite and enamel was expressed as a percentage of the entire judgeable margin length. During the clinical 8-year observation period, wear significantly increased in the restored areas as well as in OCAs. RBCs under investigation showed no significant differences regarding wear (p>0.05). Localization of the restorations (premolar vs. molar or upper vs. lower) did not show a significant influence on wear rates (p>0.05). Clinically, by SEM, and by 3-D scanning distinct changes of worn contours on enamel and RBC were visible. Quantitative margin analysis revealed a change of perfect margins (58% at baseline vs. 14% at 8 years), positive step formations (15% at baseline vs. 10% at 8 years), and negative step formations (20% at baseline vs. 71% at 8 years) over time (pGrandio showed lower values (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05). The portion of negative step formations was lower for Tetric Ceram at baseline (Mann-Whitney-U test; p<0.05). After eight years of clinical service, neither wear nor marginal quality was a critical factor for estimation and survival of extended posterior resin composite restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of periodontal status adjacent to interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvia Christina Barros de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the periodontal status of interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces. Methods: In 65 patients, we analyzed 145 restored surfaces and 145 non-restored surfaces. Results: Most of the restored surfaces (54.3% showed radiographic alterations, which was shown to be higher among restorations with clinically detected proximal excess (56.8% x 52.8%; with lack of restorative material (64.5% x 51.4%; in restorations with proximal overhang (67.7% x 44.4%; in teeth with gingival inflammation?/bleeding (55.1% x 40.0% and in teeth with probing depth exceeding 3 mm (64.3% x 52.9%. However, there were no significant associations for these variables. Of the non-restored surfaces, 24.4% showed radiographic alterations, however there were no significant associations. Conclusion: The results showed a statistical significance for radiographic alterations in restored and non-restored surfaces.

  17. Split-increment technique: an alternative approach for large cervical composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Khamis A; Khier, Salwa E

    2007-02-01

    This article proposes and describes the split-increment technique as an alternative for placement of composite resin in large cervical carious lesions which extend onto the root surface. Two flat 1.5 mm thick composite resin increments were used to restore these cervical carious lesions. Prior to light-curing, two diagonal cuts were made in each increment in order to split it into four triangular-shaped flat portions. The first increment was applied to cover the entire axial wall and portions of the four surrounding walls. The second increment was applied to fill the cavity completely covering the first one and the rest of the four surrounding walls as well as sealing all cavity margins. This technique results in the reduction of the C-factor and the generated shrinkage stresses by directing the shrinking composite resin during curing towards the free, unbonded areas created by the two diagonal cuts. The proposed technique would also produce a more naturally looking restoration by inserting flat dentin and enamel increments of composite resin of a uniform thickness which closely resembles the arrangement of natural tooth structure.

  18. Effect of Different Liners on Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored with Conventional and Short Fiber-Reinforced Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Doozandeh, Maryam; Ghaffaripour, Dordaneh

    2018-01-11

    To see whether applying four different liners under short fiber-reinforced composite (SFRC), everX Posterior, compared to conventional composite resin, Z250, affected their strengthening property in premolar MOD cavities. Mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared in 120 sound maxillary premolars divided into 10 groups (n = 12) in terms of two composite resin types and 4 liners or no liner. For each composite resin, in 5 groups no liner, resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), conventional flowable composite (COFL), self-adhesive flowable composite resin (SAFL), and self-adhesive resin cement (SARC) were applied prior to restoring incrementally. After water storage and thermocycling, static fracture resistance was tested. Data (in Newtons) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). Fracture resistance was significantly affected by composite resin type (p = 0.02), but not by the liner (p > 0.05). The interaction of the two factors was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). SFRC exhibited higher fracture strength (1470 ± 200 N) compared to conventional composite resin (1350 ± 290), irrespective of the application of liners. Application of SARC and SAFL liners led to a higher number of restorable fractures for both composite resins. The four liners can be used without interfering with the higher efficacy of SFRC, compared to conventional composite resins, to improve the fracture strength of premolar MOD cavities. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Amalgam and resin composite longevity of posterior restorations: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraschini, Vittorio; Fai, Cheung Ka; Alto, Raphael Monte; Dos Santos, Gustavo Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present review was to evaluate by means of a systematic review and meta-analysis the hypothesis of no difference in failure rates between amalgam and composite resin posterior restorations. Randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and prospective and retrospective cohort studies were included in this review. The eligibility criteria included clinical trials in humans with at least 12 months of follow-up comparing the failures rates between occlusal and occlusoproximal amalgam and composite resin restorations. Clinical questions were formulated and organized according to the PICOS strategy. An electronic search without restriction on the dates or languages was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science up until March 2015. The initial search resulted in 938 articles from PubMed/MEDLINE, 89 titles from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and 172 from the Web of Science. After an initial assessment and careful reading, 8 studies published between 1992 and 2013 were included in this review. According to the risk of bias evaluation, all studies were classified as high quality. The results of this review suggest that composite resin restorations in posterior teeth still have less longevity and a higher number of secondary caries when compared to amalgam restorations. In relation to fractures, there was no statistically significant difference between the two restorative materials regarding the time of follow-up. There is currently a worldwide trend towards replacing amalgam restorations with mercury-free materials, which are adhesive and promote aesthetics. It is important to perform an updated periodic review to synthesize the clinical performance of restorations in the long-term. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival Rates from Fracture of Endodontically Treated Premolars Restored with Full-coverage Crowns or Direct Resin Composite Restorations: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksaphar, Warattama; Banomyong, Danuchit; Jirathanyanatt, Titalee; Ngoenwiwatkul, Yaowaluk

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the survival rates against fracture of premolar endodontically treated teeth (ETT) restored with resin composite or crowns and to identify risk factors associated with the fracture. Data from dental records and radiographs of premolar ETT with postendodontic restorations (ie, resin composite or crowns) were collected between 2012 and 2016 and selected following selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Tooth location, type of restoration, number of proximal contacts, and amount of tooth surface loss were recorded. The incidence and restorability of postendodontic fractures were identified. Survival rates against fracture of the 2 restoration types were calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Any potential factors associated with fractures were identified using Cox proportional hazards models. The survival rate against fracture of ETT restored with crowns (95.1%) was higher than resin composite (77.0%). ETT restored with resin composite with 1 or 2 tooth surface losses and 2 proximal contacts had a high survival rate of 88.5% that was not significantly different from ETT with crowns. A higher incidence of restorability after fracture was observed in teeth restored with resin composite than crowns. The type of restoration and number of proximal contacts were identified as potential risk factors associated with fracture incidence. The survival rate against fracture of ETT restored with crowns was higher than resin composite. However, ETT with 1 or 2 tooth surface losses and 2 proximal contacts and restored with resin composite showed a high survival rate that was comparable with ETT restored with crowns. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cavity Adaptation of Water-Based Restoratives Placed as Liners under a Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela B. Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the cavity adaptation of mineral trioxide (ProRoot MTA/MT, tricalcium silicate (Biodentine/BD, and glass ionomer (Equia Fil/EF cements used as liners and the interfacial integrity between those liners and a composite resin placed as the main restorative material. Materials and Methods. Standardized class I cavities (n: 8 per group were prepared in upper premolars. Cavities were lined with a 1 mm thick layer of each of the tested materials and restored with Optibond FL adhesive and Herculite Precis composite resin. Cavity adaptation of the restorations was investigated by computerized X-ray microtomography. The regions of interest (ROI were set at the cavity-liner (CL interface and the liner-resin (LR interface. The percentage void volume fraction (%VVF in the ROI was calculated. The specimens were then sectioned and the interfaces were evaluated by reflection optical microscopy, to measure the % length (%LD of the interfacial gaps. Selected samples were further evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (a=0.05. Results. MT showed significantly higher %VVF and %LD values in CL interfaces than BD and EF (p<0.05. No significant differences were found among the materials for the same values at the LR interfaces. Conclusions. When used as a composite liner, ProRoot MTA showed inferior cavity adaptation at dentin/liner interface when compared to Biodentine and Equia Fil.

  2. Repair Strength in Simulated Restorations of Methacrylate- or Silorane-Based Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Marinho, Tatiane; Bacchi, Atais; Caldas, Ricardo Armini; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The study verified the bond strength in simulated dental restorations of silorane- or methacrylate-based composites repaired with methacrylate-based composite. Methacrylate- (P60) or silorane-based (P90) composites were used associated with adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2). Twenty-four hemi-hourglass-shaped samples were repaired with each composite (n=12). Samples were divided according to groups: G1= P60 + Adper Single Bond 2+ P60; G2= P60 + Adper Single Bond 2 + P60 + thermocycling; G3= P90 + Adper Single Bond 2 + P60; and G4= P90 + Adper Single Bond 2 + P60 + thermocycling. G1 and G3 were submitted to tensile test 24 h after repair procedure, and G2 and G4 after submitted to 5,000 thermocycles at 5 and 55 ?#61616;C for 30 s in each bath. Tensile bond strength test was accomplished in an universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data (MPa) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). Sample failure pattern (adhesive, cohesive in resin or mixed) was evaluated by stereomicroscope at 30?#61655; and images were obtained in SEM. Bond strength values of methacrylate-based composite samples repaired with methacrylate-based composite (G1 and G2) were greater than for silorane-based samples (G3 and G4). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values for both composites. All groups showed predominance of adhesive failures and no cohesive failure in composite resin was observed. In conclusion, higher bond strength values were observed in methacrylate-based resin samples and greater percentage of adhesive failures in silorane-based resin samples, both composites repaired with methacrylate-based resin.

  3. The effect of repeated preheating of dimethacrylate and silorane-based composite resins on marginal gap of class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Naser Alavi, Fereshteh; Salari, Ashkan

    2017-01-01

    Background. One of the problems with composite resin restorations is gap formation at resin‒tooth interface. The present study evaluated the effect of preheating cycles of silorane- and dimethacrylate-based composite resins on gap formation at the gingival margins of Class V restorations. Methods. In this in vitro study, standard Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 48 bovine incisors. For restorative procedure, the samples were randomly divided into 2 groups based on the type of composite resin (group 1: di-methacrylate composite [Filtek Z250]; group 2: silorane composite [Filtek P90]) and each group was randomly divided into 2 subgroups based on the composite temperature (A: room temperature; B: after 40 preheating cycles up to 55°C). Marginal gaps were measured using a stereomicroscope at ×40 and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Inter- and intra-group comparisons were analyzed with post-hoc Tukey tests. Significance level was defined at P composite resin type, preheating and interactive effect of these variables on gap formation were significant (Pcomposite resins (Pcomposite resins at room temperature compared to composite resins after 40 preheating cycles (Pcomposite re-sins. Preheating of silorane-based composites can result in the best marginal adaptation.

  4. A randomized clinical trial of cusp-replacing resin composite restorations: efficiency and short-term effectiveness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijs, R.H.; Fennis, W.M.M.; Kreulen, C.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Burgersdijk, R.C.W.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the efficacy and short-term effectiveness of the morphology and function of direct and indirect cusp-replacing resin composite restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 94 patients, 106 cusp-replacing restorations for maxillary premolars were fabricated to restore

  5. Comparison of fracture resistance of teeth restored with ceramic inlay and resin composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti D Desai

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The fracture resistant strength of teeth restored with ceramic inlay was comparable to that of the normal intact teeth or slightly higher, while teeth restored with direct composite resin restoration showed less fracture resistant strength than that of the normal teeth.

  6. Simple direct composite resin restoration on endodontically treated tooth: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyuni Suci Dwiandhany

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endodontically treated teeth generally havegreat structure loss so that the resistance to fracture is reduced. Therefore, the post-endodontic restoration design that covers the entire cusp (full cuspal coverage is necessary to increase the resistance of teeth to fracture. The aim of this case report is to present direct onlay restoration technique using composite resin material in non-vital tooth with chronic apical periodontitis. A 74-years-old male patient came to the clinic complaining of discomfort in the lower right posterior tooth related to eating since 1 week ago. Clinical examination revealed a large amalgam restoration on the second lower right molar, the tooth is negative to pulp sensitivity test, and tender to percussion. Radiographically, the tooth showed periapical radiolucency at distal and mesial root. The diagnosis of the tooth was chronic apical periodontitis. The treatment plan is a non-vital root canal treatment with multiple visit. Root canal preparation with rotary files (ProTaper Next, Dentsply, Germany was performed on the first visit and irrigated with NaOCl. On the next visit, during subjective examination, there was no pain complaints and the percussion test was negative so the obturation with a single cone technique can be done. On the final visit, direct onlay restoration using nano-hybrid composite resin material (Polofil NHT, Voco, Germany was performed. In conclusion, after 3 months follow up, the marginal integrity of the restoration remains intact and the tooth were functioned properly.

  7. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous) region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan). Keywords: Fiber-reinforced composite; FRC; Posterior ...

  8. Effect of Two Surface Sealants on Microleakage of Class V Resin Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosa Aboali

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: When composite resin polymerizes, shrinkage stresses tend to produce gaps at the tooth/ restoration interfaces. Surface sealants may reduce or avoid problems related to the marginal interface. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surface sealants (Fortify and Optiguard on the microleakage of class V resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods: Twenty three sound noncarious molars were collected. Totally, 45 Class V cavities with the occlusal margins in enamel and cervical margins in cementum were prepared in both buccal and lingual surfaces. The specimens were randomly assigned in three groups (15 cavities in each group and then restored with a resin composite. After the finishing and polishing procedures, the restorations in each group were covered with a specific surface sealant, except for the control samples, which were not sealed. After placing restorations, the specimens were thermocycled and then immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution (tracer agent for four hours, sectioned longitudinally and analyzed for leakage using a stereomicroscope in a blind manner. The marginal microleakage was evaluated at the occlusal and cervical interfaces and compared among the three groups using the Kruskall-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: Microleakage was found in all groups at both occlusal and cervical margins. Significantly greater leakage was observed at the cervical margins compared to the enamel margins of the material groups (P=0.005. There was no statistically significant difference among the groups at occlusal margins (P=0.66. In the cervical region, Fortify showed improved results and statistically presented the lowest degree of microleakage (P=0.003. onclusion: The used sealant materials presented different rates of effectiveness and Fortify decreased marginal microleakage significantly.

  9. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hoon; Choi, Eui Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  10. A study on the radiopacity of cavity lining materials for posterior composite resin restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui Hwan [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative radiopacities of cavity lining materials (Resin-modified Glass Ionomer cement, Compomer and Flowable resin) for posterior composite resin restoration. Resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, Vitrebond (TM)), Compomers (Dyract , Compoglass, F2000, Dyract(R) flow Compoglass Flow) and Flowable resins (Tetric (R) flow, Aeliteflo (TM) Revolution (TM)) were used. Five specimens of 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick were fabricated with each material. Human molars were horizontally sectioned 2 mm thick to include both enamel and dentin. The radiopacities of enamel, dentin, cavity lining materials, aluminum step wedge were obtained from conventional radiograph and NIH image program. All the tested lining materials showed levels of radiopacity the same as or greater than that of dentin. All compomer tested (Dyract (R), Compoglass, F2000, Dyract (R) flow, Compoglass Flow) and Vitrebond (TM), Tetric (R) flow were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacities of Fuji II LC and Revolution (TM) were between enamel and dentin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Compomer and Tetric (R) flow were greater than those of Revolution (TM), Aeliteflo (TM) or dentin. The level of radiopacity of the tested materials was variable; those with low radiopacity should be avoided in class II restorations, where a clear determination of recurrent caries by the examining clinician could be compromised. Clinician should be able to distinguish these cavity lining materials radiographically from recurrent decay, voids, gaps, or other defects that lead to clinical failure. Utilization of materials ranked more radiopaque than enamel would enable clinicians to distinguish the lining material from tooth structure.

  11. A new methodology for fluorescence analysis of composite resins used in anterior direct restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Liliane Motta; Abreu, Jessica Dantas; Cohen-Carneiro, Flavia; Regalado, Diego Ferreira; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a new methodology to evaluate the fluorescence of composite resins for direct restorations. Microhybrid (group 1, Amelogen; group 2, Opallis; group 3, Filtek Z250) and nanohybrid (group 4, Filtek Z350 XT; group 5, Brilliant NG; group 6, Evolu-X) composite resins were analyzed in this study. A prefabricated matrix was used to prepare 60 specimens of 7.0 × 3.0 mm (n = 10 per group); the composite resin discs were prepared in 2 increments (1.5 mm each) and photocured for 20 seconds. To establish a control group of natural teeth, 10 maxillary central incisor crowns were horizontally sectioned to create 10 discs of dentin and enamel tissues with the same dimensions as the composite resin specimens. The specimens were placed in a box with ultraviolet light, and photographs were taken. Aperture 3.0 software was used to quantify the central portion of the image of each specimen in shades of red (R), green (G), and blue (B) of the RGB color space. The brighter the B shade in the evaluated area of the image, the greater the fluorescence shown by the specimen. One-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences between the groups. The fluorescence achieved in group 1 was statistically similar to that of the control group and significantly different from those of the other groups (Bonferroni test). Groups 3 and 4 had the lowest fluorescence values, which were significantly different from those of the other groups. According to the results of this study, neither the size nor the amount of inorganic particles in the evaluated composite resin materials predicts if the material will exhibit good fluorescence.

  12. Comparison of fracture resistance of teeth restored with ceramic inlay and resin composite: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Priti D; Das, Utapal Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro fracture resistance of teeth restored with bonded ceramic inlay and direct composite resin restoration in comparison to the normal tooth. This study evaluated the fracture strength of the teeth restored with bonded ceramic inlay and direct composite resin restoration in comparison to the normal teeth. Thirty intact human maxillary first premolars were assigned to three groups: Group 1 - comprising sound/unprepared teeth (control). Group 2 - comprising of Class-II direct composite resin restored teeth and Group 3 - comprising Class-II ceramic inlay restored teeth. Cavities were prepared with occlusal width of 1/3 intercuspal distance and 2 mm deep pulpally. Group 2 teeth were restored with hybrid composite resin (Z350 3M ESPE, USA) and group 3 teeth were restored with Vitadur Alpha alumina (Ivoclare Vivadent, Liechtenstein, Europe). Ceramic inlay was bonded with adhesive cement (rely X resin cement of 3MESPE, USA). The specimens were subjected to a compressive load until they fractured. Data were analyzed statistically by unpaired Student's t test. The fracture resistant strength, expressed as kilonewton (KN), was group 1 - 1.51 KN, group 2 - 1.25 KN, and group 3 - 1.58 KN. Statistically, group III had highest fracture resistance followed by group I, while group II had the lowest average fracture resistance. The fracture resistant strength of teeth restored with ceramic inlay was comparable to that of the normal intact teeth or slightly higher, while teeth restored with direct composite resin restoration showed less fracture resistant strength than that of the normal teeth.

  13. Fracture Resistance of Premolars Restored by Various Types and Placement Techniques of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horieh Moosavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the fracture resistance of premolars with mesioocclusodistal preparations restored by different resin composites and placement techniques. Sixty premolars were randomly divided into two groups based on type of composite resin: Filtek P60 or Nulite F, and then each group was separated into three subgroups: bulk, centripetal, and fiber insert according to the type of placement method (n=10. Single-bond adhesive system was used as composite bonding according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were restored in Groups 1, 2, and 3 with Filtek P60 and in Groups 4, 5, and 6 with Nulite F. After being stored 24 hours at 37∘C, a 4 mm diameter steel sphere in a universal testing machine was applied on tooth buccal and lingual cusps at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min until fracture occurred. Groups 3 and 6 showed higher fracture resistance than Groups 1, 2, 4, and 5. Among the placement techniques, the fiber insert method had a significant effect, but the type of composite was ineffective. The insertion technique in contrast to the type of material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance of premolar teeth.

  14. Influence of photoactivation method and mold for restoration on the Knoop hardness of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William Cunha; Silva-Concilio, Lais Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; de Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose Carvalho; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the Knoop hardness in the top and bottom of composite photo activated by different methods when different mold materials were used. Z250 (3M ESPE) and XL2500 halogen unit (3M ESPE) were used. For hardness test, conical restorations were made in extracted bovine incisors (tooth mold) and also metal mold (approximately 2 mm top diameter × 1.5 mm bottom diameter × 2 mm in height). Different photoactivation methods were tested: high-intensity continuous (HIC), low-intensity continuous (LIC), soft-start, or pulse-delay (PD), with constant radiant exposure. Knoop readings were performed on top and bottom restoration surfaces. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). On the top, regardless of the mold used, no significant difference in the Knoop hardness (Knoop hardness number, in kilograms-force per square millimeter) was observed between the photoactivation methods. On the bottom surface, the photoactivation method HIC shows higher means of hardness than LIC when tooth and metal were used. Significant differences of hardness on the top and in the bottom were detected between tooth and metal. The photoactivation method LIC and the material mold can interfere in the hardness values of composite restorations.

  15. Marginal seal of composite resin restorations photo activated by L.E.D. and halogen-based light

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda Mejía, Martha Elena; Dpto. Acad. Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Fac. Odontologia. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Terán Casafranca, Liliana Ángela; Dpto. Acad. Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Fac. Odontologia. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Gloria Zevallos, Waldo Ernesto; Dpto. Acad. Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Fac. Odontologia. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.; Cuadrao Zavaleta, Luis Alberto; Dpto. Acad. Ciencias Básicas. Fac. Odontologia. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to compare in vitro the marginal seal degree of composite resin restorations photopolomerized with L.E.D light and conventional halogen light, was the objective of this research.It was used 20 healthy molars recently extracted, in each of them, standardized dimensions class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and palatal aspects. Both cavities were filled with nanoparticles composite resin, Filteck Z350 and Single Bond adhesive (3M). Vestibular restaurations were light cured usi...

  16. Non-destructive evaluation of teeth restored with different composite resins using synchrotron based micro-imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, A; Kulkarni, V K; Banda, N R; Agrawal, A K; Singh, B; Sarkar, P S; Tripathi, S; Shripathi, T; Kashyap, Y; Sinha, A

    2016-01-01

    Application of high resolution synchrotron micro-imaging in microdefects studies of restored dental samples. The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the defects in restorations done by two different resin systems on teeth samples using synchrotron based micro-imaging techniques namely Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) and micro-computed tomography (MCT). With this aim acquired image quality was also compared with routinely used RVG (Radiovisiograph). Crowns of human teeth samples were fractured mechanically involving only enamel and dentin, without exposure of pulp chamber and were divided into two groups depending on the restorative composite materials used. Group A samples were restored using a submicron Hybrid composite material and Group B samples were restored using a Nano-Hybrid restorative composite material. Synchrotron based PCI and MCT was performed with the aim of visualization of tooth structure, composite resin and their interface. The quantitative and qualitative comparison of phase contrast and absorption contrast images along with MCT on the restored teeth samples shows comparatively large number of voids in Group A samples. Quality assessment of dental restorations using synchrotron based micro-imaging suggests Nano-Hybrid resin restorations (Group B) are better than Group A.

  17. A comparison of stresses in molar teeth restored with inlays and direct restorations, including polymerization shrinkage of composite resin and tooth loading during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejak, Beata; Młotkowski, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composites is one of the main causes of leakage around dental restorations. Despite the large numbers of studies there is no consensus, what kind of teeth reconstruction--direct or indirect composite restorations are the most beneficial and the most durable. The aim was to compare equivalent stresses and contact adhesive stresses in molar teeth with class II MOD cavities, which were restored with inlays and direct restorations (taking into account polymerization shrinkage of composite resin) during simulated mastication. The study was conducted using the finite elements method with the application of contact elements. Three 3D models of first molars were created: model A was an intact tooth; model B--a tooth with a composite inlay, and model C--a tooth with a direct composite restoration. Polymerization linear shrinkage 0.7% of a direct composite restoration and resin luting cement was simulated (load 1). A computer simulation of mastication was performed (load 2). In these 2 situations, equivalent stresses according to the modified von Mises criterion (mvM) in the materials of mandibular first molar models with different restorations were calculated and compared. Contact stresses in the luting cement-tooth tissue adhesive interface around the restorations were also assessed and analyzed. Equivalent stresses in a tooth with a direct composite restoration (the entire volume of which was affected by polymerization shrinkage) were many times higher than in the tooth restored with a composite inlay (where shrinkage was present only in a thin layer of the luting cement). In dentin and enamel the stress values were 8-14 times higher, and were 13 times higher in the direct restoration than in the inlay. Likewise, contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct restoration were 6.5-7.7 times higher compared to an extraorally cured restoration. In the masticatory simulation, shear contact stresses in the adhesive bond around the direct

  18. Restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: an evaluation of coronal microleakage of glass ionomer and composite resin materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arnold, A M; Wilcox, L R

    1990-12-01

    A glass ionomer material was evaluated for coronal microleakage in permanent lingual access restorations of endodontically treated anterior teeth. The material was tested as a restoration, placed over a zinc oxide-eugenol base, and as a base with an acid-etched composite resin veneer and a dentinal bonding agent. Restored teeth were thermocycled, immersed in silver nitrate, developed, and sectioned to assess microleakage. Significant coronal leakage was observed with all materials used.

  19. Mechanical fatigue degradation of ceramics versus resin composites for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Geinzer, Eva; Muschweck, Anna; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    For posterior partial restorations an overlap of indication exists where either ceramic or resin-based composite materials can be successfully applied. The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of modern dental ceramic materials versus dental resin composites in order to address such conflicts. Bar specimens of five ceramic materials and resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and stored for 14 days in distilled water at 37°C. The following ceramic materials were selected for testing: a high-strength zirconium dioxide (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar), a machinable lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar), a pressable lithium disilicate ceramic (e-max Press, Ivoclar), a fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar), and a machinable color-graded feldspathic porcelain (Trilux Forte, Vita). The composite materials selected were: an indirect machinable composite (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) and four direct composites with varying filler nature (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray; GrandioSO, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar-Vivadent; and CeramX Duo, Dentsply). Fifteen specimens were tested in water for initial strength (σin) in 4-point bending. Using the same test set-up, the residual flexural fatigue strength (σff) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz (n=25). Weibull parameters σ0 and m were calculated for the σin specimens, whereas the σff and strength loss in percentage were obtained from the fatigue experiment. The zirconium oxide ceramic showed the highest σin and σff (768 and 440 MPa, respectively). Although both lithium disilicate ceramics were similar in the static test, the pressable version showed a significantly higher fatigue resistance after cyclic loading. Both the fluorapatite-based and the feldspathic porcelain showed equivalent initial and cyclic fatigue properties. From the composites, the highest filled direct material Clearfil Majesty Posterior showed superior fatigue performance

  20. Fracture Strength of Indirect Resin Composite Laminates to Teeth with Existing Restorations : An Evaluation of Conditioning Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mese, Ayse; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the fracture strength and failure types of indirect resin-based composite laminates bonded to teeth with aged Class III composite restorations that were conditioned according to various protocols. Materials and Methods: Maxillary central incisors (N = 60) with

  1. In vitro marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restorations bonded to dentin cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiotis, Christos; Tzoutzas, John; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restoratives bonded to dentin in a cylindrical cavity model. The buccal enamel of 64 human premolars was removed and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.3 mm in depth were prepared on each dentin surface. The cavities were divided into 8 groups of 8 cavities each and restored according to the manufacturers' instructions with the following adhesive/composite systems: Bond 1/Alert, Stae/Glacier, OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable, One-Step/Pyramid, Solidbond/Solitaire, Prime&Bond NT/Surefil, One Coat Bond/Synergy, and Scotchbond 1/Z250. The composite surfaces were pressed against mylar strips, covered with cover slips, and photopolymerized in a single increment for 40 s. The restorations were polished with wet SiC papers of 320 to 1000 grit size to expose dentin margins. The marginal adaptation was evaluated immediately after photopolymerization and again after 1 week of storage in water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Evaluation was performed under a metallographic microscope at 200X magnification by recording the frequency of gap-free restorations (GF), the percentage length of the debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (DM), the width of the maximum marginal gap (MG), and the marginal index (MI = MG x DM / 100). The results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U-test at alpha = 0.05. No incidence of gaps was found in 62.5% of One Coat Bond/Synergy and 37.5% of OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable restorations. All the other restorative systems exhibited restorations with gaps. One Coat Bond/Synergy, Scotchbond 1/Z250, and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable were the groups with the lowest DM values, while Stae/Glacier showed the highest DM values. One Coat Bond/Synergy and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable revealed the lowest MI values and Stae/Glacier the highest. No statistically significant differences were recorded between

  2. Bond strength and monomer conversion of indirect composite resin restorations, Part 1: Light vs heat polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Daniel Alexandre Menezes Pedrosa; Magne, Pascal; Monteiro-Junior, Sylvio

    2014-12-01

    To assess the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and the monomer conversion (MC) of indirect composite resin restorations made of three different materials. Two light-polymerized direct materials (Filtek Z100 and Premise) and one light- and heat-polymerized indirect material (Premise Indirect) were used. For MTBS testing, 42 cylindrical samples were fabricated (7 pairs per material). Surface conditioning included airborne-particle abrasion, cleaning, and application of a silane. Cylinders were bonded to each other using adhesive resin (Optibond FL). Specimens were stored in water for 24 h. Another 15 cylinders (5 per material) were fabricated for MC measurements (FT-IR) immediately and at 24 h. The MTBS data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and the MC to two-way ANOVA (material and storage time) (α=0.05), followed by post-hoc comparisons with the Tukey test. The MTBS to Z100 was 72.2 MPa, significantly higher than that to Premise (48.4 MPa) and Premise Indirect (52.7 MPa). The immediate MC was similar for all materials (range 51% to 56%) and significantly increased at 24 h (range 57% to 66%), except for Z100. Premise Indirect showed the highest MC (66% at 24 h). Z100 showed better "bondability" than Premise and Premise Indirect. Premise Indirect, with its heat initiator, did not present a higher MC.

  3. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  4. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  5. Implications of resin-based composite (RBC) restoration on cuspal deflection and microleakage score in molar teeth: Placement protocol and restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Lauren E J; Politi, Ioanna; Al-Fodeh, Rami S; Fleming, Garry J P

    2017-09-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection of standardised large mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities in third molar teeth restored using conventional resin-based composite (RBC) or their bulk fill restorative counterparts compared with the unbound condition using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge. Following thermocycling, the cervical microleakage of the restored teeth was assessed to determine marginal integrity. Standardised MOD cavities were prepared in forty-eight sound third molar teeth and randomly allocated to six groups. Restorations were placed in conjunction with (and without) a universal bonding system and resin restorative materials were irradiated with a light-emitting-diode light-curing-unit. The dependent variable was the restoration protocol, eight oblique increments for conventional RBCs or two horizontal increments for the bulk fill resin restoratives. The cumulative buccal and palatal cuspal deflections from a twin channel deflection measuring gauge were summed, the restored teeth thermally fatigued, immersed in 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage score. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) identified third molar teeth restored using conventional RBC materials had significantly higher mean total cuspal deflection values compared with bulk fill resin restorative restoration (all prestored teeth had significantly the lowest microleakage scores compared with Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (bonded and non-bonded) teeth (all prestoratives behave in a similar manner when used to restore standardised MOD cavities in third molar teeth. It would appear that light irradiation of individual conventional RBCs or bulk fill resin restoratives may be problematic such that material selection is vital in the absence of clinical data. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Microleakage in Composite-Composite and Amalgam-Composite Interfaces in Tooth with Preventive Resin Restoration (Ex-viva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, H; Jafari, A; Khami, M R; Razeghi, S

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether conservative methods of restoration may be applied efficaciously in permanent posterior teeth with proximal lesions and intact occlusal preventive resin restoration (PRR). The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage at amalgam-composite interface and composite-composite interface in permanent tooth with PRR. Thirty-five premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were selected. The occlusal surfaces were sealed as preventive resin restoration. Then the teeth were stored in incubator for 6 months. After this period, two single boxes were prepared in mesial and distal surfaces in each tooth and filled with amalgam. Another class I composite restoration was prepared in occlusal surface in contact with the first PRR. Then samples were thermocycled and marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration on sections of the restored teeth. Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests served for statistical analyses. In 51.4% of amalgam-composite interfaces the dye reached the pulpal wall. The corresponded figures for amalgam-tooth and composite-composite interfaces were 31.4% and 14.3%, respectively. The differences in microleakage among the three interfaces were statistically significant (P<0.05). In the teeth restored with PRR technique, restoring proximal lesions with a conservative technique may lead to favorable results concerning microleakage.

  7. Evaluation of Microleakage in Composite-Composite and Amalgam-Composite Interfaces in Tooth with Preventive Resin Restoration (Ex-viva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Afshar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study addresses the question of whether conservative methods of restoration may be applied efficaciously in permanent posterior teeth with proximal lesions and intact occlusal preventive resin restoration (PRR. The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage at amalgam-composite interface and composite-composite interface in permanent tooth with PRR.Materials and Methods: Thirty-five premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons were selected. The occlusal surfaces were sealed as preventive resin restoration. Then the teeth were stored in incubator for 6 months. After this period, two single boxes were prepared in mesial and distal surfaces in each tooth and filled with amalgam. Another class I composite restoration was prepared in occlusal surface in contact with the first PRR. Then samples were thermocycled and marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration on sections of the restored teeth.Friedman and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests served for statistical analyses.Results: In 51.4% of amalgam-composite interfaces the dye reached the pulpal wall. The corresponded figures for amalgam-tooth and composite-composite interfaces were 31.4% and 14.3%, respectively. The differences in microleakage among the three interfaces were statistically significant (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the teeth restored with PRR technique, restoring proximal lesions with a conservative technique may lead to favorable results concerning microleakage.

  8. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette

    2013-01-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service.......To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service....

  9. An evaluation of replacement rates for posterior resin-based composite and amalgam restorations in U.S. Navy and marine corps recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simecek, John W; Diefenderfer, Kim E; Cohen, Mark E

    2009-02-01

    Restoration replacement is a clinical concern that has not been studied among military personnel. The authors determined the prevalence of placement of posterior amalgam and resin-based composite restorations and the incidence of replacement among U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel. The authors analyzed dental records from 2,780 personnel to determine the relative risk of replacement for initially sound restorations during subjects' first years of military service. At the initial examination, 964 (15.2 percent) of amalgam restorations and 199 (17.4 percent) of resin-based composite restorations required re-treatment. Of those judged clinically acceptable, 14.2 percent of amalgam and 16.7 percent of resin-based composite restorations required replacement during the observation period. The authors found significant increases in replacement rates for resin-based composite restorations compared with amalgam restorations for replacement due to all causes (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; P composite restorations in place at the initial examination will require replacement than will amalgam restorations. Multi-surface restorations had higher rates of replacement than did one-surface restorations, and subjects at high caries risk experienced significantly higher replacement rates than did those at low caries risk. The number of surfaces restored and subjects' caries risk status may influence the longevity of resin-based composite and amalgam restorations.

  10. Marginal microleakage of resin-modified glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations: Effect of using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Previous studies have shown that dental adhesives increase the bond strength of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI restorative materials to dentin. This in vitro study has evaluated the effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etch bonding systems v/s cavity conditioner, and in comparison to similar composite resin restorations on maintaining the marginal sealing of RMGI restorations. Materials and Methods: 98 rectangular cavities (2.5×3×1.5 mm were prepared on buccal and palatal aspects of 49 human maxillary premolars, randomly divided into 7 groups (N=14. The cavities in groups 1, 2 and 3 were restored using a composite resin (APX. The cavities in groups 4, 5, 6 and 7 were restored using a resin-modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC. Before restoring, adhesive systems (Optibond FL = OFL, three-step etch-and-rinse; One Step Plus = OSP, two-step etch-and-rinse; Clearfil Protect Bond = CPB, two-step self-etch were used as bonding agents in groups 1-6 as follow: OFL in groups 1 and 4, OSP in groups 2 and 5, and CPB in groups 3 and 6, respectively. The specimens in group 7 were restored with GC cavity conditioner and Fuji II LC. All the specimens were thermo-cycled for 1000 cycles. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration method. Statistical analyzes were carried out with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α=0.05. Results: There were significant differences in microleakage scores at both enamel and dentinal margins between the study groups (P<0.05. The lowest microleakage scores at enamel and dentin margins of RMGI restorations were observed in group 6. Conclusion: Use of two-step self-etch adhesive, prior to restoring cervical cavities with RMGIC, seems to be more efficacious than the conventional cavity conditioner in decreasing marginal microleakage.

  11. Composite resin restorations of non-carious cervical lesions in patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Carlos A; Nassar, Patrícia O; Secundes, Mayron B; Busato, Priscilla do Monte Ribeiro; Camilotti, Veridiana

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a set of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from absolute or relative deficiency in insulin secretion by the pancreas and/or impaired insulin action in target tissues. Oral health maintenance through health care, as well as metabolic control are important measures for the overall health of diabetic patients. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between biocompatibility of composite resin restorations with different nanoparticles, polishing in abfraction lesions in anterior and posterior teeth with periodontal tissues in patients with diabetes mellitus. We selected 20 patients--10 patients with diabetes mellitus and 10 patients without diabetes mellitus-, but with a total of 30 restorations in each group receiving composite resin restorations, who were evaluated for periodontal purposes: Plaque Index, Gingival Index; Probing Depth, Clinical Attachment Level and Bleeding on Probing. In addition, the restorations will receive assessments according to criteria for Marginal Adaptation, Anatomical Shape, Marginal Discoloration, ormation of caries, Post-operative Sensitivity and Retention. The total period was 90 days. The results showed a significant improvement in periodontal parameters assessed (p 0.05) among all criteria evaluated within the 90-day period. Thus, we conclude that in a short period (90 days) there is clinical biocompatibility of composite resin with nanoparticles restorations in abfraction lesions and periodontal tissues of patients with diabetes mellitus, regardless the type of polish these restorations receive.

  12. EVALUATION OF INTERNAL ADAPTATION OF CLASS V RESIN COMPOSITE RESTORATIONS USING THREE TECHNIQUES OF POLYMERIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, José Carlos; D'ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; de Souza, João Batista

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of Class V composite restorations to the cavity walls using three different techniques of polymerization. Methods: Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars with margins located above and below the cementoenamel junction. Restorations were placed in one increment using two restorative systems: 3M Filtek A110/ Single Bond (M) and 3M Filtek Z250/ Single Bond (H) in the same tooth, randomly in the buccal and lingual surfaces. Resin composites were polymerized using three techniques: Group 1 – Conventional (60 s - 600 mW/cm2); Group 2 – Soft-start (20 s – 200 mW/cm2, 40 s - 600 mW/cm2); Group 3 – Pulse Activation (3 s - 200 mW/cm2, 3-min hiatus, 57 s - 600 mW/cm2). Buccolingual sections were polished, impressions taken and replicated. Specimens were assessed under scanning electron microscopy up to X1000 magnification. Scores were given for presence or absence of gaps (0 – no gap; 1 – gap in one wall; 2 – gap in two walls; 3 – gap in three walls). Results: The mean scores of the groups were (±SD) were: G1M–3.0 (± 0.0); G2M–2.43 (± 0.8); G3M– 1.71 (± 0.9); G1H– 2.14 (± 1.2); G2H- 2.00 (± 0.8); G3H- 1.67 (± 1.1). Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunnet’s tests. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was found among groups. Gaps were observed in all groups. Conclusions: The photocuring technique and the type of resin composite had no influence on the internal adaptation of the material to the cavity walls. A positive effect was observed when the slow polymerization techniques were used. PMID:19089100

  13. Evaluation of internal adaptation of Class V resin composite restorations using three techniques of polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pereira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of Class V composite restorations to the cavity walls using three different techniques of polymerization. METHODS: Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 24 extracted human third molars with margins located above and below the cementoenamel junction. Restorations were placed in one increment using two restorative systems: 3M Filtek A110/ Single Bond (M and 3M Filtek Z250/ Single Bond (H in the same tooth, randomly in the buccal and lingual surfaces. Resin composites were polymerized using three techniques: Group 1 - Conventional (60 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 2 - Soft-start (20 s - 200 mW/cm² , 40 s - 600 mW/cm²; Group 3 - Pulse Activation (3 s - 200 mW/cm², 3-min hiatus, 57 s - 600 mW/cm². Buccolingual sections were polished, impressions taken and replicated. Specimens were assessed under scanning electron microscopy up to X1000 magnification. Scores were given for presence or absence of gaps (0 - no gap; 1 - gap in one wall; 2 - gap in two walls; 3 - gap in three walls. RESULTS: The mean scores of the groups were (±SD were: G1M-3.0 (± 0.0; G2M-2.43 (± 0.8; G3M- 1.71 (± 0.9; G1H- 2.14 (± 1.2; G2H- 2.00 (± 0.8; G3H- 1.67 (± 1.1. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunnet's tests. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05 was found among groups. Gaps were observed in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: The photocuring technique and the type of resin composite had no influence on the internal adaptation of the material to the cavity walls. A positive effect was observed when the slow polymerization techniques were used.

