WorldWideScience

Sample records for composite propellant combustion

  1. Combustion mechanism of high energy composite propellants (V). Combustion of azide/nitramine propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaki, H.; Iida, A.; Mitarai, Y. [Asahi Chemical Industry Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out on the combustion of azide polymers used as a binder in high-energy propellants. AMMO (3-azidemethyl-3`-methyloxetane) is one of the energetic azide polymers which contain N3 groups in their molecular structures. EDNA (ethylenedinitramine) is a linear nitramine which has modest properties in the flame temperature and the molecular weight of burned gases as compared with HMX (cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine) and NQ (nitroguanidine). In this study, the burning rate characteristics of azide/nitramine propellants were investigated in order to gain a wide spectrum of burning rate. As a result, the burning rate of AMMO/EDNA propellant is higher than that of AMMO/HMX propellant and the pressure exponent of AMMO/EDNA propellant is lower than that of AMMO/HMX propellant. Both AMMO/EDNA and AMMO/HMX propellants exhibited the same combustion wave structure as inert polymer/nitramine propellants. The burning surface temperature and the temperature at the end of the first-stage reaction zone for AMMO/EDNA and AMMO/HMX propellants are approximately the same in the pressure range between 1.0 and 5.0 MPa. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Ignition by laser radiation and combustion of composite solid propellants with bimetal powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkikh, A. G.; Arkhipov, V. A.; Glotov, O. G.; Zolotorev, N. N.

    2017-05-01

    The use of metal powder (usually aluminum) as a fuel in composite solid propellants (CSPs) for propulsion is the most energy efficient method that allows improvement of combustion characteristics of propellants in the combustion chamber and specific impulse. This paper presents the experimental data of the ignition and combustion processes of CSPs containing Alex aluminum nanopowder and mixtures of Alex/Fe and Alex/B nanopowders. It was found that the introduction of Alex/Fe in CSPs leads to 1.3-1.9 times decrease in the ignition time at q = 55-220 W/cm2 and to 1.3-1.4 times increase in the burning rate at p = 2.2-7.5 MPa with respect to that for basic CSP with Alex. When introducing Alex/B in CSP, the ignition times are 1.2-1.4 fold decreased, and the burning rate is practically unchanged. However, the agglomeration is significantly enhanced, which is manifested through the increase in the agglomerate particles content in condensed combustion products by a factor of 1.8-2.2, at 1.6-1.7 fold increase of the agglomerates mean diameter for CSP with Alex/B.

  3. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  4. Combustion characteristics of a solid propellant with a charring binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udlock, D. E.; Strand, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A brief investigation of the combustion characteristics of a solid propellant containing a binder which chars, as opposed to melting or volatizing, has been made. The burning rate of the propellant with the charring binder was significantly higher than similar propellants containing non-charring binders. High speed motion pictures of the burning propellant showed that the aluminum burned on the regressing surface, rather than a short distance from it as is typical with composite propellants.

  5. Challenges in Propellants and Combustion: 100 Years after Nobel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuo, Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    .... The Topics covered include: chemical kinetics of propellant combustion, environmental considerations in combustion of solid and liquid propellants, commercial application in the combustion of energetic materials, effective...

  6. Calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions of composite rocket propellants combustion products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIKOLA KILIBARDA

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available An adequate method for calculating chemical equilibrium in a predominantly gaseous, multi-component reactive mixture was investigated and successfully applied. This method involves the stated equilibrium reaction scheme, including, first, the formation of chemical species, of which concentrations prevail in the mixture, then the formation of gaseous atomic species by dissociation of previous ones, and, finally, the formation of complex chemical species from the atomic species. A computer program, which permits calculations of equilibrium compositions by the iteration procedure, has been developed. The results of calculations have been compared with data obtained by the programs OPHELIE, MICROPEP, and the program SPP, as documented in the NASA-Lewis Code, which is presently the world-wide standard. All comparisons gave satisfactory agreement.

  7. Numerical study of liquid propellants combustion for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, R.; Rezoug, T.

    2011-09-01

    The present study focuses on the combustion of liquid propellants used in engines for space propulsion applications (satellites and launch vehicles). The combustion of the following propellant combinations was studied: hydrogen/oxygen, hydrocarbon fuel/oxygen, hydrocarbon fuel/hydrogen peroxide, hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide, Mono-methyl hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide and Unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine/nitrogen tetroxide. The purpose of this paper is to determine the combustion flame temperature and the other thermochemical parameters (combustion products politropic parameter and molecular mass) as function of mixture ratio by mass of oxidizer to fuel (O/F). Furthermore, the vacuum specific impulse was also calculated at assumed pressure conditions of propulsion engines to show the effect of mixture ratio of the propellants on the performances. For the determination of the equilibrium composition at assumed temperature, nonlinear systems of equations were solved numerically using Lieberstein's method. Some results were presented and compared with previous research in this area, the comparison shows good agreement between the results and the difference is less than 5%. As example, three cases of bi-propellant engines were studied using the programs of combustion and frozen fluid flow approximation: Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), Zenit second stage engine (RD-120) and Ariane-5 upper stage engine (Aestus).

  8. Holographic Investigation of Solid Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    IITLE (B=m* £Se-T) CaruatwICi, HOLOGRAPHIC INIL’ESTIGWI’ION OF SOLZ ’PROPELLANT COMBUSTION 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) -Butler, Albert G. 13a TYPE OF REPORT...Speckle 19 ABSTRACT (Ccin1,rn WI ree~rse if IlCCenr~y anld ,dentify by blod number) An Investigcation into the behavior of aissmnied solid propellant...required to obtain a good quality hologram. Nuetral density filters, :3 placed in the scene beam for collimated type transmission holograms or in the

  9. Computing Instability In Combustion Of Liquid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code developed for use in design analyses of flow instabilities associated with combustion of sprayed liquid propellants in rocket engines. Code also contributes to design of improved commercial sprayed-fuel combustors in furnaces and jet engines. Proves robust, user-friendly software tool with comprehensive analysis capability. Enables characterization of stability or instability of engine in terms of such physically meaningful parameters as initial conditions of spray, spatial distribution of ratio between concentrations of fuel and oxidizer at injector faces, geometry of combustor, and configurations of baffles.

  10. Combustion characteristics of SMX and SMX based propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, David A.

    This work investigates the combustion of the new solid nitrate ester 2,3-hydroxymethyl-2,3-dinitro-1,4-butanediol tetranitrate (SMX, C6H 8N6O16). SMX was synthesized for the first time in 2008. It has a melting point of 85 °C and oxygen balance of 0% to CO 2, allowing it to be used as an energetic additive or oxidizer in solid propellants. In addition to its neat combustion characteristics, this work also explores the use of SMX as a potential replacement for nitroglycerin (NG) in double base gun propellants and as a replacement for ammonium perchlorate in composite rocket propellants. The physical properties, sensitivity characteristics, and combustion behaviors of neat SMX were investigated. Its combustion is stable at pressures of up to at least 27.5 MPa (n = 0.81). The observed flame structure is nearly identical to that of other double base propellant ingredients, with a primary flame attached at the surface, a thick isothermal dark zone, and a luminous secondary flame wherein final recombination reactions occur. As a result, the burning rate and primary flame structure can be modeled using existing one-dimensional steady state techniques. A zero gas-phase activation energy approximation results in a good fit between modeled and observed behavior. Additionally, SMX was considered as a replacement for nitroglycerin in a double base propellant. Thermochemical calculations indicate improved performance when compared with the common double base propellant JA2 at SMX loadings above 40 wt-%. Also, since SMX is a room temperature solid, migration may be avoided. Like other nitrate esters, SMX is susceptible to decomposition over long-term storage due to the presence of excess acid in the crystals; the addition of stabilizers (e.g., derivatives of urea) during synthesis should be sufficient to prevent this. the addition of Both unplasticized and plasticized propellants were formulated. Thermal analysis of unplasticized propellant showed a distinct melt

  11. Simulation of liquid propellant rocket engine combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrice, M. B.; Fang, J. C.; Purdy, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    A simulation technique for studying the high frequency combustion instabilities of liquid propellant rocket engines has been developed and used to investigate various aspects of instability phenomena. Of importance was investigation of the significance of the method of coupling the combustion and the gas dynamics of the system. Two coupling processes were studied: linear response of the combustion process to pressure fluctuations, and the nature of the resulting instabilities; and nonlinear response of the combustion process to velocity fluctuations, and the nature of the resulting instabilities. For the combustion model studied, nonlinear (velocity) coupling was found to more closely characterize liquid propellant instabilities.

  12. Nitramine Composite Solid Propellant Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    flame occurs between the decomposition .products of the AP forming 02 and inert products. Thus: NH 3 + HCLO4 - Inert Products + 02 (26) Since the AP...Equilibrium Compositions, Thermodynamic Properties, and Performance Characteristics of Propellants Systems," NWC-TP-6037, April 1979. 152. Juhasz, A. A., "Round

  13. Integrated model of a composite propellant rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The combustion of composite solid propellants was investigated and an available numerical model was improved for taking into account the change of pressure, when the process occurs in a confined environment, as inside a rocket. The pressure increase upon ignition is correctly described by the improved model for both sandwich and dispersed particles propellants. In the latter case, self-induced fluctuations in the pressure and in all other computed variables occur, as consequence of the periodic rise and depletion of oxidizer particles from the binder matrix. The comparison with the results of the constant pressure model shows a different fluctuating profile of gas velocity, with a possible second order effect induced by the pressure fluctuations.

  14. Combustion Product Evaluation of Various Charge Sizes and Propellant Formulations. Task 1 Report: Sampling and Analytical Procedures Proposed for Use in Gun Propellant Combustion Product Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    through thermodynamic equilibrium computer calculations on the combustion product composition for the specific propellant formulation used. An...DNPH) solution in acetonitrile containing five drops of IN HClO4 catalyst added just prior to injection. The flasks will be stored in the dark until

  15. Propellant Combustion and Propulsion: Nine Year Index and Abstracts of Publications by Princeton University 1968 - 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    34 ’ *—’ ’ " ’ "’ " "• ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ~ I. A. Steady State Burning - Composite "LOW PRESSURE BURNING OF COMPOSITE SOLID PROPELLANTS" Johan A. Steinz...34 I T. Kashiwagi, C. H. Waldman, R. D. Rothman and M. Summerfield Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 8, No. 3, 1973. Experiments were

  16. PERGOLA: an experimental facility to investigate storable propellants' combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Boust, Bastien; Bellenoue, Marc; Lamory, Stéphane; Labarthe, Emilie; Girard, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    International audience; PPRIME Institute and CNES have initiated research activities to investigate the propulsion behaviour of liquid storable propellants, and the related phenomena: atomization of propellants, ignition ability, combustion stability, propulsion efficiency. For this purpose, a specific facility " PERGOLA " has been designed with high modularity, allowing physical diagnostics in a pressurized combustor featuring relevant flow conditions (a few hundred g/s, 5 MPa). The first re...

  17. A two-phase restricted equilibrium model for combustion of metalized solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabnis, J. S.; Dejong, F. J.; Gibeling, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    An Eulerian-Lagrangian two-phase approach was adopted to model the multi-phase reacting internal flow in a solid rocket with a metalized propellant. An Eulerian description was used to analyze the motion of the continuous phase which includes the gas as well as the small (micron-sized) particulates, while a Lagrangian description is used for the analysis of the discrete phase which consists of the larger particulates in the motor chamber. The particulates consist of Al and Al2O3 such that the particulate composition is 100 percent Al at injection from the propellant surface with Al2O3 fraction increasing due to combustion along the particle trajectory. An empirical model is used to compute the combustion rate for agglomerates while the continuous phase chemistry is treated using chemical equilibrium. The computer code was used to simulate the reacting flow in a solid rocket motor with an AP/HTPB/Al propellant. The computed results show the existence of an extended combustion zone in the chamber rather than a thin reaction region. The presence of the extended combustion zone results in the chamber flow field and chemical being far from isothermal (as would be predicted by a surface combustion assumption). The temperature in the chamber increases from about 2600 K at the propellant surface to about 3350 K in the core. Similarly the chemical composition and the density of the propellant gas also show spatially non-uniform distribution in the chamber. The analysis developed under the present effort provides a more sophisticated tool for solid rocket internal flow predictions than is presently available, and can be useful in studying apparent anomalies and improving the simple correlations currently in use. The code can be used in the analysis of combustion efficiency, thermal load in the internal insulation, plume radiation, etc.

  18. Mixing and combustion enhancement of Turbocharged Solid Propellant Ramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichang; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Gen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang

    2018-02-01

    Turbocharged Solid Propellant Ramjet is a new concept engine that combines the advantages of both solid rocket ramjet and Air Turbo Rocket, with a wide operation envelope and high performance. There are three streams of the air, turbine-driving gas and augment gas to mix and combust in the afterburner, and the coaxial intake mode of the afterburner is disadvantageous to the mixing and combustion. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out mixing and combustion enhancement research. In this study, the numerical model of Turbocharged Solid Propellant Ramjet three-dimensional combustion flow field is established, and the numerical simulation of the mixing and combustion enhancement scheme is conducted from the aspects of head region intake mode to injection method in afterburner. The results show that by driving the compressed air to deflect inward and the turbine-driving gas to maintain strong rotation, radial and tangential momentum exchange of the two streams can be enhanced, thereby improving the efficiency of mixing and combustion in the afterburner. The method of injecting augment gas in the transverse direction and making sure the injection location is as close as possible to the head region is beneficial to improve the combustion efficiency. The outer combustion flow field of the afterburner is an oxidizer-rich environment, while the inner is a fuel-rich environment. To improve the efficiency of mixing and combustion, it is necessary to control the injection velocity of the augment gas to keep it in the oxygen-rich zone of the outer region. The numerical simulation for different flight conditions shows that the optimal mixing and combustion enhancement scheme can obtain high combustion efficiency and have excellent applicability in a wide working range.

  19. Combustion of Solid Propellants (La Combustion des Propergols Solides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    poudres modificateurs balistiques, des noirs de A mouler de caract~ristiques volontairement carbone sont souvent incorpor~s car ils ont diffdrontes ce...de antilueurs (suppresseurs de la post noir de carbone eat souvent utilisd combustion). Ceux-ci, g~ndralement des sels industriellemont comae param...devient compressible at is vitesse de combustion Pour 6tablir un bilan sur le risque eat modifide. La figure 7 illustre cet d’appariticn d’instabilit~s

  20. Photographic Combustion Characterization of LOX/Hydrocarbon Type Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using high speed photography to identify potential combustion anomalies (pops, fuel freezing, reactive stream separation (RSS), carbon formation) were demonstrated. Combustion evaluation criteria were developed for evaluating, characterizing, and screening promising low cost propellant combination(s) and injector element(s) for long life, reusable engine systems. Carbon formation and RSS mechanisms and trends were identified by using high speed color photography at speeds up to 6000 frames/sec. Single element injectors were tested with LOX/RP-1, LOX/Propane, LOX/Methane and LOX/Ammonia propellants. Tests were conducted using seven separate injector elements. Five different conventionally machined elements were tested: OFO Triplet; Rectangular Unlike Doublet (RUD); Unlike Doublet (UD); Like on Lke Doublet (LOL-EDM); and Slit Triplet.

  1. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  2. 49 CFR 173.220 - Internal combustion engines, self-propelled vehicles, mechanical equipment containing internal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Internal combustion engines, self-propelled vehicles, mechanical equipment containing internal combustion engines, and battery powered vehicles or... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.220 Internal combustion engines, self-propelled vehicles, mechanical...

  3. Scaling of Performance in Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Combustion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, James R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses scaling of combustion and combustion performance in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. In development of new combustors, comparisons are often made between predicted performance in a new combustor and measured performance in another combustor with different geometric and thermodynamic characteristics. Without careful interpretation of some key features, the comparison can be misinterpreted and erroneous information used in the design of the new device. This paper provides a review of this performance comparison, including a brief review of the initial liquid rocket scaling research conducted during the 1950s and 1960s, a review of the typical performance losses encountered and how they scale, a description of the typical scaling procedures used in development programs today, and finally a review of several historical development programs to see what insight they can bring to the questions at hand.

  4. Combustion stability with baffles, absorbers and velocity sensitive combustion. [liquid propellant rocket combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical and computational techniques were developed to predict the stability behavior of liquid propellant rocket combustors using damping devices such as acoustic liners, slot absorbers, and injector face baffles. Models were developed to determine the frequency and decay rate of combustor oscillations, the spatial and temporal pressure waveforms, and the stability limits in terms of combustion response model parameters.

  5. Swirl-Stabilized Injector Flow and Combustion Dynamics for Liquid Propellants at Supercritical Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Vigor

    2007-01-01

    An integrated modeling and simulation program has been conducted to substantially improve the fundamental knowledge of supercritical combustion of liquid propellants under conditions representative...

  6. Liquid-Propellant Droplet Dynamics and Combustion in Supercritical Forced-Convective Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Vigor

    1998-01-01

    .... The purpose is to establish a solid theoretical basis for enhancing the understanding of liquid propellant droplet vaporization, combustion, and dynamics at supercritical conditions, with emphasis...

  7. Distinctive features of the intrachamber instability of combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.

    2008-09-01

    Self-oscillations and certain of their regularities determined by solution of a degenerate system of differential equations that is used in considering combustion instability in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines are modeled mathematically.

  8. Hydrodynamic Stability of Liquid-Propellant Combustion: Landau's Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S. B.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrodynamic, or Landau, instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. As its name suggests, it stems from hydrodynamic effects connected with thermal expansion across the reaction region. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, the classical models that originally predicted this phenomenon have been extended to include the important effects that arise from a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Thus, the onset of Landau instability has now been shown to occur for sufficiently small negative values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. It has also been shown that the onset of instability occurs for decreasing values of the disturbance wave number as the gravitational-acceleration parameter decreases. Consequently, in an appropriate weak-gravity limit, Landau instability becomes a long-wave phenomena associated with the formation of large cells on the liquid-propellant surface. Additionally, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. This instability occurs for sufficiently large negative values of the pressure sensitivity, and is enhanced by increasing values of the burning-rate temperature sensitivity. It is further shown that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating

  9. Propellant injection strategy for suppressing acoustic combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Qina

    Shear-coaxial injector elements are often used in liquid-propellant-rocket thrust chambers, where combustion instabilities remain a significant problem. A conventional solution to the combustion instability problem relies on passive control techniques that use empirically-developed hardware such as acoustic baffles and tuned cavities. In addition to adding weight and decreasing engine performance, these devices are designed using trial-and-error methods, which do not provide the capability to predict the overall system stability characteristics in advance. In this thesis, two novel control strategies that are based on propellant fluid dynamics were investigated for mitigating acoustic instability involving shear-coaxial injector elements. The new control strategies would use a set of controlled injectors allowing local adjustment of propellant flow patterns for each operating condition, particularly when instability could become a problem. One strategy relies on reducing the oxidizer-fuel density gradient by blending heavier methane with the main fuel, hydrogen. Another strategy utilizes modifying the equivalence ratio to affect the acoustic impedance through mixing and reaction rate changes. The potential effectiveness of these strategies was assessed by conducting unit-physics experiments. Two different model combustors, one simulating a single-element injector test and the other a double-element injector test, were designed and tested for flame-acoustic interaction. For these experiments, the Reynolds number of the central oxygen jet was kept between 4700 and 5500 making the injector flames sufficiently turbulent. A compression driver, mounted on one side of the combustor wall, provided controlled acoustic excitation to the injector flames, simulating the initial phase of flame-acoustic interaction. Acoustic excitation was applied either as band-limited white noise forcing between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz or as single-frequency, fixed-amplitude forcing at 1150 Hz

  10. On Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    All liquid propellant rocket instability calculations in current use have limited value in the predictive sense and serve mainly as a correlating framework for the available data sets. The well-known n-t model first introduced by Crocco and Cheng in 1956 is still used as the primary analytical tool of this type. A multitude of attempts to establish practical analytical methods have achieved only limited success. These methods usually produce only stability boundary maps that are of little use in making critical design decisions in new motor development programs. Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of combustion instability in solid propellant rockets"' provides a firm foundation for a new approach to prediction, diagnosis, and correction of the closely related problems in liquid motor instability. For predictive tools to be useful in the motor design process, they must have the capability to accurately determine: 1) time evolution of the pressure oscillations and limit amplitude, 2) critical triggering pulse amplitude, and 3) unsteady heat transfer rates at injector surfaces and chamber walls. The method described in this paper relates these critical motor characteristics directly to system design parameters. Inclusion of mechanisms such as wave steepening, vorticity production and transport, and unsteady detonation wave phenomena greatly enhance the representation of key features of motor chamber oscillatory behavior. The basic theoretical model is described and preliminary computations are compared to experimental data. A plan to develop the new predictive method into a comprehensive analysis tool is also described.

  11. Liquid-propellant droplet vaporization and combustion in high pressure environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor

    1991-01-01

    In order to correct the deficiencies of existing models for high-pressure droplet vaporization and combustion, a fundamental investigation into this matter is essential. The objective of this research are: (1) to acquire basic understanding of physical and chemical mechanisms involved in the vaporization and combustion of isolated liquid-propellant droplets in both stagnant and forced-convective environments; (2) to establish droplet vaporization and combustion correlations for the study of liquid-propellant spray combustion and two-phase flowfields in rocket motors; and (3) to investigate the dynamic responses of multicomponent droplet vaporization and combustion to ambient flow oscillations.

  12. Emissions of gun propellant compositions with added urea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of certain components to gun propellants may lead to a reduction of the NOx content in combustion gases. This is escribed in the literature based on small scale laboratory research. One of these components is urea. In the investigation described here, propellants have been studied which

  13. JANNAF workshop on hazards due to pre-combustion behavior of high energy propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental results and hazards associated with the pre-combustion behavior of high energy propellants are discussed. Special attention was given to future needs for modeling and the problem of deflagration to detonation transition.

  14. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  15. On the combustion mechanisms of ZrH2 in double-base propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjing; Zhao, Fengqi; Yuan, Zhifeng; Wang, Ying; An, Ting; Chen, Xueli; Xuan, Chunlei; Zhang, Jiankan

    2017-12-13

    Metal hydrides are regarded as a series of promising hydrogen-supplying fuel for solid rocket propellants. Their effects on the energetic and combustion performances of propellants are closely related to their reaction mechanisms. Here we report a first attempt to determine the reaction mechanism of ZrH2, a high-density metal hydride, in the combustion of a double-base propellant to evaluate its potential as a fuel. ZrH2 is determined to possess good resistance to oxidation by nitrocellulose and nitroglycerine. Thus its combustion starts with dehydrogenation to generate H2 and metallic Zr. Subsequently, the newly formed Zr and H2 participate in the combustion and, especially, Zr melts and then combusts on the burning surface which favors the heat feedback to the propellant. This phenomenon is completely different from the combustion behavior of the traditional fuel Al, where the Al particles are ejected off the burning surface of the propellant to get into the luminous flame zone to burn. The findings in this work validate the potential of ZrH2 as a hydrogen-supplying fuel for double-base propellants.

  16. On Pulsating and Cellular Forms of Hydrodynamic Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An extended Landau-Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion, one that allows for a local dependence of the burning rate on the (gas) pressure at the liquid-gas interface, exhibits not only the classical hydrodynamic cellular instability attributed to Landau but also a pulsating hydrodynamic instability associated with sufficiently negative pressure sensitivities. Exploiting the realistic limit of small values of the gas-to-liquid density ratio p, analytical formulas for both neutral stability boundaries may be obtained by expanding all quantities in appropriate powers of p in each of three distinguished wave-number regimes. In particular, composite analytical expressions are derived for the neutral stability boundaries A(sub p)(k), where A, is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wave number of the disturbance. For the cellular boundary, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wave numbers for negative values of A(sub p), which is characteristic of many hydroxylammonium nitrate-based liquid propellants over certain pressure ranges. In contrast, the pulsating hydrodynamic stability boundary is insensitive to gravitational and surface-tension effects but is more sensitive to the effects of liquid viscosity because, for typical nonzero values of the latter, the pulsating boundary decreases to larger negative values of A(sub p) as k increases through O(l) values. Thus, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be stable (that is, steady and planar) only for a range of negative pressure sensitivities that lie below the cellular boundary that exists for sufficiently small negative values of A(sub p) and above the pulsating boundary that exists for larger negative values of this parameter.

  17. Analysis of combustion instability in liquid propellant engines with or without acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, C. L.; Kesselring, R. C.; Warner, C., III; Schuman, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical studies have been made of the relative combustion stability of various propellant combinations when used with hardware configurations representative of current design practices and with or without acoustic cavities. Two combustion instability models, a Priem-type model and a modification of the Northern Research and Engineering (NREC) instability model, were used to predict the variation in engine stability with changes in operating conditions, hardware characteristics or propellant combination, exclusive of acoustic cavity effects. The NREC model was developed for turbojet engines but is applicable to liquid propellant engines. A steady-state combustion model was used to predict the needed input for the instability models. In addition, preliminary development was completed on a new model to predict the influence of an acoustic cavity with specific allowance for the effects the nozzle, steady flow and combustion.

  18. Prediction of high frequency combustion instability in liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Chen, Y. S.

    1992-01-01

    The present use of a numerical model developed for the prediction of high-frequency combustion stabilities in liquid propellant rocket engines focuses on (1) the overall behavior of nonlinear combustion instabilities (2) the effects of acoustic oscillations on the fuel-droplet vaporization and combustion process in stable and unstable engine operating conditions, oscillating flowfields, and liquid-fuel trajectories during combustion instability, and (3) the effects of such design parameters as inlet boundary conditions, initial spray conditions, and baffle length. The numerical model has yielded predictions of the tangential-mode combustion instability; baffle length and droplet size variations are noted to have significant effects on engine stability.

  19. Cu–Co–O nano-catalysts as a burn rate modifier for composite solid propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chaitanya Kumar Rao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nano-catalysts containing copper–cobalt oxides (Cu–Co–O have been synthesized by the citric acid (CA complexing method. Copper (II nitrate and Cobalt (II nitrate were employed in different molar ratios as the starting reactants to prepare three types of nano-catalysts. Well crystalline nano-catalysts were produced after a period of 3 hours by the calcination of CA–Cu–Co–O precursors at 550 °C. The phase morphologies and crystal composition of synthesized nano-catalysts were examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR methods. The particle size of nano-catalysts was observed in the range of 90 nm–200 nm. The prepared nano-catalysts were used to formulate propellant samples of various compositions which showed high reactivity toward the combustion of HTPB/AP-based composite solid propellants. The catalytic effects on the decomposition of propellant samples were found to be significant at higher temperatures. The combustion characteristics of composite solid propellants were significantly improved by the incorporation of nano-catalysts. Out of the three catalysts studied in the present work, CuCo-I was found to be the better catalyst in regard to thermal decomposition and burning nature of composite solid propellants. The improved performance of composite solid propellant can be attributed to the high crystallinity, low agglomeration and lowering the decomposition temperature of oxidizer by the addition of CuCo-I nano-catalyst.

  20. Critical Review of Phenomenological Models for Studying Transient Combustion of Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Zarko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the existing generalizations of phenomenological model of solid propellants combustion, originally formulated by Ya. B. Zel'dovich in 1942, is presented. The model still remains valid and allows the description of different patterns of solid propellant transient combustion. However, over the years after this formulation was published, several publications appeared in the literature with assumptions that are not justified. Shortcomings of different model options and their limits of applicability are discussed. In fact, in some cases the attempts of model generalization are based on rather strong additional assumptions that lead to narrowing the applicability range of the model.

  1. Combustion and Performance Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, J. R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper summarizes the analyses of combustion and performance as a follow-up to a paper published in the 2008 JANNAF/LPS meeting. Combustion stability analyses are presented in a separate paper. The current paper includes test and analysis results of coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane or gaseous methane propellants. Several thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element swirl coax element injectors tested at the NASA MSFC, and a uni-element chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods

  2. Deconsolidation and combustion performance of thermally consolidated propellants deterred by multi-layers coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-gang Xiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Both heating and solvent-spray methods are used to consolidate the standard grains of double-base oblate sphere propellants plasticized with triethyleneglycol dinitrate (TEGDN (TEGDN propellants to high density propellants. The obtained consolidated propellants are deterred and coated with the slow burning multi-layer coating. The maximum compaction density of deterred and coated consolidated propellants can reach up to 1.39 g/cm3. Their mechanic, deconsolidation and combustion performances are tested by the materials test machine, interrupted burning set-up and closed vessel, respectively. The static compression strength of consolidated propellants deterred by multi-layer coating increases significantly to 18 MPa, indicating that they can be applied in most circumstances of charge service. And the samples are easy to deconsolidate in the interrupted burning test. Furthermore, the closed bomb burning curves of the samples indicate a two-stage combustion phenomenon under the condition of certain thickness of coated multi-layers. After the outer deterred multi-layer coating of consolidated samples is finished burning, the inner consolidated propellants continue to burn and breakup into aggregates and grains. The high burning progressivity can be carefully obtained by the smart control of deconsolidation process and duration of consolidated propellants. The preliminary results of consolidated propellants show that a rapid deconsolidation process at higher deconsolidation pressure is presented in the dynamic vivacity curves of closed bomb test. Higher density and higher macro progressivity of consolidated propellants can be obtained by the techniques in this paper.

  3. Propellant combustion product analyses on an M16 rifle and a 105 mm caliber gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ase, P.; Eisenberg, W.; Gordon, S.; Taylor, K.; Snelson, A.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the propellant combustion products (particulates and gases) that are formed on firing an M16 rifle and 105 mm caliber gun have been subjected to qualitative, and to a more limited extent, quantitative chemical analyses. For both weapons, large numbers of trace gas species, 90 to 70 respectively, were identified in the combustion effluents from the small large bore weapons. Quantifiable data were obtained for 15 of these species in terms of mass of compound formed per unit mass of propellant burned. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, 11 and 4 respectively, were identified and quantified in the combustion products from the small and large bore weapons. Metal particulates in the respirable range in the combustion products from the M16 rifle were analyzed and quantified. Many of the chemical species identified in the study have known toxicological properties. Although the data base is limited, it appears that within the confines of the different propellants' stoichiometries, the amounts of combustion products formed are approximately directly proportional to the masses of propellant burned.

  4. Green Propellant Test Capabilities of the Altitude Combustion Stand at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Jonathan M.; Arnett, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is committed to providing simulated altitude rocket test capabilities to NASA programs, other government agencies, private industry partners, and academic partners. A primary facility to support those needs is the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS). ACS provides the capability to test combustion components at a simulated altitude up to 100,000 ft. (approx.0.2 psia/10 Torr) through a nitrogen-driven ejector system. The facility is equipped with an axial thrust stand, gaseous and cryogenic liquid propellant feed systems, data acquisition system with up to 1000 Hz recording, and automated facility control system. Propellant capabilities include gaseous and liquid hydrogen, gaseous and liquid oxygen, and liquid methane. A water-cooled diffuser, exhaust spray cooling chamber, and multi-stage ejector systems can enable run times up to 180 seconds to 16 minutes. The system can accommodate engines up to 2000-lbf thrust, liquid propellant supply pressures up to 1800 psia, and test at the component level. Engines can also be fired at sea level if needed. The NASA GRC is in the process of modifying ACS capabilities to enable the testing of green propellant (GP) thrusters and components. Green propellants are actively being explored throughout government and industry as a non-toxic replacement to hydrazine monopropellants for applications such as reaction control systems or small spacecraft main propulsion systems. These propellants offer increased performance and cost savings over hydrazine. The modification of ACS is intended to enable testing of a wide range of green propellant engines for research and qualification-like testing applications. Once complete, ACS will have the capability to test green propellant engines up to 880 N in thrust, thermally condition the green propellants, provide test durations up to 60 minutes depending on thrust class, provide high speed control and data acquisition, as well as provide advanced imaging and

  5. Kinetic Deuterium Isotope Effects in the Combustion of Formulated Nitramine Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    beobachteten Isotopie-Effekte combustion, les effets d’isotopie observes montrent clairement que la - naheliegend, daBl das Aufbrechen der CH- Bindung im...beirn Bruch der CH- Bindung bei 673 K. liaison CH A 673 K. L E CT__ Summary based solid propellants possess several undesirable charac

  6. Ignition of Composite Propellants under Rapid Pressure Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    the entrance of the crack cavity, and in the main chamber. Piezoelectric quartz transducers with a rise time of 1.5 us and natural frequency of 300...0C), which is the accepted decomposition temperature of AP.14 3 Because of the heterogeneous nature of the propellant, the AP and the fuel binder...Combustion in Narrow Cavities. J. of Appl. Mech., Vol. 11, 1970, pp. 276-281. 5. Godai, T.: Flame Propagacion into the Crack of a Solid-Propellant Grain

  7. Performance and Stability Analyses of Rocket Combustion Devices Using Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, James R.; Jones, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in flight-qualified engine systems, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented programs with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion, performance, and combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations on these programs. This paper summarizes these analyses. Test and analysis results of impinging and coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are included. Several cases with gaseous methane are included for reference. Several different thrust chamber configurations have been modeled, including thrust chambers with multi-element like-on-like and swirl coax element injectors tested at NASA MSFC, and a unielement chamber with shear and swirl coax injectors tested at The Pennsylvania State University. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interaction Design and Analysis (ROCCID), and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model (CICM). Significant effort was applied to show how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied or developed in the future. This paper describes the test hardware configurations, presents the results of all the analyses, and compares the results from the two analytical methods.

  8. Combustion instability analysis for liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. M.; Chen, C. P.; Ziebarth, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The multi-dimensional numerical model has been developed to analyze the nonlinear combustion instabilities in liquid-fueled engines. The present pressure-based approach can handle the implicit pressure-velocity coupling in a non-iterative way. The additional scalar conservation equations for the chemical species, the energy, and the turbulent transport quantities can be handled by the same predictor-corrector sequences. This method is time-accurate and it can be applicable to the all-speed, transient, multi-phase, and reacting flows. Special emphasis is given to the acoustic/vaporization interaction which may act as the crucial rate-controlling mechanism in the liquid-fueled rocket engines. The subcritical vaporization is modeled to account for the effects of variable thermophysical properties, non-unitary Lewis number in the gas-film, the Stefan flow effect, and the effect of transient liquid heating. The test cases include the one-dimenisonal fast transient non-reacting and reacting flows, and the multi-dimensional combustion instabilities encountered in the liquid-fueled rocket thrust chamber. The present numerical model successfully demonstrated the capability to simulate the fast transient spray-combusting flows in terms of the limiting-cycle amplitude phenomena, correspondence between combustion and acoustics, and the steep-fronted wave and flame propagation. The investigated parameters include the spray initial conditions, air-fuel mixture ratios, and the engine geometry. Stable and unstable operating conditions are found for the liquid-fueled combustors. Under certain conditions, the limiting cycle behavior of the combusting flowfields is obtained. The numerical results indicate that the spray vaporization processes play an important role in releasing thermal energy and driving the combustion instability.

  9. Effect of ammonium perchlorate grain sizes on the combustion of solid rocket propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegab, A.; Balabel, A. [Menoufia Univ., Menoufia (Egypt). Faculty of Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The combustion of heterogeneous solid rocket propellant consisting of ammonium perchlorate (AP) particles was discussed with reference to the chemical and physical complexity of the propellant and the microscopic scale of the combustion zone. This study considered the primary flame between the decomposition products of the binder and the AP oxidizer; the primary diffusion flame from the oxidizer; density and conductivity of the AP and binder; temperature-dependent gas-phase transport properties; and, an unsteady non-planer regression surface. Three different random packing disc models for the AP particles imbedded in a matrix of a hydroxyl terminated polybutadience (HTPB) fuel-binder were used as a base of the combustion code. The models have different AP grain sizes and distribution with the fuel binder. A 2D calculation was developed for the combustion of heterogeneous solid propellant, accounting for the gas phase physics, the solid phase physics and an unsteady non-planar description of the regressing propellant surface. The mathematical model described the unsteady burning of a heterogeneous propellant by simultaneously solving the combustion fields in the gas phase and the thermal field in the solid phase with appropriate jump condition across the gas/solid interface. The gas-phase kinetics was represented by a two-step reaction mechanism for the primary premixed flame and the primary diffusion flame between the decomposition products of the HTPB and the oxidizer. The essentially-non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme was used to describe the propagation of the unsteady non-planer regression surface. The results showed that AP particle size has a significant effect on the combustion surface deformation as well as on the burning rate. This study also determined the effect of various parameters on the surface propagation speed, flame structure, and the burning surface geometry. The speed by which the combustion surface recedes was found to depend on the exposed pressure

  10. Workshop Report: Fundamental Reactions in Solid Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    combustion conditions. 6. What effect might a pressure-induced phase transition to a polymorph other than 6- HMX have on the pressure slope break during...pure HMX as well. Nevertheless, it is recommended that the high pressure polymorphs of HMX and RDX be determined. It was also felt that there...plateau burning phenomena E. Solid phase, surface, gas phase reactions F. Phase transitions: melting, vaporization, polymorphs G. Flame

  11. Condensed-Phase Processes during Solid Propellant Combustion. 1. Preliminary Chemical and Microscopic Examination of Extinguished Propellant Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    to nitramines or nitramine propellants, although in one studyC the surface layers of a quenched RDX-polyester composition were extracted with benzene...performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In some cases scraped and unscraped burned surfaces were exmined by photoacoustic Fourier-transform infrared...formed, relative to RDX and HMX. It is thus estimated that the nitrosamines are present in amounts as high as 1-10% of the unreacted RDX in some cases

  12. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sackesteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid propellant combustion, which serve as seminal examples of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems, have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and/or temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity, surface tension and viscosity on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, a composite asymptotic expression, spanning three distinguished wavenumber regimes, is derived for both cellular and pulsating hydrodynamic neutral stability boundaries A(sub p)(k), where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. For the case of cellular (Landau) instability, the results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that cellular hydrodynamic instability in this context is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(l) wavenumber disturbances. It is also demonstrated that, in the large wavenumber regime, surface tension and both liquid and gas viscosity all produce comparable stabilizing effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing significant modifications to previous analyses of Landau instability in which one or more of these effects were neglected. In contrast

  13. Propellant Flow Actuated Piezoelectric Igniter for Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollen, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A propellant flow actuated piezoelectric igniter device using one or more hammer balls retained by one or more magnets, or other retaining method, until sufficient fluid pressure is achieved to release and accelerate the hammer ball, such that it impacts a piezoelectric crystal to produce an ignition spark. Certain preferred embodiments provide a means for repetitively capturing and releasing the hammer ball after it impacts one or more piezoelectric crystals, thereby oscillating and producing multiple, repetitive ignition sparks. Furthermore, an embodiment is presented for which oscillation of the hammer ball and repetitive impact to the piezoelectric crystal is maintained without the need for a magnet or other retaining mechanism to achieve this oscillating impact process.

  14. Analysis of Hydrodynamic (Landau) Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1997-01-01

    The burning of liquid propellants is a fundamental combustion problem that is applicable to various types of propulsion and energetic systems. The deflagration process is often rather complex, with vaporization and pyrolysis occurring at the liquid/gas interface and distributed combustion occurring either in the gas phase or in a spray. Nonetheless, there are realistic limiting cases in which combustion may be approximated by an overall reaction at the liquid/gas interface. In one such limit, the gas flame occurs under near-breakaway conditions, exerting little thermal or hydrodynamic influence on the burning propellant. In another such limit, distributed combustion occurs in an intrusive regime, the reaction zone lying closer to the liquid/gas interface than the length scale of any disturbance of interest. Finally, the liquid propellant may simply undergo exothermic decomposition at the surface without any significant distributed combustion, such as appears to occur in some types of HydroxylAmmonium Nitrate (HAN)-based liquid propellants at low pressures. Such limiting models have recently been formulated,thereby significantly generalizing earlier classical models that were originally introduced to study the hydrodynamic stability of a reactive liquid/gas interface. In all of these investigations, gravity appears explicitly and plays a significant role, along with surface tension, viscosity, and, in the more recent models, certain reaction-rate parameters associated with the pressure and temperature sensitivities of the reaction itself. In particular, these parameters determine the stability of the deflagration with respect to not only classical hydrodynamic disturbances, but also with respect to reactive/diffusive influences as well. Indeed, the inverse Froude number, representing the ratio of buoyant to inertial forces, appears explicitly in all of these models, and consequently, in the dispersion relation that determines the neutral stability boundaries beyond

  15. Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in a Dynamic Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    For liquid-propellant combustion, the Landau/Levich hydrodynamic models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence of the burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. Analysis of these extended models is greatly facilitated by exploiting the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio rho. Neglecting thermal coupling effects, an asymptotic expression was then derived for the cellular stability boundary A(sub p)(k) where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the disturbance wavenumber. The results explicitly indicate the stabilizing effects of gravity on long-wave disturbances, and those of viscosity and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limit of weak gravity, hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion becomes a long-wave, instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumbers. In addition, surface tension and viscosity (both liquid and gas) each produce comparable effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to the previous analyses in which one or more of these effects was neglected. For A(sub p)= O, the Landau/Levich results are recovered in appropriate limiting cases, although this typically corresponds to a hydrodynamically unstable parameter regime for p combustion have been observed at low pressures in hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN)-based liquid propellants, which often exhibit negative pressure sensitivities. While nonsteady combustion may correspond to secondary and higher-order bifurcations above the cellular boundary, it may also be a manifestation of this pulsating type of hydrodynamic instability. In the present work, a nonzero temperature sensitivity is incorporated into our previous asymptotic analyses. This entails a coupling of the energy equation

  16. Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux

  17. Concerning the problem of dynamic damping of the vibration combustion self-oscillations in a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basok, B. I.; Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2012-11-01

    The reason for the decrease in the amplitude of longitudinal vibration combustion self-oscillations in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine by means of antipulse partitions has been justified. A mathematical model of the development of combustion instability in such a chamber on attachment of a Helmholtz resonator to it has been obtained. The character of the damping of vibration combustion self-oscillations excited by the action of the Crocco mechanisms and negative thermal resistance, when varying the acoustic parameters of the resonator and of the pressure head characteristics of combustion chamber is established.

  18. Baseline Computational Fluid Dynamics Methodology for Longitudinal-Mode Liquid-Propellant Rocket Combustion Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method for the analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid rocket combustion instability has been developed based on the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations where the combustion process source terms were introduced through the incorporation of a two-zone, linearized representation: (1) A two-parameter collapsed combustion zone at the injector face, and (2) a two-parameter distributed combustion zone based on a Lagrangian treatment of the propellant spray. The unsteady Euler equations in inhomogeneous form retain full hyperbolicity and are integrated implicitly in time using second-order, high-resolution, characteristic-based, flux-differencing spatial discretization with Roe-averaging of the Jacobian matrix. This method was initially validated against an analytical solution for nonreacting, isentropic duct acoustics with specified admittances at the inflow and outflow boundaries. For small amplitude perturbations, numerical predictions for the amplification coefficient and oscillation period were found to compare favorably with predictions from linearized small-disturbance theory as long as the grid exceeded a critical density (100 nodes/wavelength). The numerical methodology was then exercised on a generic combustor configuration using both collapsed and distributed combustion zone models with a short nozzle admittance approximation for the outflow boundary. In these cases, the response parameters were varied to determine stability limits defining resonant coupling onset.

  19. Combustion efficiency and pyrochemical properties of micron-sized metal particles as the components of modified double-base propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiong-Gang; Yan, Qi-Long; Guo, Xin; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Wang, Ke-Qiang

    2011-04-01

    The combustion efficiency of metallized propellants are investigated and compared to the corresponding blank propellant in order to evaluate the actual effect of the metals in solid rocket applications. The image analysis coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis were applied to the characterization of the original metal particles such as aluminum (Al), magnesium (Mg), boron (B), nickel (Ni), and Mg-Al alloy (Mg/Al) and their condensed combustion products. Under the explored operating conditions, the results confirm that the metallized propellants show heterogeneous diffusing flame, with significant change in pressure sensitivity, and larger aggregation/agglomeration phenomena in combustion products than that of the blank propellant. Besides, the chemical reactions in condensed phase and gas phase which control the burning process and combustion efficiency of the double-base propellant containing different metal particles were systematically investigated and descriptions of the detailed reaction mechanisms from solid phase to liquid phase or to gas phase are also included. It was indicated that the combustion efficiency is favored by the activity and melting points of the metals.

  20. Control-oriented modeling of combustion and flow processes in liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsman, Joseph; Pearlstein, Arne J.; Wilcutts, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a control-oriented model of the flow, reaction, and transport processes in liquid propellant rocket combustion chambers, based on the multicomponent conservation laws of gas dynamics. This model provides a framework for the inclusion of detailed chemical kinetic relations, viscous and other dissipative effects, a variety of actuators and sensors, as well as process and measurement disturbances. In addition to its potential usefulness to the designer in understanding the dynamical complexity of the system and the sources of model uncertainty, the model provides a rigorous basis for control system design. An appraisal of current and feasible actuators and sensors, and their mathematical representation are included.

  1. Nonlinear analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1991-01-01

    A computational technique for the nonlinear analysis of longitudinal-mode liquid propellant rocket combustion instability is examined based on the unsteady, quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations with appropriate source terms introduced to account for interphase transport coupling with the spray. The method is first assessed for unsteady, nonreacting, isentropic duct flow with specified admittances at the outflow and inflow boundaries. For small amplitude disturbances, numerical results based on a sufficient number of grid points compare favorably with predictions from a small-disturbance linearized analysis.