  14. Micro-CT Comparison of Posterior Composite Resin Restorative Techniques: Sonicated versus Incremental Fill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    polymerization shrinkage3-8, marginal leakage9, issues with accelerated wear10, unpolymerized resin11, fracture 12 and difficulty in establishing...flexural strength, and incomplete adhesion between the resin and tooth surface. This aspect of RBC restorations has not been well documented... tooth surface. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the difference between a conventional, hand-placed incremental application of RBC into

  15. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  16. Effect of five staining solutions on the colour stability of two acrylics and three composite resins based provisional restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Sebnem Begüm; Koçak, Ayşe; Aktepe, Esra

    2006-09-01

    The effect of coffee, tea, coca-cola, orange-juice and red wine on the colour stability of acrylic and composite based provisional materials were evaluated. Two acrylic resins and three composite resins were studied. 48 standardized specimens for each provisional material were prepared. Each group was divided into 6 subgroups. Specimens from each group were immersed in staining solutions at room temperature for 30 days. Red wine and tea caused the most significant colour changes and orange juice showed the least significant colour changes. deltaE of all of the provisional restorations materials was changed after the immersion in all of the staining solutions during the experimental process.

  17. Surface Hardness of Dental Composite Resin Restorations in Response to Preventive Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2016-12-01

    To assess the impact of using preventive mouthwash agents on the surface hardness of various resins composites. Hundred specimens were prepared from five types of composite resin material in a Teflon mold. Five specimens from each type of restorative materials (Herculite XRV Ultra, Estelite Σ Quick, Z Hermack, Versa Comp Sultan, and Empress Direct IPS) were evaluated posttreatment with immersion in four types of preventive mouthwashes gels and rinses - group 1: Flocare gel (0.4% stannous fluoride), group 2: Pascal gel (topical APF fluoride), group 3: Pro-relief mouthwash (Na fluoride), and group 4: Plax Soin mouthwash (Na fluoride) - at 37°C in a dark glass container at 24, 48, and 72 hours. Surface hardness measurement was made for each tested material. Statistically, we analyzed the mean values with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test, with significance level of p surface hardness with the time elapsed (24, 48, and 72 hours) postimmersion in the preventive mouthwashes and gels except the Herculite XRV Ultra and Versa Comp Sultan materials. Flocare gel group showed increase in the surface hardness after 48 hours of immersion than the other periods and in Estelite Σ Quick after 72 hours. There was significant differences in all materials tested with the immersion in the preventive mouthwashes and gels, such as Flocare gel (0.4% stannous fluoride), Pro-relief mouthwash (Na fluoride), and Plax Soin mouthwash (Na fluoride) except Pascal gel (topical APF fluoride) (p > 0.05), at time intervals mentioned earlier (p surface hardness with the time elapse of immersion for all materials except the Flocare gel group, which contains 0.4% stannous fluoride as a preventive ingredient increases the surface hardness after 48 h for Herculite XRV Ultra and Versa Comp Sultan and Estelite Σ Quick after 72 hours. The preventive agents in the form of mouthwash and gel are used to prevent oral diseases that affect the surface hardness of composite resin, and this

  18. Fracture resistance of composite resin restorations and porcelain veneers in relation to residual tooth structure in fractured incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalocco, Guido; Lee, Heeje; Ercoli, Carlo; Feng, Changyong; Malmstrom, Hans

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there is a direct correlation between the amount of residual tooth structure in a fractured maxillary incisor and the fracture resistance of composite resin restorations or porcelain veneers after cyclic loading. Sixty human-extracted maxillary central and lateral incisors were mounted in an acrylic block with the coronal aspect of the tooth protruding from the block surface. The teeth were assigned to two groups: 2-mm incisal fracture and 4-mm incisal fracture. Then, the teeth were further divided into two different restoration subgroups, porcelain laminate veneer and composite resin restoration, therefore obtaining four groups for the study (n=15). The specimens were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermocycling and were mechanically tested with a custom-designed cyclic loading apparatus for 2×106 cycles or until they failed. The specimens that survived the cyclic loading were loaded on the incisal edge along the long axis of the tooth with a flat stainless steel applicator until they fractured using a universal testing machine to measure the failure load. Two-way anova was used to assess the significance of restoration, amount of fracture, and interaction effect (α=0.05). During the cyclic loading, for the composite resin group, two specimens with 2-mm fracture and three specimens with 4-mm fracture failed. For the porcelain veneer group, two specimens with 2-mm fracture and one specimen with 4-mm fracture failed. The 2-way anova did not show statistical significance for restoration (P=0.584), amount of fracture (P=0.357), or interaction effect (P=0.212). A composite resin restoration and a porcelain veneer could perform similarly for replacing a fractured incisor edge up to 4mm. Other factors such as esthetic and/or cost would be considerations to indicate one treatment over the other. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Physical Properties of a New Sonically Placed Composite Resin Restorative Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    microleakage with resulting pulpal sensitivity, staining , and recurrent caries.10 Additionally, incomplete curing of composite resins is associated...minimal stress.10 However, increased demand has led to greater use on posterior teeth , where considerable mechanical challenges occur under function...was placed on a plastic-strip-covered glass slide on a standard white background. The composite resin was injected into the mold and a plastic strip

  20. Replacement of Anterior Composite Resin Restorations Using Conservative Ceramics for Occlusal and Periodontal Rehabilitation: An 18-Month Clinical Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fernandes da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a patient with discolored and fractured composite resin restorations on the anterior teeth in whom substitution was indicated. After wax-up and mock-up, the composite was removed and replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates. An established and predictable protocol was performed using resin cement. Minimally invasive ceramic restorations are increasingly being used to replace composite restorations. This treatment improves the occlusal and periodontal aspects during the planning and restorative phases, such as anterior guides, and laterality can be restored easily with ceramic laminates. In addition, the surface smoothness and contour of ceramic restorations do not affect the health of the surrounding periodontal tissues. Here we present the outcome after 18 months of clinical follow-up in a patient in whom composite resin restorations in the anterior teeth were replaced with minimally invasive ceramic laminates.

  1. Factors relating to usage patterns of amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations--a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Mai E; Alomari, Qasem D; Omar, Ridwaan

    2014-07-01

    This study prospectively analyzed the use of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations placed by general dentists in relation to dentist, patient and cavity factors. One thousand posterior restorations placed by a representative sample of general dentists working in the Ministry of Health (MOH), Kuwait, during routine clinical practice were included. Information about the restorations was recorded using a survey questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to determine the factors associated with the use of amalgam versus tooth coloured restoratives. Dentists chose amalgam for 30.8% of the 1000 restorations. Dentists with longer work experience (>15 years) were more likely to choose amalgam (OR=2.61, 95% CI=1.06, 6.40). Younger dentists (≤30 years) were less likely to choose amalgam (OR=0. 45, 95% CI=0.26, 0.77). Amalgam was more likely to be chosen for patients with poor oral hygiene (OR=1.58, 95% CI=1.08, 2.32) and a higher number (≥4) of restorations (OR=1.44, 95% CI=1.07, 1.94) with large cavity sizes (OR=6.33, 95% CI=3.88, 10.32). Tooth-coloured restorations were more likely to be chosen for cavities of smaller sizes. The use of resin composite materials as the dominant choice among dentists in Kuwait reflects the trend worldwide. Nevertheless, clinicians still find a use for amalgam in posterior load-bearing teeth and in the high-caries risk population. The findings give insight into factors influencing material usage under different clinical conditions and provides information about the perceived deficiencies or shortcomings of resin composite materials in a general dental practice setting. This information can be useful for identifying perceived barriers to the usage of newer restorative materials and finding ways to overcome them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microleakage of Resin Composite Restoration with Total-Etch and Self-Etch Systems at Various Curing Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viona Diansari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage still occurs between cavity wall and resin composite restoration, although bonding agent such as Total-etch (TE and Selfetch (SE systems had been used. One of the causes of microleakage was associated to improper polymerization affected by curing distances. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of resin composite restoration using TE and SE adhesive systems that were polymerized at various curing distances. A total of 120 human molars were prepared for class V cavity and were divided into 4 groups with bonded resin composite restoration: Group A (TE: Filtek Z350 + Adper Single Bond 2; Group B (TE: Tetric N Ceram + Tetric N Bond; Group C (SE: Clearfil APX + SE Bond; and Group D (SE: Ceram X + Xeno III. Each group were divided into 3 parts (10 teeth each which were restored at 0; 2 and 4 mm of curing distance respectively. After stored in aquadest at 37oC (24 hours, all specimens were immersed in 1% methylene blue solution (24 hours. Dye penetration at coronal site were observed under a stereomicroscope (Nikon SM 2800. The results showed that microleakage between 3 various curing distances of each group were not significantly different (Kruskall-Wallis test, p>0,05. Mann-Whitney U test (p<0,05 showed that microleakage between Group A-C; Group A-D and Group B-D were significantly different at 2 mm curing distance. Conclusion: microleakage of resin composite restoration with TE adhesive system were lower than SE at all curing distances.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.68

  3. Effect of bulk-fill base material on fracture strength of root-filled teeth restored with laminate resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, N A; Maghaireh, G A; Ghannam, A S; Palamara, J E

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of using a bulk-fill flowable base material on fracture strength and fracture patterns of root-filled maxillary premolars with MOD preparations restored with laminate restorations. Fifty extracted maxillary premolars were selected for the study. Standardized MOD cavities with endodontic treatment were prepared for all teeth, except for intact control. The teeth were divided randomly into five groups (n=10); (Group 1) sound teeth, (Group 2) unrestored teeth; (Group 3) MOD cavities with Vitrebond base and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal); (Group 4) MOD cavities with 2mm GIC base (Fuji IX GP) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal) open laminate, (Group 5) MOD cavities were restored with 4mm of bulk-fill flowable base material (SDR) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal). All teeth were thermocycled and subjected to a 45° ramped oblique load in a universal testing machine. Fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's T3 test. Restoration in general increased the fracture strength compared to unrestored teeth. The fracture strength of group 5 (bulk-fill) was significantly higher than the fracture strength of the GIC laminate groups and not significantly different from the intact teeth (355±112N, P=0.118). The type of failure was unfavorable for most of the groups, with the majority being mixed failures. The use of a bulk-fill flowable base material significantly increased the fracture strength of extracted root-filled teeth with MOD cavities; however it did not improve fracture patterns to more favorable ones. Investigating restorative techniques that may improve the longevity of root-filled premolar teeth restored with direct resin restorations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of composite resin restorations using an ultraviolet light-emitting diode flashlight during forensic dental identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzy, Gerald; Clayton, Mary Ann

    2013-06-01

    With the increased use of composite resin and the decreased use of amalgam as a dental restorative material, the forensic dental identification of unidentified human remains has become more difficult. Various methods have been used to detect the presence of composite resin restorations including dyes, forensic alternative light sources, quantitative light-induced fluorescence, and ultraviolet lights. Although these methods may be helpful, the expense of the equipment, the electrical requirements, and the need for water to wash the dye from the mouth may make these methods impractical especially in a temporary morgue situation during a mass disaster. The fluorescent properties of composite resins, when exposed to ultraviolet light, are well documented. Standard tube ultraviolet lights have been used to detect the presence of composite resin, but these lights are large and bulky, and the tubes are fragile. The development of ultraviolet light emitting diode flashlights has provided forensic odontologists with a tool that is small, inexpensive, and battery operated. The two forensic dental identification cases described here demonstrate the value of ultraviolet light emitting diode flashlights as an adjunct to a careful clinical and radiographic examination.

  5. CAD/CAM-based chairside restorative technique with composite resin for full-mouth adhesive rehabilitation of excessively worn dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Curto, Filippo; Saratti, Carlo Massimo; Krejci, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Since the first introduction of the Cerec system (Sirona) in the early 1980s, the use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology has spread widely in modern adhesive dentistry. Thanks to this innovative technology, it has been possible to carry out chairside restorations fully managed by the clinician, with the advantages of lower costs for the patient, more rapid execution of the restorations, and the exclusion of the provisional phase. With further improvements in chairside technologies and materials, specifically in the field of composite resin blocks, it is now possible to fabricate multiple ultrathin, minimally invasive or even noninvasive restorations in one single appointment. The clinical case presented here was solved using an innovative approach: It was entirely studied and realized chairside by a dentist on a computer, without any plaster cast or classic articulator. Vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) augmentation was projected with the 'Incisal Tip' tool on the virtual articulator of the Cerec system. Eight composite resin overlays were designed on the non-prepared posterior teeth of a patient suffering from generalized tooth loss principally caused by a history of bulimia nervosa. The maxillary anterior teeth were restored with six palatal veneers modified with direct composites from the vestibular side, in order to improve the esthetic integration of the restorations. The mandibular posterior teeth were built up with direct composites.

  6. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  7. Influence of volumetric shrinkage and curing light intensity on proximal contact tightness of class II resin composite restorations: in vitro study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Shamy, H.; Saber, M.H.; Dorfer, C.E.; El-Badrawy, W.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Proximal contact tightness of class II resin composite restorations is influenced by a myriad of factors. Previous studies investigated the role of matrix band type and thickness, consistency of resin composite, and technique of placement. However, the effect of volumetric shrinkage of

  8. Atraumatic Restoration of Vertical Food Impaction with an Open Contact Using Flowable Composite Resin Aided by Cerclage Wire under Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, treating vertical food impaction with open contact effectively, especially with an atraumatic therapy, remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a simple, atraumatic, and economic therapeutic measure to treat vertical food impaction. The scientific rationale of our therapeutic technique is to restore an intact and firm proximal contact with proper location and form relationships to prevent forceful interproximal wedging of food, which in turn protects interdental papilla. We performed the procedure using flowable composite resin or composite resin cement with the aid of a cerclage wire under tension to rebuild the contact area. The reported method is especially useful for some challenging clinical cases, such as food impaction after crown and inlay on onlay restoration, and some conventional treatment methods, such as contouring the marginal ridge and developmental grooves, are ineffective.

  9. The effect of fiber dowel heights in resin composite cores on restoration failures of endodontically treated teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekayarajjananonth, Trakol; Chitcharus, Nattinee; Winkler, Sheldon; Bogert, Meredith C

    2009-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo testing suggest that fiber posts may reduce the incidence of root fractures of endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of fiber post height in resin composite cores on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Forty maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 2 control groups (Groups 1 and 2) of 5 teeth each, and 3 experimental groups (Groups 3, 4, and 5) of 10 teeth each. The teeth in Group 1 had their opening restored with composite resin, the teeth in Group 2 were restored with quartz fiber posts without resin composite cores, and the teeth in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were restored with quartz fiber posts of 2, 4, and 6 mm high, respectively, in 6-mm resin composite cores. Ceramic crowns were fabricated for the specimens. Specimens were positioned in a mounting device and aligned at a 130-degree angle to the long axis of each tooth. A universal testing machine was used to apply constant load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. The highest fracture load and mode of failure of each specimen was recorded. The highest fracture resistance force was observed in Group 2 (290.38 +/- 48.45 N) and decreased, respectively, in Group 1 (238.98 +/-26.26 N), Group 5 (228.35 +/-58.79 N), Group 4 (221.43 +/-38.74 N), and Group 3 (199.05 +/-58.00 N). According to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's test (P teeth should be restored with the longest possible post height while preserving maximum tooth structure.

  10. [The finite element analysis of stress distribution in different size of MO cavities restored with composite resin inlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Lu, Yi; Yang, Bo-song; Guo, Yan; Li, Fang-ping

    2015-04-01

    To explore the effect of different depth and width of meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity type on the tooth tissue resistance stress after restoration with composite resin inlays. The 3-D finite element model of mandibular first molar with meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity restored with composite resin inlay was established by using CBCT scanning and reverse engineering software Mimics, Geomagic Studio, and finite element analysis software ANSYS. Comparative analysis of restoration with different depth and width meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity under the same load of perpendicular and 45° deviation was explored, and finally the main stress and Von-mises stress changed as well as stress distribution were analyzed. The main stress was located in the gingival wall opposite to the inlay, while the major stress concentration area of the tooth was distributed near the canal at the bottom of the cavity. With the increase of the depth and width, the main stress and Von-mises stress distribution areas of tooth were getting larger. The Von-mises stress of tooth was influenced by the width variation of the cavity, while that depth change of cavity was affected by Von Mises stress of the inlay. With the increase of the depth and width of the cavity as well as lateral loading force, the peak stress of tooth with inlays increased and the distribution of stress concentration is modified after meiso-occlusal (Class II) cavity being inlayed with composite resin.

  11. Biomechanical Stress Analysis of Mandibular First Permanent Molar; Restored with Amalgam and Composite Resin: A Computerized Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Iqbal; Prabhakar, A R

    2010-01-01

    Normal mastication with its varying magnitude and direction generates considerable reactionary stresses in teeth and their supporting tissues. The structure of the human tooth and its supporting tissues is a complex assemblage of materials of varied mechanical properties. The finite element method (FEM), a modern technique of numerical stress analysis, has the great advantage of being applicable to solids of irregular geometry and heterogeneous material properties and therefore ideally suited to the examination of structural behavior of teeth. The mandibular first permanent molar is one of the earliest permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity and hence most prone to caries. The purpose of the present study was to construct a two-dimensional FE model of the mandibular first permanent molar and its supporting structures, using a FE software called NISA II-Display III, EMRC, USA to study the following: • To compare stress distributions patterns when a modeled Class I Cavity was restored with dental amalgam and composite resin. • To compare the stress distributions pattern when the load was applied to different to locations, i.e.: At the mesial cusp tip, and at the center of the occlusal surface. Both amalgam and composite resin showed similar stress distribution pattern, however, the magnitudes of stresses generated in the tooth restored with composite resin were higher. Thus, amalgam is a better restorative material in distributing stresses.

  12. Effects of Topical Fluoride on the Marginal Microleakage of Composite Resin and Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Restorations in Primary Molars: An In-vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topical fluoride may deteriorate dental restorations. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of topical fluoride on the marginal microleakage of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI restorations in primary molars. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 60 primary molars were randomly divided into six groups of 10 based on the type of the restoration materials and before/after the application of fluoride gel, including FC (fluoride + composite, CF (composite + fluoride, C (composite, FG (fluoride + RMGI, GF (RMGI + fluoride, and G (RMGI. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface, so that the gingival margins were located in cementum. After storing, thermocycling, and immersing the specimens in basic fuchsin, they were sectioned buccolingually and evaluated in terms of dye penetration. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 18 using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test at the significance level of 0.05. Results: No significant difference was observed between the three composite groups in terms of microleakage (P>0.05. In the RMGI groups, GF showed a significantly higher microleakage compared to G (P=0.029. However, no significant difference was observed between the other groups in this regard (P>0.05. Moreover, comparison of composite and RMGI groups (matched in terms of fluoride application indicated that microleakage was significantly higher in FG than FC (P=0.024, as well as in GF than CF (P=0.002. However, no significant difference was observed between groups C and G in this regard (P=0.268. Conclusion: According to the results, the marginal seal of composite restorations in the primary molars were not affected by the acidic fluoride gel. On the other hand, applying the acidic fluoride gel was associated with a higher microleakage in the cavities restored with RMGI.

  13. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent tee...

  14. Two years survival rate of class II composite resin restorations prepared by ART with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel in primary molars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topaloglu-Ak, A.; Eden, E.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Oncag, O.

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to test the null hypotheses that there is no difference: (1) in carious lesion development at the restoration margin between class II composite resin restorations in primary molars produced through the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) with and without a chemomechanical caries

  15. Fatigue resistance and crack propensity of large MOD composite resin restorations: direct versus CAD/CAM inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha-Silva, Silvana; de Andrada, Mauro Amaral Caldeira; Maia, Hamilton Pires; Magne, Pascal

    2013-03-01

    To assess the influence of material/technique selection (direct vs. CAD/CAM inlays) for large MOD composite adhesive restorations and its effect on the crack propensity and in vitro accelerated fatigue resistance. A standardized MOD slot-type tooth preparation was applied to 32 extracted maxillary molars (5mm depth and 5mm bucco-palatal width) including immediately sealed dentin for the inlay group. Fifteen teeth were restored with direct composite resin restoration (Miris2) and 17 teeth received milled inlays using Paradigm MZ100 block in the CEREC machine. All inlays were adhesively luted with a light curing composite resin (Filtek Z100). Enamel shrinkage-induced cracks were tracked with photography and transillumination. Cyclic isometric chewing (5 Hz) was simulated, starting with a load of 200 N (5000 cycles), followed by stages of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N at a maximum of 30,000 cycles each. Samples were loaded until fracture or to a maximum of 185,000 cycles. Teeth restored with the direct technique fractured at an average load of 1213 N and two of them withstood all loading cycles (survival=13%); with inlays, the survival rate was 100%. Most failures with Miris2 occurred above the CEJ and were re-restorable (67%), but generated more shrinkage-induced cracks (47% of the specimen vs. 7% for inlays). CAD/CAM MZ100 inlays increased the accelerated fatigue resistance and decreased the crack propensity of large MOD restorations when compared to direct restorations. While both restorative techniques yielded excellent fatigue results at physiological masticatory loads, CAD/CAM inlays seem more indicated for high-load patients. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Class I and Class II restorations of resin composite: an FE analysis of the influence of modulus of elasticity on stresses generated by occlusal loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It was the aim of the study to analyze by the FE method stresses generated in tooth and restoration by occlusal loading of Class I and Class II restorations of resin composite. On the basis of available information on the influence of the modulus of elasticity, the research hypothesis...... was that the marginal stresses would decrease with increasing modulus of elasticity of the restoration. METHODS: A cylindrical tooth was modelled in enamel and dentin and fitted with a Class I or a Class II restoration of resin composite. In one scenario the restoration was bonded to the tooth, in another...... the restoration was left nonbonded. The resin composite was modelled with a modulus of elasticity of 5, 10, 15 or 20 GPa and loaded occlusally with 100 N. By means of the soft-ware program ABAQUS the von Mises stresses in enamel and dentin were calculated. RESULTS: In the bonded scenario, the maximum stresses...

  17. The physical characteristics of resin composite-calcium silicate interface as part of a layered/laminate adhesive restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Danya F; Foxton, Richard; Manoharan, Andiappan; Watson, Timothy F; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-03-01

    To compare in-vitro micro-shear bond strengths (μSBS) of resin composite to calcium silicate cement (Biodentine™) vs. glass ionomer cement vs. resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC) using an adhesive in self-etch (SE)/total etch (TE) mode after aging three substrates and bond and characterizing their failure modes. Resin composite was SE/TE bonded to 920 standardized disks of Biodentine™, GIC & RM-GIC. Dividing samples into two groups, the first underwent early (t=0min, 5min, 20min, 24h) or delayed (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months) substrate aging before bonding and μSBS (t=24h) testing. In the second, adhesive was applied after either early (t=5min) or delayed (t=2wk) substrate aging and then tested after bond aging (t=2wk, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). The failure modes were identified using stereomicroscope. SEM images of selected samples were analyzed. No significant differences were observed between (SE)/(TE) bonding modes (P=0.42). With substrate aging, a significant reduction in μSBS occurred between early and delayed time intervals for Biodentine™ (P=0.001), but none for the GIC/RM-GIC (P=0.465, P=0.512 respectively). With bond aging, there was no significant difference between time intervals for all groups, except at 6 months for the GIC (PBiodentine™ is a weak restorative material in its early setting phase. Placing the overlying resin composite as part of the laminate/layered definitive restoration is best delayed for >2wk to allow sufficient intrinsic maturation to withstand contraction forces from the resin composite. A total-etch or self-etch adhesive may be used. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. INFLUENCE OF IRRADIATION EXPOSURE TIME ON THE DEPTH CURE OF RESTORATIVE RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fabiano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the degree of conversion by the hardness measurements of a commercial resin composite. The specimens were prepared according to ISO 4049 and photo-activated for 20s – 40s – 60s with a light-emitting diodes (LEDs. To establish the optimal increment technique mono-layers 1 mm and 2 mm thick were tested. The ratio bottom-to-top was assessed for the mono-layers groups. Vickers hardness profiles were measured for mono-layer, bi-layer and tri-layer along the cross-section. The microhardness map showed difference in the mechanical characteristic of overlying resin confirmed by SEM images analysis of the fracture mechanics. Curing effectiveness of resin composite is not only dependent on the curing light unit but also from thickness of the resin composite and the duration of the exposure. The data suggest that an exposure time of 40 s or higher is required to provide composites with a homogeneous and high hardness, moreover, a 1 mm buildup multi-layering technique results in adequate curing of the bottom layer and better mechanical properties.

  19. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service: a prospective 8 years follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Höigaard, Ruth

    2013-04-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service. All posterior RC placed, in the PDHS clinics in the cities of Copenhagen and Frederiksberg in Denmark between November 1998 and December 2002, in permanent teeth of children and adolescents up to 18 years, were evaluated in an up to 8 years follow up. The endpoint of each restoration was defined, when repair or replacement was performed. Survival analyses were performed between subgroups with Kaplan-Meier analysis. The individual contribution of different cofactors to predict the outcome was performed with Cox regression analysis. Totally 2881 children with a mean age of 13.7 years (5-18) received 4355 RC restorations placed by 115 dentists. Eighty percent were placed in molars and 49% were Class I. Two percent of restorations with base material and 1% of the restorations without base material showed postoperative sensitivity (n.s.). Replacements were made in 406 and repairs in 125 restorations. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a cumulative survival at 8 years of 84.3%, resulting in an annual failure rate of 2%. Lower patient age, more than one restoration per patient, placement of a base material and placement of RC: in molars, in cavities with high number of surfaces, in lower jaw teeth, showed all significant higher failure rates. Five variables had significant importance for the end point, replacement/repair of the resin composite restorations: age of patient, age of operator, jaw, tooth type and cavity size. Posterior RC restorations placed in children and adolescents in Public Dental Health clinics showed an acceptable durability with annual failure rates comparable with those of randomized controlled RC studies in adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival rates against fracture of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with full-coverage crowns or resin composite restorations: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warattama Suksaphar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review aims to summarize the current clinical studies that investigated survival rates against fracture of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with crowns or resin composite restorations. Literature search were performed using keywords. Publications from 1980 to 2016 were searched in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS. Included studies were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three clinical studies were included: 1 randomized controlled trial and 1 prospective and 1 retrospective cohort studies. Pooled survival rates ranged from 94%–100% and 91.9%–100% for crowns and resin composite, respectively. The majority of teeth had no more than 3 surface loss of tooth structure. The studies included were heterogeneous, and were not appropriate for further meta-analysis. Current evidence suggested that the survival rates against the fracture of endodontically treated posterior teeth restored with crowns or resin composites were not significantly different in the teeth with minimum to moderate loss of tooth structure.

  1. Fiber-reinforced Composite Resin Prosthesis to Restore Missing Posterior Teeth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Vallittu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-reinforced composite inlay-onlay FPD was used for a single posterior tooth replacement in a patient refusing implant for psychological reasons. The FRC-FPD was made of pre-impregnated E-glass fibers (everStick, StickTeck, Turku, Finland embedded in a resin matrix (Stick Resin, StickTeck, Turku, Finland. The unidirectional glass fibers were used to make a framework structure with high volume design placed in the pontic (edentulous region. To reproduce the morphology of natural teeth, the framework structure was then veneered with Gradia (GC, Tokyo, Japan.

  2. Influence of Cavity Margin Design and Restorative Material on Marginal Quality and Seal of Extended Class II Resin Composite Restorations In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sebastian; Preidl, Reinhard; Karl, Sabine; Hofmann, Norbert; Krastl, Gabriel; Klaiber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of three cavity designs on the marginal seal of large Class II cavities restored with low-shrinkage resin composite limited to the enamel. One hundred twenty (120) intact human molars were randomly divided into 12 groups, with three different cavity designs: 1. undermined enamel, 2. box-shaped, and 3. proximal bevel. The teeth were restored with 1. an extra-low shrinkage (ELS) composite free of diluent monomers, 2. microhybrid composite (Herculite XRV), 3. nanohybrid composite (Filtek Supreme XTE), and 4. silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane). After artificial aging by thermocycling and storage in physiological saline, epoxy resin replicas were prepared. To determine the integrity of the restorations' approximal margins, two methods were sequentially employed: 1. replicas were made of the 120 specimens and examined using SEM, and 2. the same 120 specimens were immersed in AgNO3 solution, and the dye penetration depth was observed with a light microscope. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn-Bonferroni tests. After bevel preparation, SEM observations showed that restorations did not exhibit a higher percentage of continuous margin (SEM-analysis; p>0.05), but more leakage was found than with the other cavity designs (p<0.05). The lowest percentage of continuous margin was observed in ELS restorations (p<0.05). More fractured margins were observed in the undermined enamel cavity design groups (p<0.05). Bevel preparation failed to improve margin quality in large Class II composite restorations and is no longer recommended. However, undermined enamel should be removed to prevent enamel fractures.

  3. Class I and Class II silver amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations: teaching approaches in Canadian faculties of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Dorothy

    2005-06-01

    A 10-question survey was mailed to the 10 Canadian faculties of dentistry to determine current approaches to teaching undergraduates about silver amalgam and resin composite for posterior restorations in adults and children. Responses were received from all 10 pedodontic programs and from 8 of the 10 operative and restorative programs. The use of silver amalgam and posterior composite for restorations of primary and permanent teeth is covered in the curricula of all dental schools, but the relative emphasis on the 2 materials varies. In the operative and restorative programs, curriculum time devoted to silver amalgam is either greater than or equal to that devoted to posterior composite. Five of the 8 schools reported greater educational emphasis on silver amalgam for the permanent dentition; however, course directors noted that the preference among patients seen in clinics is tending toward composite restorations. Curricula appear designed to educate students about the optimal use of both materials. Requirements for performance of restorations during training generally do not specify the type of material; these requirements range from 60 restorations to 250 surfaces. Five of the 8 schools conduct clinical competency tests with both materials. The responses from the pedodontic programs were more diverse. The proportion of curriculum time devoted to each type of material in these programs ranged from less than 25% to more than 75%. Five schools reported more emphasis on silver amalgam, 3 schools reported equal emphasis, and 2 schools reported more emphasis on posterior composite. No clinical requirements were specified in any of the undergraduate pedodontic programs. Within some of the faculties, there were differences between the operative and restorative program and the pedodontic program with respect to emphasis on different materials for the posterior dentition.

  4. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with 2 Different Fiber-reinforced Composite and 2 Conventional Composite Resin Core Buildup Materials: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Ashly Mary; Amirtharaj, L Vijay; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Mahalaxmi, Sekar

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with 2 fiber-reinforced composite resins and 2 conventional composite resin core buildup materials. Sixty noncarious unrestored human maxillary premolars were collected, endodontically treated (except group 1, negative control), and randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 10). Group 2 was the positive control. The remaining 40 prepared teeth were restored with various direct core buildup materials as follows: group 3 teeth were restored with dual-cure composite resin, group 4 with posterior composite resin, group 5 with fiber-reinforced composite resin, and group 6 with short fiber-reinforced composite resin. Fracture strength testing was performed using a universal testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test. Fracture patterns for each sample were also examined under a light microscope to determine the level of fractures. The mean fracture resistance values (in newtons) were obtained as group 1 > group 6 > group 4 > group 3 > group 5 > group 2. Group 6 showed the highest mean fracture resistance value, which was significantly higher than the other experimental groups, and all the fractures occurred at the level of enamel. Within the limitations of this study, a short fiber-reinforced composite can be used as a direct core buildup material that can effectively resist heavy occlusal forces against fracture and may reinforce the remaining tooth structure in endodontically treated teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-ae Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1 not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2 decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3 overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries.

  6. Three-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a two-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    ) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness.......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin...... composite (Aelite LS) was used for all restorations which were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline, 1 and 2 years. Results: 116 Class II restorations were evaluated at two years. Five restorations, 2 AU and 3OX, failed during the follow up, resulting in 96.5% (AU) and 94.8% (OX...

  7. Clinical comparison of bur- and laser-prepared minimally invasive occlusal resin composite restorations: two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Baseren, Meserret; Gorucu, Jale

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the two-year clinical performance of two minimally invasive cavity preparation techniques, bur and laser, in Class I occlusal resin composite restorations. Twenty-seven patients, each having at least one pair of occlusal caries, were enrolled in this study. For each patient, one of the cavities was prepared with a diamond bur, and the other was prepared with Er, Cr:YSGG laser. The cavities were restored with a nanofilled flowable resin composite, Grandio Flow, using an etch-and-rinse adhesive, Solobond M. A total of 108 restorations were placed in molars by a single operator. The restorations were evaluated according to modified Cvar/Ryge criteria. The evaluations were performed at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after initial placement by two calibrated operators. The Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis. All the patients were available during all evaluated periods, resulting in a recall rate of 100%. The retention rates of the restorations at 24 months were 98.1% for bur and 100% for the laser-prepared group. After 24 months, 5.6% of the bur-prepared and 7.4% of the laser-prepared restorations were rated Bravo in marginal discoloration (p > 0.05). Bur-prepared (9.3%) and laser-prepared (13%) restorations were rated Bravo in marginal adaptation (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two cavity preparation techniques regarding the evaluated parameters (p > 0.05). Both cavity preparation techniques performed equally, with excellent outcomes after a 24-month period.

  8. Clinical Impact of Dental Adhesives on Postoperative Sensitivity in Class I and Class II Resin-Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchorova-Veleva Neshka A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-etch adhesives are believed to prevent postoperative sensitivity when used under posterior resin-based composite restorations. STUDY OBJECTIVE: A hypothesis that a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA would result in less postoperative sensitivity than a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (3-E&RA was tested. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred restorations were placed with a 1-SEA and 100 restorations with a 3-E&RA. Teeth were restored with Filtek Supreme nanofilled resin-composite and were evaluated for sensitivity to cold and masticatory forces at baseline, 7 days, 14 days, 30 days, and 6 months postoperatively. Vitality test scores of the teeth were recorded at the same periods. RESULTS: The evaluation of cold sensitivity intensity (VAS score for all observation periods in both restoration groups did not reveal any statistical significance. The differences in the response time to cold stimulation (0 - 15 sec for the restorations made with a 1-SEA and those made with a separate etch step are statistically insignificant. There are no significant differences in the vitality of the restored teeth at intra- or inter-group comparison. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences in postoperative sensitivity to masticatory forces at postoperative day 14 and day 30 in the 3-E&RA group. CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative sensitivity depends on the type of dentin adhesive used. More intensive complaints of postoperative sensitivity were recorded under masticatory forces at postoperative day 14 and day 30 in 3-E&RA in comparison with 1-SEA.

  9. Creep deformation of restorative resin-composites intended for bulk-fill placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-08-01

    To determine the creep deformation of several "bulk-fill" resin-composite formulations in comparison with some other types. Six resin-composites; four bulk-fill and two conventional were investigated. Stainless steel split molds (4 mm × 6 mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens for creep testing. Specimens were thoroughly irradiated with 650 mW cm(-2). A total of 10 specimens for each material were divided into two groups (n = 5) according to the storage condition; Group A stored dry at 37 °C for 24h and Group B stored in distilled water at 37 °C in an incubator for 24h. Each specimen was loaded (20 MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. The strain deformation was recorded continuously for 4h. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way ANOVA followed by one-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test at a significance level of a = 0.05. The maximum creep strain % ranged from 0.72% up to 1.55% for Group A and the range for Group B increased from 0.79% up to 1.80% due to water sorption. Also, the permanent set ranged from 0.14% up to 0.47% for Group A and from 0.20% up to 0.59% for Group B. Dependent on the material and storage condition, the percentage of creep strain recovery ranged between 64% and 81%. Increased filler loading in the bulk-fill materials decreased the creep strain magnitude. Creep deformation of all studied resin-composites increased with wet storage. The "bulk-fill" composites exhibited an acceptable creep deformation and within the range exhibited by other resin-composites. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A resin composite material containing an eugenol derivative for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaroof, A; Rojo, L; Mannocci, F; Deb, S

    2016-02-01

    To formulate and evaluate new dual cured resin composite based on the inclusion of eugenyl methacrylate monomer (EgMA) with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin systems for intracanal post cementation and core build-up restoration of endodontically treated teeth. EgMA was synthesized and incorporated at 5% (BTEg5) or 10% (BTEg10) into dual-cure formulations. Curing properties, viscosity, Tg, radiopacity, static and dynamic mechanical properties of the composites were determined and compared with Clearfil™DC Core-Plus, a commercial dual-cure, two-component composite. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey's post-hoc test. The experimental composites were successfully prepared, which exhibited excellent curing depths of 4.9, 4.7 and 4.2 mm for BTEg0, BTEg5 and BTEg10 respectively, which were significantly higher than Clearfil™DC. However, the inclusion of EgMA initially led to a lower degree of cure, which increased when measured at 24 h with values comparable to formulations without EgMA, indicating post-curing. The inclusion of EgMA also lowered the polymerization exotherm thereby reducing the potential of thermal damage to host tissue. Both thermal and viscoelastic analyses confirmed the ability of the monomer to reduce the stiffness of the composites by forming a branched network. The compressive strength of BTEg5 was significantly higher than the control whilst flexural strength increased significantly from 95.9 to 114.8 MPa (BTEg5) and 121.9 MPa (BTEg10). Radiopacity of the composites was equivalent to ∼3 mm Al allowing efficient diagnosis. The incorporation of EgMA within polymerizable formulations provides a novel approach to prepare reinforced resin composite material for intracanal post cementation and core build-up and the potential to impart antibacterial properties of eugenol to endodontic restorations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Two years survival rate of class II composite resin restorations prepared by ART with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaloglu-Ak, Asli; Eden, Ece; Frencken, Jo E; Oncag, Ozant

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to test the null hypotheses that there is no difference: (1) in carious lesion development at the restoration margin between class II composite resin restorations in primary molars produced through the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel and (2) in the survival rate of class II composite resin restorations between two treatment groups after 2 years. Three hundred twenty-seven children with 568 class II cavitated lesions were included in a parallel mouth study design. Four operators placed resin composite (Filtek Z 250) restorations bonded with a self-etch adhesive (Adper prompt L pop). Two independent examiners evaluated the restorations after 0.5, 1, and 2 years using the modified Ryge criteria. The Kaplan-Meier survival method was applied to estimate survival percentages. A high proportion of restorations were lost during the study period. Therefore, the first hypothesis could not be tested. No statistically significant difference was observed between the cumulative survival percentages of restorations produced by the two treatment approaches over the 2-year period (ART, 54.1 +/- 3.4%; ART with Carisolv, 46.0 +/- 3.4%). This hypothesis was accepted. ART with chemomechanical gel might not provide an added benefit increasing the survival percentages of ART class II composite resin restorations in primary teeth.