  2. Applicability Study of Composite Laminates to the Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, T.; Ishikawa, T.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive application of light weight composite materials is one of the major technical challenges for drastic reduction of structural weight of the planned reusable launch vehicles (RLV) and space planes. Cryogenic propellant tanks are the dominating structural components of the vehicle structure and thus the application of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) to these components is one of the most promising but challenging technologies for achieving the aimed goal of weight reduction. Research effort has been made to scrutinize the cryogenic mechanical performance of currently available candidates of CFRP material systems suitable for use under cryogenic conditions. Seven different types of material systems of CFRP are chosen and are experimentally and analytically evaluated to discuss their applicability to the liquid propellant tanks and to provide basic information for material selections. Static tensile tests were conducted with quasi-isotropic laminates to acquire static strengths, both under cryogenic and room temperatures. The development of matrix cracks and free-edge delaminations were also experimentally investigated and were compared with the numerical calculations. Interlaminar fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature was also evaluated to investigate the damage susceptibility of the materials. The decrease in matrix crack onset stresses observed in the laminate performance experiments suggested that the propellant leakage may be a key issue when applying CFRP to the propellant tanks, as well as the durability concern. Thus the propellant leakage under matrix crack accumulation was simulated by the gas helium leakage tests. Leakage model was also developed and successfully applied to the prediction of the propellant leakage. Preliminary results of adhesive joint tests under cryogenic conditions will also be referred to.

  3. Composite propellant aluminum agglomeration reduction using tailored Al/PTFE particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, Travis R.

    can be ignited via optical flash. Propellant aluminum agglomeration is assessed through replacement of reference aluminum powders (spherical, flake, or nanoscale) with Al/PTFE (90/10 or 70/30 wt.%) particles. The effects on burning rate, pressure dependence, and aluminum ignition, combustion, and agglomeration are quantified. Microscopic imaging shows tailored particles promptly ignite at the burning surface and appear to breakup into smaller particles. Replacement of spherical aluminum with Al/PTFE 70/30 wt.% also increases the pressure exponent from 0.36 to 0.58, which results in a 50% increase in propellant burning rate at 13.8 MPa. Combustion products were quench collected using a liquid-free technique at 2.1 and 6.9 MPa. Sizing of products indicates that composite particles result in nominally 25 μm coarse products, which are smaller than the original, average particle size and are also 66% smaller in diameter (96% by volume) than the 76 μm products collected from reference spherical aluminized propellant. Smaller diameter condensed phase products and more gaseous products will likely decrease two-phase flow loss and reduce slag accumulation in solid rocket motors.

  4. Thermodynamically Modeled Non-equilibrium Structure of Combustion Products and Decomposition of Hydrazine-based Liquid Propellants

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Dorofeev; D. M. Yagodnikov

    2016-01-01

    The paper studies the emerging hallmarks and the characteristics of a two-parameter chemical non-equilibrium structure of the combustion products of liquid propellants as applied to the low-thrust liquid propellant engines (LT LPE) operating in the aircraft control system. The study is based on hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide products. The paper also analyses the catalytic and thermal decomposition of these substances in terms of inter-conditionality of the working process components in the ...

  5. Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability in a Dynamic Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a nonzero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the disturbance-wavenumber/ pressure-sensitivity plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a nonsteady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  6. Analysis of RDX-TAGzT pseudo-propellant combustion with detailed chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakarna, Neeraj; Thynell, Stefan T.; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Lin, Ping

    2011-12-01

    A detailed model of steady-state combustion of a pseudo-propellant containing cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and triaminoguanidinium azotetrazolate (TAGzT) is presented. The physicochemical processes occurring within the foam layer, comprised of a liquid and gas bubbles, and a gas-phase region above the burning surface are considered. The chemical kinetics is represented by a global thermal decomposition mechanism within the liquid by considering 18 species and eight chemical reactions. The reactions governing decomposition of TAGzT were deduced from separate confined rapid thermolysis experiments using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Within the gas bubbles and gas-phase region, a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism was used by considering up to 93 species and 504 reactions. The pseudo-propellant burn rate was found to be highly sensitive to the global decomposition reactions of TAGzT. The predicted results of burn rate agree well with experimental burn-rate data. The increase in burn rate by inclusion of TAGzT is due in part from exothermic decomposition of the azotetrazolate within the foam layer, and from fast gas-phase reactions between triaminoguanidine decomposition products, such as hydrazine, and oxidiser products from the nitramine decomposition.

  7. Viscous Analysis of Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during liquid-propellant deflagration in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that, when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes like pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wave numbers are sufficiently small. This analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wave number perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wave numbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  8. Viscous and Thermal Effects on Hydrodynamic Instability in Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during the deflagration of liquid propellants in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau, form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, that sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes the pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wavenumbers are sufficiently small. In the present work, this analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wavenumber perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wavenumbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  9. Ignition kinetics of boron in primary combustion products of propellant based on its unique characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Wang, Yang; Wu, Shixi

    2017-07-01

    Study on the boron-based primary combustion products can bridge the gap between primary combustion and secondary combustion in solid rocket ramjets. To clarify the initial state and ignition characteristics of boron particles in the after-burning chamber of solid rocket ramjets, the elemental, composition and morphology of the primary combustion products collected under gas generator chamber pressure of 0.2 MPa and 6 MPa were investigated by energy dispersive (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive (SEM-EDS) individually. The ignition times of boron particles among the primary combustion products were determined using a high temperature tube furnace system. The BD model was adopted for numerical verification. The numerical solution procedure of boron ignition model in a real afterburner chamber was modified. The results show that the sum of B, C, O elements in the primary combustion products reaches approximately 90%. The primary combustion products are mainly consisted of B, C, and B2O3. Images of the primary combustion products present highly agglomeration, indicating an oxidation of boron surface. Numerous spherical carbon particles with a diameter around 100 nm are observed in the products. Three features of the boron in the primary combustion products are obtained, compared to virgin boron. First most of the boron lumps are covered by carbon particles on the surface. Second the mean particle size is five times larger than that of virgin boron. Third the overall initial oxide layer covered on boron surface increases its thickness by above 0.1 μm. The ignition time of boron in the primary combustion products reaches 20-30 ms under 1673-1873 K, which is quite different from virgin boron of 4 ms. Numerical calculation results show the key reason leading to such a long ignition time is the variation of the initial oxide layer thickness. In conclusion, the physicochemical properties of boron particles

  10. Combustion Joining for Composite Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-25

    oxidation with every landing A380 -rejected take off test C-C brakes UNCLASSIFIED Joining C-Based Materials • Difficult task – Carbon cannot be welded ...Limiting case: reactive sintering • Materials to be joined also heated to Tig (not just the reactive media) • For most systems, Tig ~ Tmp of least...thin layer of desired reaction composition between two disks of the material to be welded Preheat to the ignition temperature. After initiation, a

  11. Photographic Study of Combustion in a Rocket Engine I : Variation in Combustion of Liquid Oxygen and Gasoline with Seven Methods of Propellant Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellman, Donald R; Humphrey, Jack C

    1948-01-01

    Motion pictures at camera speeds up to 3000 frames per second were taken of the combustion of liquid oxygen and gasoline in a 100-pound-thrust rocket engine. The engine consisted of thin contour and injection plates clamped between two clear plastic sheets forming a two-dimensional engine with a view of the entire combustion chamber and nozzle. A photographic investigation was made of the effect of seven methods of propellant injection on the uniformity of combustion. From the photographs, it was found that the flame front extended almost to the faces of the injectors with most of the injection methods, all the injection systems resulted in a considerable nonuniformity of combustion, and luminosity rapidly decreased in the divergent part of the nozzle. Pressure vibration records indicated combustion vibrations that approximately corresponded to the resonant frequencies of the length and the thickness of the chamber. The combustion temperature divided by the molecular weight of the combustion gases as determined from the combustion photographs was about 50 to 70 percent of the theoretical value.

  12. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Heat Transfer and Combustion Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan; Zakany, James S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of rocket engine heat transfer experiments using metallized gelled liquid propellants was conducted. These experiments used a small 20- to 40-lb/f thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-percentage by weight loadings of aluminum particles. Gaseous oxygen was used as the oxidizer. Three different injectors were used during the testing: one for the baseline O(2)/RP-1 tests and two for the gelled and metallized gelled fuel firings. Heat transfer measurements were made with a rocket engine calorimeter chamber and nozzle with a total of 31 cooling channels. Each chamber used a water flow to carry heat away from the chamber and the attached thermocouples and flow meters allowed heat flux estimates at each of the 31 stations. The rocket engine Cstar efficiency for the RP-1 fuel was in the 65-69 percent range, while the gelled 0 percent by weight RP-1 and the 5-percent by weight RP-1 exhibited a Cstar efficiency range of 60 to 62% and 65 to 67%, respectively. The 55-percent by weight RP-1 fuel delivered a 42-47% Cstar efficiency. Comparisons of the heat flux and temperature profiles of the RP-1 and the metallized gelled RP-1/A1 fuels show that the peak nozzle heat fluxes with the metallized gelled O2/RP-1/A1 propellants are substantially higher than the baseline O2/RP-1: up to double the flux for the 55 percent by weight RP-1/A1 over the RP-1 fuel. Analyses showed that the heat transfer to the wall was significantly different for the RP-1/A1 at 55-percent by weight versus the RP-1 fuel. Also, a gellant and an aluminum combustion delay was inferred in the 0 percent and 5-percent by weight RP-1/A1 cases from the decrease in heat flux in the first part of the chamber. A large decrease in heat flux in the last half of the chamber was caused by fuel deposition in the chamber and nozzle. The engine combustion occurred well downstream of the injector face

  13. Small scale motor tests of ADN/GAP based propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Gettwert, Volker; Fischer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Different ADN/GAP based propellants were evaluated as a potential replacement of the smoky AP based composite propellant and low signature double base propellants. The paper focuses on burning tests of propellants in a combustion chamber. The experimental results of an ADN/GAP, ADN/FOX12/GAP and Al/ADN/GAP propellant were compared with a standard Al/AP/HTPB propellant. In all cases the obtained experimental gravimetric specific impulse of the ADN/GAP based propellants were higher compared to ...

  14. A ballistic compressor-based experiment for the visualization of liquid propellant jet combustion above 100 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, A.; Kooker, D. E.

    This paper describes the components and operation of an experimental setup for the visualization of liquid propellant (LP) jet combustion at pressures above 100 MPa. The apparatus consists of an in-line ballistic compressor and LP injector. The ballistic compressor, based on a modified 76 mm gun, provides high-pressure (ca. 55 MPa) clear hot gas for the jet ignition. A piston (projectile) is fired toward a test chamber beyond the barrel's end, and its rebound is arrested in a transition section that seals the test chamber to the barrel. The LP jet is injected once the piston is restrained, and combustion of the jet further elevates the pressure. At a preset pressure, a disc in the piston ruptures and the combustion gas vents sonically into the barrel. If a monopropellant is used, the jet injection-combustion process then resembles liquid rocket combustion but at very high pressures (ca. 140 MPa). This paper discusses the ballistics of the compression and compares experimental results to those predicted by a numerical model of the apparatus. Experimentally, a pressure of 70 MPa was achieved upon a 12.5 volumetric compression factor by firing a 10 kg piston into 1.04 MPa argon using a charge of 75 g of small-grain M1 propellant.

  15. Self-oscillations of an unstable fuel combustion in the combustion chamber of a liquid-propellant rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.; Gotsulenko, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The form of the self-oscillations of a vibrating combustion of a fuel in the combustion chamber of a liquidpropellant rocket engine, caused by the fuel-combustion lag and the heat release, was determined. The character of change in these self-oscillations with increase in the time of the fuel-combustion lag was investigated.

  16. Thermodynamically Modeled Non-equilibrium Structure of Combustion Products and Decomposition of Hydrazine-based Liquid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Dorofeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the emerging hallmarks and the characteristics of a two-parameter chemical non-equilibrium structure of the combustion products of liquid propellants as applied to the low-thrust liquid propellant engines (LT LPE operating in the aircraft control system. The study is based on hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide products. The paper also analyses the catalytic and thermal decomposition of these substances in terms of inter-conditionality of the working process components in the combustion chamber and liquid pre-burner. The paper offers a technique to simulate these types of non-equilibrium as applied both to the a priori estimate and to the parametric optimization of LT LPE performance. It presents the possible equations of chemical dissociation reactions of hydrazine under various conditions, which determine a chemical disequilibrium of the process, and gives the examples to specify the source files for the software systems "Astra 4.rs" or "Terra".The technique is implemented and tested on the basis of the software systems "Astra4.rs" and "Terra" in calculating the structure and properties of the liquid propellant combustion products, which include hydrazine, combustion products, ammonia, and products of their catalytic thermal decomposition. The paper provides numerical values of the upper and lower concentration limits of the non-equilibrium of a generated propellant, which correspond to the equilibrium ratio of concentrations between ammonia and products of its decomposition, as well as meet the absence of ammonia pyrolysis. For possible conditions of the non-equilibrium work process the values of void specific impulse are calculated.

  17. Characterization of moisture and water content on ignition and combustion of hypergolic propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarbo, Nicholas D.

    Triethylamine borane (TEAB) and white fuming nitric acid (WFNA) is a promising hypergolic propellant combination being studied as an alternative to monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) or dinitrogen tetroxide (NTO). Nitric acid and MMH are both known to be hygroscopic and their performance is affected by their water content. However, the effect of water on TEAB is yet to be determined. The goal of this research is to characterize the major consequences of water presence on the ignition and combustion performance of TEAB and to compare those results to MMH. To determine the effect of hygroscopic absorption, TEAB samples were put through accelerated aging in humid and dry environments. Along with the aged TEAB, neat TEAB and neat MMH were used in drop on pool tests with WFNA. The drop tests were conducted by controlling the relative humidity in air to either below 24% or above 94% and the water concentration in WFNA to either 0% or 10% by weight. Using the Hypertester, ignition and combustion events were recorded using a photodiode, a microphone, a high speed camera, and a UV streak camera spectrometer. A drop chamber was used to determine the time of gas production onset from the liquid phase reactions. Along with the dry and humid air environments, tests were done in a nitrogen environment in the drop chamber. MMH and RFNA drop tests in a nitrogen environment were completed to replicate the results of Forness. Statistical analysis is applied to the data to determine significant parameters and trends. While relative humidity does not appear to affect the combustion of TEAB with WFNA, water concentration in the oxidizer significantly weakens it. Relative humidity improves MMH ignition delay time and water concentration shows no effect. Water concentration in the oxidizer more than doubles the liquid induction time of both TEAB and MMH with WFNA. The ambient environment does not play a significant role in the onset time of gas production. Both

  18. Synergistic and Novel Effects in Composite Solid Propellant Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    ac copper chromite . Ferric oxide, Fe?0 , exhibits, as do most k:S ’• • I« Win Mill transition element compounds, a high degree of catalytic... solid phase heat transfer may b^ solved exactly, the solution is V*’ - 1 • (gs - 1) e An overall energy balance yields the adiabatic flame...from the planar solution , but b) the solid phase deviations may be complex. By "simple" it is meant that the de- viation is not oscillatory. Thus, if g

  19. Finite element modelling and model updating of small scale composite propellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, P.J.; Kaminski, M.L.; den Besten, J.H.

    2017-01-01

    The application of composite materials in marine propellers is a relatively recent innovation. Methods have been presented to analyse the hydro-elastic behaviour of these type of propellers and in some studies these methods have been validated as well. Differences between measured and predicted

  20. Investigation of Active Control of Combustion Instabilities in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zinn, B

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of active control of combustion instabilities in liquid fueled combustors using a liquid fuel injector actuator and adaptive control of combustion instabilities...

  1. Swirl injectors for oxidizer-rich staged combustion cycle engines and hypergolic propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Matthew R.

    Presented here are two efforts concerning the application of swirl injectors to rocket engine main chamber injectors. The first study was undertaken to develop a liquid/liquid bi-centrifugal swirl injector for use with new hypergolic propellants in conjunction with KB Sciences and China Lake. The second study focuses on gas/liquid swirl injectors typically used for main chamber elements in oxidizer-rich staged combustion engines. The design, development and testing of hypergolic liquid/liquid bi-centrifugal swirl injector for use with rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) and non-toxic hypergolic miscible fuels (NHMF) are discussed first. Cold flow tests were conducted to measure the spray cone angle and discharge coefficient of the injector, and allow for comparison with theoretical predictions to evaluate the design model. The goal of this effort was to establish a method to design swirl injectors operating in a thrust regime of 35 lbf, characteristic lengths of 30 in, and c* efficiencies above 90%. A literature review of existing inviscid swirl models is provided. The bi-centrifugal swirler design process is described, along with the design features of the series of bicentrifugal swirl injectors that were built. Results from cold flow experiments are compared to the theoretical predictions of the models reviewed. Characteristic velocity (c*) efficiencies of 70-92% were measured. Next an introduction will be made to the transition of the study into the research regarding swirl injectors for the oxidizer rich staged combustion (ORSC) cycle. The goals of the effort described here are to establish an empirical knowledge base to provide a fundamental understanding of main chamber injectors and for verification of an injector design methodology for the ORSC cycle. The derivation of the baseline operating conditions is discussed. The liquid oxygen/hydrogen (LOX/H2) preburner and GOX/RP-1 injector design and hardware are detailed. Two alternative injector designs chosen

  2. Hydro-Elastic Tailoring and Optimization of a Composite Marine Propeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Berggreen, Christian; Andersen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    The following paper deals with the design and optimization of a flexible composite marine propeller. The blade shape is obtained from an existing high skew metal propeller. The aim is to tailor the laminate to control the elastic couplings and therefore the deformed shape of the blade...... are then analyzed using the Tsai-Wu failure criteria. The results show that it is possible to design a flexible composite marine propeller that will enable a reduction of the fuel consumption while withstanding the imposed loads....

  3. Combustion diagnosis for analysis of solid propellant rocket abort hazards: Role of spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, W.; Cruz-Cabrera, A. A.; Donaldson, A. B.; Lim, J.; Sivathanu, Y.; Bystrom, E.; Haug, A.; Sharp, L.; Surmick, D. M.

    2014-11-01

    Solid rocket propellant plume temperatures have been measured using spectroscopic methods as part of an ongoing effort to specify the thermal-chemical-physical environment in and around a burning fragment of an exploded solid rocket at atmospheric pressures. Such specification is needed for launch safety studies where hazardous payloads become involved with large fragments of burning propellant. The propellant burns in an off-design condition producing a hot gas flame loaded with burning metal droplets. Each component of the flame (soot, droplets and gas) has a characteristic temperature, and it is only through the use of spectroscopy that their temperature can be independently identified.

  4. Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a nonzero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the disturbance-wavenumber/ pressure-sensitivity plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a nonsteady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  5. Multiphase CFD Simulation of Solid Propellant Combustion in a Small Gun Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bougamra, Ahmed; Lu, Huilin

    2014-01-01

    ..., the combustion chamber and the launching tube (the barrel of the gun). We can assume that the two cylinders have the same diameter because for small gun using rimless ammunition the diameters are almost the same (see Figure 1). The breech contains the primer, a small space filled with black powder. The space defined by the combustion chamber, sealed by the proj...

  6. Combustion of Hazard Division 1.3 M1 Gun Propellant in a Reinforced Concrete Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Characteristics: • Energy of explosion: • Efficiency of energy t ransfer to kinet ic energy Energy of Explosion PV E= - - y -1 E : Energy of...due to the low potential energy of M1 compared to other gun propellants. The M1 gun propellant was easily accessible from the demilitarization...Manager NAWCWD TM 8742 I-B-10 NAWCWD TM 8742 Adding Value to Energy n~ ASTM C618 I AASHTO M295 Testing of Pomona Terminal Fly Ash SamJ!Ie T’ J!e

  7. Uncertainty Quantification of Non-linear Oscillation Triggering in a Multi-injector Liquid-propellant Rocket Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Pavel; Sideris, Athanasios; Sirignano, William

    2014-11-01

    We examine the non-linear dynamics of the transverse modes of combustion-driven acoustic instability in a liquid-propellant rocket engine. Triggering can occur, whereby small perturbations from mean conditions decay, while larger disturbances grow to a limit-cycle of amplitude that may compare to the mean pressure. For a deterministic perturbation, the system is also deterministic, computed by coupled finite-volume solvers at low computational cost for a single realization. The randomness of the triggering disturbance is captured by treating the injector flow rates, local pressure disturbances, and sudden acceleration of the entire combustion chamber as random variables. The combustor chamber with its many sub-fields resulting from many injector ports may be viewed as a multi-scale complex system wherein the developing acoustic oscillation is the emergent structure. Numerical simulation of the resulting stochastic PDE system is performed using the polynomial chaos expansion method. The overall probability of unstable growth is assessed in different regions of the parameter space. We address, in particular, the seven-injector, rectangular Purdue University experimental combustion chamber. In addition to the novel geometry, new features include disturbances caused by engine acceleration and unsteady thruster nozzle flow.

  8. Studies on composite solid propellant with tri-modal ammonium perchlorate containing an ultrafine fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Suresh Babu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Composite solid propellant is prepared using tri-modal Ammonium perchlorate (AP containing coarse, fine and ultrafine fractions of AP with average particle size (APS 340, 40 and 5 μm respectively, in various compositions and their rheological, mechanical and burn rate characteristics are evaluated. The optimum combination of AP coarse to fine to ultrafine weight fraction was obtained by testing of series of propellant samples by varying the AP fractions at fixed solid loading. The concentration of aluminium was maintained constant throughout the experiments for ballistics requirement. The propellant formulation prepared using AP with coarse to fine to ultrafine ratio of 67:24:9 has lowest viscosity for the propellant paste and highest tensile strength due to dense packing as supported by the literature. A minimum modulus value was also observed at 9 wt. % of ultrafine AP concentration indicates the maximum solids packing density at this ratio of AP fractions. The burn rate is evaluated at different pressures to obtain pressure exponent. Incorporation of ultrafine fraction of AP in propellant increased burn rate without adversely affecting the pressure exponent. Higher solid loading propellants are prepared by increased AP concentration from 67 to 71 wt. % using AP with coarse to fine to ultrafine ratio of 67:24:9. Higher solid content up to 89 wt. % was achieved and hence increased solid motor performance. The unloading viscosity showed a trend with increased AP content and the propellant couldn't able to cast beyond 71 wt. % of AP. Mechanical properties were also studied and from the experiments noticed that % elongation decreased with increased AP content from 67 to 71 wt.%, whereas tensile strength and modulus increased. Burn rate increased with increased AP content and observed that pressure exponent also increased and it is high for the propellant containing with 71 wt.% of AP due to increased oxidiser to fuel ratio. Catalysed

  9. Development of a generic combustion stability code for liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J. J.; Jones, Y. T.

    1987-01-01

    The mathematical framework for a combustion stability analysis code is outlined. The goal for the code is to be general enough in problem treatment so that its validity and accuracy extend over a wide range of problem applications and that it lends the convenience for any future model improvement if necessary. An approach for modeling the combustion dynamics is devised to meet both requirements. An open-loop numerical procedure is also developed to mechanistically model various combustion processes for determining the stability parameters.

  10. Investigation of Active Control of Combustion Instabilities in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zinn, B

    1999-01-01

    ... indicating that they could be employed to damp combustion instabilities. Furthermore, cold and reactive flow tests have shown that the performance of the liquid fuel actuators depends upon the injector's design and the characteristics...

  11. Navier-Stokes Entropy Controlled Combustion Instability Analysis for Liquid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, T. J.; Yoon, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    Navier-Stokes solutions are used to calculate oscillatory components of pressure, velocity, and density, which in turn provide necessary data to compute energy growth factors to determine combustion instability. It is shown that wave instabilities are associated with changes in entropy and the space and time averages of oscillatory components of pressure, velocity and density, together with the mean flow field in the energy equation. Compressible laminar and turbulent flows and reacting flows with hydrogen/oxygen combustion are considered. The SSME combustion/thrust chamber is used for illustration of the theory. The analysis shows that the increase of mean pressure and disturbances consistently results in the increase of instability. It is shown that adequate combustion instability analysis requires at least third order nonlinearity in energy growth or decay.

  12. A study of high frequency nonlinear combustion instability in baffled annular liquid propellant rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, A.; Burstein, S. Z.; Kushida, R. O.; Schechter, H.

    1971-01-01

    Computer program contains mathematical model which provides relationship between engine gas dynamics and combustion processes. Mathematically simulated explosions initiate gas disturbances. Design methods for damping disturbances can be studied to prevent future engine shutdown or destruction.

  13. Modeling of agglomerates formation and evolution at combustion of aluminized propellants in intra-chamber environments

    OpenAIRE

    Babuk Valery A.; Nizyaev Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, the solution of the problem of agglomerates parameters calculation in combustion chamber environments is described. For this, a method of two-dimensional axisymmetric multiphase quasistationary flow calculation has been developed. The method uses previously developed models of agglomerates formation and their evolution within multiphase flow with considering of interactions between agglomerates and gaseous combustion products. Parametric study of the developed models wit...

  14. Modeling of agglomerates formation and evolution at combustion of aluminized propellants in intra-chamber environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babuk Valery A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the solution of the problem of agglomerates parameters calculation in combustion chamber environments is described. For this, a method of two-dimensional axisymmetric multiphase quasistationary flow calculation has been developed. The method uses previously developed models of agglomerates formation and their evolution within multiphase flow with considering of interactions between agglomerates and gaseous combustion products. Parametric study of the developed models with respect to intra-chamber environments has been performed.

  15. Liquid propellant rocket engine combustion simulation with a time-accurate CFD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. S.; Shang, H. M.; Liaw, Paul; Hutt, J.

    1993-01-01

    Time-accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms are among the basic requirements as an engineering or research tool for realistic simulations of transient combustion phenomena, such as combustion instability, transient start-up, etc., inside the rocket engine combustion chamber. A time-accurate pressure based method is employed in the FDNS code for combustion model development. This is in connection with other program development activities such as spray combustion model development and efficient finite-rate chemistry solution method implementation. In the present study, a second-order time-accurate time-marching scheme is employed. For better spatial resolutions near discontinuities (e.g., shocks, contact discontinuities), a 3rd-order accurate TVD scheme for modeling the convection terms is implemented in the FDNS code. Necessary modification to the predictor/multi-corrector solution algorithm in order to maintain time-accurate wave propagation is also investigated. Benchmark 1-D and multidimensional test cases, which include the classical shock tube wave propagation problems, resonant pipe test case, unsteady flow development of a blast tube test case, and H2/O2 rocket engine chamber combustion start-up transient simulation, etc., are investigated to validate and demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the present numerical scheme and solution algorithm.

  16. Hydrodynamic Instability in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion at Normal and Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1998-01-01

    The classical Landau/Levich models of liquid-propellant combustion, despite their relative simplicity, serve as seminal examples that correctly describe the onset of hydrodynamic instability in reactive systems. Recently, these two separate models have been combined and extended to account for a dynamic dependence, absent in the original formulations, of the local burning rate on the local pressure and temperature fields. The resulting model admits an extremely rich variety of both hydrodynamic and reactive/diffusive instabilities that can be analyzed either numerically or analytically in various limiting parameter regimes. In the present work, a formal asymptotic analysis, based on the realistic smallness of the gas-to-liquid density ratio, is developed to investigate the combined effects of gravity and other parameters on the hydrodynamic instability of the propagating liquid/gas interface. In particular, an analytical expression is derived for the neutral stability boundary A(sub p)(k), where A(sub p) is the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and k is the wavenumber of the disturbance. The results demonstrate explicitly the stabilizing effect of gravity on long-wave disturbances, the stabilizing effect of viscosity (both liquid and gas) and surface tension on short-wave perturbations, and the instability associated with intermediate wavenumbers for critical negative values of A(sub p). In the limiting case of weak gravity, it is shown that hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is a long-wave instability phenomenon, whereas at normal gravity, this instability is first manifested through O(1) wavenumber disturbances. It is also demonstrated that, in general, surface tension and the viscosity of both the liquid and gas phases each produce comparable stabilizing effects in the large-wavenumber regime, thereby providing important modifications to previous analyses in which one or more of these effects were neglected.

  17. Hydro-elastic analysis and optimization of a composite marine propeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Berggreen, Christian; Andersen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The present paper addresses the design and optimization of a flexible composite marine propeller. The aim is to tailor the laminate to control the deformed shape of the blade and consequently the developed thrust. The development of a hydro-elastic model is presented, and the laminate lay-up which...... marine propeller that will enable a reduction of the fuel consumption while withstanding the imposed loads....... using the Tsai-Wu strength index. After local tailoring of the laminate configuration throughout the propeller a maximum value of 0.7 is determined indicating no failure will occur under normal operation conditions. The results suggest that it is possible to design a medium-sized flexible composite...

  18. Investigation of gaseous propellant combustion and associated injector/chamber design guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoon, D. F.; Ito, J. I.; Kors, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    Injector design criteria are provided for gaseous hydrogen-gaseous oxygen propellants. Design equations and procedures are presented which will allow an injector-chamber designer to a priori estimate of the performance, compatibility and stability characteristics of prototype injectors. The effects of chamber length, element geometry, thrust per element, mixture ratio, impingement angle, and element spacing were evaluated for four element concepts and their derivatives. The data from this series of tests were reduced to a single valued mixing function that describes the mixing potential of the various elements. Performance, heat transfer and stability data were generated for various mixture ratios, propellant temperatures, chamber pressures, contraction ratios, and chamber lengths. Applications of the models resulted in the design of procedures, whereby the performance and chamber heat flux can be calculated directly, and the injector stability estimated in conjunction with existing models.

  19. Fabrication of Composite Combustion Chamber/Nozzle for Fastrac Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, T.; Beshears, R.; Burlingame, S.; Peters, W.; Prince, M.; Suits, M.; Tillery, S.; Burns, L.; Kovach, M.; Roberts, K.

    2001-01-01

    The Fastrac Engine developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center for the X-34 vehicle began as a low cost engine development program for a small booster system. One of the key components to reducing the engine cost was the development of an inexpensive combustion chamber/nozzle. Fabrication of a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber and nozzle was considered too expensive and time consuming. In looking for an alternate design concept, the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Project provided an extensive background with ablative composite materials in a combustion environment. An integral combustion chamber/nozzle was designed and fabricated with a silica/phenolic ablative liner and a carbon/epoxy structural overwrap. This paper describes the fabrication process and developmental hurdles overcome for the Fastrac engine one-piece composite combustion chamber/nozzle.

  20. Strobes: Pyrotechnic compositions that show a curious oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions which show an oscillatory combustion; a dark phase and a flash phase alternate periodically. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area. All strobe compositions mentioned in the literature

  1. Control of the self-oscillation of amplitude of vibration combustion in a liquid-propellant rocket engine by solving the system of equations that describe this regime of combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotsulenko, V. V.

    2010-07-01

    Periodic solutions of the degenerate system of equations of nonstationary motion of a medium in a liquid-propellant rocket engine were obtained, with the aid of which the possibility of lowering the amplitude of the longitudinal self-oscillations of vibration combustion or their complete removal has been substantiated.

  2. The prediction of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in liquid propellant rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lores, M. E.; Zinn, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed to solve nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability problems. The analysis yields the transient and limit cycle behavior of unstable motors and the threshold amplitude required to trigger a linearly stable motor into unstable operation. The limit cycle waveforms were found to exhibit shock wave characteristics for most unstable engine operating conditions. A method of correlating the analytical solutions with experimental data was developed. Calculated results indicate that a second-order solution adequately describes the behavior of combustion instability oscillations over a broad range of engine operating conditions, but that higher order effects must be accounted for in order to investigate engine triggering.

  3. Scaling of the Transient Hydroelastic Response and Failure Mechanisms of Self-Adaptive Composite Marine Propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Motley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The load dependent deformation responses and complex failure mechanisms of self-adaptive composite propeller blades make the design, analysis, and scaling of these structures nontrivial. The objective of this work is to investigate and verify the dynamic similarity relationships for the hydroelastic response and potential failure mechanisms of self-adaptive composite marine propellers. A fully coupled, three-dimensional boundary element method-finite element method is used to compare the model and full-scale responses of a self-adaptive composite propeller. The effects of spatially varying inflow, transient sheet cavitation, and load-dependent blade deformation are considered. Three types of scaling are discussed: Reynolds scale, Froude scale, and Mach scale. The results show that Mach scaling, which requires the model inflow speed to be the same as the full scale, will lead to discrepancies in the spatial load distributions at low speeds due to differences in Froude number, but the differences between model and full-scale results become negligible at high speeds. Thus, Mach scaling is recommended for a composite marine propeller because it allows the same material and layering scheme to be used between the model and the full scale, leading to similar 3D stress distributions, and hence similar failure mechanisms, between the model and the full scale.

  4. C/C-SiC Composites for Nozzle of Solid Propellant Ramjet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Lingling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced carbon and silicon carbide matrix composites for nozzle inner of solid propellant ramjet were prepared by using the hybrid process of "chemical vapor infiltration + precursor impregnation pyrolysis (CVI+PIP". The microstructure, flexural and anti-ablation properties of the C/C-SiC composites and hydraulic test and rocket motor hot firing test for nozzle inner of solid propellant ramjet were comprehensively investigated. The results show that when the flexural strength of the composite reachs 197 MPa, the fracture damage behavior of the composites presents typical toughness mode.Also the composites has excellent anti-ablative property, i.e., linear ablation rate is only 0.0063 mm·s-1 after 200 s ablation. The C/C-SiC component have excellent integral bearing performance with the hydraulic bursting pressure of 6.5 MPa, and the high temperature combination property of the C/C-SiC composite nozzle inner is verified through motor hot firing of solid propellant ramjet.

  5. An Investigation of High-frequency Combustion Oscillations in Liquid-propellant Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantler, Raymond L; Tischler, Adelbert O; Massa, Rudolph V

    1953-01-01

    An experimental investigation of high-frequency combustion oscillations (screaming) was conducted with a 100-pound-thrust acid-hydrocarbon rocket engine and a 500-pound-thrust oxygen-fuel rocket engine. The oscillation frequencies could be correlated as a linear function of the parameter C/L, where C is the experimentally measured characteristic velocity and L is the combustion-chamber length. The tendency of the engines to scream increased as chamber length was increased. With engine configurations that normally had a low efficiency, screaming resulted in increased performance; at the same time, a five to tenfold increase in heat-transfer rate occurred. It was possible, however, to achieve good performance without screaming.

  6. Multiphase CFD Simulation of Solid Propellant Combustion in a Small Gun Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Bougamra; Huilin Lu

    2014-01-01

    The interior ballistics simulations in 9 mm small gun chamber were conducted by implementing the process into the mixture multiphase model of Fluent V6.3 platform. The pressure of the combustion chamber, the velocity, and the travel of the projectile were investigated. The performance of the process, namely, the maximum pressure, the muzzle velocity, and the duration of the process was assessed. The calculation method is validated by the comparison of the numerical simulations results in the ...

  7. An Investigation of Experimental Techniques for Obtaining Particulate Behavior in Metallized Solid Propellant Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    can help improve the latter. Other disadvantages of high speed cinematography include the image reso- lutions due to the optics employed and the film ...experimental techniques have been used: a. High speed cinematography for the observation of strand burners within a combustion bomb and a 2-D slab...with a depth of field at f/4 of about 4mn. Movie film types included 7724 41 negative (ASA 400), 7222 2x negative (ASA 250), 7250 Ektachrome (ASA 250

  8. Combustion stability analysis of preburners in liquid propellant rocket engines during shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kair-Chuan; George, Paul E., II

    1987-01-01

    A linearized one-dimensional lumped-parameter model capable of predicting the occurrence of the low frequency combustion instability (chugging) experienced during preburner shutdown in the Space Shuttle Main Engines is discussed, and predictions are compared with NASA experimental results. Results from a parametric study of parameters including chamber pressure, fuel and oxygen temperatures, and the effective bulk modulus of the liquid oxidizer suggest that chugging is probably affected by conditions at shutdown through the fuel and oxidizer temperatures. It is suggested that chugging is initiated when the fuel, oxidizer, and helium temperature and flow rates pass into an unstable region, and that chugging may be terminated by decaying pressures.

  9. Understanding the role of multifunctional nanoengineered particulate additives on supercritical pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels/propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hyung Sub

    This dissertation aims to understand the fundamental effects of colloidal nanostructured materials on the supercritical pyrolysis, injection, ignition, and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels/propellants. As a fuel additive, functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) without or with the decoration of metal catalysts, such as platinum (Pt) or polyoxometalates (POM) nanoparticles, were examined against conventional materials including nanometer sized fumed silica and aluminum particles. Supercritical pyrolysis experiments were performed as a function of temperature, residence time, and particle type, using a high pressure and temperature flow reactor designed to provide isothermal and isobaric flow conditions. Supercritical pyrolysis results showed that the addition of FGS-based particles at a loading concentration of 50 ppmw increased the conversion rates and reduced apparent activation energies for methylcyclohexane (MCH) and n-dodecane (n-C12H26) fuels. For example, conversion rates, and formations of C1-C5 n-alkanes and C2-C6 1-alkenes were significantly increased by 43.5 %, 59.1 %, and 50.0 % for MCH decomposition using FGS 19 (50 ppmw) at a temperature of 820 K and reduced pressure of 1.36. In addition, FGS decorated with 20 wt % Pt (20wt%Pt FGS) at a loading concentration of 50 ppmw exhibited additional enhancement in the conversion rate of n-C12H26 by up to 24.0 % compared to FGS. Especially, FGS-based particles seem to alter initiation mechanisms, which could result in higher hydrogen formation. Hydrogen selectivities for both MCH and n-C12H26 decompositions were observed to increase by nearly a factor of 2 and 10, respectively. Supercritical injection and combustion experiments were conducted using a high pressure and temperature windowed combustion chamber coupled to the flow reactor through a feed system. Supercritical injection/combustion experiments indicated that the presence of a small amount of particles (100 ppmw) in the fuel affected the injection, ignition

  10. Multiphase CFD Simulation of Solid Propellant Combustion in a Small Gun Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bougamra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interior ballistics simulations in 9 mm small gun chamber were conducted by implementing the process into the mixture multiphase model of Fluent V6.3 platform. The pressure of the combustion chamber, the velocity, and the travel of the projectile were investigated. The performance of the process, namely, the maximum pressure, the muzzle velocity, and the duration of the process was assessed. The calculation method is validated by the comparison of the numerical simulations results in the small gun with practical tests, and with lumped-parameter model results. In the current numerical study, both the characteristics and the performance of the interior ballistic process were reasonably predicted compared with the practical tests results. The impact of the weight charge on the interior ballistic performances was investigated. It has been found that the maximum pressure and the muzzle velocity increase with the increase of the charge weight.

  11. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  12. Development of Commercially Useable Codes to Simulate Aluminized Propellant Combustion and Related Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-03

    Fontaineb- leau sandstone and a boron- carbide /aluminum composite from two-dimensional tomographic images using second-order statistics and a “lattice...microstructure and properties of eps lightweight concrete. Cement and Concrete Research, 37:1666–1673, 2007. [9] P.M. Chaikin and T.C. Lubensky. Principles of...subjected to finite deformations . International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 65:190–223, 2006. [31] K. Matouš, H.M. Inglis, X. Gu, D

  13. Propellant Readiness Level: A Methodological Approach to Propellant Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossard, John A.; Rhys, Noah O.

    2010-01-01

    A methodological approach to defining propellant characterization is presented. The method is based on the well-established Technology Readiness Level nomenclature. This approach establishes the Propellant Readiness Level as a metric for ascertaining the readiness of a propellant or a propellant combination by evaluating the following set of propellant characteristics: thermodynamic data, toxicity, applications, combustion data, heat transfer data, material compatibility, analytical prediction modeling, injector/chamber geometry, pressurization, ignition, combustion stability, system storability, qualification testing, and flight capability. The methodology is meant to be applicable to all propellants or propellant combinations; liquid, solid, and gaseous propellants as well as monopropellants and propellant combinations are equally served. The functionality of the proposed approach is tested through the evaluation and comparison of an example set of hydrocarbon fuels.

  14. Investigation of the effects of solid rocket motor propellant composition on plume signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaza, Clay J.

    1994-06-01

    Three propellants with aluminum/silicon weight percentages of 18/0%, 13.5/4.5%, and 12/6% were fired in a subscale motor to determine if the plume infrared signature could be reduced without a significant loss in specific impulse. Spectral measurements from 2.5 to 5.5 micrometers and thermal measurements from 3.5 to 5.0 micrometers were made. Plume particle size measurements showed that only particles with small diameters (less than 1.93 micrometers) were present with any significant volume. Replacing a portion of the aluminum in a highly metallized solid propellant with silicon was found to eliminate the Al2O3 in favor of SiO2 and Al6SiO13, without any change in particulate mass concentration or any large change in particle size distribution. These particulates were found to have significantly lower absorptivity than Al2O3. An additional investigation was conducted to determine the particle size distribution at the nozzle entrance. Malvern ensemble scattering, phase-Doppler single particle scattering, and laser transmittance measurements made through windows in the combustion chamber at the nozzle entrance indicated that large particles were present (to 250 micrometers). However, most of the mass of the particles was contained in particles with diameters smaller than 5 micrometers. Approximate calculations made with the measured data showed that if 100 micrometer particles are present with the smoke (particles with diameters less than 2 micrometers) they could account for only approximately 10% of the article volume.

  15. Modeling and simulation of the debonding process of composite solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Xu, Jin-sheng; Han, Long; Chen, Xiong

    2017-07-01

    In order to study the damage evolution law of composite solid propellants, the molecular dynamics particle filled algorithm was used to establish the mesoscopic structure model of HTPB(Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene) propellants. The cohesive element method was employed for the adhesion interface between AP(Ammonium perchlorate) particle and HTPB matrix and the bilinear cohesive zone model was used to describe the mechanical response of the interface elements. The inversion analysis method based on Hooke-Jeeves optimization algorithm was employed to identify the parameters of cohesive zone model(CZM) of the particle/binder interface. Then, the optimized parameters were applied to the commercial finite element software ABAQUS to simulate the damage evolution process for AP particle and HTPB matrix, including the initiation, development, gathering and macroscopic crack. Finally, the stress-strain simulation curve was compared with the experiment curves. The result shows that the bilinear cohesive zone model can accurately describe the debonding and fracture process between the AP particles and HTPB matrix under the uniaxial tension loading.

  16. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  17. Numerical prediction of the chemical composition of gas products at biomass combustion and co-combustion in a domestic boiler

    OpenAIRE

    Radomiak Henryk; Bala-Litwiniak Agnieszka; Zajemska Monika; Musiał Dorota

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the numerical modelling of biomass combustion has been successfully applied to determine the combustion mechanism and predict its products. In this study the influence of the addition of waste glycerin in biomass wood pellets on the chemical composition of exhaust gases has been investigated. The pellets have been prepared from spruceand pine wood sawdust without and with addition of waste glycerin. The waste glycerol is a undesirable by-product of biodiesel transesterificatio...

  18. On-Line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Ferge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    On-Line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor / R. Zimmermann ... - In: Environmental science & technology. 39. 2005. S. 1393-1402

  19. Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling in an Extended Landau/Levich Model of Liquid-Propellant Combustion. 1; Inviscid Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a non-zero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the (disturbance-wavenumber, pressure-sensitivity) plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a non-steady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  20. Pulsating hydrodynamic instability and thermal coupling in an extended Landau/Levich model of liquid-propellant combustion: I. Inviscid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Stephen B.

    1999-12-01

    Hydrodynamic (Landau) instability in combustion is typically associated with the onset of wrinkling of a flame surface, corresponding to the formation of steady cellular structures as the stability threshold is crossed. In the context of liquid-propellant combustion, such instability has recently been shown to occur for critical values of the pressure sensitivity of the burning rate and the disturbance wavenumber, significantly generalizing previous classical results for this problem that assumed a constant normal burning rate. Additionally, however, a pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has been shown to occur as well, corresponding to the onset of temporal oscillations in the location of the liquid/gas interface. In the present work, we consider the realistic influence of a non-zero temperature sensitivity in the local burning rate on both types of stability thresholds. It is found that for sufficiently small values of this parameter, there exists a stable range of pressure sensitivities for steady, planar burning such that the classical cellular form of hydrodynamic instability and the more recent pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability can each occur as the corresponding stability threshold is crossed. For larger thermal sensitivities, however, the pulsating stability boundary evolves into a C-shaped curve in the (disturbance-wavenumber, pressure-sensitivity) plane, indicating loss of stability to pulsating perturbations for all sufficiently large disturbance wavelengths. It is thus concluded, based on characteristic parameter values, that an equally likely form of hydrodynamic instability in liquid-propellant combustion is of a non-steady, long-wave nature, distinct from the steady, cellular form originally predicted by Landau.

  1. Coal blend combustion: fusibility ranking from mineral matter composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Goni; S. Helle; X. Garcia; A. Gordon; R. Parra; U. Kelm; R. Jimenez; G. Alfaro [Universidad de Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile). Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, Instituto de Geologia Economica Aplicada (GEA)

    2003-10-01

    Although coal blends are increasingly utilized at power plants, ash slagging propensity is a non-additive property of the pure coals and hence difficult to predict. Coal ash tendency to slag is related to its bulk chemistry and ash fusion temperatures, and the present study aims to compare the results obtained from thermodynamic simulation with characterization of samples obtained as outcomes of plant-based coal-blend combustion trials at three utilities located in the Centre and North of Chile. Pulverized coal and plant residues samples from five families of binary blends tested in an experimental program were characterized for chemistry, mineralogy and maceral composition. The slagging was evaluated by determination of fusion curves using the MTDATA software and NPLOX3 database for the main coal ash oxides. The ranking obtained was approximately the same as obtained from carbon in the fly ashes and from plant residues observations. The thermodynamic modeling was a valid option to predict the fusibility during the combustion of blends. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Mascotte, a research test facility for high pressure combustion of cryogenic propellants; Mascotte, un banc d'essai de recherche pour la combustion a haute pression d'ergols cryogeniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vingert, L.; Habiballah, M.; Traineau, J.C. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2000-07-01

    Detailed experimental studies of cryogenic propellant combustion are needed to improve design and optimization of high performance liquid rocket engines. A research test facility called Mascotte has been built up by ONERA to study elementary processes that are involved in the combustion of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen. Mascotte is aimed at feeding a single element combustor with actual propellants, and the third version in operation since mid 1998 allows to reach supercritical pressures in the combustor. A specific high pressure combustor was developed for this purpose. Research teams from different laboratories belonging to CNRS and ONERA, regrouped in a common research program managed by CNES and SNECMA division SEP, may run experiments on Mascotte, with several objectives: - improve the knowledge and the modeling of physical phenomena; - provide experimental results for computer code validation; - improve and assess diagnostic techniques (especially optical diagnostics). Following diagnostics for instance, were used on Mascotte from 1994 to 1999: - OH imaging (spontaneous emission and laser induced fluorescence ); - CARS temperature measurements (using the H{sub 2} and simultaneously the H{sub 2}O molecules); - High speed cinematography (with a copper vapor laser synchronized to a high speed camera); - O{sub 2} vapor imaging (laser induced fluorescence); - Particle sizing (by means of a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer). (authors)

  3. Performance evaluation of commercial copper chromites as burning rate catalyst for solid propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Campos,Eunice Aparecida; Rita de Cássia L. Dutra; Rezende, Luis Cláudio; Diniz,Milton Faria; Nawa, Wilma Massae Dio; Iha,Koshun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Copper chromites are well known as burning rate catalysts for the combustion of composite solid propellants, used as a source of energy for rocket propulsion. The propellant burning rate depends upon the catalyst characteristics such as chemical composition and specific surface area. In this work, copper chromite samples from different suppliers were characterized by chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and by surface area measurement (BET). The samples were then evaluated as burni...