  12. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, G T; Saratti, C M; Cattani-Lorente, M; Feilzer, A J; Scherrer, S; Krejci, I

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n=8). The pulp chamber area was filled with: group 0 (control), no resin build-up; group 1, hybrid composite build-up (G-aenial posterior, GC); group 2, as in group 1 but covered with 3 nets of bi-directional E-glass fibers (EverStickNET, Stick Tech Ltd.); group 3, a FRC resin (EverX posterior, GC); group 4, as in group 3 but covered by the bi-directional fibers. The crowns were restored with CAD-CAM composite restorations (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE). Maximum fracture loads were recorded in Newton and data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test (p0.05). All specimens fractured in a catastrophic way, under the CEJ. The main crack evolved in the corono-apical direction. In groups 2 and 4 secondary fracture paths with apico-coronal direction were detected close to the bi-directional fibers' layer. For the restoration of endodontically treated molars, the incorporation of FRCs did not influence the load-bearing capacity of the tooth-restoration complex. The SEM analysis showed a low ability of the bi-directional fibers net in deviating the fracture but this effect was not sufficient to lead more favorable fracture patterns, over the CEJ. The use of FRCs to reinforce the "core" of devitalized molars against vertical fractures under static loads seems useless when the thickness of the CAD/CAM composite overlay restoration is high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of Resin-Based Composites in Posterior Restorations: A 3-Year Study

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Çiğdem; Arhun, Neslihan; Yamanel, Kivanc

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a nanohybrid and a microhybrid composite in class I and II restorations after 3 years. Subjects and Methods A total of 82 class I and class II restorations were performed in 31 patients (10 males and 21 females) using Grandio and QuiXfil with self-etch adhesives (Futurabond and Xeno III). The restorations were clinically evaluated by 2 operators 1 week after placement (baseline) and at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years ...

  14. Three-year survival of ART high-viscosity glass-ionomer and resin composite restorations in people with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Gustavo F; Faulks, Denise; Mazzola, Ignacio; Cabral, Ricardo J; Mulder, Jan; Frencken, Jo E

    2018-01-01

    To assess the 3-year cumulative survival rate of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) and conventional resin composite restorations (CRT) placed in persons with disability. Patients referred for restorative care to the Haemophilia Foundation special care service were treated by one of two specialists. Patients and/or caregivers were provided with written and verbal information regarding treatment options and selected the alternative they preferred. Treatment was provided as selected unless this option proved clinically unfeasible when an alternative technique was proposed. The treatment protocols were ART (hand instruments/high-viscosity glass-ionomer) in the clinic or CRT (rotary instrumentation/resin composite) in the clinic or under general anaesthesia (GA). After 6, 12, 24 and 36 months, two independent, trained and calibrated examiners evaluated restoration survival using established ART codes. The proportional hazard model with frailty corrections gave survival estimates over 3 years. Sixty-six patients (13.6 ± 7.8 years) with 16 different disability profiles participated. CRT in the clinic proved feasible for five patients (13%), and 14 patients received CRT under GA (21%). ART was used for 47 patients (71.2%). Altogether, 298 dentine carious lesions were restored in primary and permanent teeth (182 ART; 116 CRT). The 3-year cumulative survival rates and jackknife standard errors for the 182 ART and 116 CRT restorations were 94.8 ± 2.1 and 82.8 ± 5.3%, respectively (p = 0.01). The 3-year follow-up results confirm that ART is an effective treatment protocol. Patients with disability, many of whom have difficulty coping with CRT, may benefit from the ART approach.

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Resin-Based Composites in Posterior Restorations: 12-Month Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Cigdem; Arhun, Neslihan; Yamanel, Kivanc

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the 12 month clinical performances of two different posterior composites in Class I and Class II restorations. Methods: Thirty-one patients (10 male, 21 female) were recruited into the study. A total of 82 Class I and Class II cavities were restored with either a nanohybrid composite (Grandio) or a low-shrinkage composite (Quixfil), using their self etch adhesives (Futura Bond and Xeno III) according to manufacturers’ instructions. The restorations were clinically evaluated 1 week after placement as baseline, and after 6 and 12 months post-operatively using modified USPHS criteria by two previously calibrated operators. Statistical analysis were performed using Pearson Chi-square and Fisher’s Exact Test (P.05). None of the restorations had marginal discoloration and anatomic form loss on the 12 month follow-up. Restorations did not exhibit post-operative sensitivity at any evaluation period. Conclusions: Clinical assessment of nanohybrid (Grandio) and low-shrinkage posterior composite (Quixfil) exhibited good clinical results with predominating alpha scores after 12 months. However; further evaluations are necessary for the long-term clinical performance of these materials. PMID:20046481

  16. Periapical status of non-root-filled teeth with resin composite, amalgam, or full crown restorations: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Victoria; Petersson, Kerstin; Wolf, Eva; Akerman, Sigvard

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies show that dental pulp cells respond unfavorably to contact with resin composite restorative material. Hypothetically, in a random population, the frequency of apical periodontitis should be higher for teeth restored with resin composite than with amalgam. Therefore, the aim was to compare the periapical status of non-root-filled teeth restored with resin composite, amalgam, or laboratory-fabricated crowns in an adult Swedish population. The subjects comprised 440 individuals from a randomly selected sample of 1,000 adult residents of a Swedish county. The type, material, and quality of the restorations were recorded for all non-root-filled teeth by clinical examination and intraoral clinical photographs. Periapical status was evaluated on panoramic radiographs. The association between periapical status and type, material, and quality of the restorations was analyzed using the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. There was no significant difference in the frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) between teeth restored with resin composite or amalgam (1.3% and 1.1%, respectively). The frequency of AP for teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns was significantly higher (6.3%). Regression analysis showed no association between AP and resin composite restorations but a significant association with laboratory-fabricated crowns. The results indicate that the risk of damage to the pulp-dentin complex from exposure to resin composite material and dentin bonding agents shown in experimental studies is not reflected in the clinical setting. However, in the study sample, AP was diagnosed in a significantly higher proportion of teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical evaluation of resin-based composites in posterior restorations: two-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhun, Neslihan; Celik, Cigdem; Yamanel, Kivanc

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical performance of a nanohybrid and a low shrinkage posterior composite in Class I and II restorations after two years. A total of 82 Class I and Class II cavities were restored in 31 patients (10 male, 21 female) by one clinician using Grandio and Quixfil and the manufacturers' self-etch adhesives (Futura Bond and Xeno III) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Two previously calibrated operators clinically evaluated the restorations one week after placement (baseline) and six months, one year and two years after placement using modified USPHS criteria. Statistical analysis was completed using the Pearson Chi-square and Fisher's Exact Test (p0.05). None of the restorations had shown any marginal discoloration and anatomic form loss until the end of the 12-month period. Two-year recall data demonstrated an 83.87% recall rate (26 patients). Grandio restorations showed a significant deterioration of the surface properties that demonstrated 26% Bravo scores, which are still clinically acceptable. None of the restorations exhibited postoperative sensitivity at any evaluation period. It was concluded that nanofill (Grandio) and posterior composite (Quixfil) demonstrated acceptable clinical performance after two years. However, further evaluations are necessary for the long-term clinical performance of these materials.

  18. Compressive strength and failure types of cusp replacing direct resin composite restorations in previously amalgam-filled premolars versus sound teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes Durk; Zaia, John; Oezcan, Mutlu

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of cusp replacing direct resin composite restorations (DCR) in premolars that had been previously filled with amalgam mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations and compared their fracture resistance with those made on sound dentin and intact teeth.

  19. Clinical long-term success of contemporary nano-filled resin composites in class I and II restorations cured by LED or halogen light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflaum, Torsten; Kranz, Stefan; Montag, Regina; Güntsch, Arndt; Völpel, Andrea; Mills, Robin; Jandt, Klaus; Sigusch, Bernd

    2017-10-28

    The use of LED light-curing units (LED LCUs) for polymerising resin-based composite restorations has become widespread throughout dentistry. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of clinical longitudinal studies that evaluate the comparative efficacy of LED-based polymerisation in direct posterior composite restorations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of class I and II resin composite restorations for two successful composite restorative materials cured with LED versus halogen LCUs. One hundred restorations were placed using the nano-filled composites Grandio® or Filtek™ Supremé. The following test groups were established: LED-Grandio® n = 23 (LG), LED-Filtek™ Supremé n = 21 (LS). As controls were used: Halogen-Grandio® n = 28 (HG), Halogen-Filtek™ Supremé n = 28 (HS). All restorations were evaluated according to the clinical criteria of the CPM index (C-criteria) at baseline and after 6, 12 and 36 months. After 12 and 36 months, there were no significant differences between restorations polymerised with LED or halogen light. At the end of the study, 97% of the restorations showed sufficient results regardless of the employed LCU or composite. Globally, after 36 months, 56% of all restorations were assessed with code 0 (excellent) and 41% with code 1 (acceptable). In detail, excellent results (code 0) among the criteria surface quality; marginal integrity and marginal discoloration were assigned in 72, 70 and 69%. For the current limitations in the clinical trial design, the results showed that LED-polymerisation is appropriate to ensure clinical success of direct posterior resin composite restorations in a range of 3 years. The choice of LCU has no significant influence on the clinical performance of posterior direct resin composite restorations within 3 years of wear.

  20. Clinical evaluation of resin-based composites in posterior restorations: a 3-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Çiğdem; Arhun, Neslihan; Yamanel, Kivanc

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a nanohybrid and a microhybrid composite in class I and II restorations after 3 years. A total of 82 class I and class II restorations were performed in 31 patients (10 males and 21 females) using Grandio and QuiXfil with self-etch adhesives (Futurabond and Xeno III). The restorations were clinically evaluated by 2 operators 1 week after placement (baseline) and at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years using modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. At the 3-year follow-up, 62 class I and class II cavities were reevaluated in 23 patients (7 males and 16 females). Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests (p Grandio restorations started to deteriorate in terms of marginal adaptation. At the end of 2 years, 9 Grandio restorations showed significant deterioration of the surface properties, demonstrating Bravo scores. At the end of 3 years, no significant differences were observed regarding color match, marginal adaptation, secondary caries, marginal discoloration, and anatomic form loss between the evaluated materials in 25 class I and 37 class II restorations. At the 3-year follow-up, Grandio restorations had 21% Bravo scores and showed significant deterioration of the surface properties, which were still clinically acceptable according to USPHS criteria. Three QuiXfil and 1 Grandio restorations were replaced because of secondary caries and loss of retention. Both the nanohybrid (Grandio) and the microhybrid (QuiXfil) composites were clinically functional after 3 years. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A comparative in vitro study of microleakage by a radioactive isotope and compressive strength of three nanofilled composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogna, Rupika; Jagadis, S; Shashikal, K

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study compares the compressive strength and microleakage of three nanofilled composites using radioactive isotope Ca45. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six freshly extracted human premolars were used in this study. Standardized Class I preparation was carried out and then randomly divided into three different groups: A, B, and C with 12 teeth in each group which were restored with nanofilled composite restoration and then subjected to thermocycling. Microleakage was tested using radioactive isotope Ca45. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests were used to compare the microleakage scores of the three groups. For measuring the compressive strength of three nanofilled composite resin restorations, 12 specimens of each material were prepared in customized stainless steel cylindrical moulds of 6 mm ×4 mm. The compressive test was performed using the Universal Testing Machine. The values were analyzed with ANOVA and Bonferroni's test. Results: The findings of this study indicate that the synergy has the least microleakage and highest compressive strength followed by the Grandio and Filtek Z-350. Conclusions: Introduction of nanocomposites (packable) appears to have improved the performance of both anterior and posterior restorations with regard to mechanical properties, marginal integrity, and esthetics. PMID:21814351

  2. INFLUENCE OF POST-CURE TREATMENTS ON HARDNESS AND MARGINAL ADAPTATION OF COMPOSITE RESIN INLAY RESTORATIONS: AN IN VITRO STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Latempa, Antonio Marcelo Accetta; Chagas, Maurício Alves; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Leal, Mariana Pareira da Silva; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Vickers hardness number (VHN) and the in vitro marginal adaptation of inlay restorations of three hybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250, Opallis and Esthet-X) subjected to two post-cure treatments. Material and Methods: For the microhardness test, three different groups were prepared in accordance with the post-cure treatments: control group (only light cure for 40 s), autoclave group (light cure for 40 s + autoclave for 15 min at 130°C); and microwave group (light cure for 40 s + microwave for 3 min at 450 W). To assess the marginal adaptation, the composite resin was inserted incrementally into a mesial-occlusal-distal cavity brass mold and each increment light-cured for 40 s. A previous reading in micrometers was taken at the cervical wall, using a stereomicroscope magnifying glass equipped with a digital video camera and image-analysis software. Subsequently, the specimens were subjected to the post-cure treatments (autoclave and microwave) and a reading was taken again at the cervical wall. Data were compared using ANOVA for the hardness test, split-plot ANOVA for the adaptation assessment and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons. A significance level of 5% was adopted for all analyses. Results: The post-cure treatments increased the hardness of conventional composites (pinlay restorations (pinlays. Moreover, Filtek Z250 showed the best results, with higher hardness and lower gap values. PMID:20027437

  3. Amalgam or composite resin? Factors influencing the choice of restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, M B; Peres, M A; Peres, K G; Horta, B L; Barros, A D; Demarco, F F

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the patient and tooth factors associated with selection of restorative material in direct posterior restorations in young adults from a population-based birth cohort. A representative sample (n=720) of all 5914 births occurring in Pelotas in 1982 were prospectively investigated, and posterior restorations were assessed in 2006, when the patients were 24 years old. Tooth-related variables (individual level) included restorative material (amalgam or composite), type of tooth, size of cavity, and estimated time in mouth. Data regarding demographic and socio-economic characteristics, oral health, and service utilization patterns during the life course were also assessed (contextual level). Logistic Regression Multilevel models showed that individuals who have accessed dental services by private insurance by age 15 [odds ratio (OR)=1.66 (0.93-2.95)] and who had a higher dental caries index at age 15 (high DMFT tertile) [OR 2.89 (1.59-5.27)] presented more amalgam restorations in the posterior teeth. From tooth-level variables, the frequency of amalgams decreases with increasing number of surfaces enrolled in the cavity preparation (pcomposite or amalgam in posterior direct restorations, showing that, independently of socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, type of payment of dental services and clinical factors are associated with this choice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Fracture resistance of premolar teeth restored with silorane-based or dimethacrylate-based composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarian, Golsa; Ameri, Hamideh; Chasteen, Joseph E; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh

    2014-01-01

    To restore posterior teeth using low-shrinkage composite to minimize microleakage. To compare the fracture resistance of mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations restored with either low-shrinkage composite or with dimethacrylate-based composite in conjunction with cavity liners and without them. The null hypothesis of the study is that there are no differences in either fracture resistance or fracture mode between the silorane group and dimethacrylate groups with and without the use of cavity liners. Sixty maxillary premolars were divided into six groups of 10. MOD cavities were prepared in four groups: F: posterior composite (Filtek P60); GF: 0.5-mm Glass Ionomer (Fuji LC) + posterior composite; FF: 0.5-mm flowable composite (Filtek Supreme XT) + posterior composite; and S: low-shrinkage composite (Filtek P90). Negative (N) and positive (P) control groups consisted of unrestored and sound teeth, respectively. The specimens were thermocycled and loaded. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, Tukey, and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Groups FF (1643.09 ± 187/80 N) and GF (1596.80 ± 163/93 N) (p = 0.06 > 0.05) were statistically identical, although less than group P (1742/33 ± 110/08 N), but still demonstrated greater fracture resistance than the other groups. The fracture resistance of group S (1434/69 ± 107/62 N) was identical to GF and FF (p = 0.06 > 0.05). The fracture resistance of F (1353/19 ± 233/90 N) was less than GF and FF, and statistically identical to S (p = 0.87 > 0.05). Silorane-based composite showed a resistance to fracture similar to methacrylate-based composite restorations regardless of whether cavity liners were used. The findings of this study support the selection of silorane-based composite for the restoration of maxillary premolars with standardized Class II cavity preparations in order to strengthen the resistance to fracture to the same extent as do dimethacrylate

  5. Two-year clinical study on postoperative pulpal complications arising from the absence of a glass-ionomer lining in deep occlusal resin-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banomyong, Danuchit; Messer, Harold

    2013-11-01

    To observe the effects of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) lining on the risk of pulpal complications in deep occlusal cavities with resin-based restorations. Fifty-three patients, aged 18-30 years, who had one or two deep occlusal carious lesions (≥3 mm in depth) in molars, were recruited. Dental caries were removed, and the prepared cavity was restored with resin composite using one of two restorative procedures: (a) without GIC lining; and (b) with (resin-modified) GIC lining. Restored teeth were evaluated for any pulpal complications (subjective symptoms, objective signs or loss of tooth vitality) at 1 month (baseline), 1 year, and 2 years after restoration. After excluding shallow cavities, 31 restorations without GIC lining, and 31 restorations with GIC lining, were placed and recalled at baseline without any pulpal complications. At the 1- and 2-year recalls, six patients who had restorations in group 1, and 13 in group 2, had dropped out. None of the remaining teeth in the two groups exhibited pulpal complications at either recall period, regardless of GIC lining placement. The absence of GIC lining does not increase the risk of pulpal complications in deep occlusal cavities restored with resin-based restorations in either the short or long term. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Efficacy of Hydrophobic Layer On Sealing Ability of Dentin Adhesive Systems in Class V Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maleknejad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Adhesive permeability is hindered by application of an additional layer of hydrophobic resin, which increases its concentration within the hydrophilic layer, reduces its affinity to water, and enhances its physical properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a hydrophobic layer on the microleakage of class V composite restorations using different adhesives. Materials and methods. The adhesives including total-etch Scotchbond MP and Single Bond, and the self-etch Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to 80 class V cavities in vitro on the buccal surface in CEJ and then were followed by hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond in half of the cavities in each group (n=10. After restoration with microhybrid composite, Z100 and immersion in fuchsine, the degree of microleakage was assessed. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Man-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests. Results. The hydrophobic layer significantly reduced the microleakage of Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond only in dentin (p0.05. Conclusion. Within the limitation of this study, only Clearfil S3 Bond could demonstrate the identical values of microleakage in enamel and dentinal margins.

  7. A cost-effective treatment for severe generalized erosion and loss of vertical dimension of occlusion: laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J; Stapleton, Brandon M; Harris, Bryan T; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes preventive and restorative treatment planning for a 56-year-old female patient with severe, chronic, poorly controlled gastroesophageal reflux disease and resulting loss of vertical dimension of occlusion. First, the demineralization process was controlled through collaboration with the patient's physician, and measures were taken to restore adequate stimulated salivary flow. Then, for financial reasons, indirect laboratory-fabricated composite resin restorations were adhesively bonded to replace lost tooth structure and reestablish the patient's collapsed vertical dimension. Indirect-laboratory fabricated restorations can be a cost-effective alternative to direct composite resin or all-ceramic restorations for the treatment of chronic severe erosion, but there are no long-term clinical reports in the current literature to support or contraindicate the use of indirect composites for this type of clinical application. Therefore, careful, long-term follow-up evaluations are planned for this patient.

  8. Cigarette smoke combined with staining beverages decreases luminosity and increases pigmentation in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Paula; Rossi, Thais Aranha; Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Lima, Max José Pimenta; Fontes, Céres Mendonça; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio da Rocha

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cigarette smoke combined or not with colored beverages on the color change of a composite resin before and after repolishing procedures. Composite specimens were allocated into six groups (N = 10): 1) control (no colorant); 2) cigarette smoke; 3) coffee; 4) coffee and cigarette smoke; 5) red wine; and 6) red wine and cigarette smoke. During 21 days, groups 2, 4, and 6 were exposed daily to the smoke from 20 cigarettes, and groups 3, 4, 5, and 6 were immersed in coffee or red wine for 4 minutes each day. Color measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer at baseline, after 21 days, and after repolishing procedures. Statistical analysis indicated the exposure to cigarette smoke and staining beverages resulted in decreased luminosity (P = .0001) and increased red pigmentation in most experimental groups (P 7.5). Repolishing resulted in greater luminosity, as well as decreased yellow pigmentation (P < .05). It could be concluded that combined staining agents such as cigarette smoke and red wine irreversibly change resin color regardless of the use of repolishing procedures.

  9. Stress distribution in roots restored with different types of post systems with composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Daizo; Miura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Chikako; Komada, Wataru; Shin, Chiharu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Masuoka, David

    2008-07-01

    Although composite resin core is used with various types of prefabricated posts, it remains unclear which kind of material is most suitable for the post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of prefabricated posts on the stress distribution within the root by finite element analysis. Posts and cores were built up with composite resin and four types of prefabricated posts: two types of glass fiber posts (GFP1, GFP2) with low and high Young's moduli, a titanium post (TIP), and a stainless steel post (SSP). In all models, stress distribution during function was calculated. There were differences in stress concentration at the root around the end of posts. The magnitudes of stress for GFP1, GFP2, TIP, and STP were 8.7, 9.3, 11.7, and 13.9 MPa respectively. Given the results obtained, GFP1 was the most suitable material for post fabrication since this model showed a lower stress value. It would therefore mean a lower possibility of root fracture.

  10. Effect of immediate dentine sealing on the fracture strength of lithium disilicate and multiphase resin composite inlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Breemer, Carline R G; Özcan, Mutlu; Cune, Marco S; van der Giezen, Rianne; Kerdijk, Wouter; Gresnigt, Marco M M

    2017-08-01

    Limited information is available on the effect of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS) on the fracture strength of indirect partial posterior restorations. This study evaluated the effect of IDS on the fracture strength and failure types of two indirect restorative materials. Standard MOD inlay preparations were made on sound molars (N=40, n=10 per group) and randomly divided into four groups to receive the inlay materials with and without the application of IDS: Group L-IDS-: Li 2 Si 2 O 5 (Lithium disilicate, IPS e.max) without IDS; Group L-IDS+: Li 2 Si 2 O 5 with IDS; Group MR-IDS-: Multiphase resin composite (MR, Lava Ultimate) without IDS; MR-IDS+: MR with IDS. Inlays made of L were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, and MR inlays were silica coated. After silanization, they were cemented using adhesive resin cement (Variolink Esthetic DC). The specimens were thermo-mechanically aged (1.2×10 6 cycles, 1.7Hz, 8000 cycles, 5-55°C) and then subjected to load to failure (1 mm/min). Failure types and locations of debondings were classified. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, Mann Whitney U-test and Chi-square tests (α=0.05). Two-parameter Weibull distribution values including the Weibull modulus, scale (m) and shape (0), values were calculated. After aging conditions, no apparent changes were observed in marginal integrity but occlusal wear facets were more common with MR than with L (p0.05). Immediate dentin sealing improves adhesion, and thereby the fracture strength of inlays made of lithium disilicate but not that multiphase resin composite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  12. Comparison of microleakage in Class II cavities restored with silorane-based and methacrylate-based composite resins using different restorative techniques over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Kazem; Mousavinasab, Seyed-Mostafa; Samani, Mahsa Sahraneshin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing tendency toward tooth-colored restorations in dentistry, polymerization shrinkage and subsequent marginal microleakage remains a problem. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare microleakage between silorane-based and methacrylate-based composite resins at different time intervals and with different restorative techniques. In this in vitro study, 108 sound extracted human molar teeth were used. Mesial and distal proximal class II boxes with dimensions of 1.5 mm depth and 4 mm width were prepared. The gingival margins of all cavities were 1 mm below the cement enamel junction. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups based on test materials. In the first group, the teeth were restored by a nanocomposite (Filtek Z350XT, 3MESPE) and SE Bond adhesive (Kuraray, Japan), in the second group, the teeth were restored with a silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3MESPE) and Filtek P90 Adhesive (3M ESPE, USA) and in the third group, the teeth were restored with a microhybrid posterior composite resin (Filtek P60, 3MESPE) and SE Bond adhesive (Kuraray, Japan). Half of the proximal cavities in each of these three groups were restored in two horizontal layers and the other half in four horizontal layers. After a period of aging (24-h, 3-month and 6-month) in water and then application of 500 thermal cycles, the teeth were immersed for 24-h in 0.5% fuchsin and evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×36 magnification to evaluate leakage in gingival margin. Data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. In Z350XT statistically significant differences were observed in microleakage in comparison of 24-h and 6-month intervals (P = 0.01) that was higher in 6-month. Comparison of microleakage in P90 and P60 composite resins was also statistically significant and was less in P90. Microleakage was not significantly different between P90 and Z350XT at 24-h. However, this difference was

  13. Comparison of microleakage in Class II cavities restored with silorane-based and methacrylate-based composite resins using different restorative techniques over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Kazem; Mousavinasab, Seyed-Mostafa; Samani, Mahsa Sahraneshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the growing tendency toward tooth-colored restorations in dentistry, polymerization shrinkage and subsequent marginal microleakage remains a problem. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare microleakage between silorane-based and methacrylate-based composite resins at different time intervals and with different restorative techniques. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 108 sound extracted human molar teeth were used. Mesial and distal proximal class II boxes with dimensions of 1.5 mm depth and 4 mm width were prepared. The gingival margins of all cavities were 1 mm below the cement enamel junction. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups based on test materials. In the first group, the teeth were restored by a nanocomposite (Filtek Z350XT, 3MESPE) and SE Bond adhesive (Kuraray, Japan), in the second group, the teeth were restored with a silorane-based (Filtek P90, 3MESPE) and Filtek P90 Adhesive (3M ESPE, USA) and in the third group, the teeth were restored with a microhybrid posterior composite resin (Filtek P60, 3MESPE) and SE Bond adhesive (Kuraray, Japan). Half of the proximal cavities in each of these three groups were restored in two horizontal layers and the other half in four horizontal layers. After a period of aging (24-h, 3-month and 6-month) in water and then application of 500 thermal cycles, the teeth were immersed for 24-h in 0.5% fuchsin and evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×36 magnification to evaluate leakage in gingival margin. Data was statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In Z350XT statistically significant differences were observed in microleakage in comparison of 24-h and 6-month intervals (P = 0.01) that was higher in 6-month. Comparison of microleakage in P90 and P60 composite resins was also statistically significant and was less in P90. Microleakage was not significantly different between P90 and Z350XT

  14. A prospective 8-year follow-up of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth of children and adolescents in Public Dental Health Service: reasons for replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W.V.; Halken, Jette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: the aim of the study was to investigate reasons for replacement and repair of posterior resin composite (RC) restorations placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service in Denmark. Material and method: all posterior RC placed consecutively...... in general practice showed a good durability with annual failure rates of 2 %. The main reason for failure was secondary caries followed by post-operative sensitivity and resin composite fracture. A high proportion of replaced/repaired RC restorations were caused by primary caries in a non-filled surface...

  15. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000?). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the res...

  16. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  17. Comparison of pattern of failure of resin composite restorations in non-carious cervical lesions with and without occlusal wear facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, Adeleke Oke; Adeleke, Adeyinka Adedayo

    2014-07-01

    Many studies have reported the clinical problems associated with resin composite restorations in NCCLs. None has compared these clinical problems in NCCLs with and without occlusal wear facets. The present study sets out to determine the proportion of NCCLs that presents occlusal wear facets, and to compare the failure pattern of resin composite restorations in NCCLs with and without occlusal wear facets. Teeth with NCCLs were classified into two groups, those with and without occlusal wear facets. Both groups were restored using micro hybrid resin composite. The restorations were evaluated at the end of 2 years concerning post-operative sensitivity, retention, marginal integrity, marginal discolouration, wear, and secondary caries, using the USPHS criteria. Statistical analysis compared the ratings of each criterion between the two groups using Pearson's χ(2) or Fisher's exact test. About one-third (33.8%) of teeth with NCCLs presented with occlusal wear facets, more NCCLs with occlusal wear facets in mandibular teeth (44.7%) than maxillary teeth (24.5%). Retention rate of composite resin restorations in NCCLs with and without occlusal wear facets was 63.9% and 74.4% respectively at the end of 2 years. More marginal discolouration and defects were observed in restorations in NCCLs with occlusal wear facets, the differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). The decline in ratings of marginal discolouration and defects, and the lower retention rate of restorations in NCCLs with occlusal wear facets may support the role of occlusal stress and tooth flexure as a cause of failure of restorations in NCCLs. The ability to distinguish between stress induced lesions (with occlusal wear facets) and other cervical lesions will have important ramifications for the success of their restorations because they are not subjected to the same physical forces that are responsible for the deterioration of the restoration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Three-year randomized controlled clinical study of a one step universal adhesive and a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II resin composite restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive bonding system and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Materials and Methods: Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 yr......) received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class II restorations. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage resin......) success rates (p>0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.6%, respectively.The main reason for failure was resin composite fracture. Conclusion: Class II resin composite restorations placed with a one-step universal adhesive showed good short time effectiveness....

  19. Comparative evaluation of combined amalgam and composite resin restorations in extensively carious vital posterior teeth: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Manpreet; Bal, Cs; Singh, Up

    2011-01-01

    The clinical performance of the combined composite - amalgam restorations in posterior teeth was evaluated. One hundred carious posterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 25 teeth each. In Group A, the teeth were restored with composite Z250 and amalgam FusionAlloy. In Group B, composite Surefil and amalgam were used. In Groups C and D, the teeth were restored with composite Surefil and amalgam FusionAlloy, respectively. The restorations were evaluated at 3, 6, 12, and 15 months, using the Ryge criteria. Combined restorations and amalgam restorations showed better contact and contour than the composite restorations. No statistically significant difference was observed among the groups. Three amalgam restorations exhibited loss of retention. The combined composite-amalgam restorations performed better for contact and contour and retention than composite and amalgam restorations, respectively.

  20. Bulk-filled posterior resin restorations based on stress-decreasing resin technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W.V.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This randomized study evaluated a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in posterior restorations and compared it intraindividually with a conventional 2-mm resin composite layering technique over a 6-yr follow-up period. Thirty-eight pairs of Class II restorations and 15 pairs of Class I...... restorations were placed in 38 adults. In all cavities a single-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V) was applied. In the first cavity of each pair, the flowable resin composite (SDR) was placed, in bulk increments of up to 4 mm. The occlusal part was completed with a layer of nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X...... mono). In the second cavity of each pair, the hybrid resin composite was placed in 2-mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then annually for a time period of 6 yr. After 6 yr, 72 Class II restorations and 26...

  1. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  2. Influence of light-curing unit systems on shear bond strength and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fernandes Sassi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different photopolymerization (halogen, halogen soft-start and LED systems on shear bond strength (SBS and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. Forty Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins were prepared for microleakage assessment, and 160 enamel and dentin fragments were prepared for the SBS test, and divided into 4 groups. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests showed statistically significant difference in microleakage between the margins (p 0.05 neither between substrates nor among groups. It was concluded that Soft-Start technique with high intensity end-light influenced negatively the cervical marginal sealing, but the light-curing systems did not influence adhesion.

  3. Influence of method and period of storage on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations to dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro Santana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the method and period of storage on the adhesive bond strength of indirect composite resin to bovine dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were stored in three different solutions: 0.2% thymol, 10% formalin, and 0.2% sodium azide, during 3 periods of storage: 7 days, 30 days and 6 months, resulting in 9 groups (n = 10. The roots were cut off and the buccal surface was ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and a composite resin restoration (TPH Spectrum was fixed using a one-bottle adhesive system (Adper Single Bond and a dual-cured resinous cement (Rely X ARC under a load of 500 g for 5 minutes. The samples were serially cut perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain slices of 1.2 mm in thickness. Each slab was trimmed with a cylindrical diamond bur resulting in an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm². The microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing was performed in a testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead-speed until failure. After fracture, the specimens were examined under SEM to analyze the mode of fracture. μTBS Means were expressed in MPa and the data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (3X3 and the Tukey test (α = 0.05. The storage times of 7 and 30 days produced no significant difference irrespective of the solution type. The formalin and thymol solutions, however, did have a negative influence on bond strength when the teeth were stored for 6 months.

  4. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Sánchez-Ayala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S 3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06. None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76. When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05 at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3–Q1, 1.25–0.00 compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3–Q1, 0.25–0.00. The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin.

  5. Influence of immediate dentin sealing techniques on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L; Mota, E G; Borges, G A; Burnett, L H; Spohr, A M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY This research evaluated the influence of immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques on cuspal deflection and fracture resistance of teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Forty-eight maxillary premolars were divided into four groups: G1, sound teeth (control); G2, without IDS; G3, IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); and G4, IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F. The teeth from groups 2, 3, and 4 received mesio-distal-occlusal preparations. The impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane, followed by provisional restoration and storage in water for seven days. The impressions were poured using type IV die stone, and inlays with Filtek Z250 composite resin were built over each cast. The inlays were luted with Panavia F. After storage in water for 72 hours, a 200-N load was applied on the occlusal surface using a metal sphere connected to a universal testing machine, and the cuspal deflection was measured with a micrometer. The specimens were then submitted to an axial load until failure. The following mean cuspal deflection (μm) and mean fracture resistance (N) followed by the same lowercase letter represent no statistical difference by analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05): cuspal deflection: G1, 3.1 ± 1.5(a); G2, 10.3 ± 4.6(b); G3, 5.5 ± 1.8(ac); and G4, 7.7 ± 5.1(bc); fracture resistance: G1, 1974 ± 708(a); G2, 1162 ± 474(b); G3, 700 ± 280(b); and G4, 810 ± 343(b). IDS with CSE allowed cuspal deflection comparable with that associated with sound teeth. The application of Protect Liner F did not contribute to a decrease in cuspal deflection. The IDS techniques did not influence the fracture resistance of teeth.

  6. Comparative evaluation of combined amalgam and composite resin restorations in extensively carious vital posterior teeth: An in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Singh, Manpreet; Bal, CS; Singh, UP

    2011-01-01

    Aim : The clinical performance of the combined composite - amalgam restorations in posterior teeth was evaluated. Materials and Methods : One hundred carious posterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 25 teeth each. In Group A, the teeth were restored with composite Z250 and amalgam FusionAlloy. In Group B, composite Surefil and amalgam were used. In Groups C and D, the teeth were restored with composite Surefil and amalgam FusionAlloy, respectively. The restorations were ...

  7. A six-year prospective randomized study of a nano-hybrid and a conventional hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this 6 year prospective randomized equivalence trial was to evaluate the long-term clinical performance of a new nano-hybrid resin composite (RC) in Class II restorations in an intraindividual comparison with its well-established conventional hybrid RC predecessor....

  8. [The influence of the chemo-mechanical removal of the smear-layer and the use of a dentin adhesive on microleakage of composite resin restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Macorra García, J C; Gómez Martínez, A; Gutiérrez Argumosa, B

    1989-02-01

    We present an "in vitro" study of microfiltration in composite resin restorations with a perimetral seal placed totally in cement. We compare the sealing capability of a dentin adhesive (ScotchBond I) used in two ways: habitual, without conditioning dentin and conditioning it by means of the Caridex system. This produced no increasing of sealing capability under the study conditions.

  9. The evaluation of color and color difference according to the layering placement of Incisal shade composites on the body composites of the indirect resin restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jung Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface color of indirect resin restoration according to the layering placement of different shade of incisal composite. Materials and Methods In this study, CIE L*a*b* value of 16 Body composite of Tescera ATL (Bisco, Schaumburg IL,USA was measured by spectrophotometer (NF999, Nippon Denshuku, Japan, and compared to CIE L*a*b* value of Vitapan shade guide. Nine shade Incisal composite of Tescera ATL were build-up to 1 mm thickness on Body composites inlay block, and CIE L*a*b* value was measured. Incisal composite was ground to 0.5 mm thickness and CIE L*a*b* value was re-measured. Color difference between Body composite and Incisal composites layered on Body composite was calculated as a function of thickness. Results Color difference between corresponding shade of Tescera Body composite and Vitapan shade guide was from 6.88 to 12.80. L* and b*value was decreased as layering thickness of Incisal composite on Body composite was increased. But, a* value did not show specific change tendency. Conclusions Surface color difference between Body composites and Incisal composites layered on Body composite was increased as the layering thickness of Incisal composite increased (p < 0.05.

  10. Clinical Effectiveness of Different Polishing Systems and Self-Etch Adhesives in Class V Composite Resin Restorations: Two-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, J-H; Kim, H-Y; Shin, S-M; Lee, C-O; Kim, D S; Choi, K-K; Kim, S-Y

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare the clinical effectiveness of different polishing systems and self-etch adhesives in class V composite resin restorations. A total of 164 noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) from 35 patients were randomly allocated to one of four experimental groups, each of which used a combination of polishing systems and adhesives. The two polishing systems used were Sof-Lex XT (Sof), a multistep abrasive disc, and Enhance/Pogo (EP), a simplified abrasive-impregnated rubber instrument. The adhesive systems were Clearfil SE bond (CS), a two-step self-etch adhesive, and Xeno V (XE), a one-step self-etch adhesive. All NCCLs were restored with light-cured microhybrid resin composites (Z250). Restorations were evaluated at baseline and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months by two blinded independent examiners using modified FDI criteria. The Fisher exact test and generalized estimating equation analysis considering repeated measurements were performed to compare the outcomes between the polishing systems and adhesives. Three restorations were dislodged: two in CS/Sof and one in CS/EP. None of the restorations required any repair or retreatment except those showing retention loss. Sof was superior to EP with regard to surface luster, staining, and marginal adaptation (p0.05). Sof is clinically superior to EP for polishing performance in class V composite resin restoration. XE demonstrates clinically equivalent bonding performance to CS.

  11. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  12. Cytotoxic evaluation of hydroxyapatite-filled and silica/hydroxyapatite-filled acrylate-based restorative composite resins: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadda, Harshita; Naveen, Sangeetha Vasudevaraj; Mohan, Saktiswaren; Satapathy, Bhabani K; Ray, Alok R; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-07-01

    Although the physical and mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite-filled dental restorative composite resins have been examined, the biocompatibility of these materials has not been studied in detail. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the toxicity of acrylate-based restorative composite resins filled with hydroxyapatite and a silica/hydroxyapatite combination. Five different restorative materials based on bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) and tri-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) were developed: unfilled (H0), hydroxyapatite-filled (H30, H50), and silica/hydroxyapatite-filled (SH30, SH50) composite resins. These were tested for in vitro cytotoxicity by using human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. Surface morphology, elemental composition, and functional groups were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The spectra normalization, baseline corrections, and peak integration were carried out by OPUS v4.0 software. Both in vitro cytotoxicity results and SEM analysis indicated that the composite resins developed were nontoxic and supported cell adherence. Elemental analysis with EDX revealed the presence of carbon, oxygen, calcium, silicon, and gold, while the presence of methacrylate, hydroxyl, and methylene functional groups was confirmed through FTIR analysis. The characterization and compatibility studies showed that these hydroxyapatite-filled and silica/hydroxyapatite-filled bis-GMA/TEGDMA-based restorative composite resins are nontoxic to human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and show a favorable biologic response, making them potential biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Load fatigue of teeth with different ferrule lengths, restored with fiber posts, composite resin cores, and all-ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Polly S; Nicholls, Jack I; Junge, Thomas; Phillips, Keith M

    2009-10-01

    There is no evidence to suggest that the ferrule length needed for an all-ceramic crown is different from that needed for a cast metal or metal ceramic crown. The purpose of this study was to relate different ferrule lengths with the number of fatigue cycles needed for failure of the crown cement for an all-ceramic crown cemented with a resin cement. Fifteen maxillary central incisors were divided into 3 groups (n=5), with ferrules of 0.0 mm (no-ferrule group), 0.5 mm (0.5-mm ferrule group), and 1.0 mm (1.0-mm ferrule group), respectively. Each tooth was restored with a 0.050-inch glass-filled composite post (ParaPost FiberWhite) and a composite resin core (ParaCore). The posts were cemented with resin cement (ParaPost Cement), and the composite resin cores were bonded to dentin using a dentin bonding agent (ParaPost Cement, Conditioner A & B). Each specimen was prepared with a 7-mm total preparation height, a 1.5-mm lingual axial wall, and a 1.0-mm shoulder around the tooth. The crowns for all specimens were pressed with a pressable ceramic material (IPS Empress 2) and cemented with resin cement (Variolink II). A 6-kg cyclic test load was applied to each specimen at 135 degrees to the long axis of the tooth. The independent variable measured was the number of load fatigue cycles required for failure of the crown cement. The data were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis test to detect overall significance and the Mann-Whitney U test for pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni correction (alpha=.017). The mean (SD) number of cycles to failure for each group was: no-ferrule group, 213 (317); 0.5-mm ferrule group, 155,137 (68,991); and 1.0-mm ferrule group, 262,872 (21,432). None of the specimens in the 1.0-mm ferrule group failed. Significant differences were found between the no-ferrule group and the 0.5-mm ferrule group, and the no-ferrule group and the 1.0-mm ferrule group (P.017). Specimens with a 0.0-mm ferrule survived few fatigue cycles despite the fact that both the

  14. Information for patients undergoing treatment for toothwear with resin composite restorations placed at an increased occlusal vertical dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Toothwear is affecting increasing numbers of the population. In the past, treatment of patients whose teeth were affected by toothwear often involved the reduction of these teeth for crowns; a severe form of toothwear. Contemporary management of such cases is by the bonding of resin composite restorations to the worn and wearing surfaces, with these restorations being placed at an increased occlusal vertical dimension. The advantage of the technique is its minimal- or non-intervention nature and its high reported degree of patient satisfaction. There are, however, short-term disadvantages to the technique, such as the potential for lisping, pain from the teeth which will be subject to axial orthodontic tooth movement, and difficulty in chewing on the posterior teeth if these are discluded. It is therefore important, as with any treatment, that the advantages and disadvantages are fully explained to the patient. This paper therefore describes the clinical technique and presents a Patient Information Leaflet that the author has used for over five years. Patients should be advised regarding the disadvantages and advantages of any technique.

  15. Randomized 3-year Clinical Evaluation of Class I and II Posterior Resin Restorations Placed with a Bulk-fill Resin Composite and a One-step Self-etching Adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the 3-year clinical durability of the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR in Class I and Class II restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight pairs of Class I and 62 pairs of Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female patients (mean age 52.4 years......). Each patient received at least two extended Class I or Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. In all cavities, a one-step self-etching adhesive (XenoV+) was applied. One of the cavities of each pair was randomly assigned to receive the flowable bulk-fill resin composite SDR...... in increments up to 4 mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with an ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, only the resin composite CeramX mono+ was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were...

  16. General dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of resin-based composite restorations and light curing unit technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, A; Turner, S

    2011-09-23

    Clinical successful use of resin-based composite restorations (RBCs) depends on knowledge of material and light curing unit (LCU) related factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate general dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of RBCs and LCU technology. Members of the Active Research Group of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) in England, Scotland and Wales engaged in primary dental care were sent a letter introducing the study and asking for their cooperation, followed by an email containing a link to the online survey questionnaire, hosted on Surveymonkey.com. The questionnaire enquired about current LCUs, and asked a series of questions on material science. Sixty-six percent of the 274 members contacted responded. Fifty-seven percent used LED units, 25% quartz tungsten halogen (QTH), and 1% plasma arc (missing: 17%). Thirty percent reported having access to a radiometer. Appropriate responses regarding the degree of conversion of composite and adhesive materials were given by 32% and 23% respectively, and 22% agreed that LED and QTH LCUs had comparable efficiency in polymerising composites. Thirty-three percent were aware that RBCs eluted substances that may have adverse local or systemic consequences. Fifty-eight percent stated that if polymerisation of RBC is slowed down, polymerisation stress will be lower, and 43% said that polymerisation shrinkage will be reduced if the degree of conversion is reduced. Knowledge (measured by appropriate responses to these questions) was not related to years since qualification (r=-0.05, n=168, p=0.53). The study suggests that dentists' knowledge of curing RBC restorations and LCUs is poor. This indicates that there is a need for training and guidance in this aspect of primary dental care.

  17. A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael S; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S; Funkhouser, Ellen; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Shamp, Douglass G; Qvist, Vibeke; Meral, Jeffrey S; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2013-06-01

    Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations. In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression. A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P amalgam and RBC restorations: patient's age, a higher number of surfaces restored at baseline, the dentist's sex and the practice workload. Material choice was not significantly predictive in these early results. Practical Implications. If clinicians can recognize and identify the risk factors associated with early restoration failure, more effective treatment plans may be offered to the patient.

  18. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  19. Comparison of the Effect of Nd:YAG and Diode Lasers and Photodynamic Therapy on Microleakage of Class V Composite Resin Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ahmad Ajami, Amir; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Amini, Melina

    2013-01-01

    Considering the importance of disinfecting dentin after cavity preparation and the possible effect of disinfection methods on induction of various reactions between the tooth structure and the adhesive restorative material, the aim of the present study was to evaluate microleakage of composite resin restorations after disinfecting the prepared dentin surface with Nd:YAG and Diode lasers and photodynamic therapy. Standard Class V cavities were prepared on buccal surfaces of 96 sound bovine teeth. The samples were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the disinfection method: Group 1: Nd:YAG laser; Group 2: Diode laser; Group 3: photodynamic therapy; and Group 4: the control. Self-etch bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond) was applied and all the cavities were restored with composite resin (Z100). After thermocycling and immersing in 0.5% basic fuchsin, the samples were prepared for microleakage evaluation under a stereomicroscope. Data was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests at P0.05). There were no significant differences in microleakage between the occlusal and gingival margins in the Nd:YAG laser group (P>0.05). In the other groups, microleakage at gingival margins was significantly higher than that at the occlusal margins (P<0.05). Nd:YAG and Diode lasers and photodynamic therapy can be used to disinfect cavity preparations before composite resin restorations.

  20. Resin elasticity and the strengthening of all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, O; Marquis, P M; Fleming, G J P

    2007-06-01

    Resin luting of all-ceramic restorations results in increased performance; however, the strengthening mechanism and the role of the mechanical properties of the resin are not fully understood. The hypothesis tested is that ceramic strength enhancement is dependent on the elastic modulus of the resin. Three-point flexural moduli of a flowable, luting, and hybrid composite resin were characterized. Two hundred forty porcelain discs were air-abraded. One group acted as a control, and 3 additional groups were coated with 120 +/- 20 microm of each resin prior to bi-axial flexure testing. All resins significantly increased in mean strength, and the associated strength increase was related to the elastic modulus of the resin (R(2) = 0.9885), so the hypothesis was accepted. The combination of Poisson constraint and the creation of a resin-inter-penetrating layer sensitive to the elastic modulus of the resin may provide an explanation of the strengthening mechanism.

  1. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists? Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bj?rg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the de...

  2. Effect of deproteinization and tubular occlusion on microtensile bond strength and marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Baseggio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dentin adhesion procedure presents limitations, especially regarding to lifetime stability of formed hybrid layer. Alternative procedures have been studied in order to improve adhesion to dentin. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of deproteinization or dentin tubular occlusion, as well as the combination of both techniques, on microtensile bond strength (µTBS and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Extracted erupted human third molars were randomly divided into 4 groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with one of the following procedures: (A 35% phosphoric acid gel (PA + adhesive system (AS; (B PA + 10% NaOCl + AS; (C PA + oxalate + AS and (D PA + oxalate + 10% NaOCl + AS. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The microleakage scores were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Significance level was set at 0.05 for all analyses. RESULTS: µTBS data presented statistically lower values for groups D and B, ranking data as A>C>B>D. The use of oxalic acid resulted in microleakage reduction along the tooth/restoration interface, being significant when used alone. On the other hand, the use of 10% NaOCl alone or in combination with oxalic acid, resulted in increased microleakage. CONCLUSIONS: Dentin deproteinization with 10% NaOCl or in combination with oxalate significantly compromised both the adhesive bond strength and the microleakage at interface. Tubular occlusion prior to adhesive system application seems to be a useful technique to reduce marginal microleakage.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Simulated Immature Teeth Restored with Glass Fiber Posts, Intracanal Composite Resin, and Experimental Dentine Posts

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Aggarwal, Akarshak

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP), experimental dentine posts (DP) or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR). Materials and Methods. Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5?mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-p...

  4. A prospective 8-year follow-up of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth of children and adolescents in Public Dental Health Service: reasons for replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Höigaard, Ruth

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate reasons for replacement and repair of posterior resin composite (RC) restorations placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service in Denmark. All posterior RC placed consecutively by 115 dentists over a period of 4 years were evaluated at baseline and up to 8 years later. The endpoint of each restoration was defined when repair or replacement was performed. The influence of patient, dentist and material factors on reasons for repair or replacement was investigated. A total of 4,355 restorations were placed. Replacements comprised 406 and repairs 125 restorations. The cumulative survival rate at 8 years was 84 %. Failed restorations were most frequently seen due to secondary caries (57 %), post-operative sensitivity (POS) (10 %) and RC fracture (6 %). POS was observed in 1.5 % of the evaluations and reported more often in girls and from teeth restored with a base material. Older dentists showed lower proportion of replaced restorations due to secondary caries than younger dentists. Posterior RC restorations in children and adolescents performed in general practice showed a good durability with annual failure rates of 2 %. The main reason for failure was secondary caries followed by post-operative sensitivity and resin composite fracture. A high proportion of replaced/repaired RC restorations were caused by primary caries in a non-filled surface. Secondary caries was the main reason for failure of RC in children and young adults. More teeth with post-operative sensitivity and a shorter longevity of restorations were observed when a base material was used.

  5. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  6. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simen E. Kopperud

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%, followed by restoration fractures (25.1%. Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01, employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS (p < 0.01 and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03. There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01. Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  7. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-04-22

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations.

  8. R-curve behavior and micromechanisms of fracture in resin based dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M B; Ferracane, J L; Kruzic, J J

    2009-10-01

    The fracture properties and micromechanisms of fracture for two commercial dental composites, one microhybrid (FiltekZ250) and one nanofill (FiltekSupreme Plus), were studied by measuring fracture resistance curves (R-curves) using pre-cracked compact-tension specimens and by conducting both unnotched and double notched four point beam bending experiments. Four point bending experiments showed about 20% higher mean flexural strength of the microhybrid composite compared to the nanofill. Rising fracture resistance was observed over approximately 1 mm of crack extension for both composites, and higher overall fracture resistance was observed for the microhybrid composite. Such fracture behavior was attributed to crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms that developed with crack extension, causing the toughness to increase. Despite the lower strength and toughness of the present nanofill composite, based on micromechanics observations, large nanoparticle clusters appear to be as effective at deflecting cracks and imparting toughening as solid particles. Thus, with further microstructural refinement, it should be possible to achieve a superior combination of aesthetic and mechanical performance using the nanocluster approach for dental composites.

  9. Finite Element Analysis of the Endodontically-treated Maxillary Premolars restored with Composite Resin along with Glass Fiber Insertion in Various Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navimipour, Elmira Jafari; Firouzmandi, Maryam; Mirhashemi, Fatemeh Sadat

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of three methods of glass fiber insertion on stress distribution pattern and cusp movement of the root-filled maxillary premolars using finite element method (FEM) analysis. A three-dimensional (3 D) FEM model of a sound upper premolar tooth and four models of root-filled upper premolars with mesiocclusodistal (MOD) cavities were molded and restored with: (1) Composite resin only (NF); (2) Composite resin along with a ribbon of glass fiber placed in the occlusal third (OF); (3) Composite resin along with a ribbon of glass fiber placed circumferentially in the cervical third (CF), and (4) Composite resin along with occlusal and circumferential fibers (OCF). A static vertical load was applied to calculate the stress distributions. Structural analysis program by Solidworks were used for FEM analysis. Von-Mises stress values and cusp movements induced by occlusal loading were evaluated. Maximum Von-Mises stress of enamel occurred in sound tooth, followed by NF, CF, OF and OCF. Maximum Von-Mises stress of dentin occurred in sound tooth, followed by OF, OCF, CF and NF. Stress distribution patterns of OF and OCF were similar. Maximum overall stress values were concentrated in NF. Although stress distribution patterns of NF and CF were found as similar, CF showed lower stress values. Palatal cusp movement was more than buccal cusp in all of the models. The results of our study indicated that while the circumferential fiber had little effect on overall stress concentration, it provided a more favorable stress distribution pattern in cervical region. The occlusal fiber reduced the average stress in the entire structure but did not reduce cuspal movement. Incorporating glass fiber in composite restorations may alter the stress state within the structure depending on fiber position.

  10. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  11. Effects of molecular structure of the resins on the volumetric shrinkage and the mechanical strength of dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L U; Kim, J W; Kim, C K

    2006-09-01

    To prepare a dental composite that has a low amount of curing shrinkage and excellent mechanical strength, various 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) derivatives were synthesized via molecular structure design, and afterward, properties of their mixtures were explored. Bis-GMA derivatives, which were obtained by substituting methyl groups for hydrogen on the phenyl ring in the Bis-GMA, exhibited lower curing shrinkage than Bis-GMA, whereas their viscosities were higher than that of Bis-GMA. Other Bis-GMA derivatives, which contained a glycidyl methacrylate as a molecular end group exhibited reduced curing shrinkage and viscosity. Methoxy substitution for hydroxyl groups on the Bis-GMA derivatives was performed for the further reduction of the viscosity and curing shrinkage. Various resin mixtures, which had the same viscosity as the commercial one, were prepared, and their curing shrinkage was examined. A resin mixture containing 2,2-bis[3,5-dimethyl, 4-(2-methoxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane] (TMBis-M-GMA) as a base resin and 4-tert-butylphenoxy-2-methyoxypropyl methacrylate (t-BP-M-GMA) as a diluent exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage among them. The composite prepared from this resin mixture also exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage along with enhanced mechanical properties.

  12. In Vitro Solubility and Wear Rates of Silorane and Dimethacrylate Resin Based Composite Restorative Materials under Different pH Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Tarek A; Tubaigy, Khalid M; Raffat, Eman M; Al-Agha, Ebaa I

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different pH solutions on the solubility and wear resistance of Silorane and dimethacrylate resin based composite restorative materials. Materials and Methods: Two different resin based restorative materials (Filtek Silorane P90 and hybrid composite Z100) were tested. Different pH solutions (2.5 and 5) also were used. A total of 60 samples of each type of selected composite were prepared. Specimens were immersed in each type of pH solutions (2.5 and 5) and distilled water as a control group for 24 h then the specimens was subjected to the required mechanical tests. Results: Significant statistical differences were observed regarding water solubility and wear values in different pH solutions. Filtek Silorane presented the smallest values of water solubility and wear values. Conclusion: Under tested experimental conditions, the pH solutions used in this study showed pronounced effect on water solubility and wear values of both two restorative materials. Finally, within the limitation of this study we recommended to use Filtek Silorane (P90) instead of hybrid (Z100) due to its low solubility values under different pH solutions. PMID:26225097

  13. A comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth, with variable marginal ridge thicknesses, restored with composite resin and composite resin reinforced with Ribbond: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Kalburge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anatomic shape of maxillary premolars show a tendency towards separation of their cusps during mastication after endodontic treatment. Preservation of the marginal ridge of endodontically treated and restored premolars can act as a strengthening factor and improve the fracture resistance. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of varying thickness of marginal ridge on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary premolars restored with composite and Ribbond reinforced composites. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty, freshly extracted, non carious human mature maxillary premolars were selected for this experimental in vitro study. The teeth were randomly assigned in to twelve groups ( n = 10. Group 1 received no preparation. All the premolars in other groups were root canal treated. In subgroups of 3 and 4, DO cavities were prepared while MOD cavities were prepared for all subgroups of group 2, the dimensions of the proximal boxes were kept uniform. In group 3 and 4 the dimensions of the mesial marginal ridge were measured using a digital Vernier caliper as 2 mm, 1.5 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm in the respective subgroups. All samples in groups 2.2 and all the subgroups of 3 were restored with a dentin bonding agent and resin composite. The teeth in group 2.3 and all subgroups of 4 were restored with composite reinforced with Ribbond fibers. The premolars were submitted to axial compression up to failure at 45 degree angle to a palatal cusp in universal testing machine. The mean load necessary to fracture was recorded in Newtons and the data was analysed. Results: There was a highly significant difference between mean values of force required to fracture teeth in group 1 and all subgroups of group 2, 3 and 4 (i.e., P < 0.01 Conclusion: On the basis of static loading, preserving the mesial marginal ridge with thicknesses of mm, 1.5 mm, 1 mm and 0.5 mm, composite restored and Ribbond reinforced composite restored

  14. The effect of glass fiber posts and ribbons on the fracture strength of teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin post and cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Mariko; Komada, Wataru; Otake, Shiho; Inagaki, Tasuku; Omori, Satoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the fracture strength and mode of failure of structurally compromised teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin with four different systems. Sixty endodontically treated bovine teeth were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolars with flared root canals. The roots were divided into four groups of 15 specimens each based on the type of restoration: composite resin core only (control), glass fiber post, cylindroid glass fiber ribbons, and glass fiber post and ribbons. All specimens were loaded until fracture occurred using a universal testing machine. Average fracture loads were compared with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The modes of failure were observed and the Fisher exact test and Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis. The fiber post and ribbon group (1035.70N) and the fiber ribbon group (881.77N) showed significantly higher fracture strength than the controls (567.97N) (pcomposite resin post and cores in the case of the dentin within the thin root canal wall. Based on the results, this study recommends the combined use of glass fiber post and ribbons. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Three-year clinical evaluation of different restorative resins in class I restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A R; Ustunkol, I; Ozgunaltay, G; Dayangac, B

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the three-year clinical performance of a nanofilled resin composite, a packable resin composite, and silorane-based resin restorations in Class I occlusal cavities. Twenty-eight patients with at least three similar-sized occlusal lesions in molar teeth participated in the study. A total of 84 Class I occlusal restorations were placed: 28 with nanofilled resin composite (Filtek Supreme), 28 with packable resin composite (P60), and 28 with silorane-based resin (Filtek Silorane). Filtek Supreme and P60 were used with their respective etch-and-rinse adhesive system, Adper Single Bond 2, and Filtek Silorane was used with its respective self-etch adhesive, Filtek Silorane Adhesive. All restorations were placed by the same operator. The restorations were evaluated at baseline, at six months, and annually for three years according to modified US Public Health Service criteria by two calibrated examiners who did not know which restorative resin had been used. The three restorative materials for each category were compared using the χ (2) test at a significance level of 0.05. Cochran's Q test was used to compare the changes across the five time points for each restorative material. McNemar's test followed by Bonferroni adjustment was used when significance differences were found. At the end of the three years, 60 restorations were evaluated in 20 patients, with a recall rate of 71.4%. The retention rate was 100% for all restorative resins. Eight restorations from the P60 group, ten from the Filtek Supreme group, and nine from the Filtek Silorane group were rated Bravo for marginal discoloration. For marginal adaptation, three P60, five Filtek Supreme, and 11 Filtek Silorane restorations were rated Bravo. No statistically significant differences in overall clinical performance were found between the restorative materials except for marginal adaptation. P60 showed the best marginal adaptation at the end of the three years. No

  16. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum.

  17. Does the adhesive strategy influence the post-operative sensitivity in adult patients with posterior resin composite restorations?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Alessandra; Dourado Loguercio, Alessandro; Schroeder, Marcos; Luque-Martinez, Issis; Masterson, Danielle; Cople Maia, Lucianne

    2015-09-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed on the risk and intensity of postoperative sensitivity (POS) in posterior resin composite restorations bonded with self-etch (SE) and etch-and-rinse (ER) adhesives. A comprehensive search was performed in the MEDLINE via PubMeb, Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO and Cochrane Library and SIGLE without restrictions. The abstracts of the annual conference of the IADR (1990-2014), unpublished and ongoing trials registry were also searched. Dissertations and theses were searched using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periodicos Capes Theses databases. We included randomized clinical trials that compared the clinical effectiveness of SE and ER used for direct resin composite restorations in permanent dentition of adult patients. The risk/intensity of POS was the primary outcome. The risk of bias tool of the Cochrane Collaboration was used. The meta-analysis was performed on the studies considered 'low' risk of bias. After duplicates removal, 2600 articles were identified but only 29 remained in the qualitative synthesis. Five were considered to be 'high' risk of bias and eleven were considered to be 'unclear' in the key domains, yielding 13 studies for meta-analysis. The overall relative risk of the spontaneous POS was 0.63 (95% CI 0.35 to 1.15), while the stimuli-induced POS was 0.99 (95% CI 0.63 to 1.56). The overall standardized mean difference was 0.08 (95%CI -0.19 to 0.35). No overall effect was revealed in the meta-analyses, meaning that no influence of the ER or SE strategy on POS. The type of adhesive strategy (ER or SE) for posterior resin composite restorations does not influence the risk and intensity of POS. CRD42014006617. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A long-term evaluation of alternative treatments to replacement of resin-based composite restorations: results of a seven-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Blaser, Paul K; Mondragon, Eduardo; Mjör, Ivar A

    2009-12-01

    In a seven-year prospective cohort study, the authors assessed the longevity of defective resin-based composite (RBC) restorations that were not treated or were treated by means of repair, sealing, refinishing or total replacement. They also aimed to identify and quantify the main reasons clinicians diagnosed restorations as defective. Thirty-seven patients--19 women and 18 men--who were aged 27 through 78 years (mean = 57 years, standard deviation [SD] = 13 years) and had a total of 88 defective restorations participated in the study. Two of the authors assigned each restoration to one of five treatment groups, depending on the patient's treatment need: repair (n = 25), sealing of defective margins (n = 12), refinishing (n = 19), replacement (n = 16) and no treatment (n = 16). The authors conducted a survival analysis (according to modified U.S. Public Health Service criteria) at baseline and again at six months, one year, two years and seven years after treatment. The authors determined that the main reasons clinicians diagnosed the 88 restorations as being defective were marginal discoloration (n = 53, 60.2 percent), marginal degradation (n = 18, 20.5 percent) and color mismatch (n = 17, 19.3 percent). The authors examined 69 (78 percent) restorations at six months, 68 (77 percent) after one year, 62 (70 percent) after two years and 53 after seven years (60 percent). The percentages of failed restorations for each treatment after seven years were 0 percent for repair, 0 percent for sealing of defective margins, 18 percent for refinishing, 21 percent for replacement and 23 percent for no treatment. The P value for the log-rank test of equality for these groups was .36. Restorations degraded to varying degrees in all criteria, and the survival of restorations differed among treatment approaches. Longitudinal data collected across seven years support the viability of all nonreplacement restoration treatment strategies.

  19. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aimof this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Methods: Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer......-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  20. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with different heights of crown ferrule restored with prefabricated carbon fiber post and composite resin core by intermittent loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jonas Alves; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Zogheib, Lucas Villaça

    2008-11-01

    This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with prefabricated carbon fiber posts and varying quantities of coronal dentin. Sixty freshly extracted upper canines were randomly divided into groups of 10 teeth each. The specimens were exposed to 250,000 cycles in a controlled chewing simulator. All intact specimens were subjected to a static load (N) in a universal testing machine at 45 degrees to the long axis. Data were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (alpha = .05). Significant differences (P carbon fiber post and composite resin core.

  1. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, L C; Araújo, F C; Zancopé, B R; Hanashiro, F S; Nobre-dos-Santos, M; Youssef, M N; Souza-Zaroni, W C

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm(2); G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations.

  2. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC or composite resin (CR restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control: cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF. The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations.

  3. Direct composite resin layering techniques for creating lifelike CAD/CAM-fabricated composite resin veneers and crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSage, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Direct composite resin layering techniques preserve sound tooth structure and improve function and esthetics. However, intraoral placement techniques present challenges involving isolation, contamination, individual patient characteristics, and the predictability of restorative outcomes. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations enable dentists to better handle these variables and provide durable restorations in an efficient and timely manner; however, milled restorations may appear monochromatic and lack proper esthetic characteristics. For these reasons, an uncomplicated composite resin layering restoration technique can be used to combine the benefits of minimally invasive direct restorations and the ease and precision of indirect CAD/CAM restorations. Because most dentists are familiar with and skilled at composite resin layering, the use of such a technique can provide predictable and highly esthetic results. This article describes the layered composite resin restoration technique. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with glass fiber posts, intracanal composite resin, and experimental dentine posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Jha, Padmanabh; Aggarwal, Akarshak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP), experimental dentine posts (DP) or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR). Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5 mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction; Group 2: GFP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 3: DP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 4: PARACORE dual cure resin. A standardized core was built in all groups except in Group 5. Each of the specimens was tested for fracture resistance by universal testing machine. The mean fracture resistance were 817 ± 27.753, 1164.6 ± 21.624, 994.4 ± 96.8747, 873.8 ± 105.446 and 493.7 ± 6.945 newtons for Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Independent "t" test revealed statistically significant discrepancies, in the fracture resistance among the 4 groups except Group 1 and Group 4 (P < 0.05). This study suggests that GFP and DP may be preferred for additional reinforcement of immature teeth.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Simulated Immature Teeth Restored with Glass Fiber Posts, Intracanal Composite Resin, and Experimental Dentine Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeta Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth restored with gutta-percha, glass fiber posts (GFP, experimental dentine posts (DP or Intracanal composite Resin (ICR. Materials and Methods. Fifty maxillary canines were decoronated, standardized and enlarged until, number 5 Peeso reamers were allowed to simulate immature teeth. After placement of 5 mm of MTA, the canals were divided into 5 groups and filled as follows: Group 1: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction; Group 2: GFP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 3: DP luted with PARACORE dual cure resin; Group 4: PARACORE dual cure resin. A standardized core was built in all groups except in Group 5. Each of the specimens was tested for fracture resistance by universal testing machine. Results. The mean fracture resistance were 817 ± 27.753, 1164.6 ± 21.624, 994.4 ± 96.8747, 873.8 ± 105.446 and 493.7 ± 6.945 newtons for Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively. Independent “t” test revealed statistically significant discrepancies, in the fracture resistance among the 4 groups except Group 1 and Group 4 (P<0.05. Conclusions. This study suggests that GFP and DP may be preferred for additional reinforcement of immature teeth.

  6. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  7. Assessment of radiopacity of restorative composite resins with various target distances and exposure times and a modified aluminum step wedge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejeh Mir, Arash Poorsattar [Dentistry Student Research Committee (DSRC), Dental Materials Research Center, Dentistry School, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bejeh Mir, Morvarid Poorsattar [Private Practice of Orthodontics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-09-15

    ANSI/ADA has established standards for adequate radiopacity. This study was aimed to assess the changes in radiopacity of composite resins according to various tube-target distances and exposure times. Five 1-mm thick samples of Filtek P60 and Clearfil composite resins were prepared and exposed with six tube-target distance/exposure time setups (i.e., 40 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.16 seconds, 30 cm, 0.12 seconds; 15 cm, 0.2 seconds; 15 cm, 0.12 seconds) performing at 70 kVp and 7 mA along with a 12-step aluminum stepwedge (1 mm incremental steps) using a PSP digital sensor. Thereafter, the radiopacities measured with Digora for Windows software 2.5 were converted to absorbencies (i.e., A=-log (1-G/255)), where A is the absorbency and G is the measured gray scale). Furthermore, the linear regression model of aluminum thickness and absorbency was developed and used to convert the radiopacity of dental materials to the equivalent aluminum thickness. In addition, all calculations were compared with those obtained from a modified 3-step stepwedge (i.e., using data for the 2nd, 5th, and 8th steps). The radiopacities of the composite resins differed significantly with various setups (p<0.001) and between the materials (p<0.001). The best predicted model was obtained for the 30 cm 0.2 seconds setup (R2=0.999). Data from the reduced modified stepwedge was remarkable and comparable with the 12-step stepwedge. Within the limits of the present study, our findings support that various setups might influence the radiopacity of dental materials on digital radiographs.

  8. Root Canal Retreatment Followed By Root-End Resection and Direct Veneer Restoration Using Resin Composite of Maxillary Right Central Incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diatri Nari Ratih

    2012-06-01

    restore tooth in order to accomplish satisfactory clinical outcome. The purpose of this case report is to describe the root canal retreatment followed by root-and resection and direct veneer restoration with resin composite of maxillary right central incisor. Case and Treatment: A 17 year-old male patient was referred for endodontic treatment of his maxillary right central incisor. In the clinical examination, it was observed that the color of tooth was brownish, a defect of enamel with white line on the labial aspect, and a partial detach of resin composite restoration. The tooth was tenderness to percussion, but palpation and mobility were whitin normal limits. Radiographic examination revealed a lack of hermetic obturation and an apparent radiolucency around the root apex. Root canal retreatment followed by root-and resection was performed. Afterwards, direct veneering with resin composite was carried out to permanently restore the tooth. Recall evalution was showed that the patient was asymptomatic, periapical lesion disappeared and patient was satisfactory with the restoration. Conclusion: It can be concluded that when root canal retreatment is unsuccessful, endodontic surgery is an important treatment option to improve periapical healing and increase the long term success. The choice of aesthetic permanent restoration is also crucial consideration to overcome the unaesthetic problems, hence the optimal treatment outcome can be achieved.

  9. The effect of a fiber reinforced cavity configuration on load bearing capacity and failure mode of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM resin composite overlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, G.T.; Saratti, C.M.; Cattani-Lorente, M.; Feilzer, A.J.; Scherrer, S.; Krecji, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the fracture strength and the mode of failure of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM overlays with fiber reinforced composite build-up of the pulp chamber. Methods 40 Devitalized molars were cut over the CEJ and divided into five groups (n = 8). The pulp

  10. In vitro evaluation of topical fluoride pH and their effect on surface hardness of composite resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujeeb, Abdul; Mansuri, Samir; Hussain, Seema Abid; Ramaswamy, Kausar

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate the pH and fluoride ion uptake with surface hardness of composite resin based restorative materials after topical fluoride application. Forty disks of each of test materials Composite (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), Resin modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and Compomer (Dyract AP) were made and ten disks of each material were placed in different test solutions - 1.23% APF gel, Sodium fluoride mouth rinse, 0.9% neutral fluoride and distilled water (Control group). After 36 hours of immersion, specimens were subjected to microhardness testing machine for evaluation of surface hardness. The greater hardness deterioration for all materials resulted with 1.23% APF gel when compared to the control group. Composite (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) showed 17.13 VHN (control group 59.11 VHN). Vitremer showed 9.71 VHN (control group 37.71 VHN). Compomer showed 19.22 VHN (control group 36.78 VHN). 1.23% ApF gel significantly decreased hardness of composite, Vitremer and Compomer. Hardness deterioration associated with sodium fluoride mouth rinse and 0.9% neutral fluoride was less compared to 1.23% ApF gel.

  11. Joggle lap shear testing of deep occlusal composite restorations lined with Dycal, Dycal LC, conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovska Vera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The longevity of a dental restoration may be predicted to some degree by its adhesive ability, and this, in turn, can be measured by bond strength testing between restorative materials and tooth structure. The aim of this study was to test an innovative joggle lap shearing jig that integrates the tooth and the entire biomechanical unit into testing, to compare the shear bond strengths of Class I occlusal composite restorations in deep cavity preparations lined with Dycal, Dycal LC, conventional glass ionomer or resin-modified glass ionomer. The mode of failure (adhesive, cohesive, mixed after debonding was determined by stereomicroscopy. Methods. A total of 150 standardized occlusal cavities were prepared and divided into five groups. The group I cavities (n = 30 were coated with adhesive (ExciTE®F and filled directly with composite (TetricEvoCeram. The group II and III cavities were lined with Dycal (n = 30 or Dycal LC (n = 30 before placing composite. The groups IV and V specimens were based with Fuji IX (n = 30 or Fuji II LC (n = 30. Shear bond strengths were determined with a universal testing machine and fractured bonding sites were analyzed under stereomicroscope. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test (p Fuji IX > Dycal LC > Dycal.

  12. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  13. Scanning electron microscopic study of teeth restored with fiber posts and composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Sridhara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the thickness of resin dentin interface zones (RDIZ obtained by luting carbon fiber post to intra-radicular dentin, either with All-Bond 2 bonding agent and C and B composite cement or Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. Materials and Methods: Twenty single rooted mandibular premolars of similar sizes were prepared for the carbon fiber post after biomechanical preparation and obturation. They were divided into two groups, Group 1 and 2 of 10 samples each. Carbon fiber posts used for Group 1 samples were luted using All-Bond 2 and C and B cement. For Group 2 carbon fiber posts were luted using Panavia F dentin-bonding system and Panavia F resin cement. All the 20 samples were sectioned longitudinally and marked at three points on the length of the tooth from the dentin-core interface to the apex at 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm to get coronal, middle, and apical areas, respectively. The formation and thickness (width of the RDIZ at the marked areas was evaluated by scanning electron microscope using ×1000 magnification. The results were statistical analyzed. Results: Irrespective of the adhesive systems used all specimens showed a RDIZ formation. Microscopic examination of Group 1 showed significantly higher percentage of RDIZ (P < 0.05 than Group 2. RDIZ morphology was easily detectable at coronal and middle areas of all specimens. Conclusion: All-Bond 2 showed denser and wider RDIZ compared with the Panavia F.

  14. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    -based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years....... Results: One hundred and fifty-eight restorations were evaluated after 8 years. Three participants with five restorations (three Xeno III, two Excite) were registered as dropouts. Twenty-one failed restorations (13.3 %) were observed during the follow-up. Twelve in the one-step self-etch adhesive group...... and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. Clinical relevance: The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations....

  15. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  16. Evaluation of microleakage of class II dental composite resin restorations cured with LED or QTH dental curing light; Blind, Cluster Randomized, In vitro cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakavi, Faramarz; Golpasand Hagh, Leila; Sadeghian, Soheila; Freckelton, Virginia; Daraeighadikolaei, Arash; Ghanatir, Elham; Zarnaghash, Najmeh

    2014-07-03

    The aim of this study is to compare the microleakage of Class II dental composite resin restorations which have been cured by three different LED (light emitting diode) light curing modes compared to control samples cured by QTH (quartz tungsten halogen) light curing units (LCUs), to determine the most effective light curing unit and mode of curing. In this experimental study, class II cavities were prepared on 100 sound human premolars which have been extracted for orthodontic treatment. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; three experimental and one control group of 25 teeth each. Experimental groups were cured by either conventional, pulse-delay, or ramped curing modes of LED. The control group was cured for 20 seconds by QTH. The restorations were thermocycled (1000 times, between 5 and 55°C, for 5 seconds dwell time), dyed, sectioned mesio-distally and viewed under stereo-microscope (40×) magnification. Teeth were then scored on a 0 to 4 scale based on the amount of microleakage. The data were analyzed by Chi-square test.No significant difference was demonstrated between the different LCUs (light curing units), or modes of curing, at the enamel side (p > 0.05). At the dentin side, all modes of LED curing could significantly reduce microleakage (p curing improves marginal integrity and seal. High intense curing endangers those aims. Comparison between the three LED mode cured composite resin restorations and QTH curing showed LED curing in all modes is more effective than QTH for reducing microleakage. Both LED and QTH almost completely eliminate the microleakage on the enamel side, however none of them absolutely eliminated microleakage on the dentin side.

  17. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, S R; Moraes, M; Youssef, M N; De Souza-Zaroni, W C; Hanashiro, F S; Brugnera Junior, A; Nobre-dos-Santos, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO 2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO 2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO 2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm −2   +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO 2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey–Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC–C group. It was concluded that CO 2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used. (paper)

  18. Eight-year randomized clinical evaluation of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch or a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to observe the durability of Class II nanohybrid resin composite restorations, placed with two different adhesive systems, in an 8-year follow-up. Seventy-eight participants received at random at least two Class II restorations of the ormocer-based nanohybrid resin composite (Ceram X) bonded with either a one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno III) or a control two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Excite). The 165 restorations were evaluated using slightly modified United States Public Health Services (USPHS) criteria at baseline and then yearly during 8 years. One hundred and fifty-eight restorations were evaluated after 8 years. Three participants with five restorations (three Xeno III, two Excite) were registered as dropouts. Twenty-one failed restorations (13.3%) were observed during the follow-up. Twelve in the one-step self-etch adhesive group (13.5%) and nine in the two-step etch-and-rinse group (13.0%). This resulted in nonsignificant different annual failure rates of 1.69 and 1.63%, respectively. Fracture of restoration was the main reason for failure. Good clinical performance was shown during the 8-year evaluation and no significant difference in overall clinical performance between the two adhesives. Fracture was the main reason for failure. The one-step self-etch adhesive showed a good long-term clinical effectiveness in combination with the nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations.

  19. Clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite with and without an intermediate layer of flowable resin composite: a 7-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite.......The objective of this prospective clinical follow up was to evaluate the long term clinical performance of a hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations with and without intermediate layer of flowable resin composite....

  20. Eighteen-month clinical performance of composite resin restorations with two different adhesive systems for molars affected by molar incisor hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Juliana Feltrin; Fragelli, Camila Bullio; Jeremias, Fabiano; Paschoal, Marco Aurélio Benini; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; de Cássia Loiola Cordeiro, Rita

    2017-06-01

    The restorative management of molars with molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) represents a challenge in the clinical practice with high failure rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical survival of direct composite resin restorations in first permanent molars (FPMs) that are affected by MIH, comparing two adhesive systems. We selected 41 FPMs with MIH from children aged 6-8 years. FPM fully erupted and with restorative treatment needed were the inclusion criteria. We excluded FPMs with destroyed crowns. The FPMs were randomly assigned to two groups: self-etching adhesive (SEA) and total-etch adhesive (TEA). Clinical evaluation was performed by a blinded examiner during 18 months according to the modified US Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. The actuarial method was used to evaluate survival of the restorations, and Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare differences between the groups (α = 5 %). The cumulative survival rates were 100 % at 1 month, 89 % at 6 months, 73 % at 12 months, and 68 % at 18 months in SEA, and 95 % at 1 month, 72 % at 6 months, 59 % at 12 months, and 54 % at 18 months in TEA; there was no significant difference between groups. There was no difference in clinical survival of restorations in FPMs affected by MIH using TEA or SEA adhesives in the end of 18 months. It was suggested that SEAs as well as TEAs can be applied to restore molars affected by MIH, when it is performed a conservative cavity preparation. Once, cavosurface margins (cavity design) in hypomineralized enamel have less bonding capability.