  4. Performance evaluation of commercial copper chromites as burning rate catalyst for solid propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Milton Faria Diniz; Eunice Aparecida Campos; Luis Cláudio Rezende; Rita de Cássia L. Dutra; Wilma Massae Dio Nawa; Koshun Iha

    2010-01-01

    Copper chromites are well known as burning rate catalysts for the combustion of composite solid propellants, used as a source of energy for rocket propulsion. The propellant burning rate depends upon the catalyst characteristics such as chemical composition and specific surface area. In this work, copper chromite samples from different suppliers were characterized by chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and by surface area measurement (BET). The samples were then evaluated as burning rate ca...

  5. Comprehensive Computational Modeling of Hypergolic Propellant Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    Sardeshmukh, Swanand Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Ignition and combustion of hypergolic propellants mono-methyl hydrazine (MMH) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) is investigated computationally. A hierarchical approach is chosen to study parametric behavior of isolated processes and complex interactions thereof, in this transient phenomenon. Starting with a homogeneous reactor, performance of three reduced kinetic mechanisms is assessed first, followed by the study of auto-ignition delay as a function of initial composition and thermal state...

  6. Bonding agensi za kompozitna raketna goriva / Bonding agents for composite rocket propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Petrić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available U radu je analiziran uticaj bonding agensd na mehaničke karakteristike i viskozitet kompozitnih raketnih goriva na bazi hidroksiterminiranog polibutadiena i toluendiizocijanata, odnosno izoforondiizocijanata. Komparirana je efikasnost bonding agensd (BA različite strukture trietilentetramina (TET, tris-(2-metil aziridinil fosfin oksida (MAPO i N,N-di (2-hidroksietil-4,4-dimetilhidantoina (DHE. Efikasnost delovanja bonding agensa utvrdenaje na osnovu parametara dobijenih iz testa jednoosnog zatezanja uzoraka (σm - zatezna čvrstoća pri maksimalnoj sili, εm relativno izduženje pri maksimalnoj sili i εp - relativno izduženje pri prekidu. Mehaničke karakteristike merene su u temperaturskom području od -50°C do 50°C. Analiziran je uticaj BA na brzinu promene viskoziteta goriva. / The paper analyzes the effects of bonding agents on mechanical properties and viscosity of composite rocket propellants based on hydroxiterminated polybutadiene and toluendiizocyanate, i.e. izophorondiizocyanate. The efficiency of bonding agents (BA of different structure has been compared including triethylentetramine (TET, tris-(2-methyl azyrinidile phosphine oxide (MAPO and N, N-di (2-hydroxiethyl-4,4-dimethylhydantoine (DHE. The BA efficiency has been determined on the basis of parameters obtained by uniaxial tensile tests (σm - tensile strength at maximum force, εm - relative allongation at maximum force and εp - relative allongation at fracture. The mechanical properties have been measured at the temperature range from -50°C to 50°C. The BA effects on propellant viscosity change rates have been analyzed.

  7. Mechanical Damage and Combustion of TNT and Composition-B

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieb, Robert

    2001-01-01

    ... from 0.1 to 100 s-1. The mechanical response was measured with parameters that have been used to characterize the fracture response of gun propellant during its development over the last decade...

  8. Numerical prediction of the chemical composition of gas products at biomass combustion and co-combustion in a domestic boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomiak Henryk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the numerical modelling of biomass combustion has been successfully applied to determine the combustion mechanism and predict its products. In this study the influence of the addition of waste glycerin in biomass wood pellets on the chemical composition of exhaust gases has been investigated. The pellets have been prepared from spruceand pine wood sawdust without and with addition of waste glycerin. The waste glycerol is a undesirable by-product of biodiesel transesterification at oil manufacturing. The produced pellets were being burned in the 10 kW domestic boiler adapted to wood pellets combustion. The possibilities of pollutants generation (CO2, CO, NOx SOx and compounds containing chlorine in the exhaust gases coming from the boiler were numerically calculated using the latest version of CHEMKIN-PRO software, introduced by the American company Reaction Design. The results of the calculations correspond to the data obtained on a real object, in particular: combustion temperature, gas pressure, residence time of fuel in the burner, air flow, fuel consumption, as well as elementary composition of fuel supplied into the boiler. The proposed method of predicting the chemical composition of exhaust gases allows proper control of the combustion process and can be considered as an important step in reducing the pollutants (lower emission of NOx, SOx and CO2 neutral and thus to contribute to the improvement of the environmental quality. In addition, knowledge of the amounts of Clbased compounds produced in combustion process (under given conditions, can serve as an important hint in terms of corrosion prevention of boiler- and chimney steels.

  9. Investigation of combustion phenomena associated with the flow of hot propellant gases. I. Spectroscopic temperature measurements inside the muzzle flash of a rifle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingenberg, G. (Arbeitsgruppe fuer Ballistische Forschung, Weil am Rhein, Ger.); Mach, H.

    1976-10-01

    The spatial and temporal temperature distribution in the muzzle blast field of a rifle of caliber 7.62mm was determined by evaluation of the radiation emitted by the muzzle flash. In the primary flash directly adjacent to the muzzle a maximum gas temperature of 1645 K was observed by means of emission- absorption measurements of both continuum and discrete radiation. The influence of the surrounding cool layers was taken into account by applying Abel-inversion techniques. In the intermediate flash about 100 to 300 mm downstream line-reversal-techniques using K- and Na-resonance lines gave temperatures of about 1600 K increasing with time and with muzzle distance to a maximum temperature of 1940 K. This rise of temperature is due to the onset of combustion processes. Further downstream at a distance of 300 to 500 mm in the secondary flash a fast intense combustion of the propellant gases mixed with air leads to gas temperatures of about 2500 K. By firing into inert gases this flash could be suppressed whereas the primary and intermediate flash remained unchanged. When firing into oxygen a maximum gas temperature of 3000 K was observed in the secondary flash.

  10. Pyrolysis of Compositions of Mixtures of Combustible Shales and Brown Coals Deposited in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishtvan, I. I.; Dudarchik, V. M.; Kraiko, V. M.; Belova, Yu. V.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of investigating the pyrolysis of compositions of mixtures of brown coals and combustible shales in a close-packed and a moving layer and the yield dynamics of the pyrolysis gas and resin. A comparative analysis of the quality of pyrolysis products obtained from combustible shales and brown coal and from their mixtures has been performed.

  11. Cooled Ceramic Composite Panel Tested Successfully in Rocket Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2003-01-01

    Regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) structures are being considered for use along the walls of the hot-flow paths of rocket-based or turbine-based combined-cycle propulsion systems. They offer the combined benefits of substantial weight savings, higher operating temperatures, and reduced coolant requirements in comparison to components designed with traditional metals. These cooled structures, which use the fuel as the coolant, require materials that can survive aggressive thermal, mechanical, acoustic, and aerodynamic loads while acting as heat exchangers, which can improve the efficiency of the engine. A team effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and various industrial partners has led to the design, development, and fabrication of several types of regeneratively cooled panels. The concepts for these panels range from ultra-lightweight designs that rely only on CMC tubes for coolant containment to more maintainable designs that incorporate metal coolant containment tubes to allow for the rapid assembly or disassembly of the heat exchanger. One of the cooled panels based on an all-CMC design was successfully tested in the rocket combustion facility at Glenn. Testing of the remaining four panels is underway.

  12. Modifications of a Composite-Material Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.

    2005-01-01

    Two short reports discuss modifications of a small, lightweight combustion chamber that comprises a carbon/carbon composite outer shell and an iridium/ rhenium inner liner. The first report discusses chamber design modifications made as results of hot-fire tests and post-test characterization. The Books & Reports 32 NASA Tech Briefs, June 2005 modifications were intended to serve a variety of purposes, including improving fabrication, reducing thermal-expansion mismatch stresses, increasing strength-to-weight ratios of some components, and improving cooling of some components. The second report discusses (1) the origin of stress in the mismatch between the thermal expansions of the Ir/Re liner and a niobium sleeve and flange attached to the carbon/ carbon shell and (2) a modification intended to relieve the stress. The modification involves the redesign of an inlet connection to incorporate a compressible seal between the Ir/Re liner and the Nb flange. A nickel alloy was selected as the seal material on the basis of its thermal-expansion properties and its ability to withstand the anticipated stresses, including the greatest stresses caused by the high temperatures to be used in brazing during fabrication.

  13. Complex spatial organization and flagellin composition of flagellar propeller from marine magnetotactic ovoid strain MO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-Jia; Santini, Claire-Lise; Bernadac, Alain; Ruan, Juanfang; Zhang, Sheng-Da; Kato, Takayuki; Li, Ying; Namba, Keiichi; Wu, Long-Fei

    2012-03-02

    Marine magnetotactic ovoid bacterium MO-1 is capable of swimming along the geomagnetic field lines by means of its two sheathed flagellar bundles at a speed up to 300 μm/s. In this study, by using electron microscopy, we showed that, in each bundle, six individual flagella were organized in hexagon with a seventh in the middle. We identified 12 flagellin paralogs and 2 putative flagellins in the genome of MO-1. Among them, 13 were tandemly located on an ~ 17-kb segment while the 14th was on a separated locus. Using reverse transcription PCR and quantitative PCR, we found that all the 14 flagellin or putative flagellin genes were transcribed and that 2 of them were more abundantly expressed than others. A nLC (nanoliquid chromatography)-ESI (electrospray ionization)-MS/MS (mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) mass spectrometry analysis identified all the 12 flagellin proteins in three glycosylated polypeptide bands resolved by one-dimensional denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 10 of them in 21 spots obtained by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis of flagellar extracts. Most spots contained more than one flagellin, and eight of the ten identified flagellins existed in multiple isoforms. Taken together, these results show unprecedented complexity in the spatial organization and flagellin composition of the flagellar propeller. Such architecture is observed only for ovoid-coccoid, bilophotrichously flagellated magnetotactic bacteria living in marine sediments, suggesting a species and environmental specificity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. On the oxidation and combustion of AlH{sub 3} a potential fuel for rocket propellants and gas generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, Volker; Eisenreich, Norbert; Koleczko, Andreas; Roth, Evelin [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Joseph-von-Fraunhoferstrasse 7, 76327 Pfinztal (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Aluminum hydride is a promising candidate for application in energetic materials and hydrogen storages. E.g. an AP/HTPB rocket propellant filled with alane was calculated for a 100 N s kg{sup -1} higher specific impulse compared to the same concentration of aluminum. Different investigations on {alpha}-AlH{sub 3} polyhedra using thermoanalytical methods and X-ray diffraction were performed to receive a better understanding of dehydration at about 450 K, passivation of the remaining porous aluminum particles and further oxidation. A modeling approach to describe these conversions including diffusion processes, Avrami-Erofeev mechanism and Arrhenius type reaction steps of n-th order were introduced. Results were discussed in comparison to experimental investigations under pressure with model propellants on the base of gelled pure nitromethane and also filled with alane or pure aluminum in concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15%. Both alane and aluminum increase the burning rate on a factor of two correlated with a temperature increase up to 500 K and more. A mesa burning effect at 6 to 10 MPa was indicated by the mixtures with alane. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Effect of Gas Mixture Composition on the Parameters of an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Chríbik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the use of the internal combustion piston engine, which is a drive unit for micro-cogeneration units. The introduction is a brief statement of the nature of gas mixture compositions that are useful for the purposes of combustion engines, together with the basic physical and chemical properties relevant to the burning of this gas mixture. Specifically, we will discuss low-energy gases (syngases and mixtures of natural gas with hydrogen. The second section describes the conversion of the Lombardini LGW 702 combustion engine that is necessary for these types of combustion gases. Before the experimental measurements, a simulation in the Lotus Engine simulation program was carried out to make a preliminary assessment of the impact on the performance of an internal combustion engine. The last section of the paper presents the experimental results of partial measurements of the performance and emission parameters of an internal combustion engine powered by alternative fuels.

  16. Fast Reacting Nano Composite Energetic Materials: Synthesis and Combustion Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 aluminum combustion; energetic materials; fluorine ; reaction kinetics; fluoropolymers; self...techniques will be examined to quantify combustion performance. All of this information will provide a basis for future research and applications involving... fluorine content in the acids and their structural differences contribute to difference in burn velocity. The mechanisms controlling reactivity will be

  17. Eulerian multi-fluid models for the simulation of dynamics and coalescence of particles in solid propellant combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doisneau, F.; Laurent, F.; Murrone, A.; Dupays, J.; Massot, M.

    2013-02-01

    The accurate simulation of polydisperse sprays undergoing coalescence in unsteady gaseous flows is a crucial issue. In solid rocket motors, the internal flow depends strongly on the alumina droplet size distribution, which spreads up with coalescence. Yet solving for unsteady two-phase flows with high accuracy on the droplet sizes is a challenge for both modeling and scientific computing. As an alternative to Lagrangian approaches, a wide range of Eulerian models have been recently developed to describe the disperse liquid phase at a lower cost, with an easier coupling to the gaseous phase and with massively parallel codes. Among these models, the multi-fluid model allows the detailed description of polydispersity and size/velocity correlations by separately solving fluids of size-sorted droplets, the so-called sections. The existing one size moment method, which describes the size distribution with one size moment per section, provides simple and fast resolution for coalescence. On the other hand, a two size moment method has been suggested to reduce the number of sections but it lacks an efficient coalescence resolution method. After introducing a new strategy for two size moment coalescence, the two methods are compared on various configurations in a research code and an industrial-oriented code, in order to conclude on computational accuracy and cost. Then the paper aims at describing the most efficient approach for multi-dimensional unsteady and eventually coalescing rocket chamber simulations. Its objective is threefold: first, to validate the two size moment method by comparing simulations to reference solutions and dedicated experimental measurements conducted at ONERA, second to study the efficiency and robustness of both methods, third, to draw some firm conclusions about the necessity to use the one size moment or two size moment method to simulate solid propellant alumina sprays. We finally perform the first simulations of coalescence in realistic 2D

  18. Response of laminated composite plates to low-speed impact by airgun-propelled and dropped-weight impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Chunchu B.; Ambur, Damodar R.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical procedure has been developed to determine the transient response of simply supported, rectangular laminated composite plates subjected to impact loads from airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors. A first-order shear-deformation theory has been included in the analysis to represent properly any local short-wavelength transient bending response. The impact force has been modeled as a locally distributed load with a cosine-cosine distribution. A double Fourier series expansion and the Timoshenko small increment method have been used to determine the contact force, out-of-plane deflections, and inplane strains and stresses at any plate location due to an impact force at any plate location. The results of experimental and analytical studies are compared for quasi-isotropic laminates. The results indicate the importance of including transverse shear deformation effects in the analysis for predicting the response of laminated plates subjected to both airgun-propelled and dropped-weight impactors. The results also indicate that plate boundary conditions influence the axial strains more significantly than the contact force for a dropped-weight impactor. The results of parametric studies identify a scaling approach based on impactor momentum that suggests an explanation for the differences in the responses of plates impacted by airgun-propelled or dropped-weight impactors.

  19. A new compositional and thermal simulator especially designed for combustion tube experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapene, A. [Total, Calgary, AB (Canada); Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); Debenest, G.; Quintard, M.; Legac, Y.; Fadaei, H. [Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (France); Corre, B. [Total, Calgary, AB (Canada); Castanier, L.M. [Stanford Univ., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In-situ combustion (ISC) is an enhanced oil recovery method that involves a combustion front that is propagated through the reservoir by injected air. The produced heat results in higher temperatures, leading to a reduction in oil viscosity and an increase in oil mobility. There are 2 types of ISC processes, notably dry and wet combustion. Although ISC has shown promising results in terms of recovery, field operators prefer to use simpler methods due to uncertainties related to the complexity of the process. Improved modeling and a better understanding of the physical, thermodynamic and chemical phenomena may reverse this trend. Therefore, this study focused on simulating dry and wet combustion tube experiments. This paper introduced a new compositional and thermal simulator designed specifically for combustion tube experiments. The thermal compositional model was based on a full equation of state formulation. A new free water flash was used to compute phase equilibrium. Preliminary results revealed that the new compositional and thermal simulator is a promising tool for combustion tube modeling. It offers an original and very accurate method to model thermal and phase change effects. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Study on Design of High Efficiency and Light Weight Composite Propeller Blade for a Regional Turboprop Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Changduk; Lee, Kyungsun

    2013-03-01

    In this study, aerodynamic and structural design of the composite propeller blade for a regional turboprop aircraft is performed. The thin and wide chord propeller blade of high speed turboprop aircraft should have proper strength and stiffness to carry various kinds of loads such as high aerodynamic bending and twisting moments and centrifugal forces. Therefore the skin-spar-foam sandwich structure using high strength and stiffness carbon/epoxy composite materials is used to improve the lightness. A specific design procedure is proposed in this work as follows; firstly the aerodynamic configuration design, which is acceptable for the design requirements, is carried out using the in-house code developed by authors, secondly the structure design loads are determined through the aerodynamic load case analysis, thirdly the spar flange and the skin are preliminarily sized by consideration of major bending moments and shear forces using both the netting rule and the rule of mixture, and finally, the stress analysis is performed to confirm the structural safety and stability using finite element analysis commercial code, MSC. NASTRAN/PATRAN. Furthermore the additional analysis is performed to confirm the structural safety due to bird strike impact on the blade during flight operation using a commercial code, ANSYS. To realize the proposed propeller design, the prototype blades are manufactured by the following procedure; the carbon/epoxy composite fabric prepregs are laid up for skin and spar on a mold using the hand lay-up method and consolidated with a proper temperature and vacuum in the oven. To finalize the structural design, the full-scale static structural test is performed under the simulated aerodynamic loads using 3 point loading method. From the experimental results, it is found that the designed blade has a good structural integrity, and the measured results agree well with the analytical results as well.

  1. Application of C/C composites to the combustion chamber of rocket engines. Part 1: Heating tests of C/C composites with high temperature combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yukio; Kusaka, Kazuo; Ueda, Shuichi; Suemitsu, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kude, Yukinori

    1995-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) has various superior properties, such as high specific strength, specific modulus, and fracture strength at high temperatures of more than 1800 K. Therefore, C/C composite is expected to be useful for many structural applications, such as combustion chambers of rocket engines and nose-cones of space-planes, but C/C composite lacks oxidation resistivity in high temperature environments. To meet the lifespan requirement for thermal barrier coatings, a ceramic coating has been employed in the hot-gas side wall. However, the main drawback to the use of C/C composite is the tendency for delamination to occur between the coating layer on the hot-gas side and the base materials on the cooling side during repeated thermal heating loads. To improve the thermal properties of the thermal barrier coating, five different types of 30-mm diameter C/C composite specimens constructed with functionally gradient materials (FGM's) and a modified matrix coating layer were fabricated. In this test, these specimens were exposed to the combustion gases of the rocket engine using nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) / monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) to evaluate the properties of thermal and erosive resistance on the thermal barrier coating after the heating test. It was observed that modified matrix and coating with FGM's are effective in improving the thermal properties of C/C composite.

  2. Experimental studies on combustion of composite biomass pellets in fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feihong; Zhong, Zhaoping

    2017-12-01

    This work presents studies on the combustion of Composite Biomass Pellets (CBPS) in fluidized bed using bauxite particles as the bed material. Prior to the combustion experiment, cold-flow characterization and thermogravimetric analysis are performed to investigate the effect of air velocity and combustion mechanism of CBPS. The cold-state test shows that CBPs and bauxite particles fluidize well in the fluidized bed. However, because of the presence of large CBPs, optimization of the fluidization velocity is rather challenging. CBPs can gather at the bottom of the fluidized bed at lower gas velocities. On the contrary, when the velocity is too high, they accumulate in the upper section of the fluidized bed. The suitable fluidization velocity for the system in this study was found to be between 1.5-2.0m/s. At the same time, it is found that the critical fluidization velocity and the pressure fluctuation of the two-component system increase with the increase of CBPs mass concentration. The thermogravimetric experiment verifies that the combustion of CBPs is a first-order reaction, and it is divided into three stages: (i) dehydration, (ii) release and combustion of the volatile and (iii) the coke combustion. The combustion of CBPs is mainly based on the stage of volatile combustion, and its activation energy is greater than that of char combustion. During the combustion test, CBPS are burned at a 10kg/h feed rate, while the excess air is varied from 25% to 100%. Temperatures of the bed and flue gas concentrations (O2, CO, SO2 and NO) are recorded. CBPs can be burnt stably, and the temperature of dense phase is maintained at 765-780°C. With the increase of the air velocity, the main combustion region has a tendency to move up. While the combustion is stable, O2 and CO2 concentrations are maintained at about 7%, and 12%, respectively. The concentration of SO2 in the flue gas after the initial stage of combustion is nearly zero. Furthermore, NO concentration is found to

  3. Performance evaluation of commercial copper chromites as burning rate catalyst for solid propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Faria Diniz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Copper chromites are well known as burning rate catalysts for the combustion of composite solid propellants, used as a source of energy for rocket propulsion. The propellant burning rate depends upon the catalyst characteristics such as chemical composition and specific surface area. In this work, copper chromite samples from different suppliers were characterized by chemical analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and by surface area measurement (BET. The samples were then evaluated as burning rate catalyst in a typical composite propellant formulation based on HTPB binder, ammonium perchlorate and aluminum. The obtained surface area values are very close to those informed by the catalyst suppliers. The propellant processing as well as its mechanical properties were not substantially affected by the type of catalyst. Some copper chromite catalysts caused an increase in the propellant burning rate in comparison to the iron oxide catalyst. The results show that in addition to the surface area, other parameters like chemical composition, crystalline structure and the presence of impurities might be affecting the catalyst performance. All evaluated copper chromite samples may be used as burning rate catalyst in composite solid propellant formulations, with slight advantages for the SX14, Cu-0202P and Cu-1800P samples, which led to the highest burning rate propellants.

  4. The effect of solid phase reactions on the ballistic properties of propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    The combustion of NH4ClO4 composite propellants has been studied between 15 and 3000 psi. The emphasis in the program has been on determining the mechanisms by which the fuel components influence the burning rate of the composites. In order to have flexibility in the choice and concentration of the fuel component all combustion experiments were performed with pressed power strands. The fuels studied included those which affected the combustion mechanism of the composite primarily through their effect on: (1) the oxidizer decomposition mechanism and (2) the composite surface temperature. The combustion of pure and doped NH4ClO4 was studied using both pressed powder strands and pressed end burning motor grains. The experimental approach has been essentially a chemical one with emphasis on perturbing those reactions which occur on or immediately adjacent to the surface (zone of influence) of the composite.

  5. Compositional Effects of Gasoline Fuels on Combustion, Performance and Emissions in Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2016-10-17

    Commercial gasoline fuels are complex mixtures of numerous hydrocarbons. Their composition differs significantly owing to several factors, source of crude oil being one of them. Because of such inconsistency in composition, there are multiple gasoline fuel compositions with similar octane ratings. It is of interest to comparatively study such fuels with similar octane ratings and different composition, and thus dissimilar physical and chemical properties. Such an investigation is required to interpret differences in combustion behavior of gasoline fuels that show similar knock characteristics in a cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine, but may behave differently in direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines or any other engine combustion modes. Two FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE F and FACE G with similar Research and Motor Octane Numbers but dissimilar physical properties were studied in a DISI engine under two sets of experimental conditions; the first set involved early fuel injection to allow sufficient time for fuel-air mixing hence permitting operation similar to homogenous DISI engines, while the second set consists of advance of spark timings to attain MBT (maximum brake torque) settings. These experimental conditions are repeated across different load points to observe the effect of increasing temperature and pressure on combustion and emission parameters. The differences in various engine-out parameters are discussed and interpreted in terms of physical and thermodynamic properties of the fuels.

  6. Changes in the composition of synthesis products upon transitioning from self-ignition to combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seplyarskii, B. S.; Ivleva, T. P.; Grachev, V. V.; Merzhanov, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Changes in the chemical composition of condensed products upon switching from synthesis in the self-ignition mode to combustion synthesis is studied by approximate analytical and numerical means for condensed substances that react via competing reaction pathways. It is shown that these different modes of synthesis produce different compositions of the reaction products. The conditions required for transitioning from one mode of combustion initiation (thermal explosion) to another (ignition) are determined. It is found that this transition can occur upon changing the temperature of a heater by just two characteristic intervals. A scaling procedure that allows the calculation results obtained at zero dimensionless temperature of the heater to be used to determine the effect its non-zero dimensionless temperature has on the ignition mode and the composition of the obtained products is proposed. Calculations show that materials with different distributions of the chemical composition along the sample can be obtained by deliberately changing the temperature of the heater.

  7. Innovative Swirl Injector for LOX and Hydrocarbon Propellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gases trapped in the propellant feed lines of space-based rocket engines due to cryogenic propellant boil-off or pressurant ingestion can result in poor combustion...

  8. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  9. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    OpenAIRE

    J. Łabaj; M. Jodkowski

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possib...

  10. Chemical composition and properties of ashes from combustion plants using Miscanthus as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Miscanthus giganteus is one of the energy crops considered to show potential for a substantial contribution to sustainable energy production. In the literature there is little data available about the chemical composition of ashes from the combustion of Miscanthus and practically no data about their physical properties. However, for handling, treatment and utilization of the ashes this information is important. In this study ashes from two biomass combustion plants using Miscanthus as fuel were investigated. The density of the ashes was 2230±35kg/m(3), which was similar to the density of ashes from straw combustion. Also the bulk densities were close to those reported for straw ashes. The flowability of the ashes was a little worse than the flowability of ashes from wood combustion. The measured heavy metal concentrations were below the usual limits for utilization of the ashes as soil conditioner. The concentrations in the bottom ash were similar to those reported for ash from forest residue combustion plants. In comparison with cyclone fly ashes from forest residue combustion the measured heavy metal concentrations in the cyclone fly ash were considerably lower. Cl(-), S and Zn were enriched in the cyclone fly ash which is also known for ashes from wood combustion. In comparison with literature data obtained from Miscanthus plant material the concentrations of K, Cl(-) and S were lower. This can be attributed to the fact that the finest fly ash is not collected by the cyclone de-dusting system of the Miscanthus combustion plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Biomass Conversion into Solid Composite Fuel for Bed-Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the conversion of different types of biomass into solid composite fuel. The subject of research is the heat conversion of biomass into solid composite fuel. The research object is the biomass of the Tomsk region (Russia: peat, waste wood, lake sapropel. Physical experiment of biomass conversion is used as method of research. The new experimental unit for thermal conversion of biomass into carbon residue, fuel gas and pyrolysis condensate is described. As a result of research such parameters are obtained: thermotechnical biomass characteristics, material balances and product characteristics of the heat-technology conversion. Different methods of obtaining solid composite fuel from the products of thermal technologies are considered. As a result, it is established: heat-technology provides efficient conversion of the wood chips and peat; conversion of the lake sapropel is inefficient since the solid composite fuel has the high ash content and net calorific value.

  12. Theoretical performance of JP-4 fuel and liquid oxygen as a rocket propellant II : equilibrium composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Vearl N; Fortini, Anthony; Gordon, Sanford

    1956-01-01

    Data were calculated for equivalence ratios of 1 to 3, chamber pressures of 300 and 600 pounds per square inch absolute, and pressure ratios of 1 to 1500. Parameters included are specific impulse, combustion and exit temperature, molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. A correlation is given which permits determination of performance for a wide range of chamber pressures.

  13. Investigation of the interfacial bonding in composite propellants. 1,3,5-Trisubstituted isocyanurates as universal bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA S. USCUMLIC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates (substituents: CH2CH2OH, CH2CH=CH2 and CH2CH2COOH was synthesized according to a modified literature procedure. Experimental investigations included modification of the synthetic procedure in terms of the starting materials, solvents, temperature, isolation techniques, as well as purification and identification of the products. All the synthesized isocyanurates were identified by their melting point and FTIR, 1H NMR and UV spectroscopic data. Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry was also used to study the interaction between ammonium perchlorate, hydroxyl terminated poly(butadiene, carboxyl terminated poly(butadiene, poly(butadiene-co-acrylonitrile, poly(propylene ether, cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine and the compounds synthesized in this work, which can serve as bonding agents. The results show that tris(2-hydroxyethylisocyanurate is a universal bonding agent for the ammonium perchlorate/carboxyl terminated poly(butadiene/cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine composite propellant system.

  14. Combustion performance of porous silicon-based energetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Benjamin Aaron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Son, Steve F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Asay, Blaine W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cho, Kevin Y [PURDUE UNIV

    2009-01-01

    The combustion performance of oxidizer filled porous silicon(PSi) was studied. PSi samples with diameters of 2.54 cm were fabricated by electrochemical etching. The % porosity of the samples ranged from 55 to 82%. The samples were cut into 3-5 mm strips and filled with the oxidizers NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O, Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 4H{sub 2}O, S and perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The filled PSi was then burned by igniting the sample with a hot NiChrome{trademark} wire. The burns were recorded using high speed photography from which bring rates were calculated. That burning rates showed a strong dependency on quality of the oxidizer loading. The % porosity did not appear to have a direct affect on the burning rates for those studied. PSi loaded with NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O produced burning rates that ranged from 216-349 cm/s. PSi loaded with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub x}x 4 H{sub 2}O had burning rates of 154-285 cm/s. An S filled PSi sample burned a rate of 16 to 290 cm/s, and perfluoropolyether loaded PSi burned at a rate of 1.4 cm/s.

  15. Structural Benchmark Tests of Composite Combustion Chamber Support Completed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, David L.; Thesken, John C.; Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.

    2005-01-01

    A series of mechanical load tests was completed on several novel design concepts for extremely lightweight combustion chamber support structures at the NASA Glenn Research Center (http://www.nasa.gov/glenn/). The tests included compliance evaluation, preliminary proof loadings, high-strain cyclic testing, and finally residual strength testing of each design (see the photograph on the left). Loads were applied with single rollers (see the photograph on the right) or pressure plates (not shown) located midspan on each side to minimize the influence of contact stresses on corner deformation measurements. Where rollers alone were used, a more severe structural loading was produced than the corresponding equal-force pressure loading: the maximum transverse shear force existed over the entire length of each side, and the corner bending moments were greater than for a distributed (pressure) loading. Failure modes initiating at the corner only provided a qualitative indication of the performance limitations since the stress state was not identical to internal pressure. Configurations were tested at both room and elevated temperatures. Experimental results were used to evaluate analytical prediction tools and finite-element methodologies for future work, and they were essential to provide insight into the deformation at the corners. The tests also were used to assess fabrication and bonding details for the complicated structures. They will be used to further optimize the design of the support structures for weight performance and the efficacy of corner reinforcement.

  16. Time Resolved Measurements and Reactive Pathways of Hypergolic Bipropellant Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Jr, James E

    2006-01-01

    This research has improved the fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms leading to the ignition and combustion of hypergolic propellants from high-speed visualization and combustion diagnostics...

  17. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possibility of using composite fuels as an alternative reducing agent as well as an energy carrier in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper.

  18. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Composites Filled with Combustion Synthesized h-BN Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shyan-Lung; Lin, Jeng-Shung

    2016-05-20

    The thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composites filled with combustion-synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) particles was investigated. The mixing of the composite constituents was carried out by either a dry method (involving no use of solvent) for low filler loadings or a solvent method (using acetone as solvent) for higher filler loadings. It was found that surface treatment of the h-BN particles using the silane 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) increases the thermal conductivity of the resultant composites in a lesser amount compared to the values reported by other studies. This was explained by the fact that the combustion synthesized h-BN particles contain less -OH or active sites on the surface, thus adsorbing less amounts of GPTMS. However, the thermal conductivity of the composites filled with the combustion synthesized h-BN was found to be comparable to that with commercially available h-BN reported in other studies. The thermal conductivity of the composites was found to be higher when larger h-BN particles were used. The thermal conductivity was also found to increase with increasing filler content to a maximum and then begin to decrease with further increases in this content. In addition to the effect of higher porosity at higher filler contents, more horizontally oriented h-BN particles formed at higher filler loadings (perhaps due to pressing during formation of the composites) were suggested to be a factor causing this decrease of the thermal conductivity. The measured thermal conductivities were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Nielsen and Lewis theory. The theoretical predictions were found to be lower than the experimental values at low filler contents ( 60 vol %).

  20. An Equation-of-State Compositional In-Situ Combustion Model: A Study of Phase Behavior Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, M. G.; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2009-01-01

    In order to facilitate the study of reactive-compositional porous media processes we develop a virtual kinetic cell (single-cell model) as well as a virtual combustion tube (one-dimensional model). Both models are fully compositional based on an equation of state. We employ the models to study...... phase behavior sensitivity for in situ combustion, a thermal oil recovery process. For the one-dimensional model we first study the sensitivity to numerical discretization errors and provide grid density guidelines for proper resolution of in situ combustion behavior. A critical condition for success...... of in situ combustion processes is the formation and sustained propagation of a high-temperature combustion front. Using the models developed, we study the impact of phase behavior on ignition/extinction dynamics as a function of the operating conditions. We show that when operating close to ignition...

  1. Design and assembly of a catalyst bed gas generator for the catalytic decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide propellants and the catalytic combustion of hydrocarbon/air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for designing and assembling a high performance catalyst bed gas generator for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The gas generator utilizes a sectioned catalyst bed system, and incorporates a robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst. The gas generator requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. The high performance catalyst bed gas generator system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition efficiency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test articles.

  2. Study of the combustion of aluminium and magnesium particulates: influence of the composition of the gaseous mixture and of pressure; Etude de la combustion de particules d'aluminium et de magnesium: influence de la composition du melange gazeux et de la pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, B.

    2000-07-01

    The combustion of metal particulates has a major interest in the domain of space propulsion. Aluminium is today used as doping material in the solid propellant of Ariane 5 rocket engines. Magnesium represents a possible fuel for propellers allowing a come back from Mars. An electrostatic levitation device has been used to study the combustion in controlled environment of particulates having a size representative of those encountered in propellers. The particulates are ignited with a laser and observed by fast cinematography. The inhibitive property of hydrogen chloride, an important constituent of the propellant atmosphere, on the combustion of aluminium particulates has been evidenced. These results have been compared with those obtained with a kinetic model in gaseous phase. The combustion of magnesium particulates in carbon dioxide has been studied for 53-63 {mu}m and 1-2 mm particulates. It is shown that the ignition of small particulates is controlled by the chemical kinetics and that the limit ignition pressure is reversely proportional to the particulates size. A study on big samples, performed in normal gravity but also in reduced gravity to get rid of the natural convection phenomena, has permitted to show a pulsed combustion regime linked with the presence of heterogenous reactions. The measurement of the combustion durations for the different sizes of particulates has permitted to propose a correlation between these two parameters for the particulate diameters comprised between 50 {mu}m and 2 mm. (J.S.)

  3. Application of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al alloy matrix composite on piston for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenqing

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and properties of ceramic short fiber reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite and it’s application on the piston for internal combustion engines are presented. Alumina or aluminosilicate fibers reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite has more excellent synthetical properties at elevated temperature than the matrix alloys. A partially reinforced Al-Si alloy matrix composite piston produced by squeeze casting technique has a firm interface between reinforced and unreinforced areas, low reject rate and good technical tolerance. As a new kind of piston material, it has been used for mass production of about 400,000 pieces of automobile engines piston. China has become one of a few countries in which aluminum alloy matrix composite materials have been used in automobile industry and attained industrialization.

  4. Environmentally Friendly Advanced Gun Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-15

    yellow and had the consistency of cookie dough . Total mix cycle was 90 to 120 minutes. Quarter-pint mixes were 80 grams and one-pint mixes were 275...Elastomer Laminated Propellant Development,” 34th JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee and Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee and Airbreathing

  5. Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Thermally Produced NOx from Various Fossil-Fuel Combustion Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Wendell W; Tharp, Bruce D; Fang, Huan; Kozak, Brian J; Michalski, Greg

    2015-10-06

    The nitrogen stable isotope composition of NOx (δ(15)N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning, which would help constrain NOx source contributions in nitrogen deposition studies. However, there is large uncertainty in the δ(15)N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources other than on-road vehicles and coal-fired energy generating units. To this end, this study presents a broad analysis of δ(15)N-NOx from several fossil-fuel combustion sources that includes: airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a three-way catalytic converter, lawn equipment, utility vehicles, urban buses, semitrucks, residential gas furnaces, and natural-gas-fired power plants. A relatively large range of δ(15)N-NOx values was measured from -28.1‰ to 8.5‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples that generally tended to be negative due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with thermal NOx production. A negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ(15)N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with selective catalytic reducers was observed, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx increases δ(15)N-NOx values relative to the NOx produced through fossil-fuel combustion processes. Combining the δ(15)N-NOx measured in this study with previous published values, a δ(15)N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous U.S., which demonstrates seasonal and regional importance of various NOx sources.

  6. Combustion-related pollutants of polydisperse single-composition aerosols and advection fog formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The most noticeable effect of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility, with and without the occurrence of condensation, which frequently accompanies polluted air. The present study concerns the formation of advection fog associated with aerosols, due to combustion-related pollutants, with a polydisperse population distribution and a single composition model. The results show that an aerosol population with high particle concentration-shifted distribution provides a more favorable condition for the formation of dense fog than an aerosol population with a low particle concentration-shifted distribution if the value of the mass concentration of the aerosols is kept constant.

  7. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composites Rotary Valves for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary, sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or warp-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties, do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary, sleeve, and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  8. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Rotary Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G.Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite rotary sleeve, and disc valves for internal combustion engines and the like are disclosed. The valves are formed from knitted or braided or wrap-locked carbon fiber shapes. Also disclosed are valves fabricated from woven carbon fibers and from molded carbon matrix material. The valves of the present invention with their very low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent thermal and self-lubrication properties do not present the sealing and lubrication problems that have prevented rotary sleeve and disc valves from operating efficiently and reliably in the past. Also disclosed are a sealing tang to further improve sealing capabilities and anti-oxidation treatments.

  9. DETERMINING THE COMPOSITION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF FOSSIL FUEL BASED ON VARIATIONAL PRINCIPLES AND GEOMETRIC PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velibor V Vujović

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the algorithm and results of a computer program for calculation of complex equilibrium composition for the high temperature fossil fuel combustion products. The method of determining the composition of high temperatures combustion products at the temperatures appearing in the open cycle MHD power generation is given. The determination of combustion product composition is based on minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The number of equations to be solved is reduced by using variational principles and a method of geometric programming and is equal to the sum of the numbers of elements and phases. A short description of the computer program for the calculation of the composition and an example of the results are also given.

  10. On-line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferge, T; Maguhn, J; Hafner, K; Mühlberger, F; Davidovic, M; Warnecke, R; Zimmermann, R

    2005-03-15

    The emission of particulate matter and gaseous compounds during combustion of wood and refuse-derived fuel in a small batch reactor is investigated by laser mass-spectrometric on-line measurement techniques for gas-phase analysis and simultaneous registration of physical aerosol properties (number size distribution). The gas-phase composition is addressed by a laser-based mass spectrometric method, namely, vacuum-UV single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (VUV-SPI-TOFMS). Particle-size distributions are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. Furthermore, a photoelectric aerosol sensor is applied for detection of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The different phases of wood combustion are distinguishable by both the chemical profiles of gas-phase components (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH) and the particle-size distribution. Furthermore, short disturbances of the combustion process due to air supply shortages are investigated regarding their effect on particle-size distribution and gas-phase composition, respectively. It is shown that the combustion conditions strongly influence the particle-size distribution as well as on the emission of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  11. Release to the Gas Phase of Inorganic Elements during Wood Combustion. Part 2: Influence of Fuel Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    Combustion of wood for heat and power production may cause problems such as ash deposition, corrosion, and harmful emissions of gases and particulate matter. These problems are all directly related to the release of inorganic elements (in particular Cl, S, K, Na, Zn, and Pb) from the fuel...... to the gas phase. The aims of this study are to obtain quantitative data on the release of inorganic elements during wood combustion and to investigate the influence of fuel composition. Quantitative release data were obtained by pyrolyzing and subsequently combusting small samples of wood (~30 g) at various...

  12. High-temperature oxidation behavior of carbon-carbon composites in the field of combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fushitani, Kazunari; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Arai, Norio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    The effects of equivalence ratio and temperature on oxidation behavior of carbon fiber reinforced carbon composites (C/C composites) were studied experimentally. Rates of weight loss of C/C composites in the field of combustion with methane-air were measured. The experiments were conducted at equivalence ratios of 0 = 0.8 and 1.3, and at temperatures of 1200, 1300 and 1400{degrees}C. It was found that higher equivalence ratio and lower temperature of methane-air were more effective in protecting C/C composites from oxidation. Changes of chemical structure on surface of C/C composites before and after experiment were also observed by Raman spectroscopy to evaluate chemically the degree of oxidation. The two peaks of Raman spectra from C/C composites appeared strongly at 1580 cm{sup -1} and weakly at 1360 cm{sup -1}. The ratios of the peak intensities at their wave numbers, R=I{sub 1360}/I{sub 1580}, which may indicate the degree of degradation of carbonaceous materials were measured. The dependence of equivalence ratio and temperature on R-value was similar to those on behavior of weight loss. This suggested that R-value obtained by Raman spectroscopy may be useful for estimation of the degree of oxidation. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Manufacturing of Porous Al-Cr Preforms for Composite Reinforcing Using Microwave Activated Combustion Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naplocha K.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The combustion synthesis of porous skeletons (preforms of intermetallic Al–Cr compounds intended for metal matrix composite MMC reinforcing was developed. Mixture of Al and Cr powders with granularity of −10, −44, −74mm were cold isostatic pressed and next ignited and synthetized in a microwave reactor under argon atmosphere (microwave-activated combustion synthesis MACS. In order to ignite the synthesis, microwave energy was focused by a tuner on the specimen. The analysis of reaction temperature diagrams revealed that the synthesis proceeded through the following peritectic transformations: L(liquidus+Al7Cr→L+Al11Cr2→L+Al4Cr. Moreover, EDS and XRD examinations showed that the reaction proceeded between a solid Cr and a liquid Al to create a distinct envelope of Al9Cr4 on Cr particle which next extended and spreaded over the entire structure. The produced preforms with uniform structure and interconnected porosity were infiltrated with liquid Cu and Al alloy. The obtained composite materials exhibited high hardness, wear and distinct temperature oxidation resistance.

  14. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Carbon Composite Valve for an Internal Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valve for internal combustion engines and the like formed of continuous carbon fibers throughout the valve's stem and head is disclosed. The valve includes braided carbon fiber material over axially aligned unidirectional carbon fibers forming a valve stem; the braided and unidirectional carbon fibers being broomed out at one end of the valve stem forming the shape of the valve head; the valve-shaped structure being densified and rigidized with a matrix of carbon containing discontinuous carbon fibers: and the finished valve being treated to resist oxidation. Also disclosed is a carbon matrix plug containing continuous and discontinuous carbon fibers and forming a net-shape valve head acting as a mandrel over which the unidirectional and braided carbon fibers are formed according to textile processes. Also disclosed are various preform valves and processes for making finished and preform carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite valves.

  15. Wide Temperature Range Kinetics of Elementary Combustion Reactions for Army Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fontijn, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The goals of this program are to provide accurate kinetic data on isolated elementary reactions at temperatures relevant to Army combustion models, particularly for propellant combustion dark zones...

  16. High-temperature catalyst for catalytic combustion and decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Jensen, Jeff J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst for propellant composition, including high concentration hydrogen peroxide, and catalytic combustion, including methane air mixtures. The uses include target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The catalyst system requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. Start-up transients of less than 1 second have been demonstrated with catalyst bed and propellant temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The catalyst system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition effeciency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test particles.

  17. Preparation of mono-dispersed, high energy release, core/shell structure Al nanopowders and their application in HTPB propellant as combustion enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyi; Wu, Zhiguo; Shangguan, Xushui; Sun, Yunqiang; Feng, Juanjuan; Li, Zhongyou; Chen, Luyang; Zuo, Shiyong; Zhuo, Renfu; Yan, Pengxun

    2017-07-12

    Mono-dispersed, spherical and core/shell structure aluminum nanopowders (ANPs) were produced massively by high energy ion beam evaporation (HEIBE). And the number weighted average particle size of the ANPs is 98.9 nm, with an alumina shell (3-5 nm). Benefiting from the passivation treatment, the friction, impact and electrostatic spark sensitivity of the ANPs are almost equivalent to those of aluminum micro powders. The result of TG-DSC indicates the active aluminum content of ANPs is 87.14%, the enthalpy release value is 20.37 kJ/g, the specific heat release S 1/Δm 1* (392-611 °C) which determined the ability of energy release is 19.95 kJ/g. And the value of S 1/Δm 1* is the highest compared with ANPs produced by other physical methods. Besides, the ANPs perfectly compatible with hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), 3 wt. % of ANPs were used in HTPB propellant replaced micron aluminum powders, and improved the burning rate in the 3-12 MPa pressure range and reduced the pressure exponential by more than 31% in the 3-16 MPa pressure range. The production technology of ANPs with excellent properties will greatly promote the application of ANPs in the field of energetic materials such as propellant, explosive and pyrotechnics.