  1. A six-year prospective randomized study of a nano-hybrid and a conventional hybrid resin composite in Class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this 6 year prospective randomized equivalence trial was to evaluate the long-term clinical performance of a new nano-hybrid resin composite (RC) in Class II restorations in an intraindividual comparison with its well-established conventional hybrid RC predecessor. Each of 52 participants received at least two, as similar as possible, Class II restorations. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with an experimental nano-hybrid RC (Exite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n=61) and a conventional hybrid RC (Exite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n=61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then annually during 6 years. Two patient drop outs with 4 restorations (2TEC, 2TC) were registered during the follow-up. A prediction of the caries risk showed that 16 of the evaluated 52 patients were considered as high risk patients. Eight TEC (2 P, 6M) and 6 TC (2P, 4M) restorations failed during the 6 years. The main reason of failure was secondary caries (43%; including the failure fracture+secondary caries it increases to 57.1%). 63% of the recurrent caries lesions were found in high caries risk participants. The overall success rate at six years was 88.1%. No statistical significant difference was found in the overall survival rate between the two investigated RC. The nano-hybrid RC showed good clinical performance during the 6 year evaluation, comparable to the well-established conventional hybrid RC. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BIJELLA Maria Fernanda Borro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37ºC. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37ºC. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey?s test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage.

  3. A randomized controlled three year evaluation of "bulk-filled" posterior resin restorations based on stress decreasing resin technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this randomized controlled prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a flowable resin composite (SDR) bulk fill technique in posterior restorations and to compare it intraindividually with a conventional 2mm resin composite curing technique in a 3-year....... In all cavities a single step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V) was applied. In one of the cavities of each pair, a flowable resin composite (SDR) was placed, in bulk increments up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with a nano......-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono) layer. In the second cavity, the hybrid resin composite was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 3 years. Caries risk and parafunctional habits of the participants were estimated...

  4. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  5. Four-year clinical evaluation of Class II nano-hybrid resin composite restorations bonded with a one-step self-etch and a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this prospective clinical trial was to evaluate the 4-year clinical performance of an ormocer-based nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X; Dentsply/DeTrey) in Class II restorations placed with a one-step self-etch (Xeno III; Dentsply/DeTrey) and two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive...

  6. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of resin composite inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggendorf, Matthias J; Krämer, Norbert; Dippold, Christoph; Vosen, Vera E; Naumann, Michael; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Frankenberger, Roland

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate marginal quality and resin-resin transition of lab made resin composite inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3 mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermo-mechanical loading (TML). MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 40 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentine were elevated 3 mm with different resin composites (G-Cem, Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE), or left untreated. Clearfil Majesty Posterior inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-composite inlay interface was analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2500 thermocylces between +5 °C and +55 °C). Bonding resin composite inlays directly to dentine showed similar amounts of gap-free margins in dentine compared to PBE applied in three consecutive layers (p > 0.05). The groups with self-adhesive resin cements for PBE exhibited significantly more gaps in dentine (p < 0.05). With layered resin composite, PBE is effective in indirect resin composite bonding to deep proximal boxes. Self-adhesive resin cements are not suitable for this indication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of immediate dentine sealing on the fracture strength of lithium disilicate and multiphase resin composite inlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Breemer, Carline R G; Özcan, Mutlu; Cune, Marco S; van der Giezen, Rianne; Kerdijk, Wouter; Gresnigt, Marco M M

    Purpose: Limited information is available on the effect of Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS) on the fracture strength of indirect partial posterior restorations. This study evaluated the effect of IDS on the fracture strength and failure types of two indirect restorative materials. Materials and

  8. Microleakage of Composite Resin Restorations Using a Type of Fifth and Two Types of Seventh Generations of Adhesive Systems: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Tabari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent dentin adhesive systems etching of enamel/dentin are achieved simultaneously. The objective was to evaluate the microleakage of composite restorations using Single Bond2 (5th generation, Clearfil S3 Bond and G Bond (7th generation. Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on  45 extracted intact premolars with gingival margins at the cementoenamel junction and they were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=15 based on the type of adhesives: Single Bond2 (5th generation, Clearfil S3 Bond and G Bond (7th generation. After applying the adhesives, the cavities were filled with Z250 composite resin. The occlusal and gingival microleakage was evaluated using 2% basic fuchsin staining technique. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni corrected Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The mean rank of occlusal microleakage exhibited significant differences by comparison of G Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Single Bond2 (21.07, 30.67 and 17.27, respectively (P=0.005. There was a significant difference in gingival microleakage of different bonding agents (34.40, 17.83 and 16.77 for G Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond and Single Bond2, respectively (P

  9. Effect of configuration factor on gap formation in hybrid composite resin, low-shrinkage composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Parvin M; Mousavinasab, Sayyed M; Hasanli, Elham

    2015-05-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is one of the important factors in creation of gap between dental structure and composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of configuration factor (C-factor) on gap formation in a hybrid composite resin, a low shrinkage composite resin and a resin modified glass ionomer restorative material. Cylindrical dentin cavities with 5.0 mm diameter and three different depths (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm) were prepared on the occlusal surface of 99 human molars and the cavities assigned into three groups (each of 33). Each group contained three subgroups depend on the different depths and then cavities restored using resin modified glass ionomer (Fuji II LC Improved) and two type composite resins (Filtek P90 and Filtek Z250). Then the restorations were cut into two sections in a mesiodistal direction in the middle of restorations. Gaps were measured on mesial, distal and pulpal floor of the cavities, using a stereomicroscope. Data analyses using Kruskal-Wallist and Mann-Whitney tests. Increasing C-factor from 1.8 to 3.4 had no effect on the gap formation in two type composite resins, but Fuji II LC Improved showed significant effect of increasing C-factor on gap formation. Taken together, when C-factor increased from 1.8 up to 3.4 had no significant effect on gap formation in two tested resin composites. Although, Filtek P90 restorations showed smaller gap formation in cavities walls compared to Filtek Z250 restorations. High C-factor values generated the largest gap formation. Silorane-based composite was more efficient for cavity sealing than methacrylate-based composites and resin modified glass ionomer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  11. Three-year clinical performance of two indirect composite inlays compared to direct composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Ozakar-Ilda, Nurcan; Zorba, Yahya O.; Yildiz, Mehmet; Erdem, Vildan; Seven, Nilgun; Demirbuga, Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Despite the incremental build-up of resin composite restorations, their polymerization shrinkage during curing presents a serious problem. Indirect composite resin systems represent an alternative in overcoming some of the deficiencies of direct composite restorations. The hypothesis of the present study states that the clinical performance of restorations may be affected by different generation and application techniques. Study Design: Sixty restorations (20 DI system (Colt?ne/Wha...

  12. Radiopacity Of Glass-ionomer/composite Resin Hybrid Materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Hara A.T.; Serra M.C.; Rodrigues Junior A.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study visually compared the radiopacity of seven restorative materials (3 resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, 3 polyacid-modified composite resins, and 1 conventional glass-ionomer cement) to a sound tooth structure sample, and an aluminium stepwedge. All hybrid materials were more radiopaque, except for one resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, than both the tooth structure and conventional glass-ionomer cement.

  13. Seven-year clinical evaluation of painful cracked teeth restored with a direct composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdam, Niek J M; Roeters, Joost J M; Loomans, Bas A C; Bronkhorst, Ewald M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate long-term clinical effectiveness of treating painful cracked teeth with a direct bonded composite resin restoration. The hypothesis tested was that cracked teeth treated with or without cuspal coverage showed the same performance. Forty-one patients attended a dental practice with a painful cracked tooth that was restored with a direct composite resin restoration. Twenty teeth were restored without and 21 with cuspal coverage. After 7 years, 40 teeth could be evaluated. Three teeth without cuspal coverage needed an endodontic treatment, of which 2 failed as a result of fracture. No significant differences were found for tooth or pulp survival. Three more repairable restoration failures were recorded. Mean annual failure rate of restorations without cuspal coverage was 6%; no failures in restorations with cuspal coverage occurred (P = .009). A direct bonded composite resin restoration can be a successful treatment for a cracked tooth.

  14. The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation as restorative material of damaged tooth tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adioro Soetojo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of methacrylate resin and the derivation (composite resin and dentin bonding in clinical conservative dentistry has been widely developed. This material could be used to restore class I-V cavity with good aesthetic due to the compatible color with tooth. Composite resin adhesion hydrophobically in enamel that is due to mechanic retention in the form of resin tags which penetrates into enamel porosity. Meanwhile hydrophilic dentin bonding adhesion due to the chemical reaction between functional groups of amino collagen with carbonyl in dentin bonding forming amide binding. In addition mechanical retention in which dentin bonding penetrating into nano inter fibrilar cavity then polymerized. The success of methacrylate resin adhesion restoration is decided by enamel porosity, wetting character of resin, wetting contact angle, good etching acid, optimal humidity of tooth surface, the accuracy of dentist during filling is done etc.

  15. Assessment of polymerization contraction stress of three composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cadenaro, M.; Biasotto, M.; Scuor, N.; Breschi, L.; Davidson, C.L.; Di Lenarda, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to measure the development of contraction stress of three composite resin restorative materials during photo-polymerization: a micro-hybrid composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA); a nano-filled composite (Filtek Supreme, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN,

  16. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Repaired Resin Restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engy Fahmy Ismaiel Fekry Abaza

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, growing demands by patients for mercury-free esthetic restorations had markedly increased the use of resin composites in restorative dentistry. However, despite the continuing development of resin composites with improved properties, several factors, such as discoloration, color mismatch, wear; chipping or bulk fracture might present clinical problems (Mjor and Gordan. 2002, Vichi et al. 2004 and Kolbeck et al. 2006). As a result, the clinician should decide whether to replace or simply repair these restorations. Total replacement of the restoration might be regarded as over-treatment since in most cases, large portions of the restorations might be clinically and radio graphically considered free of failure. Moreover, complete removal of the restoration inevitably resulted in weakening of the tooth, unnecessary removal of intact dental tissues, more money and time consuming. For these reasons, the repair of the restoration instead of its removal would be a favorable procedure (Lucena-Martin et al. 2001, Frankenberger et al. 2003 a and Oztas et al. 2003). The key element in the determination of successful repair procedures was the adequate bond strength between the existing resin composite and the new one. Various methods have been suggested to improve the bond strength of the repaired resin restorations (Tezvergil et al. 2003 and Bonstein et al. 2005). Mechanical and/or chemical treatments had been investigated for preparation of the aged resin restorations to be repaired (Tezvergil et al. 2003, Ozcan et al. 2005 and Hannig et al. 2006). These treatments were introduced to counteract the problems of aged resin restorations which were limited amount of residual free radicals available for reaction with the repair material, contaminated surface, and highly cross-linked resin matrix ( Dall Oca et al. 2006 and Papacchini et al. 2007 a) Previous studies emphasized that mechanical treatments are the most important factor in obtaining optimal repair

  17. Marginal microleakage of cervical composite resin restorations bonded using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives: two dimensional vs. three dimensional methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was evaluated the marginal microleakage of two different adhesive systems before and after aging with two different dye penetration techniques. Materials and Methods Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 48 human molars. Clearfil SE Bond and Single Bond (self-etching and etch-and-rinse systems, respectively were applied, each to half of the prepared cavities, which were restored with composite resin. Half of the specimens in each group underwent 10,000 cycles of thermocycling. Microleakage was evaluated using two dimensional (2D and three dimensional (3D dye penetration techniques separately for each half of each specimen. Data were analyzed with SPSS 11.5 (SPSS Inc., using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (α = 0.05. Results The difference between the 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of Single bond groups (p = 0.002. The differences between 2D and 3D microleakage evaluation techniques were significant at both the occlusal and cervical margins of Clearfil SE Bond groups (p = 0.017 and p = 0.002, respectively. The difference between the 2D and 3D techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of non-aged groups (p = 0.003. The difference between these two techniques was significant at the occlusal margins of the aged groups (p = 0.001. The Mann-Whitney test showed significant differences between the two techniques only at the occlusal margins in all specimens. Conclusions Under the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the 3D technique has the capacity to detect occlusal microleakage more precisely than the 2D technique.

  18. Marginal adaptation of composite resins under two adhesive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dačić, Stefan; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolić, Marija; Cenić, Milica; Dačić-Simonović, Dragica

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, different adhesive techniques were used to set up fillings with composite resins. After the application of etch and rinse or self etch adhesive technique, marginal adaptation of composite fillings was estimated by the length of margins without gaps, and by the microretention of resin in enamel and dentin. The study material consisted of 40 extracted teeth. Twenty Class V cavities were treated with 35% phosphorous acid and restored after rinsing by Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Ultimate-ASB/FU 3M ESPE composite system. The remaining 20 cavities were restored by Adper Easy One-AEO/FU 3M ESPE composite system. Marginal adaptation of composite fillings was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The etch and rinse adhesive technique showed a significantly higher percentage of margin length without gaps (in enamel: 92.5%, in dentin: 57.3%), compared with the self-etch technique with lower percentage of margin length without gaps, in enamel 70.4% (p resin tugs in interprismatic spaces of enamel, while the dentin microretention was composed of adhesive and hybrid layers with resin tugs in dentin canals. In the second technique, resin tugs were rarely seen and a microgap was dominant along the border of restoration margins. The SEM analysis showed a better marginal adaptation of composite resin to enamel and dentin with better microretention when the etch and rinse adhesive procedure was applied. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Three-year clinical performance of two indirect composite inlays compared to direct composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozakar-Ilda, Nurcan; Zorba, Yahya O.; Yildiz, Mehmet; Erdem, Vildan; Seven, Nilgun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Despite the incremental build-up of resin composite restorations, their polymerization shrinkage during curing presents a serious problem. Indirect composite resin systems represent an alternative in overcoming some of the deficiencies of direct composite restorations. The hypothesis of the present study states that the clinical performance of restorations may be affected by different generation and application techniques. Study Design: Sixty restorations (20 DI system (Coltène/Whaledent AG, Altstätten, Switzerland) composite inlays, 20 Tescera ATL system (BISCO Inc. Schaumburg, Illinois, USA) composite inlays, and 20 direct composites) were applied to premolar teeth in 49 patients. Restorations were clinically evaluated by two examiners. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks, and X2 tests. Results: The Tescera ATL system performed significantly better than both direct composite restorations (pinlay, direct composite restorations, indirect composite restorations. PMID:23524423

  20. Effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç Ata, Gül; Gokay, Osman; Müjdeci, Arzu; Kivrak, Tugba Congara; Mokhtari Tavana, Armin

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites. Two methacrylate-based (Arabesk Top, Grandio) and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane) resin composites were used. 110 cylindrical samples of each resin composite were prepared (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter), polished and stored in distilled water (37°C for 24 hours). They were randomly divided into 11 groups (n= 10) and color measurements were taken. Then the samples were immersed in tap water (control), a black tea, a green tea or one of the eight herbal-fruit teas (37°C for 1 week) and subsequently subjected to the final color measurements. The color change of samples (ΔE*) was calculated, data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. Teas, resin composites and their interactions were significant (P= 0.000). All the teas and control caused color changes in all three resin composites. Rosehip tea caused the most color changes, while tap water showed the least in all resin composites. Arabesk Top had the most staining potential in all the teas and control, whereas Filtek Silorane was the most stain resistant except Grandio immersed in sage tea. Color stability of all resin composites used were affected from both structure of resin materials and constituents of teas used. All resin composites were susceptible to staining by all teas especially rosehip tea. Arabesk Top composite showed the greatest color susceptibility in all teas and Filtek Silorane the least with one exception. Color of resin composites can be negatively affected from teas consumed. Clinicians should advise patients that drinking different kind of teas could intensify surface staining of resin based restorations.

  1. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison between published clinical success of direct resin composite restorations in vital posterior teeth in 1995-2005 and 2006-2016 periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvanforoush, N; Palamara, J; Wong, R H; Burrow, M F

    2017-06-01

    Composites are increasing in popularity as restorative materials. This growing role indicates the necessity of studies on their clinical outcome. In this study, clinical studies published on the performance of posterior composite restorations were included except those of less than a 24-month assessment period. Results of non-vital, anterior or primary teeth and cervical single-surface restorations were also excluded. Records about composite type, number of final recall restorations, failure/survival rate, assessment period and failure reasons were analysed for each decade. Overall survival/failure rates for studies in 1995-2005 were 89.41%/10.59% and for 2006-2016 were 86.87%/13.13%, respectively. In 1995-2005, the reasons for failure were secondary caries (29.47%) and composite fracture (28.84%) with low tooth fracture (3.45%) compared with reasons of failure in 2006-2016, which were secondary caries (25.68%), composite fracture (39.07%), and tooth fracture (23.76%). An increase in incidence of composite fracture, tooth fracture and need for endodontic treatment as failure reasons was noted in the latter decade in addition to a decrease in secondary caries, postoperative sensitivity, unsatisfactory marginal adaptation and wear. The overall rates of failure showed little difference, but the causes showed a notable change. This is believed to be a reflection of increased use of composites for larger restorations and possibly changes of material characteristics. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  4. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I.; Domb, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  5. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  6. Randomized clinical comparison of endodontically treated teeth restored with amalgam or with fiber posts and resin composite: five-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannocci, Francesco; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Worthington, Helen V; Watson, Timothy F; Pitt Ford, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Prospective clinical studies comparing the results of different types of restorations of endodontically treated teeth are lacking. This study compared the clinical success rate of endodontically treated premolars restored with fiber posts and direct composite to the restorations of premolars using amalgam. Premolars with Class II carious lesions were selected and randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (1) restoration with amalgam or (2) restoration with fiber posts and composite. One hundred and nine teeth were included in Group 1 and 110 in Group 2. Patients were recalled after 1, 3 and 5 years. No statistically significant difference was found between the proportion of failed teeth in the two experimental groups. Significant differences were observed between the proportion of root fractures (p=0.029) and caries (p=0.047), with more root fractures and less caries observed in the teeth restored with amalgam at the five-year recall. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that restorations with fiber posts and composite were found to be more effective than amalgam in preventing root fractures but less effective in preventing secondary caries.

  7. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Naeimi Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N=3 and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel shades had the highest translucency. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2 to C2 of regular body shades and also from A4 to C4 of opaque dentine shades of Esthet.X composite resin. Grey enamel shade had a significantly higher diffuse translucency compared to clear and yellow enamel shades. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2B to D2B and also in diffuse translucency from A4D to C6D shades of Filtek Supreme composite resin. It can be concluded that the color of the composite resins tested in this study had a significant effect on their translucency. Information on the translucency of different shades of composite resins can be very useful for the clinicians in achieving optimal esthetic restorative outcome.

  8. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  9. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Jowkar, Zahra; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divid...

  10. Dentine deproteinization and microleakage around gingival third resin restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Sowmya; B, Mithra; B, Sureshchandra

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: A significant factor in achieving satisfactory adhesion of restorative resins to dentine substrate is the method by which the dentine surface is treated before an adhesive is applied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deproteinization on microleakage around gingival third resin restorations. Materials and Methods: Standardised Class V preparations were made on randomly selected intact upper and lower human molars. These were treated in one of five ways (no treatm...

  11. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  12. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  13. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  14. Degradation of dental resin composites during intra-oral wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yulianto, Heribertus Dedy Kusuma

    2017-01-01

    Dental resin composites have become an integral part of modern dentistry and used worldwide to restore missing tooth structures, to modify tooth color and anatomical contour, and to enhance aesthetics and function. The dentist should be aware that, the aggressive complexity of the oral environment

  15. Effects of abrasive and fiber components in medium on wear of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Ogura, Hideo

    2008-09-01

    Effects of abrasive and fiber components in a medium on the wear behavior of composite resins were evaluated. Calcium diphosphate and methyl cellulose were included in the medium as abrasive and fiber components respectively. A range of 0, 4, or 8% abrasive- or fiber-containing media were applied on a composite resin specimen during a simulated occlusal wear test. Four composite resins, Clearfil AP-X, Z100 Restorative, SOLARE P, and SOLIDEX F, were tested to evaluate the effects of these components in the medium. Presence of abrasive material in the medium increased the wear of composite resins significantly, but its effect differed among the composite resins. Presence of fiber material in the medium significantly decreased the wear of two composite resins, whereas the other two composites showed no significant differences. Nonetheless, presence of fiber in the medium generally tended to prevent the wear of composite resins.

  16. Optical properties of composite restorations influenced by dissimilar dentin restoratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Jovana; Veljovic, Djordje N; Stasic, Jovana N; Savic-Stankovic, Tatjana; Trifkovic, Branka; Miletic, Vesna

    2018-02-02

    To evaluate optical properties (color and translucency) of 'sandwich' restorations of resin-based composites and esthetically unfavorable dentin restoratives. Cylindrical 'dentin' specimens (8mm in diameter and 2mm thick, N=5/group) were prepared using EverX Posterior (GC), Biodentine (Septodont), experimental hydroxyapatite (HAP) or conventional composites (Gradia Direct Posterior, GC; Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z500, 3M ESPE). Capping 'enamel' layers were prepared using composites (Gradia Direct Posterior, Filtek Z250 or Z550) of A1 or A3 shade and the following thickness: 0.6, 1 or 2mm. Color (ΔE) and translucency parameter (TP) were determined using a spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade Advance 4.0, VITA Zahnfabrik). Data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance with Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). TP was greatly affected by layer thickness, whilst ΔE depended on shade and layer thickness of the capping composite. HAP and Biodentine showed significantly lower TP and higher ΔE (deviation from 'ideal white') than composites (pcomposite groups than in corresponding control groups of the same shade and thickness. TP of composites combined with Biodentine or HAP was below 2, lower than the corresponding control groups (pcomposite groups. EverX_Gradia and EverX_FiltekZ250 combinations showed the most comparable ΔE with the control groups. A 2mm thick layer of composite covering dentin restoratives with unfavorable esthetics is recommended for a final 'sandwich' restoration that is esthetically comparable to a conventional, mono-composite control restoration. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  18. Should my composite restorations last forever? Why are they failing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Fernando DEMARCO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Composites resins have become the first choice for direct anterior and posterior restorations. The great popularity is related to their esthetic appearance and reduced need of sound tissue removal as compared with former treatments. Several studies have demonstrated that composite restorations may last long in clinical service. In this review we discuss the factors playing a role on the long-term longevity. Composite restorations have demonstrated a good clinical performance with annual failure rates varying from 1% to 3% in posterior teeth and 1% to 5% in anterior teeth. Factors related to the patients such as caries risk and occlusal stress risk, in addition to socioeconomic factors, may affect the survival significantly. Characteristics of the clinical operators, particularly their decision making when it comes to observing or approaching an existing restoration, are decisive for longevity. Cavity features such as the number of restored walls, composite volume, and presence of endodontic treatment are of major importance and may dictate the service time of the restorative approach. The choice of restorative composite seems to have a minor effect on longevity provided that appropriate technical procedures are used. The main reasons for failure in posterior teeth are secondary caries and fracture (restoration or tooth/restoration, while in anterior teeth esthetic concerns are the main reasons leading to restoration failures. Composite resin restorations can be considered a reliable treatment as long as both the professional and the patient are aware of the factors involved in restoration failures.

  19. Oral lichenoid reactions related to composite restorations. Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, P O

    1988-02-01

    Lichenoid lesions topographically related to resin-based composite restorations were observed in 17 patients. In eight of these the composite had been inserted to replace amalgam restorations that were topographically related to lichenoid lesions. The other nine had no history of lichenoid lesions. Total remission occurred in four cases after the composite had been replaced with gold inlays or gold-porcelain crowns, and partial remission has been observed in five patients so far. The use of posterior composite restorations is rapidly increasing, and possible side effects, such as erosive lichenoid lesions, caused by these restorations should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions in the oral mucosa.

  20. The effect of fiber placement or flowable resin lining on microleakage in Class II adhesive restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Sema; Orucoglu, Hasan; Yildirim, Cihan; Eskitascioglu, Gürcan

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two fibers (polyethylene or glass) and a flowable resin liner on microleakage in Class II adhesive restorations. Class II adhesive cavities were prepared on mesial and distal surfaces of 40 extracted sound human molars. The cavity margins were below or above the CEJ. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups according to the restoration technique: group 1: restored with a resin composite (AP-X, Kuraray) in bulk after SE Bond (Kuraray) treatment; group 2: flowable resin liner (Protect Liner F, Kuraray) was used before composite restoration; in group 3, a polyethylene fiber (Ribbond) and in group 4, a glass fiber (everStick NET, StickTech) was placed into the bed of flowable resin before composite restoration. Samples were finished, stored in distilled water for 7 days at room temperature, and then thermocycled for 300 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. After sealing the apices, the teeth were varnished within 1 mm of the margins and placed in 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 h at 37 degrees C. After rinsing, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally through the restorations and microleakage was evaluated with a stereomicroscope. Marginal penetration was scored on a 0 to 4 scale, and the data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Flowable resin, everStick NET, and Ribbond THM used in combination with flowable resin significantly reduced leakage at occlusal margins in cavities with enamel margins (p 0.05). Use of flowable composite alone or in combination with polyethylene or glass fibers reduces occlusal leakage in Class II adhesive cavities with enamel margins.

  1. Effect of Ingested Liquids on Color Change of Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek Afzali, Beheshteh; Ghasemi, Amir; Mirani, Asrin; Abdolazimi, Zahra; Akbarzade Baghban, Alireza; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    Color change of composite restorations is well known to dentists. However, the effect of commonly consumed drinks on discoloration of composite resins has yet to be determined. This study sought to assess the color change of a nanofilled (Premise) and a flowable composite resin (Premise flowable) following simulated consumption of tea, cola, iron drops and multivitamin syrup. Forty disk-shaped specimens (7 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were fabricated from each composite resin. The baseline color values were measured according to the CIE L*a*b* system using digital imaging. The specimens of each restorative material were randomly divided into five groups (eight each) according to the storage media namely tea, cola, iron drops, multivitamin syrup or distilled water (control). The specimens were immersed in staining solutions for three hours daily over a 40-day test period. Following this, the color change values (ΔE*) were calculated. For statistical analyses, the color differences were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (Pcomposite resins (P>0.05). In both composite materials, the difference among the solutions was not significant (P>0.05). Under the tested experimental conditions, both restorative materials were susceptible to discoloration by all four staining solutions. The color change values were not related to the solution or the type of material used.

  2. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L. (UIC)

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  3. Retention of cast crowns cemented to amalgam and composite resin cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormati, A A; Denehy, G E

    1981-05-01

    An in vitro study was conducted to determine the tensile bond strength of complete cast gold restorations cemented with zinc phosphate cement on composite resin and amalgam crown cores. The samples were thermocycled and tested at 1-week, 1-month, and 3-month intervals. Results of the study showed that: (1) the amalgam core provides more retention for the cast gold crown than does the composite resin core and (2) the composite resin core provides increasing retention over a longer time period.

  4. Has resin-based composite replaced amalgam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J; Child, Paul L

    2010-02-01

    The major health organizations in the world continue to accept amalgam use, but the "amalgam war" of the 1800s is still going on. The end is not in sight. There is little disagreement that amalgam serves well and, although controversial, it appears to have minimal to no health hazards. There is a wide variation in the relative amount of amalgam placed in developed countries, and many dentists in North America do not use it. However, amalgam is still being used at least some of the time by the majority of practitioners in North America, and most of those practitioners also place resin-based composite in Class II locations. The evolution from amalgam to tooth-colored restorations has been a slow and tumultuous journey. The acceptability of resin-based composite in Class II locations continues to be a question for some dentists, while others have concluded that amalgam is "dead." It would be highly desirable if some of dentists using the alleged poisonous properties of amalgam as a "practice building" ploy would find more legitimate methods to increase their practice activity.

  5. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  6. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  7. Penggunaan Fiber Reinforced Composite Sebagai Resin Bonded Prosthesis Pada Gigi Anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Pintadi, Hastoro

    2007-01-01

    Resin bonded prosthesis is a fixed bridge which replace a space where one or two teeth have been lost or extracted, by using acid etched technique and resin bonding. The main goals in selecting a Resin bonded prosthesis were to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics and lower patient fees while providing restorations that had the potential for long-term service. This case report discuss about fiber reinforced composite used as a main material for resin bondedprosthesis to replace incivu...

  8. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements - What do we need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos José; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Vilela, Andomar Bruno Fernandes; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2017-08-28

    Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.

  9. Short fiber reinforced composite: a new alternative for direct onlay restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Mangoush, Enas; Vallittu, Mangoush; Lassila, Lippo

    2013-01-01

    To determine the static load-bearing capacity of direct composite onlay restorations made of novel filling composite resin system which combines short fiber-reinforced composite resin (FC) and conventional particulate filler composite resin (PFC). Three groups of onlay restorations were fabricated (n = 8/group); Group A: made from conventional particulate filler composite resin (Z250, 3M-ESPE, USA, control), Group B: made from short fiber-reinforced composite resin (EverX posterior, StickTeck Ltd, member of GC group, Turku, Finland) as substructure with 1 mm surface layer of PFC, Group C: made from FC composite resin. The specimens were incrementally polymerized with a hand-light curing unit for 80 s before they were statically loaded with two different sizes (3 & 6 mm) of steel ball until fracture. Failure modes were visually examined. Data were analyzed using ANOVA (p = 0.05). ANOVA revealed that onlay restorations made from FC composite resin had statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacity (1733 N) ( p composite resin (1081 N). Onlays made of FC composite resin with a surface layer of PFC gave force values of 1405 N which was statistically higher than control group ( p composite resin as substructure and surface layer of conventional composite resin displayed promising performance in high load bearing areas.

  10. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Jowkar, Zahra; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-07-01

    Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was Pamalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not affect fracture resistance of the teeth. Amalgam, composite, fracture resistance, restoration.

  11. Nanoleakage of Class V Resin Restorations Using Two Nanofilled Adhesive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Agha, Ebaa I; Alagha, Mustafa I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the nanoleakage of two types of nanofilled adhesive systems in Class V composite resin restorations. Materials and Methods: Totally 60 human premolars were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 30). Standardized round Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins) were prepared. A total-etch (N-Bond total etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and self-etching (N-Bond self-etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) adhesive system were evaluated. The cavities were restored inc...

  12. Clinical success and survival of indirect resin composite crowns: results of a 3-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, L.A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the new resin composite "NECO" as a material for indirect restorations clinically. Methods Forty-five patients were selected, of which 12 men and 33 women, with a mean age of 53. A total of 91 post-canine indirect resin composite NECO (Heraeus Kulzer,

  13. Influence of salivary enzymes and alkaline pH environment on fatigue behavior of resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of enzymatic activity and alkaline medium on flexural strength and rotary fatigue resistance of direct and indirect resin composite restorative materials. Methods: Three direct resin composite materials Filtek Z100, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Silorane (3M ESPE), and two

  14. Color Stability of IDM Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Discoloration of composite resins is considered to be a major factor in esthetic restoration"nfailures. The aim of this study was to evaluate color stability of IDM composite (both light and self cure"nsamples namely IL and IS, and to compare it with a self-cure composite (Degufill named DS and a light"ncure ormocer composite (Definite, called DL in the Report. 60 disk shaped samples of each composite"nwere prepared, according to ISO-7491. The samples were divided into 3 groups and aged as follows:"nA- (Control 7 days in dark 37°c chamber"nB- Foil covered and kept in 100% humidity, and 37°c in xenotest chamber for 24 hours, then transferred"nto a dark 37°c chamber for 6 more days."nC- Kept in 37°c, 100% humidity under the emission of xiiion lamp of xenotest chamber for 24 hours,"nand then transferred to 37°c dark chamber for 6 more days"nThe lightness and chromaticity values of samples were measured both before and after aging using a"nspectrophotometer (Data Flash. The total color changes as well as changes in lightness and chromaticity"nvalues were measured in the CIE L * a * b * scale, and analyzed. Color change was recorded to be"nsignificant in all samples after aging. The maximum change belonged to IL, which was significantly"ndifferent from DL and DS. It seems, in order to have a durable esthetic restoration using IDM, more"nscientific and professional consideration is needed in the production process.

  15. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  16. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  17. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Prathibha Rani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I, 30 days (phase II, 90 days (phase III, and 180 days (Phase IV. At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC (Group II, Flowable Compomer (Group III, and Flowable Composite (Group IV, respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  18. Resin-modified and conventional glass ionomer restorations in primary teeth: 8-year results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, V.; Manscher, E.; Teglers, P.T.

    2004-01-01

    clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer......clinical trial, cariostatic effects, dental restorations, glass ionomer cement, long-term behaviour, pedodontics, resin-modified glass ionomer...

  19. Flowable resin and marginal gap on tooth third medial cavity involving enamel and radicular cementum: A SEM evaluation of two restoration techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lo Giudice

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The interposition of a low elastic modulus composite between the adhesive layer and the composite resin allows an improvement of the cementum-restoration interface by the means of a lower shrinkage stress during polymerization.

  20. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  1. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Microhybrid Composite and Glass lonomer Restorative Material in Permanent Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharma, Khalil; Zogheib, Tatiana; Bhandi, Shilpa; Mehanna, Carina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to clinically compare glass ionomer cement (GIC) with microhybrid composite resin used in class I cavities on permanent teeth over a period of 9 months. A total of 40 teeth with class I cavities were divided into two groups (n = 20) and restored with GIC (EQUIA; GC) and microhybrid resin composite (Amelogen Plus; Ultradent). Restorations were evaluated at ×4.5 magnification using the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria every 3 months. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test (a composite material. EQUIA (GIC) is a viable alternative to resin composite in restoring class I cavities in permanent teeth.

  3. Coronal microleakage of temporary restorations in previously restored teeth with amalgam and composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunoglu, Ozlem; Uçtasli, Mine Betül; Ozdemir, Serife

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated microleakage at the interface between various temporary restorative materials and existing amalgam or composite restorations, and dental tissues in previously restored teeth after partial removal of the restoration. The distal half of amal gam (Ag) and composite restorations (Co) in 45 teeth were removed, then filled with temporary restorative materials (IRM, Coltosol and CLIP). After thermal cycling, microleakage was measured microscopically as the penetration of basic fuchsine according to a four-unit-scale: The data were evaluated with Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests using Bonferroni correction (p amalgam-tooth interface (Ag-CLIP-a) values. CLIP provided a better seal against microleakage at amalgam and especially composite interfaces. This material also provided a better seal against microleakage at the tooth tissue interface. The use of a resin based temporary restorative material over partially removed resin composite restorations could be beneficial in achieving better resistance to marginal leakage. Within the limitations of this study, maintaining partially removed permanent restorations does not seem to cause a problem with achieving marginal seal.

  4. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with combined composite-amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Selly; Paikin, Lev; Gorfil, Colin; Gordon, Moshe

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated teeth restored with combined composite-amalgam restorations in comparison to all-amalgam restorations. Forty-eight human premolar teeth were equally divided into 4 groups. Mesio-occlusodistal (MOD) cavities were prepared in 3 groups, and in the fourth group, a modified MOD preparation was designed with an additional buccolingual groove. All teeth were endodontically treated and restored using 1 of several restorative modalities: all amalgam (AM), all amalgam plus dentin adhesive (ADA), amalgam plus dentin adhesive plus composite resin (ADAC), and amalgam plus dentin adhesive plus composite resin with a modified preparation design (ADACM). Specimens were tested in a universal testing machine (Instron). The load (in kilonewtons) at fracture was recorded and statistically analyzed using a Bonferroni one-way statistical analysis (significance: Pcomposite-amalgam restoration were significantly more resistant to fracture ( Pamalgam alone. The modification with an additional horizontal buccolingual cavity preparation groove did not significantly increase resistance to fracture, nor did the addition of a bonding material to the amalgam restorations. Mean resistance to fracture (in kilonewtons) of each group was as follows: group AM, 0.31; group ADA, 0.34; group ADAC, 0.45; and group ADACM, 0.47. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth with combined composite-amalgam materials increased tooth resistance to fracture up to 51% when compared to teeth restored with amalgam alone.

  5. Bonding of glass ceramic and indirect composite to non-aged and aged resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Özcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-02-01

    Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged resin composite to an indirect resin composite and pressed glass ceramic using two resin cements. Disk-shaped specimens (diameter: 3.5, thickness: 3 mm) (N = 160) produced from a microhybrid resin composite (Quadrant Anterior Shine) were randomly divided into eight groups. While half of the specimens were kept dry at 37°C for 24 h, the other half was aged by means of thermocycling (6000 times, 5°C to 55°C). The non-aged and aged resin composites were bonded to a highly filled indirect composite (Estenia) and a pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress II) using either a photopolymerizing (Variolink Veneer) or a dual-polymerizing (Panavia F2.0) resin cement. While cementation surfaces of both the direct and indirect composite materials were silica coated (30 µm SiO2, CoJet-Sand) and silanized (ESPE-Sil), ceramic surfaces were conditioned with hydrofluoric acid (20 s), neutralized, and silanized prior to cementation. All specimens were cemented under a load of 750 g. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types of the specimens were identified after debonding. Significant effects of aging (p ceramic in combination with both cements showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both indirect composite (24.3 ± 5.1 MPa) and glass ceramic in combination with Variolink (22 ± 9 MPa) showed the highest results on non-aged composites, but were not significantly different from one another (p > 0.05). On the aged composites, indirect composite and glass ceramic showed no significant difference in bond strength within each material group (p > 0.05), with both Panavia (17.2 ± 6 and 15 ± 5.5 MPa, respectively) and Variolink (19 ± 8

  6. Resin composites: Modulus of elasticity and marginal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Ana R; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2014-09-01

    To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity but quite similar polymerization contraction. MOD cavities (n=30) were prepared in extracted premolars, restored and then subjected to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. Marginal quality of the restorations before and after loading was analyzed on epoxy replicas under a scanning electron microscope. The percentage of gap-free margins and occurrence of paramarginal fractures were registered. Modulus of elasticity and polymerization contraction were analyzed with parametric and margins with nonparametric ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, respectively. The number of paramarginal fractures was analyzed with exact Fisher tests (α=0.05). Grandio demonstrated significantly more gap-free enamel margins than Charisma and Filtek Supreme XTE, before and after loading (p0.05). No significant effect of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (pGrandio when compared to Charisma (p=0.008). The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can be improved by the selection of a resin composite with modulus of elasticity close to that of dentine, although an increase in paramarginal enamel fractures can result as a consequence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of polishing procedures on color stability of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Ahmet Umut; Güler, Eda; Yücel, Ali Cağin; Ertaş, Ertan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme). Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd), polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP), polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover) (PdB), and combinations of these (PdPB) were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C). The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change (DeltaE*) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (alpha=0.05). The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme). The posterior (Filtek P60) and universal (Filtek Z250) composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme) and universal (Quadrant LC) composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish

  8. Effects of polishing procedures on color stability of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umut Güler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme. Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd, polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP, polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover (PdB, and combinations of these (PdPB were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C. The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change (DE* were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (a=0.05. The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme. The posterior (Filtek P60 and universal (Filtek Z250 composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme and universal (Quadrant LC composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish

  9. Evaluation of fracture toughness and mechanical properties of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as resin matrix for dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Saeed; Yeganeh, Hamid; Atai, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Study and evaluation of fracture toughness, flexural and dynamic mechanical properties, and crosslink density of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems and comparison with corresponding conventional methacrylate system were considered in the present study. Urethane tetra allyl ether monomer (UTAE) was synthesized as ene monomer. Different formulations were prepared based on combination of UTAE, BisGMA/TEGDMA and a tetrathiol monomer (PETMP). The photocuring reaction was conducted under visible light using BD/CQ combination as photoinitiator system. Mechanical properties were evaluated via measuring flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to study the morphology of the fractured specimen's cross section. Viscoelastic properties of the samples were also determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The same study was performed on a conventional methacrylate system. The data were analyzed and compared by ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (significance level=0.05). The results showed improvement in fracture toughness of the specimens containing thiol-ene moieties. DMTA revealed a lower glass transition temperature and more homogenous structure for thiol-ene containing specimens in comparison to the system containing merely methacrylate monomer. The flexural modulus and flexural strength of the specimens with higher thiol-ene content were lower than the neat methacrylate system. The SEM micrographs of the fractured surface of specimens with higher methacrylate content were smooth and mirror-like (shiny) which represent brittle fracture. The thiol-ene-methacrylate system can be used as resin matrix of dental composites with enhanced fracture toughness in comparison to the methacrylate analogous. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  11. A retrospective clinical study on longevity of posterior composite and amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdam, Niek J M; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Roeters, Joost M; Loomans, Bas A C

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the longevity of class I and II amalgam and composite resin restorations placed in a general practice. Patient records of a general practice were used for collecting the data for this study. From the files longevity and reasons for failure of 2867 class I and II amalgam and composite resin restorations placed in 621 patients by two operators between 1990 and 1997 were recorded in 2002. 912 amalgam restorations (502 by operator 1 and 410 by operator 2) and 1955 posterior composite resin restorations (1470 by operator 1 and 485 by operator 2) were placed. One hundred and eighty-two amalgam and 259 posterior composite resin restorations failed during the observation period. The main reasons for failure of the restorations were caries (34%), endodontic treatment (12%) and fracture of the tooth (13%). Life tables calculated from the data reveal a survival for composite resin of 91.7% at 5 years and 82.2% at 10 years. For amalgam the survival is 89.6% at 5 years and 79.2% at 10 years. Cox-regression analysis resulted in a significant effect of the amount of restored surfaces on the survival of the restorations. No significant effect of operator, material as well as combination of material and operator was found. In the investigated general practice, two dentists obtained comparable longevity for amalgam and composite resin restorations.