  18. STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE ON THE COMBUSTIBILITY PERFORMANCE OF POLYMER COMPOSITIONS BASED ON ETHYLENE VINYL ACETATE COPOLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Chuleyeva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To obtain the flame retardants polymer compositions for cables tested the effect of use EVA compositions with magnesium hydroxide, on indicators combustibility polymer. Methodology. We used the method of differential scanning calorimetry and defined heat flux dependence on the test time for each composition at temperatures from 20 °C to 600 °C rate of temperature rise: 50 °C/min, 75 °C/min, 100 °C/min. Using the model of free kinetics we determined dependence of the activation energy from the conversion, a dependence of the conversion on the time of the test, the dependence of the time of the conversion from the temperature for each concentration. To comparison of these parameters for each composition we plotted the dependence of the time of the conversion from the temperature and the dependence the degree of conversion from the time of temperature exposure during the combustion of each of the compositions. Results. We obtained the kinetic characteristics, allowing to determine the composition, which provided the best results to reducing the kinetic parameters of flammability of polymeric compositions. Originality. For the first time we used the DSC and model-free kinetics to determine the effect properties of ingredients of the polymer compositions on the combustibility performance. Practical use. The research results can be used to develop polymer compositions for cable products.

  19. Influence of Combustion Parameters on Fouling Composition after Wood Pellet Burning in a Lab-Scale Low-Power Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Febrero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on fouling composition after woody biomass combustion in an experimental low-power fixed-bed boiler. The boiler was built specifically for research purposes and allows easy removal of areas susceptible to fouling and the control, modification and registry of combustion parameters. The influences of the total airflow supplied and the deposition probe temperature were studied in fouling; differentiating between the layers of fouling adhered to the tube and those deposited over the tube. Thermogravimetry and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TG-DSC and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS were performed in order to determine a relationship between the fouling composition and the combustion parameters used. Upon increasing the total airflow supplied and the deposition probe temperature, the amount of organic matter, namely unburned carbon, decreased, indicating a better combustion efficiency. Chemical analysis results of fouling deposits showed that inorganic elements presented different behaviors depending on the collection area and the combustion parameters. Non-volatile elements such as Si and Ca were mostly found in the coarse fraction of the bottom ash and minor amounts were deposited over the tube. Small amounts of Cl in biomass generated serious deposition problems, especially during combustions with low airflow rates.

  20. A. An Analytical and Experimental Study of the Erosive Burning of Composite Propellants. B. Modeling of Single Particle Aluminum Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-11-01

    Documentation Center. All others should apply to the National Technical Information Service. CONDITIONS OF RRPRODUCTION Reproduction , translation...Center. All others should apply to the National Technical Information Service. CONDITIONS OF REPRODUCTION Reproduction , translation, publication...1 K -1 0*M u. ^ UfO Mrs So s*" - a girt u «M >!5 Se m o a:» S H CO c E k. w 3 o am. I"«/"’!) 3iVa ONINWnO 63 o in e o o o (3»s

  1. Controlled combustion tests and bottom ash analysis using household waste with varying composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanjun; Bakker, Maarten; Brem, Gerrit; Chen, Guanyi

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the co-combustion of household waste with either sewage sludge, shredder fluff, electronic and electrical waste (WEEE) or PVC on the bottom ash quality and content was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions using a pot furnace. This laboratory approach avoids the interpretation problems related to large variations in input waste composition and combustion conditions that are observed in large scale MSW incinerators. The data for metals content, transfer coefficients and leaching values are presented relative to data for a base household waste composition that did not contain any of the added special wastes. The small WEEE invited direct measurement of precious metals content in the ashes, where measurement accuracy is facilitated by using only mobile phone scrap for small WEEE. The analyses were carried out for different particle size ranges that are of relevance to the recyclability of metals and minerals in the ashes. Positive correlations were found between elements content of the input waste and the bottom ashes, and also between increased levels of Cl, Mo and Cu in the input waste and their leaching in the bottom ashes. These correlations indicate that addition of PVC, small WEEE and shredder fluff in input waste can have a negative influence on the quality of the bottom ashes. Enrichment of Au and Ag occurred in the fractions between 0.15 and 6 mm. The precious metals content represents an economically interesting intrinsic value, even when the observed peak values are properly averaged over a larger volume of ashes. Overall, it has been shown that changes in quality and content of bottom ashes may be traced back to the varied input waste composition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  3. Coal blend combustion. Link between unburnt carbon in fly ashes and maceral composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helle, Sonia; Alfaro, Guillermo [Instituto de Geologia Economica Aplicada GEA, Universidad de Concepcion, P.O.B. 160-C, Casilla (Chile); Gordon, Alfredo; Garcia, Ximena; Ulloa, Claudia [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad de Concepcion, P.O.B. 160-C, Casilla (Chile)

    2003-03-15

    Coal blends are increasingly utilised at power plants with significant savings and without breaking environment regulations. However, evidence of interaction among the coals requires the study of some parameters that affect combustion efficiency and related opacity of emissions. Actual plant data was available for the combustion of five families of binary blends (single coals and approximately 25%/75%, 50%/50% and 75%/25% blends) with variable contents of ash, volatiles and maceral composition. Size distribution of particles was determined for the coals fed to the plant boilers and the fly ashes, as well as for unburnt carbon in the latter. The almost homogeneously sized feed from different coals generates a size distribution in the fly ash where 250-{mu}m particles vary up to 1.29%, while particles smaller than 38 {mu}m vary between 21.74% and 62.41%. Unburnt carbon increases with size of ash particles from a maximum of 12.2% for fractions smaller than 38 {mu}m up to 73.9% for the fraction bigger than 150 {mu}m. Total content of unburnt carbon in the fly ash from combustion of coal blends show deviations from the expected weighted average of the constituent coals (K, L, T, P, F, S and N). These deviations are related to maceral composition and rank based on reflectance values. The smallest deviation is shown by the blend (T/P) with coals having low values of reflectance and homogeneity of maceral contents. Larger deviations were found for blends K/L, P/F and S/N with higher difference of rank and greater heterogeneity of maceral composition. The K/L, R/N and S/N blends show positive deviations with respect to the expected weighted average, that is, blending was detrimental to the combustion efficiency, while blend P-F showed an enhance of the combustion efficiency as measured by unburnt carbon in the fly ash. A 'reactive maceral index' introduced in this work plays a useful role. If a ratio of reactive maceral index is established for a binary blend as

  4. Mechanically Activated Combustion Synthesis of MoSi2-Based Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafirovich, Evgeny [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of Mo5Si3. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. However, the synthesis of Mo-Si-B multi-phase alloys is difficult because of their extremely high melting temperatures. Mechanical alloying has been considered as a promising method, but it requires long milling times, leading to large energy consumption and contamination of the product by grinding media. In the reported work, MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites and several materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase have been obtained by mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Short-term milling of Mo/Si mixture in a planetary mill has enabled a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture pellet, leading to the formation of MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo/Si/B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of MoB, TiC, or TiB2. Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B and Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited spin combustion, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. It has been shown that use of

  5. Preparation of MoB and MoB-MoSi{sub 2} composites by combustion synthesis in SHS mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, C.L. [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Da-Yeh University, 112 Shan-Jiau Road, Da-Tsuen, Changhua 51505, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: clyeh@mail.dyu.edu.tw; Hsu, W.S. [Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Da-Yeh University, 112 Shan-Jiau Road, Da-Tsuen, Changhua 51505, Taiwan (China)

    2007-08-16

    Combustion synthesis in the mode of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) was carried out in the Mo-B and Mo-B-Si systems for the preparation of molybdenum boride MoB and the composite of MoB-MoSi{sub 2} from elemental powder compacts. Under a preheating temperature above 150 deg. C , the reaction of Mo with boron in the sample compact of Mo:B = 1:1 is characterized by a planar combustion front propagating in a self-sustaining and steady manner. As the preheating temperature or sample compaction density increased, combustion temperature was found to increase and the propagation rate of the combustion front was correspondingly enhanced. Moreover, the XRD analysis provides evidence of yielding nearly single-phase {alpha}-MoB from the Mo-B sample at equiatomic stoichiometry. In the synthesis of MoB-MoSi{sub 2} composites, the starting stoichiometry of the Mo-B-Si powder compact was varied so as to produce the final composites containing 20-80 mol% MoB. It was also found the increase of flame-front velocity and combustion temperature with increasing MoB content formed in the composite. The composition analysis by XRD shows excellent conversion from the Mo-B-Si powder compact to the MoB-MoSi{sub 2} composite through the SHS reaction; that is, in addition to a small amount of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, the as-synthesized composite is composed entirely of MoB and MoSi{sub 2}.

  6. Influence of Phase Composition on Sintered Microstructure of Combustion Synthesized Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibram Ganesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of powders synthesis methods (urea-combustion synthesis (CS and conventional solid-state (SS reaction on the sintering ability, microstructural features, and mechanical properties of Al2O3, MgAl2O4 spinel, and 20 wt.% ZrO2–MgAl2O4 upon sintering at 1625C∘ were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, relative density (RD, apparent porosity and water absorption capacity, hardness, fracture toughness, and three-point bend test studies revealed the superior sintering ability of CS ZrO2-MgAl2O4 composite powder as compared with one prepared by SS reaction. In contrast, single-phase powders obtained by SS reaction exhibit superior sintering ability over CS synthesized ones. The reasons for differences observed are discussed along this paper.

  7. Microwave activated combustion synthesis of porous Al-Ti structures for composite reinforcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naplocha, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztof.naplocha@pwr.wroc.p [Institute of Production Engineering and Automation, Technical University of Wroclaw, ul. Lukasiewicza 5, 50-371 Wroclaw (Poland); Granat, Kazimierz [Institute of Production Engineering and Automation, Technical University of Wroclaw, ul. Lukasiewicza 5, 50-371 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-11-03

    A research on porous Al-Ti materials produced by combustion synthesis is presented. Some of the manufactured preforms could be infiltrated with liquid aluminium alloy to obtain locally reinforced castings. The synthesis progress was analysed, as well as a structure formation, its phase composition, homogeneity degree and type of porosity. Cylindrical green compacts were prepared of Al and Ti powders with various stoichiometric ratios. Synthesis was performed in a specially designed microwave reactor, by placing a compact in a waveguide, in intensely focused field. Temperatures recorded by a pyrometer showed that the synthesis propagation accelerated at the moment of Al{sub 3}Ti creation. The highest synthesis temperature was reached by the specimens containing 45-67% Al (all percentages atomic). Microscopic examinations revealed rounded grains, sometimes with cores of solid solution Ti(Al). The grains were basically composed of AlTi{sub 3} that changed to AlTi at the edge. The grain structure was similar in almost all kinds of the specimens, especially in those with higher Al content. Around those grains, envelopes of AlTi and Al{sub 2}Ti were formed. Chemical composition of the matrix was approximately equivalent to stoichiometric ratio of the initial powder mixture. XRD investigations confirmed multiphase structure of the obtained compacts and a slight effect of the Ti powder granularity. Some of the specimens revealed regular structure with interconnected porosity. Those materials containing 75, 67 and 55% Al were used for producing the aluminium alloy-based composites.

  8. Design Analysis and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of a Polyimide Composite for Combustion Chamber Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, J. C.; Melis, M.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J.; Burke, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Polyimide composites are being evaluated for use in lightweight support structures designed to preserve the ideal flow geometry within thin shell combustion chambers of future space launch propulsion systems. Principles of lightweight design and innovative manufacturing techniques have yielded a sandwich structure with an outer face sheet of carbon fiber polyimide matrix composite. While the continuous carbon fiber enables laminated skin of high specific stiffness; the polyimide matrix materials ensure that the rigidity and durability is maintained at operation temperatures of 316 C. Significant weight savings over all metal support structures are expected. The protypical structure is the result of ongoing collaboration, between Boeing and NASA-GRC seeking to introduce polyimide composites to the harsh environmental and loads familiar to space launch propulsion systems. Design trade analyses were carried out using relevant closed form solutions, approximations for sandwich beams/panels and finite element analysis. Analyses confirm the significant thermal stresses exist when combining materials whose coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) differ by a factor of about 10 for materials such as a polymer composite and metallic structures. The ramifications on design and manufacturing alternatives are reviewed and discussed. Due to stringent durability and safety requirements, serious consideration is being given to the synergistic effects of temperature and mechanical loads. The candidate structure operates at 316 C, about 80% of the glass transition temperature T(sub g). Earlier thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) investigations of chopped fiber polyimide composites made this near to T(sub g), showed that cyclic temperature and stress promoted excessive creep damage and strain accumulation. Here it is important to verify that such response is limited in continuous fiber laminates.

  9. Green Propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Rahm, Martin

    2010-01-01

    To enable future environmentally friendly access to space by means of solid rocket propulsion a viable replacement to the hazardous ammonium perchlorate oxidizer is needed. Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) is one of few such compounds currently known. Unfortunately compatibility issues with many polymer binder systems and unexplained solid-state behavior have thus far hampered the development of ADN-based propellants. Chapters one, two and three offer a general introduction to the thesis, and into ...

  10. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  11. High Frequency Combustion Instabilities of LOx/CH4 Spray Flames in Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliphorst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the early stages of space transportation in the 1940’s, and the related liquid propellant rocket engine development, combustion instability has been a major issue. High frequency combustion instability (HFCI) is the interaction between combustion and the acoustic field in the combustion

  12. Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Various Fossil-fuel Combustion Nitrogen Oxide Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, W.; Michalski, G. M.; Fang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are important trace gases that impact atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climate. In order to help constrain NOx source contributions, the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of NOx (δ15N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning. However, despite anthropogenic emissions being the most prevalent source of NOx, there is still large uncertainty in the δ15N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources. To this end, this study provides a detailed analysis of several fossil-fuel combustion NOx sources and their δ15N-NOx values. To accomplish this, exhaust or flue samples from several fossil-fuel combustion sources were sampled and analyzed for their δ15N-NOx that included airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a catalytic converter, gasoline-powered lawn tools and utility vehicles, diesel-electric buses, diesel semi-trucks, and natural gas-burning home furnace and power plant. A relatively large range of δ15N-NOx values were measured from -28.1 to 0.3‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples with cold started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the lowest δ15N-NOx values at -20.9‰, and warm-started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the highest values of -1.7‰. The NOx sources analyzed in this study primarily originated from the "thermal production" of NOx and generally emitted negative δ15N-NOx values, likely due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with its production. It was found that there is a negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ15N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with catalytic NOx reduction technology, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx may have an influence on δ15N-NOx values. Based on the δ15N-NOx values reported in this study and in previous studies, a δ15N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous United States. The constructed isoscape demonstrates the seasonal importance of various

  13. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    wings. The literature on four different designs is reviewed: the end-plate propeller; the two-sided, shifted end-plate propeller; the tip-fin propeller; and the bladelet propeller. The conclusion is that it is indeed possible to design tip-modified propellers that, relative to an optimum conventional...

  14. Modeling of the failure front in the structure of a composite material with the observing of convective combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitsin, V. N.; Dmitrieva, M. A.; Ponomarev, S. V.; Ishchenko, A. N.; Ponomarev, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    Convective combustion presents intensive exothermic chemical transformations occurring due to the heating of the material and the start of chemical transformations in the final layer of the parent material as a result of the convection of heated gas or liquid from the combustion area into the reactive material through a chain of interconnected pores. The convective combustion in an initially proof reactive material is possible provided that a system of through pores is formed immediately before the combustion front in the process of failure of the original structure of the reactive material. However, the actual mechanisms of these processes are unclear. The common features of all models used to study the conditions for the transition of layered combustion to convective are the application of approaches of the mechanics of multiphase media and various hypotheses about the launch of chemical transformations due to heat transfer from filtering heated reaction products and heating due to a viscoplastic dissipation of pore collapse energy. The topical issues are the estimates of the resonance mode of the formation of a through porosity system ahead of the front of chemical transformations of an impenetrable heterogeneous system that includes discrete components capable of intensive chemical transformations, initiator particles. In this paper, we present a new approach to modeling and investigating the failure of a reactive composite medium ahead of the propagation wave front, from the position of the dynamics of a deformed heterogeneous object with a structure.

  15. Prediction of ignition delay of ADN-based ionic liquid propellants using thermal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    早田, 葵; 塩田, 謙人; 伊里, 友一朗; 松永, 浩貴; 羽生, 宏人; 三宅, 淳巳; Hayata, Mamoru; Shiota, Kento; Izato, Yuichiro; Matsunaga, Hiroki; Habu, Hiroto; Miyake, Atsumi

    2017-01-01

    Ammonium dinitramide based ionic liquid propellants have been studied as monopropellant in terms of high specific impulse, low melting point and low toxicity. The purpose of this study is construction prediction method of ignition delay and combustion temperature against heating rate of propellants for establishment of combustion control technique. The prediction method of ignition delay and combustion temperature is constructed by combination of thermal analysis method and combustion simulat...

  16. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McCloskey, Pat [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Ananthasayanam, Balajee [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Lee, Julia [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wroczynski, Ron [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Stewart, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McNally, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rownaghi, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lu, Liu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goizueta, Roberto [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  17. Inter-Batch Variation and the Effect of Casting Vacuum on Ballistic and Mechanical Properties of a High Performing Cast Composite Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Tensile testing of propellant in the form of ‘ dog bones’ or uniaxial tensile test pieces cut from cast slabs of propellant was performed to assess inter... dog bones were cut from the top of the mould. It is possible that the strands for both partial and full vacuum had a slightly higher solids content... Behaviour of AP/HTPB Propellant Using Coarse and Fine AP Particles. Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 2011. 36: p. 57-64. 9. Smith, P.C

  18. Kinetics of the high-temperature combustion reactions of dibutylether using composite computational methods

    KAUST Repository

    Rachidi, Mariam El

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the high-temperature combustion kinetics of n-dibutyl ether (n-DBE), including unimolecular decomposition, H-abstraction by H, H-migration, and C{single bond}C/C{single bond}O β-scission reactions of the DBE radicals. The energetics of H-abstraction by OH radicals is also studied. All rates are determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 and G4 composite methods in conjunction with conventional transition state theory. The B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd) method is used to optimize the geometries and calculate the frequencies of all reactive species and transition states for use in ChemRate. Some of the rates calculated in this study vary markedly from those obtained for similar reactions of alcohols or alkanes, particularly those pertaining to unimolecular decomposition and β-scission at the α-β C{single bond}C bond. These variations show that analogies to alkanes and alcohols are, in some cases, inappropriate means of estimating the reaction rates of ethers. This emphasizes the need to establish valid rates through computation or experimentation. Such studies are especially important given that ethers exhibit promising biofuel and fuel additive characteristics. © 2014.

  19. Combustion Synthesis of UHTC Composites from Ti–B4C Solid State Reaction with Addition of VIb Transition Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Yeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available UHTC composites were prepared by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS from the Ti–B4C reaction system with addition of Cr, Mo, and W. The starting sample composition was formulated as (3−xTi + B4C + xMe with x = 0.1–1.0 and Me = Cr, Mo, or W. For all samples conducted in this study, self-sustaining combustion was well established and propagated with a distinct reaction front. With no addition of Cr, Mo, or W, solid state combustion of the 3Ti + B4C sample featuring a combustion front temperature (Tc of 1766 °C and a combustion wave velocity (Vf of 16.5 mm/s was highly exothermic and produced an in situ composite of 2TiB2 + TiC. When Cr, Mo, or W was adopted to replace a portion of Ti, the reaction exothermicity was lowered, and hence, a significant decrease in Tc (from 1720 to 1390 °C and Vf (from 16.1 to 3.9 mm/s was observed. With addition of Cr, Mo, and W, the final products were CrB-, MoB-, and WB-added TiB2–TiC composites. The absence of CrB2, MoB2, and WB2 was attributed partly to the loss of boron from thermal decomposition of B4C and partly to lack of sufficient reaction time inherent to the SHS process.

  20. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN COMPOSITION AND PULMONARY TOXICITY OF PROTOTYPE PARTICLES FROM COAL COMBUSTION AND PYROLYSIS (MONTREAL, CANADA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypothesis that health effects associated with coal combustion fly-ash particles are exacerbated by the simultaneous presence of iron and soot was tested through two sets of experiments. The first set created prototype particles from complete and partial combustion, or oxygen...

  1. Relationships between composition and pulmonary toxicity of prototype particles from coal combustion and pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The hypothesis that health effects associated with coal combustion fly-ash particles are exacerbated by the simultaneous presence of iron and soot was tested through two sets of experiments. The first set created prototype particles from complete and partial combustion, or oxygen...

  2. JANNAF 37th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 59 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 37th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) meeting held jointly with the 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS), and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meetings. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered at the CS meeting include: a keynote address on the Future Combat Systems, and review of a new JANNAF Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee, and technical papers on gun propellant burning rate, gun tube erosion, advanced gun propulsion concepts, ETC guns, novel gun propellants; liquid, hybrid and novel propellant combustion; solid propellant combustion kinetics, GAP, ADN and RDX combustion, sandwich combustion, metal combustion, combustion instability, and motor combustion instability.

  3. Development of hydrazinium nitroformate based solid propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schöyer, H.F.R.; Schnorhk, A.J.; Korting, P.A.O.G.; Lit, P.J. van; Mul, J.M.; Gadiot, G.; Meulenbrugge, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The development of new high-performance propellant combinations requires the establishment of safety and handling characteristics and thermodynamic decomposition and explosive properties. This paper addresses the early development phases of a new composite solid propellant based on HNF as oxidizer

  4. Nonlinear Combustion Instability Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandro, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The liquid rocket engine stability prediction software (LCI) predicts combustion stability of systems using LOX-LH2 propellants. Both longitudinal and transverse mode stability characteristics are calculated. This software has the unique feature of being able to predict system limit amplitude.

  5. Novel Montmorillonite/TiO2/MnAl-Mixed Oxide Composites Prepared from Inverse Microemulsions as Combustion Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napruszewska, Bogna D.; Michalik-Zym, Alicja; Rogowska, Melania; Bielańska, Elżbieta; Rojek, Wojciech; Gaweł, Adam; Wójcik-Bania, Monika; Bahranowski, Krzysztof; Serwicka, Ewa M.

    2017-01-01

    A novel design of combustion catalysts is proposed, in which clay/TiO2/MnAl-mixed oxide composites are formed by intermixing exfoliated organo-montmorillonite with oxide precursors (hydrotalcite-like in the case of Mn-Al oxide) obtained by an inverse microemulsion method. In order to assess the catalysts’ thermal stability, two calcination temperatures were employed: 450 and 600 °C. The composites were characterized with XRF (X-ray fluorescence), XRD (X-ray diffraction), HR SEM (high resolution scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption at −196 °C, and H2 TPR (temperature programmed reduction). Profound differences in structural, textural and redox properties of the materials were observed, depending on the presence of the TiO2 component, the type of neutralization agent used in the titania nanoparticles preparation (NaOH or NH3 (aq)), and the temperature of calcination. Catalytic tests of toluene combustion revealed that the clay/TiO2/MnAl-mixed oxide composites prepared with the use of ammonia showed excellent activity, the composites obtained from MnAl hydrotalcite nanoparticles trapped between the organoclay layers were less active, but displayed spectacular thermal stability, while the clay/TiO2/MnAl-mixed oxide materials obtained with the aid of NaOH were least active. The observed patterns of catalytic activity bear a direct relation to the materials’ composition and their structural, textural, and redox properties. PMID:29156598

  6. Novel Montmorillonite/TiO2/MnAl-Mixed Oxide Composites Prepared from Inverse Microemulsions as Combustion Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna D. Napruszewska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel design of combustion catalysts is proposed, in which clay/TiO2/MnAl-mixed oxide composites are formed by intermixing exfoliated organo-montmorillonite with oxide precursors (hydrotalcite-like in the case of Mn-Al oxide obtained by an inverse microemulsion method. In order to assess the catalysts’ thermal stability, two calcination temperatures were employed: 450 and 600 °C. The composites were characterized with XRF (X-ray fluorescence, XRD (X-ray diffraction, HR SEM (high resolution scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption at −196 °C, and H2 TPR (temperature programmed reduction. Profound differences in structural, textural and redox properties of the materials were observed, depending on the presence of the TiO2 component, the type of neutralization agent used in the titania nanoparticles preparation (NaOH or NH3 (aq, and the temperature of calcination. Catalytic tests of toluene combustion revealed that the clay/TiO2/MnAl-mixed oxide composites prepared with the use of ammonia showed excellent activity, the composites obtained from MnAl hydrotalcite nanoparticles trapped between the organoclay layers were less active, but displayed spectacular thermal stability, while the clay/TiO2/MnAl-mixed oxide materials obtained with the aid of NaOH were least active. The observed patterns of catalytic activity bear a direct relation to the materials’ composition and their structural, textural, and redox properties.

  7. Applying Thermodynamics to Fossil Fuels: Heats of Combustion from Elemental Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, William G.; Davenport, Derek A.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are the calculations of heats of combustions of some selected fossil fuel compounds such as some foreign shale oils and United States coals. Heating values for coal- and petroleum-derived fuel oils are also presented. (HM)

  8. Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustion Chamber for HAN-Based Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet will design and fabricate a lightweight, high temperature 5-lbf combustion chamber. The system will be designed for use with the AF-315 family of...

  9. The Effect of Gravity on the Combustion Synthesis of Porous Ceramics and Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. J.; Woodger, T. C.; Wolanski, T.; Yi, H. C.; Guigne, J. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Combustion synthesis (self propagating, high temperature synthesis-SHS) is a novel technique that is capable of producing many advanced materials. The ignition temperature (Tig) of such combustion synthesis reactions is often coincident with that of the lowest melting point reactant. The resultant liquid metal wets and spreads around the other solid reactant particles of higher melting points, thereby improving the reactant contact and kinetics, followed by formation of the required compounds. This ignition initiates a combustion propagating wave whose narrow reaction front rapidly travels through the reactants. Since this process is highly exothermic, the heat released by combustion often melts the reactant particles ahead of the combustion front and ignites the adjacent reactant layer, resulting in a self-sustaining reaction. Whenever a fluid phase (liquid or gas) is generated by the reaction system, gravity-driven phenomena can occur. Such phenomena include convective flows of fluid by conventional or unstable convection and settling of the higher density phases. A combustion process is often associated with various kinds of fluid flow. For instance, if the SHS reaction is carried out under inert or reactive gas atmospheres, or a volatile, e.g., B2O3, is deliberately introduced as a reactant, convective flows of the gas will occur due to a temperature gradient existing in the atmosphere when a combustion wave is initiated. The increased gas flow will produce a porous (or expanded) SHS product. Owing to the highly exothermic nature of many SHS reactions, liquid phase(s) can also form before, at, or after the combustion front. The huge temperature gradient at the combustion front can induce convective flows (conventional or unstable) of the liquid phase. Each of these types of convective fluid flow can change the combustion behavior of the synthesizing reaction, and, therefore, the resultant product microstructure. In addition, when two or more phases of different

  10. Ignition of a Droplet of Composite Liquid Fuel in a Vortex Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Vershinina, K. Yu; Glushkov, D. O.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study results of a droplet ignition and combustion were obtained for coal-water slurry containing petrochemicals (CWSP) prepared from coal processing waste, low-grade coal and waste petroleum products. A comparative analysis of process characteristics were carried out in different conditions of fuel droplet interaction with heated air flow: droplet soars in air flow in a vortex combustion chamber, droplet soars in ascending air flow in a cone-shaped combustion chamber, and droplet is placed in a thermocouple junction and motionless in air flow. The size (initial radii) of CWSP droplet was varied in the range of 0.5–1.5 mm. The ignition delay time of fuel was determined by the intensity of the visible glow in the vicinity of the droplet during CWSP combustion. It was established (under similar conditions) that ignition delay time of CWSP droplets in the combustion chamber is lower in 2–3.5 times than similar characteristic in conditions of motionless droplet placed in a thermocouple junction. The average value of ignition delay time of CWSP droplet is 3–12 s in conditions of oxidizer temperature is 600–850 K. Obtained experimental results were explained by the influence of heat and mass transfer processes in the droplet vicinity on ignition characteristics in different conditions of CWSP droplet interaction with heated air flow. Experimental results are of interest for the development of combustion technology of promising fuel for thermal power engineering.

  11. Optimum Disposition of Metal Particles in the Propellant Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid L. Minkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the dispersed metal in solid propellants to increase the temperature of combustion products leads to such a problem as the specific impulse loss due to the incomplete combustion of metal particles in the exhaust products. A redistribution of metal loaded into the propellant grain is one of the methods to decrease the specific impulse loss. This paper reports on the ways to obtain the optimum metal particle disposition for the case-bounded propellant grain of tube cross-sectional type. Three different approaches to analyze the metal combustion efficiency are discussed. The influence of the dynamic nonequilibrium of two-phase flow on the optimum metal particles disposition in the propellant grain of tube cross-sectional type is investigated.

  12. Perancangan Propeler Self-Propelled Barge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Teguh kurniawan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Makalah ini menyampaikan suatu penelitian tentang perancangan propeler yang optimal beserta pemilihan daya mesin yang efisien pada self-propelled barge dengan memperhitungkan besarnya nilai tahanan dari barge tersebut. Dengan penambahan sistem propulsi, diharapkan barge dapat beroperasi dengan lebih efisien dibandingkan saat barge beroperasi menggunakan sistem towing atau ditarik tug boat. Perhitungan tahanan barge dilakukan menggunakan metode Holtrop dan Guldhammer-Harvald sehingga dapat diperhi-tungkan geometri dan jenis propeler yang optimal beserta daya mesin yang efisien untuk barge. Propeler yang dianalisis adalah propeler tipe B-Troost Series, sedangkan variasi yang dilakukan untuk perencanaan propeler pada kajian ini adalah variasi putaran propeler pada rentang antara 310-800 rpm, serta variasi jumlah daun pada rentang tiga, empat, lima, dan enam. Besarnya nilai tahanan self-propelled barge untuk metode Holtrop adalah 105.91 kilonewton, sedangkan hasil per-hitungan dari metode Guldhammer-Harvald didapatkan nilai sebesar 109.14 kilonewton. Tipe propeler yang dipilih setelah dilakukan uji kavitasi adalah tipe Troost Series B4-40, dengan diameter sebesar 2.1 m, efisiensi sebesar 0.421, pitch ratio se-besar 0.591, dengan putaran propeler 400 rpm. Daya mesin yg dibutuhkan barge pada kondisi maksimum (BHPMCR sebesar 1669.5 HP. Dengan mempertimbangkan daya tersebut, maka dipilih mesin jenis Caterpillar tipe Marine 3516B yang mem-punyai daya maksimum sebesar 1285 kilowatt atau 1722.5 horsepower dengan putaran mesin sebesar 1200 rpm

  13. Compositional Simulation of In-Situ Combustion EOR: A Study of Process Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Priyanka; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    combustion simulation is used. Preceding research work primarily focused on a kinetic model that was based on six components and incorporated four chemical reactions. However, modeling of a thermal process as complex as In-situ combustion requires in-depth understanding of detailed reaction kinetics...... and multidisciplinary process data. This paper extends the understanding of previous research done in this domain by performing the process simulations to study further the impact of oxidation reactions and combustion reactions of crude oils along with their saturate, aromatic, resin, and asphaltene (SARA) fractions....... This incorporates fourteen pseudo components and fourteen reactions (distributed amongst thermal cracking, low temperature oxidation and high temperature oxidation). The paper presents a set of derivative plots indicating that reservoir process characterization in terms of thermal behavior of oil can be well...

  14. Unsteady Processes in Solid Propellant Combustion,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    of a burning solid to ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 10. — very high frecuency pressure oscillations 1 . When the

  15. The Dynamics of Solid Propellant Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-31

    prcoposedl mechanism for os;cillaitory burning of corda Le is the successivc explo- sion, assisted by gas phase heat feedback, of diFsCrete_ sur- face layers...13 1’ 3’’ ]-y 1.3 tL.’’ -’ 4 ,c u onc t.3 (5>2 Cn vo ry n0’rn o101: 1FA-oIt c .v tIIr01 tCi, d ’n e 4𔃽 r3 ( -I_’ j -)I ’.- if󈧥 1 1 (3 1hnl a -’f c

  16. Spray and Combustion of Gelled Hypergolic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Law. Regimes of coalescence and separation in droplet collision. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 1997. 33. Paulo J. Olivera and Fernando T. Pinho...Engineering Science, ( ): . doi: J. Ku, C. M. Corvalan. Coalescence of viscous drops with surfactants, Chemical Engineering Science, ( ): . doi... Droplet Collisions, (04 2010) S. Menon, K. Mooney, D. Schmidt. Parallel adaptive simplical re-meshing for deforming domain cfd computations, (08

  17. Laser Probes of Propellant Combustion Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-29

    helaler me& sinvmed.Lhut 04m exiam no fundunel resson Ref. 4L. ’,, for smh a relesdsnehp. among11011 the differen experimenlts; although different...mechanically by a particu- Such experiments are performed much in the manner illustrated lar distribution over over mj magnetic sublevels). and the

  18. Analysis regarding steam generator furnace's incident heat, temperature and composition of combustion gases; Analisis de calor incidente, temperatura y composicion de gases de combustion en hornos de generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego Marin, Antonio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    In order to obtain more precise evaluations of the combustion process in the furnace of a steam generator a suction pyrometer has been integrated to measure the temperature of the combustion gases; an ellipsoidal radiometer to measure the incident heat by thermal radiation in the water walls; a water cooled probe to determine the particle concentration, as well as a water cooled probe to determine the composition of the combustion gases present. This document clarifies the form of use of these instruments and their engineering specifications, simultaneously presenting an analysis that considers, unlike others, the internal conditions of the furnace to obtain a more precise evaluation of the efficiency that the combustion process presents and bases for the taking of preventive actions in specific zones of the furnace. Thus, the present work exhibits instruments and techniques of analysis to study the phenomena occurring within a steam generator. [Spanish] Con el fin de obtener evaluaciones mas precisas del proceso de combustion en el horno de un generador de vapor, se ha integrado un pirometro de succion para medir la temperatura de los gases de combustion; un radiometro elipsoidal para medir el calor incidente por radiacion termica en las paredes del agua; una sonda enfriada con agua para determinar la concentracion de particulas, asi como una sonda refrigerada con agua para determinar la composicion de los gases de combustion presentes. Este documento aclara la forma de uso de estos instrumentos y sus especificaciones tecnicas, a la vez que presenta un analisis que considera, a diferencia de otros, las condiciones internas del horno para obtener una evaluacion mas precisa sobre la eficiencia del proceso de combustion y bases para la toma de acciones preventivas en zonas especificas del horno. Asi, el presente trabajo exhibe instrumentos y tecnicas de analisis para estudiar los fenomenos que ocurren dentro de un generador de vapor.

  19. Chemical characterization and stable carbon isotopic composition of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons issued from combustion of 10 Mediterranean woods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guillon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from particulate matter emitted during wood combustion and to determine, for the first time, the isotopic signature of PAHs from nine wood species and Moroccan coal from the Mediterranean Basin. In order to differentiate sources of particulate-PAHs, molecular and isotopic measurements of PAHs were performed on the set of wood samples for a large panel of compounds. Molecular profiles and diagnostic ratios were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS and molecular isotopic compositions (δ13C of particulate-PAHs were determined by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS. Wood species present similar molecular profiles with benz(aanthracene and chrysene as dominant PAHs, whereas levels of concentrations range from 1.8 to 11.4 mg g−1 OC (sum of PAHs. Diagnostic ratios are consistent with reference ratios from literature but are not sufficient to differentiate the species of woods. Concerning isotopic methodology, PAH molecular isotopic compositions are specific for each species and contrary to molecular fingerprints, significant variations of δ13C are observed for the panel of PAHs. This work allows differentiating wood combustion (with δ13CPAH = −28.7 to −26.6‰ from others origins of particulate matter (like vehicular exhaust using isotopic measurements but also confirms the necessity to investigate source characterisation at the emission in order to help and complete source assessment models. These first results on woodburnings will be useful for the isotopic approach to source tracking.

  20. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 2: a Study of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in Rocket Engine Preburners Using a Heterogeneous Stirred Tank Reactor Model. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartrand, Timothy A.

    1988-01-01

    During the shutdown of the space shuttle main engine, oxygen flow is shut off from the fuel preburner and helium is used to push the residual oxygen into the combustion chamber. During this process a low frequency combustion instability, or chug, occurs. This chug has resulted in damage to the engine's augmented spark igniter due to backflow of the contents of the preburner combustion chamber into the oxidizer feed system. To determine possible causes and fixes for the chug, the fuel preburner was modeled as a heterogeneous stirred tank combustion chamber, a variable mass flow rate oxidizer feed system, a constant mass flow rate fuel feed system and an exit turbine. Within the combustion chamber gases were assumed perfectly mixed. To account for liquid in the combustion chamber, a uniform droplet distribution was assumed to exist in the chamber, with mean droplet diameter determined from an empirical relation. A computer program was written to integrate the resulting differential equations. Because chamber contents were assumed perfectly mixed, the fuel preburner model erroneously predicted that combustion would not take place during shutdown. The combustion rate model was modified to assume that all liquid oxygen that vaporized instantaneously combusted with fuel. Using this combustion model, the effect of engine parameters on chamber pressure oscillations during the SSME shutdown was calculated.

  1. Relation between combustion heat and chemical wood composition during white and brown rot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobry, J.; Dziurzynski, A.; Rypacek, V.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of beech and spruce wood were incubated with the white rot fungi Pleurotus ostreatus and Lentinus tigrinus and the brown rot fungi Fomitopsis pinicola and Serpula lacrymans (S. lacrimans) for four months. Decomposition (expressed as percent weight loss) and amounts of holocellulose, lignin, humic acids (HU), hymatomelanic acids (HY) and fulvo acids (FU) were determined and expressed in weight percent. Combustion heat of holocellulose and lignin was determined in healthy wood and in specimens where decomposition was greater than 50%. During white rot decomposition, combustion heat was unchanged even at high decomposition and the relative amounts of holocellulose and lignin remained the same. Total amounts of HU, HY and FU increased during the initial stages and stabilized at 20%. The content of HU plus HY was negligible even at the highest degree of decomposition. During brown rot decomposition, combustion heat was unchanged only in the initial stages, it increased continously with increasing rot. Lignin content was unchanged in the initial stages and increased after 30% weight loss. Total amounts of HU, HY and FU increased continuously, reaching higher values than in white rot decomposition; there were differences between the two species. Biosynthesis of HU plus HY began when weight loss reached 30%; there were differences in absolute and relative amounts between species. 24 references.

  2. Atmospheric Environment Fabrication of Composite Films by Ethanol Catalytic Combustion and Its Use as Counter Electrodes for Dye-Sensitized Soar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite films which consist of amorphous carbon, carbon nanotube, and iron nanoparticles were prepared by ethanol catalytic combustion in atmospheric environment. The as-prepared composite films have good electrocatalytic activity and high conductivity which is due to their particular structure. The efficiency of the composite films based dye-sensitized soar cells (DSSCs is closed to that of the Pt based one. Most importantly, the DSSC employing the composite films presents a higher FF than those of Pt based solar cell. In addition, it is a simple method for mass production of composite films counter electrode (CE which is expected to reduce the cost of fabricating DSSCs.

  3. Combustion characteristics of thermally stressed hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Colin William

    Liquid propelled propulsion systems, which range from rocket systems to hypersonic scramjet and ramjet engines, require active cooling in order to prevent additional payload requirements. In these systems, the liquid fuel is used as a coolant and is delivered through micro-channels that surround the combustion chambers, nozzles, as well as the exterior surfaces in order to extract heat from these affected areas. During this process, heat exchange occurs through phase change, sensible heat extraction, and endothermic reactions experienced by the liquid fuel. Previous research has demonstrated the significant modifications in fuel composition and changes to the fuel's physical properties that can result from these endothermic reactions. As a next step, we are experimentally investigating the effect that endothermic reactions have on fundamental flame behavior for real hydrocarbon fuels that are used as rocket and jet propellants. To achieve this goal, we have developed a counter-flow flame burner to measure extinction limits of the thermally stressed fuels. The counter-flow flame system is to be coupled with a high pressure reactor, capable of subjecting the fuel to 170 atm and 873 K, effectively simulating the extreme environment that cause the liquid fuel to experience endothermic reactions. The fundamental flame properties of the reacted fuels will be compared to those of unreacted fuels, allowing us to determine the role of endothermic reactions on the combustion behavior of current hydrocarbon jet and rocket propellants. To quantify the change in transport properties and chemical kinetics of the reacting mixture, simultaneous numerical simulations of the reactor portion of the experiment coupled with a counterflow flame simulation are performed using n-heptane and n-dodecane.

  4. Aluminum agglomeration involving the second mergence of agglomerates on the solid propellants burning surface: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Liu, Xin; Rezaiguia, Hichem; Liu, Huan; Wang, Zhixin; Liu, Peijin

    2017-07-01

    The agglomeration of aluminum particles usually occurs on the burning surface of aluminized composite propellants. It leads to low propellant combustion efficiency and high two-phase flow losses. To reach a thorough understanding of aluminum agglomeration behaviors, agglomeration processes, and particles size distribution of Al/AP/RDX/GAP propellants were studied by using a cinephotomicrography experimental technique, under 5 MPa. Accumulation, aggregation, and agglomeration phenomena of aluminum particles have been inspected, as well as the flame asymmetry of burning agglomerates. Results reveals that the dependency of the mean and the maximum agglomeration diameter to the burning rate and the virgin aluminum size have the same trend. A second-time mergence of multiple agglomerates on the burning surface is unveiled. Two typical modes of second mergence are concluded, based upon vertical and level movement of agglomerates, respectively. The latter mode is found to be dominant and sometimes a combination of the two modes may occur. A new model of aluminum agglomeration on the burning surface of composite propellants is derived to predict the particulates size distribution with a low computational amount. The basic idea is inspired from the well-known pocket models. The pocket size of the region formed by adjacent AP particles is obtained through scanning electron microscopy of the propellant cross-section coupled to an image processing method. The second mergence mechanism, as well as the effect of the burning rate on the agglomeration processes, are included in the present model. The mergence of two agglomerates is prescribed to occur only if their separation distance is less than a critical value. The agglomerates size distribution resulting from this original model match reasonably with the experimental data. Moreover, the present model gives superior results for mean agglomeration diameter compared to common empirical and pocket models. The average prediction

  5. Spin Forming of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An exploratory effort between NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and SpinCraft, Inc., to experimentally spin form cylinders and concentric parts from small and thin sheets of aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (MMC), successfully yielded good microstructure data and forming parameters. MSFC and SpinCraft will collaborate on the recent technical findings and develop strategy to implement this technology for NASA's advanced propulsion and airframe applications such as pressure bulkheads, combustion liner assemblies, propellant tank domes, and nose cone assemblies.

  6. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: Waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H.

    2013-01-01

    described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating (14C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy......, the measurement uncertainties related to the two approaches were determined. Two flue gas sampling campaigns at a full-scale waste incinerator were included: one during normal operation and one with controlled waste input. Estimation of carbon contents in the main waste types received was included. Both the 14C...... method and the balance method represented promising methods able to provide good quality data for the ratio between biogenic and fossil carbon in waste. The relative uncertainty in the individual experiments was 7–10% (95% confidence interval) for the 14C method and slightly lower for the balance method....

  7. Influence of the chemical composition on the combustion properties of kraft black liquor; Mustalipeaen koostumuksen vaikutus lipeaen poltto-ominaisuuksiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alen, R.; Siistonen, H.; Malkavaara, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Inst. of Chemistry

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this work is to study the combustion properties of kraft black liquors from modified cooking. Both the industrial and laboratory-made black liquors are included. In addition, changes in the combustion properties of the spent liquors obtained by mixing prior to combustion different chlorine-free bleach liquors with black liquor are studied. (orig.)

  8. Process and quality verification controls for solid propellant manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that in-process tests to verify quality and detect discrepant propellant which could compromise motor performance are essential elements of the solid composite propellant manufacturing process. The successful performance of the 260SL-1 and 260SL-2 motors aptly verified the controls used for manufacturing the propellant. The present investigation is concerned with the selected control parameters, and their relationships to composition and final propellant properties. Control performance is evaluated by comparison with processing data experienced in the manufacture of the propellant for the 260SL-1 motor. It is found that the in-process quality verification controls utilized in the propellant manufacturing process for the 260-in. diameter motor contributed significantly to the confidence of successful and predictable motor performance.

  9. Temperatures and Species Concentration in Propellant Dark Zones via Fitting Infrared (IR) Spectral Absorption Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vanderhoff, J

    1997-01-01

    In a continuing investigation of the dark zone of double-base and nitramine propellants during self-sustained combustion, least-squares fitting has been developed and updated simulations of infrared (IR...

  10. Burning mechanism of aluminized solid rocket propellants based on energetic binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babuk, Valery A.; Dolotkazin, Ildar N.; Glebov, Andrey A. [Baltic State Technical University (BSTU), First Krasnoarmeyskaya Str. 1, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports results obtained from an experimental study of the combustion mechanism of aluminized propellants based on an energetic binder. The techniques used in this investigation include:. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Mobile propeller dynamometer validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mason Wade

    With growing interest in UAVs and OSU's interest in propeller performance and manufacturing, evaluating UAV propeller and propulsion system performance has become essential. In attempts to evaluate these propellers a mobile propeller dynamometer has been designed, built, and tested. The mobile dyno has been designed to be cost effective through the ability to load it into the back of a test vehicle to create simulated forward flight characteristics. This allows much larger propellers to be dynamically tested without the use of large and expensive wind tunnels. While evaluating the accuracy of the dyno, several improvements had to be made to get accurate results. The decisions made to design and improve the mobile propeller dyno will be discussed along with attempts to validate the dyno by comparing its results against known sources. Another large part of assuring the accuracy of the mobile dyno is determining if the test vehicle will influence the flow going into the propellers being tested. The flow into the propeller needs to be as smooth and uniform as possible. This is determined by characterizing the boundary layer and accelerated flow over the vehicle. This evaluation was accomplished with extensive vehicle aerodynamic measurements with the use of full-scale tests using a pitot-rake and the actual test vehicle. Additional tests were conducted in Oklahoma State University's low speed wind tunnel with a 1/8-scale model using qualitative flow visualization with smoke. Continuing research on the mobile dyno will be discussed, along with other potential uses for the dyno.

  12. Strobes: An Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341356034; van Lingen, J.N.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311441769; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073464708; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  13. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  14. JANNAF 35th Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor); Rognan, Melanie (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Volume 1, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 63 unclassified/unlimited distribution technical papers presented at the 35th meeting of the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Combustion Subcommittee (CS) held jointly with the 17th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) and Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS). The meeting was held on 7-11 December 1998 at Raytheon Systems Company and the Marriott Hotel, Tucson, AZ. Topics covered include solid gun propellant processing, ignition and combustion, charge concepts, barrel erosion and flash, gun interior ballistics, kinetics and molecular modeling, ETC gun modeling, simulation and diagnostics, and liquid gun propellant combustion; solid rocket motor propellant combustion, combustion instability fundamentals, motor instability, and measurement techniques; and liquid and hybrid rocket combustion.

  15. Stearic acid coating on circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes and its effect on the mechanical performance of polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nina; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lixian; Kang, Ming; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zheng, Rong

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work was to test circulating fluidized bed combustion fly ashes (CFAs) for its potential to be utilized in polymer composites manufacturing to improve its toughness. CFAs was coated by stearic acid and used in the composite of polypropylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/high density polyethylene (PP/EVA/HDPE) by molding process method. The resulting coated and uncoated CFAs were fully characterized by particle size analyzer, contact angles, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stearic acid coated onto the surface of CFAs particles in the physical and chemical ways, and the total clad ratio reached 2.05% by measuring TGA/DTA curve. The percentage of CFAs particles focused to a narrow range 2-4 μm and the median mean size was 3.2 μm more than uncoated CFAs. The properties of hydrophobic and dispersive of CFAs particles improved and original activity was reserved after stearic acid coating. The stearic acid was verified as a coupling agent by how much effect it had on the mechanical properties. It showed the elongation at break of PP/EVA/HDPE reinforced with 15 wt% coated CFAs (c-CFAs) was 80.20% and higher than that of the uncoated. The stearic acid treatment of CFAs is a very promising approach to improve the mechanical strength due to the incorporation of stearic acid on the CFAs surface, and hence, further enhances the potential for recycling CFAs as a suitable filler material in polymer composites.

  16. Contact diagnostics of combustion products of rocket engines, their units, and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, N. N.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    This article is devoted to a new block-module device used in the diagnostics of condensed combustion products of rocket engines during research and development with liquid-propellant rocket engines (Glushko NPO Energomash; engines RD-171, RD-180, and RD-191) and solid-propellant rocket motors. Soot samplings from the supersonic high-temperature jet of a high-power liquid-propellant rocket engine were taken by the given device for the first time in practice for closed-exhaust lines. A large quantity of significant results was also obtained during a combustion investigation of solid propellants within solid-propellant rocket motors.

  17. PARAMETER DESIGN PROPELLER KAPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available   Designer propeller kapal harus mempertimbangkan berbagai parameter untuk menghasilkan bentuk, type dan ukuran propeller yang memiliki nilai  efektifitas dan effisiensi propulsi tinggi. Propulsi kapal merupakan faktor yang mendominasi  operasional kapal, karena pemakaian bahan bakar untuk operasional propulsi kapal merupakan 42% dari total cost operasional kapal dan merupakan added value yang akan diperoleh oleh perusahaan pelayaran. Pertimbangan parameter desain propeller argonomis dapat mendukung tujuan di atas sehingga dapat menurunkan pemakaian bahan bakar hingga 20 % saat kapal dioperaionalkan.

  18. The influence of composition and final pyrolysis temperature variations on global kinetics of combustion of segregated municipal solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranoto; Himawanto, D. A.; Arifin, N. A.

    2017-04-01

    The combustion of segregated municipal solid waste (MSW) and the resulted char from the pyrolysis process were investigated in this research. The segregated MSW that was collected and used can be divided into organic and inorganic waste materials. The organic materials were bamboo and banana leaves and the inorganic materials were Styrofoam and snack wrappings. The composition ratio of the waste was based on the percentage of weight of each sample. The thermal behaviour of the segregated MSW was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis. For the pyrolysis process the prepared samples of 200gram were heated from ambient temperature until a variance of final pyrolysis temperature of 550°C, 650°C and 750°C at a constant heating rate of 25°C/min. It was found that the highest activation energy of the raw materials is achieved from sample CC1 (Char with 100% inorganic materials). The activation energy of the raw materials is relatively lower than that of the char. The higher the final pyrolysis temperature, the lower the calorific value of char. The calorific value gradually increases with the amount of inorganic materials.

  19. [Application of the capillary electrophoresis technique for the study of the products of explosion and combustion of mixed explosives and pyrotechnic compositions in the forensic medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, M V; Spiridonov, V A; Budnikov, V N; Petrosiants, T G

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe methods of cation-anion analysis of aqueous media by the capillary electrophoresis technique with reference to the detection of the products of explosion and combustion of mixed explosives and pyrotechnic compositions. The possibility to use the results thus obtained for the study of an explosion injury is discussed. Optimal conditions for the separation of chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, sulfide, chlorate, and perchlorate ions are determined. The efficiency of the proposed methods for the characteristic of the cation-anion composition of the aqueous medium to identify the products of explosion and combustion of mixed explosives and pyrotechnic compounds is exemplified by their application in the forensic medical practice. It is concluded that the above techniques can be used to study explosion injuries.

  20. Performance optimization of marine propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sup Lee

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a design method for increasing performance of the marine propellers including the WCT propeller is suggested. It is described to maximize the performance of the propeller by adjusting expanded areas of the propeller blade. Results show that efficiency can be increased up to over 2% through the suggested design method.

  1. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and moments which the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull.The first part of the text is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections (with and without cavitation......) and about wings. It then treats propellers in uniform flow, first via advanced actuator disc modelling, and then using lifting-line theory. Pragmatic guidance is given for design and evaluation of performance, including the use of computer modelling.The second part covers the development of unsteady forces...... arising from operation in non-uniform hull wakes. First, by a number of simplifications, various aspects of the problem are dealt with separately until the full problem of a non-cavitating, wide-bladed propeller in a wake is treated by a new and completely developed theory. Next, the complicated problem...

  2. Thermochemical of combustion products using thermodynamic properties obtained of statistical mechanics; Termoquimica dos produtos de combustao utilizando propriedades termodinamicas obtidas da mecanica estatistica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Carlos Alberto Rocha [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Aeronautica; Hinckel, Jose Nivaldo; Koreeda, Jorge [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle]. E-mail: carlosal@aer.ita.cta.br; hinckel@sigma.dem.inpe.br

    1997-07-01

    This work presents the results of an analytical model and a computer program to obtain thermochemical properties of combustion products in a liquid rocket motors, using the method of statistical mechanic to calculation thermodynamic properties of the species. The equations of statistical mechanics and the technique of minimizing of Gibbs free energy are used to calculate the thermochemical functions and the equilibrium chemical composition. These methods are applied to the calculation of equilibrium properties of the combustion products in liquid rocket motors for different propellant pairs, O/F ratios and chamber pressures. The results obtained from this method are compared to those of NASA SP-273. (author)

  3. NASA Teams With Army in Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This photograph depicts one of over thirty tests conducted on the Vortex Combustion Chamber Engine at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) test stand 115, a joint effort between NASA's MSFC and the U.S. Army AMCOM of Redstone Arsenal. The engine tests were conducted to evaluate an irnovative, 'self-cooled', vortex combustion chamber, which relies on tangentially injected propellants from the chamber wall producing centrifugal forces that keep the relatively cold liquid propellants near the wall.

  4. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  5. Combustion of metal agglomerates in a solid rocket core flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Filippo; Dossi, Stefano; DeLuca, Luigi T.

    2013-12-01

    The need for access to space may require the use of solid propellants. High thrust and density are appealing features for different applications, spanning from boosting phase to other service applications (separation, de-orbiting, orbit insertion). Aluminum is widely used as a fuel in composite solid rocket motors because metal oxidation increases enthalpy release in combustion chamber and grants higher specific impulse. Combustion process of metal particles is complex and involves aggregation, agglomeration and evolution of reacting particulate inside the core flow of the rocket. It is always stated that residence time should be enough in order to grant complete metal oxidation but agglomerate initial size, rocket grain geometry, burning rate, and other factors have to be reconsidered. New space missions may not require large rocket systems and metal combustion efficiency becomes potentially a key issue to understand whether solid propulsion embodies a viable solution or liquid/hybrid systems are better. A simple model for metal combustion is set up in this paper. Metal particles are represented as single drops trailed by the core flow and reacted according to Beckstead's model. The fluid dynamics is inviscid, incompressible, 1D. The paper presents parametric computations on ideal single-size particles as well as on experimental agglomerate populations as a function of operating rocket conditions and geometries.

  6. A comparative study of combustible cartridge case materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-tao Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Foamed combustible material based on polymer bonded RDX was fabricated using CO2 as foaming agent. The inner structures of felted and foamed combustible materials were presented by SEM. The two materials presented different formulations and inner porous structures. The combustion behaviors of felted and foamed materials were investigated by closed vessel test. Simultaneously, the co-combustion behavior of combustible cartridge case with 7-perf consolidated propellants was also investigated. The results of closed vessel test is applicable to gun system which is made of the foamed combustible material as component.

  7. Impact of Advanced Propeller Technology on Aircraft/Mission Characteristics of Several General Aviation Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of several General Aviation aircraft indicated that the application of advanced technologies to General Aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft by a significant amount. Propeller blade weight reductions achieved through the use of composites, propeller efficiency and noise improvements achieved through the use of advanced concepts and improved propeller analytical design methods result in aircraft with lower operating cost, acquisition cost and gross weight.

  8. JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This volume, the first of four volumes, is a collection of 33 unclassified/unlimited papers which were presented at the 33rd Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Combustion Subcommittee Meeting in conjunction with the Propulsion Systems Hazards at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. The JANNAF papers contained in this volume review airbreathing combustion measurement, performance and control; electrothermal-chemical gun experiment and modeling; liquid propellant gun experiment and modeling; solid propellant gun interior ballistics; formulation modeling and diagnostics, ignition, and gun barrel wear modeling, blast and flash; and ram, fastcore and gas generator gun propulsion concepts.

  9. Long-term firing tests of the nozzles of rocket engines made on the basis of carbon composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubertov, A. M.; Koshlakov, V. V.; Mironov, V. V.; Rubinskii, V. R.; Pashutov, A. V.; Antipov, Ye. A.; Bratukhin, N. A.; Volkov, N. N.; Volkova, L. I.; Tsatsuev, S. M.; Tlevtsezhev, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The results of the experimental investigation of the physico-chemical processes of interaction, destruction, and ablation of carbon composite materials and oxidation-protective coatings of nozzles of liquid-propellant rocket engines are presented. The thermally-stressed state of the joint between the nozzle made of composite material and the metallic combustion chamber of the rocket engine under standard operating conditions have been analyzed.

  10. Advanced propeller research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Bober, Lawrence J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results of aerodynamic and acoustic research on both single rotation and counterrotation propellers are reviewed. Data and analytical results are presented for three propellers: SR-7A, the single rotation design used in the NASA Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) flight program; CRP-X1, the initial 5+5 Hamilton Standard counterrotating design; and F7-A7, the 8+8 counterrotating G.E. design used in the proof of concept Unducted Fan (UDF) engine. In addition to propeller efficiencies, cruise and takeoff noise, and blade pressure data, off-design phenomena involving formation of leading edge vortexes are described. Aerodynamic and acoustic computational results derived from 3-D Euler and acoustic radiation codes are presented. Research on unsteady flows which are particularly important for understanding counterrotation interaction noise, unsteady loading effects on acoustics, and flutter or forced response is described. The first results of 3-D unsteady Euler solutions are illustrated for a single rotation propeller at angle of attack and for a counterrotation propeller. Basic experimental and theoretical results from studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of oscillating cascades are outlined.

  11. Large Eddy Simulations of Transverse Combustion Instability in a Multi-Element Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-27

    provided by the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program. References 1Harrje, D. and Reardon, F., “ Liquid Propellant Rocket Combustion ...Instability,” Tech. Rep. SP-194, NASA, 1972. 2Oefelein, J. and Yang, V., “Comprehensive review of liquid - propellant combustion instabilities in F-1 engines...plagued the development of liquid rocket engines and remains a large riskin the development and acquisition of new liquid rocket engines. Combustion

  12. Chemical composition and speciation of particulate organic matter from modern residential small-scale wood combustion appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Hendryk; Miersch, Toni; Orasche, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Sippula, Olli; Tissari, Jarkko; Michalke, Bernhard; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Streibel, Thorsten; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2018-01-15

    Combustion technologies of small-scale wood combustion appliances are continuously developed decrease emissions of various pollutants and increase energy conversion. One strategy to reduce emissions is the implementation of air staging technology in secondary air supply, which became an established technique for modern wood combustion appliances. On that account, emissions from a modern masonry heater fuelled with three types of common logwood (beech, birch and spruce) and a modern pellet boiler fuelled with commercial softwood pellets were investigated, which refer to representative combustion appliances in northern Europe In particular, emphasis was put on the organic constituents of PM2.5, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) and phenolic species, by targeted and non-targeted mass spectrometric analysis techniques. Compared to conventional wood stoves and pellet boilers, organic emissions from the modern appliances were reduced by at least one order of magnitude, but to a different extent for single species. Hence, characteristic ratios of emission constituents and emission profiles for wood combustion identification and speciation do not hold for this type of advanced combustion technology. Additionally, an overall substantial reduction of typical wood combustion markers, such as phenolic species and anhydrous sugars, were observed. Finally, it was found that slow ignition of log woods changes the distribution of characteristic resin acids and phytosterols as well as their thermal alteration products, which are used as markers for specific wood types. Our results should be considered for wood combustion identification in positive matrix factorisation or chemical mass balance in northern Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ballistic properties and burning behaviour of an ammonium perchlorate/guanidine nitrate/sodium nitrate airbag solid propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Ulas; G.A. Risha; K.K. Kuo [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-10-15

    An experimental investigation on the determination of ballistic properties and burning behavior of a composite solid propellant for airbag application was conducted. The experimental results were obtained using a high-pressure optical strand burner. Steady-state burning rates were determined for a pressure range of 20.8-41.5 MPa and initial propellant temperatures of -30 to +80{sup o}C. For the pressure and temperature ranges tested, the temperature sensitivity was on the order of 1 x 10{sup -3} K{sup -1}. The pressure exponent was found to be a function of the initial propellant temperature and was 0.75 at 25{sup o}C. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of the Arrhenius equation are 2.735 kcal/mol and 15.06 cm/s, respectively. The pressure deflagration limit for this propellant was found to be in the range of 8.37-8.72 MPa. During combustion, small condensed-phase spherical particles were ejected from the burning surface. The size of the particles decreased with either increasing the pressure or the initial propellant temperature. For pressures below 41.4 MPa, average particle size was on the order of 900 {mu}m, and at 84.4 MPa, the bead size was much smaller, on the order of 300 {mu}m. A chemical analysis on these particles using both the ESEM and the X-ray diffraction method indicated that the material of the beads was mostly sodium chloride with a small amount of silicon-containing compounds. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  14. Propeller TAP flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if a propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap can be used for breast reconstruction. Fifteen women were reconstructed using a propeller TAP flap, an implant, and an ADM. Preoperative colour Doppler ultrasonography was used for patient selection...... to identify the dominant perforator in all cases. A total of 16 TAP flaps were performed; 12 flaps were based on one perforator and four were based on two. A permanent silicone implant was used in 14 cases and an expander implant in two. Minor complications were registered in three patients. Two cases had...... major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  15. A MEMS-based solid propellant microthruster array for space and military applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaalane, A.; Chemam, R.; Houabes, M.; Yahiaoui, R.; Metatla, A.; Ouari, B.; Metatla, N.; Mahi, D.; Dkhissi, A.; Esteve, D.

    2015-12-01

    Since combustion is an easy way to achieve large quantities of energy from a small volume, we developed a MEMS based solid propellant microthruster array for small spacecraft and micro-air-vehicle applications. A thruster is composed of a fuel chamber layer, a top-side igniter with a micromachined nozzle in the same silicon layer. Layers are assembled by adhesive bonding to give final MEMS array. The thrust force is generated by the combustion of propellant stored in a few millimeter cube chamber. The micro-igniter is a polysilicon resistor deposited on a low stress SiO2/SiNx thin membrane to ensure a good heat transfer to the propellant and thus a low electric power consumption. A large range of thrust force is obtained simply by varying chamber and nozzle geometry parameters in one step of Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE). Experimental tests of ignition and combustion employing home made (DB+x%BP) propellant composed of a DoubleBase and Black-Powder. A temperature of 250 °C, enough to propellant initiation, is reached for 40 mW of electric power. A combustion rate of about 3.4 mm/s is measured for DB+20%BP propellant and thrust ranges between 0.1 and 3,5 mN are obtained for BP ratio between 10% and 30% using a microthruster of 100 μm of throat wide.

  16. Computational survey of representative energetic materials as propellants for microthruster applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Brian; Stec, Daniel, III

    2007-04-01

    Microthrusters are critical for the development of terrestrial micromissiles and nano air vehicles for reconnaissance, surveillance, and sensor emplacement. With the maturation of MEMS manufacturing technology, the physical components of the thrusters can be readily fabricated. The thruster type that is the most straightforward is chemical combustion of a propellant that is ignited by a heating element giving a single shot thrust. Arrays of MEMS manufactured thrusters can be ganged to give multiple firings. The basic model for such a system is a solid rocket motor. The desired elements for the propellant of a chemical thruster are high specific impulse (I sp), high temperature and pressure, and low molecular weight combustion gases. Since the combustion chamber of a microthruster is extremely small, the propellant material must be able to ignite, sustain and complete its burn inside the chamber. The propellant can be either a solid or a liquid. There are a large number of energetic materials available as candidates for a propellant for microthrusters. There has been no systematic evaluation of the available energetic materials as propellant candidates for microthrusters. This report summarizes computations done on a series of energetic materials to address their suitabilities as microthruster propellants.

  17. Evaluation and Improvement of Liquid Propellant Rocket Chugging Analysis Techniques. Part 1: A One-Dimensional Analysis of Low Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fuel Preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Final Report M.S. Thesis - Aug. 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kair Chuan

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency combustion instability, known as chugging, is consistently experienced during shutdown in the fuel and oxidizer preburners of the Space Shuttle Main Engines. Such problems always occur during the helium purge of the residual oxidizer from the preburner manifolds during the shutdown sequence. Possible causes and triggering mechanisms are analyzed and details in modeling the fuel preburner chug are presented. A linearized chugging model, based on the foundation of previous models, capable of predicting the chug occurrence is discussed and the predicted results are presented and compared to experimental work performed by NASA. Sensitivity parameters such as chamber pressure, fuel and oxidizer temperatures, and the effective bulk modulus of the liquid oxidizer are considered in analyzing the fuel preburner chug. The computer program CHUGTEST is utilized to generate the stability boundary for each sensitivity study and the region for stable operation is identified.

  18. Sandia Combustion Research Program: Annual report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents research results of the past year, divided thematically into some ten categories. Publications and presentations arising from this work are included in the appendix. Our highlighted accomplishment of the year is the announcement of the discovery and demonstration of the RAPRENOx process. This new mechanism for the elimination of nitrogen oxides from essentially all kinds of combustion exhausts shows promise for commercialization, and may eventually make a significant contribution to our nation's ability to control smog and acid rain. The sections of this volume describe the facility's laser and computer system, laser diagnostics of flames, combustion chemistry, reacting flows, liquid and solid propellant combustion, mathematical models of combustion, high-temperature material interfaces, studies of engine/furnace combustion, coal combustion, and the means of encouraging technology transfer. 182 refs., 170 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  20. Propeller torque load and propeller shaft torque response correlation during ice-propeller interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polić, Dražen; Ehlers, Sören; Æsøy, Vilmar

    2017-03-01

    Ships use propulsion machinery systems to create directional thrust. Sailing in ice-covered waters involves the breaking of ice pieces and their submergence as the ship hull advances. Sometimes, submerged ice pieces interact with the propeller and cause irregular fluctuations of the torque load. As a result, the propeller and engine dynamics become imbalanced, and energy propagates through the propulsion machinery system until equilibrium is reached. In such imbalanced situations, the measured propeller shaft torque response is not equal to the propeller torque. Therefore, in this work, the overall system response is simulated under the ice-related torque load using the Bond graph model. The energy difference between the propeller and propeller shaft is estimated and related to their corresponding mechanical energy. Additionally, the mechanical energy is distributed among modes. Based on the distribution, kinetic and potential energy are important for the correlation between propeller torque and propeller shaft response.

  1. Theoretical performance of JP-4 fuel with a 70-30 mixture of fluorine and oxygen as a rocket propellant : equilibrium composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sanford; Huff, Vearl N

    1956-01-01

    Data were calculated for equivalence ratios of 1 to 4, chamber pressures of 300 and 600 pounds per square inch absolute, and pressure ratios of 1 to 1500. Parameters included are specific impulse, combustion and exit temperatures, molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust, ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area, specific heat at constant pressure, isentropic exponent, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. A correlation is given which permits determination of performance for a wide range of chamber pressures. A method for obtaining specific impulse of JP-4 fuel with OF2 and O3-F2 mixtures is given.

  2. Hull-Propeller Interaction and Its Effect on Propeller Cavitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regener, Pelle Bo

    , which presumably does not reflect the differences between the propellers sufficiently. Obtaining effective wake fields using the hybrid RANS-BEM approach at model and full scale also provides the opportunity to investigate the behind-ship cavitation performance of propellers with comparably low...... computational effort. The boundary element method for propeller analysis includes a partially nonlinear cavitation model, which is able to predict partial sheet cavitation and supercavitation. The cavitation behaviour of the conventional propeller and the Kappel propeller from the earlier simulations...... a major effect on propeller cavitation, signifying the importance of using the correct inflow, i.e. the effective wake field when evaluating propeller cavitation performance....

  3. Smoldering Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Rein, G

    2016-01-01

    Smoldering combustion is the slow, low temperature, flameless burning of porous fuels and is the most persistent type of combustion phenomena. It is especially common in porous fuels which form a char on heating, like cellulosic insulation, polyurethane foam or peat. Smoldering combustion is among the leading causes of residential fires, and it is a source of safety concerns in industrial premises as well as in commercial and space flights. Smoldering is also the dominant combustion phenomena...

  4. Combustion Synthesis of Nanoparticulate LiMgxMn1-xPO4 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2) Carbon Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M; Chen, Jiajun; Conry, Thomas E.; Wang, Ruigang; Wilcox, James; Aumentado, Albert

    2009-12-14

    A combustion synthesis technique was used to prepare nanoparticulate LiMgxMn1-xPO4 (x=0, 0.1,0.2)/carbon composites. Powders consisted of carbon-coated particles about 30 nm in diameter, which were partly agglomerated into larger secondary particles. The utilization of the active materials in lithium cells depended most strongly upon the post-treatment and the Mg content, and was not influenced by the amount of carbon. Best results were achieved with a hydrothermally treated LiMg0.2Mn0.8PO4/C composite, which exhibited close to 50percent utilization of the theoretical capacity at a C/2 discharge rate.

  5. Self-Propagating Combustion Triggered Synthesis of 3D Lamellar Graphene/BaFe12O19 Composite and Its Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tingkai; Ji, Xianglin; Jin, Wenbo; Yang, Wenbo; Peng, Xiarong; Duan, Shichang; Dang, Alei; Li, Hao; Li, Tiehu

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of 3D lamellar graphene/BaFe12O19 composites was performed by oxidizing graphite and sequentially self-propagating combustion triggered process. The 3D lamellar graphene structures were formed due to the synergistic effect of the tremendous heat induced gasification as well as huge volume expansion. The 3D lamellar graphene/BaFe12O19 composites bearing 30 wt % graphene present the reflection loss peak at −27.23 dB as well as the frequency bandwidth at 2.28 GHz (graphene structures could consume the incident waves through multiple reflection and scattering within the layered structures, prolonging the propagation path of electromagnetic waves in the absorbers. PMID:28336889

  6. N-doped P25 TiO2-amorphous Al2O3 composites: one-step solution combustion preparation and enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fa-tang; Zhao, Ye; Hao, Ying-juan; Wang, Xiao-jing; Liu, Rui-hong; Zhao, Di-shun; Chen, Dai-mei

    2012-11-15

    Nitrogen-doped Degussa P25 TiO2-amorphous Al2O3 composites were prepared via facile solution combustion. The composites were characterised using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis light-diffusion reflectance spectrometry (DRS), zeta-potential measurements, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The DRS results showed that TiO2 and amorphous Al2O3 exhibited absorption in the UV region. However, the Al2O3/TiO2 composite exhibited visible-light absorption, which was attributed to N-doping during high-temperature combustion and to alterations in the electronic structure of Ti species induced by the addition of Al. The optimal molar ratio of TiO2 to Al2O3 was 1.5:1, and this composite exhibited a large specific surface area of 152 m2/g, surface positive charges, and enhanced photocatalytic activity. These characteristics enhanced the degradation rate of anionic methylene orange, which was 43.6 times greater than that of pure P25 TiO2. The high visible-light photocatalytic activity was attributed to synthetic effects between amorphous Al2O3 and TiO2, low recombination efficiency of photo-excited electrons and holes, N-doping, and a large specific surface area. Experiments that involved radical scavengers indicated that OH and O2- were the main reactive species. A potential photocatalytic mechanism was also proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spray combustion stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Jeng, S. M.; Litchford, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    The central purpose of this project is the improvement of liquid-fueled rocket motor design technology in order to assist the establishment of economical commercial access to space through the development of engines with enhanced performance and reliability. Specific research effort in the project is focused on spray physics and associated combustion instability phenomena. Results garnered from this work will contribute to the development of new computational tools for design of stable liquid propellant rocket engines. The specific objectives of the research effort include identifying and evaluating physical submodels which pertain to spray combustion stability with the idea of enhancing or refining existing submodels with a more comprehensive approach. In particular, any refinements to the spray combustion physical submodels which are achieved during the project will be channeled back to Rocketdyne for incorporation in their ARICC liquid rocket combustor code as second generation improvements. Also, as the ARICC code forms the basis or future CFD development, some effort is devoted to an evaluation of the code's capability for modeling oscillating pressure waves within the combustor.

  8. Direct numerical simulations of ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture with temperature and composition inhomogeneities relevant to HCCI and SCCI combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Luong, Minh Bau

    2015-12-01

    The effects of temperature and composition stratifications on the ignition of a lean n-heptane/air mixture at three initial mean temperatures under elevated pressure are investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNSs) with a 58-species reduced mechanism. Two-dimensional DNSs are performed by varying several key parameters: initial mean temperature, T0, and the variance of temperature and equivalence ratio (T\\' and φ\\') with different T-φcorrelations. It is found that for cases with φ\\' only, the overall combustion occurs more quickly and the mean heat release rate (HRR) increases more slowly with increasing φ\\' regardless of T0. For cases with T\\' only, however, the overall combustion is retarded/advanced in time with increasing T\\' for low/high T0 relative to the negative-temperature coefficient (NTC) regime resulting from a longer/shorter overall ignition delay of the mixture. For cases with uncorrelated T-φfields, the mean HRR is more distributed over time compared to the corresponding cases with T\\' or φ\\' only. For negatively-correlated cases, however, the temporal evolution of the overall combustion exhibits quite non-monotonic behavior with increasing T\\' and φ\\' depending on T0. All of these characteristics are found to be primarily related to the 0-D ignition delays of initial mixtures, the relative timescales between 0-D ignition delay and turbulence, and the dominance of the deflagration mode during the ignition. These results suggest that an appropriate combination of T\\' and φ\\' together with a well-prepared T-φdistribution can alleviate an excessive pressure-rise rate (PRR) and control ignition-timing in homogeneous charge compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion. In addition, critical species and reactions for the ignition of n-heptane/air mixture through the whole ignition process are estimated by comparing the temporal evolution of the mean mass fractions of important species with the overall reaction pathways of n

  9. Round Robin Tests to Determine Fiber Content of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites by Combustion and Thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Funabashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To propose methods to determine the fiber content of carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP for the International Organization for Standardization, the fiber contents of CFRP with polyamide-6 were measured using a combustion method based on ISO 14127 and a thermogravimetry method based on the modified ISO 9924-3 under a round robin test managed by the Polymer Subcommittee of the Industrial Technology Cooperative Promotion Committee in Japan. In the combustion method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~0.3 g were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after burning (ISO 14127. The fiber contents in weight of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 55.720%, 61.088%, or 65.326%, respectively, by 17 research institutes. In the thermogravimetry method, the fiber contents of the CFRTP (~10 mg were determined by the mass of carbon fiber remaining after heating it to 600°C in nitrogen gas using thermogravimetry apparatus (modified ISO 9924-3. The fiber contents of the CFRTP with 8, 9, or 10 plies were determined to be 56.908%, 61.579%, or 64.819%, respectively, by 8 research institutes. It was confirmed that thermogravimetry method was as accurate as the combustion method based on ISO 14127.

  10. Influence of Environmentally Friendly and High-Efficiency Composite Additives on Pulverized Coal Combustion in Cement Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 4 kinds of chemical reagents and 3 kinds of industrial wastes were selected as burning additives for 2 kinds of coals in cement industry. The work focused on the replacement of partial chemical reagents by industrial wastes, which not only reduced the cost and took full advantage of industrial wastes, but also guaranteed the high combustion efficiency and removed the NOX and SO2 simultaneously. The experiments were carried out in DTF. The combustion residues were analyzed by SEM and XRD. The results showed that the burnout rate was increased after adding the additives; meanwhile, the NOX and SO2 release concentration were reduced, but the degree of action varied for different additives and coals. The substitute of chemical reagents by industrial wastes was very effective; overall, the cold-rolled iron oxide worked better than others; the particles surface was tougher and the peaks of crystalline phase were lower than raw coal, which indicated that the additives played good roles in combustion process.

  11. Altered combustion characteristics of metallized energetics due to stable secondary material inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brandon C.

    (spherical or flake); metal type (Al or Al-Si); and whether the inclusion material is interacting or non-interacting with the parent metal. It was found that mechanically activated particles with an interacting inclusion material (polytetrafluoroethylene) and smaller particle sizes yielded increased blast wave strength, and more complete metal combustion. It was also found that orientation of the detonation train has a substantial effect on the completeness of combustion. While aluminum alloys are generally employed for their structural and mechanical properties, the low-level inclusion of secondary metals and metalloids may make such materials advantageous in propellant formulations and have not been fully considered. The aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) eutectic alloy was evaluated as a potential solid composite propellant fuel. Equilibrium calculations showed that Al-Si based propellants had comparable theoretical performance to equivalent aluminum based propellants, though at a typical specific impulse (ISP) reduction of roughly 2.5 seconds for most mixture ratios of interest. Interacting (polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) and non-interacting inclusion materials were mechanically activated (MA) with Al-Si (70/30 wt.% Al-Si/PTFE and 90/10 wt.% Al-Si/LDPE), which were shown to increase the powder reactivity. Neat and MA Al-Si powders were used in 15/71/14 wt.% (fuel additive)/(ammonium perchlorate)/binder propellant formulations. Environmentally cleaner solid composite propellants have been widely investigated as a means to reduce hydrochloric acid (HCl) formation. Past efforts to scavenge the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., salt). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced theoretical specific impulse. Thermochemical

  12. Biodegradation of nitroglycerin from propellant residues on military training ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Drouin, Mathieu; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is often present in soils and sometimes in pore water at antitank firing positions due to incomplete combustion of propellants. Various degradation processes can contribute to the natural attenuation of NG in soils and pore water, thus reducing the risks of groundwater contamination. However, until now these processes have been sparsely documented. This study aimed at evaluating the ability of microorganisms from a legacy firing position to degrade dissolved NG, as well as NG trapped within propellant particles. Results from the shake-flask experiments showed that the isolated culture is capable of degrading dissolved NG but not the nitrocellulose matrix of propellant particles, so that the deeply embedded NG molecules cannot be degraded. Furthermore, the results from column experiments showed that in a nutrient-poor sand, degradation of dissolved NG may not be sufficiently rapid to prevent groundwater contamination. Therefore, the results from this study indicate that, under favorable soil conditions, biodegradation can be an important natural attenuation process for NG dissolving out of fresh propellant residues. In contrast, biodegradation does not contribute to the long-term attenuation of NG within old, weathered propellant residues. Although NG in these old residues no longer poses a threat to groundwater quality, if soil clean-up of a legacy site is required, active remediation approaches should be sought. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Computational Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  14. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  15. 38th JANNAF Combustion Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ronald S. (Editor); Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor); Gannaway, Mary T. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes, is a collection of 55 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 38th Combustion Subcommittee (CS), 26 th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), 20th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS), and 21 Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee. The meeting was held 8-12 April 2002 at the Bayside Inn at The Sandestin Golf & Beach Resort and Eglin Air Force Base, Destin, Florida. Topics cover five major technology areas including: 1) Combustion - Propellant Combustion, Ingredient Kinetics, Metal Combustion, Decomposition Processes and Material Characterization, Rocket Motor Combustion, and Liquid & Hybrid Combustion; 2) Liquid Rocket Engines - Low Cost Hydrocarbon Liquid Rocket Engines, Liquid Propulsion Turbines, Liquid Propulsion Pumps, and Staged Combustion Injector Technology; 3) Modeling & Simulation - Development of Multi- Disciplinary RBCC Modeling, Gun Modeling, and Computational Modeling for Liquid Propellant Combustion; 4) Guns Gun Propelling Charge Design, and ETC Gun Propulsion; and 5) Airbreathing - Scramjet an Ramjet- S&T Program Overviews.

  16. The structure and chemical composition of combustion aerosols formed in internal combustion engine. Final report; Polttomoottorissa syntyvien palamisaerosolien rakenne ja kemiallinen koostumus. Loppuraportti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalander, T.; Leskinen, A.; Ruotsalainen, I.; Raunemaa, T.; Rantanen, L.; Mikkonen, S.

    1998-07-01

    In this investigation, the dependence of total particle emissions, particle size distribution, organic (QC) and elemental (EC) carbon content, volatility of particles and photoionisation response due to PAH compounds on driving rate, engine load and fuel composition were measured. A new 1997 diesel car equipped with a direct injection, turbo charged engine and oxidation catalyst, and an old 1988 diesel car with a swirl chamber, indirect injection engine were applied for tests. The diesel fuels tested were reformulated diesel fuel (Neste Citydiesel, DIKC), and an EN 590 fuel, both of summer grade. For spark ignition engine tests, a 1989 non-catalyst, carburettor engine car was applied. The gasolines tested were reformulated gasoline (95ER) and non-reformulated EN228 gasoline. The test runs were performed in a chassis dynamometer at Neste Engine Laboratory using constant loads of 3.5 and 10 kW at constant driving rate of 50 km/h, and loads of 10 and 20 kW at 80 km/h, all at 4th gear. Additionally, photoionisation measurements were performed in ECE+EUDC driving cycles. Exhaust gas was diluted in dilution tunnel. Exhaust particles were collected on quartz fiber, teflon and teflon impregnated glass fiber filters for gravimetric and chemical analysis. Organic and elemental carbon were analysed by thermal-optical method from quartz filters. Additionally, trace elements and Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions were analysed from teflon and glass fiber filters. Diesel particle size distributions were measured by SMPS-analyzer in the range of 10 to 480 nm, spark ignition engine exhaust particles in the range of 5 to 190 nm. The size change due to volatility of organic material on diesel particles was determined by Tandem-DMA analyzer equipped with an evaporator (thermal desorption unit) and on spark ignition engine particles with an evaporator and SMPS. The reformulated diesel fuel produced 10 to 40 % less particles than EN590 fuel

  17. Low-Cost, High-Performance Combustion Chamber for LOX/CH4 Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet will design and fabricate a lightweight, high temperature 5-lbf combustion chamber for use with cryogenic liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4) propellant that...

  18. A Film Cooling Model for a RP-1/GOX Staged Combustion Liquid Rocket Engine (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haberlen, Philip A; Greisen, Daniel A; Anderson, William E

    2007-01-01

    .... An existing film cooling model was modified and applied to these experimental results. The resultant model predicted combustion chamber adiabatic wall temperature profiles for input propellant flow conditions and chamber geometry...

  19. Nano-aluminum as energetic material for rocket propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meda, L. [Istituto G. Donegani, Polimeri Europa, 28100 Novara (Italy)], E-mail: laura.meda@polimerieuropa.com; Marra, G. [Istituto G. Donegani, Polimeri Europa, 28100 Novara (Italy); Galfetti, L.; Severini, F.; De Luca, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Solid Propulsion Laboratory (SP Lab), 20158 Milano (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    A characterization of differently sized aluminum powders, by using BET (specific surface measurements), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), was performed in order to evaluate their performance in solid propellant. These aluminum powders were used in manufacturing composite rocket propellants, that are based on Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and Hydroxyl-Terminated-PolyButadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was AP/HTPB/Al with 68/17/15 mass fractions, respectively. The ballistic characterization of studied propellants, made in terms of steady burning rates, showed how better is the performance of nano-aluminized compared to micro-aluminized propellants. Measurements of Al powder ignition time and temperature were also carried out.

  20. Closed-cycle liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper presents experience gained by SSSPE TRUD in development of NK-33, NK-43, NK-39, and NK-31 liquid propellant rocket engines, which are reusable, closed-cycle type, working on liquid oxygen and kerosene. Results are presented showing the engine structure efficiency, configuration rationality, and optimal thrust values which provide the following specific parameters: specific vacuum impulses in the range 331-353 s (for NK-33 and NK-31 engines, respectively) and specific weight of about 8 kg/tf (NK-33 and NK-43 engines). The problems which occurred during engine development and the study of the main components of these engines are discussed. The important technical data, materials, methodology, and bench development data are presented for the gas generator, turbopump assembly, combustion chamber and full-scale engines.

  1. Numerical study of flow, combustion and emissions characteristics in a 625 MWe tangentially fired boiler with composition of coal 70% LRC and 30% MRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'adiyah, Devy; Bangga, Galih; Widodo, Wawan; Ikhwan, Nur

    2017-08-01

    Tangential fired boiler is one of the methods that can produce more complete combustion. This method applied in Suralaya Power Plant, Indonesia. However, the boiler where supposed to use low rank coal (LRC), but at a given time must be mixed with medium rank coal (MRC) from another unit because of lack of LRC coal. Accordingly to the situation, the study about choosing the right position of LRC and MRC in the burner elevation must be investigated. The composition of coal is 70%LRC / 30%MRC where MRC will be placed at the lower (A & C - Case I)) or higher (E & G - Case II) elevation as the cases in this study. The study is carried out using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The simulation with original case (100%LRC) has a good agreement with the measurement data. As the results, MRC is more recommended at the burner elevation A & C rather than burner elevation E & G because it has closer temperature (880 K) compared with 100%LRC and has smaller local heating area between upper side wall and front wall with the range of temperature 1900 - 2000 K. For emissions, case I has smaller NOx and higher CO2 with 104 ppm and 15,6%. Moreover, it has samller O2 residue with 5,8% due to more complete combustion.

  2. Performance and Stability Analyses of Rocket Thrust Chambers with Oxygen/Methane Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, James R.; Jones, Gregg W.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for future in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in flight-qualified engine systems developed by NASA, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. As part of activities for the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project funded under the Exploration Technology Development Program, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been evaluating capability to model combustion performance and stability for oxygen and methane propellants. This activity has been proceeding for about two years and this paper is a summary of results to date. Hot-fire test results of oxygen/methane propellant rocket engine combustion devices for the modeling investigations have come from several sources, including multi-element injector tests with gaseous methane from the 1980s, single element tests with gaseous methane funded through the Constellation University Institutes Program, and multi-element injector tests with both gaseous and liquid methane conducted at the NASA MSFC funded by PCAD. For the latter, test results of both impinging and coaxial element injectors using liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants are included. Configurations were modeled with two one-dimensional liquid rocket combustion analysis codes, the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis code and the Coaxial Injector Combustion Model. Special effort was focused on how these codes can be used to model combustion and performance with oxygen/methane propellants a priori, and what anchoring or calibrating features need to be applied, improved or developed in the future. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred, with frequencies ranging from 150 to 250 Hz, with several multi-element injectors with liquid/liquid propellants, and was modeled using

  3. Development of a novel hydroxyl ammonium nitrate based liquid propellant for air-independent propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Joseph Henry

    The focus of this dissertation is the development of an Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUV) liquid propellant employing Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate (HAN) as the oxidizer. Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate is a highly acidic aqueous based liquid oxidizer. Therefore, in order to achieve efficient combustion of a propellant using this oxidizer, the fuel must be highly water soluble and compatible with the oxidizer to prevent a premature ignition prior to being heated within the combustion chamber. An extensive search of the fuel to be used with this oxidizer was conducted. Propylene glycol was chosen as the fuel for this propellant, and the propellant given the name RF-402. The propellant development process will first evaluate the propellants thermal stability and kinetic parameters using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The purpose of the thermal stability analysis is to determine the temperature at which the propellant decomposition begins for the future safe handling of the propellant and the optimization of the combustion chamber. Additionally, the thermogram results will provide information regarding any undesirable endotherms prior to the decomposition and whether or not the decomposition process is a multi-step process. The Arrhenius type kinetic parameters will be determined using the ASTM method for thermally unstable materials. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor of the propellant will be determined by evaluating the decomposition peak temperature over a temperature scan rate ranging from 1°C per minute to 10°C per minute. The kinetic parameters of the propellant will be compared to those of 81 wt% HAN to determine if the HAN decomposition is controlling the overall decomposition of the propellant RF-402. The lifetime of individual droplets will be analyzed using both experimental and theoretical techniques. The theoretical technique will involve modeling the lifetime of an individual droplet in a combustion chamber like operating environment

  4. Application and Comparison of Different Combustion Models of High Pressure LO X /CH 4 Jet Flames

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi; Aldebara Sciolti; Antonio Ficarella

    2014-01-01

    The present work focuses on the numerical modeling of combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Pressure and temperature are well above thermodynamic critical points of both the propellants and then the reactants show liquid-like characteristics of density and gas-like characteristics for diffusivity. The aim of the work is an efficient numerical description of the phenomena and RANS simulations were performed for this purpose. Hence, in the present work different kinetics, combustion m...

  5. Application and Comparison of Different Combustion Models of High Pressure LOX/CH4 Jet Flames

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgi, Maria De; Sciolti, Aldebara; Ficarella, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The present work focuses on the numerical modeling of combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Pressure and temperature are well above thermodynamic critical points of both the propellants and then the reactants show liquid-like characteristics of density and gas-like characteristics for diffusivity. The aim of the work is an efficient numerical description of the phenomena and RANS simulations were performed for this purpose. Hence, in the present work different kinetics, combustion ...

  6. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  7. Regarding the perturbed operating process of DB propellant rocket motor at extreme initial grain temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan ION

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite many decades of study, the combustion instability of several DB propellants is still of particular concern, especially at extreme grain temperature conditions of rocket motor operating. The purpose of the first part of the paper is to give an overview of our main experimental results on combustion instabilities and pressure oscillations in DB propellant segmented grain rocket motors (SPRM-01, large L/D ratio, working at extreme initial grain temperatures. Thus, we recorded some particular pressure-time traces with significant perturbed pressure signal that was FFT analysed. An updated mathematical model incorporating transient frequency-dependent combustion response, in conjunction with pressure-dependent burning, is applied to investigate and predict the DB propellant combustion instability phenomenon. The susceptibility of the tested motor SPRM-01 with DB propellant to get a perturbed working and to go unstable with pressure was evidenced and this risk has to be evaluated. In the last part of our paper we evaluated the influence of recorded perturbed thrust on the rocket behaviour on the trajectory. The study revealed that at firing-table initial conditions, this kind of perturbed motor operating may not lead to an unstable rocket flight, but the ballistic parameters would be influenced in an unacceptable manner.

  8. Chemical composition and structure of the shell of fly ash non-perforated cenospheres produced from the combustion of the Kuznetsk coal (Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.N. Anshits; O.A. Mikhailova; A.N. Salanov; A.G. Anshits [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

    2010-08-15

    The relationship between the composition and structure of the shell of low-density non-perforated cenospheres of fly ashes from the combustion of coal from the Kuznetsk Basin (Russia) at temperatures of 1500 and 1650{sup o}C has been investigated. Narrow fractions of cenospheres of constant composition have been separated from concentrates with the use of the technological scheme including stages of hydrodynamic gravitational separation, grain-size classification, and magnetic separation. It has been established that the concentrations of the major components of the chemical composition of the products obtained are related by linear regression equations. The shell structure has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy. It has been revealed that the outer and inner surfaces of globules are covered by a film with a thickness of 30-50 nm. The surface of magnetic cenospheres contains heterogeneous regions with extended linear ferrospinel aggregates of crystallites with sizes ranging from 50 to 1000 nm. It has been shown that the size of globules and the thickness and porosity of the shell in each series depend on the composition of the melt from which they are formed and on its viscosity. Nonmagnetic cenospheres are formed from the high-silica K-Al-Si melt with the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio varying over a wide range (1.6-3.6). Narrow fractions of magnetic cenospheres formed at low temperatures (1500{sup o}C) are characterized by nearly constant SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios. Globules of this type are formed from two immiscible high-silica K-Al-Si and Fe-Al-Si melts. 38 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Realization of a Solid-Propellant based Microthruster Using Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya THAKUR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of micro-spacecrafts in the space industry has led to the development of various micro-propulsion techniques. Microthrusters are micropropulsion devices used in a microspacecraft for precise station keeping, orbit adjustment, attitude control, drag compensation and apogee kicking. The principle of operation of a solid propellant thruster is based on the combustion of a solid energetic material stored in a microfabricated chamber. In the current work, Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC technology has been used for the realization of a solid propellant based microthruster structure. Hydroxyl Terminated Poly-Butadiene/Ammonium Perchlorate (HTPB/AP is used as the propellant. It is shown that geometric and dimensional variations in design, depending on the application requirements, can be easily implemented. Preliminary testing for micro-combustion has been done to verify the basic operation of the microthruster. A thrust value of 19.5 mN has been measured.