  12. Interactions of self-etch adhesives with resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Rie; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Endo, Tatsuo; Kanehira, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi; Manabe, Atsufumi

    2007-12-01

    Aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the correlation of shear bond strength and marginal cavity adaptation, together with polymerization shrinkage and contraction stress, using the combination of four self-etch adhesives and three resin composites. Interactions were studied between one two-step and three one-step adhesives, and the hybrid-type resin composites, Beautifil (BEU, Shofu) and Venus (VEN, Heraeus), and an experimental nano-hybrid resin composite NEUN (NEU, Heraeus). For all 12 combinations shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined on human dentin. Marginal adaptation (MGW) was assessed in cylindrical butt-joint dentin cavities. Further, polymerization contraction and contraction stress of the resin restoratives were measured. Significant determinants of SBSs on dentin were time of testing (10min or 24h) and adhesives (presin composite used was a highly significant determinant of cavity adaptation. Polymerization shrinkage after 5min was 2.58, 2.74, and 1.53% for BEU, VEN, and NEU, respectively. Polymerization contraction stresses were largest for BEU, less for VEN, and smallest for NEU (presin composites were identified as important determinants of marginal cavity adaptation.

  13. [Water absorption of five dental resins used in bonded restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, D; Dupuis, V

    2002-12-01

    The actual restorative dentistry need to bond material which are under the constraint of saliva likely, as all liquid, to enter inside the product with time and to modify its characteristics. In this study, we compare the behaviour of five materials opposite water absorption, in vitro, until one year: two composite resins (Tetric et Pertac II), two ceromer (ceromer (Tetric ceram et Tetric flow) and one compomer (Hytac(r)). Each pastille weight is expressed in percentage of initial weight. All materials loose weight in the first hours except Tetric ceram which stay stable. At 48 h, all materials except Pertac II get back their initial weight. At long-term, all the materials are stable with a profit of 1% for Hytac, 0.5% for Tetric, Tetric ceram et Tetric flow and a loss of à 0.3% for Pertac II. As a result of this study, we understand why the clinical used of Hytac must be done following strict conditions.

  14. Fatigue resistance of teeth restored with cuspal-coverage composite restorations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Kuijs, R.H.; Kreulen, C.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study assessed the influence of palatal cuspal coverage on the in vitro fatigue resistance and failure mode of Class II resin composite restorations including replacement of the buccal cusp in premolars. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master model was made of a maxillary premolar with an MOD

  15. Seven-year clinical evaluation of painful cracked teeth restored with a direct composite restoration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate long-term clinical effectiveness of treating painful cracked teeth with a direct bonded composite resin restoration. The hypothesis tested was that cracked teeth treated with or without cuspal coverage showed the same performance. Forty-one patients

  16. Antimicrobial properties of conventional restorative filling materials and advances in antimicrobial properties of composite resins and glass ionomer cements-A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Cher; Camilleri, Josette

    2015-04-01

    It has been reported that complete caries removal from cavities during restoration of teeth is difficult. Furthermore with the tissue saving approach it is expected that more of the saved affected tissue will possibly harbor more residual bacteria. Antimicrobial restorative filling materials would be ideal to prevent the spread of caries after completion of tooth restoration, thus preventing recurrent decay and eventually restoration failure. This paper reviews the literature on the antimicrobial properties of dental restorative filling materials. Pubmed searches on the antibacterial properties of restorative materials were carried out. Keywords were chosen to assess antibacterial properties of conventional filling materials. Methods of introducing antimicrobial agents in restorative materials were also reviewed together with the methodology used to assess antimicrobial activity. 174 articles from 1983 till 2014 were included. Adhesive materials have decreased antimicrobial activity when compared to amalgams and zinc oxides. Several techniques have been employed in order to increase the antimicrobial activity of restorative materials. Although antimicrobial activity of restorative materials is important, the introduction of antimicrobial agents/techniques should not be at the expense of other material properties. Environmental changes within a material may affect the bacterial response to the antimicrobial. Bacterial adhesion to the restorative materials should be assessed. Long term assessment of antimicrobial activity is important and is clinically relevant. The use of antimicrobial dental materials is important unless such characteristics are gained to the detriment of other material properties. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Amalgam vs Composite Restoration, Survival, and Secondary Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhareky, Muhanad; Tavares, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Amalgam and resin composite longevity of posterior restorations: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Moraschini V, Fai CK, Alto RM, dos Santos GO. J Dent 2015;43(9):1043-50. Information not available Systematic review with meta-analysis of data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Marginal behaviour of self-etch adhesive/composite and combined amalgam-composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kournetas, Nikos; Kakaboura, Afrodite; Giftopoulos, Dimitrios; Chakmachi, Magdad; Rahiotis, Christos; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the marginal and internal adaptation in self-etching adhesive (SEA)/composite restorations with combined amalgam-resin-based composite restorations in the proximal box with and without bonding agent beneath amalgam both before and after load-cycling. Class II restorations, were manufactured as following a) Bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray) beneath amalgam (Tytin, SDS Kerr) and resin-based composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray) with SEA, b) Amalgam without bonding agent and resin-based composite with SEA and c) Resin-based composite with SEA. Each group divided into two equal subgroups (n=8). Marginal and internal adaptation of first subgroup evaluated after 7-day water storage and of the second after load-cycling in chewing simulator for 1.2 x 10(6) cycles. Marginal and internal adaptation at cervical and amalgam-composite sites evaluated by videomicroscope and ranked as "excellent"/"non-excellent". Slices of restorations examined under optical microscope to determine the quality of bonding layer. Defects in cervical adaptation observed in the three restorative techniques examined prior loading. Amalgam-composite combination in proximal surface provided comparable marginal and internal adaptation results at cervical wall, to self-etching-composite combination. Portion (25-37.5%) of amalgam-resin-based composite interfaces in proximal box presented no perfect sealing. The application of bonding agent beneath amalgam resulted in relatively inferior cervical adaptation. Loading resulted in fewer excellent restorations in all three restorative techniques but not in a statistically significant level.

  19. Shear bond strength of the amalgam-resin composite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camilo; Sanchez, Eliana; Alapati, Satish; Seghi, Robert; Johnston, William

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the initial and one year shear bond strengths (SBS) of resin composite bonded to amalgam using Amalgambond-Plus. Resin composite cylinders (Point 4, Kerr Corporation) were bonded to either etched-enamel (A), 50% etched enamel-50% polished amalgam (B), airborne-particle abraded amalgam (C), carbide bur prepared amalgam (D) and airborne-particle abraded 50% amalgam-50% etched-enamel (E). Shear bond strengths were determined using a standardized testing device (Ultradent Products) in a universal testing machine (Instron model 4204). The failed interfaces were evaluated with SEM to obtain visual evidence of the failure mode. ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p composite masking has the strongest, most durable SBS on airborne-particle abraded amalgam and airborne-particle abraded enamel-amalgam surfaces and could be used as a method to improve the esthetics of amalgam restorations.

  20. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  1. Surface roughness comparison of methacrylate and silorane-based composite resins after 40% hydrogen peroxide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rori Sasmita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The change of the tooth colour could be restored with bleaching. The tooth bleaching will affects the surface roughness of the composite resins. Recently, the material basis for composite resins has developed, among others are methacrylate-based and silorane based composite resins. The objective of this study was to distinguish the surface roughness value of methacrylate-based composite resin and silorane based composite resins. This research was quasi-experimental. The sample used in this study were methacrylate and silorane based composite resins in discs form, with the size of 6 mm and the thickness of 3 mm, manufactured into 20 specimens and divided into 2 groups. The control group was immersed in the artificial saliva, and the treatment group was applied with 40% hydrogen peroxide. The result of the experiment analyzed using unpaired sample t-test showed significant differences in the average value of the surface roughness after the application of 40% hydrogen peroxide. The average value of methacrylate and silorane based composite resins were 2.744 μm and 3.417 μm, respectively. There was a difference in the surface roughness of methacrylate and silorane based composite resin compounds after the application of 40% hydrogen peroxide. The surface roughness value of the silorane-based composite resin was higher than the methacrylate-based.

  2. Chairside resin-based provisional restorative materials for fixed prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassler, Howard E; Lowe, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Provisional restorations are vital to fixed prosthodontics treatment, providing an important diagnostic function while in place. In addition to protecting the prepared teeth, provisionalization enables clinicians to refine biologic and biomechanical issues before the final restoration is fabricated. Adjustments can be made in the provisional restoration to achieve both the clinician's and patient's desired results. The fabrication of temporary restorations requires that clinicians be proficient with a variety of materials and techniques that can be used to make well-adapted and functional provisionals. There are many material choices available to temporize a single crown as well as multi-unit fixed partial dentures, and the selection of provisional materials should be made based on a case-by-case evaluation. This article provides a review of polymeric resin provisional materials.

  3. Polymerization Behavior and Mechanical Properties of High-Viscosity Bulk Fill and Low Shrinkage Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, S; Takamizawa, T; Nojiri, K; Imai, A; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Suzuki, S; Suda, S; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of different categories of resin composite. Three high viscosity bulk fill resin composites were tested: Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TB, Ivoclar Vivadent), Filtek Bulk Fill posterior restorative (FB, 3M ESPE), and Sonic Fill (SF, Kerr Corp). Two low-shrinkage resin composites, Kalore (KL, GC Corp) and Filtek LS Posterior (LS, 3M ESPE), were used. Three conventional resin composites, Herculite Ultra (HU, Kerr Corp), Estelite ∑ Quick (EQ, Tokuyama Dental), and Filtek Supreme Ultra (SU, 3M ESPE), were used as comparison materials. Following ISO Specification 4049, six specimens for each resin composite were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was determined using a water-filled dilatometer. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin composites ranged from 115.4 to 148.1 MPa, the elastic modulus ranged from 5.6 to 13.4 GPa, and the resilience ranged from 0.70 to 1.0 MJ/m 3 . There were significant differences in flexural properties between the materials but no clear outliers. Volumetric changes as a function of time over a duration of 180 seconds depended on the type of resin composite. However, for all the resin composites, apart from LS, volumetric shrinkage began soon after the start of light irradiation, and a rapid decrease in volume during light irradiation followed by a slower decrease was observed. The low shrinkage resin composites KL and LS showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested materials at the measuring point of 180 seconds. In contrast, the three bulk fill resin composites showed higher volumetric change than the other resin composites. The findings from this study provide clinicians with valuable information regarding the mechanical properties and

  4. Clinical longevity of extensive direct composite restorations in amalgam replacement : Up to 3.5 years follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This prospective clinical trial evaluated the longevity of direct resin composite (DRC) restorations made on stained dentin that is exposed upon removal of existing amalgam restorations in extensive cavities with severely reduced macro-mechanical retention for amalgam replacement.

  5. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohaty, Brenda S; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Restoring posterior teeth with resin-based composite materials continues to gain popularity among clinicians, and the demand for such aesthetic restorations is increasing. Indeed, the most common aesthetic alternative to dental amalgam is resin composite. Moderate to large posterior composite restorations, however, have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement. Investigators across the globe are researching new materials and techniques that will improve the clinical performance, handling characteristics, and mechanical and physical properties of composite resin restorative materials. Despite such attention, large to moderate posterior composite restorations continue to have a clinical lifetime that is approximately one-half that of the dental amalgam. While there are numerous recommendations regarding preparation design, restoration placement, and polymerization technique, current research indicates that restoration longevity depends on several variables that may be difficult for the dentist to control. These variables include the patient’s caries risk, tooth position, patient habits, number of restored surfaces, the quality of the tooth–restoration bond, and the ability of the restorative material to produce a sealed tooth–restoration interface. Although clinicians tend to focus on tooth form when evaluating the success and failure of posterior composite restorations, the emphasis must remain on advancing our understanding of the clinical variables that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth. PMID:23750102

  6. Effects of air-polishing powders on color stability of composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÜLER, Ahmet Umut; DURAN, Ibrahim; YÜCEL, Ali Çagin; ÖZKAN, Pelin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different air-polishing powders on the color stability of different types of composite resin restorative materials. Material and methods Thirty cylindrical specimens (15×2 mm) were prepared for each of 7 composite resin restorative materials. All specimens were polished with a series of aluminum oxide polishing discs (Sof-Lex). The prepared specimens of each composite resin were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 specimens each, for control (Group-C) and two air-powder applications (Group-CP: Cavitron Prophy-Jet; Group-PS: Sirona ProSmile prophylaxis powder). A standard air-polishing unit (ProSmile Handly) was used. All specimens were air-powdered for 10 s at 4-bar pressure. The distance of the spray nosel from the specimens was approximately 10 mm and angulation of the nosel was 90º. Specimens were stored in 100 mL of coffee (Nescafe Classic) for 24 h at 37ºC. Color measurement of all specimens was recorded before and after exposure to staining agent with a colorimeter (Minolta CR-300). Color differences (∆E*) between the 2 color measurements (baseline and after 24 h storage) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA test, and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (p≤0.05). Results According to the 2-way ANOVA results, composite resin restorative materials, air-polishing powders, and their interaction were statistically significant (pGrandio, CeramX Mono, and Quixfil composite resin restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between Group-PS and Group-CP (p>.05) and these groups demonstrated the highest ∆E* values. For Filtek Silorane and IntenS, the highest ∆E* values were observed in Group-PS. The lowest ∆E* values for all composite resin groups were observed in Group-C. When comparing the 7 composite resin restorative materials, Aelite Aesthetic Enemal demonstrated significantly less ∆E* values than the other composite resins

  7. Randomized control trial of composite cuspal restorations: five-year results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Kuijs, R.H.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this randomized control trial was to compare the five-year clinical performance of direct and indirect resin composite restorations replacing cusps. In 157 patients, 176 restorations were made to restore maxillary premolars with Class II cavities and one missing cusp. Ninety-two

  8. Mechanical behavior of quartz fiber reinforced epoxy resins for teeth restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, A M; Calabrese, L; Campo, N; Torrisi, L; Oteri, G; Lo Giudice, G; Cicciù, D

    2006-01-01

    In this work composite materials, based on quartz fibers and epoxy resins, were employed with the aim to restore damaged teeth. The composite materials were chosen because they show biomechanical features very similar to that of the dentine, the main constituent of the tooth. Extracted teeth were rebuilt with two different restorative procedures: in the first, the composite material was pre-formed in a conical trunk shape abutment (PA) and then bonded to a fiber quartz post with a dental bonder. In the second rebuilt system the abutment was prepared by cross linking the resin on the fiber quartz post with a halogen lamp (CRA). The restored teeth were then mechanically tested and observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with the aim to study the interaction between the reconstructive materials. Wetting and roughness measurements were also carried out in order to study the interface adhesion between the post and the abutments. Characterization analysis evidenced that the CRA restorative procedure improves the adhesion between the substitutive materials and shows higher fracture strength than the PA ones. Anyway both the rebuilt systems are able to support the masticator load. An explanation of the interfacial post-abutment interaction phenomenon is discussed.

  9. Amalgam and composite posterior restorations: curriculum versus practice in operative dentistry at a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenga, Marc E; Mjör, Ivar

    2007-01-01

    This study recorded the number of preclinical lecture and simulation laboratory sessions spent teaching the preparation and placement of amalgam and resin composite posterior restorations. These data were compared to the use of both materials in the operative clinic as placed by third- and fourth-year students. The number of posterior restorations inserted by the students, expressed as a function of the number of restoration surfaces, was also evaluated. The results show that the teaching of posterior restorations pre-clinically has consistently favored amalgam 2.5 to 1 during the last three years. However, clinically, resin composite is being used for posterior restorations 2.3 times more often than amalgam. The only instance that favored amalgam over composite during the last year was in the placement of four surface posterior restorations. This shift in emphasis from amalgam to composite needs to be addressed within dental educational institutions so that newly graduated dentists are prepared to place composite restorations properly.

  10. A comparative study to determine strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin influenced by temperature during polymerization: An In Vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuj Chhabra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Temporary coverage of a prepared tooth is an important step during various stages of the fixed dental prosthesis. Provisional restorations should satisfy proper mechanical requirements to resist functional and nonfunctional loads. A few studies are carried out regarding the comparison of the effect of curing environment, air and water, on mechanical properties of autopolymerizing acrylic and composite resin. Hence, the aim of this study was to compare the transverse strength of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and autopolymerizing composite resin as influenced by the temperature of air and water during polymerization. Materials and Methods: Samples of autopolymerizing acrylic resin and composite resin were prepared by mixing as per manufacturer's instructions and were placed in a preformed stainless steel mold. The mold containing the material was placed under different controlled conditions of water temperature and air at room temperature. Polymerized samples were then tested for transverse strength using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: Alteration of curing condition during polymerization revealed a significant effect on the transverse strength. The transverse strength of acrylic resin specimens cured at 60°C and composite resin specimens cured at 80°C was highest. Polymerizing the resin in cold water at 10°C reduced the mechanical strength. Conclusions: Polymerization of the resin in hot water greatly increased its mechanical properties. The method of placing resin restoration in hot water during polymerization may be useful for improving the mechanical requirements and obtaining long-lasting performance.

  11. Effectiveness of conventional treatment using bulk-fill composite resin versus Atraumatic Restorative Treatments in primary and permanent dentition : a pragmatic randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olegário, I.C.; Hesse, D.; Bönecker, M.; Pettorossi Imparato, J.C.; Minatel Braga, M.; Medeiros Mendes, F.; Prócida Raggio, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical studies are being conducted in less strict conditions in order to establish an adequate scientific basis for decision making. The aim of this pragmatic randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of single and multiple-surfaces restorations performed following the

  12. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin.

  13. Longevity of posterior composite restorations: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opdam, Niek; van de Sande, Francoise; Bronkhorst, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data of several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient, materials and tooth related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Methods: Following PRISMA guidelines a search was conducted resulting...... in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database...... including all restorations was constructed and a Multivariate Cox’s regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk-status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials and use of glass-ionomer cement as base...

  14. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  15. New bismaleimide matrix resins for graphite fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M.-T. S.; Chen, T. S.; Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Two new bismaleimide resins based on the N,N'-m-phenylene-bis(m-amino-benzamide) structure have been synthesized and characterized. The mixtures of the two resins gave better handling, processing, mechanical, and thermal properties in graphite composites than did the individual resins. The mechanical strength of the cured graphite composites prepared from the 1:1 copolymer of the two bismaleimide resins was excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The physical and mechanical properties of the composites from the new bismaleimide matrix resin systems are compared with conventional composites based on epoxy and other bismaleimide systems. The copolymer system provides another method for improving bismaleimide resins.

  16. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornavoi, Denise Cremonezzi; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes; Panzeri, Heitor; Dos Reis, Andréa Cândido

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the color change of composite resins used in dentistry. Three composite resins were evaluated: Two microhybrids and one hybrid of higher viscosity, with different amounts and sizes of filler particles, shades C2 and B2. A total of 54 specimens were obtained (18 for each composite resin), made of a Teflon matrix (15 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height). The color measurements were obtained with a Spectrophotometer, (PCB 6807 BYK Gardner) before and after AAA. Data were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α >0.05), ANOVA and Tukey test (α composite resins with the same shades was analyzed. All composite resins showed unacceptable color changes after AAA (ΔE > 3). Considering the variable ∆E, it was observed that the color tone C2 was already statistically different for the microhybrid composite resin prior to AAA (P composite resins (P composite resin group, before aging the composite resin hybrid of higher viscosity B2 showed the highest color variation rate and microhybrid with zirconium/silica C2 showed the lowest. All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2) and after (B2). It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  17. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  18. In vitro comparative evaluation of the effect of two different fiber reinforcements on the fracture toughness of provisional restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Vaibhav D; Parkhedkar, Rambhau D

    2012-01-01

    Fracture of provisional fixed partial denture (FPD) may jeopardize the success of provisional prosthodontic treatment phase and cause patient discomfort. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture toughness of the Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) resin and Bis-Acryl Composite (BAC) resin reinforced with the Polyethylene and Glass fibers. Three groups (N=10) of each of the two materials were prepared for the fracture toughness test. Two groups had the different reinforcements and group without reinforcement served as the control. The mean fracture toughness (MPa.m½ ) was compared by One-way ANOVA, followed by the Scheffe analysis. Fracture toughness between fiber-reinforced PMMA and BAC resin was compared by the independent samples t test. For the controls, the fracture toughness for PMMA resin (0.91) was significantly lower than for the BAC resin (1.19). Glass fiber reinforcement produced significantly higher fracture toughness for both, PMMA (1.48) and BAC (1.82) resin, but the Polyethylene fibers did not (0.95 for PMMA and 1.23 for BAC resin). Among the reinforced groups, Silane impregnated Glass fibers showed highest fracture toughness for the BAC resin (1.82). Of two fiber reinforcement methods evaluated, Glass fiber reinforcement for the PMMA and BAC resin produced highest fracture toughness. On the basis of this in--vitro study, the use of Glass and Polyethylene fibers tested may be an effective way to reinforce resins used to fabricate fixed provisional restorations.

  19. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers' instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing.

  20. Voids in Sonic Fill(TM) restorations compared to traditional incrementally-filled composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abourezq, Ibraheem A.

    SonicFill(TM) is a new composite resin and delivery system designed to provide rapid filling of cavity preparations by decreasing viscosity through application of sonic energy. However, it may produce unwanted air voids in the final restoration due to the short filling time. Air voids compromise long-term performance by providing weak foci, discontinuity at cavosurface margins and at internal cavity walls, and potential crack propagation. This study assessed the locations, sizes, and numbers of voids in SonicFill restorations compared with traditional composite resin restorations in a set of extracted molars with mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity preparations. Fifty noncarious intact extracted third molars were collected randomly from a large collection of discarded anonymous tooth specimens. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were cut, and teeth were assigned randomly to one of two groups ( n = 25). The first group was restored with SonicFill composite in two steps. The second group was restored with Herculite Ultra(TM) using an multiple increment layering technique (1-2 mm per layer). Cross-sectional images of the filling were taken by digital microscope. A total of 196 voids were found in the 50 specimens: 97 in SonicFill restorations and 99 in conventional restorations. Mean number of voids in SonicFill restorations was 3.88 versus 3.96 for conventional restorations. Mean percentage of void area in SonicFill restorations was 0.588% versus 0.508% for conventional restorations. Unpaired t tests for these differences indicated no statistically significant differences (p =.931 and p =.629, respectively). One-way ANOVA tests for mean void count and mean void area percentage differences by three location zones for conventional and SonicFill restorations also indicated no significant differences among the groups. The bulk-fill SonicFill system does not result in increased or decreased numbers or ii area of voids within Class II MOD restorations compared with a

  1. A long-term laboratory test on staining susceptibility of esthetic composite resin materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardu, S.; Braut, V.; Gutemberg, D.; Krejci, I.; Dietschi, D.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the color stability of composite resin types designed for esthetic anterior restorations when continuously exposed to various staining agents. Method and Materials: Thirty-six disk-shaped specimens were made of each of 12 composite materials (1 microfilled and 11 hybrid

  2. Radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials compared to human and bovine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkan, Gurel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disk specimens 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick (N = 220, n = 10) were prepared from the following restorative materials: · eight shades of nanofilled composite (Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), · seven shades of nanohybrid composite (Grandio Universal), · six shades of photopolymerized polyacid modified compomer (Glasiosite), and · one shade of hybrid composite (X-tra fil U). Human canine dentin (n = 10), bovine enamel (n = 10), and an aluminum (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted, and equivalent Al thickness (eq Al) values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The data were analyzed using a non-parametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis), and multiple comparisons were made with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (a = 0.05). Different shades of resin-based restorative materials tested did not reveal statistically significant differences within each material group (p > 0.05). Radiopacity values of the resin-based restorative materials investigated varied depending on their types; however, within different shades of one material type, radiopacity values were comparable. Every shade of nanocomposite material other than Aelite Aesthetic Enamel Incisal LT Gray showed comparable radiopacity to human dentin. Other materials tested demonstrated higher radiopacity compared to human dentin and bovine enamel.

  3. Polymerisation efficiency and shrinkage effects in resin based dental restoratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hindi, Abdusalam M.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerisation efficiency and shrinkage effects in resin based dental restorative materials. The study highlights factors affecting the polymerisation efficiency, but the efficiency of the light curing units was first measured. The output light intensity and the temperature rise produced by two units were measured using a radiometer with a flat-response characteristic. The units were the Elipar Highlight (Espe Dental AG) and XL3000 (3M Co). The former unit has a dual-intensity mode of operation: 10 slow plus 30 s high (termed "soft-start") and a Ml-intensity mode: 40 s high. Its "high" intensity was significantly greater than the XL3000 Unit, and produced correspondingly greater temperature rises. One of the hypotheses to be tested was whether any useful network-conversion (polymerisation) was attained by application of the 10 slow-intensity phase of the "soft-start" mode. To address this question, the polymerisation efficiency of three representative resin-based restorative materials was studied by measuring depth-of-cure, exotherm, surface hardness and degree of conversion. The Elipar Unit was used principally m these studies, with four modes of radiation: "full" and "soft- start", as above, and either 10 s or 40 s of low intensity light. Most measurements were performed at 23°C, but some specimen groups were also pre-conditioned at 37°C. Depth-of-cure values obtained by "soft-start" were as great as with "full" radiation. Low- intensity irradiation alone gave significantly reduced, but non-zero cure-depths. The exotherm of the specimens cured by "soft-start" was lower than those cured by "full" light-intensity. This pattern was also apparent when the lower-intensity (XL3000) Unit was deployed. Surface hardness was measured on upper and lower surfaces of specimens radiated by different modes. The hardness was greater at upper, relative to lower surfaces with "full" intensity. The lower-surface hardness with low

  4. Vickers microhardness comparison of 4 composite resins with different types of filler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René García-Contreras

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Composite resins are the material of choice to restore minimal invasive cavities; conversely, it is important to explore the mechanical properties of commercially available dental materials. Objective: To compare the Vickers microhardness (VHN of four available commercial composite resins using standardized samples and methods. Methodology: Composite cylinders were manufactured in a Teflon mould. We used the follow composite resins (n=4/gp: Microhybrid resins [Feeling Lux (Viarden and Amelogen Plus (Ultradent], Hybrid resin [Te-Econom Plus (Ivoclar] and Nanohybrid resin [Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE]. All samples were incubated in distilled water at 37ºC for five days. The test was carried out with microhardness indenter at 10 N, and a dwelling time of 10 s for 9 indentations across the specimens resulting in a total of 36 indentations for each group. Data were subjected to Kolmogorov-Smirnov normality test and ANOVA (post-hoc Tukey test. Results: The VHN mean values ranged from harder to softer as follows: Filtek Z350 (71.96±6.44 (p Amelogen Plus (59.90±4.40 (p Feeling lux (53.52±5.72> Te-Econom Plus (53.26±5.19. Conclusion: According to our results, the microhardness of the evaluated conventional composite resins can withstand the masticatory forces; however nanohybrid composite resins showed better Vickers microhardness and therefore are a more clinically suitable option for minimal invasion treatments.

  5. µCT-3D visualization analysis of resin composite polymerization and dye penetration test of composite adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2018-01-30

    This study evaluated the effects of the light curing methods and resin composite composition on composite polymerization contraction behavior and resin composite adaptation to the cavity wall using μCT-3D visualization analysis and dye penetration test. Cylindrical cavities were restored using Clearfil tri-S Bond ND Quick adhesive and filled with Clearfil AP-X or Clearfil Photo Bright composite. The composites were cured using the conventional or the slow-start curing method. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratio during polymerization, improved adaptation to the cavity wall using the slow-start curing method. In the μCT-3D visualization method, the slow-start curing method reduced polymerization shrinkage volume of resin composite restoration to half of that produced by the conventional curing method in the cavity with adhesive for both composites. μCT-3D visualization method can be used to detect and analyze resin composite polymerization contraction behavior and shrinkage volume as 3D image in the cavity.

  6. The Effect of Finishing and Polishing Techniques on the Surface Roughness and the Color of Nanocomposite Resin Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Aysun; Yuzbasioglu, Emir; Sarac, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Rough, poorly polished surfaces contribute to staining, plaque accumulation, gingival irritation and recurrent caries. Finishing and polishing techniques are critical factors contributing to the longevity of the direct composite resin restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of finishing and polishing systems on surface roughness of six nanocomposite restorative resins. Thirty specimens of each restorative material (n=180) were placed in a teflon mould (6 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth) and cured with a LED curing unit. Six specimens from each of restorative material were randomly assigned to four groups for finishing and polishing (carbide burs, diamond burs, aluminium oxide discs, silicon rubber polisher) techniques. Mylar strip formed specimens were served as control group. After finishing and polishing procedures surface roughness was evaluated by a profilometer. The data was analyzed by 2-way analysis of variance and the Tukey HSD test (α=0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups in terms roughness (prestorative materials. Although mylar matrix strip formed surfaces presents lower surface roughness values, recountouring and polishing of resin restorations are often required in clinical situations. Aluminium oxide discs and carbide finishing burs are suitable for finishing and polishing procedures for nanocomposite restorative resins.

  7. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  8. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  9. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage in class V restorations with composite resin in bovine teeth. Laser irradiation influences and the adhesive system in the dentin pre-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Wendell Lima de

    2003-01-01

    Microleakage is one of the most important reasons to restorations failure, it is the responsible for marginal colors changing, new caries, hipersensibility and pulpar diseases. Several techniques and materials have been studied to eliminate or, at least, to decrease microleakage. The cavities preparation with Er:YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive are some of these techniques and materials. This research has the objective to compare, in vitro, microleakage in class V cavities, prepared with high rotation (conventional treatment), Er:YAG laser (Enamel-400 mj/2 Hz/128,38 J/Cm 2 , Dentin 250 mJ/ 2 Hz/ 80,24 J/Cm 2 ) and the treatment made at dentin with autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) using Er:YAG laser (with water or not water) or not using Er:YAG laser. It was used 48 bovines teeth with cavities prepared in vestibular face and gingival wall on cement enamel junction and oclusal wall on enamel. The materials used were autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) and composite resin Z250. Teeth were divided into four groups of twelve samples each one, according to dentin treatment. Group 1 - Conventional cavity and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 2- Cavity prepared with Er: YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 3 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er:YAG laser associated to water and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 4 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er: YAG laser without water and associated to autoconditioning adhesive. Teeth were restored and stocked at 37 deg C, thermocycled and placed into a 50% silver nitrate solution. Right after, teeth were sliced and evaluated on a stereo microscopic magnifying glass in order to see microleakage degree trying to follow a score from 0 to 3. The findings were submitted to Fisher, Anderson-Darling tests and to the not parametric Sen and Puri test. The results indicated that in gingival edge, the Group 2 showed less microleakage than others

  10. Compatibility between dental adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; MacKenzie, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    Information is lacking about incompatibilities between certain types of adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins, and universal adhesives have yet to be tested with these resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding outcome of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins by using different categories of adhesive solutions and to determine whether incompatibilities were present. One hundred and eighty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were allocated to 9 groups (n=20), in which 3 different bonding agents (Single Bond Plus [SB]), Scotchbond Multi-purpose [MP], and Scotchbond Universal [SU]) were used to bond 3 different composite resins (CompCore AF [CC], Core Paste XP [CP], and Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). After restorations had been fabricated using an Ultradent device, the specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. The specimens were tested under shear force at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). All 3 composite resins produced comparable shear bond strengths when used with MP (P=.076). However, when either SB or SU was used, the light-polymerized composite resin (FS) and 1 dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CC) bonded significantly better than the other dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CP) (Pcomposite resins can obtain equally good bond strengths as light-polymerizing alternatives. However, not all dual-polymerizing composite resins perform well with all bonding systems; some incompatibilities exist between different products. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of toothbrush hardness on in vitro wear and roughness of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoizumi, Hideaki; Yamada, Junji; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate and compare the effects of toothbrushes with different hardness on abrasion and surface roughness of composite resins. Toothbrushes (DENT. EX Slimhead II 33, Lion Dental Products Co. Ltd., Tokyo, Japan) marked as soft, medium and hard, were used to brush 10 beam-shaped specimens of each of three composites resins (Venus [VEN], Venus Diamond [VED] and Venus Pearl [VEP]; HeraeusKulzer) with standardized calcium carbonate slurry in a multistation testing machine (2N load, 60 Hz). After each of five cycles with 10k brushing strokes the wear depth and surface roughness of the specimens were determined. After completion of 50k strokes representative samples were inspected by SEM. Data were treated with ANOVA and regression analyses (p composite resins increased linearly with increasing number of brushing cycles (r² > 0.9). Highest wear was recorded for VEN, lowest for VED. Hard brushes produced significantly higher wear on VEN and VEP, whereas no difference in wear by toothbrush type was detected for VED. Significantly highest surface roughness was found on VED specimens (Ra > 1.5 µm), the lowest one on VEN (Ra composite resins produced by toothbrushing with dentifrice depend mainly on the type of restorative resin. Hardness grades of toothbrushes have minor effects only on abrasion and surface roughness of composite resins. No relationship was found between abrasion and surface roughness. The grade of the toothbrush used has minor effect on wear, texture and roughness of the composite resin.

  12. Effect of adhesive cements on reduction of microleakage at the amalgam/composite-resin interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoroushi M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Patients always complain about metallic color of amalgam restorations. Covering amalgam by composite can solve this problem. Since polymerization shrinkage is a serious shortcoming in composites, application of the combined amalgam and composite restoration is one of the methods to reduce leakage in the cervical margins of posterior restorations. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the microleakage of amalgam/composite interface when Rely-X ARC adhesive resin cement was used in the joint. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four sound extracted premolars were chosen. Mesial and distal class II conventional cavities were prepared and the samples were divided into 4 groups of 12. In all groups, the bases of the cavities were restored with amalgam and then the remaining part was filled by composite resin. Specimens in groups 1 and 2 were restored with composite-resin, immediately after condensing amalgam without or with application of Rely-X ARC (3M, ESPE respectively. In groups 3 and 4, composite resin were applied 24 hours after condensation of amalgam, without or with application of Rely-X ARC respectively. After polishing and thermocycling, all specimens were prepared for dye penetration and the degree of leakage was scored and analyzed using Kruskall Wallis test with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The frequency of dye penetration in different groups was obtained. The most and the least scores were observed in groups 3 and 4 respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed in different methods. Conclusion: None of the methods in this study could seal the amalgam/composite-resin interface.

  13. Effect of proximal box elevation with resin composite on marginal quality of ceramic inlays in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, Roland; Hehn, Julia; Hajtó, Jan; Krämer, Norbert; Naumann, Michael; Koch, Andreas; Roggendorf, Matthias J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the marginal quality and resin-resin transition of milled CAD/CAM glass-ceramic inlays in deep proximal cavities with and without 3-mm proximal box elevation (PBE) using resin composites before and after thermomechanical loading. MOD cavities with one proximal box beneath the cementoenamel junction were prepared in 48 extracted human third molars. Proximal boxes ending in dentin were elevated for 3 mm with different resin composites (RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, and Maxcem Elite as self-adhesive resin cements and Clearfil Majesty Posterior as restorative resin composite in one or three layers bonded with AdheSE) or left untreated. IPS Empress CAD inlays were luted with Syntac and Variolink II (n = 8). Marginal quality as well as the PBE-ceramic interface were analyzed under an SEM using epoxy resin replicas before and after thermomechanical loading (100,000 × 50 N and 2,500 thermocycles between +5°C and +55°C). Bonding glass-ceramic directly to dentin showed the highest amounts of gap-free margins in dentin (92%, p resin composite applied in three layers achieved 84% gap-free margins in dentin; PBE with self-adhesive resin cements exhibited significantly more gaps in dentin (p resin composite, PBE may be an alternative to ceramic bonding to dentin. Self-adhesive resin cements seem not suitable for this indication. For deep proximal boxes ending in dentin, a PBE may be an alternative to conventional techniques.

  14. Direct composite restoration of permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Evans Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An uncomplicated crown fracture is a fracture that involves only the tooth enamel or the dentin and tooth enamel without any damage or exposure to the pulp. Crown fracture of the anterior teeth usually caused by traumatic forces such as falls, accidents, violence, or sports activities. Traumatic injuries of the oral region frequently involve the anterior teeth, especially maxillary incisors due to the anatomic factors which may affect the functional and aesthetical values of the teeth. The objective of this literature study was to know more about uncomplicated crown fracture of the anterior teeth and its restoration. This research was a literature study performed by researching, highlighting various interesting facts and compiling the relevant published journals. The most common and ideal direct restoration of the anterior teeth was the composite resin restoration. The anterior teeth restoration was considered to be a complex and challenging case to solves due to the fact that besides reconstructing the tooth and regaining the function, the aesthetical aspect was also becoming the main objectives. The permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture was the most common case of tooth fractures which was mainly caused by traumatic injuries such as falls, accidents, excessive forces, violence, and also sports activities. Dental injuries of the anterior teeth also affected the aesthetical properties and the function of the tooth. Composite resin restoration was able to performed directly on the permanent anterior teeth uncomplicated crown fracture.