  10. Ignition models and simulation of solid propellant of thermodynamic undersea vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Qian, Zhi-Bo; Yang, Jie; Yan, Ping

    2007-06-01

    The starting characteristics of thermodynamic undersea vehicle systems are determined by the geometry, size and combustion area of solid propellants, which directly effect liquid propellant pipeline design. It is necessary to establish accurate burning models for solid propellants. Based on combustion models using powder rings and two different solid ignition grains, namely star-shaped ignition grains and stuffed ignition grains, a mathematic model of the ignition process of the propulsion system was built. With the help of Matlab, a series of calculations were made to determine the effects of different grains on ignition characteristics. The results show that stuffed ignition grain is best suited to be the ignition grain of a thermodynamic undersea vehicle system.

  11. Robust Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon Using NTR LANTR Propulsion and Lunar-Derived Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Ryan, Stephen W.; Burke, Laura M.; McCurdy, David R.; Fittje, James E.; Joyner, Claude R.

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been identified as a key space asset required for the human exploration of Mars. This proven technology can also provide the affordable access through cislunar space necessary for commercial development and sustained human presence on the Moon. In his post-Apollo Integrated Space Program Plan (1970-1990), Wernher von Braun, proposed a reusable nuclear thermal propulsion stage (NTPS) to deliver cargo and crew to the Moon to establish a lunar base before undertaking human missions to Mars. The NTR option was selected by von Braun because it was a demonstrated technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp 900 s) twice that of todays best chemical rockets. In NASAs Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the crewed Mars transfer vehicle used three 25 klbf Pewee engines the smallest and highest performing engine tested in the Rover program along with graphite composite fuel. Smaller, lunar transfer vehicles consisting of a NTPS using three approximately 16.5 klbf Small Nuclear Rocket Engines (SNREs), an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload can enable a variety of reusable lunar missions. These include cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. Even weeklong tourism missions carrying passengers into lunar orbit for a day of sightseeing and picture taking are possible. The NTR can play an important role in the next phase of lunar exploration and development by providing an affordable in-space lunar transportation system (LTS) that can allow initial outposts to evolve into settlements supported by a variety of commercial activities such as in-situ propellant production used to supply strategically located propellant depots and transportation nodes. The utilization of iron-rich volcanic glass or lunar polar ice (LPI) deposits (each estimated at billions of metric tons) for propellant production can significantly reduce the launch mass requirements from Earth and can

  12. Combustion Product Evaluation of Various Charge Sizes and Propellant Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    benzaldehyde , and hexanaldehyde; (3) Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons: pheranthrene, anthracene, pyrene, benz-a-anthracene, chrysene, benz-b...fluoranthene, benz-k-fluor nthene, benz-a-pyrene, and benz-ghi-perylene; and (4) selected volatile organics: benzene acrylonitrile, ethylbenzene, toluene ...isobutyl aldehyde, benzaldehyde , and hexanaldehyde; (3) polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons: phenanthrene, anthra- cene, pyrene, benz-a-anthracene, chrysene

  13. Modeling of Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Solid Propellant Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    techniques required to deal with such discontinuities are discussed in Sections 2.5 and 6.4. Ihe inclusion of end burning effects does not require any...provide a vent time of approximately 20% of the period of the fundamento acoustic mode of the chamber. By varying the design of the pulser, it is possible

  14. Zinc isotopic composition of particulate matter generated during the combustion of coal and coal + tire-derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, D.M.; Gieré, R.; Ren, M.; Landa, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric Zn emissions from the burning of coal and tire-derived fuel (TDF) for power generation can be considerable. In an effort to lay the foundation for tracking these contributions, we evaluated the Zn isotopes of coal, a mixture of 95 wt % coal + 5 wt % TDF, and the particulate matter (PM) derived from their combustion in a power-generating plant. The average Zn concentrations and δ(66)Zn were 36 mg/kg and 183 mg/kg and +0.24‰ and +0.13‰ for the coal and coal + TDF, respectively. The δ(66)Zn of the PM sequestered in the cyclone-type mechanical separator was the lightest measured, -0.48‰ for coal and -0.81‰ for coal+TDF. The δ(66)Zn of the PM from the electrostatic precipitator showed a slight enrichment in the heavier Zn isotopes relative to the starting material. PM collected from the stack had the heaviest δ(66)Zn in the system, +0.63‰ and +0.50‰ for the coal and coal + TDF, respectively. Initial fractionation during the generation of a Zn-rich vapor is followed by temperature-dependent fractionation as Zn condenses onto the PM. The isotopic changes of the two fuel types are similar, suggesting that their inherent chemical differences have only a secondary impact on the isotopic fractionation process.

  15. Combustion synthesis technology for metal-ceramic composite production. Kinzoku-ceramics fukugotai seizo ni okeru nensho gosei gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odawara, O. (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes an outline of a centrifugal thermit method, which is to form ceramic layers inside a metallic tube by using centrifugal force and high temperature generated through spontaneous propagation of combustion reaction of powder. In the typical thermit reaction, Al powder and iron oxide react to each other to form Al2O3 and metal iron. In this reaction, heat as high as 836kJ/mol for Al2O3 is generated, and adiabatic temperature becomes more than 3500K. When this reaction is induced in the metallic tube that rotates at high speed, both reaction products and an internal surface of the metallic tube melt, so that a multiple-unit tube consisting of 3 layers (Al2O3 layer, generated metal layer, and metallic tube, in order from inside) can be obtained by the action of centrifugal force. The thermit reaction is characterized by its rapid propagation on the internal surface of the powder mixture, which becomes hollow due to centrifugal force, followed by its uniformly radial propagation in the tube. The multiple-unit tube is resistant to the thermal shock and the shock caused by external force, as it is characterized by the residual stress distribution after cooling. Therefore this tube can be applied as a transport tube for solid slurry and molten metal. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Role of Hydrogen and Oxygen Activation over Pt and Pd-Doped Composites for Catalytic Hydrogen Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyapaul A; Vishwanath, Karan; Madras, Giridhar

    2017-06-14

    Removal of excess amount of hydrogen in a catalytic route is a safety measure to be implemented in fuel cell technologies and in nuclear power plants. Hydrogen and oxygen activation are crucial steps for hydrogen combustion that can be achieved by modifying supports with suitable noble metals. In the present study, Pt- and Pd-substituted Co3O4-ZrO2 (CZ) were synthesized using PEG-assisted sonochemical synthesis. Ionic states of Pt and Pd in CZ supports were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Pd and Pt improved H2 and O2 activation extensively, which reduced the temperature of 50% conversion (T50%) to 33 °C compared with the support (CZ). The activation energy of PdCZ catalyst was decreased by more than 2 folds (13.4 ± 1.2 kJ mol-1) compared with CZ (34.3 ± 2.3 kJ mol-1). The effect of oxygen vacancies in the reaction mechanism is found to be insignificant with Pt- and Pd-substituted CZ supports. However, oxygen vacancies play an important role when CZ alone was used as catalyst. The importance of hydrogen and oxygen activation as well as the oxygen vacancies in mechanism was studied by H2-TPD, H2-TPR, and in situ FTIR spectroscopy.

  17. Application of theory to propeller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. G.; Morgan, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various theories concerning propeller design are discussed. The use of digital computers to obtain specific blade shapes to meet appropriate flow conditions is emphasized. The development of lifting-line and lifting surface configurations is analyzed. Ship propulsive performance and basic propeller design considerations are investigated. The characteristics of supercavitating propellers are compared with those of subcavitating propellers.

  18. The development of a combustion chamber liner utilizing a long-fiber reinforced composite material made using the poly-silazane impregnation method and the chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K.; Fujioka, N.; Hayakawa, T. [Mitsui Eng. and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tamahara, Tamano (Japan); Kawamura, N.; Sato, K. [TONEN Corp., Saitama (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    A combustion liner made of a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite (CMC) having oxidation-resistance and the required drawing dimensions, has been developed by using both methods of poly-silazane impregnation and SiC coating, which is expected to be effective in the improvement of oxidation resistance, through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A basic manufacturing technology has been established to make static components with complex shapes using non-woven fabrics made of short cut continuous fiber. The prototype extension liner has proven to be available in practical combustion environment atmosphere in engines through satisfactory inspection results conducted after the engine combustion environment test for a cumulative test duration of 31 hours. (orig.) 3 refs.

  19. Cavitation simulation on marine propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo

    Cavitation on marine propellers causes thrust breakdown, noise, vibration and erosion. The increasing demand for high-efficiency propellers makes it difficult to avoid the occurrence of cavitation. Currently, practical analysis of propeller cavitation depends on cavitation tunnel test, empirical...... criteria and inviscid flow method, but a series of model test is costly and the other two methods have low accuracy. Nowadays, computational fluid dynamics by using a viscous flow solver is common for practical industrial applications in many disciplines. Cavitation models in viscous flow solvers have been...... developed in the last decade. They show the potential for the simulation of propeller cavitation with robustness, but they are still to be more proved for practical applications. In the present work, hydrodynamic and numerical characteristics of several cavitation models developed for a viscous flow solver...

  20. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  1. Improvement in energy release properties of boron-based propellant by oxidant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Daolun; Liu, Jianzhong, E-mail: jzliu@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Binghong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-08-20

    Highlights: • NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, KNO{sub 3}, KClO{sub 4} and HMX coated B were used to prepare propellant samples. • FTIR, XRD and SEM were used for the microstructure analysis of the prepared B. • Thermal oxidation and combustion characteristics of the propellants were studied. • HMX coating was the most beneficial to the energy release of the samples. - Abstract: The energy release properties of a propellant can be improved by coating boron (B) particles with oxidants. In the study, B was coated with four different oxidants, namely, NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, KNO{sub 3}, LiClO{sub 4}, and cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), and the corresponding propellant samples were prepared. First, the structural and morphological analyses of the pretreated B were carried out. Then, the thermal analysis and laser ignition experiments of the propellant samples were carried out. Coating with NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} showed a better performance than mechanical mixing with the same component. Coating with KNO{sub 3} efficiently improved the ignition characteristics of the samples. Coating with LiClO{sub 4} was the most beneficial in reducing the degree of difficulty of B oxidation. Coating with HMX was the most beneficial in the heat release of the samples. The KNO{sub 3}-coated sample had a very high combustion intensity in the beginning, but then it rapidly became weak. Large amounts of sparks were ejected during the combustion of the LiClO{sub 4}-coated sample. The HMX-coated sample had the longest self-sustaining combustion time (4332 ms) and the highest average combustion temperature (1163.92 °C).

  2. DESIGN EKONOMIS UNTUK PROPELLER KAPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Hartono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Increase of the price of world oil pushs liner to conduct action is economic from every operational unit in it’sship armada. One other most dominant in usage of fuel is Main engine is working to turn around propeller asship actuator. On that account ship owner wants design propeller which is economic for it’s ship to canreduce usage of fuel of 20% when sailing.

  3. Thrust Deduction in Contrarotating Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    Numerical results are given for a MARAD high -speed containership. Some principal findings for the subject ship are: (1) good agreement between...betwet.-i formard and after propellers. and the spacing between propellers. Computational re-wIlts air presen ted for a NIAHAl) high -speed...ratio of the effective velocity to the volume mean velocity. The volume mecan %eiocity ratio is (defined as ’V 2 h X h where V~ /V is the

  4. Satellite Propellant Pump Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Veres, Joseph P.; Hah, Chunill; Nerone, Anthony L.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Fraser, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn initiated a satellite propellant pump technology demonstration program. The goal was to demonstrate the technologies for a 60 percent efficient pump at 1 gpm flow rate and 500 psia pressure rise. The pump design and analysis used the in-house developed computer codes named PUMPA and HPUMP3D. The requirements lead to a 4-stage impeller type pump design with a tip diameter of 0.54 inches and a rotational speed of 57,000 rpm. Analyses indicated that flow cavitation was not a problem in the design. Since the flow was incompressible, the stages were identical. Only the 2-stage pump was designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested for demonstration. Water was selected as the surrogate fluid for hydrazine in this program. Complete mechanical design including stress and dynamic analyses were conducted. The pump was driven by an electric motor directly coupled to the impellers. Runs up to 57,000 rpm were conducted, where a pressure rise of 200 psia at a flow rate of 0.8 gpm was measured to validate the design effort.

  5. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  6. Developments on HNF based high performance and green solid propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizers, H.L.J.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Vliet, L.D. van; Welland-Veltmans, W.H.M.; Ciucci, A.

    2001-01-01

    Worldwide developments are ongoing to develop new and more energetic composite solid propellant formulations for space transportation and military applications. Since the 90's, the use of HNF as a new high performance oxidiser is being reinvestigated. Within European development programmes,

  7. Bubble capture by a propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillé, François; Clanet, Christophe; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2006-08-01

    A small air bubble (radius a) is injected in water (kinematic viscosity nu) in the vicinity (distance r_0) of a propeller (radius r_p, angular frequency omega). We study experimentally and theoretically the conditions under which the bubble can be ‘captured’, i.e. deviated from its vertical trajectory (imposed by gravity g) and moved toward the centre of the propeller (r {=} 0). We show that the capture frequency omega_{scriptsizecapt} follows the relationship [omega_{hboxriptsizeit capt}=left(frac{2ga^2}{9betanu r_p f(hboxRe_b)}right)left(frac{r_0}{r_p}right)^2(1+\\cos\\varphi_0),] where beta is a dimensionless parameter characterizing the propeller, f(Re_b) is an empirical correction to Stokes' drag law which accounts for finite-Reynolds-number effects and pi/2-varphi_0 is the angle between the axis of the propeller and the line between the centre of the propeller and the point where the bubble is injected. This law is found to be valid as long as the distance d between the propeller and the water surface is larger than 3r_0. For smaller distances, the capture frequency increases; using an image technique, we show how the above expression is modified by the presence of the surface.

  8. Strobes: an oscillatory combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, Justine M L; Lingen, Joost N J; Zevenbergen, John F; Gijzeman, Onno L J; Meijerink, Andries

    2012-04-26

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginning of the 20th century. However, the chemical and physical processes involved in this curious oscillatory combustion remain unknown. Several theories have been proposed: One claims that two different reactions occur: one during the slow dark phase and another during the fast flash phase. The alternation between the phases is ascribed to heat variations. Other theories suggest that the formation of intermediate species during the dark phase and the change of phase are caused by variations in their concentration. A ternary strobe composition with ammonium perchlorate, magnalium, and barium sulfate is analyzed. The role of barium sulfate is studied by replacing it by other metal sulfates that have different physical properties (melting points), and the burning of the compositions is recorded with a high-speed camera and a spectrometer coupled with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Experimental results show noticeable differences in the physical and chemical processes involved in the strobe reactions.

  9. Bubble Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  10. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  11. Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Disk for Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Mike; Genge, Gary; Kiser, Doug

    2000-01-01

    NASA has recently completed testing of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC), integrally bladed disk (blisk) for rocket engine turbopumps. The turbopump's main function is to bring propellants from the tank to the combustion chamber at optimal pressures, temperatures, and flow rates. Advantages realized by using CMC blisks are increases in safety by increasing temperature margins and decreasing costs by increasing turbopump performance. A multidisciplinary team, involving materials, design, structural analysis, nondestructive inspection government, academia, and industry experts, was formed to accomplish the 4.5 year effort. This article will review some of the background and accomplishments of the CMC Blisk Program relative to the benefits of this technology.

  12. Catalyst Effects of Nanometer CuCr2O4 on the Thermal Decomposition of TEGDN Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shi; Kou, Chenxia; Li, Yanchun; Cheng, Yi

    2012-04-01

    The catalyst effects of nanometer CuCr2O4 on the thermal decomposition of triethyleneglycol dinitrate (TEGDN) propellant were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The Ozawa equation and step integral equation were used to calculate the activation energy. The results showed that the thermal decomposition reaction of TEGDN propellant can be seen as two reactions. Nanometer CuCr2O4 added in TEGDN propellant reduced the activation energy of the second reaction step; therefore, the second reaction step was sped up. Mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and the combustion residue analysis results also supported this conclusion.

  13. Fabrication of Cu-riched W-Cu composites by combustion synthesis and melt-infiltration in ultrahigh-gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Guo, Shibin; Liu, Guanghua; Chen, Yixiang; Li, Jiangtao

    2013-10-01

    Unadulterated Cu-riched W-Cu composites of W27-Cu73, W34-Cu66, W40-Cu60, W49-Cu51 and W56-Cu44 have been prepared by a novel method called combustion synthesis and melt-infiltration in ultrahigh-gravity field, of which W27-Cu73 and W34-Cu66 showed good ductility and W40-Cu60, W49-Cu51 and W56-Cu44 were brittle. In this technique, Cu melt accompanied with a great amount of heat was produced by thermit reaction and infiltrated into W-Cu powder bed. When the powder bed was Cu-riched powder bed such as W50-Cu50 or W60-Cu40, Cu melt would go through the powder bed, reach the bottom of the graphite crucible and then form a heat dissipation channel. Thus the cooling rate was so fast that the product was mixed up with impurity. The problem can be solved by putting some W powders under W50-Cu50 or W60-Cu40 powder bed to prevent the formation of heat dissipation channel.

  14. Fabrication of Cu-riched W–Cu composites by combustion synthesis and melt-infiltration in ultrahigh-gravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pei [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Guo, Shibin; Liu, Guanghua; Chen, Yixiang [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Jiangtao, E-mail: ljt0012@vip.sina.com [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Unadulterated Cu-riched W–Cu composites of W27–Cu73, W34–Cu66, W40–Cu60, W49–Cu51 and W56–Cu44 have been prepared by a novel method called combustion synthesis and melt-infiltration in ultrahigh-gravity field, of which W27–Cu73 and W34–Cu66 showed good ductility and W40–Cu60, W49–Cu51 and W56–Cu44 were brittle. In this technique, Cu melt accompanied with a great amount of heat was produced by thermit reaction and infiltrated into W–Cu powder bed. When the powder bed was Cu-riched powder bed such as W50–Cu50 or W60–Cu40, Cu melt would go through the powder bed, reach the bottom of the graphite crucible and then form a heat dissipation channel. Thus the cooling rate was so fast that the product was mixed up with impurity. The problem can be solved by putting some W powders under W50–Cu50 or W60–Cu40 powder bed to prevent the formation of heat dissipation channel.

  15. Experimental Performance of a Novel Trochoidal Propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Bernard; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    In the quest for energy efficiency in marine transportation, a promising marine propulsor concept is the trochoidal propeller. We have designed and tested a novel trochoidal propeller using a sinusoidal blade pitch function. The main results presented are measurements of thrust and torque, as well as the calculated efficiency, for a range of advance coefficients. The experimental data show narrow 95% confidence bounds, demonstrating high accuracy and repeatability in the experimental methods. We compare our sinusoidal-pitch trochoidal propeller with prior cross-flow propellers, as well as a representative screw propeller. While the efficiency of our propeller exceeds that of the cycloidal-pitch trochoidal propeller, it is slightly lower than the efficiencies of the other propellers considered. We also present a theoretical model that can be used to further explore and optimize such trochoidal propellers, leading to new avenues for improvements in marine propulsion systems.

  16. Aspects of Propeller Developements for a Submarine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; kappel, Jens Julius; Spangenberg, Eugen

    2009-01-01

    Design and development of propellers for submarines are in some ways different from propellers for surface vessels. The most important demand is low acoustic signature that has priority over propeller efficiency, and the submarine propeller must be optimized with respect to acoustics rather than...... efficiency. Moreover the operating conditions of a submarine propeller are quite different. These aspects are discussed as well as the weighing of the various propeller parameters against the design objectives. The noise generated by the propeller can be characterized as thrust noise due to the inhomogeneous...... wake field of the submarine, trailing-edge noise and noise caused by turbulence in the inflow. The items discussed are demonstrated in a case study where a propeller of the Kappel type was developed. Three stages of the development are presented, including a design of an 8-bladed propeller where...

  17. Erosive Burning of Composite Solid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-01

    motion picture camera through a series of four quartz windows located along the length of the test section. Frame by frame analysis of the films permits...increased heat transfer from a "core" gas flow (not- 5 ably the widely used model of L. noir and Robillard( 1 4 )). If this is indeed the controlling

  18. Combustion of High Molecular Weight Hydrocarbon Fuels and JP-8 at Moderate Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    oxidizer-boundary and the liquid –gas interface, respectively. R.K. Gehmlich et al. / Proceedings of the Combustion Institute 35 (2015) 937–943 939 If...A.F. Sarofim, S. Granata, T. Faravelli, E. Ranzi, Combust . Sci. Technol. 174 (11-12) (2002) 399–417. [25] J. Muylaert, Technologies for Propelled ...a stagnating oxidizer stream or a premixed combustible gas burning in a stagna- tion flow, the lower duct is replaced by the solid fuel, a liquid

  19. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  20. A quantitative study of acoustic growth rates in a characterized Rijke burner with particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Brian Russell

    2000-12-01

    The acoustic growth rate, frequency, and limiting amplitude of a characterized Rijke burner were quantitatively measured during the combustion of aluminum and zirconium carbide particles, which are common solid propellant additives. Extremely narrow size distributions of aluminum particles with mean diameters of 9.2, 19.0, 35.6, and 68.7 μm were tested at mass loadings up to 3% for frequencies of 800 and 1200 Hz. Large aluminum particles were ignited in the C3H8/O2 flame of a welding nozzle, mounted flush with the burner's flat, C3H8/O 2/N2 flame. Testing provided no conclusive evidence of distributed particle combustion affecting the acoustic driving in the Rijke burner. In solid propellant rockets, the distributed combustion of aluminum particles far from the propellant surface may contribute to pressure oscillations caused by acoustic combustion instability. The Rijke burner was developed as an experimental platform to investigate the phenomenon. Research into the transient acoustic response of Rijke burners is almost nonexistent; consequently, the current burner's acoustic response was quantified as a function of gas flow rate, gas composition, geometry, and burner orientation for two frequencies. Acoustic growth rate trends were explained in terms of the pulsing flame's heat release and the flame's position relative to the optimal acoustic driving point. Variations in gas flow rate, flame temperature, geometry, and exhaust temperature profile could affect a 300 s-1 change in acoustic growth rate for the conditions tested. Frequency remained approximately constant, except for acoustic mode shifts which occurred due to geometry alterations or changing gas temperatures in the burner's hot section. The Rijke burner's acoustic response was not significantly altered by the installation of the welding nozzle with its gas mixture operated near stoichiometric or fuel rich. The radial and axial temperature profiles of the gas temperatures in the burner's hot section

  1. Regarding the evaluation of the solid rocket propellant response function to pressure coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan ION

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available High frequency combustion instabilities imply a major risk for the solid rocket motor stableworking and they are directly linked to the propellant response to chamber pressure coupling. Thisarticle discusses a laboratory testing method for the measurement and evaluation of the pressurecoupled response for non-metalized propellants in a first stage. Experimental researches were donewith an adequate setup, built and improved in our lab, able to evaluate the propellant response byinterpreting the pressure oscillations damping in terms of propellant response. Our paper aims atdefining a linearized one-dimensional flow study model to analyze the disturbed operation of the solidpropellant rocket motors. Based on the applied model we can assert that the real part of propellantresponse is a function of the oscillations damping, acoustic energy in the motor chamber and variouslosses in the burning chamber. The imaginary part of propellant response mainly depends on thenormalized pulsation, on the burning chamber gas column and on the pressure oscillations frequency.Our research purpose was obviously to minimize the risk of the combustion instabilities effects on therocket motors working, by experimental investigations using jet modulating techniques and sustainedby an interesting study model based on the perturbation method.

  2. Hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow modelling in rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    A predictive tool for hypergolic bipropellant spray combustion and flow evolution in small rocket combustion chambers is described. It encompasses a computational technique for the gas-phase governing equations, a discrete particle method for liquid bipropellant sprays, and constitutive models for combustion chemistry, interphase exchanges, and unlike impinging hypergolic spray interactions. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenological modeling of the hypergolic liquid bipropellant gasification processes. Sample computations with the N2H4-N2O4 propellant system are given in order to show some of the capabilities and inadequacies of this tool.

  3. Effects of Fuel Composition on Combustion Stability and NO X Emissions for Traditional and Alternative Jet Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijlee, Shazib Z.

    Synthetic jet fuels are studied to help understand their viability as alternatives to traditionally derived jet fuel. Two combustion parameters -- flame stability and NOX emissions -- are used to compare these fuels through experiments and models. At its core, this is a fuels study comparing how chemical makeup and behavior relate. Six 'real', complex fuels are studied in this work -- four are synthetic from alternative sources and two are traditional from petroleum sources. Two of the synthetic fuels are derived from natural gas and coal via the Fischer Tropsch catalytic process. The other two are derived from Camelina oil and tallow via hydroprocessing. The traditional military jet fuel, JP8, is used as a baseline as it is derived from petroleum. The sixth fuel is derived from petroleum and is used to study the effects of aromatic content on the synthetic fuels. The synthetic fuels lack aromatic compounds, which are an important class of hydrocarbons necessary for fuel handling systems to function properly. Several single-component fuels are studied (through models and/or experiments) to facilitate interpretation and understanding. The flame stability study first compares all the 'real', complex fuels for blowout. A toroidal stirred reactor is used to try and isolate temperature and chemical effects. The modeling study of blowout in the toroidal reactor is the key to understanding any fuel-based differences in blowout behavior. A detailed, reacting CFD model of methane is used to understand how the reactor stabilizes the flame and how that changes as the reactor approaches blowout. A 22 species reduced form of GRI 3.0 is used to model methane chemistry. The knowledge of the radical species role is utilized to investigate the differences between a highly aliphatic fuel (surrogated by iso-octane) and a highly aromatic fuel (surrogated by toluene). A perfectly stirred reactor model is used to study the chemical kinetic pathways for these fuels near blowout. The

  4. Marine propellers: the latest topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, H

    1996-02-01

    The impeller of the axial flow blood pump in an artificial heart is essentially based on the same principle as a marine propeller. Impellers designed for artificial hearts and marine propellers have a number of points in common. Decreased cavitation and relieved fluctuation load are only representative of them. As for a distinct concept of pressure distribution, the inverse method could be very useful. Skew may led to a more mild and natural character in the blood. Highly skewed blades and super elastic blades have the potential to decrease the burden on the entire circulatory system. This paper will address the main points and latest issues in propeller design concluding with a discussion of the implications of these issues for blood pump impellers.

  5. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  6. [Characteristics and mechanism of boat propeller injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Song; Shen, Yi-Wen; Xue, Ai-Min

    2008-02-01

    To summarize the characteristics and investigate the mechanisms of boat propeller injuries so as to explore the identification methods between boat propeller injuries and corpse dismemberment. More than 100 autopsy cases of boat propeller injuries were collected in a period between 1994 and 2005 in Huzhou district, Zhejiang province. The characteristics of injuries caused by propeller, including abrasion, wound, fracture and severed wound, and the characteristics of clothing, were retrospectively studied and summarized. The severed cross wound section of boat propeller injuries was compared with that caused by corpse dismemberment. The boat propeller injuries were resulted from high-speed propellers with enormous splitting power and mechanical cutting, while corpse dismemberment were resulted from cutting and dismembering the body with sharp instruments. Due to the different mechanisms, the different strength of force and recoil force, the severed wound cross section had different characteristics. Wounds caused by boat propeller injuries have their unique characteristics, distinguished from wounds of dismembered corpse.

  7. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  8. Quadcopter thrust optimization with ducted-propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuantama Endrowednes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In relation to quadcopter body frame model, propeller can be categorized into propeller with ducted and without ducted. This study present differences between those two using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics method. Both categories utilize two blade-propeller with diameter of 406 (mm. Propeller rotation generates acceleration per time unit on the volume of air. Based on the behavior of generated air velocity, ducted propeller can be modeled into three versions. The generated thrust and performance on each model were calculated to determine the best model. The use of ducted propeller increases the total weight of quadcopter and also total thrust. The influence of this modeling were analyzed in detail with variation of angular velocity propeller from 1000 (rpm to 9000 (rpm. Besides the distance between propeller tip and ducted barrier, the size of ducted is also an important part in thrust optimization and total weight minimization of quadcopter.

  9. Scale Effects on Solid Rocket Combustion Instability Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Greatrix

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to understand and predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. A numerical model incorporating pertinent elements, such as a representative transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of scale effects (motor size, i.e., grain length and internal port diameter on influencing instability-related behaviour in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the motor’s size has a significant influence on transient pressure wave magnitude and structure, and on the appearance and magnitude of an associated base pressure rise.

  10. Scale effects on solid rocket combustion instability behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greatrix, D. R. [Ryerson University, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The ability to understand and predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. A numerical model incorporating pertinent elements, such as a representative transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of scale effects (motor size, i.e., grain length and internal port diameter) on influencing instability-related behaviour in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the motor's size has a significant influence on transient pressure wave magnitude and structure, and on the appearance and magnitude of an associated base pressure rise. (author)

  11. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  12. Composition, microstructures and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) self-growing ceramic composites prepared by combustion synthesis under high gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z. M.; Zhang, L.; Song, Y. G.; Wang, W. G.; Liu, H. B.

    2009-03-01

    By introducing ZrO2 (4Y) powder into the thermit, Al2O3/ZrO2 (4Y) composite ceramics were prepared through combustion synthesis under high gravity, and the correlations of composition, microstructures and mechanical properties of composite ceramics were investigated. The results of XRD, SEM and EDS showed that Al2O3/33%ZrO2 (4Y) were composed of random-orientated rod-shaped colonies consisting of a triangular dispersion of orderly submicron-nanometer t-ZrO2 fibers, surrounded by inter-colony regions consisting of spherically-shaped micronmeter t-ZrO2 grains; Al2O3/45%ZrO2 (4Y) were comprised of spherically-shaped micron-meter t-ZrO2 grains, surround by irregularly-shaped α-Al2O3 grains and a few colonies. Compared to the directionally solidified Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3), the increase in hardness and flexural strength of Al2O3/33%ZrO2 (4Y) in the experiment was due to high densification, small-size defect and high fracture toughness induced by compressive residual stress toughening and transformation toughening mechanisms; meanwhile, in despite of the moderate decrease in hardness, high flexural strength of Al2O3/45%ZrO2 (4Y) was considered to be a result of small-size defect in spherically-shaped micronmeter t-ZrO2 grain matrix and high fracture toughness induced by transformation toughening and micro-crack toughening mechanisms.

  13. Composition, microstructures and properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) self-growing ceramic composites prepared by combustion synthesis under high gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z M; Zhang, L [Institute of Advanced Materials, Shijiazhuang Mechanical Engineering College, Shijiazhuang, 050003 (China); Song, Y G; Wang, W G; Liu, H B [Science Research Department, Shijiazhuang Mechanical Engineering College, Shijiazhuang, 050003 (China)], E-mail: zhao_zhongmin@163.net

    2009-03-01

    By introducing ZrO{sub 2} (4Y) powder into the thermit, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} (4Y) composite ceramics were prepared through combustion synthesis under high gravity, and the correlations of composition, microstructures and mechanical properties of composite ceramics were investigated. The results of XRD, SEM and EDS showed that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/33%ZrO{sub 2} (4Y) were composed of random-orientated rod-shaped colonies consisting of a triangular dispersion of orderly submicron-nanometer t-ZrO{sub 2} fibers, surrounded by inter-colony regions consisting of spherically-shaped micronmeter t-ZrO{sub 2} grains; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/45%ZrO{sub 2} (4Y) were comprised of spherically-shaped micron-meter t-ZrO{sub 2} grains, surround by irregularly-shaped {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains and a few colonies. Compared to the directionally solidified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2} (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the increase in hardness and flexural strength of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/33%ZrO{sub 2} (4Y) in the experiment was due to high densification, small-size defect and high fracture toughness induced by compressive residual stress toughening and transformation toughening mechanisms; meanwhile, in despite of the moderate decrease in hardness, high flexural strength of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/45%ZrO{sub 2} (4Y) was considered to be a result of small-size defect in spherically-shaped micronmeter t-ZrO{sub 2} grain matrix and high fracture toughness induced by transformation toughening and micro-crack toughening mechanisms.

  14. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet

  15. Propelling arboriculture into the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson

    2011-01-01

    Research is the engine that propels arboriculture and urban forestry into the future. New knowledge, technologies, and tools provide arborists with improved tree care practices that result in healthier urban forests. The ISA Science and Research Committee (SRC) is composed of 13 professionals and researchers who are dedicated to elevating the importance of research...

  16. Cars Spectroscopy of Propellant Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Propellant Flames," Fast Reactions in Energetic Systems, D. Capellos and R. F. Walker, ed., Reidel, Boston, MA, 1981, pp 473-434. 2. L. E. Harris and M. E...Beardell Y. Carignon J. Fendell K, Aron E. Petro DRStfC-LCE-(D), R. Walker P. Marinkas C. Capellos S. Buluou F. Gilbert Dover, tU 07801 Afmtnistrator

  17. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to

  18. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition......The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...

  19. 14 CFR 35.23 - Propeller control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hazardous propeller effect. (3) The loss of normal propeller pitch control does not cause a hazardous propeller effect under the intended operating conditions. (4) The failure or corruption of data or signals shared across propellers does not cause a hazardous propeller effect. (c) Electronic propeller control...

  20. Numerical simulation on bearing force of propeller for machining errors in non-uniform inflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Anbin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the bearing force caused by the machining errors of composite material propeller in non-uniform flow, the propeller was computed by changing the machining error of the propeller in six degrees of freedom, in which the main blade translates and rotates along the coordinate axis artificially by way of the statistical method. The bearing force of a DTMB P4119 propeller with a machining error was calculated according to the SST k-ω model and sliding meshing non-uniform flow to figure out the impact of various machining errors on the propeller, enabling a fundamental rule about the impact of various machining errors on a propeller's bearing force to be formed. The results show that vertical bearing force and horizontal bearing force increase linearly, and first-order blade frequency bearing force rarely changes with the increase of machining errors in each freedom; machining errors along the directions of diameter and pitch have a great impact on the propeller shaft's frequency bearing force. Therefore, we can put forward a more refined principle about the machining accuracy of propellers.

  1. Automotive airbag inflator analysis using the measured properties of modern propellants

    KAUST Repository

    Seo, Young D.

    2011-04-01

    An airbag is composed of a housing assembly, door assembly, cushion assembly, and an inflator. The inflator is an essential part that generates gas for the airbag. When an airbag is activated, it effectively absorbs the crash energy of the passenger by inflating a cushion. In the present study, tank tests were performed with newly synthesized propellants with various compositions, and the results are compared with the numerical results. In the simulation of the inflator, a zonal model has been adopted which consisted of four zones of flow regions: combustion chamber, filter, gas plenum, and discharge tank. Each zone was described by the conservation equations with specified constitutive relations for gas. The pressure and temperature of each zone of the inflator were calculated and analyzed, and the results were compared with the tank test data. The similarity of the pressure curve and closed bomb calculation show that the modeled results are well correlated with the experimental data. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  2. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  3. A predictive model of natural gas mixture combustion in internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the development of a predictive natural gas mixture combustion model for conventional com-bustion (ignition engines. The model was based on resolving two areas; one having unburned combustion mixture and another having combustion products. Energy and matter conservation equations were solved for each crankshaft turn angle for each area. Nonlinear differential equations for each phase’s energy (considering compression, combustion and expansion were solved by applying the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The model also enabled studying different natural gas components’ composition and evaluating combustion in the presence of dry and humid air. Validation results are shown with experimental data, demonstrating the software’s precision and accuracy in the results so produced. The results showed cylinder pressure, unburned and burned mixture temperature, burned mass fraction and combustion reaction heat for the engine being modelled using a natural gas mixture.

  4. A predictive model of natural gas mixture combustion in internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the development of a predictive natural gas mixture combustion model for conventional com-bustion (ignition engines. The model was based on resolving two areas; one having unburned combustion mixture and another having combustion products. Energy and matter conservation equations were solved for each crankshaft turn angle for each area. Nonlinear differential equations for each phase’s energy (considering compression, combustion and expansion were solved by applying the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The model also enabled studying different natural gas components’ composition and evaluating combustion in the presence of dry and humid air. Validation results are shown with experimental data, demonstrating the software’s precision and accuracy in the results so produced. The results showed cylinder pressure, unburned and burned mixture temperature, burned mass fraction and combustion reaction heat for the engine being modelled using a natural gas mixture.

  5. Thermal decomposition of AP/HTPB propellants in presence of Zn nanoalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Dave, Pragnesh N.; Patel, Nikul N.

    2015-01-01

    Composite solid propellants were prepared with and without nanoalloys (Zn-Cu, Zn-Ni, Zn-Fe), where nanoalloys are used as catalyst. Catalytic properties of these nanomaterials measured on ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene propellant by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Both experimental results show enhancement in the thermal decomposition of propellants in presence of nanoalloys. In differential thermal analysis method, experiments had done at three heating rates, β1 = 5°, β2 = 10°, β3 = 15° per minute. Calculation of activation energy of high temperature decomposition step was done by using following Kissinger equation. Zn-Cu was found to be the best.

  6. Studies on n-butyl nitroxyethylnitramine (n-buNENA): Synthesis, characterization and propellant evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Kala P.C.; Sikder, Aarun K.; Kulkarni, Mahadev A.; Bhalerao, Melind M.; Gandhe, Balkrishna R. [High Energy Materials Research Laboratory, Pune 411 021 (India)

    2004-04-01

    The laboratory synthesis of the energetic plasticizer n-buNENA was scaled up to one kg batch size and the compound was fully characterized by spectral data and elemental analysis. N-buNENA was formulated with CMDB and EDB propellant compositions. The results showed an improvement in mechanical properties and burning rate over a wide range of pressure along with acceptable limits of hazard and thermal stability as compared to DEP based propellant systems. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Laser Ignition Characteristics of GOX/GH2 and GOX/GCH4 Propellants

    OpenAIRE

    長谷川, 恵一; HASEGAWA, Keichi; 佐藤, 政裕; Sato, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    The laser ignition characteristics of gaseous oxygen (GOX) / gaseous hydrogen (GH2) and GOX / gaseous methane (GCH4) as non-toxic propellants have been under investigation at the Rocket Propulsion Center. Because of the advantages of initiating ignition with laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber, this system is expected to be used in liquid rocket engines with multiple combustion chambers, such as the RCS (Reaction Control System) and the aero-spike nozzle engine. Another advantage ...

  8. Surveillance Report. Stage 1. Dissected Motors. Phase 9. Propellant and Component Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-03-01

    Component & Combustion Test Unit • Approved By DON F. WOODS, Chief Propellant Laboratory Section March 1978 A0 Industrial Products & Ldg Gear Division...CwF z z 10 CD IhD C) 0DL E + O OD-o Oflih OO)h K-w ID= O- -75- C) 0 r- 00 inj- 0 .a-m LP- N~ VV x 15c1 cc 00 I I tL j N. . . - - =~zc C LD 0 ý I

  9. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  10. LOX/Hydrocarbon Combustion Instability Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. J.; Dodson, H. C.; Claflin, S. E.

    1989-01-01

    The LOX/Hydrocarbon Combustion Instability Investigation Program was structured to determine if the use of light hydrocarbon combustion fuels with liquid oxygen (LOX) produces combustion performance and stability behavior similar to the LOX/hydrogen propellant combination. In particular methane was investigated to determine if that fuel can be rated for combustion instability using the same techniques as previously used for LOX/hydrogen. These techniques included fuel temperature ramping and stability bomb tests. The hot fire program probed the combustion behavior of methane from ambient to subambient temperatures. Very interesting results were obtained from this program that have potential importance to future LOX/methane development programs. A very thorough and carefully reasoned documentation of the experimental data obtained is contained. The hot fire test logic and the associated tests are discussed. Subscale performance and stability rating testing was accomplished using 40,000 lb. thrust class hardware. Stability rating tests used both bombs and fuel temperature ramping techniques. The test program was successful in generating data for the evaluation of the methane stability characteristics relative to hydrogen and to anchor stability models. Data correlations, performance analysis, stability analyses, and key stability margin enhancement parameters are discussed.

  11. Autodesk Combustion 4 fundamentals courseware

    CERN Document Server

    Autodesk,

    2005-01-01

    Whether this is your first experience with Combustion software or you're upgrading to take advantage of the many new features and tools, this guide will serve as your ultimate resource to this all-in-one professional compositing application. Much more than a point-and-click manual, this guide explains the principles behind the software, serving as an overview of the package and associated techniques. Written by certified Autodesk training specialists for motion graphic designers, animators, and visual effects artists, Combustion 4 Fundamentals Courseware provides expert advice for all skill le

  12. The "Tokyo" consensus on propeller flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Marco; Ogawa, Rei; Hallock, Geoffrey G; Mateev, Musa; Georgescu, Alexandru V; Balakrishnan, Govindasamy; Ono, Shimpei; Cubison, Tania C S; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Koshima, Isao; Hyakusoku, Hikko

    2011-02-01

    Over the past few years, the use of propeller flaps, which base their blood supply on subcutaneous tissue or isolated perforators, has become increasingly popular. Because no consensus has yet been reached on terminology and nomenclature of the propeller flap, different and confusing uses of the term can be found in the literature. In this article, the authors report the consensus on the definition and classification of propeller flaps reached by the authors that gathered at the First Tokyo Meeting on Perforator and Propeller Flaps in June of 2009. Some peculiar aspects of the surgical technique are discussed. A propeller flap can be defined as an "island flap that reaches the recipient site through an axial rotation." The classification is based on the nourishing pedicle (subcutaneous pedicled propeller flap, perforator pedicled propeller flap, supercharged propeller flap), the degrees of skin island rotation (90 to 180 degrees) and, when possible, the artery of origin of the perforator. The propeller flap is a useful reconstructive tool that can achieve good cosmetic and functional results. A flap should be called a propeller flap only if it fulfils the definition above. The type of nourishing pedicle, the source vessel (when known), and the degree of skin island rotation should be specified for each flap.

  13. Effect of biomass-sulfur interaction on ash composition and agglomeration for the co-combustion of high-sulfur lignite coals and olive cake in a circulating fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Murat; Atimtay, Aysel T

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of biomass-sulfur interaction on ash composition and agglomeration for the co-combustion of high-sulfur lignite coals and olive cake in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The tests included co-combustion of 50-50% by wt. mixtures of Bursa-Orhaneli lignite+olive cake and Denizli-Kale lignite+olive cake, with and without limestone addition. Ash samples were subjected to XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS analyses. While MgO was high in the bottom ash for Bursa-Orhaneli lignite and olive cake mixture, Al2O3 was high for Denizli-Kale lignite and olive cake mixture. Due to high Al2O3 content, Muscovite was the dominant phase in the bottom ash of Denizli Kale. CaO in the bottom ash has increased for both fuel mixtures due to limestone addition. K was in Arcanite phase in the co-combustion test of Bursa/Orhaneli lignite and olive cake, however, it mostly appeared in Potassium Calcium Sulfate phase with limestone addition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  15. The Mobile Combustion Diagnostic Fixture and Its Application to the Study of Propellant Combustion: Part 1. Investigation of the Low Pressure Combustion of LOVA XM39 Propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    Centralite 0.4 Nitrocellulose 4.0 RDX 76.0 Finished Product Diameter: 0.724 cm Density (g!mL): 1.622 Length: 0.858 cm Total Volatiles (wt %)- 0.29...number of grains quenching is not as rapid or complete, and the sample continues to " smolder " after the rupture disc bursts, and b) with more grains

  16. Fuel gas combustion research at METC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, T.S.

    1995-06-01

    The in-house combustion research program at METC is an integral part of many METC activities, providing support to METC product teams, project managers, and external industrial and university partners. While the majority of in-house combustion research in recent years has been focussed on the lean premixed combustion of natural gas fuel for Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) applications, increasing emphasis is being placed on issues of syngas combustion, as the time approaches when the ATS and coal-fired power systems programs will reach convergence. When the METC syngas generator is built in 1996, METC will have the unique combination of mid-scale pressurized experimental facilities, a continuous syngas supply with variable ammonia loading, and a team of people with expertise in low-emissions combustion, chemical kinetics, combustion modeling, combustion diagnostics, and the control of combustion instabilities. These will enable us to investigate such issues as the effects of pressure, temperature, and fuel gas composition on the rate of conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx, and on combustion instabilities in a variety of combustor designs.

  17. Propeller Test Facilities Â

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: Three electrically driven whirl test stands are used to determine propeller (or other rotating device) performance at various rotational speeds. These...

  18. Oxygen-enhanced combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Combustion technology has traditionally been dominated by air/fuel combustion. However, two developments have increased the significance of oxygen-enhanced combustion-new technologies that produce oxygen less expensively and the increased importance of environmental regulations. Advantages of oxygen-enhanced combustion include less pollutant emissions as well as increased energy efficiency and productivity. Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion, Second Edition compiles information about using oxygen to enhance industrial heating and melting processes. It integrates fundamental principles, applications, a

  19. Generation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} microparticles by solution combustion method and its Zn-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite thin films for corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrappa, K.G. [Department of P.G. Studies and Research in Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Jnana Sahyadri Campus, Kuvempu University, Shankaraghatta 577451, Karnataka (India); Venkatesha, T.V., E-mail: drtvvenkatesha@yahoo.co.uk [Department of P.G. Studies and Research in Chemistry, School of Chemical Sciences, Jnana Sahyadri Campus, Kuvempu University, Shankaraghatta 577451, Karnataka (India)

    2012-11-25

    Graphical abstract: The pseudo-cubic cobalt oxide microparticles have been successfully synthesized by a solution combustion method using Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (oxidizer) and dextrose (sugar; fuel). The as-synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} microparticles are crystalline and Rietveld refinement of calcined samples exhibited cubic structure with space group of Fm3m (No. 227). The generated Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} microparticles were used to fabricate Zn-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite thin films for corrosion protection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of pseudo-cubic Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} microparticles by solution combustion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} compounds are calcined and structurally characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} are utilized for the fabrication of Zn-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite thin films. - Abstract: Microcrystalline cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) powder was successfully synthesized by a simple, fast, economical and eco-friendly solution-combustion method. The as-synthesized powder was calcined for an hour at temperatures ranging from 100 to 900 Degree-Sign C. The crystallite size, morphology, and chemical state of synthesized powders were characterized by powder XRD, TG-DTA, XPS, SEM/EDAX, TEM and FT-IR spectral methods. The as-synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder was single-crystalline and Rietveld refinement of calcined samples exhibited cubic structure with space group of Fm3m (No. 227). The effect of calcination temperature on crystallite size and morphology was assessed. Scanning electron micrographs show a uniform, randomly oriented pseudo-cubic particle with porous like morphology and EDAX measurement showed its chemical composition. Thermal behavior of as-synthesized compound was examined. The TEM result revealed that, the particles are pseudo-cubic in nature with diameter of 0.2-0.6 {mu}m and a length of 0.9-1.2 {mu}m. The crystallite size

  20. Self‐propagating Combustion Triggered Synthesis of  3D Lamellar Graphene/BaFe12O19 Composite and Its  Electromagnetic Wave Absorption Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingkai Zhao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of 3D lamellar graphene/BaFe12O19 composites was performed by oxidizing graphite and sequentially self‐propagating combustion triggered process. The 3D lamellar graphene structures were formed due to the synergistic effect of the tremendous heat induced gasification as well as huge volume expansion. The 3D lamellar graphene/BaFe12O19 composites bearing 30 wt % graphene present the reflection loss peak at −27.23 dB as well as the frequency bandwidth at 2.28 GHz (< −10 dB. The 3D lamellar graphene structures could consume the incident waves through multiple Reflection and scattering within the layered structures, Prolonging the propagation path of electromagnetic waves in the absorbers.

  1. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  2. Assessing Spontaneous Combustion Instability with Recurrence Quantification Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Chad J.; Casiano, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous instabilities can pose a significant challenge to verification of combustion stability, and characterizing its onset is an important avenue of improvement for stability assessments of liquid propellant rocket engines. Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) is used here to explore nonlinear combustion dynamics that might give insight into instability. Multiple types of patterns representative of different dynamical states are identified within fluctuating chamber pressure data, and markers for impending instability are found. A class of metrics which describe these patterns is also calculated. RQA metrics are compared with and interpreted against another metric from nonlinear time series analysis, the Hurst exponent, to help better distinguish between stable and unstable operation.

  3. Towards the regulation of aerosol emissions by their potential health impact: Assessing adverse effects of aerosols from wood combustion and ship diesel engine emissions by combining comprehensive data on the chemical composition and their toxicological effects on human lung cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, R.; Streibel, T.; Dittmar, G.; Kanashova, T.; Buters, J.; Öder, S.; Paur, H. R.; Dilger, M.; Weiss, C.; Harndorf, H.; Stengel, B.; Hirvonen, M. R.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hiller, K.; Sapcariu, S.; Sippula, O.; Orasche, J.; Müller, L.; Rheda, A.; Passig, J.; Radischat, C.; Czech, H.; Tiita, P.; Jalava, P.; Kasurinen, S.; Schwemer, T.; Yli-Prilä, P.; Tissari, J.; Lamberg, H.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ship engine emissions are important regarding lung and cardiovascular diseases in coastal regions worldwide. Bio mass burning is made responsible for adverse health effects in many cities and rural regions. The Virtual Helmholtz Institute-HICE (www.hice-vi.eu) addresses chemical & physical properties and health effects of anthropogenic combustion emissions. Typical lung cell responses to combustion aerosols include inflammation and apoptosis, but a molecular link with the specific chemical composition in particular of ship emissions has not been established. Through an air-liquid interface exposure system (ALI), we exposed human lung cells at-site to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on common heavy fuel oil (HFO) and cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF) as well as to emissions of wood combustion compliances. A special field deployable ALI-exposition system and a mobile S2-biological laboratory were developed for this study. Human alveolar basal epithelial cells (A549 etc.) are ALI-exposed to fresh, diluted (1:40-1:100) combustion aerosols and subsequently were toxicologically and molecular-biologically characterized. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling to characterise the cellular responses. The HFO ship emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds (transition metals, organic toxicants) and particle masses. The cellular responses included inflammation and oxidative stress. Surprisingly, the DF ship emissions, which predominantly contain rather "pure" carbonaceous soot and much less known toxicants, induced significantly broader biological effects, affecting essential cellular pathways (e.g., mitochondrial function and intracellular transport). Therefore the use of distillate fuels for shipping (this is the current emission reduction strategy of the IMO) appears insufficient for diminishing health effects. The study suggests rather reducing the particle emissions

  4. Influence of gas composition on the combustion and efficiency of a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine system fuelled with methanol reformed gases

    OpenAIRE

    Shudo, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine system fuelled with dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol-reformed gas (MRG), both produced from methanol by onboard reformers using exhaust heat, has been proposed in previous research. Adjusting the proportions of DME and MRG with different ignition properties effectively controlled the ignition timing and load in HCCI combustion. The use of the single liquid fuel, methanol, also eliminates the inconvenience of carrying two fuels while mai...

  5. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    OpenAIRE

    David Greatrix

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave ...

  6. Fundamental Structure of High-Speed Reacting Flows: Supersonic Combustion and Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    liquid rocket engines, studied the concept of rotating detonation rocket engine in both gaseous and two-phase propellants . Recently, there have been...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0195 Fundamental Structure of High-Speed Reacting Flows: Supersonic Combustion and Detonation Kenneth Yu MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE...MARCH 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FUNDAMENTAL STRUCTURE OF HIGH-SPEED REACTING FLOWS: SUPERSONIC COMBUSTION AND DETONATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  7. Review of Combustion Stability Characteristics of Swirl Coaxial Element Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulka, J. R.; Casiano, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engine injectors using coaxial elements where the center liquid is swirled have become more common in the United States over the past several decades, although primarily for technology or advanced development programs. Currently, only one flight engine operates with this element type in the United States (the RL10 engine), while the element type is very common in Russian (and ex-Soviet) liquid propellant rocket engines. In the United States, the understanding of combustion stability characteristics of swirl coaxial element injectors is still very limited, despite the influx of experimental and theoretical information from Russia. The empirical and theoretical understanding is much less advanced than for the other prevalent liquid propellant rocket injector element types, the shear coaxial and like-on-like paired doublet. This paper compiles, compares and explores the combustion stability characteristics of swirl coaxial element injectors tested in the United States, dating back to J-2 and RL-10 development, and extending to very recent programs at the NASA MSFC using liquid oxygen and liquid methane and kerosene propellants. Included in this study are several other relatively recent design and test programs, including the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), COBRA, J-2X, and the Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE). A presentation of the basic data characteristics is included, followed by an evaluation by several analysis techniques, including those included in Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis Computer Program (ROCCID), and methodologies described by Hewitt and Bazarov.

  8. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  9. Sound signature of propeller tip vortex cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, P.C.; Westerweel, J.; Van Terwisga, T.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    The design of an efficient propeller is limited by the harmful effects of cavitation. The insuffcient understanding of the role of vortex cavitation in noise and vibration reduces the maximum effciency by a necessary safety margin. The aim in the present study is to directly relate propeller

  10. Green plasticizers for multibase gun propellants (Lecture)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, C.; Driel, C.A. van; Zebregs, M.

    2007-01-01

    TNO Defence, Security and Safety has a long history of research on gun propellants. Areas investigated are formulating (new ingredients, optimization), manufacturing, charge design and lifetime assessment [1,2,3,4,5]. In conventional propellants inert plasticizers are used to alter performance,

  11. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    liquid fuel droplet combustion studies. In addition, the internal compositions of rapidly quenched metal particles will be analyzed using SEM technique. Such compositions are similar to those existing during the combustion and provide new insight on metal combustion processes. The results of this experimental work will be used to model the fundamental mechanisms of metal combustion. Preliminary experimental results on Al and Zr particle combustion at normal gravity are discussed here.

  12. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur.

  13. Proceedings of the Zel’Dovich Memorial International Conference on Combustion, Detonation, Shock Waves Held in Moscow, Russia on 12-17 September 1994. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-17

    New interest in metal combustion has arisen recently due to the plans of using in-situ propellants in lunar and Mars missions. Recent research have...measurements of burner inlet conditions and cold flow in furnace room. Report for Fase 1 of Project 02259. Department of Combustion Research, IsO National

  14. ISRU Propellant Selection for Space Exploration Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical propulsion remains the only viable solution as technically matured technology for the near term human space transportation to Lunar and Mars. Current mode of space travel requires us to "take everything we will need", including propellant for the return trip. Forcing the mission designers to carry propellant for the return trip limits payload mass available for mission operations and results in a large and costly (and often unaffordable) design. Producing propellant via In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) will enable missions with chemical propulsion by the "refueling" of return-trip propellant. It will reduce vehicle propellant mass carrying requirement by over 50%. This mass reduction can translates into increased payload to enhance greater mission capability, reduces vehicle size, weight and cost. It will also reduce size of launch vehicle fairing size as well as number of launches for a given space mission and enables exploration missions with existing chemical propulsion. Mars remains the ultimate destination for Human Space Exploration within the Solar System. The Mars atmospheric consist of 95% carbon dioxide (CO2) and the presence of Ice (water) was detected on Mars surfaces. This presents a basic chemical building block for the ISRU propellant manufacturing. However, the rationale for the right propellant to produce via ISRU appears to be limited to the perception of "what we can produce" as oppose to "what is the right propellant". Methane (CH4) is often quoted as a logical choice for Mars ISRU propellant, however; it is believed that there are better alternatives available that can result in a better space transportation architecture. A system analysis is needed to determine on what is the right propellant choice for the exploration vehicle. This paper examines the propellant selection for production via ISRU method on Mars surfaces. It will examine propellant trades for the exploration vehicle with resulting impact on vehicle performance, size

  15. KAPPEL Propeller. Development of a Marine Propeller with Non-planar Lifting Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, J.; Andersen, Poul

    2002-01-01

    The principle of non-planar lifting surfaces is applied to the design of modern aircraft wings to obtain better lift to drag ratios. Whereas a pronounced fin or "winglet" at the wingtip has been developed for aircraft, the application of the non-planar principle to marine propellers, dealt...... with in this paper, has led to the KAPPEL propeller with blades curved towards the suction side integrating the fin or winglet into the propeller blade. The combined theoretical, experimental and practical approach to develop and design marine propellers with non-planar lifting surfaces has resulted in propellers...... with higher efficiency and lower levels of noise and vibration excitation compared to conventional propellers designed for the same task. Conventional and KAPPEL propellers have been compared for a medium sized container ship and a product tanker. In total nine of these unconventional and two conventional...

  16. Annoyance caused by propeller airplane flyover noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, D. A.; Powell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide information on quantifying the annoyance response of people to propeller airplane noise. The items of interest were current noise metrics, tone corrections, duration corrections, critical band corrections, and the effects of engine type, operation type, maximum takeoff weight, blade passage frequency, and blade tip speed. In each experiment, 64 subjects judged the annoyance of recordings of propeller and jet airplane operations presented at d-weighted sound pressure levels of 70, 80, and 90 dB in a testing room which simulates the outdoor acoustic environment. The first experiment examined 11 propeller airplanes with maximum takeoff weights greater than or equal to 5700 kg. The second experiment examined 14 propeller airplanes weighting 5700 kg or less. Five jet airplanes were included in each experiment. For both the heavy and light propeller airplanes, perceived noise level and perceived level (Stevens Mark VII procedure) predicted annoyance better than other current noise metrics.

  17. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant volume is next considered as example of application, observing the changes occurring in the composition of the combustion gases depending on temperature.

  18. Propelling medical humanities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    Advances in the study of the medical humanities and medical humanities education have been made over the past few decades. Many influential journals have published articles examining the role of medical humanities and medical humanities education, the development and evaluation of medical humanities, and the design of a curriculum for medical humanities education in Western countries. However, most articles related to medical humanities in China were published in Chinese, moreover, researchers have worked in relative isolation and published in disparate journals, so their work has not been systematically presented to and evaluated by international readers. The six companion articles featured in this issue describe the current status and challenge of medical humanities and medical humanities education in China in the hope of providing international readers with a novel and meaningful glimpse into medical humanities in China. This Journal is calling for greater publication of research on medical humanities and medical humanities education to propel medical humanities in China.

  19. New Delivery Systems and Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Dolovich

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC propellants from industrial and household products has been agreed to by over 165 countires of which more than 135 are developing countries. The timetable for this process is outlined in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer document and in several subsequent amendments. Pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs for medical use have been granted temporary exemptions until replacement formulations, providing the same medication via the same route, and with the same efficacy and safety profiles, are approved for human use. Hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs are the alternative propellants for CFCs-12 and -114. Their potential for damage to the ozone layer is nonexistent, and while they are greenhouse gases, their global warming potential is a fraction (one-tenth of that of CFCs. Replacement formulations for almost all inhalant respiratory medications have been or are being produced and tested; in Canada, it is anticipated that the transition to these HFA or CFC-free pMDIs will be complete by the year 2005. Initially, an HFA pMDI was to be equivalent to the CFC pMDI being replaced, in terms of aerosol properties and effective clinical dose. However, this will not necessarily be the situation, particularly for some corticosteroid products. Currently, only one CFC-free formulation is available in Canada – Airomir, a HFA salbutamol pMDI. This paper discusses the in vitro aerosol characteristics, in vivo deposition and clinical data for several HFA pMDIs for which there are data available in the literature. Alternative delivery systems to the pMDI, namely, dry powder inhalers and nebulizers, are briefly reviewed.

  20. Mars Ascent Vehicle-Propellant Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John; Rousseau, Jeremy; Williams, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This project is to develop and test a new propellant formulation specifically for the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) for the robotic Mars Sample Return mission. The project was initiated under the Planetary Sciences Division In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program and is continuing under the Mars Exploration Program. The two-stage, solid motor-based MAV has been the leading MAV solution for more than a decade. Additional studies show promise for alternative technologies including hybrid and bipropellant options, but the solid motor design has significant propellant density advantages well suited for physical constraints imposed while using the SkyCrane descent stage. The solid motor concept has lower specific impulse (Isp) than alternatives, but if the first stage and payload remain sufficiently small, the two-stage solid MAV represents a potential low risk approach to meet the mission needs. As the need date for the MAV slips, opportunities exist to advance technology with high on-ramp potential. The baseline propellant for the MAV is currently the carboxyl terminated polybutadiene (CTPB) based formulation TP-H-3062 due to its advantageous low temperature mechanical properties and flight heritage. However, the flight heritage is limited and outside the environments, the MAV must endure. The ISPT program competed a propellant formulation project with industry and selected ATK to develop a new propellant formulation specifically for the MAV application. Working with ATK, a large number of propellant formulations were assessed to either increase performance of a CTPB propellant or improve the low temperature mechanical properties of a hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant. Both propellants demonstrated potential to increase performance over heritage options, but an HTPB propellant formulation, TP-H-3544, was selected for production and testing. The test plan includes propellant aging first at high vacuum conditions, representative of the Mars transit

  1. A research on polyether glycol replaced APCP rocket propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Tianyou; Bao, Chun Jia; Wang, Yiyang

    2017-08-01

    Ammonium perchlorate composite propellant (APCP) is a modern solid rocket propellant used in rocket vehicles. It differs from many traditional solid rocket propellants by the nature of how it is processed. APCP is cast into shape, as opposed to powder pressing it with black powder. This provides manufacturing regularity and repeatability, which are necessary requirements for use in the aerospace industry. For traditional APCP, ingredients normally used are ammonium peroxide, aluminum, Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene(HTPB), curing agency and other additives, the greatest disadvantage is that the fuel is too expensive. According to the price we collected in our country, a single kilogram of this fuel will cost 200 Yuan, which is about 35 dollars, for a fan who may use tons of the fuel in a single year, it definitely is a great deal of money. For this reason, we invented a new kind of APCP fuel. Changing adhesive agency from cross-linked htpb to cross linked polyether glycol gives a similar specific thrust, density and mechanical property while costs a lower price.

  2. Coolant Design System for Liquid Propellant Aerospike Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Miranda; Branam, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines burn at incredibly high temperatures making it difficult to design an effective coolant system. These particular engines prove to be extremely useful by powering the rocket with a variable thrust that is ideal for space travel. When combined with aerospike engine nozzles, which provide maximum thrust efficiency, this class of rockets offers a promising future for rocketry. In order to troubleshoot the problems that high combustion chamber temperatures pose, this research took a computational approach to heat analysis. Chambers milled into the combustion chamber walls, lined by a copper cover, were tested for their efficiency in cooling the hot copper wall. Various aspect ratios and coolants were explored for the maximum wall temperature by developing our own MATLAB code. The code uses a nodal temperature analysis with conduction and convection equations and assumes no internal heat generation. This heat transfer research will show oxygen is a better coolant than water, and higher aspect ratios are less efficient at cooling. This project funded by NSF REU Grant 1358991.

  3. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  4. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Brandon C., E-mail: terry13@purdue.edu [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sippel, Travis R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pfeil, Mark A. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Gunduz, I.Emre; Son, Steven F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Al-Li alloy propellant has increased ideal specific impulse over neat aluminum. • Al-Li alloy propellant has a near complete reduction in HCl acid formation. • Reduction in HCl was verified with wet bomb experiments and DSC/TGA-MS/FTIR. - Abstract: Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (I{sub SP}). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal I{sub SP} by ∼7 s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5 ± 4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption.

  5. Transient combustion in hybrid rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Mustafa Arif

    1998-09-01

    Hybrid rockets regained interest recently as an alternative chemical propulsion system due to their advantages over the solid and liquid systems that are currently in use. Development efforts on hybrids revealed two important problem areas: (1) low frequency instabilities and (2) slow transient response. Both of these are closely related to the transient behavior which is a poorly understood aspect of hybrid operation. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical study of transient combustion in hybrid rockets. We follow the methodology of identifying and modeling the subsystems of the motor such as the thermal lags in the solid, boundary layer combustion and chamber gasdynamics from a dynamic point of view. We begin with the thermal lag in the solid which yield the regression rate for any given wall heat flux variation. Interesting phenomena such as overshooting during throttling and the amplification and phase lead regions in the frequency domain are discovered. Later we develop a quasi-steady transient hybrid combustion model supported with time delays for the boundary layer processes. This is integrated with the thermal lag system to obtain the thermal combustion (TC) coupled response. The TC coupled system with positive delays generated low frequency instabilities. The scaling of the instabilities are in good agreement with actual motor test data. Finally, we formulate a gasdynamic model for the hybrid chamber which successfully resolves the filling/emptying and longitudinal acoustic behavior of the motor. The TC coupled system is later integrated to the gasdynamic model to obtain the overall response (TCG coupled system) of gaseous oxidizer motors with stiff feed systems. Low frequency instabilities were also encountered for the TCG coupled system. Apart from the transient investigations, the regression rate behavior of liquefying hybrid propellants such as solid cryogenic materials are also studied. The theory is based on the possibility of enhancement

  6. Formulation development and characterization of cellulose acetate nitrate based propellants for improved insensitive munitions properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose acetate nitrate (CAN was used as an insensitive energetic binder to improve the insensitive munitions (IM properties of gun propellants to replace the M1 propellant used in 105 mm artillery charges. CAN contains the energetic nitro groups found in nitrocellulose (NC, but also acetyl functionalities, which lowered the polymer's sensitivity to heat and shock, and therefore improved its IM properties relative to NC. The formulation, development and small-scale characterization testing of several CAN-based propellants were done. The formulations, using insensitive energetic solid fillers and high-nitrogen modifiers in place of nitramine were completed. The small scale characterization testing, such as closed bomb testing, small scale sensitivity, thermal stability, and chemical compatibility were done. The mechanical response of the propellants under high-rate uni-axial compression at, hot, cold, and ambient temperatures were also completed. Critical diameter testing, hot fragment conductive ignition (HFCI tests were done to evaluate the propellants' responses to thermal and shock stimuli. Utilizing the propellant chemical composition, theoretical predictions of erosivity were completed. All the small scale test results were utilized to down-select the promising CAN based formulations for large scale demonstration testing such as the ballistic performance and fragment impact testing in the 105 mm M67 artillery charge configurations. The test results completed in the small and large scale testing are discussed.

  7. Spark Ignition of Combustible Vapor in a Plastic Bottle as a Demonstration of Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    I report an innovation that provides a compelling demonstration of rocket propulsion, appropriate for students of physics and other physical sciences. An electrical spark is initiated from a distance to cause the deflagration of a combustible vapor mixed with air in a lightweight plastic bottle that is consequently propelled as a rocket by the…

  8. Effect of pressure on the composition and superconducting T{sub c} value of NbN prepared by combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscaglia, V. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Genoa (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Fisica Applicata dei Materiali; Caracciolo, F.; Ferretti, M.; Minguzzi, M. [Dipt. di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Genoa (Italy); Musenich, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Genoa (Italy)

    1998-02-20

    The synthesis of niobium nitride by combustion of packed niobium powder under nitrogen atmosphere was studied in the pressure range 3.5-700 bar without solid-phase dilution. Surface melting of niobium was only detected at 30 bar. The reaction products consist of {delta}-NbN above 100 bar and of {gamma}-Nb{sub 4}N{sub 3}+{delta}-NbN at lower pressures. The lattice parameter of {delta}-NbN vs. the applied pressure presents a maximum corresponding to the transition from a predominantly defective nitrogen sublattice (N/Nb<1) to a predominantly defective niobium sublattice (N/Nb>1). Bulk metal-nitride components were obtained using a `chemical oven` configuration and combining the high pressure with the high combustion temperatures of the niobium powder. Thick nitride films of {approx}50 {mu}m with a critical superconducting temperature up to 17.2 K were prepared. The films consist of a {delta}-NbN external layer, of a {gamma}-Nb{sub 4}N{sub 3} intermediate layer and of a {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N inner layer. (orig.) 25 refs.

  9. Energy coefficients for a propeller series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Smærup

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency for a propeller is calculated by energy coefficients. These coefficients are related to four types of losses, i.e. the axial, the rotational, the frictional, and the finite blade number loss, and one gain, i.e. the axial gain. The energy coefficients are derived by use...... of the potential theory with the propeller modelled as an actuator disk. The efficiency based on the energy coefficients is calculated for a propeller series. The results show a good agreement between the efficiency based on the energy coefficients and the efficiency obtained by a vortex-lattice method....

  10. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  11. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-05

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nano Icy Moons Propellant Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWoerkom, Michael (Principal Investigator)

    2017-01-01

    As one of just a few bodies identified in the solar system with a liquid ocean, Europa has become a top priority in the search for life outside of Earth. However, cost estimates for exploring Europa have been prohibitively expensive, with estimates of a NASA Flagship class orbiter and lander approaching $5 billion. ExoTerra's NIMPH offers an affordable solution that can not only land, but return a sample from the surface to Earth. NIMPH combines solar electric propulsion (SEP) technologies being developed for the asteroid redirect mission and microsatellite electronics to reduce the cost of a full sample return mission below $500 million. A key to achieving this order-of-magnitude cost reduction is minimizing the initial mass of the system. The cost of any mission is directly proportional to its mass. By keeping the mission within the constraints of an Atlas V 551 launch vehicle versus an SLS, we can significantly reduce launch costs. To achieve this we reduce the landed mass of the sample return lander, which is the largest multiplier of mission mass, and shrink propellant mass through high efficiency SEP and gravity assists. The NIMPH projects first step in reducing landed mass focuses on development of a micro-In Situ Resource Utilization (micro-ISRU) system. ISRU allows us to minimize landed mass of a sample return mission by converting local ice into propellants. The project reduces the ISRU system to a CubeSat-scale package that weighs just 1.74 kg and consumes just 242 W of power. We estimate that use of this ISRU vs. an identical micro-lander without ISRU reduces fuel mass by 45 kg. As the dry mass of the lander grows for larger missions, these savings scale exponentially. Taking full advantage of the micro-ISRU system requires the development of a micro-liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. The micro-liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine is tailored for the mission by scaling it to match the scale of the micro-lander and the low gravity of the target moon

  13. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    OpenAIRE

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant ...

  14. High Speed Compressor for Subcooling Propellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Propellant densification systems for LH2 require compression systems that develop significant head. In the past this has required multiple stages of compressors...

  15. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  16. High Speed Compressor for Subcooling Propellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The most promising propellant subcooling systems for LH2 require compression systems that involve development of significant head. The inlet pressure for these...

  17. Gelled Propellants for Reduced Temperature Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is responsive to NASA 2004 SBIR objectives (under Topic X6.05) seeking gelled propellant formulations "for long-duration missions involving low-power...

  18. Development and implementation of a propeller test capability for GL-10 "Greased Lightning" propeller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Brian Edward

    Interest in small unmanned aerial vehicles has increased dramatically in recent years. Hybrid vehicles which allow forward flight as a fixed wing aircraft and a true vertical landing capability have always had applications. Management of the available energy and noise associated with electric propeller propulsion systems presents many challenges. NASA Langley has developed the Greased Lightning 10 (GL-10) vertical takeoff, unmanned aerial vehicle with ten individual motors and propellers. All are used for propulsion during takeoff and contribute to acoustic noise pollution which is an identified nuisance to the surrounding users. A propeller test capability was developed to gain an understanding of how the noise can be reduced while meeting minimum thrust requirements. The designed propeller test stand allowed for various commercially available propellers to be tested for potential direct replacement of the current GL-10 propellers and also supported testing of a newly designed propeller provided by the Georgia Institute of Technology. Results from the test program provided insight as to which factors affect the noise as well as performance characteristics. The outcome of the research effort showed that the current GL-10 propeller still represents the best choice of all the candidate propellers tested.

  19. Comparison of super-high-energy-propulsion-systems based on metallic hydrogen propellant for ES to LEO space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierschmann, M.

    1990-01-01

    The application is studied of metallic H2 as a rocket propellant, which contains a specific energy of about 52 kcal/g in theory yielding a maximum specific impulse of 1700 s. With the convincing advantage of having a density 14 times that of conventional liquid H2/liquid O2 propellants, metallic H2 could satisfy the demands of advanced launch vehicle propulsion for the next millennium. Provided that there is an atomic metallic state of H2, and that this state is metastable at ambient pressure, which still is not proven, the results are given of the study of some important areas, which concern the production of metallic H2, the combustion, chamber cooling, and storage. The results show that the use of metallic H2 as rocket propellant could lead to revolutionary changes in space vehicle philosophy toward small size, small weight, and high performance single stage to orbit systems. The use of high metallic H2 mass fractions results in a dramatic reduction of required propellant volume, while gas temperatures in the combustion chamber exceed 5000 K. Furthermore, it follows, that H2 (liquid or slush) is the most favorable candidate as working fluid. Jet generated noise due to high exhaust velocities could be a problem.

  20. Propellant Nonlinear Constitutive Theory Extension: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    r) dr f1 dr 0 *where: u : stress e: strain E(t) = relaxation modulus ( PRONY series representation using a matrix solution for curve fitting data...series of unaxial tests were conducted with two materials - a PEAN and an HTPB propellant. The data was fit to each of the nonlinear theories.* Then the...PRELIMINARY STUDY Generally speaking, solid propellants may be considered as lightly cross- linked long-chain polymers , highly filled with coarse solid

  1. Air lifted and propelled vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.E.; Johnson, R.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a vehicle which rides on air cushion and which is propelled by air, comprising: upper deck means, having a bottom edge which defines the periphery of an area; a thin, flexible sheet located below the upper deck means, extending beneath the bottom edge and secured beneath the bottom edge for defining a plenum that is defined by and closed off by the upper deck means and the sheet. The deck means is shaped within the area defined by its bottom edge for causing the plenum to always be an open space and the upper deck means is rigid enough to maintain that open condition of the plenum; the sheet being secured in a manner permitting the sheet to pillow when air is pressurized in the plenum; and the sheet being perforated below the upper deck means for permitting exit of air from the plenum at a controllable rate through the perforations; the sheet having a large plurality of the perforations dispersed over most of its area below the upper deck means; each of the perforations being a hole.

  2. Development of high temperature materials for solid propellant rocket nozzle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. R., Jr.; Lineback, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of the development and characteristics of thermal shock resistant hafnia ceramic material for use in solid propellant rocket nozzles are presented. The investigation of thermal shock resistance factors for hafnia based composites, and the preparation and analysis of a model of elastic materials containing more than one crack are reported.

  3. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. For propeller-driven small airplanes in the primary, normal, utility...

  4. Water Contaminant Mitigation in Ionic Liquid Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, David; Ziemer, John

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate system and operational requirements are needed in order to ensure mission success without unnecessary cost. Purity requirements applied to thruster propellants may flow down to materials and operations as well as the propellant preparation itself. Colloid electrospray thrusters function by applying a large potential to a room temperature liquid propellant (such as an ionic liquid), inducing formation of a Taylor cone. Ions and droplets are ejected from the Taylor cone and accelerated through a strong electric field. Electrospray thrusters are highly efficient, precise, scaleable, and demonstrate low thrust noise. Ionic liquid propellants have excellent properties for use as electrospray propellants, but can be hampered by impurities, owing to their solvent capabilities. Of foremost concern is the water content, which can result from exposure to atmosphere. Even hydrophobic ionic liquids have been shown to absorb water from the air. In order to mitigate the risks of bubble formation in feed systems caused by water content of the ionic liquid propellant, physical properties of the ionic liquid EMI-Im are analyzed. The effects of surface tension, material wetting, physisorption, and geometric details of the flow manifold and electrospray emitters are explored. Results are compared to laboratory test data.

  5. The effects of SENSE on PROPELLER imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuchou; Pipe, James G; Karis, John P; Gibbs, Wende N; Zwart, Nicholas R; Schär, Michael

    2015-12-01

    To study how sensitivity encoding (SENSE) impacts periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) image quality, including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), robustness to motion, precision of motion estimation, and image quality. Five volunteers were imaged by three sets of scans. A rapid method for generating the g-factor map was proposed and validated via Monte Carlo simulations. Sensitivity maps were extrapolated to increase the area over which SENSE can be performed and therefore enhance the robustness to head motion. The precision of motion estimation of PROPELLER blades that are unfolded with these sensitivity maps was investigated. An interleaved R-factor PROPELLER sequence was used to acquire data with similar amounts of motion with and without SENSE acceleration. Two neuroradiologists independently and blindly compared 214 image pairs. The proposed method of g-factor calculation was similar to that provided by the Monte Carlo methods. Extrapolation and rotation of the sensitivity maps allowed for continued robustness of SENSE unfolding in the presence of motion. SENSE-widened blades improved the precision of rotation and translation estimation. PROPELLER images with a SENSE factor of 3 outperformed the traditional PROPELLER images when reconstructing the same number of blades. SENSE not only accelerates PROPELLER but can also improve robustness and precision of head motion correction, which improves overall image quality even when SNR is lost due to acceleration. The reduction of SNR, as a penalty of acceleration, is characterized by the proposed g-factor method. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Combustion Aerosols from Pulverised Coal Combustion and Biomass Grate Combustion. Filtration aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillieblad, Lena [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology

    2005-06-01

    Combustion processes generate particles, which are formed both from the inorganic content in the fuel and from organic compounds as a result of incomplete combustion. The particles are removed from the flue gas by cyclones, electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) or fabric filters (FFs). The particle removal capacity is strongly depending on the particle properties, operating conditions and selected particle removal technology. The particle properties are depending on fuel type, combustion technique and combustion conditions. In this study the particle properties for two different types of solid fuel combustion were investigated and compared. The two processes were pulverised coal combustion and grate boilers operating on woody biomass. Characterisation of fuels was made both with standard analyses and more sophisticated methods like computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) and subsequent leaching procedures. A major difference between coal and woody biomass is the occurrence of potassium. In woody biofuel potassium is a reactive components, mainly water-soluble or organically associated, whereas it in coal it is associated to minerals like illite. The particle number size and particle mass size distributions were measured with low-pressure impactors (LPI), electrical mobility analysers and electrical low-pressure impactors (ELPI). The submicrometer particle mass concentration was similar for the two combustion processes. There is a difference between different coals and also between different woody biofuels. The coarse particle fraction is considerably larger for coal combustion, due to the high content of minerals in the coal. Potassium, sulphur and chlorine dominate the submicrometer particle chemical composition from wood fired grate boilers. Coarser particles have a high content of calcium. Silicon and aluminium are the major elements in particles from pulverised coal combustion. An enrichment of calcium, sulphur and phosphorous in the submicrometer

  7. Test data from solid propellant plume aerodynamics test program in Ames 6 x 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel (shuttle test FA7) (Ames test 033-66)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of plumes from hot combustion gases in the presence of a transonic external flow field were measured to advance plumes simulation technology, extend a previously acquired data base, and provide data to compare with the effects observed using cold gas plumes. A variety of underexpanded plumes issuing from the base of a strut-mounted ogive-cylinder body were produced by combusting solid propellant gas generators. The gas generator fired in a short-duration mode (200 to 300 msec). Propellants containing 16 percent and 2 percent A1 were used, with chamber pressures from 400 to 1800 psia. Conical nozzles of 15 deg half-angle were tested with area ratios of 4 and 8. Pressures were measured in the gas generator combustion chamber, along the nozzle wall, on the base, and along the body rear exterior. Schlieren photographs were taken for all tests. Test data are presented along with a description of the test setup and procedures.

  8. Multifunctional Metal Matrix Composite Filament Wound Tank Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials offer tremendous potential for lightweight propellant and pressurant tankage for space applications. Thin MMC liners for COPVs...

  9. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  10. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  11. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all...

  12. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  13. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  14. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  15. Highly energetic compositions based on functionalized carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi-Long; Gozin, Michael; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Cohen, Adva; Pang, Si-Ping

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, research in the field of carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), such as fullerenes, expanded graphite (EG), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and graphene oxide (GO), has been widely used in energy storage, electronics, catalysts, and biomaterials, as well as medical applications. Regarding energy storage, one of the most important research directions is the development of CNMs as carriers of energetic components by coating or encapsulation, thus forming safer advanced nanostructures with better performances. Moreover, some CNMs can also be functionalized to become energetic additives. This review article covers updated preparation methods for the aforementioned CNMs, with a more specific orientation towards the use of these nanomaterials in energetic compositions. The effects of these functionalized CNMs on thermal decomposition, ignition, combustion and the reactivity properties of energetic compositions are significant and are discussed in detail. It has been shown that the use of functionalized CNMs in energetic compositions greatly improves their combustion performances, thermal stability and sensitivity. In particular, functionalized fullerenes, CNTs and GO are the most appropriate candidate components in nanothermites, solid propellants and gas generators, due to their superior catalytic properties as well as facile preparation methods.

  16. Modeling of cooling channel flow in liquid-propellant rocket engines

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzarelli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the development of liquid rocket engine, there has been a need to predict the peak heat flux that affects the engine material and thus to control the wall thermal behavior of rocket engine. To prevent thermal failure, the engine is generally cooled by means of a coolant that flows in passages that line the hottest part of the engine (i.e., combustion chamber and nozzle wall). This is the fluid-cooling system. If the coolant is one of the propellants, once it passes through th...

  17. Computational Thermochemistry of Jet Fuels and Rocket Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The design of new high-energy density molecules as candidates for jet and rocket fuels is an important goal of modern chemical thermodynamics. The NASA Glenn Research Center is home to a database of thermodynamic data for over 2000 compounds related to this goal, in the form of least-squares fits of heat capacities, enthalpies, and entropies as functions of temperature over the range of 300 - 6000 K. The chemical equilibrium with applications (CEA) program written and maintained by researchers at NASA Glenn over the last fifty years, makes use of this database for modeling the performance of potential rocket propellants. During its long history, the NASA Glenn database has been developed based on experimental results and data published in the scientific literature such as the standard JANAF tables. The recent development of efficient computational techniques based on quantum chemical methods provides an alternative source of information for expansion of such databases. For example, it is now possible to model dissociation or combustion reactions of small molecules to high accuracy using techniques such as coupled cluster theory or density functional theory. Unfortunately, the current applicability of reliable computational models is limited to relatively small molecules containing only around a dozen (non-hydrogen) atoms. We propose to extend the applicability of coupled cluster theory- often referred to as the 'gold standard' of quantum chemical methods- to molecules containing 30-50 non-hydrogen atoms. The centerpiece of this work is the concept of local correlation, in which the description of the electron interactions- known as electron correlation effects- are reduced to only their most important localized components. Such an advance has the potential to greatly expand the current reach of computational thermochemistry and thus to have a significant impact on the theoretical study of jet and rocket propellants.

  18. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  19. Propeller and inflow vortex interaction : vortex response and impact on the propeller performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Zhou, T; Sciacchitano, A.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.; Eitelberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic operating conditions of a propeller can include complex situations where vorticity from sources upstream can enter the propeller plane. In general, when the vorticity enters in a concentrated form of a vortex, the interaction between the vortex and blade is referred to as

  20. 75 FR 7934 - Airworthiness Directives; McCauley Propeller Systems 1A103/TCM Series Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... inspections of steel reinforcement plates and gaskets. This AD results from 16 reports received of propeller..., inspections of steel reinforcement plates and gaskets, removal from service of propellers with cracks that do... engines modified by Supplemental Type Certificates SA1763SO, SA5695NM, SA1000NW, and SA432NE. Unsafe...

  1. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semiannual technical report, January 14, 1997--August 14, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorr, B.S.; Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-08-31

    Research is presently being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituent size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. Bulk powder processed Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an average particle size of 12 um. Also, to deposit model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings, an electrodeposition technique was developed and coatings with various volume fractions (0-35%) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced. The powder and electrodeposition processing of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Composites provide the ability to produce two phase microstructure without changing the microstructure of the matrix material. Therefore, the effect of hard second phase particles size and volume fraction on erosion resistance could be analyzed.

  2. A Detailed Historical Review of Propellant Management Devices for Low Gravity Propellant Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive background and historical review of Propellant Management Devices (PMDs) used throughout spaceflight history. The purpose of a PMD is to separate liquid and gas phases within a propellant tank and to transfer vapor-free propellant from a storage tank to a transfer line en route to either an engine or receiver depot tank, in any gravitational or thermal environment. The design concept, basic flow physics, and principle of operation are presented for each type of PMD. The three primary capillary driven PMD types of vanes, sponges, and screen channel liquid acquisition devices are compared and contrasted. For each PMD type, a detailed review of previous applications using storable propellants is given, which include space experiments as well as space missions and vehicles. Examples of previous cryogenic propellant management are also presented.

  3. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  4. 3D CFD Simulation and Experimental Validation of Small APC Slow Flyer Propeller Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairuniza Ahmed Kutty

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the numerical prediction method to determine small-scale propeller performance. The study is implemented using the commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD solver, FLUENT. Numerical results are compared with the available experimental data for an advanced precision composites (APC Slow Flyer propeller blade to determine the discrepancy of the thrust coefficient, power coefficient, and efficiencies. The study utilized unstructured tetrahedron meshing throughout the analysis, with a standard k-ω turbulence model. The Multiple Reference Frame model was also used to consider the rotation of the propeller toward its local reference frame at 3008 revolutions per minute (RPM. Results show reliable thrust coefficient, power coefficient, and efficiency data for the case of low advance ratio and an advance ratio less than the negative thrust conditions.

  5. Simulation Of The Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1987-01-01

    Program adapts to available information about particular engine. Mathematical model of internal-combustion engine constructed and implemented as computer program suitable for use on large digital computer systems. ZMOTTO program calculates Otto-cycle performance parameters as well as working-fluid compositions and properties throughout cycle for number of consecutive cycles and for variety of input parameters. Written in standard FORTRAN IV.

  6. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice...

  7. In-Space Propellant Production Using Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, William; Johnson, Wesley; Swanger, Adam; McQuade, William

    2012-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Manned exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space, and larger science mission directorate payloads can be delivered using cryogenic propulsion stages. Several architecture studies have shown that in-space cryogenic propulsion depots offer benefits including lower launch costs, smaller launch vehicles, and enhanced mission flexibility. NASA is currently planning a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) technology demonstration mission that will use existing technology to demonstrate long duration storage, acquisition, mass gauging, and transfer of liquid hydrogen in low Earth orbit. This mission will demonstrate key technologies, but the CPST architecture is not designed for optimal mission operations for a true propellant depot. This paper will consider cryogenic propellant depots that are designed for operability. The operability principles considered are reusability, commonality, designing for the unique environment of space, and use of active control systems, both thermal and fluid. After considering these operability principles, a proposed depot architecture will be presented that uses water launch and on orbit electrolysis and liquefaction. This could serve as the first true space factory. Critical technologies needed for this depot architecture, including on orbit electrolysis, zero-g liquefaction and storage, rendezvous and docking, and propellant transfer, will be discussed and a developmental path forward will be presented. Finally, use of the depot to support the NASA Science Mission Directorate exploration goals will be presented.

  8. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  9. COMPOSITE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An effective medium theory of ferroelectric ceramic-polymer composite materials which treats both components symmetrically has been investigated to demonstrate the role played by the microgeometry of inclusions on dielectric, mechanical and piezoelectric properties of 0-3 composites. The limits of the various theoretical ...

  10. Unit Costs for Lunar-Derived Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Brad R.

    2004-02-01

    The estimated propellant production cost per metric ton will be derived and presented for solar system transportation waypoints. Background on recent and ongoing space resource propellant supply models will be presented, with a review of architectural assumptions, costs and expected markets. Integrated economic and engineering models (Duke et al., 2003; Duke, Blair and Diaz, 2002; Lamassoure et al. 2003; and Blair et al., 2002) estimate production costs, expected productivity of the mining and processing system, reusable transportation element behavior, fuel depot activity and revenues based on projected market conditions. Results of these economic models are used to derive total and marginal unit costs for propellant at fuel depot facilities for the purpose of facilitating the commercial development of space and to aid program and logistic planning for human space exploration missions.

  11. Electrostatic Discharge testing of propellants and primers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the results of testing of selected propellants and primers to Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) characteristic of the human body. It describes the tests and the fixturing built to accommodate loose material (propellants) and the packed energetic material of the primer. The results indicate that all powders passed and some primers, especially the electric primers, failed to pass established requirements which delineate insensitive energetic components. This report details the testing of components and materials to four ESD environments (Standard ESD, Severe ESD, Modified Standard ESD, and Modified Severe ESD). The purpose of this study was to collect data based on the customer requirements as defined in the Sandia Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) Manual, Chapter 9, and to define static sensitive and insensitive propellants and primers.

  12. APEX 3D Propeller Test Preliminary Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    A low Reynolds number, high subsonic mach number flight regime is fairly uncommon in aeronautics. Most flight vehicles do not fly under these aerodynamic conditions. However, recently there have been a number of proposed aircraft applications (such as high altitude observation platforms and Mars aircraft) that require flight within this regime. One of the main obstacles to flight under these conditions is the ability to reliably generate sufficient thrust for the aircraft. For a conventional propulsion system, the operation and design of the propeller is the key aspect to its operation. Due to the difficulty in experimentally modeling the flight conditions in ground-based facilities, it has been proposed to conduct propeller experiments from a high altitude gliding platform (APEX). A preliminary design of a propeller experiment under the low Reynolds number, high mach number flight conditions has been devised. The details of the design are described as well as the potential data that will be collected.

  13. Heterogeneous propellant internal ballistics: criticism and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, R. L.

    2011-10-01

    Although heterogeneous propellant and its innately nondeterministic, chemically discrete morphology dominates applications, ballisticcharacterization deterministic time-mean burning rate and acoustic admittance measures' absence of explicit, nondeterministic information requires homogeneous propellant with a smooth, uniformly regressing burning surface: inadequate boundary conditions for heterogeneous propellant grained applications. The past age overcame this dichotomy with one-dimensional (1D) models and empirical knowledge from numerous, adequately supported motor developments and supplementary experiments. However, current cost and risk constraints inhibit this approach. Moreover, its fundamental science approach is more sensitive to incomplete boundary condition information (garbage-in still equals garbage-out) and more is expected. This work critiques this situation and sketches a path forward based on enhanced ballistic and motor characterizations in the workplace and approximate model and apparatus developments mentored by CSAR DNS capabilities (or equivalent).

  14. Elliptical field-of-view PROPELLER imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Ajit; Pipe, James G

    2009-09-01

    Traditionally two-dimensional scans are designed to support an isotropic field-of-view (iFOV). When imaging elongated objects, significant savings in scan time can potentially be achieved by supporting an elliptical field-of-view (eFOV). This work presents an empirical closed-form solution to adapt the PROPELLER trajectory for an eFOV. The proposed solution is built on the geometry of the PROPELLER trajectory permitting the scan prescription and data reconstruction to remain largely similar to standard PROPELLER. The achieved FOV is experimentally validated by the point spread function (PSF) of a phantom scan. The details of potential savings in scan time and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance in comparison to iFOV scans for both phantom and in-vivo images are also described.

  15. Research of Working Characteristics of Alternative Motor Fuels in Their Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Assad

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Air-fuel mixtures of various composition, using hydrogen, have been investigated in the paper. The paper shows dependences of the investigated mixtures’ combustion duration on an initial pressure and a coefficient of oxidizer (air excess. While adding hydrogen an analysis of mixture burning speed influence on the combustion process in the modeling chamber of internal combustion engine has been carried in the paper. The paper reveals combustion peculiarities while applying hydrogen in the area of poor mixtures.

  16. Local structure of the metal-oxygen bond in compositionally homogeneous, nanocrystalline zirconia-ceria solid solutions synthesized by a gel-combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabregas, Ismael O [CINSO - Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos, CITEFA-CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (1603) Villa Martelli, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fuentes, Rodolfo O [CINSO -Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos, CITEFA-CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (1603) Villa Martelli, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lamas, Diego G [CINSO - Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos, CITEFA-CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (1603) Villa Martelli, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rapp, MarIa E Fernandez de [CINSO - Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos, CITEFA-CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (1603) Villa Martelli, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Reca, Noemi E Walsoee de [CINSO - Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos, CITEFA-CONICET, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (1603) Villa Martelli, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fantini, Marcia C A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Travessa R da Rua do Matao, no.187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Craievich, Aldo F [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Travessa R da Rua do Matao, no.187, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Prado, Rogerio Junqueira [Departamento de Recursos Minerais (DRM-ICET), Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Avenida Fernando Correa s/n, 78060-900, Cuiaba-MT (Brazil); Millen, Ricardo P [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Prof. Lineu Prestes 748, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Temperini, Marcia L A [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Prof. Lineu Prestes 748, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-30

    Compositionally homogeneous ZrO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} nanopowders have been characterized by Raman and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies. These techniques revealed a tetragonal-to-cubic phase transition as a function of CeO{sub 2} content, as observed in a previous synchrotron x-ray diffraction study. The tetragonal-cubic phase boundary was found to be at (85 {+-} 5) mol% CeO{sub 2}. The EXAFS study demonstrated that this transition is related to a tetragonal-to-cubic symmetry change of the Zr-O first neighbour coordination sphere, while the Ce-O coordination sphere preserves its cubic symmetry over the whole composition range.

  17. Lectures on combustion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, S.Z.; Lax, P.D.; Sod, G.A. (eds.)

    1978-09-01

    Eleven lectures are presented on mathematical aspects of combustion: fluid dynamics, deflagrations and detonations, chemical kinetics, gas flows, combustion instability, flame spread above solids, spark ignition engines, burning rate of coal particles and hydrocarbon oxidation. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the lectures. (DLC)

  18. Rocket Combustion Chamber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coating with the ability to protect (1) the inside wall (i.e., lining) of a rocket engine combustion chamber and (2) parts of other apparatuses that utilize or are exposed to combustive or high temperature environments. The novelty of this invention lies in the manner a protective coating is embedded into the lining.

  19. Energetic residues from field disposal of gun propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael R; Walsh, Marianne E; Hewitt, Alan D

    2010-01-15

    Military training with howitzers and mortars produces excess propellant that is burned on the training range and can result in point sources containing high concentrations of unreacted propellant constituents. Propellants contain energetic compounds such as nitroglycerin (NG) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), both of which are found at firing positions and propellant disposal areas. To quantify the mass of residue remaining from the field-expedient disposal of propellants, two mortar propellants and one howitzer propellant were burned under different field conditions. These conditions included burning on a snow pack, at the bottom of a snow pit, and in a pan surrounded by snow for the mortar propellants and on dry and wet sand for the howitzer propellant. For the mortar propellant, the energetics (NG) remaining after burning in the bowl, on frozen ground, and on snow were 0.21%, 5.2% and 18%, respectively. For the howitzer propellant, the difference in energetics (2,4-DNT) remaining after disposal on wet and dry sand was mortar propellant burned in an open container. These tests demonstrate that environmental factors, especially in winter, can play a significant role in the effectiveness of field-expedient disposal of propellants.

  20. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  1. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  2. Neki aspekti performansi raketnih goriva i pravci razvoja čvrstih raketnih goriva / Some aspects of rocket propellant performances and solid rocket propellant development tendencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radun Jeremić

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Radi povećanja korisnog tereta raketnih sistema napori istraživača u oblasti raketnih goriva usmereni su, pre svega, na osvajanje novih sastava sa visokim sadržajem energije, koji će obezbediti veći zapreminski specifični impuls. U radu je dat kratak pregled dosadašnjeg razvoja raketnih goriva, sa posebnim osvrtom na najnovija dostignuća u poboljšanju energetskih karakteristika postojećih sastava, kao i osvajanje potpuno novih sastava visokoenergetskih čvrstih raketnih goriva. / In order to increase pay loads in missile systems, research work in the domain of rocket propellants concentrates on conquering new, high-energy compositions providing a greater volume specific impulse. A short survey of rocket propellant development up to present days is followed by the most recent achievements in enhancing energy characteristics of existing compositions and in conquering completely new compositions of high-energy solid rocket propellants.

  3. Transient Combustion in Granular Propellant Beds. Part I. Theoretical Modeling and Numerical Solution of Transient Combustion Processes in Mobile Granular Propellant Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    equaz:ious Ls thui trsasformod into a set of algebraic equations. Different investigntors use dl.ffereut imth-ds to v-prosen,. the partial derivatives...8217±r%-M lineas are clo~od baor !.Witi.an by. spark plugs, Zlwo spark plugs are used to insure s successful iguiti~n ;zn every firiag. The isnition and...4 Detaiiniuaton of Eigenvalures for Qhe Governing Equations The purpose of thLs appendix is to indicate the algebraic steps to obtain the itgenval

  4. AEROSOL INDUSTRY SUCCESS IN REDUCING CFC PROPELLANT USAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Part I of this report discusses the U.S. aerosol industry's experience in converting from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants to alternative aerosol formulations. Detailed examples of non-CFC formulations are provided for 28 categories of aerosol products. ydrocarbon propellants...

  5. Development of a Marine Propeller With Nonplanar Lifting Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; Friesch, Jürgen; Kappel, Jens J.

    2005-01-01

    The principle of non-planar lifting surfaces is applied to the design of modern aircraft wings to obtain better lift to drag ratios. Whereas a pronounced fin or winglet at the wingtip has been developed for aircraft, the application of the nonplanar principle to marine propellers, dealt...... with in this paper, has led to the KAPPEL propeller with blades curved toward the suction side integrating the fin or winglet into the propeller blade. The combined theoretical, experimental, and practical approach to develop and design marine propellers with nonplanar lifting surfaces has resulted in propellers...... with higher efficiency and lower levels of noise and vibration excitation compared to conventional state-of-the-art propellers designed for the same task. Conventional and KAPPEL propellers have been compared for a medium-sized containership and a product tanker. In total, nine KAPPEL propellers and two...

  6. Attenuation studies of booster-rocket propellants and their simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weirick, L.J.

    1990-08-01

    A series of impact experiments on a composite propellant, an energetic propellant, and their simulants was recently completed using a light-gas gun. Previous experiments were done to obtain Hugoniot data, to investigate the pressure threshold at which a reaction occurs, and to measure spall damage at various impact velocities. The present studies measured the attenuation of shock waves in these materials, completing the shock characterization needed for material modeling. An initial impulse of 2.0 GPa magnitude and {approximately}0.6 {mu}s duration was imposed upon samples of various thicknesses. VISAR was used to measure the free-surface velocity at the back of the samples; these data were used to generate a curve of shock-wave attenuation versus sample thickness for each material. Results showed that all four materials attenuated the shock wave very similarly. Material thicknesses of 3.0, 7.62, 12.7, and 19.0 mm attenuated the shock wave {approximately}16%, 33%, 50%, and 66% respectively. 14 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, William de

    2010-07-31

    The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally

  8. Investigation of the flow turning loss in unstable solid propellant rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Lawrence Mark

    The goal of this study was to improve the understanding of the flow turning loss, which contributes to the damping of axial acoustic instabilities in solid propellant rocket motors. This understanding is needed to develop practical methods for designing motors that do not exhibit such instabilities. The flow turning loss results from the interaction of the flow of combustion products leaving the surface of the propellant with the acoustic field in an unstable motor. While state of the art solid rocket stability models generally account for the flow turning loss, its magnitude and characteristics have never been fully investigated. This thesis describes a combined theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigation of the flow turning loss and its dependence upon various motor design and operating parameters. First, a one dimensional acoustic stability equation that verifies the existence of the flow turning loss was derived for a chamber with constant mean pressure and temperature. The theoretical development was then extended to include the effects of mean temperature gradients to accommodate combustion systems in which mean temperature gradients and heat losses are significant. These analyses provided the background and expressions necessary to guide an experimental study. The relevant equations were then solved for the developed experimental setup to predict the behavior of the flow turning loss and the other terms of the developed acoustic stability equation. This was followed by and experimental study in which the flow turning region of an unstable solid propellant rocket motor was simulated. The setup was used, with and without combustion, to determine the dependence of the flow turning loss upon operating conditions. These studies showed that the flow turning loss strongly depends upon the gas velocity at the propellant surface and the location of the flow turning region relative to the standing acoustic wave. The flow turning loss measured in the

  9. Controlling the composition, microstructure, electrical and magnetic properties of LiFe5O8 powders synthesized by sol gel auto-combustion method using urea as a fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashad, M. M.; El-Shaarawy, M. G.; Shash, N. M.; Maklad, M. H.; Afifi, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline lithium ferrite LiFe5O8 powders were synthesized by the sol gel auto-combustion method from the corresponding metal nitrates using urea as a fuel. DTA results showed that the LiFe5O8 phase started to form at temperature around 385 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that all compositions were formed in a single-phase cubic spinel structure at different annealing temperatures from 400 to 800 °C for 2 h. The lattice parameter was found to decrease whereas the particle size was increased with annealing temperature. The frequency exponent "s" of lithium ferrite lies in the range 0.5≤s≤1, which confirmed the electron hopping between Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions. The electron mobility in LiFe5O8 samples ranged from 0.05 to 0.29 eV, which clearly indicated that the present lithium ferrites have semiconductor-like behavior. The saturation magnetization was increased on increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C. High saturation magnetization (Ms=51.9 emu/g) was achieved for the ferrite powders produced at annealing temperature 800 °C for 2 h.

  10. Improvement of energy efficiency of natural gas combustion by applying a homogeneous combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczyk Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many heat devices designers and operators meet the problem of low efficiency of combustion and restricted emission standards. This process should be improved to maximize its efficiency and satisfy additional requirements as, for example, uniform temperature fieldin combustion chamber, low noise level or very low NOx emission. These requirements are satisfied by homogeneous combustion. Such combustion method is particularly attractive for the steel or glass industry or power industry based in particular on natural gas. In this paper factors, which have the biggest influence on performance of flameless combustion, are discussed, among others: momentum of fuel and oxidizer, composition of the mixture, the temperature of the inlet gases. Additionally, blind simulations of combustion in a combustion chamber of a furnace are run to assess how high is the influence of these factors individually. Numerical simulations are performed in a CFD code AVL Fire. The detailed chemical kinetics mechanism GRI-mech 3.0 is used for combustion calculations. Calculations results are correlated with experimental data. Blind simulations and experiment provide similar level of NOX emission (~6-8 ppm. Experiments showed that the effect of the addition of ethylene to fuel on emissions of NOX, CO, THC is not significant. Similarly, numerical simulations predict that influence of ethylene is negligible. CO, THC and CO2 were on a stable level across all cases. NOX emissions increases when mass flow of air and fuel increases due to higher heat release in the same volume, what results in higher temperature of combustion products. When temperature of fuel increases NOX level decreases.

  11. The 1997 JANNAF Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee and Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee Joint Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Filliben, Jeff D. (Editor); Watson, Anne H. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    In the Propellant Development and Characterization Subcommittee (PDCS) meeting, topics included: the analysis, characterization, and processing of propellants and propellant ingredients; chemical reactivity; liquid propellants; test methods; rheology; surveillance and aging; and process engineering. In the Safety and Environmental Protection Subcommittee (S&EPS) meeting, topics covered included: hydrazine propellant vapor detection methods; toxicity of propellants and propellants; explosives safety; atmospheric modeling and risk assessment of toxic releases; reclamation, disposal, and demilitarization methods; and remediation of explosives or propellant contaminated sites.

  12. Synthesis of functional materials in combustion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, V. D., E-mail: zhvd@ihim.uran.ru; Bamburov, V. G.; Ermakova, L. V.; Lobachevskaya, N. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The conditions for obtaining oxide compounds in combustion reactions of nitrates of metals with organic chelating–reducing agents such as amino acids, urea, and polyvinyl alcohol are reviewed. Changing the nature of internal fuels and the reducing agent-to-oxidizing agent ratio makes possible to modify the thermal regime of the process, fractal dimensionality, morphology, and dispersion of synthesized functional materials. This method can be used to synthesize simple and complex oxides, composites, and metal powders, as well as ceramics and coatings. The possibilities of synthesis in combustion reactions are illustrated by examples of αand γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, YSZ composites, uranium oxides, nickel powder, NiO and NiO: YSZ composite, TiO{sub 2}, and manganites, cobaltites, and aluminates of rare earth elements.

  13. Synthesis of functional materials in combustion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. D.; Bamburov, V. G.; Ermakova, L. V.; Lobachevskaya, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    The conditions for obtaining oxide compounds in combustion reactions of nitrates of metals with organic chelating-reducing agents such as amino acids, urea, and polyvinyl alcohol are reviewed. Changing the nature of internal fuels and the reducing agent-to-oxidizing agent ratio makes possible to modify the thermal regime of the process, fractal dimensionality, morphology, and dispersion of synthesized functional materials. This method can be used to synthesize simple and complex oxides, composites, and metal powders, as well as ceramics and coatings. The possibilities of synthesis in combustion reactions are illustrated by examples of αand γ-Al2O3, YSZ composites, uranium oxides, nickel powder, NiO and NiO: YSZ composite, TiO2, and manganites, cobaltites, and aluminates of rare earth elements.

  14. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... from the beginning to the end. Thus, this work used the Bp standard chart using the optimum design line to carry out the design analysis of propellers for a ship with a detailed calculation of the various stages involved ..... To estimate the weight of all blades and the polar moment of inertia of a blade, the ...

  15. Jumping Mechanism of Self-Propelled Droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yongsheng; Chen, Yan

    2017-11-01

    The self-propelled behavior of coalesced droplets can be utilized to enhance heat transfer performance of dropwise condensation. It has been recognized that the droplet self-propelling is the combined result of the conversion of surface energy to kinetic energy and the unsymmetrical boundary conditions imposed on the droplets. However, the roles of boundary conditions, which largely determine the conversion ratio of surface energy to the effective jumping kinetic energy, are not well understood. In this paper we use a numerical approach to investigate the boundary condition effect on the self-propelling behavior. A Navier-Stokes equation solver for multiphase flows is used to describe the flow field. The moment of fluid interface reconstruction technique is applied to resolute the interfaces. A direction splitting method is applied to advect the interface. And an approximate projection method is used to decouple the calculation of velocity and pressure. Comparisons are made with experimental results and show the simulation can accurately capture self-propelling behavior. Our simulation show the vertical flow velocity inside the coalesced droplet can increase the normalized jumping velocity but the contact area between droplets and substrate can decrease jumping velocity. High viscous dissipation is observed at the beginning of the coalescence which reduces jumping velocity.

  16. 14 CFR 25.875 - Reinforcement near propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reinforcement near propellers. 25.875 Section 25.875 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....875 Reinforcement near propellers. (a) Each part of the airplane near the propeller tips must be...

  17. 14 CFR 23.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 23.907... General § 23.907 Propeller vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood... evaluation of the propeller to show that failure due to fatigue will be avoided throughout the operational...

  18. 14 CFR 25.907 - Propeller vibration and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller vibration and fatigue. 25.907... vibration and fatigue. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a... propeller to show that failure due to fatigue will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  19. Refinement of Propellant Strand Burning Method to Suit Aluminised Composite Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    with a soft brush (dedusting) and the strands were inhibited with paint diluted by water. The paint was a Super Flat acrylic, deep tint base (Line 500...Unfortunately, the viscosity of the epoxy was such that the excess needed to be manually removed by scraping the strands on the edges of the bath as they were...ANNOUNCEMENT No Limitations 17. CITATION IN OTHER DOCUMENTS Yes 18. DSTO RESEARCH LIBRARY THESAURUS http:// web -vic.dsto.defence.gov.au/workareas

  20. Main Factors Affecting Blade Failure of Marine Propeller(2nd Report:Resonance between Vibrations of Propeller Shaft and Blade)

    OpenAIRE

    川添, 強; 松尾, 信太郎; 錦戸, 真吾

    1994-01-01

    The first report showed the difficulty to consider the small material defects and the low fluctuating stress by the hydrodynamic force as the main factors of the propeller blade failure. For the purpose of the elucidation of resonance between vibrations of the propeller shaft and the propeller blade, this paper presents the measurements and calculations of the flexural natural frequency of the full scale propeller blade in .air and in water, the vibratory stress due to the resonance and the l...

  1. Space Transportation Infrastructure Supported By Propellant Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David; Woodcock, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    A space transportation infrastructure is described that utilizes propellant depot servicing platforms to support all foreseeable missions in the Earth-Moon vicinity and deep space out to Mars. The infrastructure utilizes current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) systems such as the Delta IV Heavy, Atlas V, and Falcon 9, for all crew, cargo, and propellant launches to orbit. Propellant launches are made to Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Depot and an Earth-Moon Lagrange Point 1 (L1) Depot to support a new reusable in-space transportation vehicles. The LEO Depot supports missions to Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) for satellite servicing and to L1 for L1 Depot missions. The L1 Depot supports Lunar, Earth-Sun L2 (ESL2), Asteroid and Mars Missions. New vehicle design concepts are presented that can be launched on current 5 meter diameter ELV systems. These new reusable vehicle concepts include a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV) for crew transportation between the LEO Depot, L1 Depot and missions beyond L1; a new reusable lunar lander for crew transportation between the L1 Depot and the lunar surface; and Mars orbital Depot are based on International Space Station (ISS) heritage hardware. Data provided includes the number of launches required for each mission utilizing current ELV systems (Delta IV Heavy or equivalent) and the approximate vehicle masses and propellant requirements. Also included is a discussion on affordability with ideas on technologies that could reduce the number of launches required and thoughts on how this infrastructure include competitive bidding for ELV flights and propellant services, developments of new reusable in-space vehicles and development of a multiuse infrastructure that can support many government and commercial missions simultaneously.

  2. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  3. Les moyens necessaires a l'etude fondamentale des instabilites de combustion d'un moteur biliquide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourme, D.; Schmitt, D.

    (Necessary means for a fundamental study of combustion instabilities in a liquid propellant engine).—Within the framework of Ariane launch vehicle studies, ONERA has entered upon a fundamental investigation of combustion instabilities, that should lead to a digital program simulating the unsteady behaviour of a liquid propellant engine with radial injection, the nominal working pressure of which is near the critical pressure of propellant. The first step of this study was to define the necessary methods and means that must be worked out to characterize the various physical processes taking place in the engine, in order to achieve this object. The droplet size and velocity distributions in space and time (characteristic of injection-atomization) is the upper boundary condition of the problem. It will be empirically described from parametric test results, so a flexible and valid measurement method must be found, the exploitation of which has to be automatized. The droplet evolution within the chamber (characteristic of combustion) depends on environmental conditions, especially forced convection due to radial injection geometry. It will be analyzed with the help of a two-dimenstional single droplet combustion model, that must stay valid near the propellant critical pressure; thus the propellant state law, and its thermodynamic and transport properties, have to be known in this area. Gas flow description, droplet trajectography in a turbulent-environment and mass, momentum and energy transport consideration (characteristic of aerodynamics) will be handled in a progressive way. Each of intermediate models will be checked, then validated, with the help of suitable test results, some of them being fit to be later used as a theoretical support for the exploitation of complementary atomization or combustion experiments. The final model that is reached constitutes the synthesis of the whole study. ONERA has taken advantage of the helpful assistance of external research

  4. Modular, Rapid Propellant Loading System/Cryogenic Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter, Sr.; Jumper, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Test Laboratory (CTL) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has designed, fabricated, and installed a modular, rapid propellant-loading system to simulate rapid loading of a launch-vehicle composite or standard cryogenic tank. The system will also function as a cryogenic testbed for testing and validating cryogenic innovations and ground support equipment (GSE) components. The modular skid-mounted system is capable of flow rates of liquid nitrogen from 1 to 900 gpm (approx equals 3.8 to 3,400 L/min), of pressures from ambient to 225 psig (approx equals 1.5 MPa), and of temperatures to -320 F (approx equals -195 C). The system can be easily validated to flow liquid oxygen at a different location, and could be easily scaled to any particular vehicle interface requirements

  5. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulhavy Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time. Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results – i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  6. Testing fireproof materials in a combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhavy, Petr; Martinec, Tomas; Novak, Ondrej; Petru, Michal; Srb, Pavel

    This article deals with a prototype concept, real experiment and numerical simulation of a combustion chamber, designed for testing fire resistance some new insulating composite materials. This concept of a device used for testing various materials, providing possibility of monitoring temperatures during controlled gas combustion. As a fuel for the combustion process propane butane mixture has been used and also several kinds of burners with various conditions of inlet air (forced, free) and fuel flows were tested. The tested samples were layered sandwich materials based on various materials or foams, used as fillers in fire shutters. The temperature distribution was measured by using thermocouples. A simulation of whole concept of experimental chamber has been carried out as the non-premixed combustion process in the commercial final volume sw Pyrosim. The result was to design chamber with a construction suitable, according to the international standards, achieve the required values (temperature in time). Model of the combustion based on a stoichiometric defined mixture of gas and the tested layered samples showed good conformity with experimental results - i.e. thermal distribution inside and heat release rate that has gone through the sample.

  7. Combustion Technology Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis' High Speed Research (HSR) Propulsion Project Office initiated a targeted outreach effort to market combustion-related technologies developed at Lewis for the next generation of supersonic civil transport vehicles. These combustion-related innovations range from emissions measurement and reduction technologies, to diagnostics, spray technologies, NOx and SOx reduction of burners, noise reduction, sensors, and fuel-injection technologies. The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the Great Lakes Industrial Technology Center joined forces to assist Lewis' HSR Office in this outreach activity. From a database of thousands of nonaerospace firms considered likely to be interested in Lewis' combustion and emission-related technologies, the outreach team selected 41 companies to contact. The selected companies represent oil-gas refineries, vehicle/parts suppliers, and manufacturers of residential furnaces, power turbines, nonautomobile engines, and diesel internal combustion engines.

  8. Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Considers how photography is more than just pointing a camera in the right direction. Explains that good pictures use elements of composition such as the Rule of Thirds, leading lines, framing and repetition of shapes. Presents 16 photographs from college and secondary school publications, and describes the techniques that makes them effective.…

  9. Combustion performance evaluation of Posidonia oceanica using TGA and bubbling fluidized-bed combustor (batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Plis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion performance of emerging raw marine biomass called Posidonia oceanica (PO was investigated using TGA apparatus and a bubbling fluidized-bed batch reactor. The kinetic mechanism and parameters of the combustion process were determined. The Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO method and data fitting method were analyzed. It was observed that a model based on consecutive processes: devolatilisation and char combustion for two fractions of PO (holocellulose and lignin, is the best model for the analyzed cases. Combustion performance was observed using a BFB reactor and the composition of flue gas after combustion was analyzed, and the conversion of NOx and SO2 was taken into account. The relatively low SO2 emission in the case of PO combustion can be attributed to the impact of the sulphur self-retention (SSR process. The results were compared to the combustion of wood biomass and Turow lignite. The results showed the good combustion performance of PO.

  10. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  11. Approach Considerations in Aircraft with High-Lift Propeller Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael D.; Borer, Nicholas K.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's research into distributed electric propulsion (DEP) includes the design and development of the X-57 Maxwell aircraft. This aircraft has two distinct types of DEP: wingtip propellers and high-lift propellers. This paper focuses on the unique opportunities and challenges that the high-lift propellers--i.e., the small diameter propellers distributed upstream of the wing leading edge to augment lift at low speeds--bring to the aircraft performance in approach conditions. Recent changes to the regulations related to certifying small aircraft (14 CFR x23) and these new regulations' implications on the certification of aircraft with high-lift propellers are discussed. Recommendations about control systems for high-lift propeller systems are made, and performance estimates for the X-57 aircraft with high-lift propellers operating are presented.

  12. CFD simulation on Kappel propeller with a hull wake field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul; Møller Bering, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    for propeller designers and the computational effort can be reduced by excluding the hull. The CFD simulation of a propeller flow with a hull wake is verified in order to use CFD as a propeller design tool. A Kappel propeller, which is an innovative tip-modified propeller, is handled. Kappel propellers....... It is investigated how the accuracy is improved, as the wake field is modelled more precisely. The thrust variation and pressure distribution on the blade from the CFD simulation with the hull wake model are also analyzed.......Marine propellers are designed not for the open-water operation, but for the operation behind a hull due to the inhomogeneous hull wake and thrust deduction. The adaptation for the hull wake is important for the propulsive efficiency and cavitation risk especially on single-screw ships. CFD...

  13. Non-cavitating propeller noise modeling and inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Keunhwa; Seong, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    Marine propeller is the dominant exciter of the hull surface above it causing high level of noise and vibration in the ship structure. Recent successful developments have led to non-cavitating propeller designs and thus present focus is the non-cavitating characteristics of propeller such as hydrodynamic noise and its induced hull excitation. In this paper, analytic source model of propeller non-cavitating noise, described by longitudinal quadrupoles and dipoles, is suggested based on the propeller hydrodynamics. To find the source unknown parameters, the multi-parameter inversion technique is adopted using the pressure data obtained from the model scale experiment and pressure field replicas calculated by boundary element method. The inversion results show that the proposed source model is appropriate in modeling non-cavitating propeller noise. The result of this study can be utilized in the prediction of propeller non-cavitating noise and hull excitation at various stages in design and analysis.

  14. Application and Comparison of Different Combustion Models of High Pressure LOX/CH4 Jet Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia De Giorgi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the numerical modeling of combustion in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Pressure and temperature are well above thermodynamic critical points of both the propellants and then the reactants show liquid-like characteristics of density and gas-like characteristics for diffusivity. The aim of the work is an efficient numerical description of the phenomena and RANS simulations were performed for this purpose. Hence, in the present work different kinetics, combustion models and thermodynamic approaches were used for combustion modeling first in a trans-critical environment, then in the sub-critical state. For phases treatment the pure Eulerian single phase approach was compared with the Lagrangian/Eulerian description. For modeling combustion, the Probability Density Function (PDF equilibrium and flamelet approaches and the Eddy Dissipation approach, with two different chemical kinetic mechanisms (the Jones-Lindstedt and the Skeletal model, were used. Real Gas (Soave-Redlich-Kwong and Peng-Robinson equations were applied. To estimate the suitability of different strategies in phenomenon description, a comparison with experimental data from the literature was performed, using the results for different operative conditions of the Mascotte test bench: trans-critical and subcritical condition for oxygen injection. The main result of this study is the individuation of the DPM approach of the most versatile methods to reproduce cryogenic combustion adapted for different operating conditions and producing good results.

  15. Improving the Performance of Multi-engined Airplanes by Means of Idling Propellers : the "free-wheel" Propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillard, M

    1930-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the importance of free-wheeling propellers, this report considers the braking effect of a propeller on a stopped engine when the propeller is rigidly connected with the engine shaft and also when mounted on a free-wheel hub. The cases of propellers of asymmetric and symmetric section are discussed. The author describes the mechanism of the free-wheel propeller as constructed for this test. The results obtained with the device mounted on a 1,000 horsepower two-engine airplane are given.

  16. Smokeless Propellants as Vehicle Borne IED Main Charges: An Initial Threat Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    of equating blast damage from different explosives it has long been the custom to rate the output of explosives as a percentage ofthe output of TNT...size, composition and MREL ’I’HI:: Dhl <LAUKATIUN TU DhTUNA:llUN TRAN,s1𔃻’lUN UNiUN AND SMALL ARMS PROPELLANTS - A STUDY AND REVIEW - 0-5 ’NOMINAL

  17. On shear rheology of gel propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Shai; Peretz, Arie [RAFAEL, MANOR Propulsion and Explosive Systems Division, Haifa (Israel); Natan, Benveniste [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2007-04-15

    Selected fuel, oxidizer and simulant gels were prepared and rheologically characterized using a rotational rheometer. For fuel gelation both organic and inorganic gellants were utilized, whereas oxidizers and simulants were gelled with addition of silica and polysaccharides, respectively. The generalized Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model was found to most adequately represent the gels studied. Hydrazine-based fuels, gelled with polysaccharides, were characterized as shear-thinning pseudoplastic fluids with low shear yield stress, whereas inhibited red-fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) and hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, gelled with silica, were characterized as yield thixotropic fluids with significant shear yield stress. Creep tests were conducted on two rheological types of gels with different gellant content and the results were fitted by Burgers-Kelvin viscoelastic constitutive model. The effect of temperature on the rheological properties of gel propellant simulants was also investigated. A general rheological classification of gel propellants and simulants is proposed. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Hydro-elastic analysis of marine propellers based on a BEM-FEM coupled FSI algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hyoungsuk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A reliable steady/transient hydro-elastic analysis is developed for flexible (composite marine propeller blade design which deforms according to its environmental load (ship speed, revolution speed, wake distribution, etc. Hydro-elastic analysis based on CFD and FEM has been widely used in the engineering field because of its accurate results however it takes large computation time to apply early propeller design stage. Therefore the analysis based on a boundary element method-Finite Element Method (BEM-FEM Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI is introduced for computational efficiency and accuracy. The steady FSI analysis, and its application to reverse engineering, is designed for use regarding optimum geometry and ply stack design. A time domain two-way coupled transient FSI analysis is developed by considering the hydrodynamic damping ffects of added mass due to fluid around the propeller blade. The analysis makes possible to evaluate blade strength and also enable to do risk assessment by estimating the change in performance and the deformation depending on blade position in the ship’s wake. To validate this hydro-elastic analysis methodology, published model test results of P5479 and P5475 are applied to verify the steady and the transient FSI analysis, respectively. As the results, the proposed steady and unsteady analysis methodology gives sufficient accuracy to apply flexible marine propeller design

  19. Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) Gauging of an Isothermal Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurized with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging of a liquid oxygen/liquid nitrogen tank pressurized with gaseous helium that was supplied by a high-pressure cryogenic tank simulating a cold helium supply bottle on a spacecraft. The fluid inside the test tank was kept isothermal by frequent operation of a liquid circulation pump and spray system, and the propellant tank was suspended from load cells to obtain a high-accuracy reference standard for the gauging measurements. Liquid quantity gauging errors of less than 2 percent of the tank volume were obtained when quasi-steady-state conditions existed in the propellant and helium supply tanks. Accurate gauging required careful attention to, and corrections for, second-order effects of helium solubility in the liquid propellant plus differences in the propellant/helium composition and temperature in the various plumbing lines attached to the tanks. On the basis of results from a helium solubility test, a model was developed to predict the amount of helium dissolved in the liquid as a function of cumulative pump operation time. Use of this model allowed correction of the basic PVT gauging calculations and attainment of the reported gauging accuracy. This helium solubility model is system specific, but it may be adaptable to other hardware systems.

  20. Hydro-elastic analysis of marine propellers based on a BEM-FEM coupled FSI algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoungsuk Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A reliable steady/transient hydro-elastic analysis is developed for flexible (composite marine propeller blade design which deforms according to its environmental load (ship speed, revolution speed, wake distribution, etc. Hydro-elastic analysis based on CFD and FEM has been widely used in the engineering field because of its accurate results however it takes large computation time to apply early propeller design stage. Therefore the analysis based on a boundary element method-Finite Element Method (BEM-FEM Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI is introduced for computational efficiency and accuracy. The steady FSI analysis, and its application to reverse engineering, is designed for use regarding optimum geometry and ply stack design. A time domain two-way coupled transient FSI analysis is developed by considering the hydrodynamic damping ffects of added mass due to fluid around the propeller blade. The analysis makes possible to evaluate blade strength and also enable to do risk assessment by estimating the change in performance and the deformation depending on blade position in the ship's wake. To validate this hydro-elastic analysis methodology, published model test results of P5479 and P5475 are applied to verify the steady and the transient FSI analysis, respectively. As the results, the proposed steady and unsteady analysis methodology gives sufficient accuracy to apply flexible marine propeller design.

  1. Controlling the composition, microstructure, electrical and magnetic properties of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} powders synthesized by sol gel auto-combustion method using urea as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashad, M.M., E-mail: rashad133@yahoo.com [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute (CMRDI), Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); El-Shaarawy, M.G.; Shash, N.M.; Maklad, M.H. [Physics Department, Benha University, Benha (Egypt); Afifi, F.A. [Basic Engineering Science Department, Faculty of Engineering, Benha university, Benha (Egypt)

    2015-01-15

    Nanocrystalline lithium ferrite LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} powders were synthesized by the sol gel auto-combustion method from the corresponding metal nitrates using urea as a fuel. DTA results showed that the LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} phase started to form at temperature around 385 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that all compositions were formed in a single-phase cubic spinel structure at different annealing temperatures from 400 to 800 °C for 2 h. The lattice parameter was found to decrease whereas the particle size was increased with annealing temperature. The frequency exponent “s” of lithium ferrite lies in the range 0.5≤s≤1, which confirmed the electron hopping between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The electron mobility in LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} samples ranged from 0.05 to 0.29 eV, which clearly indicated that the present lithium ferrites have semiconductor-like behavior. The saturation magnetization was increased on increasing the annealing temperature up to 800 °C. High saturation magnetization (Ms=51.9 emu/g) was achieved for the ferrite powders produced at annealing temperature 800 °C for 2 h. - Highlights: • LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} phase was prepared at low temperature 400 °C. • Microstructure was temperature dependent. • Electron mobility ranged from 0.05 to 0.29 eV. • Frequency exponent “s” lies in the range 0.5≤s≤1 • Good magnetization was achieved.

  2. Nanoporous Silicon Ignition of JA2 Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    suggested the use of an additional igniter material. Nano bismuth oxide and nano cuprous oxide thermites were both attempted as supplemental igniter...materials. The nano bismuth oxide thermite did not ignite the JA2, but the nano cuprous thermite did succussfully provide ignition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS...nanoporous silicon, JA2 propellant, thermite , ignition 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 26

  3. Holographic Investigation of Solid Propellant Particulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    used at the Naval Postgraduate School in an attempt to obtain this type of data. They are: 1. High speed cinematography of burning propellant strands in...techniques vice conventional photography. Utilization of the holographic procedure results in a film plate which has recorded on it both the phase and...AGFA-GEVAERT 8E75 HD film plate is mounted on a kinematic plate holder near the focal plane of a pair of plano convex lenses. This device serves to

  4. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m)) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  5. Propellant actuated nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke, Alan C.; Knepp, John B.; Skoda, George I.

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear fission reactor combined with a propellant actuated depressurization and/or water injection valve is disclosed. The depressurization valve releases pressure from a water cooled, steam producing nuclear reactor when required to insure the safety of the reactor. Depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel enables gravity feeding of supplementary coolant water through the water injection valve to the reactor pressure vessel to prevent damage to the fuel core.

  6. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  7. Assessing Spontaneous Combustion Instability with Nonlinear Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Casiano, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable interest lies in the ability to characterize the onset of spontaneous instabilities within liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) combustion devices. Linear techniques, such as fast Fourier transforms, various correlation parameters, and critical damping parameters, have been used at great length for over fifty years. Recently, nonlinear time series methods have been applied to deduce information pertaining to instability incipiency hidden in seemingly stochastic combustion noise. A technique commonly used in biological sciences known as the Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis has been extended to the combustion dynamics field, and is introduced here as a data analysis approach complementary to linear ones. Advancing, a modified technique is leveraged to extract artifacts of impending combustion instability that present themselves a priori growth to limit cycle amplitudes. Analysis is demonstrated on data from J-2X gas generator testing during which a distinct spontaneous instability was observed. Comparisons are made to previous work wherein the data were characterized using linear approaches. Verification of the technique is performed by examining idealized signals and comparing two separate, independently developed tools.

  8. Engine system assessment study using Martian propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccio, Dennis; Jacobs, Mark; Scheil, Christine; Collins, John

    1992-06-01

    A top-level feasibility study was conducted that identified and characterized promising chemical propulsion system designs which use two or more of the following propellant combinations: LOX/H2, LOX/CH4, and LOX/CO. The engine systems examined emphasized the usage of common subsystem/component hardware where possible. In support of this study, numerous mission scenarios were characterized that used various combinations of Earth, lunar, and Mars propellants to establish engine system requirements to assess the promising engine system design concept examined, and to determine overall exploration leverage of such systems compared to state-of-the-art cryogenic (LOX/H2) propulsion systems. Initially in the study, critical propulsion system technologies were assessed. Candidate expander and gas generator cycle LOX/H2/CO, LOX/H2/CH4, and LOX/CO/CH4 engine system designs were parametrically evaluated. From this evaluation baseline, tripropellant Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) LOX cooled and bipropellant Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) and Mars Excursion Vehicle (MEV) engine systems were identified. Representative tankage designs for a MTV were also investigated. Re-evaluation of the missions using the baseline engine design showed that in general the slightly lower performance, smaller, lower weight gas generator cycle-based engines required less overall mission Mars and in situ propellant production (ISPP) infrastructure support compared to the larger, heavier, higher performing expander cycle engine systems.

  9. Simulating marine propellers with vortex particle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youjiang; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa; Song, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    The vortex particle method is applied to compute the open water characteristics of marine propellers. It is based on the large-eddy simulation technique, and the Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale model is implemented for the eddy viscosity. The vortex particle method is combined with the boundary element method, in the sense that the body is modelled with boundary elements and the slipstream is modelled with vortex particles. Rotational periodic boundaries are adopted, which leads to a cylindrical sector domain for the slipstream. The particle redistribution scheme and the fast multipole method are modified to consider the rotational periodic boundaries. Open water characteristics of three propellers with different skew angles are calculated with the proposed method. The results are compared with the ones obtained with boundary element method and experiments. It is found that the proposed method predicts the open water characteristics more accurately than the boundary element method, especially for high loading condition and high skew propeller. The influence of the Smagorinsky constant is also studied, which shows the results have a low sensitivity to it.

  10. Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliano, Michael; Seltzer, Andrew; Agarwal, Hans; Robertson, Archie; Wang, Lun

    2012-01-31

    Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO2 level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to two year

  11. Oxy-Combustion Boiler Material Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Gagliano; Andrew Seltzer; Hans Agarwal; Archie Robertson; Lun Wang

    2012-01-31

    Under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NT0005262 Foster Wheeler North America Corp conducted a laboratory test program to determine the effect of oxy-combustion on boiler tube corrosion. In this program, CFD modeling was used to predict the gas compositions that will exist throughout and along the walls of air-fired and oxy-fired boilers operating with low to high sulfur coals. Test coupons of boiler tube materials were coated with deposits representative of those coals and exposed to the CFD predicted flue gases for up to 1000 hours. The tests were conducted in electric tube furnaces using oxy-combustion and air-fired flue gases synthesized from pressurized cylinders. Following exposure, the test coupons were evaluated to determine the total metal wastage experienced under air and oxy-combustions conditions and materials recommendations were made. Similar to air-fired operation, oxy-combustion corrosion rates were found to vary with the boiler material, test temperature, deposit composition, and gas composition. Despite this, comparison of air-fired and oxy-fired corrosion rates showed that oxy-firing rates were, for the most part, similar to, if not lower than those of air-firing; this finding applied to the seven furnace waterwall materials (wrought and weld overlay) and the ten superheater/reheater materials (wrought and weld overlay) that were tested. The results of the laboratory oxy-combustion tests, which are based on a maximum bulk flue gas SO{sub 2} level of 3200 ppmv (wet) / 4050 ppmv (dry), suggest that, from a corrosion standpoint, the materials used in conventional subcritical and supercritical, air-fired boilers should also be suitable for oxy-combustion retrofits. Although the laboratory test results are encouraging, they are only the first step of a material evaluation process and it is recommended that follow-on corrosion tests be conducted in coal-fired boilers operating under oxy-combustion to provide longer term (one to

  12. The Heat of Combustion of Tobacco and Carbon Oxide Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman AB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated a relationship between mass burn rates of straight-grade cigarettes and heats of combustion of the tobacco materials. In the present work, relationships between measured heats of combustion and elemental composition of the tobacco materials were further analyzed. Heats of combustion measured in oxygen were directly correlated with the carbon and hydrogen content of the tobacco materials tested. Ash content of the materials was inversely related to the heats of combustion. The water insoluble residues from exhaustively extracted tobacco materials showed higher heats of combustion and higher carbon content than the non-extracted materials, confirming a direct relationship between carbon content and heat of combustion. A value for the heat of formation of tobacco was estimated (1175 cal/g from the heat of combustion data and elemental analysis results. The estimated value for heat of formation of tobacco appears to be constant regardless of the material type. Heat values measured in air were uniformly lower than the combustion heats in oxygen, suggesting formation of CO and other reaction products. Gases produced during bomb calorimetry experiments with five tobacco materials were analyzed for CO and CO2 content. When the materials were burned in oxygen, no CO was found in the gases produced. Measured heats of combustion matched estimates based on CO2 found in the gas and conversion of the sample hydrogen content to water. Materials burned in air produced CO2 (56% to 77% of the sample carbon content and appreciable amounts of CO (7% to 16% of the sample carbon content. Unburned residue containing carbon and hydrogen was found in the air combustion experiments. Estimated heat values based on amounts of CO and CO2 found in the gas and water formed from the hydrogen lost during combustion in air were higher than the measured values. These observations indicate formation of products containing hydrogen when the materials

  13. Disturbing effect of free hydrogen on fuel combustion in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedler, A

    1923-01-01

    Experiments with fuel mixtures of varying composition, have recently been conducted by the Motor Vehicle and Airplane Engine Testing Laboratories of the Royal Technical High School in Berlin and at Fort Hahneberg, as well as at numerous private engine works. The behavior of hydrogen during combustion in engines and its harmful effect under certain conditions, on the combustion in the engine cylinder are of general interest. Some of the results of these experiments are given here, in order to elucidate the main facts and explain much that is already a matter of experience with chauffeurs and pilots.

  14. Environmentally conscious coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to evaluate the environmental impacts of home-scale coal combustion on the Navajo Reservation and develop strategies to reduce adverse health effects associated with home-scale coal combustion. Principal accomplishments of this project were: (1) determination of the metal and gaseous emissions of a representative stove on the Navajo Reservation; (2) recognition of cyclic gaseous emissions in combustion in home-scale combustors; (3) `back of the envelope` calculation that home-scale coal combustion may impact Navajo health; and (4) identification that improved coal stoves require the ability to burn diverse feedstocks (coal, wood, biomass). Ultimately the results of Navajo home-scale coal combustion studies will be extended to the Developing World, particularly China, where a significant number (> 150 million) of households continue to heat their homes with low-grade coal.

  15. Experimental Study of Open Water Non-Series Marine Propeller Performance

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Elghorab; A. Abou El-Azm Aly; A. S. Elwetedy; M. A. Kotb

    2013-01-01

    Later marine propeller is the main component of ship propulsion system. For a non-series propeller, it is difficult to indicate the open water marine propeller performance without an experimental study to measure the marine propeller parameters. In the present study, the open water performance of a non-series marine propeller has been carried out experimentally. The geometrical aspects of a commercial non-series marine propeller have been measured for a propeller blade ar...

  16. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  17. Long-Term Cryogenic Propellant Storage on Mars with Hercules Propellant Storage Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This report details the process and results of roughly sizing the steady state, zero boil-off thermal and power parameters of the Hercules Propellant Storage Facility. For power analysis, isothermal and isobaric common bulkhead tank scenarios are considered. An estimated minimum power requirement of 8.3 kW for the Reverse Turbo-Brayton Cryocooler is calculated. Heat rejection concerns in soft vacuum Mars atmosphere are noted and potential solutions are proposed. Choice of coolant for liquid propellant conditioning and issues with current proposed cryocooler cycle are addressed; recommendations are made, e.g. adding a Joule-Thomson expansion valve after the Reverse Turbo-Brayton turbine in order to have two-phase, isothermal heat exchange through the Broad Area Cooling system. Issues with cross-country transfer lines from propellant storage to flight vehicle are briefly discussed: traditional vacuum jacketed lines are implausible, and Mars insulation needs to be developed.

  18. REVERSE ENGINEERING IN MODELING OF AIRCRAFT PROPELLER BLADE - FIRST STEP TO PRODUCT OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yasir Anwar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Propeller aircrafts have had many ups and downs throughout their use in the aviation history. Due to the current economic recession and price hikes in fuels, propeller aircrafts may yet again be a choice for aerial transport and has thus re-emerged as an active area for research. On modern propeller aircrafts old aluminum propellers are being replaced with fiber reinforced composite propellers. However, owing to their reliability, strength, and integrity, aluminum propellers are still used in military aircrafts. One of the challenges that engineers of these aircraft-type have had to deal with is the non-availability of engineering drawings of these propellers. It is practically impossible to carry out any study, research or modification on such propellers in the absence of correct CAD data. This article proposes a methodology wherein a CAD model of a C-130 aircraft propeller blade can be constructed using reverse engineering techniques. Such a model would help in future aerodynamic as well as structural analyses which includes investigation on structural integrity and the fluid dynamics characteristics of propeller blades. Different steps involved in this process are discussed; starting from laser scanning to obtain the cloud of points data and subsequently generating a CAD model in a commercial CAD software. The model is then imported into an analysis software where quality surface meshes are generated using tetrahedral elements. The purpose is to prepare a meshed model for future computational analysis including CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics and FE (Finite Element analysis. ABSTRAK: Pesawat bebaling mempunyai tempoh pasang surutnya sepanjang penggunaanya dalam sejarah penerbangan. Kini disebabkan oleh kemelesetan ekonomi dan kenaikan harga minyak, pesawat bebaling mungkin akan merupakan pengangkutan udara pilihan dan seterusnya muncul semula sebagai ruangan aktif penyelidikan. Pada pesawat bebaling moden, bebaling aluminium yang

  19. Internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  20. In-water gas combustion in linear and annular gas bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, V. S.; Drozhzhin, A. P.; Medvedev, R. N.; Batraev, I. S.

    2014-08-01

    A new pulsed-cyclic method of in-water gas combustion was developed with separate feed of fuel gas and oxygen with the focus on development of new technologies for heat generators and submerged propellers. The results of calorimetric and hydrodynamic measurements are presented. In-water combustion of acetylene, hydrogen, and propane was tested with the operation frequency of 2-2.5 Hz and with a linear injector. The combustion dynamics of combustion of stoichiometric mixture with propane (C3H8+5O2) was studied for a bubble near a solid wall; the produced gas bubble continues expansion and oscillations (for the case of linear and annular bubbles). It was demonstrated that gas combustion in annular bubbles produces two same-magnitude pulses of force acting on the wall. The first pulse is produced due to expansion of combustion products, and the second pulse is produced due to axial cumulative processes after bubble collapse. This process shapes an annular vortex which facilitates high-speed convective processes between combustion products and liquid; and this convection produces small-size bubbles.