  15. Dentine deproteinization and microleakage around gingival third resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sowmya; B, Mithra; B, Sureshchandra

    2008-01-01

    A significant factor in achieving satisfactory adhesion of restorative resins to dentine substrate is the method by which the dentine surface is treated before an adhesive is applied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of deproteinization on microleakage around gingival third resin restorations. Standardised Class V preparations were made on randomly selected intact upper and lower human molars. These were treated in one of five ways (no treatment, enamel etch only, total etch, total etch followed by deproteinization, and deproteinization only) and then adhesively bonded using either an acetone or ethanol based bonding system. The samples were first immersed in 2% methylene blue dye and then 35% nitric acid, for 72 hours each. The solutions were filtered and centrifuged, and the supernatant was used to determine absorbance in a spectrophotometer at 670 nm. The results were recorded as a measure of transmission of light of the test solutions. The results were subjected to multiple comparisons amongst groups, using anova. There was a statistically significant difference between all treatment groups for the two different bonding systems used. The experimental groups, total etch alone and total etch followed by deproteinization showed statistically significant differences, as compared to all other groups. However, although the total etch group showed a decrease in microleakage, when compared to the total etch followed by deproteinization group, this was not statistically significant. Within the limitations of this study, collagen removal may be important to reduce microleakage whilst using acetone based adhesive systems and it may not influence the amount of microleakage for ethanol or water based adhesive systems.

  16. Shrinkage-stress kinetics of photopolymerised resin-composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Julian D.

    The use of directly-placed substances as restorative materials in teeth remains the technique of choice for preserving function and form in teeth that have cavities. The current aesthetic restorative materials of choice are resin-composite materials, although these undergo molecular densification during polymerisation, which has deleterious effects. Although shrinkage-strain is the cause, it is the shrinkage-stress effects that may be seen as being responsible for the problems with adhesive resin-based restorations that are encountered clinically, the bond may fail with separation of the material from the cavity wall, leading to marginal discolouration, pulpal irritation and subsequent necrosis, post operative sensitivity, recurrent caries and eventual failure of restorations. Other outcomes include cohesive fracture of enamel or cusps, cuspal movement (strain) and persistent pain. The aims of this research were to characterise the effects of variations in resin-composite formulation on shrinkage-strain and shrinkage-stress kinetics. In particular, the influence of the size and morphology of the dispersed phase was investigated through the study of experimental formulations. Polymerisation shrinkage-strain kinetics were assessed with the bonded-disk method. It was found that resin-composites with spherical filler particles had significantly lower shrinkage-strain compared to those with irregular filler particles. Additionally, shrinkage-strain was found to be dependent on the size of filler particle, and this trend was related, in part, to differences in the degree of conversion. The data were also used to calculate the activation energy for each material, and a relationship between this and filler particle size for the irregular fillers was demonstrated. A fixed-compliance cantilever beam instrument (Bioman) was used for characterisation of shrinkage-stress kinetics. Significant differences were identified between materials in relation to filler particle size and

  17. Effect of different composite core materials on fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with FRC posts

    OpenAIRE

    PANITIWAT, Prapaporn; SALIMEE, Prarom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite posts, using three resin composite core build-up materials, (Clearfil Photo Core (CPC), MultiCore Flow (MCF), and LuxaCore Z-Dual (LCZ)), and a nanohybrid composite, (Tetric N-Ceram (TNC)). Material and Methods Forty endodontically treated lower first premolars were restored with quartz fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) cemented with resin cement (Panavia F2...

  18. Longevity of posterior composite restorations: not only a matter of materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarco, F.F.; Correa, M.B.; Cenci, M.S.; Moraes, R.R.; Opdam, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Resin composites have become the first choice for direct posterior restorations and are increasingly popular among clinicians and patients. Meanwhile, a number of clinical reports in the literature have discussed the durability of these restorations over long periods. In this review, we have

  19. Restoring crown fractures by direct composite layering using transparent strip crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Ece; Taviloğlu, Engin

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are mostly seen at childhood and adolescence. The most common fracture in permanent anterior teeth is crown fracture. Esthetic and easy rehabilitation of these anterior teeth is possible using layering techniques and direct composite resin restorations. Shape, color and surface texture are the most important factors in restoring crown fractures esthetically. This article illustrates how to perform an esthetic composite resin restoration of crown fractures using strip crowns. The technique suggests using a strip crown as a mold for direct resin composite restoration. This provides a cost-effective treatment with operator friendly approach where most outstanding advantage is the minimum chair-side time with a single visit that is very important for young trauma patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Comparison of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNS Resin with Polyester Resin in Composite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Ugoamadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural resins can compete effectively with the synthetic ones in composite development. In this research, cashew nuts were picked and processed for the extraction of the resin content. The resin (natural resin so obtained was mixed with cobalt amine (accelerator, methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (catalyst to develop two sets of composite specimens – specimens without fibres and specimens reinforced with glass fibres. This method of sample specimen development was repeated with polyester (synthetic resin. Compressive and tensile strength tests conducted proved that composites developed with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL resin were comparable to those developed with polyester resin. In the results, CNSL has an ultimate compressive strength of 55MPa compared to that of polyester resin with an ultimate strength of 68MPa. The result of tensile strength proved cashew nut shell liquid resin (with ultimate strength of 44MPa to be better than polyester resin with 39MPa as ultimate tensile strength. This means that natural resins could be a better substitute for the synthetic ones when the required quantities of fibers (reinforcements and fillers are used in the fibre-reinforced plastic composite developments.

  1. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise™Flow Self-Adhering Flowable Composite, Kerr Dental, USA versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self

  2. Are resin composites suitable replacements for amalgam? A study of two-body wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridou, Dimitra; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Wear resistance is an important property of the dental materials, particularly for large restorations in the posterior regions and for the patients suffering from parafunctional activities. Additionally, the wear resistance of flowable composite resin materials is a clinical concern, although they are popular among dentists because of their easy handling. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the wear resistance of nine composite resins both condensable (G-aenial posterior, Venus, GrandioSO, Tetric EvoCeram, Ceram X duo, Filtek Supreme XTE) and new-generation flowable resin composites (G-aenial Universal Flo, GrandioSO Flow and GrandioSO Heavy Flow) and to compare these results with amalgam. Eight specimens of each material were subjected to two-body wear tests, using a chewing simulator. The wear region of each material was examined under profilometer, measuring the vertical loss (μm) and the volume loss (mm(3)) of the materials. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to assess surfaces irregularities. The results showed significant difference of the vertical loss and the volume loss of the examined materials (p amalgam had the best wear resistance, two condensable resin composites (GrandioSO, Ceram X duo) and all flowable materials had no significant difference with amalgam. GrandioSO had the highest wear resistance and Filtek Supreme XTE the lowest wear resistance. The majority of resin composites had good wear resistance and similar to amalgam. Based on the in vitro measurements of two-body wear resistance, the new resin composites could replace amalgam for restorations placed in occlusal stress-bearing regions. New-generation flowable resin materials may also be used in occlusal contact restorations.

  3. Treatment planning and smile design using composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marus, Robert

    2006-05-01

    Recent advances in dental materials and adhesive protocols have expanded the restorative procedures available to today's clinicians. Used in combination with proper treatment planning, these innovations enable dental professionals to provide enhanced aesthetic care that achieves the increasing expectations of their patients. Using a case presentation, this article will document the steps required to harmoniously integrate smile design, material selection, and patient communication that are involved in the provisional of aesthetic dental care. This article discusses the utilization of composite resin as a tool to enhance the patient's smile. Upon reading this article, the reader should: Become familiar with a smile-enhancing technique which can be completed in one office visit. Realize the benefits that intraoral composite mockups offer in terms of prototyping and confirming patient satisfaction.

  4. Influence of Curing Light Attenuation Caused by Aesthetic Indirect Restorative Materials on Resin Cement Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Bárbara; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Junior, Washington Steagall; Kawano, Yoshio; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To verify the effect of interposing different indirect restorative materials on degree of conversion (DC), hardness, and flexural strength of a dual-cure resin cement. Methods: Discs (2 mm-thick, n=5) of four indirect restorative materials were manufactured: a layered glass-ceramic (GC); a heat-pressed lithium disilicate-based glass-ceramic veneered with the layered glass-ceramic (LD); a micro-hybrid (MH); and a micro-filled (MF) indirect composite resin. The light transmittance of these materials was determined using a double-beam spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Bar-shaped specimens of a dual-cure resin cement (Nexus 2/SDS Kerr), with (dual-cure mode) and without the catalyst paste (light-cure mode), were photoactivated through the discs using either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. As a control, specimens were photoactivated without the interposed discs. Specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24h before being submitted to FT-Raman spectrometry (n=3), Knoop microhardness (n=6) and three-point bending (n=6) tests. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: MH presented the highest transmittance. The DC was lower in light-cure mode than in dual-cure mode. All restorative materials reduced the cement microhardness in light-cure mode. GC and LD with QTH and GC with LED decreased the strength of the cement for both activation modes compared to the controls. Curing units did not affect DC or microhardness, except when the dual-cure cement was photoactivated through LD (LED>QTH). Flexural strength was higher with QTH compared to LED. Conclusions: Differences in transmittance among the restorative materials significantly influenced cement DC and flexural strength, regardless of the activation mode, as well as the microhardness of the resin cement tested in light-cure mode. Microhardness was not impaired by the interposed materials when the resin cement was used in dual-cure mode. PMID:20613921

  5. Fatigue behavior of dental resin composites: flexural fatigue in vitro versus 6 years in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Godoy, F.; Frankenberger, R.; Lohbauer, U.; Feilzer, A.J.; Krämer, N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate fatigue behavior of direct resin composite restorations (Tetric Ceram vs. Grandio) in vitro and in vivo over an observation period of 6 years. Methods: For the in vitro part, Young's moduli (YM) were calculated and both initial (FS: flexural strength) and fatigue flexural

  6. Voids and porosities in class I micropreparations filled with various resin composites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Boer, T. de; Pesschier, D.; Bronkhorst, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this in vitro study, voids inside a minimal occlusal restoration using different consistencies of resin composite and various application techniques were investigated. One hundred and fifty-two simulated, minimally invasive preparations, including a prepared fissure and an excavated carious

  7. Mechanical properties of composite resin blocks for CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvahutanon, Sasipin; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Shiozawa, Maho; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Asakawa, Yuya; Oki, Meiko; Finger, Werner J; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2014-01-01

    This study compared commercial composite resin blocks with one ceramic block for use in computer-aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Four composite resins, one composite ceramic, and one feldspar-ceramic block were investigated. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), and Vickers hardness (VH) were determined under three conditions: dry storage; immersion in water at 37°C for 7 days; and immersion in water at 37°C for 7 days followed by 10,000 thermocycles. After dry storage, FS ranged from 127 to 242 MPa, FM from 9.6 to 51.5 GPa, and VH from 64 to 455. Two-way ANOVA was performed for FS, FM and VH followed by Tukey's multiple comparison (α<0.05). Results demonstrated that the materials degraded after water immersion and thermocycling, but their properties were within the acceptable range for fabrication of single restorations according to the ISO standard for ceramics (ISO 6872:2008).

  8. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (Presin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (Pcomposite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of air-polishing powders on color stability of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umut Güler

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different air-polishing powders on the color stability of different types of composite resin restorative materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty cylindrical specimens (15×2 mm were prepared for each of 7 composite resin restorative materials. All specimens were polished with a series of aluminum oxide polishing discs (Sof-Lex. The prepared specimens of each composite resin were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 specimens each, for control (Group-C and two air-powder applications (Group-CP: Cavitron Prophy-Jet; Group-PS: Sirona ProSmile prophylaxis powder. A standard air-polishing unit (ProSmile Handly was used. All specimens were air-powdered for 10 s at 4-bar pressure. The distance of the spray nosel from the specimens was approximately 10 mm and angulation of the nosel was 90°. Specimens were stored in 100 mL of coffee (Nescafe Classic for 24 h at 37°C. Color measurement of all specimens was recorded before and after exposure to staining agent with a colorimeter (Minolta CR-300. Color differences (∆E* between the 2 color measurements (baseline and after 24 h storage were calculated. The data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA test, and mean values were compared by the Tukey HSD test (p.05 and these groups demonstrated the highest ∆E* values. For Filtek Silorane and IntenS, the highest ∆E* values were observed in Group-PS. The lowest ∆E* values for all composite resin groups were observed in Group-C. When comparing the 7 composite resin restorative materials, Aelite Aesthetic Enemal demonstrated significantly less ∆E* values than the other composite resins tested. The highest ∆E* values were observed in Quixfil. CONCLUSION: Except for Quixfil, all control groups of composite resins that were polished Sof-Lex exhibited clinically acceptable ∆E values (<3.7. Air-polishing applications increased the color change for all composite resin restorative materials

  10. Subsurface degradation of resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Rafat; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2007-08-01

    To determine the depth of a degraded subsurface layer produced in dental composites as a result of exposure to lactic acid or NaOH, by observing the penetration of AgNO(3) solution. Specimens were prepared from four resin composites; Point 4 (Kerr), Premise (Kerr), Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE), Ceram X (Dentsply), and two polyacid-modified resin composites; Dyract (Dentsply) and F2000 (3M/ESPE). The specimens were immersed in distilled water for 1 week, transferred to one of three aqueous media at 60 degrees C for 2 weeks; distilled water, 0.01mol/L lactic acid or 0.1N NaOH, washed and immersed in 50% (w/w) aqueous silver nitrate for 10 days at 60 degrees C and placed in a photodeveloper solution. After reduction of the silver, specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned and polished, coated with carbon, and examined by backscattered mode scanning electron microscopy. The depth of silver penetration into the degraded area was measured from the SEM micrographs. Energy dispersive analysis X-ray (EDAX) was used to confirm the presence of silver. NaOH produced the greatest depth of degradation and lactic acid the least. Premise showed the greatest depth of silver penetration when subjected to NaOH, and Filtek Supreme the second with peeling of the surface and cracking, whereas F2000 and Point 4 showed the least in NaOH and lactic acid. ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that the depth of silver penetration was material and solution dependent, and the differences were significant for most of the materials (P<0.05).

  11. An in vitro quantitative antibacterial analysis of amalgam and composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Weiss, Ervin I

    2007-03-01

    Antibacterial properties of restorative dental materials such as amalgam and composite resins may improve the restorative treatment outcome. This study evaluates the antibacterial properties of three composite resins: Z250, Tetric Ceram, P60 and a dental amalgam in vitro. Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus served as test microorganisms. Three quantitative microtiter spectrophotometric assays were used to evaluate the effect of the restorative materials on: (i) early-stage biofilm using a direct contact test (DCT); (ii) planktonic bacterial growth; (iii) bacterial growth in the materials' elute. For comparison purposes, agar diffusion test (ADT) was also performed. The effect of the composite resins on bacterial growth was minimal and limited to a few days only. One-week-aged composites promoted growth of S. mutans and A. viscosus. The antibacterial properties in direct contact were more potent than in planktonic bacterial growth. Amalgam showed complete inhibition of both bacteria in all phases, and the effect lasted for at least 1 week. The materials' elute had no effect on both bacterial growth with the exception of complete inhibition of S. mutans in amalgam. The later results correlated with the ADT. The present findings demonstrate potent and lasting antibacterial properties of amalgam, which are lacking in composite resins. This may explain the clinical observation of biofilm accumulated more on composites compared to amalgams. It follows that the assessment of antibacterial properties of poorly-soluble materials has to employ more than one assay.

  12. Interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis of resin-dentin interface of self-adhering flowable resin composite [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer M. Hamdy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The newly introduced self-adhering flowable resin-composites decrease the required time for application by incorporation of an acidic adhesive monomer, thus reducing the number of the steps, but its bonding is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interfacial microscopic examination and chemical analysis at the resin-dentin interface of a self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise-Flow versus a total-etch (Te-Econom Plus resin composite, using an etching agent (Eco-Etch gel and  bonding agent (Single Bond Universal. Methods: Sixteen freshly extracted sound human posterior teeth were used. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups: 8 specimens per type of composite. Standard-shaped class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface. One group was restored by Te-Econom Plus resin composite by total-etch technique using Eco-Etch gel, which was applied to dentine for 15 seconds, followed by rinsing, drying and bonding agent application (Single Bond Universal. The other group restored directly with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow without application of etch or bond. Curing was done for 20 seconds using a light emitting diode light curing unit. Evaluation of the resin-dentin interface was done microscopically by examination of marginal gap distance in μm using scanning electron microscope (SEM, and chemical analysis of silver particles was observed using SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry after 24 hours of specimen storage in ammoniacal silver nitrate. Results: Regarding marginal gap distance (µm and silver atomic % mean values, teeth restored with self-adhering resin composite (Vertise-Flow showed significantly higher mean values than the multi-step etch and rinse resin composite group (5.2 vs 0; 12.2 vs 8.2, respectively. Conclusions: Resin-dentin bonding using total-etch resin composite technique was more effective than self-adhering flowable resin composite (Vertise

  13. Can repair increase the longevity of composite resins? Results of a 10-year clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, E; Martín, J; Vildósola, P; Oliveira Junior, O B; Gordan, V; Mjor, I; Bersezio, C; Estay, J; de Andrade, M F; Moncada, G

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this double-blind clinical trial was to assess the longevity of repairs to localized clinical defects in composite resin restorations that were initially planned to be treated with a restoration replacement. Twenty-eight patients aged 18-80 years old with 50 composite resin restorations (CR) were recruited. The restorations with localized, marginal, anatomical deficiencies and/or secondary caries adjacent to CR that were "clinically judged" to be suitable for repair or replacement according to the USPHS criteria were randomly assigned to Repair (n=25) or Replacement (n=25) groups, and the quality of the restorations was scored according to the modified USPHS criteria. The restorations were blind and two examiners scored them at baseline (Cohen Kappa agreement score 0.74) and at ten years (Cohen Kappa agreement score 0.87) restorations. Wilcoxon tests were performed for comparisons within the same group (95% CI), and Friedman tests were utilized for multiple comparisons between the different years within each group. Over the decade, the two groups behaved similarly on the parameters of marginal adaptation (MA) (p>0.05), secondary caries (SC) (p>0.05), anatomy (A) (p0.05). Given that the MA, SC, A and C parameters behaved similarly in both groups, the repair of composite resins should be elected when clinically indicated, because it is a minimally invasive treatment that can consistently increase the longevity of restorations. The repair of defective composite resins as an alternative treatment to increase their longevity proved to be a safe and effective treatment in the long term. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Method for curing alkyd resin compositions by applying ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Murata, K.; Maruyama, T.

    1975-01-01

    An alkyd resin composition is prepared by dissolving a polymerizable alkyd resin having from 10 to 50 percent of oil length into a vinyl monomer. The polymerizable alkyd resin is obtained by a half-esterification reaction of an acid anhydride having a polymerizable unsaturated group and an alkyd resin modified with conjugated unsaturated oil having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per one molecule. The alkyd resin composition thus obtained is coated on an article, and ionizing radiation is applied on the article to cure the coated film thereon. (U.S.)

  15. DESENSITIZING BIOACTIVE AGENTS IMPROVES BOND STRENGTH OF INDIRECT RESIN-CEMENTED RESTORATIONS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-De-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; de Marco, Fabíola Fiorezi; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Panzeri, Heitor

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. Materials and Method: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5): Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®)+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita); Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer) cylinders (6x10mm) were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dualcure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply). After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37oC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC) with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence). Results: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05). Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05) than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. Conclusion: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems. PMID:19089114

  16. Desensitizing bioactive agents improves bond strength of indirect resin-cemented restorations: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of indirect composite restorations cemented with a resin-based cement associated with etch-and-rinse and self-etching primer adhesive systems to dentin treated or not with a bioactive material. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Twenty bovine incisor crowns had the buccal enamel removed and the dentin ground flat. The teeth were assigned to 4 groups (n=5: Group I: acid etching + Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply; Group II: application of a bioactive glass (Biosilicato®+ acid etching + Prime & Bond NT; Group III: One-up Bond F (J Morita; Group IV: Biosilicato® + One-up Bond F. Indirect composite resin (Artglass, Kulzer cylinders (6x10mm were fabricated and cemented to the teeth with a dual-cure resin-based cement (Enforce, Dentsply. After cementation, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37ºC for 30 days and thereafter tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine (EMIC with 50 kgf load cell at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Failure modes were assessed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (95% level of confidence. RESULTS: Groups I, II and III had statistically similar results (p>0.05. Group IV had statistically significant higher bond strength means (p<0.05 than the other groups. The analysis of the debonded surfaces showed a predominance of adhesive failure mode for Group III and mixed failure mode for the other groups. CONCLUSION: The use of desensitizing agent did not affect negatively the bonding of the indirect composite restorations to dentin, independently of the tested adhesive systems.

  17. Nanoleakage of Class V Resin Restorations Using Two Nanofilled Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Agha, Ebaa I; Alagha, Mustafa I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried out to evaluate the nanoleakage of two types of nanofilled adhesive systems in Class V composite resin restorations. Materials and Methods: Totally 60 human premolars were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 30). Standardized round Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins) were prepared. A total-etch (N-Bond total etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and self-etching (N-Bond self-etch) (Ivoclar Vivadent) adhesive system were evaluated. The cavities were restored incrementally with nanohybird composite resin (Tetric N-Ceram). The teeth were sectioned into a series of 1 mm thick beams then they were immersed in the prepared ammoniacal silver nitrate tracer solution for 24 h in a black photo-film container to ensure total darkness. The beams were then rinsed with distilled water, and immersed in photo-developing solution for eight hours then they were subjected to the nanoleakage evaluation. The specimens were analyzed in the environmental scanning electron operated with backscattered electron mode at ×1000 magnification. Results: Self-etch adhesive recorded higher nanoleakage % mean value than the total-etch adhesive. The difference in nanoleakage % mean values between total and self-etch adhesive was statistically significant. Conclusion: The self-etch adhesive had statistically significant higher nanoleakage mean values than the total-etch adhesive. PMID:26229363

  18. Inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans and mechanical properties of the chitosan containing composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sun Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the antibacterial effect and mechanical properties of composite resins (LCR, MCR, HCR incorporating chitosan with three different molecular weights (L, Low; M, Medium; H, High. Materials and Methods Streptococcus (S. mutans 100 mL and each chitosan powder were inoculated in sterilized 10 mL Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI solution, and was centrifuged for 12 hr. Absorbance of the supernatent was measured at OD660 to estimate the antibacterial activities of chitosan. After S. mutans was inoculated in the disc shaped chitosan-containing composite resins, the disc was cleansed with BHI and diluted with serial dilution method. S. mutans was spread on Mitis-salivarius bacitracin agar. After then, colony forming unit (CFU was measured to verify the inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm. To ascertain the effect on the mechanical properties of composite resin, 3-point bending and Vickers hardness tests were done after 1 and 3 wk water storage, respectively. Using 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Scheffe test, statistical analysis was done with 95% significance level. Results All chitosan powder showed inhibition effect against S. mutans. CFU number in chitosan-containing composite resins was smaller than that of control resin without chitosan. The chitosan containing composite resins did not show any significant difference in flexural strength and Vickers hardness in comparison with the control resin. However, the composite resin, MCR showed a slightly decreased flexural strength and the maximum load than those of control and the other composite resins HCR and LCR. Conclusions LCR and HCR would be recommended as a feasible antibacterial restorative due to its antibacterial nature and mechanical properties.

  19. Investigation into the Depth of Cure of Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    glass - ionomer restorative dental materials. Samples of different thicknesses using...attempt at delineating the depth of cure of resin-modified glass - ionomer restorative dental materials. Samples of different thicknesses using Vitremer... glass ionomers liners. Dent Mater 1993:9:198-203. 16. Culbertson BM. Glass - ionomer dental restoratives . Prog Polym Sci 2001 ;26:577-604. 17. Fuji II

  20. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  1. The effect of soda immersion on nano hybrid composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chair Effendi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composite resin is the tooth-colored restorative material which most of the people are fond of due to their aesthetic value. The composite resin discoloration may happen because of the intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Soda water is one of the beverages which can cause the composite resin discoloration. Purpose: The study was aimed to determine the effect of soda immersion on nano hybrid composite resin discoloration. Methods: The study was an experimental laboratory study using 100 shade A3 nano hybrid composite resin specimens with the diameter of 5 mm and density of 2mm. The samples were divided into 5 groups, each group was immersed in different beverages. The beverages were mineral water; lemon-flavored soda; strawberry-flavored soda; fruit punch-flavored soda; and orange-flavored soda for 3, 7, 14 and 21 days respectively, in the temperature of 37o C. The discoloration measurement utilizes Spectrophotometer, Vita Easy Shade, and uses CIEL*a*b* method. Results: The result showed that the duration of immersion in soda had an effect on the Nano hybrid composite resin discoloration. Strawberry and fruit punch- flavored soda were the most influential components toward the discoloration. Nevertheless, the generally-occurred discoloration was clinically acceptable (∆E ≤ 3,3. Conclusion: The study suggested that the soda immersion duration has effect on Nano hybrid composite resin discoloration.Latar belakang: Resin komposit adalah material sewarna gigi yang diminati masyarakat karena memiliki nilai estetik yang baik. Perubahan warna resin komposit dapat terjadi karena faktor intrinsik dan ekstrinsik. Minuman soda merupakan salah satu minuman yang dapat menyebabkan perubahan warna pada resin komposit. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini untuk meneliti perubahan warna resin komposit nanohibrida akibat perendaman dalam minuman soda. Metode: Metode yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah eksperimental laboratorik dengan menggunakan

  2. The effect of surface conditioning on the bond strength of resin composite to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Igor R; Hafiana, Khaula; Curtis, Andrew; Barbour, Michele E; Attin, Thomas; Lynch, Christopher D; Jagger, Daryll C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface, using commercially available restoration repair systems. One hundred and sixty Gamma 2 amalgam specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and then randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning groups (n=20/group): Group 1: air abrasion, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 2: air abrasion and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 3: air abrasion and 'All-Bond 3', Group 4: diamond bur, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 5: diamond bur and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 6: diamond bur and 'All-Bond 3', Group 7: silica coating technique, and Group 8: non-conditioned amalgam surfaces (control group). Subsequently, resin composite material was added to the substrate surfaces and the amalgam-resin composite specimens were subjected to TBS testing. Representative samples from the test groups were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. The data was analysed statistically with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests (α=0.05). The mean TBS of amalgam-resin composite ranged between 1.34 and 5.13MPa and varied with the degree of amalgam surface roughness and the type of conditioning technique employed. Significantly highest TBS values (5.13±0.96MPa) were obtained in Group 1 (p=0.013). Under the tested conditions, significantly greater tensile bond strength of resin composite to amalgam was achieved when the substrate surface was conditioned by air abrasion followed by the application of the Panavia 21 adhesive system. Effecting a repair of an amalgam restoration with resin composite via the use of air abrasion and application of Panavia 21 would seem to enhance the integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface. Clinical trials involving the implementation of this technique are indicated to determine the usefulness of this technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Fatigue behavior of dental resin composites: flexural fatigue in vitro versus 6 years in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Frankenberger, Roland; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Feilzer, Albert J; Krämer, Norbert

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate fatigue behavior of direct resin composite restorations (Tetric Ceram vs. Grandio) in vitro and in vivo over an observation period of 6 years. For the in vitro part, Young's moduli (YM) were calculated and both initial (FS: flexural strength) and fatigue flexural strength (FFL: flexural fatigue limit) were evaluated in a four-point bending setup (n = 15) in distilled water at 37°C. For the in vivo part, 30 patients received 68 direct resin composite restorations of the same materials (Grandio bonded with Solobond M; Tetric Ceram bonded with Syntac). Patients revealed a minimum of two different class II restorations in different quadrants. Epoxy replicas of restored teeth were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at 30× magnification for fatigue characteristics, and 11 selected restorations per group were assessed for marginal fatigue characteristics at 200×. In vitro, YM was 15.7 GPa (Grandio) and 8.7 GPa (Tetric Ceram; p Grandio) versus 101.5 MPa (Tetric Ceram; p > 0.05), and FFL was 63.0 MPa (Grandio) versus 44.3 MPa (Tetric Ceram; p Grandio; p Grandio, clinical outcome for both resin composite materials over 6 years of clinical service was similar. Higher FFLs in vitro seem to be related to less marginal composite fractures in vivo but without any influence on clinical outcome until the 6 years recall. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Indirect composite restorations luted with two different procedures: A ten years follow up clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Alessandro; Vano, Michele; Derchi, Giacomo; Mangani, Francesco; Cerutti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate posterior indirect composite resin restoration ten years after placement luted with two different procedures. Study Design: In 23 patients 22 inlays/onlays (Group A) were luted using a dual-cured resin composite cement and 26 inlays/onlays (Group B) were luted using a light cured resin composite for a total of 48 Class I and Class II indirect composite resin inlays and onlays. The restorations were evaluated at 2 time points: 1) one week after placement (baseline evaluation) and 2) ten years after placement using the modified USPHS criteria. The Mann-Whitney and the Wilcoxon tests were used to examine the difference between the results of the baseline and 10 years evaluation for each criteria. Results: Numerical but not statistically significant differences were noted on any of the recorded clinical parameters (p>0.05) between the inlay/onlays of Group A and Group B. 91% and 94 % of Group A and B respectively were rated as clinically acceptable in all the evaluated criteria ten years after clinical function. Conclusions: Within the limits of the study the results showed after ten years of function a comparable clinical performance of indirect composite resin inlays/onlays placed with a light cure or dual cure luting procedures. Key words:Light curing composite, dual curing composite, indirect composite restoration, inlays/onlays, clinical trial. PMID:25810842

  5. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Porcelain Using Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yassini

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Ceramics as in ceramo-metallic and all ceramic tooth restorations have grown popular owing to their high tissue compatibility and esthetic advantages. Such restorations have the capability to deliver valuable services over a long period of time; however, failures under intraoral conditions are not unanticipated.Purpose: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain using different bonding system materials.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four equal groups. The porcelain surfaces were then etched with HF for 2 minutes, washed with water for 2 minutes and treated with a silane layer. The silane treated porcelain surfaces were left for one minute and then the specimens were bonded to composite resin as follow:Group 1 (control group, hybrid composite Z100 was applied and light cured from four directions for 20 seconds. Group 2, flowable composite was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. Group 3, unfilled resin was used and photo cured for 20 seconds. Group 4,(Dentin bonding agent adhesive resin was used followed by 20 seconds photo curing.Hybrid composite resin Z100 was subsequently applied on all porcelain surfaces of groups 2, 3 and 4, and light cured for 20 seconds from four directions. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling 1000 times. Shear bond strength was determined by a Universal testing machine. The data obtained was subjected to a one-way ANOVA test.Results: The results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between adhesive group and the other three groups of hybrid, flowable and unfilled resin (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results from this study showed that the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain was significantly higher for porcelain bonded surfaces using a dentin bonding agent than that of other materials tested.

  6. An esthetic technique for veneering anterior stainless steel crowns with composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenfeld, K R; Draughn, R A; Welford, J B

    1994-01-01

    The restoration of primary anterior teeth presents complicated esthetic and retention problems to the clinician. A technique is described for the chairside veneering of composite resin to stainless steel crowns, which results in well contoured restorations with superior durability and esthetics. A trimmed and fitted stainless steel crown can be veneered in three to five minutes. This provides the adaptability and gingival contour benefits of the stainless steel crown in conjunction with the cosmetics of the composite facings. The technique described produced composite veneers with a mean sheer bond strength of 3520 PSI (24.4 Mpa).

  7. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  8. Effect of photoactivation on the reduction of composite resin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletti, Natalia A; Girotto, Luiza P S; Leite, Françoise H S; Mario, Débora N

    2017-06-01

    Composite resins are predominantly marketed in developing countries in tube form, and the contents of the tube may be used in numerous procedures for different patients. This represents a problem because of the risk of cross-contamination. This study aimed to evaluate contamination in vitro of the internal contents of composite resin tubes in the dental clinics of a higher-education institution, as well as the effect of photoactivation on the level of contamination. Twenty-five tubes containing composite resin were randomly chosen (by lottery). From each tube, two samples of approximately 2 mm of composite resin were removed, and then one sample, but not the other, was photoactivated. These samples were plated on Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI), Sabouraud and MacConkey agars, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48 h. Colony counting and Gram staining were performed for subsequent microscopic identification of fungi and bacteria. The non-photoactivated composite resin group presented significantly higher microbial contamination in relation to the photoactivated composite resin group. The photoactivation of camphorquinone present in composite resin produces reactive oxygen species, which might promote cell death of contaminant microorganisms. Thus, although the same tube of composite resin may be used for a number of different patients in the dental clinics of developing countries, the photoactivation process potentially reduces the risk of cross-contamination. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. Influence of different restorative techniques on marginal seal of class II composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinval Adalberto Rodrigues Junior

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the gingival marginal seal in class II composite restorations using different restorative techniques. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Class II box cavities were prepared in both proximal faces of 32 sound human third molars with gingival margins located in either enamel or dentin/cementum. Restorations were performed as follows: G1 (control: composite, conventional light curing technique; G2: composite, soft-start technique; G3: amalgam/composite association (amalcomp; and G4: resin-modified glass ionomer cement/composite, open sandwich technique. The restored specimens were thermocycled. Epoxy resin replicas were made and coated for scanning electron microscopy examination. For microleakage evaluation, teeth were coated with nail polish and immersed in dye solution. Teeth were cut in 3 slices and dye penetration was recorded (mm, digitized and analyzed with Image Tool software. Microleakage data were analyzed statistically by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: Leakage in enamel was lower than in dentin (p<0.001. G2 exhibited the lowest leakage values (p<0.05 in enamel margins, with no differences between the other groups. In dentin margins, groups G1 and G2 had similar behavior and both showed less leakage (p<0.05 than groups G3 and G4. SEM micrographs revealed different marginal adaptation patterns for the different techniques and for the different substrates. CONCLUSION: The soft-start technique showed no leakage in enamel margins and produced similar values to those of the conventional (control technique for dentin margins.

  10. Influence of different restorative techniques on marginal seal of class II composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    RODRIGUES JUNIOR, Sinval Adalberto; PIN, Lúcio Fernando da Silva; MACHADO, Giovanna; DELLA BONA, Álvaro; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the gingival marginal seal in class II composite restorations using different restorative techniques. Material and Methods Class II box cavities were prepared in both proximal faces of 32 sound human third molars with gingival margins located in either enamel or dentin/cementum. Restorations were performed as follows: G1 (control): composite, conventional light curing technique; G2: composite, soft-start technique; G3: amalgam/composite association (amalcomp); and G4: resin-modified glass ionomer cement/ composite, open sandwich technique. The restored specimens were thermocycled. Epoxy resin replicas were made and coated for scanning electron microscopy examination. For microleakage evaluation, teeth were coated with nail polish and immersed in dye solution. Teeth were cut in 3 slices and dye penetration was recorded (mm), digitized and analyzed with Image Tool software. Microleakage data were analyzed statistically by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results Leakage in enamel was lower than in dentin (p<0.001). G2 exhibited the lowest leakage values (p<0.05) in enamel margins, with no differences between the other groups. In dentin margins, groups G1 and G2 had similar behavior and both showed less leakage (p<0.05) than groups G3 and G4. SEM micrographs revealed different marginal adaptation patterns for the different techniques and for the different substrates. Conclusion The soft-start technique showed no leakage in enamel margins and produced similar values to those of the conventional (control) technique for dentin margins. PMID:20379680

  11. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  12. Abrasive wear and surface roughness of contemporary dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Zhang, Hongyu; Choe, Hyo-Sun; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Hong, Guang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasive wear and surface roughness of 20 currently available commercial dental composite resins, including nanofilled, supra-nanofilled, nanohybrid and microhybrid composite resins. The volume loss, maximum vertical loss, surface roughness (R(a)) and surface morphology [Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)] were determined after wear. The inorganic filler content was determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The result showed that the volume loss and vertical loss varied among the materials. The coefficients of determination (R(2)) of wear volume loss and filler content (wt%) was 0.283. SEM micrographs revealed nanofilled composites displayed a relatively uniform wear surfaces with nanoclusters protrusion, while the performance of nanohybrid composites varied. The abrasive wear resistance of contemporary dental composite resins is material-dependent and cannot be deduced from its category, filler loading and composite matrix; The abrasive wear resistance of some flowable composites is comparable to the universal/posterior composite resins.

  13. Metameric effect between dental porcelain and porcelain repairing resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Rhee, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2007-03-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the metameric color and hue angle (degrees) changes between dental porcelain and porcelain repairing resin composites. Color of three shades (A2, A3, A3.5) of one brand of dental porcelain and three original shades (A2, A3, A3.5) and three combinations (A2-A3, A3-3.5, A2-A3.5) of three brands of porcelain repairing resin composites (ABT, FSP, TCR) were measured relative to the three standard illuminants (D65, A and F2). Specimen was 2mm in thickness, and 1mm of each shade was layered to make combined shades. Color differences (DeltaEab*) between each shade of dental porcelain and repairing resin composites relative to the three illuminants were calculated, and the ratios of color difference (modified metamerism index) by the change of illuminant were calculated. The ratios of hue angle changes were also compared. Differences in modified metamerism index and the ratio of hue angle changes were influenced by the porcelain shade, brand of resin composites and shade of resin composites. In all three brands of resin composites, A3.5 shade showed the smallest values in modified metamerism index regardless of the shade of porcelain. The average ratio of hue angle changes between each porcelain shade and all the shades of each resin composites showed similar trend when illuminant was changed from D65 to F2. Metameric effect between dental porcelain and repairing resin composites varied depending on the shade of porcelain, brand of resin composite and the illuminant. Therefore, shade matching between porcelain and repairing resin composite should be performed carefully. This study confirmed that shades should be matched under the light corresponding to that of use.

  14. Direct composite resin fillings versus amalgam fillings for permanent or adult posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasines Alcaraz, M Graciela; Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Sahrmann, Philipp; Schmidlin, Patrick Roger; Davis, Dell; Iheozor-Ejiofor, Zipporah

    2014-03-31

    Amalgam has been the traditional material for filling cavities in posterior teeth for the last 150 years and, due to its effectiveness and cost, amalgam is still the restorative material of choice in certain parts of the world. In recent times, however, there have been concerns over the use of amalgam restorations (fillings), relating to the mercury release in the body and the environmental impact following its disposal. Resin composites have become an esthetic alternative to amalgam restorations and there has been a remarkable improvement of its mechanical properties to restore posterior teeth.There is need to review new evidence comparing the effectiveness of both restorations. To examine the effects of direct composite resin fillings versus amalgam fillings for permanent posterior teeth, primarily on restoration failure. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 22 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 22 October 2013), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 22 October 2013), and LILACs via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1980 to 22 October 2013). We applied no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We contacted manufacturers of dental materials to obtain any unpublished studies. Randomized controlled trials comparing dental resin composites with dental amalgams in permanent posterior teeth. We excluded studies having a follow-up period of less than three years. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Of the 2205 retrieved references, we included seven trials (10 articles) in the systematic review. Two trials were parallel group studies involving 1645 composite restorations and 1365 amalgam restorations (921 children) in the analysis. The other five trials were split-mouth studies involving 1620 composite restorations and 570 amalgam restorations in an unclear

  15. Inhibitor of Carious Lesions in Vitro Around Gallium Alloy restorations By Fluoride releashing Resin-ionomer cement.

    OpenAIRE

    Nasman Nur Alim, drg. PhD

    2008-01-01

    The Result indicate that the fluoride releasing resin-inomer cem,ent provided good adhesion and caries inhibitor in enamel and dentin. A new fluoride releassing resin-ionnomer cement was used for bonding of gallium alloy restoration in vitro. Etching, priming, and fluoride releasing resin-ionomer cement were used the experimental group (ARG), prior to placement of the gallium alloy restoration

  16. Effect of Static and Cyclic Loading on Ceramic Laminate Veneers Adhered to Teeth with and Without Aged Composite Restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kalk, Warner; Galhano, Graziela

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Existing composite restorations on teeth are often remade prior to the cementation of fixed dental prostheses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of static and cyclic loading on ceramic laminate veneers adhered to aged resin composite restorations. Materials and Methods:

  17. Resistance of Bonded Composite Restorations on Fractures of Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dentine bonding agents and Glass Ionomer cement beneath composite restorations and its resistance on fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Forty sound maxillary teeth were selected; ten of them for positive control, and on the rest, RCT and MOD cavity preparations were done with standard methods. Then, the teeth were divided to four groups: 1-Sound teeth for positive control. 2-Prepared without any restoration for negative control. 3-Prepared and restored with Vitrabond(3M, USA, Single bond(3M, USA and Z100(3M, USA resin composite. 4-Prepared and restored by Single bond and Z100 resin composite. Specimens were subjected to compressive load by Instron 8502 until fracture occurred. Results: Group 1 showed the highest resistance to compressive forces followed by group 4,3&2 respectively. ANOVA, t test and Chi-square tests indicated significant difference between all the groups. Conclusion: Use of dentine bonding agents and resin composite increases resistance of endodontically treated teeth to fractures more than teeth restored with sandwich of glass ionomer cements, dentine bonding agents and resin composite.

  18. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  19. Distance and protective barrier effects on the composite resin degree of conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Coutinho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The food wrap films are used to cover the tip of curing light units in order to avoid contamination and prevent damage to the light guide. However, their effects on resin polymerization are not fully known. Aims: We investigated the effects on restoration efficiency of a food wrap protective barrier used on the tip of curing light units. Materials and Methods: For each treatment, five replications were performed, a total of 60 bovine incisor. The degree of conversion (%DC of restorations with the composite resin Opallis EA2 was evaluated using 3 curing light devices (Optilux 501, Optilight and Ultra LED and 2 curing distances (0 and 5 mm. The composite resin was tested for restoration of cavities in bovine crowns. %DC values were measured by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance technique. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using 3-way ANOVA and Tukey′s test. Results: Use of the protective film lowered %DC ( F = 4.13; P = 0.05, and the effects of curing distance were associated to the curing light device ( F = 3.61; P = 0.03. Conclusions: The distance from the light curing tip and use of a translucent protective barrier on the light-cure device can both impair composite resin %DC.

  20. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  1. NaF-loaded core-shell PAN-PMMA nanofibers as reinforcements for Bis-GMA/TEGDMA restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liyuan; Zhou, Xuegang; Zhong, Hong; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    A kind of core-shell nanofibers containing sodium fluoride (NaF) was produced and used as reinforcing materials for dimethacrylate-based dental restorative resins in this study. The core-shell nanofibers were prepared by coaxial-electrospinning with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solutions as core and shell fluids, respectively. The produced PAN-PMMA nanofibers varied in fiber diameter and the thickness of PMMA shell depending on electrospinning parameters. NaF-loaded nanofibers were obtained by incorporating NaF nanocrystals into the core fluid at two loadings (0.8 or 1.0wt.%). Embedment of NaF nanocrystals into the PAN core did not damage the core-shell structure. The addition of PAN-PMMA nanofibers into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA clearly showed the reinforcement due to the good interfacial adhesion between fibers and resin. The flexural strength (Fs) and flexural modulus (Ey) of the composites decreased slightly as the thickness of PMMA shell increasing. Sustained fluoride releases with minor initial burst release were achieved from NaF-loaded core-shell nanofibers and the corresponding composites, which was quite different from the case of embedding NaF nanocrystals into the dental resin directly. The study demonstrated that NaF-loaded PAN-PMMA core-shell nanofibers were not only able to improve the mechanical properties of restorative resin, but also able to provide sustained fluoride release to help in preventing secondary caries. © 2013.

  2. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Fouda Hany; Guo Lin; Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin) with carbon fiber (CF) to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength...

  3. Clinical evaluation of a nanohybrid and a flowable resin composite in non-carious cervical lesions: 24-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Emel; Yazici, A Rüya; Ozgunaltay, Gül; Dayangac, Berrin

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the 24-month clinical performance of cervical restorations using a nanohybrid and a flowable resin composite with a one-step self-etching adhesive. Twenty-one patients with at least one pair of non-carious cervical lesions participated in this study. A total of 134 non-carious cervical lesions were restored (67 with a nanohybrid resin composite, Grandio; 67 with a flowable resin composite, Grandio Flow) using a one-step self-etching adhesive system, Futura Bond NR, by one dentist. The restorations were evaluated for retention, color match, marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, surface texture, anatomic form, and secondary caries by two calibrated examiners at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 months using modified USPHS criteria. The survival rates of the restorations were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier estimator. The comparison of resin composites for each category was performed with the Pearson chi-square test, and the performance of restorations at baseline and after each recall time was evaluated using McNemar's test (p Grandio and Grandio Flow, respectively. At the 24-month recall, the retention rate was 60% for Grandio and 54% for Grandio Flow. No statistically significant differences were found in retention rates among the restorative materials in any evaluation period (p > 0.05). For marginal discoloration and anatomical form, three Grandio and three Grandio Flow restorations showed Bravo scores at the end of 24 months. The restorations in both groups had Alfa ratings of 100% for the rest of the criteria evaluated. The nanohybrid and flowable resin composites showed similar clinical performances in the restoration of non-carious cervical lesions over 24 months.

  4. Preparation and Characterizations of Composite Material Based on Carbon Fiber and Two Thermoset Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Hany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we used two types of thermoset resins (epoxy resin and phenol formaldehyde resin with carbon fiber (CF to produce composite materials. CF/epoxy resin composite and CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite were fabricated and compared between their mechanical properties as compression, tension and flexural. it was found that mechanical properties of CF/epoxy composite higher than mechanical properties of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite such as flexural strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 30 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin composite, tensile strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 11.4 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin and axial compression strength of CF/epoxy resin composite increased by 14.5 % than flexural strength of CF/phenolformaldhyde resin.

  5. In vitro evaluation of microleakage in restored teeth with synthetic resins by neutrongraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, A.L.N.; Crispim, V.R.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate, using neutron graphic images, microleakage in teeth that were treated with resins. Teeth samples were drilled, producing wells with similar dimensions in each tooth. Afterwards, they were thoroughly filled with different resins to avoid voids. In preliminary tests, four different resins were used, and after submitted to neutron radiography their images were analyzed. The results of this trial showed good adherent for all the resins used, and since no micro leakage were seen on the images, the restoration procedure was successfully. (author)

  6. In vitro evaluation of microleakage in restored teeth with synthetic resins by neutrongraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A.L.N.; Crispim, V.R., E-mail: abarbosa@ien.gov.b, E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate, using neutron graphic images, microleakage in teeth that were treated with resins. Teeth samples were drilled, producing wells with similar dimensions in each tooth. Afterwards, they were thoroughly filled with different resins to avoid voids. In preliminary tests, four different resins were used, and after submitted to neutron radiography their images were analyzed. The results of this trial showed good adherent for all the resins used, and since no micro leakage were seen on the images, the restoration procedure was successfully. (author)

  7. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Resin composite for sealing and its use in a solar cell. Fushiyo jushi soseibutsu oyobi sore wo mochiita taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, H.; Mimura, T.; Takehara, N.

    1994-01-28

    This invention presents resin composites for sealing of a solar cell composed of a hardening resin and a thermoplastic resin which has a number average molecular weight larger than that of the hardening resin and is soluble in the hardening resin, and the invention affords a solar cell to endure a long-term stable operation and to give a good performance. The hardening resin includes unsaturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, alkyd resin, unsaturated acrylic resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, melamine resin, diallyl phthalate resin, their oligomers and their modifications. The thermoplastic resin includes saturated polyester resin, phenolic resin, acrylic resin, styrene resin, epoxy resin, polyurethane resin, polyvinyl acetate resin, polyvinyl chloride resin, polyvinyl alcohol resin, polyacetal resin, their modifications and their copolymer resin. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Properties of Graphene Oxide/Epoxy Resin Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Jijun Tang; Haijun Zhou; Yunxia Liang; Xinlan Shi; Xin Yang; Jiaoxia Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) was obtained by pressurized oxidation method using natural graphite as raw materials. Then the GO/epoxy resin composites were prepared by casting. The mechanical and damping properties of composites were studied. As a result, the impact intensity of GO/epoxy resin composites was prominently improved with the content of the graphene oxide increasing. The glass transition temperature decreased and the damping capacity is improved.

  10. The influence of FRCs reinforcement on marginal adaptation of CAD/CAM composite resin endocrowns after simulated fatigue loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, G.T.; Sarrati, C.M.; Poncet, A.; Feilzer, A.J.; Krejci, I.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal adaptation of endodontically treated molars restored with CAD/CAM composite resin endocrowns either with or without reinforcement by fibre reinforced composites (FRCs), used in different configurations. 32 human endodontically treated molars were cut 2 mm over the CEJ. Two

  11. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Periapical Status of Root-filled Teeth Restored with Composite, Amalgam, or Full Crown Restorations: A Cross-sectional Study of a Swedish Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Victoria S; Petersson, Kerstin; Wolf, Eva; Åkerman, Sigvard

    2016-09-01

    The aim was to compare the periapical status of root-filled teeth restored with resin composite, laboratory-fabricated crowns, or amalgam in a Swedish adult population. The subjects consisted of 440 individuals from a randomly selected sample of 1000 adult residents of a Swedish county. The type, material, and quality of the restorations were recorded for all root-filled teeth by using clinical examination and intraoral clinical photographs. Periapical status, root-filling quality, and marginal bone loss were evaluated on panoramic radiographs. The association between periapical status and type, material, and quality of the restorations was analyzed by using the χ(2) test and logistic regression. No difference in the frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) between teeth restored with resin composite, laboratory-fabricated crowns, or amalgam (29.7%, 26.2%, and 43.1%, respectively) of adequate quality was found. No association between AP and resin composite restorations was disclosed; however, there was an association between AP and inadequate root-filling quality and marginal bone loss >1/3 of the root length. The results did not indicate any association between AP and resin composite restorations. Neither the type nor the material of the restoration was of significance for periapical status as long as the quality was adequate. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Various Surface Treatment on Repair Strength of Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Alizade

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: In some clinical situations, repair of composite restorations is treatment of choice. Improving the bond strength between one new and old composite usually requires increased surface roughness to promote mechanical interlocking sincechemical bonding might not be adequate. Similarly, the treatment of a laboratory fabricated resin composite restoration involves the same procedures, and there is a need to create the strongest possible bond of a resin cement to a previously polymerized composite.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various surface treatments on the shear bond strength of repaired to aged composite resin.Materials and Methods: Eighty four cylindrical specimens of a composite resin were fabricated and stored in distilled water for 100 days prior to surface treatment. Surface treatment of old composite was done in 6 groups as follow:1- Air abrasion with CoJet sand particles with micoretcher + silane + dentin bonding agent2- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles+ phosphoric acid+ silane+ dentin bonding agent3- Air abrasion with 50μm Al2O3 particles + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent4- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + silane + dentin bonding agent5- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + dentin bonding agent6- Diamond bur + phosphoric acid + composite activator + dentin bonding agentThen fresh composite resin was bonded to treated surfaces. Twelve specimens were also fabricated as control group with the same diameter but with the height twice as much as other specimens. All of the specimens were thermocycled prior to testing for shear bondstrength. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically using one way ANOVA test, t test and Duncan's grouping test.Results: One-way ANOVA indicated no significant difference between 7 groups (P=0.059. One-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the three diamond bur groups (P=0.036. Silane had a significant effect on the repair bond

  14. Effect of reinforcement with resin composite on fracture strength of structurally compromised roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yuji; Komada, Wataru; Yoshida, Keiichi; Otake, Shiho; Okada, Daizo; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the fracture resistance of structurally compromised roots restored with four different post and core systems. Thirty-two bovine roots were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolar roots. The roots were divided into four groups based on the type of restoration: cemented cast post and core (Group MC), resin composite build-up (Group CR), resin composite and prefabricated glass fiber post build-up (Group FRC), and thick-layer dual-cured resin composite-reinforced small-diameter tapered cast post and core (Group CRM). After a static loading test, the failure mode and fracture resistance were recorded. Group CRM (719.38+/-196.73 N) exhibited a significantly high fracture resistance compared with the other groups (Group MC: 429.56+/-82.43 N; Group CR: 349.56+/-66.21 N; Group FRC: 398.94+/-112.71 N; pCRM exhibited better mechanical properties for structurally compromised roots with no ferrules, although all types of restorations showed non-restorable fracture modes.

  15. On the design of dental resin-based composites: a micromechanical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill; Kotousov, Andrei; Swain, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Adhesive resin-based restorative materials have the potential to considerably strengthen teeth and offer more economically viable alternatives to traditional materials such as gold, amalgam or ceramics. Other advantages are direct and immediate placement and the elimination of the use of mercury. However, polymerization shrinkage during curing of an adhesive restoration and mismatch in mechanical properties can lead to the initiation and development of interfacial defects. These defects could have a detrimental effect on the longevity of the restored tooth. The current study is focused on some design issues of resin-based composites affecting the longevity of the tooth-restoration interface. The theoretical approach is based on self-consistent micromechanical modelling that takes into account the effect of the material properties, volume concentration of the dispersed particle phase as well as the shape of these particles on the overall thermomechanical properties of the composite. Results obtained for resin-based composites reinforced with spherical, disc and short fibre particles highlight the advantages of disc shaped and short fibre particles.

  16. Ten-year clinical assessment of three posterior resin composites and two amalgams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, L H

    1998-08-01

    The long-term clinical performance of three posterior resin composites and two amalgams was assessed. Thirty Class II restorations each of P-30, Occlusin, Clearfil Posterior (composites), New True Dentalloy, and Solila Nova (amalgams) were placed. Reviews took place at 6 months and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 10 years. At each visit the gingival condition, the contact point status, and the presence of ledges, gaps, or recurrent caries were assessed. The color match, cavosurface marginal stain, general surface stain, tarnish, and corrosion were also scored where applicable. Epoxy resin replicas were used to measure the maximum depth of wear. After 10 years, there had been corrosion of both the high- and low-copper amalgams and a slight deterioration in color match of a number of composite restorations. Eighteen (of 20) Occlusin restorations had obvious cavosurface marginal stain, attributed to staining of the unfilled bonding resin layer. Statistical analysis indicated that New True Dentalloy, Solila Nova, and Clearfil-P exhibited significantly less wear than Occlusin and P-30. None of the restorations examined at the 10-year recall required replacement. The five materials, placed in a dental school environment, provided adequate clinical service for 10 years.

  17. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (ptested FRC posts is required for effective bonding.

  18. Aerospace Composite Materials Delivery Order 0003: Nanocomposite Polymeric Resin Enhancements for Improved Composite Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Chenggang

    2002-01-01

    .... The addition of clays does not significantly alter the viscosity or cure kinetics so that the modified resin will still be suitable for liquid composite molding techniques such as resin transfer molding...

  19. Moisture diffusion parameter characteristics for epoxy composites and neat resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The moisture absorption characteristics of two graphite/epoxy composites and their corresponding cured neat resins were studied in high humidity and water immersion environments at elevated temperatures. Moisture absorption parameters, such as equilibrium moisture content and diffusion coefficient derived from data taken on samples exposed to high humidity and water soak environments, were compared. Composite swelling in a water immersion environment was measured. Tensile strengths of cured neat resin were measured as a function of their equilibrium moisture content after exposure to different moisture environments. The effects of intermittent moderate tensile loads on the moisture absorption parameters of composite and cured neat resin samples were determined.

  20. The effect of exposure time on diametral tensile strength of light-cured resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia M Tetelepta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition or extend the exposure time in using light-cured resin composite are often done by practitioners in order to get a higher mechanical strength. Nevertheless, failure still can occur. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exposure time on Diametral Tensile Strength (DTS of two different resin composite used for provisional crown and bridge restoration and filling materials. A total of 60 cylindrical specimens (6mm diameter x 3mm thickness were divided into three groups (n=10. The first group was cured as recommended by the manufacturer, the second group were cured two times, and the third group were cured three times. Furthermore, specimens were immersed in distilled water for 24 hours at a temperature of 37 °C. DTS were tested by universal testing machine and the results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA continued with Post Hoc Tamhane to see the difference between the groups. The results showed DTS composite as filling materials was significantly higher compared with the resin composite  for provisional crown and bridge restoration. DTS of composite as filling materials in first group had a higher value than first  and third groups. The composite for the provisional crown and bridge restoration in second group had a lower DTS value than in first and third groups. In third group, DTS increased but not significantly. DTS also could be influenced by the composition of filler content and type of matrix. The conclusion of this study was to extend the exposure time can weaken the DTS resin composite.

  1. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phenolic resin; nanometric silicon carbide; nanocomposites; friction coefficient. 1. Introduction. Phenolic resin composites have their applications in a wide range of fields ... Curing time and temperature as well as mold materials influence the resulting homogeneity, glass transition temperature and mechanical properties.

  2. The measurement of polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with ESPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Guo Biao

    2008-09-01

    In the current study, we used the method of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to measure polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. Standardized cavities were prepared and placed into the ESPI apparatus before the cavities were filled with composites (n=2) .The ESPI apparatus was constructed to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the resins surface during the polymerization. Experiments demonstrated that the ESPI technique was a viable method to measure the deformation of composite resins. It was responsive and sensitive to dimensional changes. We found that cavity shape, size and C- factor influenced the date of resins shrinkage. And the tooth deformation in response to polymerization of resins was measured by the ESPI too. We concluded that ESPI was a feasible method for assessing resins deformation induced by its polymerization shrinkage when it was bonded in tooth cavities. And the results were greatly influenced by the dimensions of cavities , or interface adhesive and so on. It could also measure the tooth deformation induced by shrinkage of bonded composite resins. We found that resins polymerization shrinkage date may overestimate shrinkage-induced tooth deformation.

  3. Synthesis of nanosized barium titanate/epoxy resin composites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barium titanate/epoxy resin composites have been synthesized and tested for microwave absorption/ transmission. Nanocrystalline barium titanate (BaTiO3 or BT) ... Anechoic chamber; barium titanate; electromagnetic interference and compatibility; epoxy resin ..... electromagnetic waves, the two port calibrations have been.

  4. Effect of water storage and additional polymerization on the color parameters of flowable resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harorli, Osman Tolga; Barutcigil, Çagatay; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Bayindir, Funda

    2013-11-01

    Tooth colored dental restorative materials should maintain their chromatic properties throughout their service period. The aim of this study was to examine the possible color changes of flowable resin composite filling materials following water storage. The effect of additional light curing on color stability of restorative materials was also investigated. Six brands of light-cured flowable resin composites of the same shade (A3) were prepared from two groups generated by curing for 20 or 60 seconds. The initial color parameters of the flowable composite samples were measured with a dental colorimeter according to the CIELAB color scale, and the samples were stored in distilled water at 37°C. Following 2 weeks' water storage, the measurements were repeated. The color differences (ΔE*(ab)) were calculated according to the CIELAB formula. Statistical differences between the measurements were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's tests. No initial color variation between the samples cured for 20 seconds and 60 seconds was perceptible (ΔE*(ab)3.3, was detected in Eco-flow, Filtek Supreme and Grandio samples in both polymerization groups. Flowable resin composites may exhibit a significant color change as a result of water storage. Sixty seconds exposure period does not influence the final color. Clinicians should be aware of color shifts in flowable resins.

  5. Antibacterial properties of amalgam and composite resin materials used as cores under crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghadban, A; Al Shaarani, F

    2012-06-01

    The Aim of this Study was to compare the bacterial growth in the bulk of both amalgam and fluoridated composite resin materials used as cores under crowns at core's surface (in the superficial area of the bulk) and depth levels. With 24 lower premolars, 12 of them were restored with metal posts and amalgam cores (group 1). The rest were restored with glass Fiber-reinforced Composite (FRC) posts and fluoridated composite resin cores (group 2). All specimens were covered with aluminium crowns cemented with resin cement, and then they were soaked in natural saliva for three months. Excoriations abraded from the superficial and the depth areas of the core materials were cultured under aerobic conditions on blood agar plates. After incubation for 2 days, colonies formed on the plates were identified, and the CFU mg(-1) counts were recorded accordingly. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent sample T test. The mean values of CFU mg(-1) counts in group 2 excoriations (surface 39.75, and depth 9.75) were higher than the group 1 excoriations (surface 1.67, and depth 0.42). This study supports the use of amalgam for building up cores due to its antibacterial properties. Composite resin, however, enhanced sizable bacterial growth despite the presence of fluoride.

  6. The effect of time between curing and tea immersion on composite resin discoloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Behnaz; Afkhami, Solaleh; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh

    2018-01-01

    One common cause for the replacement of a composite restoration is discoloration. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of tea solution on the discoloration of 3 types of composites at different timepoints after curing. For this study, 150 disc-shaped specimens of 3 types of composite resin-a nanohybrid (Filtek Z350), a microhybrid (Filtek Z250), and a microfilled material (Heliomolar)-were prepared. Specimens were randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10) according to the type of composite and the time from curing to immersion in a tea solution (none [immersed immediately], 1 hour, 6 hours, 12 hours, or 24 hours postcuring). The color for all specimens was measured before and after immersion in tea. Color change (ΔE*) for all specimens was measured, and a ΔE* value of less than 3.3 was considered clinically acceptable. Analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey test were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Immediately after curing, the levels of composite discoloration were deemed clinically acceptable (ΔE* composites, the greatest color change was found immediately after curing (P composite resin specimens was significantly greater than that of Heliomolar specimens (P composite group than in the Heliomolar group (P composites were not significantly different from each other (P > 0.05), except with 12-hour postcure immersion. The results suggest that patients should avoid the intake of staining foods or beverages for at least 12 hours after placement of a composite resin restoration, although this restriction may be reduced to 1 hour for microfilled composite resins.

  7. Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Two Bis-Acryl Composite Resins Using Human Gingival Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Fabiano Palmeira; Alves, Gutemberg; Guimarães, Vladi Oliveira; Gallito, Marco Antônio; Oliveira, Felipe; Scelza, Míriam Zaccaro

    2016-01-01

    Bis-acryl resins are used for temporary dental restorations and have shown advantages over other materials. The aim of this work was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of two bis-acryl composite resins (Protemp 4 and Luxatemp Star), obtained at 1, 7 and 40 days after mixing the resin components, using a standardized assay employing human primary cells closely related to oral tissues. Human gingival fibroblast cell cultures were exposed for 24 h to either bis-acryl composite resins, polystyrene beads (negative control) and latex (positive control) extracts obtained after incubation by the different periods, at 37 °C under 5% CO2. Cell viability was evaluated using a multiparametric procedure involving sequential assessment (using the same cells) of mitochondrial activity (XTT assay), membrane integrity (neutral red test) and total cell density (crystal violet dye exclusion test). The cells exposed to the resin extracts showed cell viability indexes exceeding 75% after 24 h. Even when cells were exposed to extracts prepared with longer conditioning times, the bis-acryl composite resins showed no significant cytotoxic effects (p>0.05), compared to the control group or in relation to the first 24 h of contact with the products. There were no differences among the results obtained for the bis-acryl composite resins evaluated 24 h, 7 days and 40 days after mixing. It may be concluded that the bis-acryl resins Protemp 4 and Luxatemp Star were cytocompatible with human gingival fibroblasts, suggesting that both materials are suitable for use in contact with human tissues.

  8. Long-term evaluation of extensive restorations in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwenhuysen, J.-P. van; D'hoore, W.D.; Carvalho, J.

    2003-01-01

    Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry......Biostatistics, cast crowns, complex restorations, composite resins, decision making, dental amalgam, metal ceramic crowns, multi-surfaced restorations, prosthodontics, restorative dentistry...

  9. Characterization and Process Development of Cyanate Ester Resin and Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1998-03-01

    Cyanate ester (or polycyanate) resins offer advantages as composite matrices because of their high thermal stability, low outgassing, low water absorption and radiation resistance. This report describes the results of a processing study to develop high-strength hoop-wound composite by the wet-filament winding method using Toray T1000G carbon fiber and YLA RS-14A polycyanate resin as the constituent materials. Process trials, tests and analyses were conducted in order to gain insight into factors that can affect final properties of the cured cyanate ester resin and its composites. The study shows that the cyanate ester resin has a broad process envelope but that an inert-atmosphere cure is essential for obtaining optimum resin and composite properties. Minimizing moisture exposure prior to cure is also crucial as it affects the T{sub g} of the resin and composite. Recommendations for reducing moisture contact with the resin during wet-winding are presented. High fiber volume fraction ({approximately}80%) composites wound and cured with these methods yielded excellent hoop tensile strengths (660 to 670 ksi average with individual rings failing above 700 ksi), which are believed to be the highest recorded strengths for this class of materials. The measured transverse properties were also exceptional for these high fiber fraction composites. Based on the available data, this cyanate ester resin system and its composites are recommended for space and vacuum applications only. Further testing is required before these materials can be recommended for long term use at elevated temperatures in an ambient air environment. The results of all analyses and tests performed as part of this study are presented as well as baseline process for fabricating thick, stage-cured composites. The manufacture of a 1 in. thick composite cylinder made with this process is also described.

  10. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  11. Effect of water storage on the translucency of silorane-based and dimethacrylate-based composite resins with fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozakar Ilday, Nurcan; Celik, Neslihan; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Seven, Nilgün

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the translucency of silorane and dimethacrylate-based composite resins and (2) to evaluate the effect of water storage and reinforcement with fibre on the translucency of composite resins. Two light-cured composite resins (A2 shade), Filtek Silorane (silorane-based composite) and Valux Plus (dimethacrylate-based composite), were used in this study. The first group was used as the control with no reinforcements, the second was reinforced with polyethylene (Ribbond THM) and the third was reinforced with a glass fibre (Everstick Net) for each composite resin. Colour measurements were measured against white and black backgrounds with a Shadepilot (Degu Dent Gmbh, Hanau, Germany) spectrophotometer and recorded under a D65 light source, which reflects daylight. CIELAB parameters of each specimen were recorded at baseline and at 24 h, 168 h and 504 h. Translucency of materials was calculated using the translucency parameter (TP) formula. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and LSD post hoc tests (α=0.05). The highest baseline TP value was in the Valux Plus/non-fibre reinforced group (14.06±1) and the lowest in the Filtek Silorane/Ribond THM group (8.98±1.11). Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant effects from the factors storage time, composite resin, composite resin×storage time and fibre×time (p=0.047; p=0.001; p=0.013; p=0.022, respectively). Within the limitations of the study, we concluded that inclusion of polyethylene and glass fibres did not alter the translucency of the different-based composite resins. The longest storage time resulted in the greatest change in translucency values of Filtek Silorane composite resins. Considering the translucencies of composites with different formulations in the selection of composite resins for aesthetic restorations is important in terms of obtaining optimal aesthetic outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface roughness of etched composite resin in light of composite repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, B.A.C.; Cardoso, M.V.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.; Munck, J. De; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Meerbeek, B. Van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In search for clinically effective composite repair protocols, the effect of various etching protocols on the surface roughness of composite resins with different filler composition were investigated. METHODS: Of two composite resins (hybrid-filled Clearfil AP-X; nano-filled Filtek

  13. SUSTENTAÇÃO DE ESMALTE COM IONÔMEROS DE VIDRO E RESINA COMPOSTA: EFEITO NA RESISTÊNCIA À FRATURA DAS CÚSPIDES DE DENTES RESTAURADOS SUPPORTING ENAMEL WITH GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOSITE RESIN: EFFECT ON FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF CUSPS OF RESTORED TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Stefano SECCO

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo determinou a resistência e o tipo de fratura do esmalte suportado pelos materiais restauradores ionômeros de vidro convencional e modificado por resina e resina composta, bem como a influência dessa técnica restauradora na resistência das cúspides dos dentes. A remoção da estrutura dental para o preparo de cavidades tipo classe II e a presença de esmalte socavado diminuiram significativamente a resistência das cúspides dos dentes em relação ao dente hígido (p This study determined the resistance to fracture and its pattern for enamel supported with conventional and modified glass ionomer cements, and composite resin restorative materials, as well as the influence of these restorative techniques on cuspal strength of teeth. Removal of dental structure by class II cavity preparations and unsupported enamel had decreased significantly the cuspal strength in relation to healthy teeth (p < 0.01. Restorative materials used to support enamel reduced the fracture rate of restored cusps, but did not increase the fracture resistance values statistically. All tested groups presented alterations in the fracture pattern

  14. Polymerization shrinkage assessment of dental resin composites: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarly, Dalia; Gezawi, Moataz El

    2016-09-01

    Composite restorations are widely used worldwide, but the polymerization shrinkage is their main disadvantage that may lead to clinical failures and adverse consequences. This review reports, currently available in vitro techniques and methods used for assessing the polymerization shrinkage. The focus lies on recent methods employing three-dimensional micro-CT data for the evaluation of polymerization shrinkage: volumetric measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation through tracing particles before and after polymerization. Original research articles reporting in vitro shrinkage measurements and shrinkage stresses were included in electronic and hand-search. Earlier methods are easier, faster and less expensive. The procedures of scanning the samples in the micro-CT and performing the shrinkage vector evaluation are time consuming and complicated. Moreover, the respective software is not commercially available and the various methods for shrinkage vector evaluation are based on different mathematical principles. Nevertheless, these methods provide clinically relevant information and give insight into the internal shrinkage behavior of composite applied in cavities and how boundary conditions affect the shrinkage vectors. The traditional methods give comparative information on polymerization shrinkage of resin composites, whereas using three-dimensional micro-CT data for volumetric shrinkage measurement and the shrinkage vector evaluation is a highly accurate method. The methods employing micro-CT data give the researchers knowledge related to the application method and the boundary conditions of restorations for visualizing the shrinkage effects that could not be seen otherwise. Consequently, this knowledge can be transferred to the clinical situation to optimize the material manipulation and application techniques for improved outcomes.

  15. Polymerization shrinkage of different types of composite resins and microleakage with and without liner in class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, E; Ozgunaltay, G

    2014-01-01

    To determine the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of four different types of composite resin and to evaluate microleakage of these materials in class II (MOD) cavities with and without a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) liner, in vitro. One hundred twenty-eight extracted human upper premolar teeth were used. After the teeth were divided into eight groups (n=16), standardized MOD cavities were prepared. Then the teeth were restored with different resin composites (Filtek Supreme XT, Filtek P 60, Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z 250) with and without a RMGIC liner (Vitrebond). The restorations were finished and polished after 24 hours. Following thermocycling, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours, then midsagitally sectioned in a mesiodistal plane and examined for microleakage using a stereomicroscope. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage of materials was measured using a video imaging device (Acuvol, Bisco, Inc). Data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. All teeth showed microleakage, but placement of RMGIC liner reduced microleakage. No statistically significant differences were found in microleakage between the teeth restored without RMGIC liner (p>0.05). Filtek Silorane showed significantly less volumetric polymerization shrinkage than the methacrylate-based composite resins (pcomposite resin restorations resulted in reduced microleakage. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage was least with the silorane-based composite.

  16. Microleakage of silorane- and methacrylate-based class V composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-08-01

    The marginal integrity of class V restorations in a silorane- and a group of methacrylate-based composite resins with varying viscosities was tested in the present study. Different adhesives (OptiBond FL, KerrHawe; AdheSE One, Vivadent; or Silorane System Adhesive, 3M ESPE) were applied to 168 standardized class V cavities. The cavities (n = 12) were filled with a wide range of different viscous composite resins: Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE; els and els flow, Saremco; Tetric EvoCeram and Tetric EvoFlow, Vivadent; Grandio, Voco; and Ultraseal XT Plus, Ultradent. Microleakage of the restoration was assessed by dye penetration (silver staining) on multiple sections with and without thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML: 5,000 × 5-55°C; 30 s/cycle; 500,000 × 72.5 N, 1.6 Hz). Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test and the Error Rates Method (ERM). The silorane-based composite resin yielded the lowest dye penetration after TCML. Microleakage of methacrylate-based composite restorations, in general (ERM), was statistically significantly influenced by the adhesive system, Moreover, dye penetration at enamel margins was significantly lower than dye penetration at dentin margins. The chemical basis of composite resins and adjacent tooth substance seems to strongly influence marginal sealing of class V restorations for methacrylate-based materials. Moreover, the steps of dental adhesives used affected marginal integrity. The silorane-based composite resin evaluated in the present study exhibits the best marginal seal. The three-step adhesive yielded better marginal sealing than the one-step adhesive for methacrylate-based class V composite restorations.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of bulk-fill restorative composites to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandava, Jyothi; Vegesna, Divya-Prasanna; Ravi, Ravichandra; Boddeda, Mohan-Rao; Uppalapati, Lakshman-Varma; Ghazanfaruddin, M D

    2017-08-01

    To facilitate the easier placement of direct resin composite in deeper cavities, bulk fill composites have been introduced. The Mechanical stability of fillings in stress bearing areas restored with bulk-fill resin composites is still open to question, since long term clinical studies are not available so far. Thus, the objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the microtensile bond strength of three bulk-fill restorative composites with a nanohybrid composite. Class I cavities were prepared on sixty extracted mandibular molars. Teeth were divided into 4 groups (n= 15 each) and in group I, the prepared cavities were restored with nanohybrid (Filtek Z250 XT) restorative composite in an incremental manner. In group II, III and IV, the bulk-fill composites (Filtek, Tetric EvoCeram, X-tra fil bulk-fill restoratives) were placed as a 4 mm single increment and light cured. The restored teeth were subjected to thermocycling and bond strength testing was done using instron testing machine. The mode of failure was assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The bond strength values obtained in megapascals (MPa) were subjected to statistical analysis, using SPSS/PC version 20 software.One-way ANOVA was used for groupwise comparison of the bond strength. Tukey's Post Hoc test was used for pairwise comparisons among the groups. The highest mean bond strength was achieved with Filtek bulk-fill restorative showing statistically significant difference with Tetric EvoCeram bulk-fill ( p composites. Adhesive failures are mostly observed with X-tra fil bulk fill composites, whereas mixed failures are more common with other bulk fill composites. Bulk-fill composites exhibited adequate bond strength to dentin and can be considered as restorative material of choice in posterior stress bearing areas. Key words: Bond strength, Bulk-fill restoratives, Configuration factor, Polymerization shrinkage.

  18. Bacterial colonization of resin composite cements: influence of material composition and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Stephanie; Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Müller, Johannes A; Fischer, Jens; Waltimo, Tuomas; Rohr, Nadja

    2017-08-01

    So-called secondary caries may develop in the cement gap between the tooth and the bonded restoration. Cement materials with a low susceptibility to biofilm formation are therefore desirable. In the present study, the adhesion of Strepococcus mutans onto three adhesive (Multilink Automix, RelyX Ultimate, and Panavia V5) and three self-adhesive (Multilink Speed Cem, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, and Panavia SA plus) resin composite cements was evaluated. Previous studies have failed to evaluate concomitantly the effect of both the composition of the cements and their surface roughness on biofilm formation. The presence of S. mutans on cement surfaces with differing degrees of roughness was therefore recorded using fluorescence microscopy and crystal violet staining, and the composition of the cements was analyzed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping. Biofilm formation on resin composite cements was found to be higher on rougher surfaces, implying that adequate polishing of the cement gap is essential. The use of copper-containing cements (Multilink Automix, Panavia V5, and Panavia SA plus) significantly reduced biofilm formation. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  19. Cosmetic Remodeling of the Smile: Combining Composite Resin and Ceramics over Teeth and Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fernandes da Cunha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a restorative approach to the cosmetic remodeling of the teeth of a young adult patient with right maxillary lateral hypodontia and left lateral microdontia. A conservative restorative management was proposed to improve smile esthetics by combining direct composite resins and ceramics. Initially, periodontal therapy and dental bleaching were performed. Subsequently, direct composite resins were applied to the central incisors and canines to reestablish the sizes and shapes of these teeth. Finally, ceramics were placed on the implant and the microdontia to unite with the new alignment and color of the anterior teeth. Thus, conservative remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile was provided.

  20. Color and Gloss of Nano-Filled Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers and Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Marc; Lawson, Nathaniel C; Rupal, Manpreet; Beck, Preston; Burgess, John O

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to compare in vitro stain resistance, color stability, gloss, and gloss retention of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) to a traditional RMGI and resin-based composites (RBCs). Specimens (N = 20) were fabricated from a nano-filled RBC (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), a nanohybrid RBC (Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, Kuraray; Tokyo, Japan), a nano-filled RMGI (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), and traditional RMGI (Fuji II LC, GC America, Chicago, IL, USA). L*a*b* values were recorded with a spectrophotometer, and gloss was measured with a glossmeter. For each material, 10 specimens were stored in distilled water in darkness for 1 week and 10 specimens were placed in a staining solution for 1 week. After storage, specimens were cleaned and L*a*b* and gloss measurements were remeasured. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey analyses. Regarding color change, materials ranked: Ketac = Fuji > Filtek > Clearfil in water, and Ketac > Fuji > Filtek > Clearfil in staining solution. Prior to storage, the initial gloss of the materials ranked: Filtek ≥ Clearfil ≥ Ketac > Fuji. After storage, the materials ranked: Filtek = Clearfil > Ketac > Fuji in water, and Filtek > Clearfil > Ketac > Fuji in staining solution. Gloss retention was similar for all materials in water and gloss retention ranked: Filtek = Clearfil > Ketac = Fuji in staining solution. The nano-RMGI showed less stain resistance but higher gloss than the traditional RMGI. Both RMGIs had more color change, less stain resistance, lower gloss and less gloss retention than the RBCs. The clinician should be aware that the use of a nano-RMGI may improve the gloss of an RMGI restoration; however, color change will likely occur, particularly if the patient consumes a staining diet. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L*a*b* system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab*) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested. PMID:23559921

  2. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Poggio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet·X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram·X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO, after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h, for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco. The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE LFNx01aFNx01bFNx01 system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DE abFNx01 between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  3. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  4. Resin flow/fiber deformation model for composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a resin flow/fiber deformation model that can be used to predict the behavior of composites during the molding cycle. The model can take into account time varying pressure and viscosity and output the time history of the fiber volume fraction. With this known, the composite thickness, resin pressure, and fiber pressure can all be determined as a function of time. The results of this model are in good agreement with experimentally measured values. 10 references, 9 figures

  5. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal