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Sample records for complexes carbonate phosphate

  1. Complexation/encapsulation of green tea polyphenols in mixed calcium carbonate and phosphate micro-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabbadi, Amal; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P; Ouali, Lahoussine

    2011-01-01

    We used a double-jet mixer to encapsulate water-soluble polyphenols, green tea extract (GTE), with calcium-based inorganic materials. The device mixed calcium chloride solutions with a solution of carbonate and phosphate in the presence of a GTE solution, and formed micro-particles which capture the GTE molecules. The micro-particles were analysed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the encapsulation yield and loading of the different GTE components. We established correlations between (1) the efficiency of the GTE encapsulation and the composition of the mixed anion solutions and (2) the protonation degree of the ions and the molar ratio of calcium cations and carbonate/phosphate anions. An optimal and reproducible GTE loading of about 40% with an encapsulation yield of 65% was observed for a carbonate/phosphate molar composition of 4 : 1. In addition, our experimental results showed that the process is selective and favours the encapsulation of gallated species which form stronger complexes with calcium cations.

  2. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  3. Metal complex derivatives of hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohol, D.; Blinn, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    Derivatives of hydrogen uranyl phosphate were prepared by incorporating transition metal complexes into the uranyl phosphate matrix. The transition metal complexes employed include bis(ethylenediamine)copper(II), bis(1,3-propanediamine)copper(II) chloride, (triethylenetetramine)copper(II), (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)copper(II), (1,4,8,12-tetraazacyclopentadecane)copper(II), (1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)nickel(II) chloride, (triethylenetetramine)nickel(II) and others. The chemical analyses of these derivatives indicated that the incorporation of the transition metal complexes into the uranyl phosphate matrix via ion exchange was not stoichiometric. The extent of ion exchange is dependent on the size and structure of the transition metal complex. All complexes were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, electronic and infrared spectra, thermal analyses and chemical analysis. An attempt was made to correlate the degree of quenching of the luminescence of the uranyl ion to the spacing between the uranyl phosphate layers in the derivatives

  4. Method of stripping plutonium from tributyl phosphate solution which contains dibutyl phosphate-plutonium stable complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochsenfeld, W.; Schmieder, H.

    1976-01-01

    Fast breeder fuel elements which have been highly burnt-up are reprocessed by extracting uranium and plutonium into an organic solution containing tributyl phosphate. The tributyl phosphate degenerates at least partially into dibutyl phosphate and monobutyl phosphate, which form stable complexes with tetravalent plutonium in the organic solution. This tetravalent plutonium is released from its complexed state and stripped into aqueous phase by contacting the organic solution with an aqueous phase containing tetravalent uranium. 6 claims, 1 drawing figure

  5. Industrial hygiene survey. IMC, Phosphate Chemical Complex, New Wales, Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, F.; Cassady, M.

    1977-10-01

    An industrial hygiene survey was conducted by NIOSH at IMC Phosphate Chemical Complex, New Wales, Florida, on June 7-11, 1976, as part of a study of the phosphate industry. Phosphate fertilizer manufacturing, the plant, and the medical, safety, and industrial hygiene programs are described. During the study 8-hour time weighted averages were determined for exposure to arsenic, cadmium, chromium, vanadium, phosphoric acid, and sulfuric acid for workers involved in cleaning out phosphoric acid reactor vessels. General area samples were collected for fluorides, radon, and uranium. Several samples were above the NIOSH recommended levels for arsenic and chromium

  6. Chemical activation of gasification carbon residue for phosphate removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpimaa, Sari; Runtti, Hanna; Lassi, Ulla; Kuokkanen, Toivo

    2012-05-01

    Recycling of waste materials provides an economical and environmentally significant method to reduce the amount of waste. Bioash formed in the gasification process possesses a notable amount of unburned carbon and therefore it can be called a carbon residue. After chemical activation carbon residue could be use to replace activated carbon for example in wastewater purification processes. The effect of chemical activation process variables such as chemical agents and contact time in the chemical activation process were investigated. This study also explored the effectiveness of the chemically activated carbon residue for the removal of phosphate from an aqueous solution. The experimental adsorption study was performed in a batch reactor and the influence of adsorption time, initial phosphate concentration and pH was studied. Due to the carbon residue's low cost and high adsorption capacity, this type of waste has the potential to be utilised for the cost-effective removal of phosphate from wastewaters. Potential adsorbents could be prepared from these carbonaceous by-products and used as an adsorbent for phosphate removal.

  7. Investigation of the benzotriazole as addictive for carbon steel phosphating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annies, V.; Cunha, M.T.; Rodrigues, P.R.P.; Banczek, E.P.; Terada, M.

    2010-01-01

    This work studied the viability of substitution of sodium nitrite (NaNO 2 ) for benzotriazole (BTAH) in the zinc phosphate bath (PZn+NaNO 2 ) for phosphating of carbon steel (SAE 1010). The characterization of the samples was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was evaluated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by Open Circuit Potential, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Anodic Potentiodynamic Polarization Curves in a 0.5 mol L -1 NaCl electrolyte. The experimental results showed that the phosphate layer obtained in the solution with benzotriazole (PZn+BTAH) presented better corrosion resistance properties than that obtained in sodium nitrite. The results demonstrated that the sodium nitrite NaNO 2 can be replaced by benzotriazole (BTAH) in zinc phosphate baths. (author)

  8. Phosphate binding therapy in dialysis patients: focus on lanthanum carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A Mohammed

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ismail A Mohammed, Alastair J HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, UKAbstract: Hyperphosphatemia is an inevitable consequence of end stage chronic kidney disease and is present in the majority of dialysis patients. Recent observational data has associated hyperphosphatemia with increased cardiovascular mortality among dialysis patients. Dietary restriction of phosphate and current dialysis prescription practices are not enough to maintain serum phosphate levels within the recommended range so that the majority of dialysis patients require oral phosphate binders. Unfortunately, conventional phosphate binders are not reliably effective and are associated with a range of limitations and side effects. Aluminium-containing agents are highly efficient but no longer widely used because of well established and proven toxicity. Calcium based salts are inexpensive, effective and most widely used but there is now concern about their association with hypercalcemia and vascular calcification. Sevelamer hydrochloride is associated with fewer adverse effects, but a large pill burden and high cost are limiting factors to its wider use. In addition, the efficacy of sevelamer as a monotherapy in lowering phosphate to target levels in severe hyperphosphatemia remains debatable. Lanthanum carbonate is a promising new non-aluminium, calcium-free phosphate binder. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated a good safety profile, and it appears well tolerated and effective in reducing phosphate levels in dialysis patients. Its identified adverse events are apparently mild to moderate in severity and mostly GI related. It appears to be effective as a monotherapy, with a reduced pill burden, but like sevelamer, it is significantly more expensive than calcium-based binders. Data on its safety profile over 6 years of treatment are now available.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, lanthanum

  9. Biomineralization of carbonate and phosphate by moderately halophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Rivadeneyra, Maria A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; McKenzie, Judith A.

    We investigated the precipitation of carbonate and phosphate minerals by 19 species of moderately halophilic bacteria using media with variable Mg 2+/Ca2+ ratios. The precipitated minerals were calcite, magnesium (Mg) calcite, and struvite (MgNH4PO4· 6H2O) in variable proportions depending on the

  10. Hydrogen Bonding in Phosphine Oxide/Phosphate-Phenol Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    To develop a new solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) system for the removal of phenols and thiophenols from water, complex formation by hydrogen bonding of phosphine oxides and phosphates is studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemical modeling. Six different computational

  11. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of D-Galactose-6-Phosphate Isomerase Complexed with Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays. PMID:24015281

  12. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  13. Actinides and rare earths complexation with adenosine phosphate nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostapha, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorus compounds are important molecules in both nuclear industry and living systems fields. Indeed, several extractants of organophosphorus compounds (such as TBP, HDEHP) are used in the nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and in the biological field. For instance, the nucleotides are organophosphates which play a very important role in various metabolic processes. Although the literature on the interactions of actinides with inorganic phosphate is abundant, published studies with organophosphate compounds are generally limited to macroscopic and / or physiological approaches. The objective of this thesis is to study the structure of several organophosphorus compounds with actinides to reach a better understanding and develop new specific buildings blocks. The family of the chosen molecules for this procedure consists of three adenine nucleotides mono, bi and triphosphate (AMP, adenosine monophosphate - ADP, adenosine diphosphate - ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and an amino-alkylphosphate (AEP O-phosphoryl-ethanolamine). Complexes synthesis was conducted in aqueous and weakly acidic medium (2.8-4) for several lanthanides (III) (Lu, Yb, Eu) and actinides (U (VI), Th (IV) and Am (III)). Several analytical and spectroscopic techniques have been used to describe the organization of the synthesized complexes: spectrometric analysis performed by FTIR and NMR were used to identify the functional groups involved in the complexation, analysis by ESI-MS and pH-metric titration were used to determine the solution speciation and EXAFS analyzes were performed on Mars beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, have described the local cation environment, for both solution and solid compounds. Some theoretical approaches of DFT were conducted to identify stable structures in purpose of completing the experimental studies. All solid complexes (AMP, ADP, ATP and AEP) have polynuclear structures, while soluble ATP complexes are mononuclear. For all synthesized complexes, it has been

  14. Application of phosphating techniques to aluminium and carbon steel surfaces using nitro guanidine as oxidizing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briseno M, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Phosphate coatings are inorganic crystalline deposits laid down uniformly on properly prepared surfaces by a chemical reaction with the treated base metal. The reaction consists in dissolving some surface metal by acid attack and then causing surface neutralization of the phosphate solution with consequent precipitation of the phosphate coating. Phosphate coatings do not provide appreciable corrosion protection in themselves. They are useful mainly as a base for paints, ensuring good adherence of paint to steel and decreasing the tendency for corrosion to under cut the paint film at scratches or other defects. In this work firstly were realized phosphate on standard carbon steel, employing technical of cold phosphate (at 40 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 30 minutes) and hot phosphate (at 88 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 15 minutes), where with this last were obtained the best results. Both methods used phosphate solutions of Zn/Mn and using as catalyst Nitro guanidine. Aluminium surfaces were phosphate used solutions of Cr and as catalyst Sodium bi fluoride. The phosphating on this surface were realized at temperature of 50 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 10 minutes. In this work were obtained a new phosphate coatings on steel surfaces, these coatings were realized with a phosphate solution manufactured with the precipitates gathered during the hot phosphating on carbon steel. These coatings show excellent physical characteristics and of corrosion resistance. Were determined the physical testings of the coatings phosphate obtained on carbon steel and aluminium surfaces. These testing were: roughness, thickness, microhardness and adhesion. The best results were showed in carbon steel phosphate with precipitated solutions. The technical of analysis for activation with thermic neutrons was used to determine the phosphate coatings composition. Finally, corrosion testings were realized by means of two methods

  15. Protein complexation with DNA phosphates as a cause for DNA duplex destabilization : a thermodynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, van M.H.P.; Buck, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Complexation of positively charged sites in a protein with the negative DNA phosphate groups shields the phosphate charges. This diminishes interstrand electrostatic repulsions, which stabilizes the duplex. When phosphate shidlding is present in one DNA strand only, the conformation of this strand

  16. Capacitive, deionization with carbon aerogel electrodes: Carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the capacitive deionization (CDI) of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes has been developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals are required for regeneration of the system. Electricity is used instead. Water with various anions and cations is pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, ions are electrostatically removed from the water and held in the electric double layers formed at the surfaces of electrodes. The water leaving the cell is purified, as desired. The effects of cell voltage on the electrosorption capacities for Na 2 SO 4 , Na 3 PO 4 , and Na 2 CO 3 have been investigated and are reported here. Results for NaCl and NaNO 3 have been reported previously. Possible applications for CDI are as a replacement for ion exchange processes which remove heavy metals and radioisotopes from process and waste water in various industries, as well as to remove inorganic ions from feedwater for fossil and nuclear power plants

  17. Pore-Water Carbonate and Phosphate As Predictors of Arsenate Toxicity in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Dane T; Kader, Mohammed; Wang, Liang; Choppala, Girish; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-12-06

    Phytotoxicity of inorganic contaminants is influenced by the presence of competing ions at the site of uptake. In this study, interaction of soil pore-water constituents with arsenate toxicity was investigated in cucumber (Cucumis sativa L) using 10 contrasting soils. Arsenate phytotoxicity was shown to be related to soluble carbonate and phosphate. The data indicated that dissolved phosphate and carbonate had an antagonistic impact on arsenate toxicity to cucumber. To predict arsenate phytotoxicity in soils with a diverse range of soil solution properties, both carbonate and phosphate were required. The relationship between arsenic and pore-water toxicity parameters was established initially using multiple regression. In addition, based on the relationship with carbonate and phosphate we successively applied a terrestrial biotic ligand-like model (BLM) including carbonate and phosphate. Estimated effective concentrations from the BLM-like parametrization were strongly correlated to measured arsenate values in pore-water (R 2 = 0.76, P soils.

  18. Effect of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium orthophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliassi, Mohammad Daoud, E-mail: eliassi2007@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhao, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Soil Erosion and Dryland Farming on Loess Plateau, Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yangling 712100 (China); Tan, Wen Feng, E-mail: wenfeng.tan@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Arable Land Conservation (Middle and Lower Reaches of Yangtze River), Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate and hydroxylapatite (HAp), respectively. Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are effective on the reduction of carbonate activity during the crystallization of HAp. - Highlights: • Formation of different complexes from CO{sub 3}{sup 2−}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and Ca{sup 2+} solutions at 60 °C. • Molar ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2} cause changes in phase and size of synthesized products. • Addition of PO{sub 4}{sup 3} inhibited the activity of CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} during bound with Ca{sup 2+}. • The phase transformation was completed, when CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappeared in FTIR. • PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ca{sup 2+} distributed heterogeneously on the surface of precipitation. - Abstract: Complexes among phosphate, carbonate and calcium have been synthesized by a designed hydrothermal method. Effects of carbonate and phosphate ratios on the transformation of calcium-orthophosphates were investigated. With X-ray diffraction measurement the synthesized product at the low (0.15) and the high (1.8) molar ratio of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} is calcium phosphate hydrate at pH 9.0, and hydroxylapatite (HAp) at pH 8.0, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of product at the high ratio (1.8) of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} shows that the CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} peaks disappear, and the strong peaks at 1412 and 1460 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the vibrations of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in HAp. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of products at the low (0.15–0.6) to the high (1.2–1.8) ratios of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} are obtained at 2.9 and 2.7 ppm, respectively. Molar ratios of PO

  19. Direct 3D powder printing of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for substitution of complex bone defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castilho, Miguel; Pires, Inês; Moseke, Claus; Ewald, Andrea; Gbureck, Uwe; Groll, Jürgen; Teßmar, Jörg; Vorndran, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The 3D printing technique based on cement powders is an excellent method for the fabrication of individual and complex bone substitutes even in the case of large defects. The outstanding bone remodeling capacity of biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) containing hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) in varying ratios makes the adaption of powder systems resulting in BCP materials to this fabrication technique a desirable aim. This study presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel powder system for the 3D printing process, intended for the production of complexly shaped BCP scaffolds by a hydraulic setting reaction of calcium carbonate and TCP with phosphoric acid. The HA/TCP ratio in the specimens could be tailored by the calcium/phosphate ratio of the starting powder. The scaffolds could be fabricated with a dimensional accuracy of >96.5% and a minimal macro pore size of 300 µm. Independent of the phase composition the printed specimens showed a microporosity of approximately 68%, while the compressive strength strongly depended on the chemical composition and increased with rising TCP content in the scaffolds to a maximum of 1.81 MPa. Post-treatment of the scaffolds with a polylactic-co-glycolic acid-solution enhanced the mechanical properties by a factor of 8. In vitro studies showed that all BCP scaffolds were cytocompatible and enhanced the cell viability as well as the cell proliferation, as compared with pure TCP. Cell proliferation is even better on BCP when compared to HA and cell viability is in a similar range on these materials. (paper)

  20. Complex formation of uranium(VI) with fructose and glucose phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koban, A.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2002-01-01

    The uptake of heavy metals into plants is commonly quantified by the soil-plant transfer factor. Up to now little is known about the chemical speciation of actinides in plants. To compare the obtained spectroscopic data of uranium complexes in plants with model compounds, we investigate the complexation of uranium with relevant bioligands of various functionalities. A very important class of ligands consists of phosphate esters, which serve as phosphate group and energy transmitters as well as energy storage media in biological systems. Heavy metal ions bound to the phosphate esters can be transported into living cells and then deposited. Therefore, in our study we present the results of uranium complexation with glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) obtained by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The experiments were performed at a fixed uranyl concentration (10 -5 M) as a function of the ligand concentrations (10 -5 to 10 -3 M) in a pH range from 2 to 4.5. For the glucose phosphate system we observed, using increasing ligand concentrations, a decrease in the fluorescence intensity and a small red shift of the emission bands. From this we conclude that the complexed uranyl glucose phosphate species show only minor or no fluorescence properties. The TRLFS spectra of the glucose phosphate samples indicated the presence of a single species with fluorescence properties. This species has a lifetime of approximately 1.5 μs and was identified as the free uranyl ion. An opposite phenomenon was observed for the fructose phosphate system: there was no decrease in fluorescence intensity. However, a strong red shift of the spectra was observed, illustrating the fluorescence properties of the uranyl fructose phosphate complex. The TRLFS spectra of the fructose phosphate system showed a second lifetime ( 2 2+ UO 2 (lig) x (2-y)+ + y H + (lig = sugar phosphate). Applying the mass action law and transformation to the logarithmic

  1. Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coating for carbon/carbon composites prepared by pulsed electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shou-jie, E-mail: jlliushoujie@126.com; Li, He-jun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Lei-lei, E-mail: zhangleilei@nwpu.edu.cn; Feng, Lei, E-mail: fengleijinan@163.com; Yao, Pei, E-mail: 1113923884@qq.com

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The potentiodynamic polarization curve shows that the SM-DCPD coating can dramatically enhance the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) value and meanwhile decrease the corrosion current density (I{sub corr}) of C/C composites. - Highlights: • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coatings for carbon/carbon composites were synthesized by pulsed eletrodeposition. • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coated carbon/carbon composites exhibited excellent bioactivity in vivo. • Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coated carbon/carbon composites showed lower corrosion rate with the comparison to pure carbon/carbon composites. - Abstract: Trace elements substituted apatite coatings have received a lot of interest recently as they have many benefits. In this work, strontium and magnesium substituted DCPD (SM-DCPD) coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by pulsed electrodeposition method. The morphology, microstructure, corrosion resistance and in vitro bioactivity of the SM-DCPD coatings are analyzed. The results show that the SM-DCPD coatings exhibit a flake-like morphology with dense and uniform structure. The SM-DCPD coatings could induce the formation of apatite layers on their surface in simulated body fluid. The electrochemical test indicates that the SM-DCPD coatings can evidently decrease the corrosion rate of the C/C composites in simulated body fluid. The SM-DCPD has potential application as the bioactive coatings.

  2. Developing porous carbon with dihydrogen phosphate groups as sulfur host for high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhui; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Junwei; Liang, Xiao; Baker, Andrew P.; Qu, Deyang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Huayu; Zhang, Xinhe

    2018-02-01

    Carbon matrix (CM) derived from biomass is low cost and easily mass produced, showing great potential as sulfur host for lithium sulfur batteries. In this paper we report on a dihydrogen phosphate modified CM (PCM-650) prepared from luffa sponge (luffa acutangula) by phosphoric acid treatment. The phosphoric acid not only increases the surface area of the PCM-650, but also introduces dihydrogen phosphate onto PCM-650 (2.28 at% P). Sulfur impregnated (63.6 wt%) PCM-650/S, in comparison with samples with less dihydrogen phosphate LPCM-650/S, shows a significant performance improvement. XPS analysis is conducted for sulfur at different stages, including sulfur (undischarged), polysulfides (discharge to 2.1 V) and short chain sulfides (discharge to 1.7 V). The results consistently show chemical shifts for S2p in PCM-650, suggesting an enhanced adsorption effect. Furthermore, density functional theory (DFT) calculations is used to clarify the molecular binding: carbon/sulfur (0.86 eV), carbon/Li2S (0.3 eV), CH3-O-PO3H2/sulfur (1.24 eV), and CH3-O-PO3H2/Li2S (1.81 eV). It shows that dihydrogen phosphate group can significantly enhance the binding with sulfur and sulfide, consistent with XPS results. Consequently a CM functionalised with dihydrogen phosphate shows great potential as the sulfur host in a Li-S battery.

  3. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engeneering; Roden, E.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2007-07-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  4. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O.; Roden, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  5. The carbonate complexation of plutonium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium(IV) carbonate complexes are expected to be of particular importance in typical groundwaters at the Yucca Mountain site of the candidate nuclear waste repository being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project. The chemistry of these complexes is also important in the areas of nuclear fuel reprocessing and purification, actinide separations, and environmental studies. This report describes initial experiments performed to determine the identity and equilibrium quotients of plutonium(IV) carbonate complexes. These experiments were performed at pH values between 7.2 and 9.6 using a spectrophotometric method. In addition, a brief review of the published literature on Pu(IV) carbonate complexes is presented. Since Pu(IV) exhibits low solubility in the near-neutral pH range, a complex-competition reaction where citrate ligands compete with carbonate ions for the plutonium will be employed. This will permit us to study the pure carbonate system; study the mixed carbonate/citrate system, and confirm and extend the literature work on the pure citrate system. The current experiments have demonstrated the existence of at least three distinct species in the pH region studied. This work will continue in the extended study of the pure citrate system, followed by the investigation of the citrate/carbonate complex/competition reaction. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Assessment of phosphate binding by sevelamer carbonate powder for oral suspension mixed in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Martin; Zhorov, Eugene; Brommage, Deborah; Plone, Melissa; Holmes-Farley, Stephen Randall

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated mixing sevelamer carbonate powder with foods and beverages other than water. Food samples, including applesauce, oatmeal, chicken, protein powder, scrambled eggs, ginger ale, and diet ginger ale, were subjected to an in vitro assay, and the difference in the amount of phosphate bound between samples pre-exposed to foods and samples where the drug was exposed to foods concurrently was determined Under these assay conditions, pre-exposure to sevelamer carbonate powder had no effect on the ability to bind phosphate. Clinical testing is needed to further evaluate this finding.

  7. The Use of Ameliorant Fe3+ and Rock Phosphates in Peat Soil at Several Water Condition on the P Content of Plants Rice and Carbon Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelvia

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The addition of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation can reduce effect of toxic organic acids, increase peat stability through formation of complex compounds and reduce carbon emission. The research was conducted in the laboratory and green house of the Departement of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agriculture University. Peat samples with hemic degree of decomposition were taken from Riau. Rock phosphates were taken from the rock phosphates of PT. Petrokimia Gresik, Christmas Island phosphates, and Huinan China and FeCl3.6H2O was used as the other Fe3+ source. The aims of the research were to study (a the effect of the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates on the P content of plants dan (b the effect of the application ameliorant Fe3+ and the contribution of Fe cation in rock phosphates in the decrease of carbon emission. The results showed that the P content of plants rice increased 58 – 286% with the applications of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates. The estimation of carbon loss through CO2 and CH4 emissions from peats if planted continuously with rice was around 2.5, 2.2 and 2.6 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 respectively in field capacity condition, two times of field capacity condition, and 5 cm of saturated condition. The application of ameliorant Fe3+ and rock phosphates containing high Fe cation increased the stability of peats and reduced the carbon loss around 1.7 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (64% in 5 cm of saturated condition, 1.3 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (58% in two times of field capacity condition, and 1.0 Mg of C ha-1 year-1 (41% in field capacity condition.

  8. Effects of Inulin and Sodium Carbonate in Phosphate-Free Restructured Poultry Steaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, B.; Serdaroğlu, M.

    2017-09-01

    Recently inorganic phosphates used in meat product formulations have caused negative impact on consumers due to their potential health risks. Therefore, utilization of natural ingredients as phosphate replacers has come into prominence as a novel research topic to meet consumer demands for clean-label trends. In this study, we objected to investigate the effects of inulin utilization either in the powder or gelled form, alone or in combination with sodium carbonate on quality of phosphate-free restructured chicken steaks. Total moisture, protein, lipid and ash values of the trial groups were in the range of 71.54-75.46%, 22.60-24.31%, 0.94-1.70% and 1.45-2.13%, respectively. pH of the samples was between 6.18-6.39, significant increments were recorded in samples containing inulin with sodium carbonate. L*, a* and b* values were recorded as 78.92-81.05, 1.76-3.05 and 10.80-11.94, respectively, where use of gelled inulin resulted in changes of L* and a* values. Utilization of inulin in combination with sodium carbonate decreased cook loss and enhanced product yield. Sensory scores in control group with phosphate showed a similar pattern to sensory scores in groups with inulin and sodium carbonate. During storage, purge loss and lipid oxidation rate were similar in control and inulin + sodium carbonate samples. The results showed that use of inulin in combination with sodium carbonate provided equivalent physical, chemical and sensory quality to phosphates in restructured chicken steaks.

  9. Analysis of trehalose-6-phosphate control over carbon allocation and growth in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghdasi, M.

    2007-01-01

    Trehalose is the non-reducing alpha-alpha-1, 1-linked glucose disaccharide. The biosynthesic precursor of trehalose, trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P), is essential for plant development, growth, carbon utilization and alters photosynthetic capacity but its mode of action is not underestood. This thesis

  10. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M.; Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine c oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  11. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M., E-mail: kostya@eimb.relarn.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology (Russian Federation); Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Dorovatovskii, P. V. [Kurchatov Center for Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology (Russian Federation); Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Koval' chuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-15

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine{sub c}oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  12. Ternary complex formation of lanthanides and radiolanthanides with phosphate and serum proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumaier, B.; Roesch, F.

    1999-01-01

    Radioyttrium was recently reported to form ternary complexes with phosphate and serum proteins in blood. In the present work it was investigated whether the trivalent radiolanthanides react in a chemically similar way. In systematic binding studies using gel filtration a ternary complex formation between different lanthanides, phosphate and serum proteins could be identified. The tendency to build a ternary compound of the type Ln III - phosphate - serum protein, however, is dependent on the ionic radii of the lanthanides. Whereas the light and transition lanthanides have a strong inclination to build a ternary complex, this tendency is weaker for the heavier ones. Taking into account the high content of phosphate in human blood, the corresponding ternary complexes of radiolanthanides represent an important transport form of these elements in blood. This finding may contribute to an understanding of the nuclear medical observation on the biodistribution of radiolanthanides. The heavy radiolanthanides can be classified as bone seeking metals, whereas the light and transition lanthanide elements accumulate mainly in the liver and the spleen. For the lighter radiolanthanides the corresponding ternary complexes thus represent an important transport form in blood. This physicochemical form of lanthanides mainly results in reticulo endothelial accumulation; on the other hand, the lower tendency of heavier lanthanides leads to preferential skeletal deposition. (orig.)

  13. Adsorption of arsenic and phosphate onto the surface of calcite as revealed by batch experiments and surface complexation modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt

    different calcite-equilibrated solutions that varied in pH, PCO2, ionic strength and activity of Ca2+, CO3 2- and HCO3 -. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate or arsenic-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (generally 3 h) and a low concentration of phosphate...... adsorption affinity for calcite is greater as compared to arsenate and the phosphate sorption isotherms are more strongly curved. However, the amount of both arsenate and phosphate adsorbed varied with the solution composition in the same manner. In particular, adsorption increased as the CO3 2- activity...... decreased (at constant pH) and as pH increased (at constant CO3 2- activity). The dependency on the carbonate activity indicates competition for sorption sites between carbonate and arsenate/phosphate, whereas the pH dependency is likely a response to changes in arsenate and phosphate speciation...

  14. Aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous carbon (APTMS-CMK-3) as effective phosphate adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanju; Wang, Juanjuan; Qian, Xiaoqing; Shan, Yuhua; Zhang, Haipeng

    2018-01-01

    Excess phosphate discharge into water bodies can lead to severe eutrophication. Adsorption has been considered as one of the most effective approaches for phosphate removal and recovery. A new aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous carbon CMK-3 (denoted as APTMS-CMK-3) was prepared and the materials were used as adsorbents for the removal of phosphate in water. The structure, functional groups and surface charge of the materials were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscope, N2 adsorption-desorption, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. The effects of contact time, initial phosphate concentration, solution pH, coexisting anions and dissolved humic acid were studied. The adsorption capacity of APTMS-CMK-3 was 38.09 mg g-1 at the equilibrium concentration of 49.06 mg L-1, and the adsorption data were well fitted with the Freundlich model. As for the reuse of APTMS-CMK-3, a relatively stable adsorption performance was observed after five adsorption-desorption cycles. Therefore, the way of grafting aminopropyl groups on the CMK-3 efficiently enhanced the capability for phosphate adsorption, indicating that it could be used as potential adsorbents for the removal of phosphate in water.

  15. Removal of phosphate from water by activated carbon fiber loaded with lanthanum oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ling; Wan Lihua; Chang Ning; Liu Jianyong; Duan Chao; Zhou Qi; Li Xiangling; Wang Xinze

    2011-01-01

    Phosphate removal from wastewater is very important for the prevention of eutrophication. Adsorption of phosphate from water was investigated using activated carbon fiber loaded with lanthanum oxide (ACF-La) as a novel adsorbent. The effects of variables (La/ACF mass ratio, impregnation time, activation time, and activation temperature) have been studied by the single-factor method. Response surface methodology (RSM), based on three-variable-three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD), was employed to assess the individual and collective effects of the main independent parameters on the phosphate removal. The optimal conditions within the range studied for preparing ACF-La were found as follows: La/ACF mass ratio of 11.78%, activation time of 2.5 h and activation temperature at 650 ° C , respectively. The phosphate removal using the ACF-La prepared under the optimal conditions was up to 97.6% even when the phosphate concentration in water was 30 mg P/L, indicating that ACF-La may be an effective adsorbent. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and change of pH values associated with the adsorption process revealed that the probable mechanism of phosphate ions onto ACF-La was not only ion exchange and coulomb interaction, but also a result of Lewis acid-base interaction due to La-O coordination bonding.

  16. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Debasish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. Results We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2Å resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in

  17. The calcium-paracaseinate-phosphate-complex under conditions similar to those in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monib, A.M.M.F.

    1962-01-01

    The complex of calcium-paracaseinate-phosphate is the matrix substance of cheese. The changes it undergoes during maturing determines many characteristics of the finished product.

    The preliminary studies of the effect of pH and sodium chloride on the swelling and solubility of the

  18. Electrochemically assisted co-deposition of calcium phosphate/collagen coatings on carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Xueni [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Hu Tao [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Department of Cardiology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Li Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Chen Mengdi; Cao Sheng; Zhang Leilei [C/C Composites Technology Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710072 (China); Hou Xianghui [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)/collagen coatings were prepared on the surface of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by electrochemically assisted co-deposition technique. The effects of collagen concentration in the electrolyte on morphology, structure and composition of the coatings were systematically investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The adhesive strength of the coatings was also evaluated by scratch tests and tensile bond tests. It was demonstrated that the coatings of three-dimensional collagen network structure was formed on the C/C composites from the electrolyte containing collagen. The surface of the collagen network was covered by uniform CaP aggregates. The coatings were actually composites of CaP and collagen. Hydroxyapatite (HA) was a favorable composition in the coatings with the increase of the collagen concentration in the electrolyte. The formed collagen network increased the cohesive and adhesive strength of the coatings. The adhesive strength between the coatings and substrates increased as the collagen concentration in the electrolyte increased. The coatings prepared at the collagen concentration of 500 mg/L in the electrolyte were not scraped off until the applied load reached 32.0 {+-} 2.2 N and the average tensile adhesive strength of the coatings was 4.83 {+-} 0.71 MPa. After C/C coated with composite coatings (500 mg/L) being immersed in a 10{sup -3} M Ca (OH){sub 2} solution at 30-33 deg. C for 96 h, nano-structured HA/collagen coatings similar to the natural human bone were obtained on the C/C.

  19. Selective recognition of monohydrogen phosphate by fluorescence enhancement of a new cerium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Morteza; Memari, Zahra; Faridbod, Farnoush; Norouzi, Parviz; Goldooz, Hassan; Badiei, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Finding a new fluorescent enhancing chemosensor for phosphate ions. ► Synthesis of a new complex (bis(8-hydroxy quinoline-5-solphonate) cerium(III) chloride (Ce(QS) 2 Cl)) as a practical fluorescent probe. ► Analysis of phosphate content in three kinds of fertilizers, mixed fertilizer (N–P–K), triple super phosphate (TSP), and single super phosphate (SSP) (from Zarrin Kood Co., Tehran, Iran). - Abstract: Bis(8-hydroxy quinoline-5-solphonate) cerium(III) chloride (Ce(QS) 2 Cl) (L) was synthesized and then used as a novel fluorescent sensor for anion recognition. Preliminarily study showed that fluorescence of L enhanced selectively in the presence of HPO 4 2− ion. This enhancement is attributed to a 1:1 complex formation between L and HPO 4 2− anion. The association constant of 1:1 complex of L-HPO 4 2− was calculated as 3.0 × 10 6 . Thus, L was utilized as a basis for a selective detection of HPO 4 2− anion in solution. The linear response range of the proposed fluorescent chemo-sensor covers a concentration range of HPO 4 2− from 3.3 × 10 −7 to 5.0 × 10 −6 mol L −1 with a detection limit of 2.5 × 10 −8 mol L −1 . L showed selective and sensitive fluorescence enhancement response toward HPO 4 2− ion in comparison with I 3 − , NO 3 − , CN − , CO 3 2− , Br − , Cl − , F − , H 2 PO 4 − and SO 4 2− ions. It was probably attributed to the higher stability of the inorganic complex between HPO 4 2− ion and L. The method was successfully applied for analysis of phosphate ions in some fertilizers samples.

  20. Electrochemical Sensing of Casein Based on the Interaction between Its Phosphate Groups and a Ruthenium(III) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Iku; Kuramitz, Hideki; Sugawara, Kazuharu

    2016-01-01

    A reaction to casein, along with β-lactoglobulin, is a main cause of milk allergies, and also is a useful indicator of protein in allergic analyses. In the present study, a simple casein sensor was developed based on the interaction between a phosphate group of casein and electroactive [Ru(NH3)6](3+). We evaluated the voltammetric behavior of a casein-[Ru(NH3)6](3+) complex using a glassy carbon electrode. When the ruthenium(III) complex was combined with the phosphate groups of casein, the structure of the casein was changed. Since the hydrophobicity of casein was increased due to the binding, the casein was adsorbed onto the electrode. Furthermore, we modified an electrode with a ruthenium(III) ions/collagen film. When the sensor was applied to the detection of the casein contained in milk, the values coincided with those indicated by the manufacturer. Accordingly, this electrode could be a powerful sensor for the determination of casein in several foods.

  1. Effect of calcium carbonate on hardening, physicochemical properties, and in vitro degradation of injectable calcium phosphate cements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sariibrahimoglu, K.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Yubao, L.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main disadvantage of apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) is their slow degradation rate, which limits complete bone regeneration. Carbonate (CO(3)(2)(-)) is the common constituent of bone and it can be used to improve the degradability of the apatitic calcium phosphate ceramics. This study

  2. Functional polyterthiophene-appended uranyl-salophen complex: electropolymerization and ion-selective response for monohydrogen phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghwan; Kang, Dong Min; Shin, Sung Chul; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Jineun; Lee, Shim Sung; Kim, Jae Sang

    2008-04-28

    We have synthesized a bis(terthiophene)-appended uranyl-salophen complex, comprising N,N'-bis[4-(5,2':5',2''-terthiophen-3'-yl)salicylidene]-1,2-ethanediamine-uranyl complexes (TUS), and used it as a monomer for the electrochemical polymerizations (poly-TUS) on glassy carbon surfaces to prepare functionalized conducting polymer (CP) films. The poly-TUS films prepared from propylene carbonate/0.1 M tetrabutyl ammonium perchlorate (TBAP) on a glassy carbon electrode have both the functionality of ion-to-electron transducers (solid contact) and Lewis-acidic binding sites for a monohydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion-selective electrode (ISE). The CP/poly-TUS sensor showed a linear range between 1.0 x 10(-1) and 1.0 x 10(-4.5) M with a near-Nernstian behavior (-30.4 mV decade(-1)) at a pH of 8.2. The detection limit of the electrode was 10(-5.0) M and the response time was improved (polyvinyl chloride (PVC) liquid membrane with or without tridodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMACl) as an additive was also constructed and its performance as an MHP-ISE were studied. The superior selectivity and sensitivity of the CP/poly-TUS sensor enabled the direct measurement of MHP in a wide variety of applications.

  3. Reduction of phosphate ores by carbon: Part I. Process variables for design of rotary kiln system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Jacob; Leder, Frederic; Park, Won C.; Hard, Robert A.; Megy, Joseph; Reiss, Howard

    1986-12-01

    Feasibility is established for the reduction of phosphate ores in a rotary kiln, avoiding electric submerged arc furnace technology. This represents a totally new approach to phosphoric acid. Reduction rates of phosphate ore-silica mixtures by carbon in the temperature range of 1100 to 1500 °C under several CO partial pressures in nitrogen were measured in thermogravimetric analyzers. Parameters such as carbon and silica contents, particle and pellet sizes, and gas flow rate were also evaluated with various domestic and foreign phosphate ores. Furthermore, a variety of carbon sources such as subbituminous coals, bituminous coals, anthracite, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke were tested as reducing agents. Thermodynamic considerations elucidate the temperature dependence of overall conversion as well as the role of excess silica in establishing equilibrium pressure. These findings provide the background for analysis of the kinetics of conversion in Part II of this work. These studies, in conjunction with a previously published work, indicate the importance of intergranular melt phases in the kinetics of otherwise solid state reactions.

  4. Utilization of Glyphosate as Phosphate Source: Biochemistry and Genetics of Bacterial Carbon-Phosphorus Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechel, David L.; Jochimsen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY After several decades of use of glyphosate, the active ingredient in weed killers such as Roundup, in fields, forests, and gardens, the biochemical pathway of transformation of glyphosate phosphorus to a useful phosphorus source for microorganisms has been disclosed. Glyphosate is a member of a large group of chemicals, phosphonic acids or phosphonates, which are characterized by a carbon-phosphorus bond. This is in contrast to the general phosphorus compounds utilized and metabolized by microorganisms. Here phosphorus is found as phosphoric acid or phosphate ion, phosphoric acid esters, or phosphoric acid anhydrides. The latter compounds contain phosphorus that is bound only to oxygen. Hydrolytic, oxidative, and radical-based mechanisms for carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage have been described. This review deals with the radical-based mechanism employed by the carbon-phosphorus lyase of the carbon-phosphorus lyase pathway, which involves reactions for activation of phosphonate, carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage, and further chemical transformation before a useful phosphate ion is generated in a series of seven or eight enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The phn genes, encoding the enzymes for this pathway, are widespread among bacterial species. The processes are described with emphasis on glyphosate as a substrate. Additionally, the catabolism of glyphosate is intimately connected with that of aminomethylphosphonate, which is also treated in this review. Results of physiological and genetic analyses are combined with those of bioinformatics analyses. PMID:24600043

  5. Supported phosphate and carbonate salts for heterogeneous catalysis of triglycerides to fatty acid methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Stephanie Lynne

    Fatty acid methyl esters made from vegetable oil, or biodiesel, have been identified as a substitute for diesel derived from crude oil. Biodiesel is currently made using a homogeneous base catalyst to perform the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol to generate fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The use of a homogeneous catalyst necessitates additional purification of the product and byproducts before sale, and the catalyst is consumed and discarded. The development of a heterogeneous basic catalyst for the production of FAME is desirable. Tribasic phosphate salts and dibasic carbonate salts are active for the production of FAME but generally operate as homogeneous catalysts. Supporting these phosphate and carbonate salts on mesoporous MCM-41, microporous silica gel, and nonporous a-alumina proved successful to greater or lesser degrees depending on the identity of the support and pretreatment of the support. Although these salts were supported and were active for the production of FAME from canola oil, they proved to be operating as homogeneous catalysts due to leaching of the active species off the surface of the support. Further investigation of the active species present in the tribasic phosphate catalysts identified the active support as orthophosphate, and NMR studies revealed the phosphorus to be present as orthophosphate and diphosphate in varying proportions in each catalyst. Evaluation of the acid-washing support pretreatment process revealed that the exposure of the support to acid plays a large role in the development of activity on the surface of the catalyst, but manipulation of these parameters did not prevent leaching of the active site off the surface of the catalyst. Alternate methods of support pretreatment were no more effective in preventing leaching. Tribasic phosphate supported on silica gel is not effective as a heterogeneous catalyst for FAME production from triglycerides because of the lack of stability of the phosphate on the

  6. Complex formation between uranium(VI) and α-D-glucose 1-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koban, A.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G.

    2003-01-01

    The complex formation of uranium(VI) with α-D-glucose 1-phosphate (C 6 H 11 O 6 PO 3 2- , G1P) was determined by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at pH 4 and potentiometric titration in the pH range from 3 to 10. Both measurements show the formation of a 1 : 1 complex at lower pH values. The formation constant of UO 2 (C 6 H 11 O 6 PO 3 ) was calculated from TRLFS measurements to be log β 11 = 5.72±0.12, and from potentiometric titration log β 11 = 5.40±0.25, respectively. It was found by potentiometric titration that at higher pH values the complexation changes to a 1 : 2 complex. The stability constant for this complex was calculated to be log β 12 = 8.96±0.18. (orig.)

  7. Performance of flexible capacitors based on polypyrrole/carbon fiber electrochemically prepared from various phosphate electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Wei; Han, Gaoyi, E-mail: han_gaoyis@sxu.edu.cn; Chang, Yunzhen; Li, Miaoyu; Xiao, Yaoming, E-mail: ymxiao@sxu.edu.cn; Zhou, Haihan; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yanping

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • PPy/CFs have been fabricated by electrodepositing polypyrrole on carbon fibers. • The electrolytes in deposition solution have effect on PPy/CFs’ capacitive behavior. • Cells of PPy/CFs obtained from NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} electrolyte has good stability in PVA/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. - Abstract: In order to investigate the influence of electrolytes in electro-deposition solution on the capacitive properties of polypyrrole (PPy), we have chosen phosphoric acid, phosphate, hydrogen phosphate and dihydrogen phosphate as electrolyte in deposition solution respectively and electrochemically deposited PPy on carbon fibers (CFs) via galvanostatic method. The morphologies of the PPy/CFs samples have been characterized by scanning electron microscope. The specific capacitance of PPy/CFs samples has been evaluated in different electrolytes through three-electrode test system. The assembled flexible capacitors by using PPy/CFs as electrodes and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/polyvinyl alcohol as gel electrolyte have been systematically measured by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the electrochemical capacitors based on PPy/CFs prepared from deposition solution containing NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O electrolyte exhibit higher specific capacitance, flexibility and excellent stability (retaining 96.8% of initial capacitance after 13,000 cycles), and that three cells connected in series can power a light-emitting diode.

  8. Thermodynamic study of dihydrogen phosphate dimerisation and complexation with novel urea- and thiourea-based receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregović, Nikola; Cindro, Nikola; Frkanec, Leo; Užarević, Krunoslav; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2014-11-24

    Complexation of dihydrogen phosphate by novel thiourea and urea receptors in acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide was studied in detail by an integrated approach by using several methods (isothermal titration calorimetry, ESI-MS, and (1)H NMR and UV spectroscopy). Thermodynamic investigations into H2PO4(-) dimerisation, which is a process that has been frequently recognised, but rarely quantitatively described, were carried out as well. The corresponding equilibrium was taken into account in the anion-binding studies, which enabled reliable determination of the complexation thermodynamic quantities. In both solvents the thiourea derivatives exhibited considerably higher binding affinities with respect to those containing the urea moiety. In acetonitrile, 1:1 and 2:1 (anion/receptor) complexes formed, whereas in dimethyl sulfoxide only the significantly less stable complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were detected. The solvent effects on the thermodynamic parameters of dihydrogen phosphate dimerisation and complexation reactions are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fabrication of carbonate apatite block based on internal dissolution-precipitation reaction of dicalcium phosphate and calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daitou, Fumikazu; Maruta, Michito; Kawachi, Giichiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Matsuya, Shigeki; Terada, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we investigated a novel method for fabrication of carbonate apatite block without ionic movement between precursor and solution by using precursor that includes all constituent ions of carbonate apatite. A powder mixture prepared from dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and calcite at appropriate Ca/P ratios (1.5, 1.67, and 1.8) was used as starting material. For preparation of specimens, the slurry made from the powder mixture and distilled water was packed in a split stainless steel mold and heat - treated, ranging from 60 degrees C to 100 degrees C up to 48 hours at 100% humidity. It appeared that carbonate apatite could be obtained above 70 degrees C and monophasic carbonate apatite could be obtained from the powder mixture at Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Carbonate content of the specimen was about 5-7%. Diametral tensile strength of the carbonate apatite blocks slightly decreased with increasing treatment temperature. The decrease in diametral tensile strength is thought to be related to the crystal size of the carbonate apatite formed.

  10. Physicochemical characteristics and sorption capacities of heavy metal ions of activated carbons derived by activation with different alkyl phosphate triesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Hai; Yang, Shaokun; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Chenglu; Wu, Haiming

    2014-10-01

    Five alkyl phosphate triesters (APTEs), including trimethyl phosphate (TMP), triethyl phosphate (TEP), triisopropyl phosphate (TPP), tributyl phosphate (TBP) and trioctyl phosphate (TOP), were used as activating agents for preparing activated carbons (AC-APTEs) with high surface acidity and metal ion sorption capacity. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, surface morphologies, elemental compositions, results of Boehm's titration and sorption capacities of heavy metal ions of the carbons were investigated. AC-APTEs contained much more acidic groups and exhibited much less surface area (phosphoric acid activation. For the AC-APTEs, AC-TOP had the highest surface area (488 m2/g), AC-TMP showed the highest yield (41.1%), and AC-TBP possessed the highest acidic groups (2.695 mmol/g), oxygen content (47.0%) and metal ion sorption capacities (40.1 mg/g for Ni(II) and 53.5 mg/g for Cd(II)). For the carbons, AC-APTEs showed much larger Ni(II) and Cd(II) sorption capacities than AC-PPA, except AC-TPP. The differences of the carbons in the physicochemical and sorption properties suggested surface chemistry of the carbons was the main factor influencing their sorption capacities whereas the pore structure played a secondary role.

  11. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; (UAB)

    2009-06-08

    The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate) and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate) proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD) state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2{angstrom} resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate

  12. Biological phosphate removal using a degradable carbon source produced by hydrothermal treatment of excess sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Haraguchi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of reusing excess sludge treated by hydrothermal reaction for the purpose of improving the efficiency of the enhanced biological phosphate removal (EBPR process was investigated. Excess sludge from a fish-processing industry located in Japan was treated in high-temperature and high-pressure water, at a reaction temperature ranging from 200 to 400ºC, a pressure of 1.8 to 30MPa and a constant reaction time of 7 min. For the conditions tested, the results showed that when the reaction temperature was increased the content of readily biodegradable substrate in the total COD Cr increased. In addition, the amount of some volatile fatty acids (VFAs produced by the hydrothermal reaction increased as reaction temperature increased. From the phosphate release tests under anaerobic conditions, it was possible to demonstrate that not only the VFAs, but also the readily and slowly biodegradable substrates are used as potential carbon source by the phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs.

  13. Functional polyterthiophene-appended uranyl-salophen complex: Electropolymerization and ion-selective response for monohydrogen phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Junghwan; Kang, Dong Min; Shin, Sung Chul; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Jineun; Lee, Shim Sung; Kim, Jae Sang

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized a bis(terthiophene)-appended uranyl-salophen complex, comprising N,N'-bis[4-(5,2':5',2''-terthiophen-3'-yl)salicylidene] -1,2-ethanediamine-uranyl complexes (TUS), and used it as a monomer for the electrochemical polymerizations (poly-TUS) on glassy carbon surfaces to prepare functionalized conducting polymer (CP) films. The poly-TUS films prepared from propylene carbonate/0.1 M tetrabutyl ammonium perchlorate (TBAP) on a glassy carbon electrode have both the functionality of ion-to-electron transducers (solid contact) and Lewis-acidic binding sites for a monohydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion-selective electrode (ISE). The CP/poly-TUS sensor showed a linear range between 1.0 x 10 -1 and 1.0 x 10 -4.5 M with a near-Nernstian behavior (-30.4 mV decade -1 ) at a pH of 8.2. The detection limit of the electrode was 10 -5.0 M and the response time was improved (<10 s) compared to that of conventional ISEs (<20 s). For comparison, a conventional ISE (with an internal aqueous solution) based on a TUS monomer/o-nitrophenyl octylether (o-NPOE)/polyvinyl chloride (PVC) liquid membrane with or without tridodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMACl) as an additive was also constructed and its performance as an MHP-ISE were studied. The superior selectivity and sensitivity of the CP/poly-TUS sensor enabled the direct measurement of MHP in a wide variety of applications

  14. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N., E-mail: jesper.knijnenburg@alumni.ethz.ch; Hilty, Florentine M. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland); Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E. [ETH Zurich, Particle Technology Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Michael B. [ETH Zurich, Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health, Department of Health Sciences and Technology (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO{sub 3} made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO{sub 3} and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO{sub 3}, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO{sub 3}) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO{sub 3} nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  15. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO3) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO3, with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca2P2O7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO3) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H3PO4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  16. Dissolution and storage stability of nanostructured calcium carbonates and phosphates for nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posavec, Lidija; Knijnenburg, Jesper T. N.; Hilty, Florentine M.; Krumeich, Frank; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Zimmermann, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid calcium (Ca) dissolution from nanostructured Ca phosphate and carbonate (CaCO 3 ) powders may allow them to be absorbed in much higher fraction in humans. Nanosized Ca phosphate and CaCO 3 made by flame-assisted spray pyrolysis were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. As-prepared nanopowders contained both CaCO 3 and CaO, but storing them under ambient conditions over 130 days resulted in a complete transformation into CaCO 3 , with an increase in both crystal and particle sizes. The small particle size could be stabilized against such aging by cation (Mg, Zn, Sr) and anion (P) doping, with P and Mg being most effective. Calcium phosphate nanopowders made at Ca:P ≤ 1.5 were XRD amorphous and contained γ-Ca 2 P 2 O 7 with increasing hydroxyapatite content at higher Ca:P. Aging of powders with Ca:P = 1.0 and 1.5 for over 500 days gradually increased particle size (but less than for CaCO 3 ) without a change in phase composition or crystallinity. In 0.01 M H 3 PO 4 calcium phosphate nanopowders dissolved ≈4 times more Ca than micronsized compounds and about twice more Ca than CaCO 3 nanopowders, confirming that nanosizing and/or amorphous structuring sharply increases Ca powder dissolution. Because higher Ca solubility in vitro generally leads to greater absorption in vivo, these novel FASP-made Ca nanostructured compounds may prove useful for nutrition applications, including supplementation and/or food fortification.

  17. Coordination chemistry of sugar-phosphate complexes with palladium(II), rhenium(V) and zinc(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinborn, Christian Martin

    2013-05-21

    As described before, some studies dealing with coordination chemistry of sugar phosphates are available but no analogous complexes of Zn{sup II} have been investigated yet. The primary goal of this work is, therefore, to fill this gap. In order to stay close to the active sites of enzymes such as class-II-aldolase, the simple metal fragment Zn{sup II}(dien) is used. NMR spectroscopy is used primarily as analytical method since it enables the investigation of both complex equilibria in solution and pH dependence of metal-binding sites. Since this approach is challenging due to the fast metal-ligand exchange and the absence of CIS values, it is necessary to improve the significance of NMR data collected from sugar-phosphate complexes with Zn{sup II}. Hence, further experiments are performed with molecules similar to sugar phosphates such as reducing and methylated sugars or polyols. Beside NMR spectroscopy, crystal-structure analysis will be used to get more detailed information about the binding pattern of the complexes. Additionally, sugar-phosphate complexes of Pd{sup II} are investigated. Further experiments are conducted, on the one hand, to synthesise more sugarphosphate complexes with ReVON2 fragments, and, on the other hand, to grow crystals confirming the theory about mixed sugar-core-phosphate chelation.

  18. Complex phosphates in the Li(Na)3PO4-InPO4 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapova, A.M.; Zimina, G.V.; Smirnova, I.N.; Novoselov, A.V.; Spiridonov, F.M.; Stefanovich, S.Yu.

    2008-01-01

    Subsolidus sections in the systems Li 3 PO 4 -InPO 4 (950 deg C) and Na 3 PO 4 -InPO 4 (800, 900, and 1000 deg C) have been studied by X-ray powder diffraction. The compound Li 3 In(PO 4 ) 2 has been synthesized, and the NASICON-type solid solution Li 3(1-x) In 2+x (PO 4 ) 3 (0.67 ≤ x ≤ 0.80) has been found to exist. In the system Na 3 PO 4 -InPO 4 , the solid solution Na 3(1-x) In x/3 PO 4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) and two complex phosphates exist: Na 3 In(PO 4 ) 2 and Na 3 In 2 (PO 4 ) 3 . These complex phosphates are dimorphic, with the irreversible-transition temperature equal to 675 and 820 deg C, respectively. Na 3 In(PO 4 ) 2 degrades at 920 deg C. Ionic conductivity has been measured in some phases in the system [ru

  19. Phosphate barrier on pore-filled cation-exchange membrane for blocking complexing ions in presence of non-complexing ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Vivek; Agarwal, Chhavi; Shinde, Rakesh N.

    2018-06-01

    In present work, an approach has been used to form a phosphate groups bearing surface barrier on a cation-exchange membrane (CEM). Using optimized conditions, the phosphate bearing monomer bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate has been grafted on the surface of the host poly(ethersulfone) membranes using UV light induced polymerization. The detailed characterizations have shown that less than a micron layer of phosphate barrier is formed without disturbing the original microporous structure of the host membrane. The pores of thus formed membrane have been blocked by cationic-gel formed by in situ UV-initiator induced polymerization of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid along with crosslinker ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the pores of the membrane. UV-initiator is required for pore-filling as UV light would not penetrate the interior matrix of the membrane. The phosphate functionalized barrier membrane has been examined for permselectivity using a mixture of representative complexing Am3+ ions and non-complexing Cs+ ions. This experiment has demonstrated that complex forming Am3+ ions are blocked by phosphate barrier layer while non-complexing Cs+ ions are allowed to pass through the channels formed by the crosslinked cationic gel.

  20. Phosphate buffer and salt medium concentrations affect the inactivation of T4 phage by platinum(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik B.; Josephsen, Jens; Kerszman, Gustaw

    1985-01-01

    -Tris) buffer and HEPES buffer. The phosphate abolishes the antiphage activity of the platinum complexes probably by some sort of complex formation. This together with dimerization reactions qualitatively explains the tailing off of the phage inactivation rate. High concentrations of NaNO3 as the salt medium...

  1. Calcium carbonate phosphate binding ion exchange filtration and accelerated denitrification improve public health standards and combat eutrophication in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the greater Los Angeles area, California, cultural eutrophication has become a major problem. In this study, calcium carbonate was found to be an excellent phosphate binder, reducing up to 70% of the phosphates in a given sample of water, and it posed relatively negligent ecological repercussions. This study involved the testing of this principle in both the laboratory and the real ecosystem. A calcium carbonate lacing procedure was first carried out to determine its efficacy in Madrona Marsh. Through this, ammonia was found to interfere with the solubility of calcium carbonate and therefore to be a hindrance to the reduction of phosphate. Therefore, various approaches for reduction of ammonia were tested, including aeration, use of fiber growth media, and plants, mainly Caulerpa verticellata, chosen for it hardiness, primarily in an attempt to increase population of Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas. All were successful in moderately reducing ammonia levels. In addition, soil sampling, sediment analysis, microscopic plant analysis, microorganism and macroinvertebrate identification, and rate law formulations were conducted. The effect of phosphate and ammonia reduction on the populations of enterobacteria was also an important focus of this experiment. Varying concentrations of phosphate, ammonia, and calcium carbonate in conjunction with phosphate were tested in Madrona Marsh to determine their effects on the populations of enteropathogens on nonspecific blood agar, MacConkey agar, and

  2. Unusual carbon partitioning during phosphate deficiency in celery, a mannitol-synthesizing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyson, R.H.; Loescher, W.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Mannitol and sucrose are the main photosynthetic products and translocated carbon compounds in celery (Apium graveolens L.). Carbon partitioning was studied in greenhouse-grown celery plants supplied with a nutrient solution containing or lacking phosphate (P). P-deficient plants developed new leaves at about the same rate as control plants, but showed greatly reduced growth of leaves and petioles; root growth was apparently unaffected. P-deficient leaves contained less mannitol and more sucrose than control leaves. Starch content increased with P-deficiency only in mature (the most photosynthetically-active) leaves, and then amounted to less than 10 mg/g fresh weight. Similarly, when {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was supplied to intact plants, P-deficient leaves contained less label in mannitol and more in sucrose than did control leaves; labeling of starch changed little. The P-status of celery leaves apparently affects the partitioning of carbon between mannitol and sucrose more than it affects starch accumulation. This is in marked contrast to the large increase in starch content commonly observed during P-deficiency in species that produce and translocate predominantly sucrose.

  3. Calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement compositions for bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, C; Bareille, R; Rey, C

    2006-11-01

    The feasibility of making calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO(3)-CaP) mixed cements, comprising at least 40% (w/w) CaCO(3) in the dry powder ingredients, has been demonstrated. Several original cement compositions were obtained by mixing metastable crystalline CaCO(3) phases with metastable amorphous or crystalline CaP powders in aqueous medium. The cements set within at most 1 h at 37 degrees C in atmosphere saturated with water. The hardened cement is microporous and exhibits weak compressive strength. The setting reaction appeared to be essentially related to the formation of a highly carbonated nanocrystalline apatite phase by reaction of the metastable CaP phase with part or almost all of the metastable CaCO(3) phase. The recrystallization of metastable CaP varieties led to a final cement consisting of a highly carbonated poorly crystalline apatite analogous to bone mineral associated with various amounts of vaterite and/or aragonite. The presence of controlled amounts of CaCO(3) with a higher solubility than that of the apatite formed in the well-developed CaP cements might be of interest to increase resorption rates in biomedical cement and favors its replacement by bone tissue. Cytotoxicity testing revealed excellent cytocompatibility of CaCO(3)-CaP mixed cement compositions.

  4. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations

  5. Dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate-hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, A.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Direct dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) has been attempted. The effects of TBP concentration and pressure on the extraction of uranium have been studied. Addition of hydrogen peroxide in the modifier enhances the dissolution/extraction of uranium. (author)

  6. Sorption of phosphate onto calcite; results from batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite was stud......The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite...... of a high degree of super-saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (SIHAP⩽7.83). The amount of phosphate adsorbed varied with the solution composition, in particular, adsorption increases as the CO32- activity decreases (at constant pH) and as pH increases (at constant CO32- activity). The primary effect...... of ionic strength on phosphate sorption onto calcite is its influence on the activity of the different aqueous phosphate species. The experimental results were modeled satisfactorily using the constant capacitance model with >CaPO4Ca0 and either >CaHPO4Ca+ or >CaHPO4- as the adsorbed surface species...

  7. Chitosan–Zinc(II Complexes as a Bio-Sorbent for the Adsorptive Abatement of Phosphate: Mechanism of Complexation and Assessment of Adsorption Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Roza Yazdani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines zinc(II–chitosan complexes as a bio-sorbent for phosphate removal from aqueous solutions. The bio-sorbent is prepared and is characterized via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Point of Zero Charge (pHPZC–drift method. The adsorption capacity of zinc(II–chitosan bio-sorbent is compared with those of chitosan and ZnO–chitosan and nano-ZnO–chitosan composites. The effect of operational parameters including pH, temperature, and competing ions are explored via adsorption batch mode. A rapid phosphate uptake is observed within the first three hours of contact time. Phosphate removal by zinc(II–chitosan is favored when the surface charge of bio-sorbent is positive/or neutral e.g., within the pH range inferior or around its pHPZC, 7. Phosphate abatement is enhanced with decreasing temperature. The study of background ions indicates a minor effect of chloride, whereas nitrate and sulfate show competing effect with phosphate for the adsorptive sites. The adsorption kinetics is best described with the pseudo-second-order model. Sips (R2 > 0.96 and Freundlich (R2 ≥ 0.95 models suit the adsorption isotherm. The phosphate reaction with zinc(II–chitosan is exothermic, favorable and spontaneous. The complexation of zinc(II and chitosan along with the corresponding mechanisms of phosphate removal are presented. This study indicates the introduction of zinc(II ions into chitosan improves its performance towards phosphate uptake from 1.45 to 6.55 mg/g and provides fundamental information for developing bio-based materials for water remediation.

  8. Effects of Jerusalem Artichoke Powder and Sodium Carbonate as Phosphate Replacers on the Quality Characteristics of Emulsified Chicken Meatballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Burcu; Serdaroğlu, Meltem

    2018-02-01

    Today incorporation of natural ingredients as inorganic phosphate replacers has come into prominence as a novel research topic due to health concerns about phosphates. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality of emulsified chicken meatballs produced with Jerusalem artichoke powder (JAP), either alone or in combination with sodium carbonate (SC) as sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) replacers. The results showed that naturally dried JAP showed favorable technological properties in terms of water-oil binding and gelling. Emulsion batters formulated with JAP-SC mixture showed lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with STPP. In final product, incorporation of JAP-SC mixture increased moisture and reduced lipid and energy values, and kept the pH value similar to control. Added JAP lead to increments in b* values whereas decreases L* values. Cook yield was similar to control in phosphate-free samples formulated with JAP-SC mix. Either low or medium ratios of JAP in combination with SC managed to protect most of the sensory parameters, while sensory scores tend to decrease in samples containing high levels of JAP. Addition of JAP to formulations presented samples that have equivalent behavior to phosphates in terms of lipid oxidation. In conclusion, our study confirms that utilization of JAP in combination with SC had promising effects as phosphate replacers by presenting natural solutions and providing equivalent quality to standard phosphate containing products.

  9. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XIX. The Identification of Sucrose Phosphate in Sugar Beet Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, J. G.

    1952-09-01

    The recognition and characterization of a sucrose phosphate as an intermediate in sucrose by synthesis by green plants is described. A tentative structure for this phosphate is proposed and its mode of formation suggested.

  10. Application of phosphating techniques to aluminium and carbon steel surfaces using nitro guanidine as oxidizing agent.; Aplicacion de tecnicas de fosfatacion sobre acero al carbon y aluminio, utilizando como agente oxidante la nitroguanidina.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briseno M, S A

    1995-10-01

    Phosphate coatings are inorganic crystalline deposits laid down uniformly on properly prepared surfaces by a chemical reaction with the treated base metal. The reaction consists in dissolving some surface metal by acid attack and then causing surface neutralization of the phosphate solution with consequent precipitation of the phosphate coating. Phosphate coatings do not provide appreciable corrosion protection in themselves. They are useful mainly as a base for paints, ensuring good adherence of paint to steel and decreasing the tendency for corrosion to under cut the paint film at scratches or other defects. We deposited phosphate on standard carbon steel, employing techniques of cold phosphate (at 40 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 30 minutes) and hot phosphate (at 88 Centigrade degrees and with a treatment time of 15 minutes), where the latter gave the best results. Both methods used phosphate solutions of Zn/Mn and the catalyst Nitro guanidine. Aluminium surfaces of phosphate were used solutions of Cr and as catalyst Sodium bi fluoride. The phosphating on this surface we deposited at temperature of 50 degrees C with a treatment time of 10 minutes. We obtained a new phosphate coating on steel surfaces, these coatings were realized with a phosphate solution manufactured with the precipitates gathered during the hot phosphating on carbon steel. These coatings show excellent physical characteristics of corrosion resistance. The physical testings of the coatings phosphate obtained on carbon steel and aluminium surfaces. These testing were: roughness, thickness, microhardness and adhesion. The best results were showed in carbon steel phosphate with precipitated solutions. Activation analysis with thermic neutrons was used to determine the phosphate coatings composition. Finally, corrosion testings were realized by means of two methods; electrochemical and by weight loss methods (gravimetric). (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Carbon-hydrogen-related complexes in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkovsky, Vl.; Stübner, R.; Gwozdz, K.; Weber, J.

    2018-04-01

    Several deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) peaks (E42, E65, E75, E90, E262, and H180) are observed in n- and p-type Czochralski-grown Si samples subjected to hydrogenation by a dc H plasma treatment. The concentration of the defects is found to be proportional to the carbon and hydrogen content in our samples. The analysis of the depth profiles performed in Si samples hydrogenated by wet chemically etching shows that all these defects contain a single H atom. E65 and E75 appear only in samples with a high oxygen content which shows that oxygen is a constituent of these defects. The analysis of the enhancement of the emission rate of the defects with electric field shows that E65, E75, E90, and E262 are single acceptors whereas E42 is a double acceptor. The presence of a barrier for hole capture (about 53 meV) can explain the absence of the enhancement of the emission rate of H180, which can be attributed to a single acceptor state. From a comparison with theory, we assign E90 to CH1BC, E42 (E262) to CH1AB, and H180 to CH1Td. The similarity of the electrical properties of E65 and E75 to those of E90 suggest that E65 and E75 may originate from the CH1BC defect with an oxygen atom in its nearest neighborhood. Our results on the CH-related complexes give a conclusive explanation of some previously reported controversial experimental data.

  12. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera Palomino, J.; Galiano Sedano, J. A.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Bellido Gonzalez, A.

    1975-01-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0 3 ) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs

  13. The Porcupine Bank Canyon coral mounds: oceanographic and topographic steering of deep-water carbonate mound development and associated phosphatic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.; Akhmetzhanov, A.; Monteys, X.; Ivanov, M.

    2012-06-01

    The head of a canyon system extending along the western Porcupine Bank (west of Ireland) and which accommodates a large field of giant carbonate mounds was investigated during two cruises (INSS 2000 and TTR-13). Multibeam and sidescan sonar data (600-1,150 m water depth) suggest that the pre-existing seabed topography acts as a significant factor controlling mound distribution and shape. The mounds are concentrated along the edges of the canyon or are associated with a complex fault system traced around the canyon head, comprising escarpments up to 60 m high and several km long. The sampling for geochemical and petrographic analysis of numerous types of authigenic deposits was guided by sidescan sonar and video recordings. Calcite-cemented biogenic rubble was observed at the top and on the flanks of the carbonate mounds, being associated with both living and dead corals ( Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata and occasional Desmophyllum cristagalli). This can plausibly be explained by dissolution of coral debris facilitated by strong currents along the mound tops and flanks. In turn, the dissolved carbon is recycled and precipitated as interstitial micrite. Calcite, dolomite and phosphatic hardgrounds were identified in samples from the escarpment framing the eastern part of the survey area. The laterally extensive phosphatic hardgrounds represent a novel discovery in the region, supplying hard substrata for the establishment of new coral colonies. Based on existing knowledge of regional oceanographic conditions, complemented with new CTD measurements, it is suggested that water column stratification, enhanced bottom currents, and upwelling facilitate the deposition of organic matter, followed by phosphatisation leading to the formation of phosphate-glauconite deposits. The occurrence of strong bottom currents was confirmed by means of video observations combined with acoustic and sampling data, providing circumstantial evidence of fine- to medium-grained sand

  14. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  15. Phosphate adsorption and precipitation on calcite under calco-carbonic equilibrium condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenxuan; Sun, Xiaowen; Huang, Lidong; Liu, Dagang; Yu, Luji; Wu, Hongsheng; Wei, Dongyang

    2017-09-01

    Phosphate (PO 4 3- ) removal on calcite often entails two processes: adsorption and precipitation. Separating these two processes is of great importance for assessment of PO 4 3- stability after removal. Thus, this study was aimed at finding a critical range of conditions for separating these two processes in calco-carbonic equilibrium, by adjusting PO 4 3- concentration, reaction time and pH. PO 4 3- removal kinetic results showed that: (I) At pH7.7, PO 4 3- removal was mainly by adsorption at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤2.2 mg L -1 and reaction time ≤24 h, with dominant precipitation occurring at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≥3 mg L -1 after 24 h reaction; (II) At pH8.3, adsorption was the key removal process at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤7.5 mg L -1 and reaction time ≤24 h, whereas precipitation was observed at initial PO 4 3- concentration of 10 mg L -1 after 24 h reaction, (III) At pH 9.1 and 10.1, PO 4 3- removal mechanism was mainly by adsorption at initial PO 4 3- concentration ≤10 mg L -1 within 24 h reaction. Based on the kinetic results, it is suggested that PO 4 3- precipitation will occur after 24 h reaction when saturation index of amorphous calcium phosphate is between 1.97 and 2.19. Besides, increasing PO 4 3- concentration does not cause a continuous decline of PO 4 3- removal percentage. Moreover, experimental removal data deviated largely from the theoretical adsorption value by CD-MUSIC model. These indicate occurrence of precipitation which is in agreement with the kinetic result. Therefore our study will provide fundamental reference information for better understanding of phosphorous stabilization after removal by calcite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fe phase complexes and their thermal stability in iron phosphate catalysts supported on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasireddy, Venkata D. B. C., E-mail: dasireddy@gmail.com; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Harilal, A.; Singh, S.; Friedrich, H. B. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Chemistry and Physics (South Africa)

    2015-04-15

    Comparative XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies have been conducted on the effect of temperature on the phase transformations of an iron phosphate catalyst synthesized using the ammonia gel method (CAT1) and a commercial grade FePO {sub 4} catalyst supported on silica using wet impregnation method (CAT2). The XRD patterns of both catalysts showed the presence of iron phosphate and the tridymite phase of aluminum phosphate. Mössbauer spectra of the catalysts show that the phases present in CAT1 are thermally stable up to 500 {sup ∘}C, but CAT2 shows significant changes with the tridymite phase of iron phosphate increasing from 6 % to 29 % of the spectral area at a temperature of 500 {sup ∘}C.

  17. Two-step carbon coating of lithium vanadium phosphate as high-rate cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Quan; Zhao, Yanming

    2012-10-01

    Carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 was firstly prepared at 850 °C via two-step reaction method combined sol-gel and conventional solid-state synthesis by using VPO4/carbon as an intermediate. Two different carbon sources, citric acid and glucose as carbon additives in sequence, ultimately deduced double carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 as a high-rate cathode material. The Li3V2(PO4)3/carbon with 4.39% residual carbon has a splendid electronic conductivity of 4.76×10-2 S cm-1. Even in the voltage window of 2.5-4.8 V, the Li3V2(PO4)3/carbon cathode can retain outstanding rate ability (170.4 mAh g-1 at 1.2 C, 101.9 mAh g-1 at 17 C), and no degradation is found after 120 C current rate. These phenomena show that the two-step carbon-coated Li3V2(PO4)3 can act as a fast charge-discharge cathode material for high-power Li-ion batteries. Furthermore, it's believed that this synthesize method can be easily transplanted to prepare other lithiated vanadium-based phosphates.

  18. Effects of Sucroferric Oxyhydroxide Compared to Lanthanum Carbonate and Sevelamer Carbonate on Phosphate Homeostasis and Vascular Calcifications in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Phan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated serum phosphorus, calcium, and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 levels are associated with cardiovascular disease in chronic renal disease. This study evaluated the effects of sucroferric oxyhydroxide (PA21, a new iron-based phosphate binder, versus lanthanum carbonate (La and sevelamer carbonate (Se, on serum FGF23, phosphorus, calcium, and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH concentrations, and the development of vascular calcification in adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF rats. After induction of CRF, renal function was significantly impaired in all groups: uremic rats developed severe hyperphosphatemia, and serum iPTH increased significantly. All uremic rats (except controls then received phosphate binders for 4 weeks. Hyperphosphatemia and increased serum iPTH were controlled to a similar extent in all phosphate binder-treatment groups. Only sucroferric oxyhydroxide was associated with significantly decreased FGF23. Vascular calcifications of the thoracic aorta were decreased by all three phosphate binders. Calcifications were better prevented at the superior part of the thoracic and abdominal aorta in the PA21 treated rats. In adenine-induced CRF rats, sucroferric oxyhydroxide was as effective as La and Se in controlling hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and vascular calcifications. The role of FGF23 in calcification remains to be confirmed.

  19. "Fabrication of arbitrarily shaped carbonate apatite foam based on the interlocking process of dicalcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Yuki; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2017-08-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO 3 Ap) foam with an interconnected porous structure is highly attractive as a scaffold for bone replacement. In this study, arbitrarily shaped CO 3 Ap foam was formed from α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) foam granules via a two-step process involving treatment with acidic calcium phosphate solution followed by hydrothermal treatment with NaHCO 3 . The treatment with acidic calcium phosphate solution, which is key to fabricating arbitrarily shaped CO 3 Ap foam, enables dicalcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) crystals to form on the α-TCP foam granules. The generated DCPD crystals cause the α-TCP granules to interlock with each other, inducing an α-TCP/DCPD foam. The interlocking structure containing DCPD crystals can survive hydrothermal treatment with NaHCO 3 . The arbitrarily shaped CO 3 Ap foam was fabricated from the α-TCP/DCPD foam via hydrothermal treatment at 200 °C for 24 h in the presence of a large amount of NaHCO 3 .

  20. Analysis and application of classification methods of complex carbonate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiongyan; Qin, Ruibao; Ping, Haitao; Wei, Dan; Liu, Xiaomei

    2018-06-01

    There are abundant carbonate reservoirs from the Cenozoic to Mesozoic era in the Middle East. Due to variation in sedimentary environment and diagenetic process of carbonate reservoirs, several porosity types coexist in carbonate reservoirs. As a result, because of the complex lithologies and pore types as well as the impact of microfractures, the pore structure is very complicated. Therefore, it is difficult to accurately calculate the reservoir parameters. In order to accurately evaluate carbonate reservoirs, based on the pore structure evaluation of carbonate reservoirs, the classification methods of carbonate reservoirs are analyzed based on capillary pressure curves and flow units. Based on the capillary pressure curves, although the carbonate reservoirs can be classified, the relationship between porosity and permeability after classification is not ideal. On the basis of the flow units, the high-precision functional relationship between porosity and permeability after classification can be established. Therefore, the carbonate reservoirs can be quantitatively evaluated based on the classification of flow units. In the dolomite reservoirs, the average absolute error of calculated permeability decreases from 15.13 to 7.44 mD. Similarly, the average absolute error of calculated permeability of limestone reservoirs is reduced from 20.33 to 7.37 mD. Only by accurately characterizing pore structures and classifying reservoir types, reservoir parameters could be calculated accurately. Therefore, characterizing pore structures and classifying reservoir types are very important to accurate evaluation of complex carbonate reservoirs in the Middle East.

  1. Selective removal of phosphate for analysis of organic acids in complex samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sandeep; Frolov, Andrej; Marcillo, Andrea; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2015-04-03

    Accurate quantitation of compounds in samples of biological origin is often hampered by matrix interferences one of which occurs in GC-MS analysis from the presence of highly abundant phosphate. Consequently, high concentrations of phosphate need to be removed before sample analysis. Within this context, we screened 17 anion exchange solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials for selective phosphate removal using different protocols to meet the challenge of simultaneous recovery of six common organic acids in aqueous samples prior to derivatization for GC-MS analysis. Up to 75% recovery was achieved for the most organic acids, only the low pKa tartaric and citric acids were badly recovered. Compared to the traditional approach of phosphate removal by precipitation, SPE had a broader compatibility with common detection methods and performed more selectively among the organic acids under investigation. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that phosphate removal strategies during the analysis of biologically relevant small molecular weight organic acids consider the respective pKa of the anticipated analytes and the detection method of choice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term progress prediction for the carbon steel corrosion in diluted artificial seawater with and without zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Kazumi; Ishioka, Shinichi; Iwanami, Masaru; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Tanaka, Norihiko; Kawaharada, Yoshiyuki; Yokoyama, Yutaka; Umehara, Ryuji; Kato, Chiaki; Ueno, Fumiyoshi; Fukaya, Yuichi; Kumaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (1F) were damaged by an unprecedented severe accident in the great east Japan earthquake on 11th, March, 2011, and seawater and fresh water were injected as an emergency countermeasure for the core cooling. The primary containment vessels (PCVs), made of carbon steel, were exposed to seawater and fresh water, and have had the possibility of corrosion. The PCVs of 1F are the most important equipment for the core cooling and removal of the fuel debris, the structural integrity of the PCV must be maintained until decommissioning. Therefore, evaluation of PCV carbon steel corrosion behavior is important, as well as evaluation of corrosion inhibitors as one of the corrosion protection methods. In this study, long-term immersion corrosion tests for up to 10000 hours were performed in diluted artificial seawater simulating 1F with and without zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate. Based on the long-term immersion corrosion test results, diagnosis method of the reduction in plate thickness of the nuclear vessel was examined. The validity of the existing corrosion progress models following parabolic rate law was confirmed. The corrosion progress models were also applicable to the corrosion inhibited condition adding zinc / sodium carbonate mixed phosphate. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel drastically fell down by adding this corrosion inhibitor. (author)

  3. Bone Regeneration of Rat Tibial Defect by Zinc-Tricalcium Phosphate (Zn-TCP Synthesized from Porous Foraminifera Carbonate Macrospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Chou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foraminifera carbonate exoskeleton was hydrothermally converted to biocompatible and biodegradable zinc-tricalcium phosphate (Zn-TCP as an alternative biomimetic material for bone fracture repair. Zn-TCP samples implanted in a rat tibial defect model for eight weeks were compared with unfilled defect and beta-tricalcium phosphate showing accelerated bone regeneration compared with the control groups, with statistically significant bone mineral density and bone mineral content growth. CT images of the defect showed restoration of cancellous bone in Zn-TCP and only minimal growth in control group. Histological slices reveal bone in-growth within the pores and porous chamber of the material detailing good bone-material integration with the presence of blood vessels. These results exhibit the future potential of biomimetic Zn-TCP as bone grafts for bone fracture repair.

  4. Phosphate tuned copper electrodeposition and promoted formic acid selectivity for carbon dioxide reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jian; Sun, Libo; Canepa, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Fabrication of catalytically active electrodes by electrodeposition is attractive due to its in situ nature, easy controllability, and large-scale operation capability. Most recently, modifying the electrodes with phosphate ligands through electrodepositing electrode materials has shown promising...

  5. Catalytic Copolymerization of Ethene and Carbon Monoxide on Nickel Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domhöver, Bernd; Kläui, Wolfgang; Kremer-Aach, Andreas; Bell, Ralf; Mootz, Dietrich

    1998-11-16

    Can palladium be replaced by nickel? For the industrial copolymerization of carbon monoxide and ethene a palladium catalyst is used which cannot be recovered-a cheaper procedure would be desirable. The presented complex 1 is the first structurally characterized nickel compound which does not polymerize ethene but a mixture from carbon monoxide and ethene unter mild conditions to give a perfectly alternating polyketone. © 1998 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  6. The EIS investigation of powder polyester coatings on phosphated low carbon steel: The effect of NaNO2 in the phosphating bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegdic, B.V.; Bajat, J.B.; Popic, J.P.; Stevanovic, S.I.; Miskovic-Stankovic, V.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effect of NaNO 2 on surface morphology of iron-phosphate coatings were determined. → Better corrosion stability of polyester coating on phosphated steel without NaNO 2 . → EIS results and microscopic examinations correlate well with adhesion measurements. - Abstract: The effect of different type of iron-phosphate coatings on corrosion stability and adhesion characteristic of top powder polyester coating on steel was investigated. Iron-phosphate coatings were deposited on steel in the novel phosphating bath with or without NaNO 2 as an accelerator. The corrosion stability of the powder polyester coating was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), adhesion by pull-off and NMP test, while surface morphology of phosphate coatings were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesion and corrosion stability of powder polyester coatings were improved with pretreatment based on iron-phosphate coating deposited from NaNO 2 -free bath.

  7. Mechanistic insights into validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate synthesis by VldE using the structure of the entire product complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Cavalier

    Full Text Available The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an "open" and "closed" conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  8. Maize source leaf adaptation to nitrogen deficiency affects not only nitrogen and carbon metabolism but also control of phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Urte; Mascher, Martin; Colmsee, Christian; Scholz, Uwe; Bräutigam, Andrea; Fahnenstich, Holger; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Crop plant development is strongly dependent on the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil and the efficiency of N utilization for biomass production and yield. However, knowledge about molecular responses to N deprivation derives mainly from the study of model species. In this article, the metabolic adaptation of source leaves to low N was analyzed in maize (Zea mays) seedlings by parallel measurements of transcriptome and metabolome profiling. Inbred lines A188 and B73 were cultivated under sufficient (15 mM) or limiting (0.15 mM) nitrate supply for up to 30 d. Limited availability of N caused strong shifts in the metabolite profile of leaves. The transcriptome was less affected by the N stress but showed strong genotype- and age-dependent patterns. N starvation initiated the selective down-regulation of processes involved in nitrate reduction and amino acid assimilation; ammonium assimilation-related transcripts, on the other hand, were not influenced. Carbon assimilation-related transcripts were characterized by high transcriptional coordination and general down-regulation under low-N conditions. N deprivation caused a slight accumulation of starch but also directed increased amounts of carbohydrates into the cell wall and secondary metabolites. The decrease in N availability also resulted in accumulation of phosphate and strong down-regulation of genes usually involved in phosphate starvation response, underlining the great importance of phosphate homeostasis control under stress conditions.

  9. Some observations on phosphate based corrosion inhibitors in preventing carbon steel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anupkumar, B.; Satpathy, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    Among the various types of phosphonic acid based inhibitors assayed, namely HEDP, ATMP and a commercial corrosion inhibitor (code named Betz), it was found that Betz has the maximum amount of organic phosphate followed by HEDP and ATMP. The corrosion rate studies show that Betz gives the highest inhibition efficiency followed by HEDP and ATMP. This shows that organic phosphate plays a significant role in corrosion protection. However, it was observed that due to synergestic effect, HEDP in the presence of Zn 2+ gave a better corrosion protection than Betz. The results are discussed in the light of available literature. (author)

  10. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Fupo; Ren, Weiwei; Tian, Xiumei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  11. Comparative study on in vivo response of porous calcium carbonate composite ceramic and biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo, E-mail: fphebm@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Ren, Weiwei [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2016-07-01

    In a previous study, robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) were prepared by using phosphate-based glass (PG) as an additive, which showed good cell response. In the present study the in vivo response of porous CC/PG was compared to that of porous biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), using a rabbit femoral critical-size grafting model. The materials degradation and bone formation processes were evaluated by general observation, X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography, and histological examination. The results demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and progressive degradation of CC/PG and BCP. Although the in vitro degradation rate of CC/PG was distinctly faster than that of BCP, at 4 week post-implantation, the bone generation and material degradation of CC/PG were less than those of BCP. Nevertheless, at postoperative week 8, the increment of bone formation and material degradation of CC/PG was pronouncedly larger than that of BCP. These results show that CC/PG is a potential resorbable bone graft aside from the traditional synthetic ones. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vivo response of CC/PG and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) was compared. • CC/PG showed faster in vitro degradation rate compared to BCP. • CC/PG showed less in vivo degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 4. • CC/PG had larger increment of degradation and bone formation than BCP at week 8.

  12. Towards a selective adsorbent for arsenate and selenite in the presence of phosphate: Assessment of adsorption efficiency, mechanism, and binary separation factors of the chitosan-copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani, Jamila S; Lounsbury, Amanda W; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2016-01-01

    The potential for a chitosan-copper polymer complex to select for the target contaminants in the presence of their respective competitive ions was evaluated by synthesizing chitosan-copper beads (CCB) for the treatment of (arsenate:phosphate), (selenite:phosphate), and (selenate:sulfate). Based on work by Rhazi et al., copper (II) binds to the amine moiety on the chitosan backbone as a monodentate complex (Type I) and as a bidentate complex crosslinking two polymer chains (Type II), depending on pH and copper loading. In general, the Type I complex exists alone; however, beyond threshold conditions of pH 5.5 during synthesis and a copper loading of 0.25 mol Cu(II)/mol chitosan monomer, the Type I and Type II complexes coexist. Subsequent chelation of this chitosan-copper ligand to oxyanions results in enhanced and selective adsorption of the target contaminants in complex matrices with high background ion concentrations. With differing affinities for arsenate, selenite, and phosphate, the Type I complex favors phosphate chelation while the Type II complex favors arsenate chelation due to electrostatic considerations and selenite chelation due to steric effects. No trend was exhibited for the selenate:sulfate system possibly due to the high Ksp of the corresponding copper salts. Binary separation factors, α12, were calculated for the arsenate-phosphate and selenite-phosphate systems, supporting the mechanistic hypothesis. While, further research is needed to develop a synthesis method for the independent formation of the Type II complexes to select for target contaminants in complex matrices, this work can provide initial steps in the development of a selective adsorbent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chloride pyrometallurgy of uranium ore. 1. Chlorination of phosphate ore using solid or gas chlorinating agent and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomihiro; Komoto, Shigetoshi; Otomura, Keiichiro; Takenaka, Toshihide; Sato, Nobuaki; Fujino, Takeo.

    1995-01-01

    A thermodynamical and pyrometallurgical study to recover uranium from the phosphate ores was undertaken using the chloride volatilization method. Iron was chlorinated with solid chlorinating agents such as NaCl and CaCl 2 in combination with activated carbon, which will be used for removing this element from the ore, but uranium was not. On the other hand, the chlorination using Cl 2 gas and activated carbon gave a good result at 1,223 K. Not only uranium but also iron, phosphorus, aluminum and silicon were found to form volatile chlorides which vaporized out of the ore, while calcium remained in the ore as non-volatile CaCl 2 . The chlorination condition was studied as functions of temperature, reaction time and carbon content. The volatilization ratio of uranium around 95% was obtained by heating the mixture of the ore and activated carbon (35 wt%) in a mixed gas flow of Cl 2 (200 ml/min) and N 2 (200 ml/min) at 1,223 K for 120 min. (author)

  14. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the S(N)2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental k(obs) value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  15. Complex terrain influences ecosystem carbon responses to temperature and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, W. M.; Epstein, H. E.; Li, X.; McGlynn, B. L.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Emanuel, R. E.

    2017-08-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem responses to temperature and precipitation have major implications for the global carbon cycle. Case studies demonstrate that complex terrain, which accounts for more than 50% of Earth's land surface, can affect ecological processes associated with land-atmosphere carbon fluxes. However, no studies have addressed the role of complex terrain in mediating ecophysiological responses of land-atmosphere carbon fluxes to climate variables. We synthesized data from AmeriFlux towers and found that for sites in complex terrain, responses of ecosystem CO2 fluxes to temperature and precipitation are organized according to terrain slope and drainage area, variables associated with water and energy availability. Specifically, we found that for tower sites in complex terrain, mean topographic slope and drainage area surrounding the tower explained between 51% and 78% of site-to-site variation in the response of CO2 fluxes to temperature and precipitation depending on the time scale. We found no such organization among sites in flat terrain, even though their flux responses exhibited similar ranges. These results challenge prevailing conceptual framework in terrestrial ecosystem modeling that assumes that CO2 fluxes derive from vertical soil-plant-climate interactions. We conclude that the terrain in which ecosystems are situated can also have important influences on CO2 responses to temperature and precipitation. This work has implications for about 14% of the total land area of the conterminous U.S. This area is considered topographically complex and contributes to approximately 15% of gross ecosystem carbon production in the conterminous U.S.

  16. Coordination of manganous ion at the active site of pyruvate, phosphate dikinase: the complex of oxalate with the phosphorylated enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kofron, J.L.; Ash, D.E.; Reed, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the structure of the complex of manganous ion with the phosphorylated form of pyruvate, phosphate dikinase (E/sub p/) and the inhibitor oxalate. Oxalate, an analogue of the enolate of pyruvate, is competitive with respect to pyruvate in binding to the phosphorylated form of the enzyme. Superhyperfine coupling between the unpaired electrons of Mn(I) and ligands specifically labeled with 17 O has been used to identify oxygen ligands to Mn(II) in the complex with oxalate and the phosphorylated form of the enzyme. Oxalate binds at the active site as a bidentate chelate with Mn(II). An oxygen from the 3'-N-phosphohistidyl residue of the protein is in the coordination sphere of Mn(II), and at least two water molecules are also bound to Mn(II) in the complex. Oxalate also binds directly to Mn(II) in a complex with nonphosphorylated enzyme. The structure for the E/sub p/-Mn(II)-oxalate complex implies that simultaneous coordination of a phospho group and of the attacking nucleophile to the divalent cation is likely an important factor in catalysis of this phospho-transfer reaction

  17. Investigation of the benzotriazole as addictive for carbon steel phosphating; Estudo da utilizacao do benzotriazol como aditivo para a fosfatizacao de aco carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annies, V.; Cunha, M.T.; Rodrigues, P.R.P.; Banczek, E.P. [Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Costa, I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Terada, M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This work studied the viability of substitution of sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) for benzotriazole (BTAH) in the zinc phosphate bath (PZn+NaNO{sub 2}) for phosphating of carbon steel (SAE 1010). The characterization of the samples was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Optical Microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was evaluated by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated by Open Circuit Potential, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Anodic Potentiodynamic Polarization Curves in a 0.5 mol L{sup -1} NaCl electrolyte. The experimental results showed that the phosphate layer obtained in the solution with benzotriazole (PZn+BTAH) presented better corrosion resistance properties than that obtained in sodium nitrite. The results demonstrated that the sodium nitrite NaNO{sub 2} can be replaced by benzotriazole (BTAH) in zinc phosphate baths. (author)

  18. Structure of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase in complex with an aminopyridine bisphosphonate and two molecules of inorganic phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaeok [McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Lin, Yih-Shyan [McGill University, 801 Rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, QC H3A 0B8 (Canada); Tsantrizos, Youla S. [McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 (Canada); McGill University, 801 Rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montreal, QC H3A 0B8 (Canada); McGill University, 3649 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 0B1 (Canada); Berghuis, Albert M., E-mail: albert.berghuis@mcgill.ca [McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6 (Canada); McGill University, 3649 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, QC H3G 0B1 (Canada); McGill University, 3775 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B4 (Canada)

    2014-02-19

    A co-crystal structure of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase in complex with an aminopyridine bisphosphonate, YS0470, and two molecules of inorganic phosphate has been determined. The identity of the phosphate ligands was confirmed by anomalous diffraction data. Human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (hFPPS) produces farnesyl pyrophos@@phate, an isoprenoid essential for a variety of cellular processes. The enzyme has been well established as the molecular target of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), which are best known for their antiresorptive effects in bone but are also known for their anticancer properties. Crystal structures of hFPPS in ternary complexes with a novel bisphosphonate, YS0470, and the secondary ligands inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}), inorganic pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) have recently been reported. Only the co-binding of the bisphosphonate with either PP{sub i} or IPP resulted in the full closure of the C-@@terminal tail of the enzyme, a conformational change that is required for catalysis and that is also responsible for the potent in vivo efficacy of N-BPs. In the present communication, a co-crystal structure of hFPPS in complex with YS0470 and two molecules of P{sub i} is reported. The unusually close proximity between these ligands, which was confirmed by anomalous diffraction data, suggests that they interact with one another, with their anionic charges neutralized in their bound state. The structure also showed the tail of the enzyme to be fully disordered, indicating that simultaneous binding of two P{sub i} molecules with a bisphosphonate cannot induce the tail-closing conformational change in hFPPS. Examination of homologous FPPSs suggested that this ligand-dependent tail closure is only conserved in the mammalian proteins. The prevalence of P{sub i}-bound hFPPS structures in the PDB raises a question regarding the in vivo relevance of P{sub i} binding to the function of the enzyme.

  19. High-temperature carbonates in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, H. M.; Boudreau, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The processes involved in the petrogenesis of the sulphide-hosted platinum-group-element (PGE) deposits of the Stillwater Complex are controversial, with theories ranging from the purely magmatic to those involving an aqueous fluid. To further constrain these models, we have been examining the trace phase assemblages in rocks away from the ore zones. High-temperature carbonates have been observed in association with sulphide minerals below the platiniferous J-M Reef of the Stillwater Complex. The carbonate assemblage consists of dolomite with exsolved calcite and is found in contact with sulphide minerals: chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite in the Peridotite Zone; and pyrrhotite with pentlandite, pyrite and chalcopyrite in Gabbronorite I of the Lower Banded Series. The minimal silicate alteration and the lack of greenschist minerals in association with the mineral assemblage are consistent with a high-temperature origin for the carbonates. The calcite-dolomite geothermometer [1] yields a minimum formation temperature of ~900°C for the unmixed assemblages. A reaction rim surrounds the carbonate-sulphide assemblages, showing an alteration of the host orthopyroxene to a more Ca-enriched, Fe-depleted composition. This is consistent with diffusive exchange between carbonates and pyroxenes at high temperatures, mediated by an aqueous fluid. The highly variable molar MnO/FeO ratios in both the high-temperature carbonates and their associated altered pyroxene rims also imply their interaction with a fluid. The carbonate assemblages are consistent with Stillwater fluid inclusion studies [2], showing that fluids comprising coexisting Cl-rich brine and carbonic fluid were trapped in pegmatitic quartz at 700-715°C, some of which also contained "accidental" calcite inclusions. The high Cl-content of apatite [3] found below the platiniferous J-M Reef is further evidence that a Cl-rich fluid was migrating through the rocks beneath the Reef. Carbonates have been shown to be stabilized

  20. Incorporation of 14C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorska, M.; Gorzkowski, B.; Szumanska, G.; Smialek, M.

    1975-01-01

    Incorporation of 14 C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication was studied. In brains of rats tested on the 20, 30 and 60th minute of exposure to CO and immediately after removal from the chamber the enzyme activity showed no essential deviation from the control level. In the group of rats tested 1 hour after taking them out from the chamber increase of the enzyme activity was noticed, amounting to about 33% of the control value. The brains tested 24 hours after exposure showed the largest increase of the enzyme activity by about 94%. In the next time periods, 48 and 72 hours after intoxication, the enzyme activity was decreasing. The glycogen content in brains of control animals increased 3 hours after CO intoxication by about 69%. The increase of glycogen synthesis was expressed by increase of the total radioactivity, which amounted to 160% of the control value. (Z.M.)

  1. Hydroformylation of propene and 1-hexene catalysed by a alpha-zirconium phosphate supported rhodium-phosphine complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Magnus; Andersson, C; Hjortkjær, Jes

    2001-01-01

    The reaction of the amphiphilic ligand {4-[bis(diethylaminoethyl)aminomethyl]diphenyl}phosphine with alpha -zirconium phosphate, of intermediate surface area (24m(2) g(-1)), provided a phosphine functionalised support in which electrostatic interaction between ammonium groups on the ligand and de......-protonated surface hydroxyl groups on the support provided the binding force. The X-ray powder diffractogram of the material showed that the binding lowers the crystallinity of the carrier and that the ligand is not intercalated but bound at the outer surface and at the entrances to the interlamellar space. Reaction...... of the phosphine functionalised support with Rh(CO)(2)(acac) led to CO-phosphine exchange and formation of an immobilised complex of the composition LRh(CO)(acac) (L = surface bound phosphine). When applied as catalyst in continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of propene and in liquid phase hydroformylation of 1...

  2. Competition of a parathion-hydrolyzing Flavobacterium with bacteria from ditch water in carbon-, nitrate- and phosphate-limited continuous cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprenger, W.; Dijkstra, A.; Zwart, G.; Van Agterveld, M.P.; Van Noort, P.C.M.; Parsons, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of competition for macroelements with bacteria from ditch water on the parathion-hydrolyzing Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 (FB) was investigated within mixed continuous cultures under carbon-, nitrate- or phosphate-limited conditions. The high initial rate of parathion hydrolysis

  3. Linking aboveground net primary productivity to soil carbon and dissolved organic carbon in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.S. Peterson; K. Lajtha

    2013-01-01

    Factors influencing soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in complex terrain, where vegetation, climate, and topography vary over the scale of a few meters, are not well understood. We examined the spatial correlations of lidar and geographic information system-derived landscape topography, empirically measured soil...

  4. Alkali Metal Ion Complexes with Phosphates, Nucleotides, Amino Acids, and Related Ligands of Biological Relevance. Their Properties in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal ions play very important roles in all biological systems, some of them are essential for life. Their concentration depends on several physiological factors and is very variable. For example, sodium concentrations in human fluids vary from quite low (e.g., 8.2 mmol dm(-3) in mature maternal milk) to high values (0.14 mol dm(-3) in blood plasma). While many data on the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) in various fluids are available, the information on other alkali metal cations is scarce. Since many vital functions depend on the network of interactions occurring in various biofluids, this chapter reviews their complex formation with phosphates, nucleotides, amino acids, and related ligands of biological relevance. Literature data on this topic are quite rare if compared to other cations. Generally, the stability of alkali metal ion complexes of organic and inorganic ligands is rather low (usually log K  Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). For example, for citrate it is: log K ML = 0.88, 0.80, 0.48, 0.38, and 0.13 at 25 °C and infinite dilution. Some considerations are made on the main aspects related to the difficulties in the determination of weak complexes. The importance of the alkali metal ion complexes was also studied in the light of modelling natural fluids and in the use of these cations as probes for different processes. Some empirical relationships are proposed for the dependence of the stability constants of Na(+) complexes on the ligand charge, as well as for correlations among log K values of NaL, KL or LiL species (L = generic ligand).

  5. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Sullivan, J.C.; Stout, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using 13 C NMR of 99.9% 13 C-enriched U VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- and Am VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- systems has been examined by variable temperature 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of ΔG double-dagger 295 = 56 kJ/M, ΔH double-dagger = 38 kJ/M, and ΔS double-dagger = -60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress

  6. Covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with tetramanganese complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Carola; Frielinghaus, Robert; Saelhoff, Anna-Katharina; Schneider, Claus M.; Besson, Claire; Floetotto, Henrik; Koegerler, Paul; Houben, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    We present first results on the covalent chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with polynuclear {Mn 4 } coordination complexes. Raman spectra prove that the reaction can only be achieved for tubes which have been oxidized to create carboxylic groups. HRTEM is used to show that the reaction can be carried out directly on a substrate as well. Analysis of the D/G intensity ratio for different oxidation times shows that it is possible to reduce the amount of defects created. This is important for the future application of this material in transport devices. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Amorphous Ca-phosphate precursors for Ca-carbonate biominerals mediated by Chromohalobacter marismortui

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivadeneyra, María Angustias; Martín-Algarra, Agustín; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Martín-Ramos, José Daniel

    Although diverse microbial metabolisms are known to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals, the mechanisms involved in the bacterial mediation, in particular nucleation, are still debated. The study of aragonite precipitation by Chromohalobacter marismortui during the early stages (3-7 days)

  8. Bone tissue engineering on amorphous carbonated apatite and crystalline octacalcium phosphate-coated titanium discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Robert J.; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; Stigter, Martin; Barrère, F.; Layrolle, Pierre; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2005-01-01

    Poor fixation of bone replacement implants, e.g. the artificial hip, in implantation sites with inferior bone quality and quantity may be overcome by the use of implants coated with a cultured living bone equivalent. In this study, we tested, respectively, amorphous carbonated apatite (CA)- and

  9. Lithium iron phosphate/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes for high energy lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanyi; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Qifeng; Yu, Danmei; Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports sol-gel derived nanostructured LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite film cathodes exhibiting enhanced electrochemical properties and cyclic stabilities. LiFePO4/carbon films were obtained by spreading sol on Pt coated Si wafer followed by ambient drying overnight and annealing/pyrolysis at elevated temperature in nitrogen. Uniform and crack-free LiFePO4/carbon nanocomposite films were readily obtained and showed olivine phase as determined by means of X-Ray Diffractometry. The electrochemical characterization revealed that, at a current density of 200 mA/g (1.2 C), the nanocomposite film cathodes demonstrated an initial lithium-ion intercalation capacity of 312 mAh/g, and 218 mAh/g after 20 cycles, exceeding the theoretical storage capacity of conventional LiFePO4 electrode. Such enhanced Li-ion intercalation performance could be attributed to the nanocomposite structure with fine crystallite size below 20 nm as well as the poor crystallinity which provides a partially open structure allowing easy mass transport and volume change associated with Li-ion intercalation. Moreover the surface defect introduced by carbon nanocoating could also effectively facilitate the charge transfer and phase transitions.

  10. Acid-base properties and surface complexation modeling of phosphate anion adsorption by wasted low grade iron ore with high phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoli; Bai, Chenguang; Xia, Wentang; An, Juan

    2014-08-15

    The adsorption phenomena and specific reaction processes of phosphate onto wasted low grade iron ore with high phosphorus (WLGIOWHP) were studied in this work. Zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses were used to elucidate the interaction mechanism between WLGIOWHP and aqueous solution. The results implied that the main adsorption mechanism was the replacement of surface hydroxyl groups by phosphate via the formation of inner-sphere complex. The adsorption process was characterized by chemical adsorption onto WLGIOWHP. The non-electrostatic model (NEM) was used to simulate the surface adsorption of phosphate onto WLGIOWHP. The total surface site density and protonation constants for NEM (N(T)=1.6×10(-4) mol/g, K(a1)=2.2×10(-4), K(a2)=6.82×10(-9)) were obtained by non-linear data fitting of acid-base titrations. In addition, the NEM was used to establish the surface adsorption complexation modeling of phosphate onto WLGIOWHP. The model successfully predicted the adsorption of phosphate onto WLGIOWHP from municipal wastewater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reinforcement of calcium phosphate cement with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and bovine serum albumin for injectable bone substitute applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chew, K.K.; Low, K.L.; Zein, S.H.S.; McPhail, D.; Gerhardt, L.C.; Roether, J.A.; Boccaccini, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of novel alternative injectable calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composites for orthopaedic applications. The new CPC composites comprise ß-tri-calcium phosphate (ß-TCP) and di-calcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) mixed with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and incorporated

  12. Fluorimetric study of the interaction between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and tetracycline-europium complex and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qian; Hou Faju; Ge Xiaoxia; Jiang Chongqiu; Gong Shubo

    2005-01-01

    A new spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the determination of trace amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Using europium (Eu 3+ )-tetracycline (TC) complex as a fluorescent probe, in the buffer solution of pH 7.60. NADP can remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the Eu 3+ -TC complex at λ = 612 nm and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Eu 3+ ion is in proportion to the concentration of NADP. Optimum conditions for the determination of NADP were also investigated. The dynamic range for the determination of NADP is 4.4 x 10 -7 to 2.2 x 10 -6 mol l -1 with detection limit of 6.9 x 10 -8 mol l -1 . This method is simple, practical and relatively free interference from coexisting substances and can be successfully applied to determination of NADP in synthetic water samples and in serum samples. Moreover, the enhancement mechanisms of the fluorescence intensity in the Eu 3+ -TC system and the Eu 3+ -TC-NADP system have been also discussed

  13. Reduction of uranyl carbonate and hydroxyl complexes and neptunyl carbonate complexes studied with chemical-electrochemical methods and rixs spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butorin, Sergei; Nordgren, Joseph; Ollila, Kaija; Albinsson, Yngve; Werme, Lars

    2003-10-01

    Sweden and Finland plan to dispose of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants in deep underground repositories sited in granitic rocks. The fuel assemblies will be placed in canisters consisting of an outer corrosion-resistant copper shell with an inner cast iron insert that gives mechanical strength and reduces void space in the canister. The canister will be placed in a disposal borehole lined with compacted bentonite blocks. After sealing of the borehole, groundwater seepage will saturate the bentonite. The water flow path and transport mechanism between the host rock and the canister will be via diffusion through the swollen bentonite. Any oxygen trapped in the repository will be consumed by reaction with the host rock, pyrite in the bentonite and through microbial activity, giving long-term conditions with low redox potentials. Under these conditions, uranium dioxide - the matrix of unirradiated fuel - is a stable phase. This reducing near-field environment can upset by radiolysis of water caused by the radioactivity of the fuel, which after a few hundred years will be primarily alpha activity. Radiolysis of water produces equal amounts of oxidising and reducing species, but the reducing species produced by alpha radiolysis is molecular hydrogen, which is expected to be far less reactive than the produced oxidising species, H 2 O 2 . Alpha radiolysis could create locally oxidising conditions close to the fuel surface and oxidise the U(IV) in the uranium dioxide fuel to the more soluble U(VI) oxidation state. Furthermore, the solubility of U(VI) is enhanced in the presence of bicarbonate/carbonate by the formation of strong anionic uranyl carbonate complexes. This increase in solubility can amount to 4 to 5 orders of magnitude depending on the composition of the groundwater in contact with the fuel. The other tetravalent actinides in the fuel, Np and Pu, also have higher solubilities when oxidised beyond 4 + to neptunyl and plutonyl species. Once these

  14. Mineralogy and geochemistry of phosphate minerals and brannerite from the Proterozoic Carbon Leader Reef gold and uranium placer deposit, Witwatersrand, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberthuer, T.

    1987-01-01

    Yttrium-phosphate, the most common phosphate phase, is closely associated with detrital uraninite. It is assumed having formed by the reaction of mobile phosphate with Y and HREE liberated from the lattice of detrital uraninite, during diagenesis and/or metamorphism of the sediments. Authigenic brannerite (UTi 2-3 O 6-8 ) is well-defined microscopically and geochemically. Textural relationships indicate that both titanium migrated to uraninite, forming brannerite, and mobile uranium caused the 'branneritization' of rutile/leucoxene. Microprobe analyses demonstrate that brannerite from the Carbon Leader Reef displays a distinct and small variation of UO 2 /TiO 2 ratios, which lie close to the theoretical value of 1.117 for UTi 3 O 8 , in contrast to uraniferous leucoxene/brannerite from other Witwatersrand-type deposits, the latter showing a wide scatter of UO 2 /TiO 2 ratios. (orig./HP)

  15. Complexation of neptunium(V) by salicylate, phthalate and citrate ligands in a pH 7.5 phosphate buffered system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, T.F.; Daniel, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    Conditional stability constants, enthalpies and entropies of complexation at pH 7.5 and ionic strength 0.1 have been determined for neptunium(V) complexes of phosphate, salicylate, phthalate and citrate. Results are given and discussed. At pH 7.5 salicylate does not form a complex with neptunium(V) due to the low charge density of the NpO 2 + ion and incomplete ionization of the salicylate ion. In all cases, only 1:1 complexes were identified. (U.K.)

  16. Theoretical investigation of the reaction mechanism for the phosphate diester hydrolysis using an asymmetric dinuclear metal complex as a biomimetic model of the purple acid phosphatase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Dalva E C; De Almeida, Wagner B; Neves, Ademir; Rocha, Willian R

    2008-12-14

    In this work we have applied quantum mechanical calculations, at the density functional theory level, to investigate the phosphate diester hydrolysis promoted by a cationic heterodinuclear Fe(III)...Zn(II) complex that mimics the structural and functional properties of the purple acid phosphatase (PAP) enzymes. The hydrolysis of the dimethyl phosphate diester was investigated in the gas phase and in solution by means of the continuum PCM model, using the B3LYP hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Our computed results showed that the hydrolysis of the dimethyl phosphate ester takes place in two steps. The first step corresponds to a slow P-O bond formation through nucleophilic attack of the coordinated (Fe(III))-OH group. The second step consists of a proton transfer process followed by the release of a methanol molecule. The first step is rate determining with activation free energy of 12.3 kcal mol(-1), which is about 3 times lower than the activation free energy for the uncatalyzed reaction. We also show that the heterodinuclear site plays an important role favoring an associative mechanism for the phosphate diester hydrolysis, favoring the formation of a high energy intermediate phosphorane, and orienting the phosphate group to the nucleophilic attack.

  17. A glassy carbon electrode modified with cerium phosphate nanotubes for the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone, catechol and resorcinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Yue, Yuhua; Hao, Yanjun; Feng, Shun; Zhou, Xianli

    2018-03-12

    A nafion film containing cerium phosphate nanotubes was pasted onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to obtain a sensor for hydroquinone (HQ). The morphologies and components of the coating were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) showed the specific surface of the electrode to be significantly increased and the electron transfer rate to be accelerated. The modified GCE was applied to the determination of hydroquinone (HQ) via DPV. The oxidation current increases linearly in the 0.23 μM to 16 mM HQ concentration range which is as wide as five orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is 0.12 μM (based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3), and the sensitivity is 1.41 μA·μM -1  cm -2 . The method was further applied to the simultaneous determination of HQ, catechol and resorcinol. The potentials for the three species are well separated (20, 134, and 572 mV vs SCE). Average recoveries from (spiked) real water samples are between 95.2 and 107.0%, with relative standard deviations of 0.9~2.7% (for n = 3) at three spiking levels. The method was validated by independent assays using HPLC. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  18. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution using iron-zirconium modified activated carbon nanofiber: Performance and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Weiping; Tong, Jing; Yang, Zhaohui; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Wang, Dongbo; Song, Peipei; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2017-05-01

    Phosphate (P) removal is significant for the prevention of eutrophication in natural waters. In this paper, a novel adsorbent for the removal of P from aqueous solution was synthesized by loading zirconium oxide and iron oxide onto activated carbon nanofiber (ACF-ZrFe) simultaneously. The adsorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that P adsorption was highly pH dependent and the optimum pH was found to be 4.0. The isotherm of adsorption could be well described by the Langmuir model and the maximum P adsorption capacity was estimated to be 26.3mgP/g at 25°C. The kinetic data were well fitted to the pseudo-second-order equation, indicating that chemical sorption was the rate-limiting step. Moreover, co-existing ions including sulfate (SO 4 2- ), chloride (Cl - ), nitrate (NO 3 - ) and fluoride (F - ) exhibited a distinct effect on P adsorption with the order of F - >NO 3 - >Cl - >SO 4 2- . Further investigations by FT-IR spectroscopy and pH variations associated with the adsorption process revealed that ligands exchange and electrostatic interactions were the dominant mechanisms for P adsorption. The findings reported in this work highlight the potential of using ACF-ZrFe as an effective adsorbent for the removal of P in natural waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Perfluorooctane sulfonate adsorption on powder activated carbon: Effect of phosphate (P) competition, pH, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Shen, Mengmeng; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Li, Kun; Liu, Jingjing; Lu, Bianhe; Tian, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC), as an adsorbent, was applied to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Laboratory batch experiments were performed to investigate the influences of phosphate (P) competition, temperature, and pH for PFOS adsorption onto PAC. The results showed that higher temperature favored PFOS adsorption in single and binary systems. The kinetic data fitted very well to the pseudo second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamically, the endothermic enthalpy of the PFOS adsorption in single and binary systems were 125.07 and 21.25 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The entropy of the PFOS adsorption in single and binary systems were 0.479 and 0.092 kJ mol -1  K -1 , respectively. And the Gibbs constants were negative. These results indicated that the adsorption processes were spontaneous. The adsorption isotherms of PFOS agreed well with the Langmuir model. In the single system, PFOS adsorption decreased with increased pH value. The difference in the amount of PFOS adsorption between the single and binary systems increased at higher pH. Frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) demonstrated that P competition increased the hydrophilicity of the PAC and the electrostatic repulsion between PFOS and PAC, then the PFOS adsorption amount decreased. It also demonstrated that, at higher temperature, increased PFOS adsorption was mainly due to the higher diffusion rate of PFOS molecules and greater number of active sites opened on the PAC surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Recovery of uranium from the Syrian phosphate by solid-liquid method using alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were analyzed in the Syrian phosphate deposits. Mean concentrations were found between 50 and 110 ppm. As a consequence, an average phosphate dressing of 22 kg/ha phosphate would charge the soil with 5-20 g/ha uranium when added as a mineral fertilizer. Fine grinding phosphate produced at the Syrian mines was used for uranium recovery by carbonate leaching. The formation of the soluble uranyl tricarbonate anion UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- permits use of alkali solutions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate salts for the nearly selective dissolution of uranium from phosphate. Separation of iron, aluminum, titanium, etc., from the uranium during leaching was carried out. Formation of some small amounts of molybdates, vanadates, phosphates, aluminates, and some complexes metal was investigated. This process could be used before the manufacture of TSP fertilizer, and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author)

  1. Electrocatalytic and simultaneous determination of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid at molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitollahi, Hadi; Sheikhshoaie, Iran

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode have been fabricated. → This electrode reduced the oxidation potential of isoproterenol by about 175 mV. → It resolved the voltammetric waves of isoproterenol, uric acid and folic acid. - Abstract: This paper describes the development, electrochemical characterization and utilization of a novel modified molybdenum (VI) complex-carbon nanotube paste electrode for the electrocatalytic determination of isoproterenol (IP). The electrochemical profile of the proposed modified electrode was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) that showed a shift of the oxidation peak potential of IP at 175 mV to less positive value, compared with an unmodified carbon paste electrode. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.0 was performed to determine IP in the range from 0.7 to 600.0 μM, with a detection limit of 35.0 nM. Then the modified electrode was used to determine IP in an excess of uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) by DPV. Finally, this method was used for the determination of IP in some real samples.

  2. Complexity Analysis of Carbon Market Using the Modified Multi-Scale Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuli Yin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon markets provide a market-based way to reduce climate pollution. Subject to general market regulations, the major existing emission trading markets present complex characteristics. This paper analyzes the complexity of carbon market by using the multi-scale entropy. Pilot carbon markets in China are taken as the example. Moving average is adopted to extract the scales due to the short length of the data set. Results show a low-level complexity inferring that China’s pilot carbon markets are quite immature in lack of market efficiency. However, the complexity varies in different time scales. China’s carbon markets (except for the Chongqing pilot are more complex in the short period than in the long term. Furthermore, complexity level in most pilot markets increases as the markets developed, showing an improvement in market efficiency. All these results demonstrate that an effective carbon market is required for the full function of emission trading.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial activity of silver(I) and copper(II) complexes of phosphate derivatives of pyridine and benzimidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska-Lis, Urszula; Szewczyk, Eligia M; Chęcińska, Lilianna; Wojciechowski, Jakub M; Wolf, Wojciech M; Ochocki, Justyn

    2014-01-01

    Two silver(I) complexes--[Ag(4-pmOpe)]NO₃}(n) and [Ag(2-bimOpe)₂]NO₃--and three copper(II) complexes--[Cu₄Cl₆O(2-bimOpe)₄], [CuCl₂(4-pmOpe)₂], and [CuCl₂(2-bis(pm)Ope]--were synthesized by reaction of silver(I) nitrate or copper(II) chloride with phosphate derivatives of pyridine and benzimidazole, namely diethyl (pyridin-4-ylmethyl)phosphate (4-pmOpe), 1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl diethyl phosphate (2-bimOpe), and ethyl bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)phosphate (2-bis(pm)Ope). These compounds were characterized by ¹H, ¹³C, and ³¹P NMR as well as IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and ESIMS spectrometry. Additionally, molecular and crystal structures of {[Ag(4-pmOpe)]NO₃}n and [Cu₄Cl₆O(2-bimOpe)₄] were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The antimicrobial profiles of synthesized complexes and free ligands against test organisms from the ATCC and clinical sources were determined. Silver(I) complexes showed good antimicrobial activities against Candida albicans strains (MIC values of ∼19 μM). [Ag(2-bimOpe)₂]NO₃ was particularly active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, with MIC values of ∼5 and ∼10 μM, respectively. Neither copper(II) complexes nor the free ligands inhibited the growth of test organisms at concentrations below 500 μg mL⁻¹. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A Bimetallic Aluminium(Salphen) Complex for the Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates from Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao; North, Michael

    2017-01-10

    A bimetallic aluminium(salphen) complex is reported as a sustainable, efficient and inexpensive catalyst for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide. In the presence of this complex and tetrabutylammonium bromide, terminal and internal epoxides reacted at 50 °C and 10 bar carbon dioxide pressure to afford their corresponding cyclic carbonates in yields of 50-94 % and 30-71 % for terminal and internal cyclic carbonates, respectively. Mechanistic studies using deuterated epoxides and an analogous monometallic aluminium(salphen) chloride complex support a mechanism for catalysis by the bimetallic complex, which involves intramolecular cooperative catalysis between the two aluminium centres. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Building complex carbon skeletons with ethynyl[2.2]paracyclophanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Dix

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethynyl[2.2]paracyclophanes are shown to be useful substrates for the preparation of complex, highly unsaturated carbon frameworks. Thus both the pseudo-geminal- 2 and the pseudo-ortho-diethynylcyclophane 4 can be dimerized by Glaser coupling to the respective dimers 9/10 and 11/12. Whereas the former isomer pair could not be separated so far, the latter provided the pure diastereomers after extensive column chromatography/recrystallization. Isomer 11 is chiral and could be separated on a column impregnated with cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate. The bridge-extended cyclophane precursor 18 furnished the ring-enlarged cyclophanes 19 and 20 on Glaser–Hay coupling. Cross-coupling of 4 and the planar building block 1,2-diethynylbenzene (1 yielded the chiral hetero dimer 22 as the main product. An attempt to prepare the biphenylenophane 27 from the triacetylene 24 by CpCo(CO2-catalyzed cycloisomerization resulted in the formation of the cyclobutadiene Co-complex 26. Besides by their usual spectroscopic and analytical data, the new cyclophanes 11, 12, 19, 20, 22, and 26 were characterized by X-ray structural analysis.

  6. Energy transfer from natural photosynthetic complexes to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiwatowski, Kamil [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Dużyńska, Anna; Świniarski, Michał [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Szalkowski, Marcin [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Zdrojek, Mariusz; Judek, Jarosław [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wroclaw Research Center EIT+, Stablowicka 147, Wroclaw (Poland); Kaminska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    Combination of fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy results indicates that single-walled carbon nanotubes are extremely efficient quenchers of fluorescence emission associated with chlorophylls embedded in a natural photosynthetic complex, peridinin-chlorophyll-protein. When deposited on a network of the carbon nanotubes forming a thin film, the emission of the photosynthetic complexes diminishes almost completely. This strong reduction of fluorescence intensity is accompanied with dramatic shortening of the fluorescence lifetime. Concluding, such thin films of carbon nanotubes can be extremely efficient energy acceptors in structures involving biologically functional complexes. - Highlights: • Fluorescence imaging of carbon nanotube - based hybrid structure. • Observation of efficient energy transfer from chlorophylls to carbon nanotubes.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of carbonated hydroxyapatite and bioinspired polymer-calcium phosphate nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusufoglu, Yusuf [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Nature offers many exciting ideas and inspiration for the development of new materials and processes. The toughness of spider silk, the strength and lightweight of bone, and the adhesion abilities of the gecko's feet are some of the many examples of highperformance natural materials, which have attracted the interest of scientist to duplicate their properties in man-made materials. Materials found in nature combine many inspiring properties such as miniaturization, sophistication, hierarchical organization, hybridization, and adaptability. In all biological systems, whether very basic or highly complex, nature provides a multiplicity of materials, architectures, systems and functions. Generally, the architectural configurations and material characteristics are the important features that have been duplicated from nature for building synthetic structural composites.

  8. Complexes of silver(I) ions and silver phosphate nanoparticles with hyaluronic acid and/or chitosan as promising antimicrobial agents for vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudobova, Dagmar; Nejdl, Lukas; Gumulec, Jaromir; Krystofova, Olga; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Kynicky, Jindrich; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-06-28

    Polymers are currently widely used to replace a variety of natural materials with respect to their favourable physical and chemical properties, and due to their economic advantage. One of the most important branches of application of polymers is the production of different products for medical use. In this case, it is necessary to face a significant disadvantage of polymer products due to possible and very common colonization of the surface by various microorganisms that can pose a potential danger to the patient. One of the possible solutions is to prepare polymer with antibacterial/antimicrobial properties that is resistant to bacterial colonization. The aim of this study was to contribute to the development of antimicrobial polymeric material ideal for covering vascular implants with subsequent use in transplant surgery. Therefore, the complexes of polymeric substances (hyaluronic acid and chitosan) with silver nitrate or silver phosphate nanoparticles were created, and their effects on gram-positive bacterial culture of Staphylococcus aureus were monitored. Stages of formation of complexes of silver nitrate and silver phosphate nanoparticles with polymeric compounds were characterized using electrochemical and spectrophotometric methods. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of complexes was determined using the methods of determination of growth curves and zones of inhibition. The results of this study revealed that the complex of chitosan, with silver phosphate nanoparticles, was the most suitable in order to have an antibacterial effect on bacterial culture of Staphylococcus aureus. Formation of this complex was under way at low concentrations of chitosan. The results of electrochemical determination corresponded with the results of spectrophotometric methods and verified good interaction and formation of the complex. The complex has an outstanding antibacterial effect and this effect was of several orders higher compared to other investigated complexes.

  9. on association of trialkyl phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkovic, D.M.; Maksimovic, Z.B.

    1976-01-01

    The association constants of tri-n-butyl (TBP), tri-n-propyl (TPP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP) with chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and benzene were determined by dielectric constant, proton magnetic resonance and vapor pressure measurements. Correlation of the trialkyl phosphate-chloroform association constants, using the Hammett equation, showed their increase with the number of carbon atoms in the aliphatic radicals. The change of trialkyl phosphate reactivity with temperature was used to determine the thermodynamic quantities. (author)

  10. Effect of pore size distribution on iron oxide coated granular activated carbons for phosphate adsorption – Importance of mesopores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suresh Kumar, P.; Prot, T.J.F.; Korving, Leon; Keesman, Karel J.; Dugulan, A.I.; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption is often suggested for to reach very low phosphate levels in municipal wastewater effluent and even to recover phosphate. Adsorbent performance is usually associated with surface area but the exact role of the pore size distribution (PSD) is unclear. Here, we show the effect of the PSD

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases in opisthokonts reveals unexpected ancestral complexity and novel modern biosynthetic components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Smart

    Full Text Available Glycerolipid synthesis represents a central metabolic process of all forms of life. In the last decade multiple genes coding for enzymes responsible for the first step of the pathway, catalyzed by glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, have been described, and characterized primarily in model organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mice. Notoriously, the fungal enzymes share low sequence identity with their known animal counterparts, and the nature of their homology is unclear. Furthermore, two mitochondrial GPAT isoforms have been described in animal cells, while no such enzymes have been identified in Fungi. In order to determine if the yeast and mammalian GPATs are representative of the set of enzymes present in their respective groups, and to test the hypothesis that metazoan orthologues are indeed absent from the fungal clade, a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis was performed including organisms spanning the breadth of the Opisthokonta supergroup. Surprisingly, our study unveiled the presence of 'fungal' orthologs in the basal taxa of the holozoa and 'animal' orthologues in the basal holomycetes. This includes a novel clade of fungal homologues, with putative peroxisomal targeting signals, of the mitochondrial/peroxisomal acyltransferases in Metazoa, thus potentially representing an undescribed metabolic capacity in the Fungi. The overall distribution of GPAT homologues is suggestive of high relative complexity in the ancestors of the opisthokont clade, followed by loss and sculpting of the complement in the descendent lineages. Divergence from a general versatile metabolic model, present in ancestrally deduced GPAT complements, points to distinctive contributions of each GPAT isoform to lipid metabolism and homeostasis in contemporary organisms like humans and their fungal pathogens.

  12. Strontium hydroxyapatite and strontium carbonate as templates for the precipitation of calcium-phosphates in the absence and presence of fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternitzke, Vanessa; Janousch, Markus; Heeb, Michèle B.; Hering, Janet G.; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-06-01

    The heterogeneous precipitation of calcium-phosphates on calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 or HAP) in the presence and absence of fluoride is important in the formation of bone and teeth, protection against tooth decay, dental and skeletal fluorosis and defluoridation of drinking water. Strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr10(PO4)6(OH)2 or SrHAP) and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) were used as calcium-free seed templates in precipitation experiments conducted with varying initial calcium-to-phosphate (Ca/P) or calcium-to-phosphate-to-fluoride (Ca/P/F) ratios. Suspensions of SrHAP or SrCO3 seed templates (which were calcium-limited for both templates and phosphate-limited in the case of SrCO3) were reacted at pH 7.3 (25 °C) over 3 days. The resulting solids were examined with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Calcium apatite was the predominant phase identified by all techniques independent of the added Ca/P ratios and of the presence of fluoride. It was not possible to make an unambiguous distinction between HAP and fluorapatite (Ca10(PO4)6F2, FAP). The apatite was calcium-deficient and probably contained some strontium.

  13. [An experimental study on a slow-release complex with rifampicin-polylactic-co-glycolic acid-calcium 
phosphate cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianhuang; Ding, Zhou; Lei, Qing; Li, Miao; Liang, Yan; Lu, Tao

    2016-09-28

    To prepare the slow-release complex with rifampicin (RFP)-polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-calcium phosphate cement (CPC) (RFP-PLGA-CPC complex), and to study its physical and chemical properties and drug release properties in vitro.
 The emulsification-solvent evaporation method was adopted to prepare rifampicin polylactic acid-glycolic acid (RFP-PLGA) slow-release microspheres, which were divided into 3 groups: a calcium phosphate bone cement group (CPC group), a CPC embedded with RFP group (RFP-CPC group), and a PLGA slow-release microspheres carrying RFP and the self-curing CPC group (RFP- PLGA-CPC complex group). The solidification time and porosity of materials were determined. The drug release experiments in vitro were carried out to observe the compressive strength, the change of section morphology before and after drug release. 
 The CPC group showed the shortest solidification time, while the RFP-PLGA-CPC complex group had the longest one. There was statistical difference in the porosity between the CPC group and the RFP-CPC group (Pbehavior of the complex, which was in accordance with zero order kinetics equation F=0.168×t.
 The porosity of RFP-PLGA-CPC complex is significantly higher than that of CPC, and it can keep slow release of the effective anti-tuberculosis drugs and maintain a certain mechanical strength for a long time.

  14. Biogeochemical stability and reactions of iron-organic carbon complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Adhikari, D.; Zhao, Q.; Dunham-Cheatham, S.; Das, K.; Mejia, J.; Huang, R.; Wang, X.; Poulson, S.; Tang, Y.; Obrist, D.; Roden, E. E.

    2017-12-01

    Our core hypothesis is that the degradation rate of soil organic carbon (OC) is governed by the amount of iron (Fe)-bound OC, and the ability of microbial communities to utilize OC as an energy source and electron shuttle for Fe reduction that in turn stimulates reductive release of Fe-bound labile dissolved OC. This hypothesis is being systematically evaluated using model Fe-OC complexes, natural soils, and microcosm system. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic C was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic C. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil OC was stabilized by association with Fe oxide. In other studies, pyrogenic OC was found to facilitate the reduction of hematite, by enhancing extracellular electron transport and sorbing Fe(II). For ferrihydrite-OC co-precipitates, the reduction of Fe and release of OC was closely governed by the C/Fe ratio in the system. Based on the XPS, XANES and XAFS analysis, the transformation of Fe speciation was heterogeneous, depending on the conformation and composition of Fe-OC complexes. For natural soils, we investigated the quantity, characteristics, and reactivity of Fe-bound OC in soils collected from 14 forests in the United States. Fe-bound OC contributed up to 57.8% of total OC in the forest soils. Under the anaerobic conditions, the reduction of Fe was positively correlated to the electron accepting capacity of OC. Our findings highlight the closely coupled dynamics of Fe and OC, with broad implications on the turnover of OC and biogeochemical cycles of Fe.

  15. Pre-treatment of Dairy and Breast Milk with Sevelamer Hydrochloride and Sevelamer Carbonate to Reduce Phosphate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, R.; Houkes, L.M.; Schroder, C.H.; Willems, J.L.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Young children and infants with chronic kidney disease are at increased risk of hyperphosphatemia because of high intake of dairy products. Hyperphosphatemia leads to metastatic calcifications and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. Sevelamer is an effective phosphate

  16. Calcium Carbonate Phosphate Binding Ion Exchange Filtration and Accelerated Denitrification Improve Public Health Standards and Combat Eutrophication in Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yanamadala, Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Cultural eutrophication, the process by which a lake becomes rich in dissolved nutrients as a result of point and nonpoint pollutant sources, is a major cause of the loss of natural lake ecosystems throughout the world. The process occurs naturally in all lakes, but phosphate-rich nutrient runoff from sources such as storm drains and agricultural runoff is a major cause of excess phosphate-induced eutrophication. Especially in Madrona Marsh, one of the last remaining vernal marshes in the gre...

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byung Woo; Bingman, Craig A.; Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L.; Phillips, George N. Jr

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6 2 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byung Woo [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Bingman, Craig A. [Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L. [Department of Biochemistry, The Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226-4801 (United States); Phillips, George N. Jr, E-mail: phillips@biochem.wisc.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  19. Structure of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase in a quaternary complex with a magnesium ion, NADPH and the antimalarial drug fosmidomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Shunsuke; Hara, Kodai; Iino, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Ohsawa, Kanju; Seto, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) from Escherichia coli complexed with Mg 2+ , NADPH and fosmidomycin was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure showed a well defined loop conformation at the active site of DXR. The crystal structure of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) from Escherichia coli complexed with Mg 2+ , NADPH and fosmidomycin was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. DXR is the key enzyme in the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway and is an effective target of antimalarial drugs such as fosmidomycin. In the crystal structure, electron density for the flexible loop covering the active site was clearly observed, indicating the well ordered conformation of DXR upon substrate binding. On the other hand, no electron density was observed for the nicotinamide-ribose portion of NADPH and the position of Asp149 anchoring Mg 2+ was shifted by NADPH in the active site

  20. Joint Optimal Production Planning for Complex Supply Chains Constrained by Carbon Emission Abatement Policies

    OpenAIRE

    He, Longfei; Xu, Zhaoguang; Niu, Zhanwen

    2014-01-01

    We focus on the joint production planning of complex supply chains facing stochastic demands and being constrained by carbon emission reduction policies. We pick two typical carbon emission reduction policies to research how emission regulation influences the profit and carbon footprint of a typical supply chain. We use the input-output model to capture the interrelated demand link between an arbitrary pair of two nodes in scenarios without or with carbon emission constraints. We design optim...

  1. Steric Effects on the Binding of Phosphate and Polyphosphate Anions by Zinc(II) and Copper(II) Dinuclear Complexes of m-Xylyl-bis-cyclen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Catarina V; Esteban-Gómez, David; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tripier, Raphaël; Delgado, Rita

    2018-05-11

    The triethylbenzene-bis-cyclen (cyclen = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) compound (tbmce) was designed with an imposed structural rigidity at the m-xylyl spacer to be compared to a less restrained and known parent compound (bmce). The framework of both compounds differs only in the substituents of the m-xylyl spacer. The study was centered in the differences observed in the acid-base reactions of both compounds, their copper(II) and zinc(II) complexation behaviors, as well as in the uptake of phosphate and polyphosphate anions (HPPi 3- , ATP 4- , ADP 3- , AMP 2- , PhPO 4 2- , and HPO 4 2- ). On the one hand, the acid-base reactions showed lower values for the third and fourth protonation constants of tbmce than for bmce, suggesting that the ethyl groups of the spacer in tbmce force the two cyclen units to more conformational restricted positions. On the other hand, the stability constant values for copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes revealed that bmce is a better chelator than tbmce pointing out to additional conformational restraints imposed by the triethylbenzene spacer. The binding studies of phosphates by the dinuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes showed much smaller effective association constants for the dicopper complexes. Single-crystal X-ray and computational (density functional theory) studies suggest that anion binding promotes the formation of tetranuclear entities in which anions are bridging the metal centers. Our studies also revealed the dinuclear zinc(II) complex of bmce as a promising receptor for phosphate anions, with the largest effective association constant of 5.94 log units being observed for the formation of [Zn 2 bmce(HPPi)] + . Accordingly, a colorimetric study via an indicator displacement assay to detect phosphates in aqueous solution found that the [Zn 2 bmce] 4+ complex acts as the best receptor for pyrophosphate displaying a detection limit of 2.5 nM by changes visible to naked eye.

  2. Stabilization of microtubules by inorganic phosphate and its structural analogues, the fluoride complexes of aluminum and beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlier, M.F.; Didry, D.; Melki, R.; Chabre, M.; Pantaloni, D.

    1988-01-01

    In order to elucidate how the elementary reactions of GTP cleavage and subsequent inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) release, which accompany microtubule assembly, regulate microtubule dynamics, the effect of P/sub i/ and of its structural analogues AlF 4 - and BeF 3 - on the stability of GDP-microtubules has been investigated. Inorganic phosphate binds to microtubules with a low affinity (K/sub D/ = 25 mM) and slows down the rate of GDP-subunit dissociation by about 2 orders of magnitude. AlF 4 - and BeF 3 - exhibit phosphate-like effects with 1000-fold higher affinity. Evidence has been obtained for direct binding of BeF 3 - to microtubules with a stoichiometry of 1 mol of BeF 3 - per mole of GDP-subunit and an equilibrium dissociation constant of 12-15 μM. AlF 4 - and P/sub i/ compete for this site. Phosphate analogues abolish oscillatory polymerization kinetics and slow down microtubule turnover at steady state. In view of these results, the authors propose that P/sub i/ and its structural analogues bind to the site of the γ-phosphate of GTP in the E site and reconstitute a GDP-P/sub i/-microtubule, from which tubulin subunits dissociate very slowly. They therefore understand that, following GTP cleavage on microtubules, P/sub i/ release in the medium is accompanied by a structural change resulting in a large destabilization of the polymer. A cap of slowly dissociating GDP-P/sub i/-subunits prevents depolymerization of the microtubule GDP-core at steady state. The similarity with the actin system is studied

  3. Mechanistic Insights into Validoxylamine A 7'-Phosphate Synthesis by VldE Using the Structure of the Entire Product Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Yim, Young-Sun; Asamizu, Shumpei; Neau, David; Almabruk, Khaled H.; Mahmud, Taifo; Lee, Yong-Hwan [Oregon State U.; (Cornell); (LSU)

    2013-09-09

    The pseudo-glycosyltransferase VldE catalyzes non-glycosidic C-N coupling between an unsaturated cyclitol and a saturated aminocyclitol with the conservation of the stereochemical configuration of the substrates to form validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, the biosynthetic precursor of the antibiotic validamycin A. To study the molecular basis of its mechanism, the three-dimensional structures of VldE from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. limoneus was determined in apo form, in complex with GDP, in complex with GDP and validoxylamine A 7'-phosphate, and in complex with GDP and trehalose. The structure of VldE with the catalytic site in both an “open” and “closed” conformation is also described. With these structures, the preferred binding of the guanine moiety by VldE, rather than the uracil moiety as seen in OtsA could be explained. The elucidation of the VldE structure in complex with the entirety of its products provides insight into the internal return mechanism by which catalysis occurs with a net retention of the stereochemical configuration of the donated cyclitol.

  4. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fux, P.

    1984-06-01

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO 2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 25 0 C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed [fr

  5. Phosphate-Doped Carbon Black as Pt Catalyst Support: Co-catalytic Functionality for Dimethyl Ether and Methanol Electro-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Min; Huang, Yunjie; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    ). The supported Pt catalysts show significant improvement in catalytic activity towards the direct oxidation of methanol and DME, attributable to the enhanced adsorption and dehydrogenation of methanol and DME, as well as the presence of activated OH species in the catalysts. The latter is demonstrated......Niobium-phosphate-doped (NbP-doped) carbon blacks were prepared as the composite catalyst support for Pt nanoparticles. Functionalities of the composite include intrinsic proton conductivity, surface acidity, and interfacial synergistic interactions with methanol and dimethyl ether (DME...... to facilitate the removal of CO intermediates formed during the oxidation reactions....

  6. Thermodynamic and electrochemical properties of some rare earth cryptates and related complexes in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loufouilou, E.L.

    1986-03-01

    The stability of trivalent lanthanide complexes with [1]-cryptand 22 and [2]-cryptands 222 and 211 and also tris (3.6- dioxa heptyl) amine (TDHA) is studied in propylene carbonate solution by potentiometry with Ag + as an auxiliary cation. Complexation enthalpies and entropies are determined for other complexes of some trivalent lanthanides (La, Er, Pr and Eu) with ligands 222, 221, 211, 22, 21, 18C6 and TDHA. [1]- and [2]- crytands are complexing agents more powerful than TDHA and crown-ethers 15C6 and 18C6. For ligands containing nitrogen complexe stability increase with RE atomic number but decrease for crown-ethers. In propylene carbonate complexes are stabilized by enthalpic effects, entropic contribution is variable. Polarographic reduction of samarium cryptate with ligand 222, 221 and 22 in propylene carbonate is reversible as in more solvating solvents water and methanol. Mixed complexes are formed with chlorides and this cryptate system is more difficult to reduce [fr

  7. Preformed and regenerated phosphate in ocean general circulation models: can right total concentrations be wrong?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Duteil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate distributions simulated by seven state-of-the-art biogeochemical ocean circulation models are evaluated against observations of global ocean nutrient distributions. The biogeochemical models exhibit different structural complexities, ranging from simple nutrient-restoring to multi-nutrient NPZD type models. We evaluate the simulations using the observed volume distribution of phosphate. The errors in these simulated volume class distributions are significantly larger when preformed phosphate (or regenerated phosphate rather than total phosphate is considered. Our analysis reveals that models can achieve similarly good fits to observed total phosphate distributions for a~very different partitioning into preformed and regenerated nutrient components. This has implications for the strength and potential climate sensitivity of the simulated biological carbon pump. We suggest complementing the use of total nutrient distributions for assessing model skill by an evaluation of the respective preformed and regenerated nutrient components.

  8. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Carciello, Neal R.

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80.degree. C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5-5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150.degree. C. to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2.times.10.sup.5 gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  9. Unsaturated carbone and allenylidene ruthenium complexes from alkynes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, Yu.L.; Diznev, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author's studies aimed at activation of terminal alkynes by metal complexes, reactivity patterns and selective preparations of unsaturated carbene, allenylidene and cumulenylidene derivatives of (arene)ruthenium complexes are reviewed. 48 refs

  10. Assessing potential impacts of phosphate precipitation on nitrous oxide emissions and the carbon footprint of wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosse, Pascal; Lübken, Manfred; Schmidt, Torsten C; Lange, Ruben-Laurids; Wichern, Marc

    2018-02-15

    Metal salts are widely used for the precipitation of phosphorus during wastewater treatment transforming soluble orthophosphate to an insoluble salt. In practice, more complex reactions are taking place including a reduction of the chemical solubility of dissolved greenhouse gases, such as nitrous oxide, present in the wastewater stream. In this respect, it was postulated that phosphorous precipitation will lead to artificial N 2 O stripping and hence to an increased carbon footprint of wastewater treatment plants. From lab-scale experiments utilizing N 2 O-saturated synthetic sewage solutions, it was evidenced that metal salt addition leads to N 2 O stripping with 20.8 g N 2 O per liter for a FeCl 2 -based precipitant to 26.4 g N 2 O per liter for a Al n (OH) m Cl3 n-m -based precipitant. Taking this maximum potential stripping effect into account for a carbon footprint analysis, a potential contribution of 16.11 kg CO 2,eq ·PE -1 ·a -1 was calculated in a case study, where FeCl 3 was considered. With respect to the defined system boundary conditions, the overall on-site and off-site CO 2 emissions were raised by 34% from 46.87 kg CO 2,eq ·PE -1 ·a -1 to 62.97 kg CO 2,eq ·PE -1 ·a -1 through CO 2,eq coming from phosphorous precipitation.

  11. Calcification mechanism and bony bonding studies of calcium carbonate and composite aluminosilicate/calcium phosphate applied as biomaterials by using radioactivation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudadesse, H.; Derrien, A.C.; Lucas-Girot, A.; Martin, S.; Cathelieau, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bony grafts are used as a filling biomaterial for defective bone. The introduction of new range of synthetic materials offers to surgeons additional possibilities to avoid virus transmission risks by using natural grafts in bony surgery. In this work, two materials, synthetic calcium carbonate and composite aluminosilicate/calcium phosphate were synthesized by an original method and experimented 'in vivo' as biomaterials for bony filling. Extracted biopsies were studied by several physico chemical and biological methods. The aim was to evaluate the kinetic resorption and bioconsolidation of these materials. We focused on the bioconsolidation between implant and bone by realising cartographies from the implant to the bone and on the calcification mechanism by determination of the origin of Ca and Sr responsible of the neo-formed bone. Neutron activation analysis (NAA), radiotracers 45 Ca* and 85 Sr* and proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) were used. Concerning the synthetic calcium carbonate, results show that twelve months after implantation, the mineral composition of implant becomes similar to that of the mature bone. The neoformed bone is composed with Ca and Sr coming from the organism when the Ca and Sr of the implant were progressively eliminated. Concerning the composite geopolymer/calcium phosphate, PIXE and histological studies reveal the intimate links between the bone and the implant starting with the first month after implantation. (author)

  12. Diiridium Bimetallic Complexes Function as a Redox Switch To Directly Split Carbonate into Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsun-Ren; Wu, Fang-Siou; Lee, Hsiu-Pen; Chen, Kelvin H-C

    2016-03-23

    A pair of diiridium bimetallic complexes exhibit a special type of oxidation-reduction reaction that could directly split carbonate into carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen via a low-energy pathway needing no sacrificial reagent. One of the bimetallic complexes, Ir(III)(μ-Cl)2Ir(III), can catch carbonato group from carbonate and reduce it to CO. The second complex, the rare bimetallic complex Ir(IV)(μ-oxo)2Ir(IV), can react with chlorine to release O2 by the oxidation of oxygen ions with synergistic oxidative effect of iridium ions and chlorine atoms. The activation energy needed for the key reaction is quite low (∼20 kJ/mol), which is far less than the dissociation energy of the C═O bond in CO2 (∼750 kJ/mol). These diiridium bimetallic complexes could be applied as a redox switch to split carbonate or combined with well-known processes in the chemical industry to build up a catalytic system to directly split CO2 into CO and O2.

  13. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-01

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu2) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H2O/DMSO (4:1 v/v, 1.0 mmol L- 1 HEPES buffer solution pH 7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO42 - determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46 μmol L- 1, respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu2 complex to detect HPO42 - in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO42 - over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P2O5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu2 + and HPO42 - as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output.

  14. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-05

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu 2 ) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H 2 O/DMSO (4:1v/v, 1.0mmolL -1 HEPES buffer solution pH7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO 4 2- determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3 lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46μmolL -1 , respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu 2 complex to detect HPO 4 2- in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO 4 2- over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P 2 O 5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu 2+ and HPO 4 2- as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes. 6. Fully acetylated dendrimers as biocompatible drug vehicles using dexamethasone 21-phosphate as a model drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Weng, Liang; Cheng, Yiyun; Zhang, Hongfeng; Zhang, Jiahai; Wu, Qinglin; Xu, Tongwen

    2011-03-17

    Fully acetylated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer was proposed as a biocompatible drug vehicle using dexamethasone 21-phosphate (Dp21) as a model drug. NMR techniques including (1)H NMR and 2D NOE NMR were used to characterize the host-guest chemistry of acetylated dendrimer/Dp21 and cationic dendrimer/Dp21 complexes. The pH-dependent micellization, complexation, and inclusion behaviors of Dp21 were observed in the presence of acetylated and cationic PAMAM dendrimers. Acetylated dendrimer only encapsulates Dp21 at acidic conditions, while cationic dendrimer can host Dp21 at both acidic and neutral conditions. The orientation of Dp21 molecules in the dendrimer cavities depends on the quaternization degree of tertiary amine groups of dendrimer and the protonation ratio of phosphate group of Dp21. A distinctive pH-dependent release behavior of Dp21 from the acetylated and nonacetylated dendritic matrix was observed: Dp21 exhibits a much slower release rate from acetylated dendrimer at lower pH conditions and a much faster release rate from nonacetylated dendrimer with decreasing pH values. Cytotoxicity studies further confirmed the biocompatibility of acetylated dendrimers, which are much safer in the delivery of therapeutics for the treatment of various diseases than nonacetylated dendrimers. The dendrimer-drug binding and release mechanisms provide a new insight for the design and optimization of biocompatible dendrimer-based drug delivery systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Can uranyl complexes encapsulate to carbon nanotubes? A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K SRINIVASU

    We find that uranyl-aqua complex ([UO2(H2O)5]2+) binds stronger as compared to uranyl-hydroxo-complex .... until the maximum Hellmann–Feynman force on each atom ..... porters and near-infrared agents for selective cancer cell.

  17. New La(III) complex immobilized on 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica as an efficient and reusable catalyst for hydrolysis of phosphate ester bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muxel, Alfredo A; Neves, Ademir; Camargo, Maryene A; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Castellano, Eduardo E; Castilho, Nathalia; Bortolotto, Tiago; Terenzi, Hernán

    2014-03-17

    Described herein is the synthesis, structure, and monoesterase and diesterase activities of a new mononuclear [La(III)(L(1))(NO3)2] (1) complex (H2L(1) = 2-bis[{(2-pyridylmethyl)-aminomethyl}-6-[N-(2-pyridylmethyl) aminomethyl)])-4-methyl-6-formylphenol) in the hydrolysis of 2,4-bis(dinitrophenyl)phosphate (2,4-BDNPP). When covalently linked to 3-aminopropyl-functionalized silica, 1 undergoes disproportionation to form a dinuclear species (APS-1), whose catalytic efficiency is increased when compared to the homogeneous reaction due to second coordination sphere effects which increase the substrate to complex association constant. The anchored catalyst APS-1 can be recovered and reused for subsequent hydrolysis reactions (five times) with only a slight loss in activity. In the presence of DNA, we suggest that 1 is also converted into the dinuclear active species as observed with APS-1, and both were shown to be efficient in DNA cleavage.

  18. Sensing of phosphates by using luminescent Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes: application to the microalgal cell Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadella, Sandeep; Sahoo, Jashobanta; Subramanian, Palani S; Sahu, Abhishek; Mishra, Sandhya; Albrecht, Markus

    2014-05-12

    Phenanthroline-based chiral ligands L(1) and L(2) as well as the corresponding Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes were synthesized and characterized. The coordination compounds show red and green emission, which was explored for the sensing of a series of anions such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-), NO2(-), HPO4(2-), HSO4(-), CH3COO(-), and HCO3(-). Among the anions, HPO4(2-) exhibited a strong response in the emission property of both europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes. The complexes showed interactions with the nucleoside phosphates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). Owing to this recognition, these complexes have been applied as staining agents in the microalgal cell Chlorella vulgaris. The stained microalgal cells were monitored through fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Initially, the complexes bind to the outer cell wall and then enter the cell wall through holes in which they probably bind to phospholipids. This leads to a quenching of the luminescence properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    of activity that it fueled, its soluble nature, and its relatively high (50%) carbohydrate content. The microbial community in these cold anoxic sediments clearly has the capacity to react rapidly to carbon input; extent and timecourse of remineralization of added carbon is similar to observations made......Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst...

  20. Controlled-potential coulometric determination of plutonium with a hydrochloric acid-sulfamic acid electrolyte and phosphate complexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Hollen, R.M.; Roensch, F.R.; Rein, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Total plutonium is selectively determined by a controlled-potential coulometric method in which plutonium is reduced to Pu(III) at 0.25 V (vs. SCE) in a 5.5 M hydrochloric acid-0.015 M sulfamic acid electrolyte, diverse ions are oxidized at 0.57 V, phosphate is added to reduce the Pu(III)-Pu(IV) potential, and Pu(III) is oxidized to Pu(IV) at 0.68 V. None of more than 50 metal ions present in nuclear fuel-cycle material interferes. Many anions are without effect and most interfering ones are removed by preliminary fuming with perchloric acid. The apparatus described consists mainly of commercial components. The relative standard deviation is < 0.1% at the 5-mg plutonium level

  1. Phosphorus and nitrogen-containing carbons obtained by the carbonization of conducting polyaniline complex with phosphites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bober, Patrycja; Trchová, Miroslava; Morávková, Zuzana; Kovářová, Jana; Vulić, I.; Gavrilov, N.; Pašti, I. A.; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 246, 20 August (2017), s. 443-450 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02787S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbonization * conducting polymer * nitrogen-containing carbon Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  2. Magnetic Particle-Based Immunoassay of Phosphorylated p53 Using Protein-Cage Templated Lead Phosphate and Carbon Nanospheres for Signal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Aiqiong; Bao, Yuanwu; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Shin, Yongsoon; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-11-20

    Phosphorylated p53 at serin 15 (phospho-p53-15) is a potential biomarker of Gamma-radiation exposure. In this paper, we described a new magnetic particles (MPs)-based electrochemical immunoassay of human phospho-p53-15 using carbon nanospheres (CNS) and protein-cage templated lead phosphate nanoparticles for signal amplification. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by three aspects: 1) The protein-cage nanoparticle (PCN) and p53-15 signal antibody (p53-15 Ab2) are linked to CNS (PCNof each apoferritin; 3) MPs capture a large amount of primary antibodies. Using apoferritin templated metallic phosphate instead of enzyme as label has the advantage of eliminating the addition of mediator or immunoreagents and thus makes the immunoassay system simpler. The subsequent stripping voltammetric analysis of the released lead ions were detected on a disposable screen printed electrode. The response current was proportional to the phospho-p53-15 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 20 ng mL-1 with detection limit of 0.01 ng mL-1. This method shows a good stability, reproducibility and recovery.

  3. An azine based sensor for selective detection of Cu2 + ions and its copper complex for sensing of phosphate ions in physiological conditions and in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Karishma; Kumar, Sumit; Kumar, Vipan; Kaur, Jeevanjot; Arora, Saroj; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A simple and cost effective unsymmetrical azine based Schiff base, 5-diethylamino-2-[(2-hydroxy-benzylidene)hydrazonomethyl]-phenol (1) was synthesized which selectively detect Cu2 + ions in the presence of other competitive ions through ;naked eye; in physiological conditions (EtOH-buffer (1:1, v/v, HEPES 10 mM, pH = 7.4)). The presence of Cu2 + induce color change from light yellow green to yellow with the appearance of a new band at 450 nm in UV-Vis spectra of Schiff base 1. The fluorescence of Schiff base 1 (10 μM) was quenched completely in the presence of 2.7 equiv. of Cu2 + ions. Sub-micromolar limit of detection (LOD = 3.4 × 10- 7 M), efficient Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV = 1.8 × 105 L mol- 1) and strong binding constant (log Kb = 5.92) has been determined with the help of fluorescence titration profile. Further, 1 - Cu2 + complex was employed for the detection of phosphate ions (PO43 -, HPO42 - and H2PO4-) at micromolar concentrations in EtOH-buffer of pH 7.4 based on fluorescence recovery due to the binding of Cu2 + with phosphate ions. Solubility at low concentration in aqueous medium, longer excitation (406 nm) and emission wavelength (537 nm), and biocompatibility of Schiff base 1 formulates its use in live cell imaging.

  4. Spontaneous Resolution and Carbonation of Chiral Benzyllithium Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartson, Anders; Sundberg, Jonas; Wiklund, Tove

    2010-01-01

    In search for new examples of absolute asymmetric synthesis (AAS), chiral α-substituted benzyllithium complexes have been prepared. While [Li(phet)(pmdta)] (1) (phet = 1-phenylethyl, pmdta = N,N,N′,N″,N″-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine) affords only racemic crystals, a promising candidate for AAS w...

  5. Biomimetic synthesis of needle-like fluorescent calcium phosphate/carbon dot hybrid composites for cell labeling and copper ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shanshan; Lu, Shousi; Xu, Pingxiang; Ma, Yi; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Yuming; Gu, Wei; Xue, Ming

    2016-05-04

    Herein, we report a biomimetic method to synthesize needle-like calcium phosphate (CaP) with dimensions of ∼130 nm length and ∼30 nm width using carbon dots (CDs) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose as dual templates. In addition to acting as the template, the CDs enable the CaP/CDs hybrid composites to emit blue fluorescence under UV excitation. Moreover, the prepared CaP/CDs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells. The potential of these CaP/CDs as a fluorescent probe for cell labeling was tested. In addition, it was demonstrated that the CaP/CDs were capable of selective detection of copper ions in drinking water.

  6. Incorporation of /sup 14/C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorska, M; Gorzkowski, B; Szumanska, G; Smialek, M [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw. Centrum Medycyny Doswiadczalnej i Klinicznej; Panstwowy Zaklad Higieny, Warsaw (Poland))

    1975-01-01

    Incorporation of /sup 14/C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication was studied. In brains of rats tested on the 20, 30 and 60th minute of exposure to CO and immediately after removal from the chamber the enzyme activity showed no essential deviation from the control level. In the group of rats tested 1 hour after taking them out from the chamber increase of the enzyme activity was noticed, amounting to about 33% of the control value. The brains tested 24 hours after exposure showed the largest increase of the enzyme activity by about 94%. In the next time periods, 48 and 72 hours after intoxication, the enzyme activity was decreasing. The glycogen content in brains of control animals increased 3 hours after CO intoxication by about 69%. The increase of glycogen synthesis was expressed by increase of the total radioactivity, which amounted to 160% of the control value.

  7. Two Iron Complexes as Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan, Chandan Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Manish

    2018-04-16

    Two new bimetallic iron-alkali metal complexes of amino acid (serine)-based reduced Schiff base ligand were synthesized and structurally characterized. Their efficacy as catalysts for the chemical fixation of carbon dioxide was explored. The heterogeneous version of the catalytic reaction was developed by the immobilization of these homogeneous bimetallic iron-alkali metal complexes in an anion-exchange resin. The resin-bound complexes can be used as recyclable catalysts up to six cycles.

  8. Effect of fluoridated casein phospopeptide-amorphous-calcium phosphate complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Abdul Shahariyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strengths (SBSs of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: About sixty extracted healthy human premolar teeth with intact buccal enamel were divided into two equal groups to which brackets were bonded using self-etching primers (SEPs and conventional means respectively. These were further equally divided into three subgroups - (1 control (2 CPP-ACP (3 chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash. The SBSs were then measured using a universal testing machine. Results: SBS of the conventional group was significantly higher than the self-etching group. The intragroup differences were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: CPP-ACP, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash did not adversely affect SBS of orthodontic brackets irrespective of the method of conditioning. Brackets bonded with conventional technique showed greater bond strengths as compared to those bonded with SEP.

  9. The human amygdaloid complex: a cytologic and histochemical atlas using Nissl, myelin, acetylcholinesterase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K S; Williams, R S

    1990-01-01

    We examined the distribution of acetylcholinesterase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase enzyme activity in the human amygdala using histochemical techniques. Both methods revealed compartments of higher or lower enzyme activity, in cells or neuropil, which corresponded to the nuclear subdivisions of the amygdala as defined with classical Nissl and myelin methods. The boundaries between the histochemical compartments were usually so sharp that the identification of these nuclear subdivisions was enhanced. There was also variation of staining intensity within many of the nuclear subdivisions, such as the lateral and central nuclei, anterior amygdaloid area and the intercalated groups. This histochemical difference corresponded to more subtle differences in Nissl and myelin staining patterns, and suggests further structural subdivisions of potential functional significance. We present a revised scheme of anatomical parcellation of the human amygdala based upon serial analysis with all four techniques. Our expectation is that this will allow the delineation of a clearer homology between the cytoarchitectonic subdivisions of the human amygdala and those of experimental animals.

  10. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of bezafibrate using a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Jorge Armando; Oliveira, Geiser Gabriel; Medeiros, Roberta Antigo; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-04-07

    A highly sensitive method for bezafibrate determination using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film based on square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV) is proposed. The electrochemical behaviour of bezafibrate has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, showing an irreversible anodic peak at a potential of 1.09 V in 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution (pH 2.0). A study of the scan rate showed that the oxidation of bezafibrate is an adsorptive-controlled process, involving the transfer of two electrons and two protons per molecule. The analytical curve was linear over a bezafibrate concentration range from 50 to 910 nmol L(-1), with a detection limit of 16 nmol L(-1). This analytical method was successfully applied for benzafibrate determination in pharmaceutical formulations, with results showing good agreement with those obtained using a comparative spectrophotometric method, and has the potential for field application.

  11. Unprecedented Carbonato Intermediates in Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis Catalysed by Bimetallic Aluminium(Salen) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Osma, José A; North, Michael; Offermans, Willem K; Leitner, Walter; Müller, Thomas E

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism by which [Al(salen)]2 O complexes catalyse the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide in the absence of a halide cocatalyst has been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) studies, mass spectrometry and (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR and infrared spectroscopies provide evidence for the formation of an unprecedented carbonato bridged bimetallic aluminium complex which is shown to be a key intermediate for the halide-free synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide. Deuterated and enantiomerically-pure epoxides were used to study the reaction pathway. Based on the experimental and theoretical results, a catalytic cycle is proposed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Investigation of different-ligand complexes of holmium and erbium with NTA and carbonate ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, N.A.; Bel'tyukova, S.V.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Found out have been the optimum conditions for the formation of the lantanides (Ln) multiligand complexes with the nitriletriacetic acid (NTA) and the carbonate-ion. It has been established that the components correlation in complex compounds is equal to 1:1:1. Computed have been the values of the oscillator forces of the absorption bands, that conform to the ''supersensitive'' migration of the multiligand complexes, It is shown that the increment in the oscillator forces, the induced entering of one carbonate-ion into the Ln-NTA complex molecule conforms to about 1/4 of the oscillator forces increment during the migration from the aquo ion to the [Ln(CO 3 ) 4 ] 5- complex carbonaceous ion

  13. Structural, optical, and redox properties of lamellar solids derived from copper(I) complexes and n-butylammonium uranyl phosphate and arsenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, A.T.; Ellis, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    A family of hydrated, layered solids has been prepared from intercalative ion-exchange reactions of n-butylammonium uranyl phosphate (BAUP) or arsenate (BAUAs), (n-C 4 H 9 NH 3 )UO 2 EO 4 ·3H 2 O (E = P, As), with Cu(LL) 2 + complexes (LL is dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline or bcp = 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-dipheyl-1,10-phenanthroline). The products obtained were analyzed as having compositions [Cu(LL) 2 ] x [BA] 1-x UO 2 EO 4 ·2H 2 O with x ∼ 0.2. X-ray powder diffraction data reveal that the compounds are single phases that can be indexed on the basis of a tetragonal unit cell. The solids exhibit absorption and photoluminescence (PL) properties characteristic of the Cu(LL) 2 + species; the Cu(I) complexes completely quench the uranyl PL. Once intercalated, the Cu(I) complexes can be oxidized by using Br 2 vapor and rereduced either by photochemical means or by N 2 H 4 vapor, as shown by changes in electronic and EPR spectra. 37 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippini, V.

    2007-12-01

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An 3+ and Ln 3+ cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO 3 ) 2 ,xH 2 O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO 3 ) 4 5- whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO 3 ) 3 3- in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO 3 ) 4 5- while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO 3 ) 3 3- . Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO 3 ) 3 3- complex, specially with Cs + . Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  15. Sm-Nd in marine carbonates and phosphates: implications for Nd isotopes in seawater and crustal ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, H.F.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    This study explores the possibility of establishing Nd isotopic variations in seawater over geologic time. Calcite, aragonite and apatite are examined as possible phases recording seawater values of epsilonsubNd. Modern, biogenic and inorganically precipitated calcite and aragonite from marine environments were found to have Nd concentrations of from 0.2 to 70 ppb, showing that primary marine CaCO 3 contains little REE and that Nd/Ca is not greatly enhanced relative to seawater during carbonate precipitation. Very young marine limestone and dolomite containing no continental detritus have approx. 200 ppb Nd. All the carbonates are LREE enriched. Modern and very young Atlantic and Pacific carbonates have epsilonsub(Nd) in the range of shallow Atlantic and Pacific seawater respectively, implying that they derive their REE from local seawater. The Nd in well preserved carbonate fossils is 4 ppb, much greater than in their modern counterparts but like the high values found for carbonates in other studies. Results are also reported for apatite. They suggest that sedimentary apatite can be used to determine epsilonsub(Nd)(T) in ancient seawater. The seawater values so inferred range between -1.7 and -8.9 over the last 700 my and lie in the range of modern seawater, showing no evidence for drastic changes. (U.K.)

  16. Phosphate Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. They are involved in cell structure, energy transport and storage, vitamin function, and numerous other processes ... Phosphate-containing foods and beverages include cola, wine, beer, whole grain cereals, nuts, dairy products and some ...

  17. Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) electrochemistry at multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion modified glassy carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelster, Lindsey N.; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The electron transport chain is important to the understanding of metabolism in the living cell. ► Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase is a membrane bound complex of the electron transport chain (Complex III). ► The paper details the first bioelectrochemical characterization of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase at an electrode. - Abstract: Electron transport chain complexes are critical to metabolism in living cells. Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) is responsible for carrying electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c, but the complex has not been evaluated electrochemically. This work details the bioelectrochemistry of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase of the electron transport chain of tuber mitochondria. The characterization of the electrochemistry of this enzyme is investigated in carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotube/tetrabutyl ammonium bromide-modified Nafion ® modified glassy carbon electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Increasing concentrations of cytochrome c result in a catalytic response from the active enzyme in the nanotube sandwich. The experiments show that the enzyme followed Michaelis–Menten kinetics with a K m for the immobilized enzyme of 2.97 (±0.11) × 10 −6 M and a V max of 6.31 (±0.82) × 10 −3 μmol min −1 at the electrode, but the K m and V max values decreased compared to the free enzyme in solution, which is expected for immobilized redox proteins. This is the first evidence of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase bioelectrocatalysis.

  18. Chromatographic behavior of carbonate complexes of lanthanides and of thorium in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, E.K.

    1977-01-01

    The chromatographic behavior of some rare earth elements and thorium on alumina is studied in order to evaluate the possibility of separation from concentration of trace rare earths from high-purity thorium compounds. The effect of some factors on complex thorium carbonate formation and the extent of thorium solubility in sodium and potassium carbonate solutions investigated. The sorption of rare earth elements and thoriuum on alumina from alkali carbonate solution is observed, despite the reports that alumina acts as a cation exchanger in alkali media and that thorium and rare earths form stable anionic carbonate complexes. The formation of these elements between alumina and potassium carbonate solutions is studied as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and metal ion concentration. Also the elution of rare earths from alumina is studied and the best results are obtained with mineral acids and EDTA plus alkali carbonate solutions. The effect of some parameters as column aging, mixed solvents, column treatment with organic solvents, temperature, aluant concentration is investigated. Attempting to understand this sorption mechanism, some experiments with strongly basic anion exchanger and cation exchangers of strongly acid and weakly acid type are accomplished. It is observed that there are significant differences, in some conditions, between the behavior of rare earths and of thorium, pointing our the possibility of separation of one lanthanide from others and of these from thorium [pt

  19. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structures, and phosphate ester cleavage properties of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine copper(II) complexes with guanidinium pendant groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Tjioe, Linda; Graham, Bim; Spiccia, Leone

    2008-10-06

    Three new derivatives of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (DPA) featuring ethylguanidinium (L (1)), propylguanidinium (L (2)), or butylguanidinium (L (3)) pendant groups have been prepared by the reaction of N, N- bis(2-pyridylmethyl)alkane-alpha,omega-diamines with 1 H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine hydrochloride. The corresponding mononuclear copper(II) complexes were prepared by reacting the ligands with copper(II) nitrate and were isolated as [Cu(LH (+))(OH 2)](ClO 4) 3. xNaClO 4. yH 2O ( C1: L = L (1), x = 2, y = 3; C2: L = L (2), x = 2, y = 4; C3: L = L (3), x = 1, y = 0) following cation exchange purification. Recrystallization yielded crystals of composition [Cu(LH (+))(X)](ClO 4) 3.X ( C1': L = L (1), X = MeOH; C2': L = L (2), X = H 2O; C3': L = L (3), X = H 2O), which were suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of C1', C2', and C3' indicate that the DPA moieties of the ligands coordinate to the copper(II) centers in a meridional fashion, with a water or methanol molecule occupying the fourth basal position. Weakly bound perchlorate anions located in the axial positions complete the distorted octahedral coordination spheres. The noncoordinating, monoprotonated guanidinium groups project away from the Cu(II)-DPA units and are involved in extensive charge-assisted hydrogen-bonding interactions with cocrystallized water/methanol molecules and perchlorate anions within the crystal lattices. The copper(II) complexes were tested for their ability to promote the cleavage of two model phosphodiesters, bis( p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNPP) and uridine-3'- p-nitrophenylphosphate (UpNP), as well as supercoiled plasmid DNA (pBR 322). While the presence of the guanidine pendants was found to be detrimental to BNPP cleavage efficiency, the functionalized complexes were found to cleave plasmid DNA and, in some cases, the model ribose phosphate diester, UpNP, at a faster rate than the parent copper(II) complex of DPA.

  20. Phosphorus-31, 15N, and 13C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E S3P Glyph ) of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by 31 P, 15 N, and 13 C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts (δ) for each of the three nuclei. By 31 P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The 13 C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The 15 N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the 31 P δ and the C-P-O bond angle, and the 13 C and 15 N δ values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield 31 P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P 31 P δ vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E S3P binary complex, while the E S3P Glyph complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle

  1. Histological Evaluation of Degradable Guided Bone Regeneration Membranes Prepared from Poly(trimethylene carbonate) and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  2. Histological evaluation of degradable guided bone regeneration membranes prepared from poly(trimethylene carbonate) and biphasic calcium phosphate composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  3. Range of engineering-geological properties for some carbonate rock complexes for Balkan peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovski, Milorad; Shpago, Azra; Peshevski, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The Carbonate Rock masses are a geological media with extremely complex states and properties, which has a certain influences on the mechanical and hydraulic behavior during construction and exploitation of engineering structures. Practical aspects of the problem analysis arise from the fact that the areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia and the entire Balkans is characterized by presence of wide areas covered with carbonate complexes, where large number of complex engineering structures have been, or shall be constructed in the future. In this context, their engineering-geological modeling is still a practical and scientific challenge. The analysis of engineering- geological properties is one of the main steps in forming of analytical and geotechnical models for complex rock structures. This article gives a data about the range for these properties, according to the results from an extensive investigation program. Some original correlations and testing results are given and they are compared with some published relations from the world. (Author)

  4. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Mironov, A. S. [State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Betzel, C. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2′-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation.

  5. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2'-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation

  6. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin; Leech, Donal

    2009-01-01

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl) 2 (4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF 6 , to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E 0 '' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  7. Prerequisite for highly efficient isoprenoid production by cyanobacteria discovered through the over-expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase and carbon allocation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudoh, Kai; Kawano, Yusuke; Hotta, Shingo; Sekine, Midori; Watanabe, Takafumi; Ihara, Masaki

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria have recently been receiving considerable attention owing to their potential as photosynthetic producers of biofuels and biomaterials. Here, we focused on the production of isoprenoids by cyanobacteria, and aimed to provide insight into metabolic engineering design. To this end, we examined the over-expression of a key enzyme in 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In the DXS-over-expression strain (Dxs_ox), the mRNA and protein levels of DXS were 4-times and 1.5-times the levels in the wild-type (WT) strain, respectively. The carotenoid content of the Dxs_ox strain (8.4 mg/g dry cell weight [DCW]) was also up to 1.5-times higher than that in the WT strain (5.6 mg/g DCW), whereas the glycogen content dramatically decreased to an undetectable level. These observations suggested that the carotenoid content in the Dxs_ox strain was increased by consuming glycogen, which is a C-storage compound in cyanobacteria. We also quantified the total sugar (145 and 104 mg/g DCW), total fatty acids (31 and 24 mg/g DCW) and total protein (200 and 240 mg/g DCW) content in the WT and Dxs_ox strains, respectively, which were much higher than the carotenoid content. In particular, approximately 54% of the proteins were phycobiliproteins. This study demonstrated the major destinations of carbon flux in cyanobacteria, and provided important insights into metabolic engineering. Target yield can be improved through optimization of gene expression, the DXS protein stabilization, cell propagation depression and restriction of storage compound synthesis. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of calcium phosphate paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Reusmaazran Yusof; Norzita Yaacob; Idris Besar; Che Seman Mahmood; Rusnah Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Calcium phosphate paste were prepared by mixing between calcium sodium potassium phosphate, Ca 2 NaK (PO 4 ) 2 (CSPP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate, Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O (MCPM). CSPP were obtained by reaction between calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO 4 ), potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ) and sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) in solid state sintering process followed by quenching in air at 1000 degree Celsius. The paste was aging in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 hrs, 3, 7 and 14 days. The morphological investigation indicated the formation of apatite crystal were first growth after 24 hours. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown at 3 days. The obvious growth of apatite crystal was shown in 7 and 14 days indicated the prediction of paste would have rapid reaction with bone after implantation. (author)

  9. Environmentally-relevant concentrations of Al(III) and Fe(III) cations induce aggregation of free DNA by complexation with phosphate group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Kang, Fuxing; Zhang, Wei; Shou, Weijun; Hu, Xiaojie; Gao, Yanzheng

    2017-10-15

    Environmental persistence of free DNA is influenced by its complexation with other chemical species and its aggregation mechanisms. However, it is not well-known how naturally-abundant metal ions, e.g., Al(III) and Fe(III), influence DNA aggregation. This study investigated aggregation behaviors of model DNA from salmon testes as influenced by metal cations, and elucidated the predominant mechanism responsible for DNA aggregation. Compared to monovalent (K + and Na + ) and divalent (Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ) cations, Al(III) and Fe(III) species in aqueous solution caused rapid DNA aggregations. The maximal DNA aggregation occurred at 0.05 mmol/L Al(III) or 0.075 mmol/L Fe(III), respectively. A combination of atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that Al(III) and Fe(III) complexed with negatively charged phosphate groups to neutralize DNA charges, resulting in decreased electrostatic repulsion and subsequent DNA aggregation. Zeta potential measurements and molecular computation further support this mechanism. Furthermore, DNA aggregation was enhanced at higher temperature and near neutral pH. Therefore, DNA aggregation is collectively determined by many environmental factors such as ion species, temperature, and solution pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. pH Sensing Properties of Flexible, Bias-Free Graphene Microelectrodes in Complex Fluids: From Phosphate Buffer Solution to Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jinglei; Blum, Jacquelyn E; Vishnubhotla, Ramya; Vrudhula, Amey; Naylor, Carl H; Gao, Zhaoli; Saven, Jeffery G; Johnson, Alan T Charlie

    2017-08-01

    Advances in techniques for monitoring pH in complex fluids can have a significant impact on analytical and biomedical applications. This study develops flexible graphene microelectrodes (GEs) for rapid (pH of complex biofluids by measuring real-time Faradaic charge transfer between the GE and a solution at zero electrical bias. For an idealized sample of phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the Faradaic current is varied monotonically and systematically with the pH, with a resolution of ≈0.2 pH unit. The current-pH dependence is well described by a hybrid analytical-computational model, where the electric double layer derives from an intrinsic, pH-independent (positive) charge associated with the graphene-water interface and ionizable (negative) charged groups. For ferritin solution, the relative Faradaic current, defined as the difference between the measured current response and a baseline response due to PBS, shows a strong signal associated with ferritin disassembly and the release of ferric ions at pH ≈2.0. For samples of human serum, the Faradaic current shows a reproducible rapid (pH. By combining the Faradaic current and real-time current variation, the methodology is potentially suitable for use to detect tumor-induced changes in extracellular pH. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The effect of carbon dioxide during the desulfurization of flue gas with Mardin-Mazidagi phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melike Sinirkaya; Hatice Bayrakceken; A. Kadir Ozer; M. Sahin Gulaboglu [Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-11-15

    The effects of temperature, CO{sub 2} concentration and particle size on simultaneous calcination/sulfation of Mardin-Mazidagi phosphate rock in fluidized-bed reactor were investigated. For this, a raw sample was exposed to calcination and sulfation processes in a fluidized-bed reactor to determine the effects of parameters by using a model gas mixture similar to the flue gas composition. The calcination ratio increased with increasing temperature and decreasing particle size, but decreased with increasing CO{sub 2} concentration. In sulfation process, however, sulphate conversion ratio increased with increasing CO{sub 2} ratio and decreased with decreasing particle size. The sulfation reaction is well represented by the shrinking core model and can be divided into two regions with different rate controlling step. For low conversions, the controlling step was found to be chemical reaction at the interface, but the diffusion through the product layer for high conversion. The activation energies for the chemical reaction at the interface and diffusion through the product layer cases were calculated as 100 and 296 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. 23 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Engineered carbon (biochar) prepared by direct pyrolysis of Mg-accumulated tomato tissues: characterization and phosphate removal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ying; Gao, Bin; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Ming; Inyang, Mandu; Li, Yuncong; Alva, Ashok; Yang, Liuyan

    2013-06-01

    An innovative method was developed to produce engineered biochar from magnesium (Mg) enriched tomato tissues through slow pyrolysis in a N2 environment. Tomato plants treated with 25mM Mg accumulated much higher level of Mg in tissue, indicating Mg can be substantially enriched in tomato plants, and pyrolysis process further concentrated Mg in the engineered biochar (8.8% Mg). The resulting Mg-biochar composites (MgEC) showed better sorption ability to phosphate (P) in aqueous solutions compared to the other four tomato leaves biochars. Statistical analysis showed a strong and significant correlation between P removal rate and biochar Mg content (R(2)=0.78, and p<0.001), indicating the enriched Mg in the engineered biochar is the main factor controlling its P removal ability. SEM-EDX, XRD and XPS analyses showed that nanoscale Mg(OH)2 and MgO particles were presented on the surface of MgEC, which serve as the main adsorption sites for aqueous P. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extraction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and carbonic anhydrase from stroma-free red blood cell hemolysate for the preparation of the nanobiotechnological complex of polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C; Gynn, M; Chang, T M S

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel method to simultaneously extract superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the same sample of red blood cells (RBCs). This avoids the need to use expensive commercial enzymes, thus enabling a cost-effective process for large-scale production of a nanobiotechnological polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA complex, with enhancement of all three red blood cell functions. An optimal concentration of phosphate buffer for ethanol-chloroform treatment results in good recovery of CAT, SOD, and CA after extraction. Different concentrations of the enzymes can be used to enhance the activity of polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA to 2, 4, or 6 times that of RBC.

  14. Fe(III) mobilisation by carbonate in low temperature environments: Study of the solubility of ferrihydrite in carbonate media and the formation of Fe(III) carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivé, Mireia; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have determined thermodynamic stabilities of Fe(III)-carbonate species. • We have determined the effect of those species on the solubility of ferrihydrite. • Results. • Highlight the importance of two Fe(III)-carbonate: FeOHCO 3 and Fe(CO 3 ) 3 3− . - Abstract: The linkage between the iron and the carbon cycles is of paramount importance to understand and quantify the effect of increased CO 2 concentrations in natural waters on the mobility of iron and associated trace elements. In this context, we have quantified the thermodynamic stability of mixed Fe(III) hydroxo-carbonate complexes and their effect on the solubility of Fe(III) oxihydroxides. We present the results of carefully performed solubility measurements of 2-line ferrihydrite in the slightly acidic to neutral–alkaline pH ranges (3.8–8.7) under constant pCO 2 varying between (0.982–98.154 kPa) at 25 °C. The outcome of the work indicates the predominance of two Fe(III) hydroxo carbonate complexes FeOHCO 3 and Fe(CO 3 ) 3 3− , with formation constants log * β° 1,1,1 = 10.76 ± 0.38 and log β° 1,0,3 = 24.24 ± 0.42, respectively. The solubility constant for the ferrihydrite used in this study was determined in acid conditions (pH: 1.8–3.2) in the absence of CO 2 and at T = (25 ± 1) °C, as log * K s,0 = 1.19 ± 0.41. The relative stability of the Fe(III)-carbonate complexes in alkaline pH conditions has implications for the solubility of Fe(III) in CO 2 -rich environments and the subsequent mobilisation of associated trace metals that will be explored in subsequent papers

  15. Electrochemistry of closo-dodecaborate dianion and its simple exo-skeletal derivatives at carbon electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojt, Lukáš; Fojta, Miroslav; Grüner, Bohumír; Vespalec, Radim

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 707, OCT152013 (2013), s. 38-42 ISSN 1572-6657 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : Boron cluster * Dodecarborate * Glasy carbon electrode Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 2.871, year: 2013

  16. Surface complexation of carbonate on goethite: IR spectroscopy, structure & charge distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Rahnemaie, R.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of carbonate on goethite has been evaluated, focussing on the relation between the structure of the surface complex and corresponding adsorption characteristics, like pH dependency and proton co-adsorption. The surface structure of adsorbed CO3-2 has been assessed with (1) a

  17. Room temperature synthesis of protonated layered titanate sheets using peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, Narottam; Sinhamahapatra, Apurba; Pahari, Sandip Kumar; Bajaj, Hari C; Panda, Asit Baran

    2011-07-21

    We report the synthesis of peroxo titanium carbonate complex solution as a novel water-soluble precursor for the direct synthesis of layered protonated titanate at room temperature. The synthesized titanates showed excellent removal capacity for Pb(2+) and methylene blue. Based on experimental observations, a probable mechanism for the formation of protonated layered dititanate sheets is also discussed.

  18. Spectrofluorimetric characterization and study for the determination of rare earth carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, E.S.K.; Abrao, A.

    1982-01-01

    Some rare earths exhibit fluorescence in acid solution (HC1, H 2 SO 4 or HC10 4 ) when irradiated with ultraviolet radiation; however, analytical application of this property has not been proposed due to the lack of sensitivity resulted from the weakness of the fluorescence transitions. The rare earths are soluble in alkali carbonate solutions, forming anionic carbonate complexes (TR(CO 3 ) sup(n-) sub(x)); some of them have stronger absorption bands than those obtained in acid media. Using this property, the characterization and determination of the six rare earths which fluoresce in carbonate solution has been studied. The excitation and emission wavelengths are (in nm): Sm (406, 596); Eu (280,612); Gd (272,312); Tb (240,542); Dy (350, 576) and Tm (360, 450). Although Ce-III is highly fluorescent in acid media, when in carbonate solution it is easily oxidized to Ce-IV which does not fluoresce neither in acid nor in carbonate solutions. The other rare earths, although soluble in carbonate solution, do not fluoresce in this medium. A comparison is made, between the fluorescence of the fluorescing lanthanides, in acid and carbonate media. The precision and accuracy of this method, the detection limit of all rare earths studied and the mutual interference of some of them is also discussed. The method will be applied to the analytical control of the separation and purification of individual rare earths, now under development. (Author) [pt

  19. Tetranuclear copper(II) complexes bridged by alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate and incorporation of sugar acids through the Cu4 core structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Merii; Sah, Ajay Kumar; Tanase, Tomoaki; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2006-08-21

    Tetranuclear copper(II) complexes containing alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate (alpha-D-Glc-1P), [Cu4(mu-OH){mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(bpy)4(H2O)2]X3 [X = NO3 (1a), Cl (1b), Br (1c)], and [Cu4(mu-OH){mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(phen)4(H2O)2](NO3)3 (2) were prepared by reacting the copper(II) salt with Na2[alpha-D-Glc-1P] in the presence of diimine ancillary ligands, and the structure of 2 was characterized by X-ray crystallography to comprise four {Cu(phen)}2+ fragments connected by the two sugar phosphate dianions in 1,3-O,O' and 1,1-O mu4-bridging fashion as well as a mu-hydroxo anion. The crystal structure of 2 involves two chemically independent complex cations in which the C2 enantiomeric structure for the trapezoidal tetracopper(II) framework is switched according to the orientation of the alpha-D-glucopyranosyl moieties. Temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility data of 1a indicated that antiferromagnetic spin coupling is operative between the two metal ions joined by the hydroxo bridge (J = -52 cm(-1)) while antiferromagnetic interaction through the Cu-O-Cu sugar phosphate bridges is weak (J = -13 cm(-1)). Complex 1a readily reacted with carboxylic acids to afford the tetranuclear copper(II) complexes, [Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-CA)2(bpy)4](NO3)2 [CA = CH3COO (3), o-C6H4(COO)(COOH) (4)]. Reactions with m-phenylenediacetic acid [m-C6H4(CH2COOH)2] also gave the discrete tetracopper(II) cationic complex [Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-m-C6H4(CH2COO)(CH2COOH))2(bpy)4](NO3)2 (5a) as well as the cluster polymer formulated as {[Cu4{mu-(alpha-D-Glc-1P)}2(mu-m-C6H4(CH2COO)2)(bpy)4](NO3)2}n (5b). The tetracopper structure of 1a is converted into a symmetrical rectangular core in complexes 3, 4, and 5b, where the hydroxo bridge is dissociated and, instead, two carboxylate anions bridge another pair of Cu(II) ions in a 1,1-O monodentate fashion. The similar reactions were applied to incorporate sugar acids onto the tetranuclear copper(II) centers. Reactions of 1a with delta

  20. Carbonic anhydrase activity of integral-functional complexes of thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Semenihin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated thylakoid membranes were disrupted by treatment with nonionic detergents digitonin or dodecyl maltoside. Solubilized polypeptide complexes were separated by native gel charge shift electrophoresis. The position of ATP-synthase complex and its isolated catalytic part (CF1 within gel was determined using the color reaction for ATPase activity. Due to the presence of cytochromes, the red band in unstained gels corresponded to the cytochrome b6f complex. Localization of the cytochrome b6f complex, ATP synthase and coupling CF1 in the native gel was confirmed by their subunit composition determined after SDS-electrophoretic analysis. Carbonic anhydrase (CA activity in polypeptide zones of PS II, cytochrome b6f complex, and ATP-synthase CF1 was identified in native gels using indicator bromothymol blue. CA activity of isolated CF1 in solution was determined by infrared gas analysis as the rate of bicarbonate dehydration. The water-soluble acetazolamide, an inhibitor of CA, unlike lipophilic ethoxyzolamide inhibited CA activity of CF1. Thus, it was shown for the first time that ATP-synthase has a component which is capable of catalyzing the interconversion of forms of carbonic acid associated with proton exchange. The data obtained suggest the presence of multiple forms of carbonic anhydrase in the thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts and confirm their involvement in the proton transfer to the ATP synthase.

  1. Extraction of cobalt ion from textile using a complexing macromolecular surfactant in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirat, Mathieu; Ribaut, Tiphaine; Clerc, Sebastien; Lacroix-Desmazes, Patrick; Charton, Frederic; Fournel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt ion under the form of cobalt nitrate is removed from a textile lab coat using supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. The process involves a macromolecular additive of well-defined architecture, acting both as a surfactant and a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency of cobalt reaches 66% when using a poly(1,1,2,2-tetrahydroperfluoro-decyl-acrylate-co-vinyl-benzylphosphonic diacid) gradient copolymer in the presence of water at 160 bar and 40 C. The synergy of the two additives, namely the copolymer and water which are useless if used separately, is pointed out. The potential of the supercritical carbon dioxide process using complexing macromolecular surfactant lies in the ability to modulate the complexing unit as a function of the metal as well as the architecture of the surface-active agent for applications ranging for instance from nuclear decontamination to the recovery of strategic metals. (authors)

  2. Sorption behavior of Zn(II) ions on synthetic apatitic calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebei, Haroun; Pham Minh, Doan; Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, characterization and the reactivity of apatitic calcium phosphates (Ca-HA, chemical formula Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is reported. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH2PO4) were selected as economical starting materials for the synthesis of Ca-HA under atmospheric conditions. Monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and octacalcium phosphate pentahydrate (OCP) were identified as the main intermediates of the synthesis reaction. The product obtained after 48 h of reaction contains mainly low-crystalline Ca-HA and small amounts of other calcium phosphates such as octacalcium phosphate (OCP), B-type carbonate apatite (CAP), as well as unreacted calcium carbonate. This Ca-HA was found to be active for the removal of Zn2+ from an aqueous solution. Its sorption capacity reached up to 120 mg of Zn2+ per g of Ca-HA powder after 24 h of reaction. The monitoring of soluble Zn, Ca and P during the sorption experiment allowed characterizing the mechanism of Zn uptake. Dissolution-precipitation, ionic exchange and surface complexation are the three main mechanisms involved in the sorption processes. The contribution of these mechanisms is discussed in detail.

  3. Extraction of uranium from simulated ore by the supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction method with nitric acid-TBP complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, Le Thi Kim; Imai, Tomoki; Tomioka, Osamu; Nakashima, Mikio; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Meguro, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method using CO 2 as a medium with an extractant of HNO 3 -tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) complex was applied to extract uranium from several uranyl phosphate compounds and simulated uranium ores. An extraction method consisting of a static extraction process and a dynamic one was established, and the effects of the experimental conditions, such as pressure, temperature, and extraction time, on the extraction of uranium were ascertained. It was found that uranium could be efficiently extracted from both the uranyl phosphates and simulated ores by the SFE method using CO 2 . It was thus demonstrated that the SFE method using CO 2 is useful as a pretreatment method for the analysis of uranium in ores. (author)

  4. Formation of carbonato and hydroxo complexes in the reaction of platinum anticancer drugs with carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Centerwall, Corey R; Kerwood, Deborah J; Dabrowiak, James C

    2009-02-02

    The second-generation Pt(II) anticancer drug carboplatin is here shown to react with carbonate, which is present in blood, interstitial fluid, cytosol, and culture medium, to produce platinum-carbonato and -hydroxo complexes. Using [(1)H-(15)N] HSQC NMR and (15)N-labeled carboplatin, we observe that cis-[Pt(CBDCA-O)(OH)(NH(3))(2)](-), cis-[Pt(OH)(2)(NH(3))(2)], cis-[Pt(CO(3))(OH)(NH(3))(2)](-), and what may be cis-[Pt(CO(3))(NH(3))(2)] are produced when 1 is allowed to react in 23.8 mM carbonate buffer. When (15)N-labeled carboplatin is allowed to react in 0.5 M carbonate buffer, these platinum species, as well as other hydroxo and carbonato species, some of which may be dinuclear complexes, are produced. Furthermore, we show that the carbonato species cis-[Pt(CO(3))(OH)(NH(3))(2)](-) is also produced when cisplatin is allowed to react in carbonate buffer. The study outlines the conditions under which carboplatin and cisplatin form carbonato and aqua/hydroxo species in carbonate media.

  5. The effect of carbon and boron on the accumulation of vacancy-oxygen complexes in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetov, V.D.; Bolotov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    By means of IR-absorption measurements the dose dependencies of the concentrations of vacancy-oxygen complexes (VO), interstitial oxygen atoms (Osub(I)), substitutional carbon atoms (Csub(S)) and interstitial carbon-oxygen complexes (Csub(I)Osub(I)) in n- and p-type silicon irradiated with 1.1 MeV electrons have been investigated. The observed increase of the production rate of VO-complexes with the rise of carbon and boron atoms concentrations (these impurities act as sinks for silicon interstitial atoms) has been explained in terms of annihilation of the vacancies and interstitials on the oxygen atoms. The results obtained show that boron atoms are more effective sinks than carbon atoms for the interstitial silicon atoms. That seems to be connected not only with the higher probability of boron injection into interstitial position but also with the further capture of interstitial silicon atoms on the interstitial boron, i.e. with the interstitial cluster formation. (author)

  6. The synthesis and characterization of tributyl phosphate grafted carbon nano-tubes by the floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition method and their sorption behavior towards uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shruti Mishra; Jaya Dwivedi; Amar Kumar; Nalini Sankararamakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) were synthesized by the floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique using ferrocene in benzene as the hydrocarbon source. The functionalization of CNTs was carried out by oxidation (CNT-OX) and grafting with a tributyl phosphate (TBP) ligand (CNT-TBP). Various spectroscopic techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the adsorbents. FTIR and XPS studies revealed the efficient grafting of the TBP ligand on the CNT surface. The effect of the initial pH and the contact time for the maximum adsorption of U(VI) with CNT-plain, CNT-OX and CNT-TBP was studied. The spontaneity of the sorption was confirmed by thermodynamic data. A pseudo second order model with a regression coefficient of ≥0.978 was obtained for CNT-TBP and equilibrium was reached within 3 h. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) at pH 5 for CNT, CNT-OX and CNT-TBP was found to be 66.6, 100.0 and 166.6 mg.g -1 respectively. Using 0.1 M HCl as a de-sorbent, recyclability studies were carried out for three cycles. The probable mechanism of adsorption between U(VI) and CNT-TBP could be understood through FTIR and XPS techniques. (authors)

  7. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    relatively inert carbonaceous dust from the ISM into the vital organic precursors to life such as amino acids and sugars intimately mixed with dust and ice in primitive planetesimals. Since the number of carbon atoms entering the Solar Nebula as dust exceeds the number of atoms entering the nebula as oxide grains. the formation of large quantities of complex organic molecules may represent the largest single chemical cycle in the nebula.

  8. Joint Optimal Production Planning for Complex Supply Chains Constrained by Carbon Emission Abatement Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the joint production planning of complex supply chains facing stochastic demands and being constrained by carbon emission reduction policies. We pick two typical carbon emission reduction policies to research how emission regulation influences the profit and carbon footprint of a typical supply chain. We use the input-output model to capture the interrelated demand link between an arbitrary pair of two nodes in scenarios without or with carbon emission constraints. We design optimization algorithm to obtain joint optimal production quantities combination for maximizing overall profit under regulatory policies, respectively. Furthermore, numerical studies by featuring exponentially distributed demand compare systemwide performances in various scenarios. We build the “carbon emission elasticity of profit (CEEP” index as a metric to evaluate the impact of regulatory policies on both chainwide emissions and profit. Our results manifest that by facilitating the mandatory emission cap in proper installation within the network one can balance well effective emission reduction and associated acceptable profit loss. The outcome that CEEP index when implementing Carbon emission tax is elastic implies that the scale of profit loss is greater than that of emission reduction, which shows that this policy is less effective than mandatory cap from industry standpoint at least.

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, phosphate, dissolved oxygen, and other variables collected from surface discrete observations using Niksin bottle and other instruments from R/V Sultana in the southwest coast of Puerto Rico from 2009-01-05 to 2016-02-01 (NCEI Accession 0145164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This time series dataset includes weekly and bi-weekly discrete seawater samples of pH and total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, phosphates and profile...

  10. Influence of nutrient signals and carbon allocation on the expression of phosphate and nitrogen transporter genes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hui; Yuan, Xiaolei; Duan, Jianfeng; Li, Wenhu; Zhai, Bingnian; Gao, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization of plant roots causes the down-regulation of expression of phosphate (Pi) or nitrogen (N) transporter genes involved in direct nutrient uptake pathways. The mechanism of this effect remains unknown. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in roots of winter wheat colonized by AM fungus responded to (1) Pi or N nutrient signals transferred from the AM extra-radical hyphae, or (2) carbon allocation changes in the AM association. A three-compartment culture system, comprising a root compartment (RC), a root and AM hyphae compartment (RHC), and an AM hyphae compartment (HC), was used to test whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes responded to nutrients (Pi, NH4+ and NO3-) added only to the HC. Different AM inoculation density treatments (roots were inoculated with 0, 20, 50 and 200 g AM inoculum) and light regime treatments (6 hours light and 18 hours light) were established to test the effects of carbon allocation on the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in wheat roots. The expression of two Pi transporter genes (TaPT4 and TaPHT1.2), five nitrate transporter genes (TaNRT1.1, TaNRT1.2, TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, and TaNRT2.3), and an ammonium transporter gene (TaAMT1.2) was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of TaPT4, TaNRT2.2, and TaAMT1.2 was down-regulated by AM colonization only when roots of host plants received Pi or N nutrient signals. However, the expression of TaPHT1.2, TaNRT2.1, and TaNRT2.3 was down-regulated by AM colonization, regardless of whether there was nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The expression of TaNRT1.2 was also down-regulated by AM colonization even when there was no nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The present study showed that an increase in carbon consumption by the AM fungi did not necessarily result in greater down-regulation of expression of Pi or N transporter genes.

  11. Study by magnetic resonance and relaxation of carbon 13 of some paramagnetic coordination complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronfard-Haret, Jean-Claude

    1977-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of coordination complexes by using NMR. After a brief recall of the theoretical background required for the processing of experimental data (hyper-fine coupling and magnetic resonance, spin density distribution, chemical displacement, dipolar, scalar and electronic relaxation), the author describes the conditions in which experiments have been performed and presents measurement methods (pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance, relaxation time measurement, determination of hyper-fine coupling constants, spectrometers and reactants). The next chapters address the study of different coordination complexes: [(pyridine-N-oxide) 2 Ni(acetylacetonate) 2 ], carbon 13 in alkyl-anilines-Ni II, complexation of 1- and 2-aminonaphthalene by transition ions, complexation of pyridine-N-oxide by the nickel Ni ++ ion in presence of water

  12. A diketiminate-bound diiron complex with a bridging carbonate ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadique, Azwana R.; Brennessel, William W.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2009-01-01

    Reduction of carbon dioxide by a diiron(I) complex gives μ-carbonato-κ3 O:O′,O′′-bis­{[2,2,6,6-tetra­methyl-3,5-bis­(2,4,6-triisopropyl­phenyl)heptane-2,5-diiminate(1−)-κ2 N,N′]iron(II)} toluene disolvate, [Fe2(C41H65N)2(CO3)]·2C7H8, a diiron(II) species with a bridging carbonate ligand. The asymmetric unit contains one diiron complex and two cocrystallized toluene solvent mol­ecules that are distributed over three sites, one with atoms in general positions and two in crystallographic sites. Both FeII atoms are η2-coordinated to diketiminate ligands, but η1- and η2-coordinated to the bridging carbonate ligand. Thus, one FeII center is three-coordinate and the other is four-coordinate. The bridging carbonate ligand is nearly perpendicular to the iron–diketiminate plane of the four-coordinate FeII center and parallel to the plane of the three-coordinate FeII center. PMID:19407402

  13. Characterization and determination of the stability constant of lanthanide complexes with carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidoglio, G.; Marcandalli, B.

    1983-01-01

    The stability constants of Europium (III) complexes with carbonate and bicarbonate ions are measured at 22 0 C and at 0.5M ionic strength. Solvent extraction with 1.3-diphenyl 1.3-propanedione 5x10 -2 M in benzene is studied. The distribution between the organic and aqueous phases is determined by radioactive tracers. The limits of the spectrophotometric method and of the solubility in the evaluation of this type of complex are evidenced, mainly in the concentration range useful in geochemistry. Some results obtained with Nd and Am 241 are also given

  14. Low-Frequency Carbon Recombination Lines in the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Chenoa D.; Jordan, Christopher H.; Cunningham, Maria; Jones, Paul A.; Hurley-Walker, Natasha

    2018-05-01

    We detail tentative detections of low-frequency carbon radio recombination lines from within the Orion molecular cloud complex observed at 99-129 MHz. These tentative detections include one alpha transition and one beta transition over three locations and are located within the diffuse regions of dust observed in the infrared at 100 μm, the Hα emission detected in the optical, and the synchrotron radiation observed in the radio. With these observations, we are able to study the radiation mechanism transition from collisionally pumped to radiatively pumped within the H ii regions within the Orion molecular cloud complex.

  15. Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Greta C; Lewis, Simon L; Lawson, Ian T; Mitchard, Edward T A; Page, Susan E; Bocko, Yannick E; Ifo, Suspense A

    2017-02-02

    Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth's land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world's most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin. We find extensive peat deposits beneath the swamp forest vegetation (peat defined as material with an organic matter content of at least 65 per cent to a depth of at least 0.3 metres). Radiocarbon dates indicate that peat began accumulating from about 10,600 years ago, coincident with the onset of more humid conditions in central Africa at the beginning of the Holocene. The peatlands occupy large interfluvial basins, and seem to be largely rain-fed and ombrotrophic-like (of low nutrient status) systems. Although the peat layer is relatively shallow (with a maximum depth of 5.9 metres and a median depth of 2.0 metres), by combining in situ and remotely sensed data, we estimate the area of peat to be approximately 145,500 square kilometres (95 per cent confidence interval of 131,900-156,400 square kilometres), making the Cuvette Centrale the most extensive peatland complex in the tropics. This area is more than five times the maximum possible area reported for the Congo Basin in a recent synthesis of pantropical peat extent. We estimate that the peatlands store approximately 30.6 petagrams (30.6 × 10 15  grams) of carbon belowground (95 per cent confidence interval of 6.3-46.8 petagrams of carbon)-a quantity that is similar to the above-ground carbon stocks of the tropical forests of the entire Congo Basin. Our result for the Cuvette Centrale increases the best estimate of global tropical peatland carbon stocks by

  16. Rock phosphate solubilization by the ectomycorrhizal fungus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... To evaluate phosphate solubilization of ... and MHB had the potential to solubilize these phosphates by decreasing the pH and confirmed that ... Minerals like N, P, K, Ca, S, Zn, Cu and Sr are ... sterile distilled water, chopped, homogenized in 10 ml sterile .... The role of carbon source is important in mineral.

  17. High pressure behavior of complex phosphate K2Ce[PO4]2: Grüneisen parameter and anharmonicity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Karuna Kara; Bevara, Samatha; Ravindran, T. R.; Patwe, S. J.; Gupta, Mayanak K.; Mittal, Ranjan; Krishnan, R. Venkata; Achary, S. N.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2018-02-01

    Herein we reported structural stability, vibrational and thermal properties of K2Ce[PO4]2, a relatively underexplored complex phosphate of tetravalent Ce4+ from in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopic investigations up to 28 GPa using a diamond anvil cell. The studies identified the soft phonons that lead to a reversible phase transformation above 8 GPa, and a phase coexistence of ambient (PI) and high pressure (PII) phases in a wider pressure region 6-11 GPa. From a visual representation of the computed eigen vector displacements, the Ag soft mode at 82 cm-1 is assigned as a lattice mode of K+ cation. Pressure-induced positional disorder is apparent from the substantial broadening of internal modes and the disappearance of low frequency lattice and external modes in phase PII above 18 GPa. Isothermal mode Grüneisen parameters γi of the various phonon modes are calculated and compared for several modes. Using these values, thermal properties such as average Grüneisen parameter, and thermal expansion coefficient are estimated as 0.47, and 2.5 × 10-6 K-1, respectively. The specific heat value was estimated from all optical modes obtained from DFT calculations as 314 J-mol-1 K-1. Our earlier reported temperature dependence of phonon frequencies is used to decouple the "true anharmonic" (explicit contribution at constant volume) and "quasi harmonic" (implicit contribution brought out by volume change) contributions from the total anharmonicity. In addition to the 81 cm-1 Ag lattice mode, several other lattice and external modes of PO43- ions are found to be strongly anharmonic.

  18. New insight into the ternary complexes of uranyl carbonate in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccia, M R; Matara-Aho, M; Reeves, B; Roques, J; Solari, P L; Monfort, M; Moulin, C; Den Auwer, C

    2017-11-01

    Uranium is naturally present in seawater at trace levels and may in some cases be present at higher concentrations, due to anthropogenic nuclear activities. Understanding uranium speciation in seawater is thus essential for predicting and controlling its behavior in this specific environmental compartment and consequently, its possible impact on living organisms. The carbonato calcic complex Ca 2 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 was previously identified as the main uranium species in natural seawater, together with CaUO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 2- . In this work, we further investigate the role of the alkaline earth cation in the structure of the ternary uranyl-carbonate complexes. For this purpose, artificial seawater, free of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ , using Sr 2+ as a spectroscopic probe was prepared. Combining TRLIF and EXAFS spectroscopy, together with DFT and theoretical thermodynamic calculations, evidence for the presence of Sr alkaline earth counter ion in the complex structure can be asserted. Furthermore, data suggest that when Ca 2+ is replaced by Sr 2+ , SrUO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 2- is the main complex in solution and it occurs with the presence of at least one monodentate carbonate in the uranyl coordination sphere. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Hexahapto-Chromium Complexes of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina

    2016-12-17

    This chapter employs purified pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and octadecylaminefunctionalized-SWNTs. These SWNTs are employed for investigate the potential of the SWNT sidewall to function as a hexahapto ligand for chromium (Cr), with in-depth characterization of the products using some of the techniques, such as thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Purified electric arc (EA)-produced SWNTs (P2-SWNT) and octadecylaminefunctionalized SWNTs were obtained from Carbon Solutions, Inc. The TEM images show the removal of the Cr particles from the outer surface of the SWNT bundles in the SWNT-Cr complexes after decomplexation; Cr attachment to the surface of the as-prepared complexes (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT-CONH(CH2)17CH3)Cr(CO)3 is clearly evident. The positions of the bands in the Raman spectra of SWNTs are sensitive to doping and thus the chapter examines the effect of complexation of the Cr(CO)3 and Cr(η6-benzene) units on the position of the G and 2D bands in the (η6-SWNT)Cr(CO)3 and (η6-SWNT)Cr(η6-benzene) complexes.

  20. Heterologous Production of an Energy-Conserving Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Complex in the Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Jan Schut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important intermediate in anaerobic carbon fixation pathways in acetogenesis and methanogenesis. In addition, some anaerobes can utilize CO as an energy source. In the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus, which grows optimally at 80°C, CO oxidation and energy conservation is accomplished by a respiratory complex encoded by a 16-gene cluster containing a carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, a membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase and a Na+/H+ antiporter module. This complex oxidizes CO, evolves CO2 and H2, and generates a Na+ motive force that is used to conserve energy by a Na+-dependent ATP synthase. Herein we used a bacterial artificial chromosome to insert the 13.2 kb gene cluster encoding the CO-oxidizing respiratory complex of T. onnurineus into the genome of the heterotrophic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100°C. P. furiosus is normally unable to utilize CO, however, the recombinant strain readily oxidized CO and generated H2 at 80°C. Moreover, CO also served as an energy source and allowed the P. furiosus strain to grow with a limiting concentration of sugar or with peptides as the carbon source. Moreover, CO oxidation by P. furiosus was also coupled to the re-utilization, presumably for biosynthesis, of acetate generated by fermentation. The functional transfer of CO utilization between Thermococcus and Pyrococcus species demonstrated herein is representative of the horizontal gene transfer of an environmentally-relevant metabolic capability. The transfer of CO utilizing, hydrogen-producing genetic modules also has applications for biohydrogen production and a CO-based industrial platform for various thermophilic organisms.

  1. Subsurface Permian reef complexes of southern Tunisia: Shelf carbonate setting and paleogeographic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaafouri, Adel; Haddad, Sofiene; Mannaî-Tayech, Beya

    2017-05-01

    2-D seismic reflection sections, borehole data as well as published and unpublished data have been investigated to reconstruct the paleogeography of southern Tunisia during Middle to Late Permian times. Paleogeographical reconstruction based on the integration of petroleum well data and 2-D seismic facies interpretation shows three main depositional areas with very contrasting sedimentary pile. These are 1) a subsiding basin; 2) an outer shelf carbonate, and 3) an inner shelf carbonate. Based on typical electric responses of reef buildups to seismic wave, we shall urge that during Middle Permian times, the outer carbonate shelf was subject of reef barrier development. Lithology evidences from core samples show that reef framework correspond mainly to fossiliferous limestone and dolomite. The WNW-ESE recognized reef barrier led between latitudes 33° 10‧ 00″N and 33° 20‧ 00″N. The Tebaga of Medenine outcrop constitutes the northern-edge of this barrier. Westward it may be extended to Bir Soltane area whereas its extension eastward is still to be determined. Biogenic buildups took place preferentially over faulted Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic paleohighs resulting likely from the Hercynian orogeny. The subsiding basin is located north of Tebaga of Medenine outcrop where Upper Permian sedimentary sequence is made entirely of 4000 m deep marine green silty shale facies. These are ascribed to unorganized and chaotic reflectors. Inner carbonate shelf facies succession corresponds to a typical interbedding of shallow marine carbonate deposits, shale, dolomite, and anhydrite inducing parallel-layered of strong amplitude and good continuity reflectors. Also within the inner carbonate shelf patch reef or reef pinnacles have been identified based on their seismic signature particularly their low vertical development as compared to reef complexes. Southward, towards Sidi Toui area, the Upper Permian depositional sequence thins out and bears witness of land

  2. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H 2 O, NH 3 , CO 2 , H 2 CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites

  4. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Identifies Calcium-Uranyl-Carbonate Complexes at Environmental Concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2007-01-01

    Current research on bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater focuses on supplying indigenous metal-reducing bacteria with the appropriate metabolic requirements to induce microbiological reduction of soluble uranium(VI) to poorly soluble uranium(IV). Recent studies of uranium(VI) bioreduction in the presence of environmentally relevant levels of calcium revealed limited and slowed uranium(VI) reduction and the formation of a Ca-UO2-CO3 complex. However, the stoichiometry of the complex is poorly defined and may be complicated by the presence of a Na-UO2-CO3 complex. Such a complex might exist even at high calcium concentrations, as some UO2-CO3 complexes will still be present. The number of calcium and/or sodium atoms coordinated to a uranyl carbonate complex will determine the net charge of the complex. Such a change in aqueous speciation of uranium(VI) in calcareous groundwater may affect the fate and transport properties of uranium. In this paper, we present the results from X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements of a series of solutions containing 50 lM uranium(VI) and 30 mM sodium bicarbonate, with various calcium concentrations of 0-5 mM. Use of the data series reduces the uncertainty in the number of calcium atoms bound to the UO2-CO3 complex to approximately 0.6 and enables spectroscopic identification of the Na-UO2-CO3 complex. At nearly neutral pH values, the numbers of sodium and calcium atoms bound to the uranyl triscarbonate species are found to depend on the calcium concentration, as predicted by speciation calculations

  5. Mechanistic deductions from kinetic isotope effects and pH studies of pyridoxal phosphate dependent carbon-carbon lyases: Erwinia herbicola and Citrobacter freundii tyrosine phenol-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiick, D.M.; Phillips, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and primary deuterium isotope effects have been determined for tyrosine phenol-lyase from both Erwinia herbicola and Citrobacter freundii. The primary deuterium isotope effects indicate that proton abstraction from the 2-position of the substrate is partially rate-limiting for both enzymes. The C. freundii enzyme primary deuterium isotope effects [DV = 3.5 and D(V/Ktyr) = 2.5] are pH independent, indicating that tyrosine is not sticky (i.e., does not dissociate slower than it reacts to give products). Since Vmax for both tyrosine and the alternate substrate S-methyl-L-cysteine is also pH independent, substrate binds only to the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. For the E. herbicola enzyme, both Vmax and V/K for tyrosine or S-methyl-L-cysteine are pH dependent, as well as both DV and D(V/Ktyr). Thus, while both the protonated and unprotonated enzyme can bind substrate, and may be interconverted directly, only the unprotonated Michaelis complex is catalytically competent. At pH 9.5, DV = 2.5 and D(V/Ktyr) = 1.5. However, at pH 6.4 the isotope effect on both parameters is equal to 4.1. From these data, the forward commitment factor (cf = 5.2) and catalytic ratio (cvf = 1.1) for tyrosine and S-methyl-L-cysteine (cf = 2.2, cvf = 24) are calculated. Also, the Michaelis complex partition ratio (cf/cvf) for substrate and products is calculated to be 4.7 for tyrosine and 0.1 for S-methyl-L-cysteine

  6. [Phosphate-solubilizing activity of aerobic methylobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, N V; Kaparullina, E N; Doronina, N V; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate-solubilizing activity was found in 14 strains of plant-associated aerobic methylobacteria belonging to the genera Methylophilus, Methylobacillus, Methylovorus, Methylopila, Methylobacterium, Delftia, and Ancyclobacter. The growth of methylobacteria on medium with methanol as the carbon and energy source and insoluble tricalcium phosphate as the phosphorus source was accompanied by a decrease in pH due to the accumulation of up to 7 mM formic acid as a methanol oxidation intermediate and by release of 120-280 μM phosphate ions, which can be used by both bacteria and plants. Phosphate-solubilizing activity is a newly revealed role of methylobacteria in phytosymbiosis.

  7. Adsorption of some metal complexes derived from acetyl acetone on activated carbon and purolite S-930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam A.H. Al-Ameri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new Schiff base (HL derived from condensation of p-anisidine and acetyl acetone has been prepared and used as a chelating ligand to prepare Cr(III, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes. The study of the nature of these complexes formed in ethanol solution following the mole ratio method (2:1, L:M gave results which were compared successfully with these obtained from isolated solid state studies. These studies revealed that the complexes having square planner geometry of the type (ML2, M = Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II, and octahedral geometry of the type [CrIIIL2(H2O2]Cl and [MNIIL2(H2O2]. The adsorption studies of three complexes Cr(III, Mn(II, and Co(II on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 resin show high adsorption percentage for Cr(III on purolite S-930 due to ion exchange interaction compared with high adsorption of neutral Mn(II, Co(II complexes on activated charcoal. Linear plot of log Qe versus log Ce showed that the adsorption isotherm of these three complexes on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 surface obeys Freundlich isotherm and was similar to S-curve type according to Giles classification which investigates heterogeneous adsorption. The regression values indicate that the adsorption data for these complexes fitted well within the Freundlich isothermal plots for the concentration studied. The accuracy and precision of the concentration measurements of these complexes were determined by preparing standard laboratory samples, the results show relative error ranging from ±1.08 to 5.31, ±1.04 to 4.82 and ±0.28 to 3.09 and the relative standard deviation did not exceed ±6.23, ±2.77 and ±4.38% for A1, A2 and A3 complexes, respectively.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of trace uranium in phosphate ore samples from kurum and uro areas, Nuba mountains, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A. A.; Ali, A. H.; Altayeb, M. A. H.

    2004-01-01

    A method was proposed for the spectrophotometric determination of uranium content in phosphate ores. the method is based on the use of nitrogen (v) acid for leaching the rock, and treatment with ammonium carbonate solution, whereby uranium (Vi) is kept in solution as its carbonate complex. The ion-exchange technique was used for the recovery of uranium. Uranium was determined spectrophotometrically by measurement of the absorbance of the yellow uranium (Vi)-8-hydroxyquinolate complex at λ 425 nm. The procedure was used for the determination of trace uranium content in 30 phosphate ore samples collected from Kurun and Uro areas in Nuba mountains in Sudan. X-ray fluorescence technique was employed for the assessment of the method used. The spectrophotometric method results show a high similarity with those obtained by XRF technique. This agreement indicates that the procedure proposed here has been successfully applied for the determination of uranium in phosphate ores. (Author)

  9. Enhancing phosphorus release from waste activated sludge containing ferric or aluminum phosphates by EDTA addition during anaerobic fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinte; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Lin; Li, Yongmei

    2017-03-01

    The effect of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition on phosphorus release from biosolids and phosphate precipitates during anaerobic fermentation was investigated. Meanwhile, the impact of EDTA addition on the anaerobic fermentation process was revealed. The results indicate that EDTA addition significantly enhanced the release of phosphorus from biosolids, ferric phosphate precipitate and aluminum phosphate precipitate during anaerobic fermentation, which is attributed to the complexation of metal ions and damage of cell membrane caused by EDTA. With the optimal EDTA addition of 19.5 mM (0.41 gEDTA/gSS), phosphorus release efficiency from biosolids was 82%, which was much higher than that (40%) without EDTA addition. Meanwhile, with 19.5 mM EDTA addition, almost all the phosphorus in ferric phosphate precipitate was released, while only 57% of phosphorus in aluminum phosphate precipitate was released. This indicates that phosphorus in ferric phosphate precipitate was much easier to be released than that in aluminum phosphate precipitate during anaerobic fermentation of sludge. In addition, proper EDTA addition facilitated the production of soluble total organic carbon and volatile fatty acids, as well as solid reduction during sludge fermentation, although methane production could be inhibited. Therefore, EDTA addition can be used as an alternative method for recovering phosphorus from waste activated sludge containing ferric or aluminum precipitates, as well as recovery of soluble carbon source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CUMULATE ROCKS ASSOCIATED WITH CARBONATE ASSIMILATION, HORTAVÆR COMPLEX, NORTH-CENTRAL NORWAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. G.; Prestvik, T.; Li, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Hortavær igneous complex intruded high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Caledonian Helgeland Nappe Complex at ca. 466 Ma. The complex is an unusual mafic-silicic layered intrusion (MASLI) because the principal felsic rock type is syenite and because the syenite formed in situ rather than by deep-seated partial melting of crustal rocks. Magma differentiation in the complex was by assimilation, primarily of calc-silicate rocks and melts with contributions from marble and semi-pelites, plus fractional crystallization. The effect of assimilation of calcite-rich rocks was to enhance stability of fassaitic clinopyroxene at the expense of olivine, which resulted in alkali-rich residual melts and lowering of silica activity. This combination of MASLI-style emplacement and carbonate assimilation produced three types of cumulate rocks: (1) Syenitic cumulates formed by liquid-crystal separation. As sheets of mafic magma were loaded on crystal-rich syenitic magma, residual liquid was expelled, penetrating the overlying mafic sheets in flame structures, and leaving a cumulate syenite. (2) Reaction cumulates. Carbonate assimilation, illustrated by a simple assimilation reaction: olivine + calcite + melt = clinopyroxene + CO2 resulted in cpx-rich cumulates such as clinopyroxenite, gabbro, and mela-monzodiorite, many of which contain igneous calcite. (3) Magmatic skarns. Calc-silicate host rocks underwent partial melting during assimilation, yielding a Ca-rich melt as the principal assimilated material and permitting extensive reaction with surrounding magma to form Kspar + cpx + garnet-rich ‘cumulate’ rocks. Cumulate types (2) and (3) do not reflect traditional views of cumulate rocks but instead result from a series of melt-present discontinuous (peritectic) reactions and partial melting of calc-silicate xenoliths. In the Hortavær complex, such cumulates are evident because of the distinctive peritectic cumulate assemblages. It is unclear whether assimilation of

  11. Carbon monoxide migratory insertion - A comparison of cationic and neutral palladium(II) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankcombe, K.; Cavell, K.J.; Yates, B.F.; Knott, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    With the use of ANSTO's resources and expertise and with support from AINSE, we have carried out extensive computer modelling on the mechanism of the palladium catalysed carbonylation reaction, a process which is used industrially in the conversion of carbon monoxide into biodegradable polymers. In this project, experimental and theoretical work has focussed on using Pd(II) complexes containing pyridine carboxylate ligands (NC 5 H 4 COO ) to explore the fundamental mechanistic steps. The results for subsequent steps in the catalytic cycle are presented and their implication for the design of more efficient catalysts are discussed

  12. Novel encapsulation method for probiotics using an interpolymer complex in supercriticial carbon dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moolman, FS

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available on Bioencapsulation, Lausanne, CH. Oct.6-7, 2006 O5-3 – page 1 A novel encapsulation method for probiotics using an interpolymer complex in supercriticial carbon dioxide F.S Moolman1, P.W. Labuschagne1, M.S. Thantsha2, T.L. van der Merwe1, H. Rolfes2 and T....cloete@up.ac.za 1. Introduction Evidence for the health benefits of probiotics is increasing. These benefits include protection against pathogenic bacteria, stimulation of the immune system, reduction in carcinogenesis, vitamin production and degradation...

  13. Methods of analysis for complex organic aerosol mixtures from urban emission sources of particulate carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hildemann, L.M.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1990-10-01

    Organic aerosols comprise approximately 30% by mass of the total fine particulate matter present in urban atmospheres. The chemical composition of such aerosols is complex and reflects input from multiple sources of primary emissions to the atmosphere, as well as from secondary production of carbonaceous aerosol species via photochemical reactions. To identify discrete sources of fine carbonaceous particles in urban atmospheres, analytical methods must reconcile both bulk chemical and molecular properties of the total carbonaceous aerosol fraction. This paper presents an overview of the analytical protocol developed and used in a study of the major sources of fine carbon particles emitted to an urban atmosphere. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  14. Decomposition of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ion in the presence of metal oxides in carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Yong Chung; Min-Sung Park; Keun-Young Lee; Eil-Hee Lee; Kwang-Wook Kim; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2015-01-01

    Uranium oxide was dissolved in the form of the uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ion, UO 2 (O 2 )(CO 3 ) 2 4- in carbonate solutions with hydrogen peroxide. When UO 2 (O 2 )(CO 3 ) 2 4- ions lose their peroxide component, they become a stable species of uranyl tricarbonato complex ion, UO 2 (O 2 )(CO 3 ) 2 4- . The uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex self-decomposed more rapidly into the uranyl tricarbonato complex ion in the presence of a metal oxide in the carbonate solution. In this study, decomposition of the uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex in a carbonate solution was investigated in the presence of several metal oxides using absorption spectroscopy. (author)

  15. Pentose phosphates in nucleoside interconversion and catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Maria G; Camici, Marcella; Mascia, Laura; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ipata, Piero L

    2006-03-01

    Ribose phosphates are either synthesized through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, or are supplied by nucleoside phosphorylases. The two main pentose phosphates, ribose-5-phosphate and ribose-1-phosphate, are readily interconverted by the action of phosphopentomutase. Ribose-5-phosphate is the direct precursor of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate, for both de novo and 'salvage' synthesis of nucleotides. Phosphorolysis of deoxyribonucleosides is the main source of deoxyribose phosphates, which are interconvertible, through the action of phosphopentomutase. The pentose moiety of all nucleosides can serve as a carbon and energy source. During the past decade, extensive advances have been made in elucidating the pathways by which the pentose phosphates, arising from nucleoside phosphorolysis, are either recycled, without opening of their furanosidic ring, or catabolized as a carbon and energy source. We review herein the experimental knowledge on the molecular mechanisms by which (a) ribose-1-phosphate, produced by purine nucleoside phosphorylase acting catabolically, is either anabolized for pyrimidine salvage and 5-fluorouracil activation, with uridine phosphorylase acting anabolically, or recycled for nucleoside and base interconversion; (b) the nucleosides can be regarded, both in bacteria and in eukaryotic cells, as carriers of sugars, that are made available though the action of nucleoside phosphorylases. In bacteria, catabolism of nucleosides, when suitable carbon and energy sources are not available, is accomplished by a battery of nucleoside transporters and of inducible catabolic enzymes for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and for pentose phosphates. In eukaryotic cells, the modulation of pentose phosphate production by nucleoside catabolism seems to be affected by developmental and physiological factors on enzyme levels.

  16. The Effect of Single, Binary and Ternary Anions of Chloride, Carbonate and Phosphate on the Release of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetate Intercalated into the Zn–Al-layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Zulkarnain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intercalation of beneficial anion into inorganic host has lead to an opportunity to synthesize various combinations of new organic–inorganic nanohybrids with various potential applications; especially, for the controlled release formulation and storage purposes. Investigation on the release behavior of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D intercalated into the interlayer of Zn–Al-layered double hydroxide (ZAN have been carried out using single, binary and ternary aqueous systems of chloride, carbonate and phosphate. The release behavior of the active agent 2,4-D from its double-layered hydroxide nanohybrid ZANDI was found to be of controlled manner governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. It was found that carbonate medium yielded the highest accumulated release of 2,4-D, while phosphate in combination with carbonate and/or nitrate speeds up the release rate of 2,4-D. These results indicate that it is possible to design and develop new delivery system of latex stimulant compound with controlled release property based on 2,4-D that is known as a substance to increase latex production of rubber tree,Hevea brasiliensis.

  17. Functionalized granular activated carbon and surface complexation with chromates and bi-chromates in wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha, Somdutta; Sarkar, Ujjaini; Luharuka, Pallavi

    2013-01-01

    Cr(VI) is present in the aqueous medium as chromate (CrO 4 2− ) and bi-chromate (HCrO 4 − ). Functionalized granular activated carbons (FACs) are used as adsorbents in the treatment of wastewaters containing hexavalent chromium. The FACs are prepared by chemical modifications of granular activated carbons (GACs) using functionalizing agents like HNO 3 , HCl and HF. The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface areas of FAC-HCl (693.5 m 2 /g), FAC-HNO 3 (648.8 m 2 /g) and FAC-HF (726.2 m 2 /g) are comparable to the GAC (777.7 m 2 /g). But, the adsorption capacity of each of the FAC-HNO 3 , FAC-HCl and FAC-HF is found to be higher than the GAC. The functional groups play an important role in the adsorption process and pH has practically no role in this specific case. The FACs have hydrophilic protonated external surfaces in particular, along with the functional surface sites capable to make complexes with the CrO 4 2− and HCrO 4 − present. Surface complex formation is maximized in the order FAC-HNO 3 > FAC-HF > FAC-HCl, in proportion to the total surface acidity. This is also confirmed by the well-known pseudo second-order kinetic model. Physi-sorption equilibrium isotherms are parameterized by using standard Freundlich and Langmuir models. Langmuir fits better. The formation of surface complexes with the functional groups and hexavalent chromium is also revealed in the images of field emission scanning electron micrograph; energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis after adsorption. The intra-particle diffusion is not the only rate-controlling factor. The Boyd's film diffusion model fits very well with R 2 as high as 98.1% for FAC-HNO 3 . This result demonstrates that the functionalization of the GAC by acid treatments would increase the diffusion rate, predominantly with a boundary layer diffusion effect. - Highlights: ► Physico-chemical adsorption using functionalized activated carbon (FACs) is applied. ► FACs

  18. Square-wave voltammetric determination of rutin in pharmaceutical formulations using a carbon composite electrode modified with copper (II phosphate immobilized in polyester resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellen Heloizy Garcia Freitas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A carbon composite electrode modified with copper (II phosphate immobilized in a polyester resin (Cu3(PO42-Poly for the determination of rutin in pharmaceutical samples by square-wave voltammetry is described herein. The modified electrode allows the determination of rutin at a potential (0.20 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3.0 mol L-1 KCl lower than that observed at an unmodified electrode. The peak current was found to be linear to the rutin concentration in the range from 9.9 × 10-8 to 2.5 × 10-6 mol L-1, with a detection limit of 1.2×10-8 mol L-1. The response of the electrode was stable, with no variation in baseline levels within several hours of continuous operation. The surface morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX system. The results obtained are precise and accurate. In addition, these results are in agreement with those obtained by the chromatographic method at a 95% confidence level.Descreve-se um eletrodo de carbono modificado com fosfato de cobre (II imobilizado em uma resina de poliéster (Cu3(PO42-Poly para a determinação de rutina em amostras farmacêuticas por voltametria de onda quadrada. O eletrodo modificado permite a determinação de rutina em potencial (0.20 V vs Ag / AgCl (3,0 mol L-1 KCl menor que o observado em um eletrodo não modificado. Verificou-se que a corrente de pico foi linear com a concentração de rutina na faixa de 9,9 × 10-8 a 2,5 × 10-6 mol L-1, com um limite de detecção de 1,2 × 10-8 mol L¹. A resposta do eletrodo foi estável, sem variação significativa dentro de várias horas de operação contínua. A morfologia da superfície do eletrodo modificado foi caracterizada por microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV e pelo sistema de energia dispersiva de raios-X (EDX. Os resultados obtidos foram precisos e exatos. Ademais, estes resultados estão de acordo com aqueles obtidos pelo método cromatográfico a um nível de

  19. Complex resistivity spectra in relation to multiscale pore geometry in carbonates and mixed-siliciclastic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbisrath, Jan Henrik

    Carbonate rocks are known to have complex and heterogeneous pore structures, which result from their biogenic origin and strong affinity for diagenetic processes that change their pore structure after burial. The combination of sheer endless variations of precursor biogenic material, depositional environments, and diagenetic effects results in rocks that are interesting to study but intricate to understand. Many schemes to categorize the diversity of carbonate rocks are in use today; most are based on the macropore structure and qualitative thin-section analysis. Many studies, however, acknowledge that micropores have a significant influence on the macroscopic petrophysical rock properties, which are essential to determine reservoir quality. Micropores are, by definition, smaller than the thickness of a thin-section (four major carbonate microporosity types: (1) small intercrystalline, (2) large inter-crystalline, (3) intercement, and (4) micromoldic. Each microporosity type shows a distinct capacity to conduct electrical charge, which largely controls the magnitude and range of cementation factors (m) in rocks with such microporosity type. The BIB-SEM method is also used on a dataset of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (mudrock) samples with high kerogen and pyrite content. Results show that the nanopore geometry here has little influence on cementation factors, and instead porosity is the main control on m in mudrocks. Cementation factors are crucial for estimates of oil-in-place and water saturation in a wireline application, and a slight change of (assumed) cementation factor can change the interpreter's evaluation from dry hole to discovery. Therefore, accurate determination of cementation factors is a critical task in formation evaluation, similar to accurate estimates of permeability. To achieve this goal, this dissertation utilizes a new approach of using complex resistivity spectra (CRS) to assess the pore geometry and its resulting electrical and fluid flow

  20. Flow and Transport in Complex Microporous Carbonates as a Consequence of Separation of Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, B.; Raeini, A. Q.; Lin, Q.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Some of the most important examples of flow and transport in complex pore structures are found in subsurface applications such as contaminant hydrology, carbon storage and enhanced oil recovery. Carbonate rock structures contain most of the world's oil reserves, considerable amount of water reserves, and potentially hold a storage capacity for carbon dioxide. However, this type of pore space is difficult to represent due to complexities associated with a wide range of pore sizes and variation in connectivity which poses a considerable challenge for quantitative predictions of transport across multiple scales.A new concept unifying X-ray tomography experiment and direct numerical simulation has been developed that relies on full description flow and solute transport at the pore scale. Differential imaging method (Lin et al. 2016) provides rich information in microporous space, while advective and diffusive mass transport are simulated on micro-CT images of pore-space: Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow in the image voxels comprising the pore space, streamline-based simulation is used to account for advection, and diffusion is superimposed by random walk.Quantitative validation has been done on analytical solutions for diffusion and by comparing the model predictions versus the experimental NMR measurements in the dual porosity beadpack. Furthermore, we discriminate signatures of multi-scale transport behaviour for a range of carbonate rock (Figure 1), dependent on the heterogeneity of the inter- and intra-grain pore space, heterogeneity in the flow field, and the mass transfer characteristics of the porous media. Finally, we demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the model through an analysis that includes a number of probability density functions flow and transport (PDFs) measures of non-Fickian transport on the micro-CT i935mages. In complex porous media separation of scales exists, leading to flow and transport signatures that need to be described by

  1. Monolayer-by-monolayer growth of platinum films on complex carbon fiber paper structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Liuqing; Zhang, Yunxia [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Key Laboratory for Advanced Energy Devices, Shaanxi Engineering Lab for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119 (China); Liu, Shengzhong, E-mail: szliu@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Key Laboratory for Advanced Energy Devices, Shaanxi Engineering Lab for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710119 (China); Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, iChEM, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled monolayer-by-monolayer deposition process has been developed to fabricate Pt coating on carbon fiber paper with complex network structures using a dual buffer strategy. This development may pave a way to fabricate superior Pt catalysts with the minimal Pt usage. In fact, the present Pt group metal loading is 25 times lower than the U.S. DOE 2017 target value. - Highlights: • Developed a controlled monolayer-by-monolayer Pt deposition using a dual buffer strategy. • The present Pt group metal loading is 25 times lower than the U.S. DOE 2017 target value. • This development may pave a way to fabricate superior Pt catalysts with the minimal Pt usage. - Abstract: A controlled monolayer-by-monolayer deposition process has been developed to fabricate Pt coating on carbon fiber paper with complex network structures using a dual buffer (Au/Ni) strategy. The X-ray diffraction, electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, current density analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results conclude that the monolayer deposition process accomplishes full coverage on the substrate and that the thickness of the deposition layer can be controlled on a single atom scale. This development may pave a way to fabricate superior Pt catalysts with the minimal Pt usage. In fact, the present Pt group metal loading is 25 times lower than the U.S. DOE 2017 target value.

  2. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Vorberger, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  3. 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Determination of Phosphate Compartmentation in Leaves of Reproductive Soybeans (Glycine max L.) as Affected by Phosphate Nutrition 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Michael J.; Blevins, Dale G.; Sierzputowska-Gracz, Hanna

    1989-01-01

    Most leaf phosphorus is remobilized to the seed during reproductive development in soybean. We determined, using 31P-NMR, the effect phosphorus remobilization has on vacuolar inorganic phosphate pool size in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves with respect to phosphorus nutrition and plant development. Phosphate compartmentation between cytoplasmic and vacuolar pools was observed and followed in intact tissue grown hydroponically, at the R2, R4, and R6 growth stages. As phosphorus in the nutrient solution decreased from 0.45 to 0.05 millimolar, the vacuolar phosphate peak became less prominent relative to cytoplasmic phosphate and hexose monophosphate peaks. At a nutrient phosphate concentration of 0.05 millimolar, the vacuolar phosphate peak was not detectable. At higher levels of nutrient phosphate, as plants progressed from the R2 to the R6 growth stage, the vacuolar phosphate peak was the first to disappear, suggesting that storage phosphate was remobilized to a greater extent than metabolic phosphate. Under suboptimal phosphate nutrition (≤ 0.20 millimolar), the hexose monophosphate and cytoplasmic phosphate peaks declined earlier in reproductive development than when phosphate was present in optimal amounts. Under low phosphate concentrations (0.05 millimolar) cytoplasmic phosphate was greatly reduced. Carbon metabolism was coincidently disrupted under low phosphate nutrition as shown by the appearance of large, prominent starch grains in the leaves. Cytoplasmic phosphate, and leaf carbon metabolism dependent on it, are buffered by vacuolar phosphate until late stages of reproductive growth. Images Figure 4 PMID:16666705

  4. Bacterial synergism in lignocellulose biomass degradation : Complementary roles of degraders as influenced by complexity of the carbon source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes Tolalpa, Larisa; Falcao Salles, Joana; van Elsas, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass (LCB) is an attractive source of carbon for the production of sugars and other chemicals. Due to its inherent complexity and heterogeneity, efficient biodegradation requires the actions of different types of hydrolytic enzymes. In nature, complex microbial communities that

  5. Dinuclear copper(II) complexes with {Cu2(mu-hydroxo)bis(mu-carboxylato)}+ cores and their reactions with sugar phosphate esters: A substrate binding model of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Merii; Tanase, Tomoaki; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2006-04-03

    Reactions of CuX2.nH2O with the biscarboxylate ligand XDK (H2XDK = m-xylenediamine bis(Kemp's triacid imide)) in the presence of N-donor auxiliary ligands yielded a series of dicopper(II) complexes, [Cu2(mu-OH)(XDK)(L)2]X (L = N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tetmen), X = NO3 (1a), Cl (1b); L = N,N,N'-trimethylethylenediamine (tmen), X = NO3 (2a), Cl (2b); L =2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), X = NO3 (3); L = 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), X = NO3 (4); L = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me2bpy), X = NO3 (5); L = 4-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Mephen), X = NO3 (6)). Complexes 1-6 were characterized by X-ray crystallography (Cu...Cu = 3.1624(6)-3.2910(4) A), and the electrochemical and magnetic properties were also examined. Complexes 3 and 4 readily reacted with diphenyl phosphoric acid (HDPP) or bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphoric acid (HBNPP) to give [Cu2(mu-phosphate)(XDK)(L)2]NO3 (L = bpy, phosphate = DPP (11); L = phen, phosphate = DPP (12), BNPP (13)), where the phsophate diester bridges the two copper ions in a mu-1,3-O,O' bidentate fashion (Cu...Cu = 4.268(3)-4.315(1) A). Complexes 4 and 6 with phen and Mephen have proven to be good precursors to accommodate a series of sugar monophosphate esters (Sugar-P) onto the biscarboxylate-bridged dicopper centers, yielding [Cu2(mu-Sugar-P)(XDK)(L)2] (Sugar-P = alpha-D-Glc-1-P (23a and b), D-Glc-6-P (24a and b), D-Man-6-P (25a), D-Fru-6-P (26a and b); L = phen (a), Mephen (b)) and [Cu2(mu-Gly-n-P)(XDK)(Mephen)2] (Gly-n-P = glycerol n-phosphate; n = 2 (21), 3 (22)), where Glc, Man, and Fru are glucose, mannose, and fructose, respectively. The structure of [Cu2(mu-MNPP)(XDK)(phen)2(CH3OH)] (20) was characterized as a reference compound (H2MNPP = 4-nitrophenyl phosphoric acid). Complexes 4 and 6 also reacted with d-fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (D-Fru-1,6-P2) to afford the tetranuclear copper(II) complexes formulated as [Cu4(mu-D-Fru-1,6-P2)(XDK)2(L)4] (L = phen (27a), Mephen (27b)). The detailed structure of 27a was determined by X

  6. Temperature and ionic strength influences on actinide(VI)/(V) redox potentials for carbonate limiting complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, H.; Vitorge, P.

    1998-01-01

    Actinide behaviour was studied in two limiting aqueous solutions: acidic and carbonate. Cyclic voltametry was validated with well-known U redox system. SIT was used to account for I influence. Taylor's series expansions to the second order were used to account for T influence. Redox potentials of actinide couples had previously been measured in non complexing media. The above data treatments give standard values for redox potential E 0 , for the corresponding entropy ΔS 0 , enthalpy ΔH 0 and heat capacity ΔC p 0 changes, and also for the corresponding excess values (i.e. the variation of these thermodynamic constants with ionic strength). This methodology was here used in carbonate media to measure the potential of the redox couple PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- /PuO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- from 5 to 70 degC and from I = 0.5 to 4.5 M in Na 2 CO 3 , NaClO 4 media. Experimental details and full results are given for Pu. Only final results are given for Np. Previous and/or published data for U and Am are discussed. E and ΔS variations with T or I were enough to be measured. The values obtained for the fitted SIT coefficients Δε, and for ΔS and ΔCp are similar for U, Np and Pu redox reactions. Using this analogy for Am missing data is discussed. β 3 V /β 3 VI formation constant ratio of the carbonate limiting complexes were deduced from the potential shift from complexing to non complexing media for the Actinide(VI)/Actinide(V) redox couples. β 3 V (U and Pu) and β 3 VI (Np) were finally proposed using published β3 VI (U and Pu) and β 3 V (Np). For Am, this data treatment was used to discuss the AmO 2 2+ / AmO 2 + redox potential

  7. Carbene complexes of zirconium. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity with carbon monoxide to affort coordinated ketene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, P.T.; Santarsiero, B.D.; Armantrout, J.; Bercaw, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of Cp 2 Zr(L)(CO) (Cp = C 5 H 5 ; L = PMe 3 , CO) with Cp* 2 ZrH 2 (Cp* = C 5 Me 5 ) affords zirconium oxycarbene complexes, Cp 2 (L)Zr double bond CHO single bond Zr(X)Cp* 2 (L = PMe 3 , X = H, I; L = CO, X = H), that represent some of the first examples of group 4 metal-to-carbon multiple bonding. The first X-ray diffraction structure determination of a zirconium carbene complex, that of Cp(PMe 3 )Zr double bond CHO single bond Zr(H)Cp* 2 .C 6 H 6 , is reported (C2/c, a = 27.318 (4) A, b = 19.895 (3) A, c = 19.932 (5) A β = 132.188 (10) 0 , Z = 8) and shows a very short Zr-C bond length of 2.117 (7) A. Treatment of Cp 2 (CO)Zr double bond CHO single bond Zr(H)Cp* 2 with CH 3 I or Cp 2 (PMe 3 )Zr double bond CHO single bond Zr(I)Cp* 2 with CO affords the zirconium substituted enediolate zirconacycle, Cp* 2 ZrOCH double bond C(Zr(I)Cp 2 )O, which has been characterized by an X-ray diffraction study (P2 1 /c, a = 15.866 (4) A, b = 10.673 (3) A, c = 20.561 (4) A, β = 105.5 (2) 0 , Z = 4). This complex most likely forms by coupling of the zirconoxycarbene and a carbonyl to give a metal-coordinated ketene intermediate that subsequently rearranges to the isolated product. An isotopic crossover experiment has demonstrated that the new carbon-carbon bond is formed in an intramolecular coupling step. The ketene intermediate can be trapped by dissolving Cp 2 (CO)Zr double bond CHO single bond Zr(H)Cp* 2 in pyridine, giving Cp 2 (py)Zr(O double bond C double bond CHOZr(I)Cp* 2 ). Treatment of the isolated ketene complex with CH 3 I in benzene gives the enediolate zirconocycle; in pyridine Cp 2 (py)Zr(O double bond C double bond CHOZr(I)Cp* 2 ) can be observed spectroscopically. 38 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  8. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  9. Removal of phosphate from solution by adsorption and precipitation of calcium phosphate onto monohydrocalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shintaro; Fukushi, Keisuke

    2012-10-15

    The sorption behavior and mechanism of phosphate on monohydrocalcite (CaCO(3)·H(2)O: MHC) were examined using batch sorption experiments as a function of phosphate concentrations, ionic strengths, temperatures, and reaction times. The mode of PO(4) sorption is divisible into three processes depending on the phosphate loading. At low phosphate concentrations, phosphate is removed by coprecipitation of phosphate during the transformation of MHC to calcite. The sorption mode at the low-to-moderate phosphate concentrations is most likely an adsorption process because the sorption isotherm at the conditions can be fitted reasonably with the Langmuir equation. The rapid sorption kinetics at the conditions is also consistent with the adsorption reaction. The adsorption of phosphate on MHC depends strongly on ionic strength, but slightly on temperature. The maximum adsorption capacities of MHC obtained from the regression of the experimental data to the Langmuir equation are higher than those reported for stable calcium carbonate (calcite or aragonite) in any conditions. At high phosphate concentrations, the amount of sorption deviates from the Langmuir isotherm, which can fit the low-to-moderate phosphate concentrations. Speciation-saturation analyses of the reacted solutions at the conditions indicated that the solution compositions which deviate from the Langmuir equation are supersaturated with respect to a certain calcium phosphate. The obtained calcium phosphate is most likely amorphous calcium phosphate (Ca(3)(PO(4))(2)·xH(2)O). The formation of the calcium phosphate depends strongly on ionic strength, temperature, and reaction times. The solubility of MHC is higher than calcite and aragonite because of its metastability. Therefore, the higher solubility of MHC facilitates the formation of the calcium phosphates more than with calcite and aragonite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, Luis; Berrios, Cristhian; Yanez, Mauricio; Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  11. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Luis [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Berrios, Cristhian [Laboratorio de Electrocatalisis, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Yanez, Mauricio [Laboratorio de Recursos Renovables, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla-160 C, Concepcion (Chile); Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I., E-mail: gloria.cardenas@usach.cl [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-11-26

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  12. Selective hydrolysis of phosphate monoester by a supramolecular phosphatase formed by the self-assembly of a bis(Zn(2+)-cyclen) complex, cyanuric acid, and copper in an aqueous solution (cyclen = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkefeli, Mohd; Suzuki, Asami; Shiro, Motoo; Hisamatsu, Yosuke; Kimura, Eiichi; Aoki, Shin

    2011-10-17

    In Nature, organized nanoscale structures such as proteins and enzymes are formed in aqueous media via intermolecular interactions between multicomponents. Supramolecular and self-assembling strategies provide versatile methods for the construction of artificial chemical architectures for controlling reaction rates and the specificities of chemical reactions, but most are designed in hydrophobic environments. The preparation of artificial catalysts that have potential in aqueous media mimicking natural enzymes such as hydrolases remains a great challenge in the fields of supramolecular chemistry. Herein, we describe that a dimeric Zn(2+) complex having a 2,2'-bipyridyl linker, cyanuric acid, and a Cu(2+) ion automatically assembles in an aqueous solution to form a 4:4:4 complex, which is stabilized by metal-ligand coordination bonds, π-π-stacking interactions, and hydrogen bonding and contains μ-Cu(2)(OH)(2) cores analogous to the catalytic centers of phosphatase, a dinuclear metalloenzyme. The 4:4:4 complex selectively accelerates the hydrolysis of a phosphate monoester, mono(4-nitrophenyl)phosphate, at neutral pH.

  13. Architecture and evolution of an Early Permian carbonate complex on a tectonically active island in east-central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Calvin H.; Magginetti, Robert T.; Stone, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The newly named Upland Valley Limestone represents a carbonate complex that developed on and adjacent to a tectonically active island in east-central California during a brief interval of Early Permian (late Artinskian) time. This lithologically unique, relatively thin limestone unit lies within a thick sequence of predominantly siliciclastic rocks and is characterized by its high concentration of crinoidal debris, pronounced lateral changes in thickness and lithofacies, and a largely endemic fusulinid fauna. Most outcrops represent a carbonate platform and debris derived from it and shed downslope, but another group of outcrops represents one or possibly more isolated carbonate buildups that developed offshore from the platform. Tectonic activity in the area occurred before, probably during, and after deposition of this short-lived carbonate complex.

  14. Thermal decomposition and Moessbauer analysis of two iron hydroxy-carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaves, T.L.; Cashio, J.D.; Turney, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text:The two iron hydroxy carbonate complexes (NH 4 ) 2 Fe 2 (OH) 4 (CO 3 ) 2 .H 2 O and (NH 4 ) 4 Fe 2 (OH) 4 (CO 3 ) 3 .3H 2 O were prepared by the method of Dvo a k and Feitknecht. Moessbauer spectra of the first sample at room temperature and 81K showed principally a ferric doublet with a small quadrupole splitting while spectra of the second sample showed a broad ferric doublet with a large mean quadrupole splitting of 1mm/s. Parameters for both spectra were characteristic of distorted octahedral coordination to oxygens. Thermal gravimetric analysis of both samples up to 750 K showed several fractions corresponding to the loss of the more volatile components

  15. Clean exergy biotechnical complex for recycling carbon dioxide from flue gas stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolyarenko, G. [Cherkassy State Technological University, Cherkassy (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    A main problem, impedimental to the use of smoke gases as raw material for the production of pure carbon dioxide, is formation at incineration of fuel of such toxic connections as oxide of carbon(II), nitrogen oxides, and benzo (a) pyrene, formaldehyde, vapors of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, toxic metals. Suppressions of formation CO, NO{sub x} and other harmful admixtures in smoke gases it is possible to attain on the stage of burning with the use of new technology: electronic catalysis of flame in the discharge zone. Method of heterophasic ozonization minimizes content CO and NO{sub x} and other toxic admixtures in smoke gases. Photosynthesis - by converting pure CO{sub 2} into hydrocarbons with the use of solar energy - enables to receive on a commercial scale genetically modified cyano-bacteria (blue-green algae). Oils got from them, a gaseous and diesel fuel during incineration results in the decline of maintenance of toxic connections in smoke gases. Thus achieves the creation of clean energy bio-complex. (author)

  16. Clean exergy biotechnical complex for recycling carbon dioxide from flue gas stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarenko, G.

    2013-01-01

    A main problem, impedimental to the use of smoke gases as raw material for the production of pure carbon dioxide, is formation at incineration of fuel of such toxic connections as oxide of carbon(II), nitrogen oxides, and benzo (a) pyrene, formaldehyde, vapors of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, toxic metals. Suppressions of formation CO, NO x and other harmful admixtures in smoke gases it is possible to attain on the stage of burning with the use of new technology: electronic catalysis of flame in the discharge zone. Method of heterophasic ozonization minimizes content CO and NO x and other toxic admixtures in smoke gases. Photosynthesis - by converting pure CO 2 into hydrocarbons with the use of solar energy - enables to receive on a commercial scale genetically modified cyano-bacteria (blue-green algae). Oils got from them, a gaseous and diesel fuel during incineration results in the decline of maintenance of toxic connections in smoke gases. Thus achieves the creation of clean energy bio-complex. (author)

  17. Surface Complexation Modeling of Calcite Zeta Potential Measurement in Mixed Brines for Carbonate Wettability Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Zeng, Y.; Biswal, S. L.; Hirasaki, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    We presents zeta potential measurements and surface complexation modeling (SCM) of synthetic calcite in various conditions. The systematic zeta potential measurement and the proposed SCM provide insight into the role of four potential determining cations (Mg2+, SO42- , Ca2+ and CO32-) and CO2 partial pressure in calcite surface charge formation and facilitate the revealing of calcite wettability alteration induced by brines with designed ionic composition ("smart water"). Brines with varying potential determining ions (PDI) concentration in two different CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) are investigated in experiments. Then, a double layer SCM is developed to model the zeta potential measurements. Moreover, we propose a definition for contribution of charged surface species and quantitatively analyze the variation of charged species contribution when changing brine composition. After showing our model can accurately predict calcite zeta potential in brines containing mixed PDIs, we apply it to predict zeta potential in ultra-low and pressurized CO2 environments for potential applications in carbonate enhanced oil recovery including miscible CO2 flooding and CO2 sequestration in carbonate reservoirs. Model prediction reveals that pure calcite surface will be positively charged in all investigated brines in pressurized CO2 environment (>1atm). Moreover, the sensitivity of calcite zeta potential to CO2 partial pressure in the various brine is found to be in the sequence of Na2CO3 > Na2SO4 > NaCl > MgCl2 > CaCl2 (Ionic strength=0.1M).

  18. Carbon-tuned bonding method significantly enhanced the hydrogen storage of BN-Li complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qing-ming; Zhao, Lina; Luo, You-hua; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Li-xia; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-11-01

    Through first-principles calculations, we found doping carbon atoms onto BN monolayers (BNC) could significantly strengthen the Li bond on this material. Unlike the weak bond strength between Li atoms and the pristine BN layer, it is observed that Li atoms are strongly hybridized and donate their electrons to the doped substrate, which is responsible for the enhanced binding energy. Li adsorbed on the BNC layer can serve as a high-capacity hydrogen storage medium, without forming clusters, which can be recycled at room temperature. Eight polarized H(2) molecules are attached to two Li atoms with an optimal binding energy of 0.16-0.28 eV/H(2), which results from the electrostatic interaction of the polarized charge of hydrogen molecules with the electric field induced by positive Li atoms. This practical carbon-tuned BN-Li complex can work as a very high-capacity hydrogen storage medium with a gravimetric density of hydrogen of 12.2 wt%, which is much higher than the gravimetric goal of 5.5 wt % hydrogen set by the U.S. Department of Energy for 2015.

  19. Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titan’s Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, R. T.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Vuitton, V.; Crary, F. J.; González-Caniulef, D.; Shebanits, O.; Jones, G. H.; Lewis, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Cordiner, M.; Taylor, S. A.; Kataria, D. O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Sittler, E. C.

    2017-08-01

    Cassini discovered a plethora of neutral and ionized molecules in Titan’s ionosphere including, surprisingly, anions and negatively charged molecules extending up to 13,800 u q-1. In this Letter, we forward model the Cassini electron spectrometer response function to this unexpected ionospheric component to achieve an increased mass resolving capability for negatively charged species observed at Titan altitudes of 950-1300 km. We report on detections consistently centered between 25.8 and 26.0 u q-1 and between 49.0-50.1 u q-1 which are identified as belonging to the carbon chain anions, CN-/C3N- and/or C2H-/C4H-, in agreement with chemical model predictions. At higher ionospheric altitudes, detections at 73-74 u q-1 could be attributed to the further carbon chain anions C5N-/C6H- but at lower altitudes and during further encounters extend over a higher mass/charge range. This, as well as further intermediary anions detected at >100 u, provide the first evidence for efficient anion chemistry in space involving structures other than linear chains. Furthermore, at altitudes below environments where chain anions have been observed and shows that anion chemistry plays a role in the formation of complex organics within a planetary atmosphere as well as in the interstellar medium.

  20. Highly efficient one-step synthesis of carbon encapsulated nanocrystals by the oxidation of metal π-complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Shao, Yingfeng; Xiang, Xin; Zhang, Fuhua; Yan, Shengchang; Li, Wenge

    2017-08-01

    Various carbon encapsulated nanocrystals, including MnS and MnO, Cr2O3, MoO2, Fe7S8 and Fe3O4, and ZrO2, are prepared in one step and in situ by a simple and highly efficient synthesis approach. The nanocrystals have an equiaxed morphology and a median size smaller than 30 nm. Tens and hundreds of these nanocrystals are entirely encapsulated by a wormlike amorphous carbon shell. The formation of a core-shell structure depends on the strongly exothermic reaction of metal π-complexes with ammonium persulfate in an autoclave at below 200 °C. During the oxidation process, the generated significant amounts of heat will destroy the molecular structure of the metal π-complex and cleave the ligands into small carbon fragments, which further transform into an amorphous carbon shell. The central metal atoms are oxidized to metal oxide/sulfide nanocrystals. The formation of a core-shell structure is independent of the numbers of ligands and carbon atoms as well as the metal types, implying that any metal π-complex can serve as a precursor and that various carbon encapsulated nanocrystals can be synthesized by this method.

  1. Functionalized granular activated carbon and surface complexation with chromates and bi-chromates in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, Somdutta; Sarkar, Ujjaini, E-mail: usarkar@chemical.jdvu.ac.in; Luharuka, Pallavi

    2013-03-01

    Cr(VI) is present in the aqueous medium as chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) and bi-chromate (HCrO{sub 4}{sup −}). Functionalized granular activated carbons (FACs) are used as adsorbents in the treatment of wastewaters containing hexavalent chromium. The FACs are prepared by chemical modifications of granular activated carbons (GACs) using functionalizing agents like HNO{sub 3}, HCl and HF. The Brunauer, Emmett and Teller surface areas of FAC-HCl (693.5 m{sup 2}/g), FAC-HNO{sub 3} (648.8 m{sup 2}/g) and FAC-HF (726.2 m{sup 2}/g) are comparable to the GAC (777.7 m{sup 2}/g). But, the adsorption capacity of each of the FAC-HNO{sub 3}, FAC-HCl and FAC-HF is found to be higher than the GAC. The functional groups play an important role in the adsorption process and pH has practically no role in this specific case. The FACs have hydrophilic protonated external surfaces in particular, along with the functional surface sites capable to make complexes with the CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and HCrO{sub 4}{sup −} present. Surface complex formation is maximized in the order FAC-HNO{sub 3} > FAC-HF > FAC-HCl, in proportion to the total surface acidity. This is also confirmed by the well-known pseudo second-order kinetic model. Physi-sorption equilibrium isotherms are parameterized by using standard Freundlich and Langmuir models. Langmuir fits better. The formation of surface complexes with the functional groups and hexavalent chromium is also revealed in the images of field emission scanning electron micrograph; energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis after adsorption. The intra-particle diffusion is not the only rate-controlling factor. The Boyd's film diffusion model fits very well with R{sup 2} as high as 98.1% for FAC-HNO{sub 3}. This result demonstrates that the functionalization of the GAC by acid treatments would increase the diffusion rate, predominantly with a boundary layer diffusion effect. - Highlights: ► Physico

  2. INTERACTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE WITH CARBON ADSORBENTS BELOW 400 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitz, V R; Carpenter, F G; Arnold, R G

    1963-06-15

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide on carbon adsorbents (FT carbon, coconut charcoal, acid-washed bone char) and adsorbents containing basic calcium phosphate (hydroxylapatite, bone char, ash of bone char) was studied. Special consideration was given to the pretreatment of the materials. The carbons equilibrated as rapidly as the temperature; the basic calcium phosphates showed a rapid initial adsorption followed by a very slow rate which continued for days. Linear adsorption isotherms were found on FT carbon and the isosteric heats varied slightiy with coverage. The isotherms for the remaining materials had varying curvature and were for the most part in the same sequence as the estimated surface areas. The isosteric heats of carbon dioxide correlated very well with the magnitude of surface hydroxyl groups, an estimate of which was made from the chemical composition. There appeared to be three increasing levels of interaction: (1) pure physical adsorption; (2) an adsorption complex having 'bicarbonate structure'; and (3) an adsorption complex having 'carbonate structure'. (auth)

  3. Evaluation of the stability of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in carbonate media at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Keun-Young; Chung, Dong-Yong; Lee, Eil-Hee; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Shin, Dong-Woo

    2012-09-30

    This work studied the stability of peroxide in uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide using absorption and Raman spectroscopies, and evaluated the temperature dependence of the decomposition characteristics of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in the solution. The uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions self-decomposed more rapidly into uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions in higher temperature carbonate solutions. The concentration of peroxide in the solution without free hydrogen peroxide represents the concentration of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a mixture of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex and uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions. The self-decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions was a first order reaction, and its activation energy was evaluated to be 7.144×10(3) J mol(-1). The precipitation of sodium uranium oxide hydroxide occurred when the amount of uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions generated from the decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions exceeded the solubility of uranyl tris-carbonato ions in the solution at the solution temperature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the stability of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in carbonate media at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook; Lee, Keun-Young; Chung, Dong-Yong; Lee, Eil-Hee; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Shin, Dong-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The stability of peroxide in uranyl peroxo carbonato complex solutions with different temperatures was characterized. ► The decomposition rate of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ion to uranyl tris-carbonato complex ion was observed to increase with temperature ► The decomposition kinetics of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions was evaluated by absorption and Raman spectroscopies. ► A precipitate of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex solution was evaluated with XRD. - Abstract: This work studied the stability of peroxide in uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide using absorption and Raman spectroscopies, and evaluated the temperature dependence of the decomposition characteristics of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in the solution. The uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions self-decomposed more rapidly into uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions in higher temperature carbonate solutions. The concentration of peroxide in the solution without free hydrogen peroxide represents the concentration of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a mixture of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex and uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions. The self-decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions was a first order reaction, and its activation energy was evaluated to be 7.144 × 10 3 J mol −1 . The precipitation of sodium uranium oxide hydroxide occurred when the amount of uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions generated from the decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions exceeded the solubility of uranyl tris-carbonato ions in the solution at the solution temperature.

  5. Evaluation of the stability of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in carbonate media at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook, E-mail: nkwkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Keun-Young; Chung, Dong-Yong; Lee, Eil-Hee; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong-Woo [Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stability of peroxide in uranyl peroxo carbonato complex solutions with different temperatures was characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decomposition rate of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ion to uranyl tris-carbonato complex ion was observed to increase with temperature Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The decomposition kinetics of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions was evaluated by absorption and Raman spectroscopies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A precipitate of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex solution was evaluated with XRD. - Abstract: This work studied the stability of peroxide in uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a carbonate solution with hydrogen peroxide using absorption and Raman spectroscopies, and evaluated the temperature dependence of the decomposition characteristics of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in the solution. The uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions self-decomposed more rapidly into uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions in higher temperature carbonate solutions. The concentration of peroxide in the solution without free hydrogen peroxide represents the concentration of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions in a mixture of uranyl peroxo carbonato complex and uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions. The self-decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions was a first order reaction, and its activation energy was evaluated to be 7.144 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} J mol{sup -1}. The precipitation of sodium uranium oxide hydroxide occurred when the amount of uranyl tris-carbonato complex ions generated from the decomposition of the uranyl peroxo carbonato complex ions exceeded the solubility of uranyl tris-carbonato ions in the solution at the solution temperature.

  6. Confocal Raman and electronic microscopy studies on the topotactic conversion of calcium carbonate from Pomacea lineate shells into hydroxyapatite bioceramic materials in phosphate media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dePaula, S M; Huila, M F G; Araki, K; Toma, H E

    2010-12-01

    Conversion of Pomacea lineate shells into hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic materials was investigated by their in vitro treatment with phosphate solutions, at room temperature. Confocal Raman microscopy revealed that the conversion proceeds at distinct rates through the nacreous or periostracum sides of the shell. The conversion can be accelerated using powdered samples, yielding biocompatible materials of great interest in biomedicine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of the transmission characteristics of China's carbon market transaction price volatility from the perspective of a complex network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jingjing; Li, Huajiao; Zhou, Jinsheng; Jiang, Meihui; Dong, Di

    2018-03-01

    Research on the price fluctuation transmission of the carbon trading pilot market is of great significance for the establishment of China's unified carbon market and its development in the future. In this paper, the carbon market transaction prices of Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Shenzhen, and Guangdong were selected from December 29, 2013 to March 26, 2016, as sample data. Based on the view of the complex network theory, we construct a price fluctuation transmission network model of five pilot carbon markets in China, with the purposes of analyzing the topological features of this network, including point intensity, weighted clustering coefficient, betweenness centrality, and community structure, and elucidating the characteristics and transmission mechanism of price fluctuation in China's five pilot cities. The results of point intensity and weighted clustering coefficient show that the carbon prices in the five markets remained unchanged and transmitted smoothly in general, and price fragmentation is serious; however, at some point, the price fluctuates with mass phenomena. The result of betweenness centrality reflects that a small number of price fluctuations can control the whole market carbon price transmission and price fluctuation evolves in an alternate manner. The study provides direction for the scientific management of the carbon price. Policy makers should take a positive role in promoting market activity, preventing the risks that may arise from mass trade and scientifically forecasting the volatility of trading prices, which will provide experience for the establishment of a unified carbon market in China.

  8. Prevention of radioactive contamination in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero G, E.T.

    1995-01-01

    In this work was studied the separation of uranium from the phosphate rock to decrease the level of radioactivity in the phosphate fertilizers, this prevents the redistribution of uranium in the environment. The uranium leaching conditions from phosphate rock were estimated using alkaline solutions. The changes in the natural phosphate rock after leaching were studied. The amenability to separate the uranium from phosphate rock with ammonium carbonate / bicarbonate solution was determined. The uranium extraction was approximately 40%. The leaching conditions showed high selectivity for uranium without changes in the ore structure. The bulk ore was not dissolved. (Author)

  9. Degraded tropical rain forests possess valuable carbon storage opportunities in a complex, forested landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Campbell, Mason J; Turton, Stephen M; Pert, Petina L; Edwards, Will; Laurance, William F

    2016-07-20

    Tropical forests are major contributors to the terrestrial global carbon pool, but this pool is being reduced via deforestation and forest degradation. Relatively few studies have assessed carbon storage in degraded tropical forests. We sampled 37,000 m(2) of intact rainforest, degraded rainforest and sclerophyll forest across the greater Wet Tropics bioregion of northeast Australia. We compared aboveground biomass and carbon storage of the three forest types, and the effects of forest structural attributes and environmental factors that influence carbon storage. Some degraded forests were found to store much less aboveground carbon than intact rainforests, whereas others sites had similar carbon storage to primary forest. Sclerophyll forests had lower carbon storage, comparable to the most heavily degraded rainforests. Our findings indicate that under certain situations, degraded forest may store as much carbon as intact rainforests. Strategic rehabilitation of degraded forests could enhance regional carbon storage and have positive benefits for tropical biodiversity.

  10. Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titan’s Ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, R. T.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; González-Caniulef, D.; Jones, G. H.; Lewis, G. R.; Taylor, S. A.; Kataria, D. O. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Vuitton, V. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Crary, F. J. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Innovation Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Waite, J. H. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute (SWRI), 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Cordiner, M.; Sittler, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Edberg, N. J. T., E-mail: r.t.desai@ucl.ac.uk [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 537, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-08-01

    Cassini discovered a plethora of neutral and ionized molecules in Titan’s ionosphere including, surprisingly, anions and negatively charged molecules extending up to 13,800 u q{sup −1}. In this Letter, we forward model the Cassini electron spectrometer response function to this unexpected ionospheric component to achieve an increased mass resolving capability for negatively charged species observed at Titan altitudes of 950–1300 km. We report on detections consistently centered between 25.8 and 26.0 u q{sup −1} and between 49.0–50.1 u q{sup −1} which are identified as belonging to the carbon chain anions, CN{sup −}/C{sub 3}N{sup −} and/or C{sub 2}H{sup −}/C{sub 4}H{sup −}, in agreement with chemical model predictions. At higher ionospheric altitudes, detections at 73–74 u q{sup −1} could be attributed to the further carbon chain anions C{sub 5}N{sup −}/C{sub 6}H{sup −} but at lower altitudes and during further encounters extend over a higher mass/charge range. This, as well as further intermediary anions detected at >100 u, provide the first evidence for efficient anion chemistry in space involving structures other than linear chains. Furthermore, at altitudes below <1100 km, the low-mass anions (<150 u q{sup −1}) were found to deplete at a rate proportional to the growth of the larger molecules, a correlation that indicates the anions are tightly coupled to the growth process. This study adds Titan to an increasing list of astrophysical environments where chain anions have been observed and shows that anion chemistry plays a role in the formation of complex organics within a planetary atmosphere as well as in the interstellar medium.

  11. Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titan’s Ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, R. T.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; González-Caniulef, D.; Jones, G. H.; Lewis, G. R.; Taylor, S. A.; Kataria, D. O.; Vuitton, V.; Crary, F. J.; Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Waite, J. H.; Cordiner, M.; Sittler, E. C.; Edberg, N. J. T.

    2017-01-01

    Cassini discovered a plethora of neutral and ionized molecules in Titan’s ionosphere including, surprisingly, anions and negatively charged molecules extending up to 13,800 u q"−"1. In this Letter, we forward model the Cassini electron spectrometer response function to this unexpected ionospheric component to achieve an increased mass resolving capability for negatively charged species observed at Titan altitudes of 950–1300 km. We report on detections consistently centered between 25.8 and 26.0 u q"−"1 and between 49.0–50.1 u q"−"1 which are identified as belonging to the carbon chain anions, CN"−/C_3N"− and/or C_2H"−/C_4H"−, in agreement with chemical model predictions. At higher ionospheric altitudes, detections at 73–74 u q"−"1 could be attributed to the further carbon chain anions C_5N"−/C_6H"− but at lower altitudes and during further encounters extend over a higher mass/charge range. This, as well as further intermediary anions detected at >100 u, provide the first evidence for efficient anion chemistry in space involving structures other than linear chains. Furthermore, at altitudes below <1100 km, the low-mass anions (<150 u q"−"1) were found to deplete at a rate proportional to the growth of the larger molecules, a correlation that indicates the anions are tightly coupled to the growth process. This study adds Titan to an increasing list of astrophysical environments where chain anions have been observed and shows that anion chemistry plays a role in the formation of complex organics within a planetary atmosphere as well as in the interstellar medium.

  12. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  13. Formation and annealing of metastable (interstitial oxygen)-(interstitial carbon) complexes in n- and p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Makarenko, L F; Lastovskii, S B; Murin, L I; Moll, M; Pintilie, I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown experimentally that, in contrast to the stable configuration of (interstitial carbon)-(interstitial oxygen) complexes (CiOi), the corresponding metastable configuration (CiOi{*}) cannot be found in n-Si based structures by the method of capacitance spectroscopy. The rates of transformation CiOi{*} -> CiOi are practically the same for both n- and p-Si with a concentration of charge carriers of no higher than 10(13) cm(-3). It is established that the probabilities of the simultaneous formation of stable and metastable configurations of the complex under study in the case of the addition of an atom of interstitial carbon to an atom of interstitial oxygen is close to 50\\%. This is caused by the orientation dependence of the interaction potential of an atom of interstitial oxygen with an interstitial carbon atom, which diffuses to this oxygen atom.

  14. Iridium and ruthenium complexes covalently bonded to carbon surfaces by means of electrochemical oxidation of aromatic amines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sandroni, M.; Volpi, G.; Fiedler, Jan; Buscaino, R.; Viscardi, G.; Milone, L.; Gobetto, R.; Nervi, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 158, 1-2 (2010), s. 22-28 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : functionalization * glassy carbon electrode * metallorganic complexes * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.993, year: 2010

  15. Translocation of metal phosphate via the phosphate inorganic transport system of Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, H.W; Abee, T.; Kortstee, G.J J; Konings, W.N; Zehnder, A.J B

    1994-01-01

    P-i transport via the phosphate inorganic transport system (Pit) of Escherichia coil was studied in natural and artificial membranes. P-i uptake via Pit is dependent on the presence of divalent cations, like Mg2+, Ca2+, Co2+, or Mn2+, which form a soluble, neutral metal phosphate (MeHPO(4)) complex.

  16. Kampelite, Ba3Mg1.5Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3·4H2O, a new very complex Ba-Sc phosphate mineral from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex (Kola Peninsula, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenchuk, Victor N.; Ivanyuk, Gregory Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Yakov A.; Panikorovskii, Taras L.; Britvin, Sergei N.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Shilovskikh, Vladimir V.; Bocharov, Vladimir N.

    2018-02-01

    Kampelite, Ba3Mg1.5Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3·4H2O, is a new Ba-Sc phosphate from the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite complex (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It is orthorhombic, Pnma, a = 11.256(1), b = 8.512(1), c = 27.707(4) Å, V = 2654.6(3) Å3 and Z = 4 (from powder diffraction data) or a = 11.2261(9), b = 8.5039(6), c = 27.699(2) Å, V = 2644.3(3) Å3 (from single-crystal diffraction data). The mineral was found in a void within the calcite-magnetite phoscorite (enriched in hydroxylapatite and Sc-rich baddeleyite) inside the axial zone of the Kovdor phoscorite-carbonatite pipe. Kampelite forms radiated aggregates (up to 1.5 mm in diameter) of platy crystals grown on the surfaces of crystals of quintinite-2 H in close association with pyrite, bobierrite and quintinite-3 R. Kampelite is colourless, with a pearly lustre and a white streak. The cleavage is perfect on {001}, the fracture is smooth. Mohs hardness is about 1. In transmitted light, the mineral is colourless without pleochroism or dispersion. Kampelite is biaxial + (pseudouniaxial), α ≈ β = 1.607(2), γ = 1.612(2) (589 nm), and 2 V calc = 0°. The calculated and measured densities are 3.28 and 3.07(3) g·cm-3, respectively. The mean chemical composition determined by electron microprobe is: MgO 4.79, Al2O3 0.45, P2O5 31.66, K2O 0.34, Sc2O3 16.17, Mn2O3 1.62, Fe2O3 1.38, SrO 3.44, and BaO 29.81 wt%. The H2O content estimated from the crystal-structure refinement is 7.12 wt%, giving a total of 96.51 wt%. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of P = 6 apfu (atoms per formula unit) is (Ba2.62Sr0.45K0.10Ca0.06)Σ3.23Mg1.60Mn0.28(Sc3.15Fe3+ 0.23Al0.12)Σ3.50(PO4)6(OH)2.61·4.01H2O. The simplified formula is Ba3Mg1.5Sc4(PO4)6(OH)3·4H2O. The mineral easily dissolves in 10% cold HCl. The strongest X-ray powder-diffraction lines [listed as d in Å ( I) ( hkl)] are as follows: 15.80(100)(001), 13.86(45)(002), 3.184(18)(223), 3.129(19)(026), 2.756(16)(402), 2.688(24)(10 10). The crystal structure of kampelite was

  17. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  18. Simplifying the complexity of a coupled carbon turnover and pesticide degradation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschmann, Gianna; Erhardt, André H.; Pagel, Holger; Kügler, Philipp; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    The mechanistic one-dimensional model PECCAD (PEsticide degradation Coupled to CArbon turnover in the Detritusphere; Pagel et al. 2014, Biogeochemistry 117, 185-204) has been developed as a tool to elucidate regulation mechanisms of pesticide degradation in soil. A feature of this model is that it integrates functional traits of microorganisms, identifiable by molecular tools, and physicochemical processes such as transport and sorption that control substrate availability. Predicting the behavior of microbially active interfaces demands a fundamental understanding of factors controlling their dynamics. Concepts from dynamical systems theory allow us to study general properties of the model such as its qualitative behavior, intrinsic timescales and dynamic stability: Using a Latin hypercube method we sampled the parameter space for physically realistic steady states of the PECCAD ODE system and set up a numerical continuation and bifurcation problem with the open-source toolbox MatCont in order to obtain a complete classification of the dynamical system's behaviour. Bifurcation analysis reveals an equilibrium state of the system entirely controlled by fungal kinetic parameters. The equilibrium is generally unstable in response to small perturbations except for a small band in parameter space where the pesticide pool is stable. Time scale separation is a phenomenon that occurs in almost every complex open physical system. Motivated by the notion of "initial-stage" and "late-stage" decomposers and the concept of r-, K- or L-selected microbial life strategies, we test the applicability of geometric singular perturbation theory to identify fast and slow time scales of PECCAD. Revealing a generic fast-slow structure would greatly simplify the analysis of complex models of organic matter turnover by reducing the number of unknowns and parameters and providing a systematic mathematical framework for studying their properties.

  19. Organomineral Complexation at the Nanoscale: Iron Speciation and Soil Carbon Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, E.; Thompson, A.; Plante, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Much of the uncertainty in the biogeochemical behavior of soil carbon (C) in tropical ecosystems derives from an incomplete understanding of soil C stabilization processes. The 2:1 phyllosilicate clays often associated with temperate organomineral complexation are largely absent in tropical soils due to extensive weathering. In contrast, these soils contain an abundance of Fe- and Al-containing short-range-order (SRO) mineral phases capable of C stabilization through sorption or co-precipitation, largely enabled by high specific surface area (SSA). SRO-mediated organomineral associations may thus prove a critical, yet matrix-selective, driver of the long-term C stabilization capacity observed in tropical soils. Characterizing the interactions between inherently heterogeneous organic matter and amorphous mineralogy presses the limits of current analytical techniques. This work pairs inorganic selective dissolution with high-resolution assessment of Fe speciation to determine the contribution of extracted mineral phases to the mineral matrix, and to C stabilization capacity. Surface (0-20 cm) samples were taken from 20 quantitative soil pits within the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory in northeast Puerto Rico stratified across granodioritic and volcaniclastic parent materials. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy (MBS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) before and after Fe-SOM extraction were used to assess changes in the mineralogical matrix associated with SOM dissolution, while N2-BET sorption was used to determine the contributions of the extractable phases to SSA. Results indicate (1) selective extraction of soil C produces significant shifts in Fe phase distribution, (2) SRO minerals contribute substantially to SSA, and (3) SRO minerals appear protected by more crystalline phases via physical mechanisms, rather than dissolution-dependent chemical bonds. This nanoscale characterization of Fe-C complexes thus provides evidence for both anticipated mineral-organic and

  20. Study of new complexes of uranium and comba radical. I.- Complexes defective in sodium carbonate; Estudio de nuevos complejos entre el uranio y el radical CDMBA. I. Complejos con defectos de carbonato sodico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, J; Galiano Sedano, J A; Parellada Bellod, R; Bellido Gonzalez, A

    1975-07-01

    Some complexes formed in presence of defect of sodium carbonate with respect to the stoichiometric ratio (U): (C0{sub 3}) = 1:3 are studied. This ratio corresponds to the main complex which is responsible for the uranium extraction with CDMBAC organic solutions and from U(VI) aqueous solutions with an excess of sodium carbonate. (Author) 10 refs.

  1. Evidence of different stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes of lanthanides(3); Mise en evidence d'un changement de stoechiometrie du complexe carbonate limite au sein de la serie des lanthanides(3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippini, V

    2007-12-15

    Two stoichiometries have been proposed by different laboratories to interpret measurements on the limiting carbonate complexes of An{sup 3+} and Ln{sup 3+} cations. The study of the solubility of double carbonates (AlkLn(CO{sub 3}){sub 2},xH{sub 2}O) in concentrated carbonate solutions at room temperature and high ionic strengths has shown that on the one hand the lightest lanthanides (La and Nd) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} whereas the heaviest (Eu and Dy) form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} in the studied chemical conditions, and on the other hand, that the kinetics of precipitation of double carbonates depends on the alkali metal and the lanthanide ions. The existence of two stoichiometries for the limiting carbonate complexes was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis hyphenated to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (CE-ICP-MS), used to extend the study to the whole series of lanthanides (except Ce, Pm and Yb). Two behaviours have been put forward comparing the electrophoretic mobilities: La to Tb form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 5-} while Dy to Lu form Ln(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-}. Measurements by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) on Eu(III) indicate small variations of the geometry of Eu(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 3-} complex, specially with Cs{sup +}. Although analogies are currently used among the 4f-block trivalent elements, different aqueous speciations are evidenced in concentrated carbonate solutions across the lanthanide series. (author)

  2. Electrochemical sensor for ranitidine determination based on carbon paste electrode modified with oxovanadium (IV) salen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo-Pereira, Paulo A; Teixeira, Marcos F S; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando; Dockal, Edward R; Bonifácio, Viviane Gomes; Marcolino, Luiz H

    2013-10-01

    The preparation and electrochemical characterization of a carbon paste electrode modified with the N,N-ethylene-bis(salicyllideneiminato)oxovanadium (IV) complex ([VO(salen)]) as well as its application for ranitidine determination are described. The electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode for the electroreduction of ranitidine was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, and analytical curves were obtained for ranitidine using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) under optimized conditions. The best voltammetric response was obtained for an electrode composition of 20% (m/m) [VO(salen)] in the paste, 0.10 mol L(-1) of KCl solution (pH 5.5 adjusted with HCl) as supporting electrolyte and scan rate of 25 mV s(-1). A sensitive linear voltammetric response for ranitidine was obtained in the concentration range from 9.9×10(-5) to 1.0×10(-3) mol L(-1), with a detection limit of 6.6×10(-5) mol L(-1) using linear sweep voltammetry. These results demonstrated the viability of this modified electrode as a sensor for determination, quality control and routine analysis of ranitidine in pharmaceutical formulations. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red Imaging of Femoral Neck Bone: Reduced Heterogeneity of Mineral-to-Matrix and Carbonate-to-Phosphate and more Variable Crystallinity in Treatment-Naïve Fracture Cases compared to Fracture-Free Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L.

    2012-01-01

    After age 60 hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and non-fractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck’s axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed Tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared to controls. While our treatment-naïve patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone’s toughness as a material. PMID:22865771

  4. Fourier transform infrared imaging of femoral neck bone: reduced heterogeneity of mineral-to-matrix and carbonate-to-phosphate and more variable crystallinity in treatment-naive fracture cases compared with fracture-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourion-Arsiquaud, Samuel; Lukashova, Lyudmilla; Power, Jon; Loveridge, Nigel; Reeve, Jonathan; Boskey, Adele L

    2013-01-01

    After the age of 60 years, hip fracture risk strongly increases, but only a fifth of this increase is attributable to reduced bone mineral density (BMD, measured clinically). Changes in bone quality, specifically bone composition as measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging (FTIRI), also contribute to fracture risk. Here, FTIRI was applied to study the femoral neck and provide spatially derived information on its mineral and matrix properties in age-matched fractured and nonfractured bones. Whole femoral neck cross sections, divided into quadrants along the neck's axis, from 10 women with hip fracture and 10 cadaveric controls were studied using FTIRI and micro-computed tomography. Although 3-dimensional micro-CT bone mineral densities were similar, the mineral-to-matrix ratio was reduced in the cases of hip fracture, confirming previous reports. New findings were that the FTIRI microscopic variation (heterogeneity) of the mineral-to-matrix ratio was substantially reduced in the fracture group as was the heterogeneity of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Conversely, the heterogeneity of crystallinity was increased. Increased variation of crystallinity was statistically associated with reduced variation of the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio. Anatomical variation in these properties between the different femoral neck quadrants was reduced in the fracture group compared with controls. Although our treatment-naive patients had reduced rather than increased bending resistance, these changes in heterogeneity associated with hip fracture are in another way comparable to the effects of experimental bisphosphonate therapy, which decreases heterogeneity and other indicators of bone's toughness as a material. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  5. Deciphering Complex Carbon Cycle Changes Across the K-Pg Boundary Using Compound-Specific Carbon Isotopic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancost, R. D.; Taylor, K. W.; Hollis, C. J.; Crouch, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The consequences of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary event on the Earth system have been the subject of much scrutiny. Postulated climate events include a brief (10 - 2000 yr) period of global cooling induced by sulphate aerosols (the so-called 'impact winter'), an interval of warming caused by impact-induced CO2release, as well as longer-term climatic oscillations during the subsequent 1 to 3Myr. Associated with these were putative changes in the biogeochemical cycle, manifested as carbon isotope excursions on both short- and long-term timescales. In this study we develop new biomarker-based climate and biogeochemical records for the mid-Waipara River and Branch Stream sections, NZ. At Branch Stream, a pronounced negative (ca 6 to 8 permil) carbon isotope excursion occurs at the K/Pg; the excursion is recorded by higher plant biomarkers, consistent with some terrestrial records and suggesting that the immediate aftermath of the K/Pg boundary event was characterised by the massive release of 13C-depleted reduced carbon into the ocean-atmosphere reservoir. Mixing across the K/Pg boundary at the Waipara section precludes a similar high-resolution investigation. Lower-resolution, longer-term records, however, also reveal a negative carbon istope excursion documented by both algal and higher plant biomarkers. This event appears to be distinct from that recorded at Branch Stream, being of lower magnitude and longer duration. It coincided with a transient terrestrial and marine warming and appears to have lasted at least 100 kyr and perhaps longer. We argue that this protracted negative CIE reflects a secondary and longer-term consequence of the K/Pg on the global carbon cycle. There is little evidence for an algal extinction as a range of C27 to C30 sterols continued to be deposited throughout the entire section, but changes in GDGT distributions do suggest a change in carbon export dynamics which could have impacted burial of 13C-depleted marine organic matter

  6. The surface chemistry of divalent metal carbonate minerals; a critical assessment of surface charge and potential data using the charge distribution multi-site ion complexation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation or CD–MUSIC modeling approach is used to describe the chemical structure of carbonate mineralaqueous solution interfaces. The new model extends existing surface complexation models of carbonate minerals, by including atomic scale information on

  7. Carbonate formation within a nickel dimer: synthesis of a coordinatively unsaturated bis(mu-hydroxo) dinickel complex and its reactivity toward carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikstrom, Jeffrey P; Filatov, Alexander S; Mikhalyova, Elena A; Shatruk, Michael; Foxman, Bruce M; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V

    2010-03-14

    The tridentate aminopyridine ligand bearing a bulky tert-butyl substituent at the amine nitrogen, tert-butyl-dipicolylamine (tBuDPA), occupies three coordination sites in six-coordinate complexes of nickel(ii), leaving the remaining three sites available for additional ligand binding and activation. New crystallographically characterized complexes include two mononuclear species with 1:1 metal:ligand complexation: a trihydrate solvate (1.3H(2)O) and a monohydrate biacetonitrile solvate (1.H(2)O.2CH(3)CN). Complexation in the presence of sodium hydroxide results in a bis(mu-hydroxo) complex (2), the bridging hydroxide anions of which are labile and become displaced by methoxide anions in methanol solvent, affording bis-methoxo-bridged (4). Nickel(II) centers in 2 are five-coordinate and antiferromagnetically coupled (with J = -31.4(5) cm(-1), H = -2JS(1)S(2), in agreement with Ni-O-Ni angle of 103.7 degrees). Bridging hydroxide or alkoxide anions in coordinatively unsaturated dinuclear nickel(II) complexes with tBuDPA react as active nucleophiles. 2 readily performs carbon dioxide fixation, resulting in the formation of a bis(mu-carbonato) tetrameric complex (3), which features a novel binding geometry in the form of an inverted butterfly-type nickel-carbonate core. Temperature-dependent magnetic measurements of tetranuclear carbonato-bridged revealed relatively weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J(1) = -3.1(2) cm(-1)) between the two nickel centers in the core of the cluster, as well as weak antiferromagnetic pairwise interactions (J(2) = J(3) = -4.54(5) cm(-1)) between central and terminal nickel ions.

  8. Study on the relation between uranium content and total phosphorus in some sudanese phosphate ore samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltayeb, M. A. H.; Mohammed, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work uranium content and total phosphorus were determined in 30 phosphate ore samples collected from Kurun and Uro areas in Nuba Mountains in Sudan. Spectrophotometry technique was used for this purpose. Uranium analysis is based on the use of nitrogen (V) acid for leaching the rock, and treatment with ammonium carbonate solution, whereby uranium (Vi) is kept in solution as its carbonate complex. The ion exchange technique was used for the recovery of uranium. Uranium was eluted from the resin with 1 M hydrochloric acid. In the elute, uranium was determined spectrophotometrically by measurement of absorbance of the yellow uranium (Vi)-8-hydroxyquinolate complex at λ 400 nm. The total phosphorus was measured as (P 2 O 5 %) by treatment of the total liquor with ammonium molybdate solution. The absorbance of the blue complex was measured at λ 880 nm. The results show that a limited relation is existed between uranium content and total phosphorus in phosphate samples from kurun area, which contain 58.8 ppm uranium in average, where there are no relation is existed in phosphate samples from uro area, which contain 200 ppm uranium in average. (Author)

  9. Study on the relation between uranium content and total phosphorus in some sudanese phosphate ore samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A.A.; Eltayeb, M.A.H.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work uranium content and total phosphorous were determined in 30 phosphate ore samples collected from Kurun and Uro areas in Nuba mountains in sudan. Spectrophotometry technique was used for this purpose. Uranium analysis is based on the use of nitrogen (V) acid for leaching the rock, and treatment with ammonium carbonate solution, whereby uranium (VI) is kept in solution as its carbonate complex. The ion-exchange technique was used for the recovery of uranium. Uranium was eluted from the resin with 1 M hydrochloric acid. In the elute, uranium was determined spectrophotometrically by measurement of the absorbance of the yellow uranium (VI) - 8- hydroxyquinolate complex at λ 400 nm. The total phosphorus was measured as (P 2 O 5 %) by treatment of the leach liquor with ammonium molybdate solution. The absorbance of the blue complex was measured at λ 880 nm. The results show that a limited relation is existed between uranium content and total phosphorus in phosphate samples from Kurun area, which contain 58.8 ppm uranium in average, where there are no relation is existed in phosphate samples samples from Uro area, which contain 200 ppm uranium in average

  10. A novel non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on single walled carbon nanotubes-manganese complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdioun, Monierosadat; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolmaleki, Amir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156/83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghavami, Raoof [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-30

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and phenazine derivative of Mn-complex. With immersing the GC/CNTs modified electrode into Mn-complex solution for a short period of time 20-100 s, a stable thin layer of the complex was immobilized onto electrode surface. Modified electrode showed a well defined redox couples at wide pH range (1-12). The surface coverages and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k{sub s}) of immobilized Mn-complex were approximately 1.58 x 10{sup -10} mole cm{sup -2} and 48.84 s{sup -1}. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Detection limit, sensitivity, linear concentration range and k{sub cat} for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were, 0.2 {mu}M and 692 nA {mu}M{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, 1 {mu}M to 1.5 mM and 7.96({+-}0.2) x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. Compared to other modified electrodes, this electrode has many advantageous such as remarkable catalytic activity, good reproducibility, simple preparation procedure and long term stability.

  11. A novel non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on single walled carbon nanotubes-manganese complex modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Mahdioun, Monierosadat; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Ghavami, Raoof

    2011-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and phenazine derivative of Mn-complex. With immersing the GC/CNTs modified electrode into Mn-complex solution for a short period of time 20-100 s, a stable thin layer of the complex was immobilized onto electrode surface. Modified electrode showed a well defined redox couples at wide pH range (1-12). The surface coverages and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k s ) of immobilized Mn-complex were approximately 1.58 x 10 -10 mole cm -2 and 48.84 s -1 . The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. Detection limit, sensitivity, linear concentration range and k cat for H 2 O 2 were, 0.2 μM and 692 nA μM -1 cm -2 , 1 μM to 1.5 mM and 7.96(±0.2) x 10 3 M -1 s -1 , respectively. Compared to other modified electrodes, this electrode has many advantageous such as remarkable catalytic activity, good reproducibility, simple preparation procedure and long term stability.

  12. Ruthenium-bipyridine complexes bearing fullerene or carbon nanotubes: synthesis and impact of different carbon-based ligands on the resulting products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-yi; Huang, Rong-bin; Xie, Su-yuan; Zheng, Lan-sun

    2011-09-07

    This paper discusses the synthesis of two carbon-based pyridine ligands of fullerene pyrrolidine pyridine (C(60)-py) and multi-walled carbon nanotube pyrrolidine pyridine (MWCNT-py) via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The two complexes, C(60)-Ru and MWCNT-Ru, were synthesized by ligand substitution in the presence of NH(4)PF(6), and Ru(II)(bpy)(2)Cl(2) was used as a reaction precursor. Both complexes were characterized by mass spectroscopy (MS), elemental analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The results showed that the substitution way of C(60)-py is different from that of MWCNT-py. The C(60)-py and a NH(3) replaced a Cl(-) and a bipyridine in Ru(II)(bpy)(2)Cl(2) to produce a five-coordinate complex of [Ru(bpy)(NH(3))(C(60)-py)Cl]PF(6), whereas MWCNT-py replaced a Cl(-) to generate a six-coordinate complex of [Ru(bpy)(2)(MWCNT-py)Cl]PF(6). The cyclic voltammetry study showed that the electron-withdrawing ability was different for C(60) and MWCNT. The C(60) showed a relatively stronger electron-withdrawing effect with respect to MWCNT. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. Highly microporous carbons derived from a complex of glutamic acid and zinc chloride for use in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Ling; Lu, An-Hui; He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui

    2016-09-01

    The selection of carbon precursor is an important factor when designing carbon materials. In this study, a complex derived from L-glutamic acid and zinc chloride was used to prepare highly microporous carbons via facile pyrolysis. L-glutamic acid, a new carbon precursor with nitrogen functionality, coordinated with zinc chloride resulted in a homogeneous distribution of Zn2+ on the molecular level. During pyrolysis, the evaporation of the in situ formed zinc species creates an abundance of micropores together with the inert gases. The obtained carbons exhibit high specific surface area (SBET: 1203 m2 g-1) and a rich nitrogen content (4.52 wt%). In excess of 89% of the pore volume consists of micropores with pore size ranging from 0.5 to 1.2 nm. These carbons have been shown to be suitable for use as supercapacitor electrodes, and have been tested in 6 M KOH where a capacitance of 217 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.5 A g-1. A long cycling life of 30 000 cycles was achieved at a current density of 1 A g-1, with only a 9% loss in capacity. The leakage current through a two-electrode device was measured as 2.3 μA per mg of electrode and the self-discharge characteristics were minimal.

  14. Are Polyphosphates or Phosphate Esters Prebiotic Reagents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    It is widely held that there was a phosphate compound in prebiotic chemistry that played the role of adenosine triphosphate and that the first living organisms had ribose-phosphate in the backbone of their genetic material. However, there are no known efficient prebiotic synthesis of high-energy phosphates or phosphate esters. We review the occurrence of phosphates in nature, the efficiency of the volcanic synthesis of P4O10, the efficiency of polyphosphate synthesis by heating phosphate minerals under geological conditions, and the use of high-energy organic compounds such as cyanamide or hydrogen cyanide. These are shown to be inefficient processes especially when the hydrolysis of the polyphosphates is taken into account. For example, if a whole atmosphere of methane or carbon monoxide were converted to cyanide which somehow synthesized polyphosphates quantitatively, the polyphosphate concentration in the ocean would still have been insignificant. We also attempted to find more efficient high-energy polymerizing agents by spark discharge syntheses, but without success. There may still be undiscovered robust prebiotic syntheses of polyphosphates, or mechanisms for concentrating them, but we conclude that phosphate esters may not have been constituents of the first genetic material. Phosphoanhydrides are also unlikely as prebiotic energy sources.

  15. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kasraie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA, have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA.

  16. Serum albumin forms a lactoferrin-like soluble iron-binding complex in presence of hydrogen carbonate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi M; Urazono, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-02-15

    The iron-lactoferrin complex is a common food ingredient because of its iron-solubilizing capability in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. However, it is unclear whether the formation of a stable iron-binding complex is limited to lactoferrin. In this study, we investigated the effects of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on iron solubility and iron-catalyzed lipid oxidation in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. BSA could solubilize >100-fold molar equivalents of iron at neutral pH, exceeding the specific metal-binding property of BSA. This iron-solubilizing capability of BSA was impaired by thermally denaturing BSA at ≥ 70 °C for 10 min at pH 8.5. The resulting iron-BSA complex inhibited iron-catalyzed oxidation of soybean oil in a water-in-oil emulsion measured using the Rancimat test. Our study is the first to show that BSA, like lactoferrin, forms a soluble iron-binding complex in the presence of hydrogen carbonate ions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbonate sedimentology of Seribu Islands patch reef complex: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, D. A.; Hakim, A. R.

    2018-02-01

    Many oil and gas reservoirs in the world are reserved in fossil carbonate sediment. Knowledge of modern carbonate sedimentology is important for a better understanding of ancient carbonate sedimentation. Equatorial coral reefs comprise almost half of the world coral reef production, and yet their dynamics, distributions, and cycles are still not well understood. Contrary to their subtropical counterpart, South East Asian carbonate system is known to be strongly influenced by the combination of oceanographic and climatic conditions. Hence carbonate sediments in the tropics have a distinct depositional system, and ought to be treated differently since common distribution models were developed from the (sub-tropical) Atlantic and Pacific regions. This paper systematically summarizes carbonate sediment studies in Seribu Islands and its dominant oceanographic configuration to provide insights and a sense of research direction in the future.

  18. Phosphate acquisition efficiency and phosphate starvation tolerance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, College of Agriculture, Lembucherra, Tripura 799 ... vated in soil like red and lateritic or acid, with low soluble phosphate content. ..... activation of genes involved in the adaptation of Arabidopsis to.

  19. 磷酸二氢钙与生物质共热解提高生物炭固碳效果%Biomass co-pyrolysis with calcium dihydrogen phosphate improving carbon fixation of biochar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞跃; 张丽; 李孝良; 谢越; 王艳; 汪建飞

    2016-01-01

    Turning biomass wastes into biochar under low temperature and limited oxygen conditions has recently proven as a promising approach for long term carbon sequestration. In order to reveal the effects of mineral addition which is a pretreatment of biochar production on carbon retention and stability of biochar and provide an creative idea for further improvement of carbon sequestration potential by turning biomass into biochar. Calcium dihydrogen phosphate using as a typical mineral was added to sawdust and dairy manure feedstock at the ratio of 20% for biochar formation through co-pyrolysis treatment under lab condition, a typical slow pyrolysis process, heated in a Muffle Furnace at a speed of approximately 20℃/min under limited oxygen and held at 200 to 500℃ with every other 100℃ for 1 h. Moreover, two reliable methods were applied to test biochar stability: One was a simulated long-term stability method using chemical oxidation treatment to assess the labile fraction of C in biochar samples after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation, this method was to determine the chemical stability of biochar; The other was simulated mineralization experiment to test the biochar's microbe-resistance stability, this method was to evaluate the biological stability of biochar in terms of microbial mineralization rate under simulated soil microbial conditions in a lab-scale experiment. The carbon retention was defined as the proportion of the original carbon, which was from plant photosynthesis by sequestrating the CO2 from atmosphere in feedstock, retained in the biochar after the pyrolysis. Compared with the original biochar, modified biochar produced with calcium dihydrogen phosphate addition to sawdust and dairy manure were increased by 31.3% and 26.1%, respectively; With H2O2 oxidation, the carbon loss of modified biochar produced with calcium dihydrogen phosphate addition to sawdust was reduced by 93.1%, compared with its unmodified biochar. However, the carbon loss of

  20. Influence of Beaver-Induced Complexity on Storage of Organic Carbon and Sediment in Colorado Mountain Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurel, D.; Wohl, E.

    2016-12-01

    Beaver meadows (complexes of multiple different aged beaver dams and ponds) influence the storage of water, sediment, and nutrients. Although beaver meadows compose only a small fraction of catchment area, they provide a potentially large role in retaining these fluxes in mountain watersheds. Multiple dams and ponds in beaver meadows increase overbank flows leading to an anastomosing stream channel planform, and deposition of fine sediment along with particulate organic carbon. An earlier study estimated a range of cumulative carbon stored in 27 beaver meadows east of the continental divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. Storage ranged from 735,800 to 2.8 x 106 Mg carbon, with the high value estimating storage if all the meadows had active beaver (historic conditions pre-European settlement) and the lower value estimating current conditions where many of the meadows are abandoned. We combined geomorphic surveys, soil depth probing by rebar, and soil cores analyzed for carbon content to investigate the influence of beaver activity, meadow size, and meadow placement within the drainage on catchment-scale fluxes of fine sediment and organic carbon. We found carbon storage in floodplain soils to be highly variable across both active and abandoned meadows; however, active beaver meadows store more carbon on average than abandoned meadows. In addition, active meadows with high levels of beaver activity (multiple colonies) stored greater volumes of fine sediment behind dams and in ponds. These results have implications for the restoration potential of abandoned beaver meadows in mountain environments to store greater volumes of sediment and more organic carbon if beaver are successfully reintroduced.

  1. Model complexity in carbon sequestration:A design of experiment and response surface uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Li, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is proposed for the Nugget Sandstone in Moxa Arch, a regional saline aquifer with a large storage potential. For a proposed storage site, this study builds a suite of increasingly complex conceptual "geologic" model families, using subsets of the site characterization data: a homogeneous model family, a stationary petrophysical model family, a stationary facies model family with sub-facies petrophysical variability, and a non-stationary facies model family (with sub-facies variability) conditioned to soft data. These families, representing alternative conceptual site models built with increasing data, were simulated with the same CO2 injection test (50 years at 1/10 Mt per year), followed by 2950 years of monitoring. Using the Design of Experiment, an efficient sensitivity analysis (SA) is conducted for all families, systematically varying uncertain input parameters. Results are compared among the families to identify parameters that have 1st order impact on predicting the CO2 storage ratio (SR) at both end of injection and end of monitoring. At this site, geologic modeling factors do not significantly influence the short-term prediction of the storage ratio, although they become important over monitoring time, but only for those families where such factors are accounted for. Based on the SA, a response surface analysis is conducted to generate prediction envelopes of the storage ratio, which are compared among the families at both times. Results suggest a large uncertainty in the predicted storage ratio given the uncertainties in model parameters and modeling choices: SR varies from 5-60% (end of injection) to 18-100% (end of monitoring), although its variation among the model families is relatively minor. Moreover, long-term leakage risk is considered small at the proposed site. In the lowest-SR scenarios, all families predict gravity-stable supercritical CO2 migrating toward the bottom of the aquifer. In the highest

  2. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells ons biomimetically and electrolytically deposited calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; de Boer, Jan; de Groot, K.

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic and electrolytic deposition are versatile methods to prepare calcium phosphate coatings. In this article, we compared the effects of biomimetically deposited octacalcium phosphate and carbonate apatite coatings as well as electrolytically deposited carbonate apatite coating on the

  3. Osteogenecity of octacalcium phosphate coatings applied on porous metal implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.; van der Valk, Chantal M.; Dalmeijer, Remco A.J.; Meijer, Gert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Groot, K.; Layrolle, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The biomimetic route allows the homogeneous deposition of calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings on porous implants by immersion in simulated physiologic solution. In addition, various Ca-P phases, such as octacalcium phosphate (OCP) or bone-like carbonated apatite (BCA), which are stable only at low

  4. Effect of nitrogen and phosphate limitation on utilization of bitumen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The degradation of bitumen was found to be associated with the production of carbon (IV) oxide, natural gas and oil. As a result of using nitrogen limited and phosphate limited media, 1750 and 1250 cm3 of gas and 0.95 and 0.85 g/l of oil were obtained respectively. Nitrogen and phosphate limitation have profound effect on ...

  5. Adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} onto a novel activated carbon-chitosan complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, H.; Fan, X. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2011-10-15

    A novel activated carbon-chitosan complex adsorbent (ACCA) was prepared via the crosslinking of glutaraldehyde and activated carbon-(NH{sub 2}-protected) chitosan complex under microwave irradiation. The surface morphology of this adsorbent was characterized. The adsorption of ACCA for Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} was investigated. The results demonstrate that ACCA has higher adsorption capacity than chitosan. The adsorption follows pseudo first-order kinetics. The isotherm adsorption equilibria are better described by Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms than by the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorbent can be recycled. These results have important implications for the design of low-cost and effective adsorbents in the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewaters. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells from covalent-bonded polyaniline-multiwalled carbon nanotube complex counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huihui; He, Benlin; Tang, Qunwei; Yu, Liangmin

    2015-02-01

    Exploration of cost-effective counter electrodes (CEs) and enhancement of power conversion efficiency have been two persistent objectives for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In the current work, polyaniline-multiwalled carbon nanotube (PANi-MWCNT) complexes are synthesized by a reflux method and employed as CE materials for bifacial DSSCs. Owing to the high optical transparency of PANi-MWCNT complex CE, the incident light from rear side can compensate for the incident light from TiO2 anode. The charge-transfer ability and electrochemical behaviors demonstrate the potential utilization of PANi-MWCNT complex CEs in robust bifacial DSSCs. The electrochemical properties as well as photovoltaic performances are optimized by adjusting MWCNT dosages. A maximum power conversion efficiency of 9.24% is recorded from the bifacial DSSC employing PANi-8 wt‰ MWCNT complex CE for both irradiation, which is better than 8.08% from pure PANi CE.

  7. Electrosorption of Os(III)-complex at single-wall carbon nanotubes immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode: Application to nanomolar detection of bromate, periodate and iodate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Kavosi, Begard; Babaei, Ali; Hallaj, Rahman

    2008-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare a glassy carbon electrode modified with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and Os(III)-complex. The glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with CNTs was immersed into Os(III)-complex solution (direct deposition) for a short period of time (60 s). 1,4,8,12-Tetraazacyclotetradecane osmium(III) chloride, (Os(III)LCl 2 ).ClO 4 , irreversibly and strongly adsorbed on SWCNTs immobilized on the surface of GC electrode. Cyclic voltammograms of the Os(III)-complex-incorporated-SWCNTs indicate a pair of well defined and nearly reversible redox couple with surface confined characteristic at wide pH range (1-8). The surface coverage (Γ) and charge transfer rate constant (k s ) of the immobilized Os-complex on SWCNTs were 3.07 x 10 -9 mol cm -2 , 5.5 (±0.2) s -1 , 2.94 x 10 -9 mol cm -2 , 7.3 (±0.3) s -1 at buffer solution with pH 2 and 7, respectively, indicate high loading ability of SWCNTs for Os(III) complex and great facilitation of the electron transfer between electroactive redox center and carbon nanotubes immobilized on the electrode surface. Modified electrodes showed higher electrocatalytic activity toward reduction of BrO 3 - , IO 3 - and IO 4 - in acidic solutions. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction bromate, periodate and iodate were 3.79 (±0.2) x 10 3 , 7.32 (±0.2) x 10 3 and 1.75 (±0.2) x 10 3 M -1 s -1 , respectively. The hydrodynamic amperometry of rotating modified electrode at constant potential (0.3 V) was used for nanomolar detection of selected analytes. Excellent electrochemical reversibility of the redox couple, good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, long life time, fast amperometric response time, wide linear concentration range, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation are great advantage of this sensor

  8. Carbon-13 magnetic relaxation rates or iron (III) complexes of some biogenic amines and parent compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, A.; Monduzzi, M.; Saba, G.

    1980-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates (R 1 ) from naturally occuring C-13 F.T. N.M.R. spectra of some catecholamines and parent compounds with Iron(III) at pD = 4 were determined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying their association in aqueous solutions. Complexation was observed only for catecholic ligands. The R 1 values were used to calculate iron-carbon scaled distances, and two complexation models were proposed where the catecholic function binds Fe(III) in the first and second coordination spheres respectively. The latter case was shown to be the consistent with the molecular geometries. (orig.)

  9. A glassy carbon electrode modified with a nickel(II) norcorrole complex and carbon nanotubes for simultaneous or individual determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Keqin; Li, Xiaofang; Huang, Haowen

    2016-01-01

    The authors report on the synthesis of a hybrid material consisting of the porphyrinoid metal complex nickel(II) norcorrole that was noncovalently bound to carbon nanotubes (CNT-NiNC). The hybrid was characterized by UV–vis, FTIR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The CNT-NiNC hybrid possesses high catalytic activity and selectivity toward the oxidation of ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid. It was used to modify a glassy carbon electrode which then is shown to enable simultaneous or individual determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) at pH 6.5 and typical working potentials of −70, 200 and 380 mV (vs. SCE). The detection limits (at an SNR of 3) are 2.0 μM for AA, 0.1 μM for DA, and 0.4 μM for UA. (author)

  10. Influence of carbonate on the complexation of Cm(III) with human serum transferrin studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Nicole; Panak, Petra J.

    2015-01-01

    The complexation of Cm(III) with transferrin is investigated in the pH range from 3.5 to 11.0 in the absence of carbonate and at c(carbonate)(tot) = 25 mM. In the absence of carbonate two Cm(III) transferrin species I and II are formed depending on pH. An increase of the total carbonate concentration favors the formation of the Cm(III) transferrin species II with Cm(III) bound at the Fe(III) binding site of transferrin at significantly lower pH values. The spectroscopic results directly prove that carbonate acts as a synergistic anion for Cm(III) complexation at the binding site of transferrin. At c(carbonate)(tot) = 25 mM the formation of the nonspecific Cm(III) transferrin species I is suppressed completely. Instead, three Cm(III) carbonate species Cm(CO 3 ) + , Cm(CO 3 ) 2 - and Cm(CO 3 ) 3 3- are formed successively with increasing pH. The formation of Cm(III) carbonate species results in a decreased fraction of the Cm(III) transferrin species II at pH ≥ 7.4 which indicates that carbonate complexation is an important competition reaction for Cm(III) transferrin complexation at physiological carbonate concentration. (authors)

  11. Radical-induced dephosphorylation of fructose phosphates in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zegota, H.; Sonntag, C. von

    1981-01-01

    Oxygen free N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions of D-fructose-1-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate were γ-irradiated. Inorganic phosphate and phosphate free sugars (containing four to six carbon atoms) were identified and their G-values measured. D-Fructose-1-phosphate yields (G-values in parentheses) inorganic phosphate (1.6), hexos-2-ulose (0.12), 6-deoxy-2,5-hexodiulose (0.16), tetrulose (0.05) and 3-deoxytetrulose (0.15). D-Fructose-6-phosphate yields inorganic phosphate (1.7), hexos-5-ulose (0.1), 6-deoxy-2,5-hexodiulose (0.36), 3-deoxy-2,5-hexodiulose and 2-deoxyhexos-5-ulose (together 0.18). On treatment with alkaline phosphatase further deoxy sugars were recognized and in fructose-1-phosphate G(6-deoxy-2,5-hexodiulose) was increased to a G-value of 0.4. Dephosphorylation is considered to occur mainly after OH attack at C-5 and C-1 in fructose-1-phosphate and at C-5 and C-6 in fructose-6-phosphate. Reaction mechanisms are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Atomistic materials modeling of complex systems: Carbynes, carbon nanotube devices and bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiqi

    The key to understanding and predicting the behavior of materials is the knowledge of their structures. Many properties of materials samples are not solely determined by their average chemical compositions which one may easily control. Instead, they are profoundly influenced by structural features of different characteristic length scales. Starting in the last century, metallurgical engineering has mostly been microstructure engineering. With the further evolution of materials science, structural features of smaller length scales down to the atomic structure, have become of interest for the purpose of properties engineering and functionalizing materials and are, therefore, subjected to study. As computer modeling is becoming more powerful due to the dramatic increase of computational resources and software over the recent decades, there is an increasing demand for atomistic simulations with the goal of better understanding materials behavior on the atomic scale. Density functional theory (DFT) is a quantum mechanics based approach to calculate electron distribution, total energy and interatomic forces with high accuracy. From these, atomic structures and thermal effects can be predicted. However, DFT is mostly applied to relatively simple systems because it is computationally very demanding. In this thesis, the current limits of DFT applications are explored by studying relatively complex systems, namely, carbynes, carbon nanotube (CNT) devices and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Special care is taken to overcome the limitations set by small system sizes and time scales that often prohibit DFT from being applied to realistic systems under realistic external conditions. In the first study, we examine the possible existence of a third solid phase of carbon with linear bonding called carbyne, which has been suggested in the literature and whose formation has been suggested to be detrimental to high-temperature carbon materials. We have suggested potential structures for

  13. Novel in situ multiharmonic EQCM-D approach to characterize complex carbon pore architectures for capacitive deionization of brackish water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpigel, Netanel; Levi, Mikhael D; Sigalov, Sergey; Aurbach, Doron; Daikhin, Leonid; Presser, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Multiharmonic analysis by electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (EQCM-D) is introduced as an excellent tool for quantitative studying electrosorption of ions from aqueous solution in mesoporous (BP-880) or mixed micro-mesoporous (BP-2000) carbon electrodes. Finding the optimal conditions for gravimetric analysis of the ionic content in the charged carbon electrodes, we propose a novel approach to modeling the charge-dependent gravimetric characteristics by incorporation of Gouy-Chapman-Stern electric double layer model for ions electrosorption into meso- and micro-mesoporous carbon electrodes. All three parameters of the gravimetric equation evaluated by fitting it to the experimental mass changes curves were validated using supplementary nitrogen gas sorption analysis and complementing atomic force microscopy. Important overlap between gravimetric EQCM-D analysis of the ionic content of porous carbon electrodes and the classical capacitive deionization models has been established. The necessity and usefulness of non-gravimetric EQCM-D characterizations of complex carbon architectures, providing insight into their unique viscoelastic behavior and porous structure changes, have been discussed in detail. (paper)

  14. Carbon-water Cycling in the Critical Zone: Understanding Ecosystem Process Variability Across Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, Holly [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Brooks, Paul [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-16

    One of the largest knowledge gaps in environmental science is the ability to understand and predict how ecosystems will respond to future climate variability. The links between vegetation, hydrology, and climate that control carbon sequestration in plant biomass and soils remain poorly understood. Soil respiration is the second largest carbon flux of terrestrial ecosystems, yet there is no consensus on how respiration will change as water availability and temperature co-vary. To address this knowledge gap, we use the variation in soil development and topography across an elevation and climate gradient on the Front Range of Colorado to conduct a natural experiment that enables us to examine the co-evolution of soil carbon, vegetation, hydrology, and climate in an accessible field laboratory. The goal of this project is to further our ability to combine plant water availability, carbon flux and storage, and topographically driven hydrometrics into a watershed scale predictive model of carbon balance. We hypothesize: (i) landscape structure and hydrology are important controls on soil respiration as a result of spatial variability in both physical and biological drivers: (ii) variation in rates of soil respiration during the growing season is due to corresponding shifts in belowground carbon inputs from vegetation; and (iii) aboveground carbon storage (biomass) and species composition are directly correlated with soil moisture and therefore, can be directly related to subsurface drainage patterns.

  15. Study on the adsorption and desorption of fertilizer phosphates by the soil suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puspodikoro, S.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fertilizer phosphate by soil suspensions were studied with the purpose to improve the efficiency of the use of phosphate fertilizer in rice growing countries. Experiments have shown that the applied phosphate fertilizer was quickly adsorbed by the soil and that the bulk of the fertilizer phosphate got bound to the soil complex. These bound fertilizer phosphates could readily be desorbed by flooding of the soil up to a certain amount. (author)

  16. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  17. An investigation of groundwater organics, soil minerals, and activated carbon on the complexation, adsorption, and separation of technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, B.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes studies on the interactions of technetium-99 (Tc) with different organic compounds and soil minerals under both oxidizing and reducing conditions. The report is divided into four parts and includes (1) effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the complexation and solubility of Tc, (2) complexation between Tc and trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous solutions, (3) adsorption of Tc on soil samples from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), and (4) adsorption and separation of Tc on activated carbon. Various experimental techniques were applied to characterize and identify Tc complexation with organic compounds and TCE, including liquid-liquid extraction, membrane filtration, size exclusion, and gel chromatography. Results indicate, within the experimental error, Tc (as pertechnetate, TcO 4 ) did not appear to form complexes with groundwater or natural organic matter under both atmospheric and reducing conditions. However, Tc can form complexes with certain organic compounds or specific functional groups such as salicylate. Tc did not appear to form complexes with TCE in aqueous solution.Both liquid-liquid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) gave no indication Tc was complexed with TCE. The correlations between Tc and TCE concentrations in monitoring wells at PGDP may be a coincidence because TCE was commonly used as a decontamination reagent. Once TCE and Tc entered the groundwater, they behaved similarly because both TcO 4 - and TCE are poorly adsorbed by soils. An effective remediation technique to remove TcO 4 - from PGDP contaminated groundwater is needed. One possibility is the use of an activated carbon adsorption technique developed in this study

  18. Two different carbon-hydrogen complexes in silicon with closely spaced energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stübner, R., E-mail: ronald.stuebner@physik.tu-dresden.de, E-mail: kolkov@ifpan.edu.pl; Kolkovsky, Vl., E-mail: ronald.stuebner@physik.tu-dresden.de, E-mail: kolkov@ifpan.edu.pl; Weber, J. [Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Angewandte Physik, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-08-07

    An acceptor and a single donor state of carbon-hydrogen defects (CH{sub A} and CH{sub B}) are observed by Laplace deep level transient spectroscopy at 90 K. CH{sub A} appears directly after hydrogenation by wet chemical etching or hydrogen plasma treatment, whereas CH{sub B} can be observed only after a successive annealing under reverse bias at about 320 K. The activation enthalpies of these states are 0.16 eV for CH{sub A} and 0.14 eV for CH{sub B}. Our results reconcile previous controversial experimental results. We attribute CH{sub A} to the configuration where substitutional carbon binds a hydrogen atom on a bond centered position between carbon and the neighboring silicon and CH{sub B} to another carbon-hydrogen defect.

  19. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...

  20. Adsorption of chromium complex dye and copper(II) ions by activated carbons

    OpenAIRE

    Česūnienė, Rasa

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, more and more attention is paid to the environment protection because of the emission of large quantities of solid, liquid and gaseous waste from many manufacturing processes. They cause the environmental pollution and are harmful to human health. The commercial activated carbons (CAC) are widely used for drinking water and waste water treatment. Activated carbon is a form of graphite, which is characterized by irregular or amorphous structure, with varying sizes - from the...

  1. Electrochemistry of different boranes, carbaboranes and their exo-skeletal hydroxy derivatives at the graphite carbon electrode in aqueous phosphate buffers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fojt, Lukáš; Fojta, Miroslav; Holub, Josef; Grüner, Bohumír; Vespalec, Radim

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 205, JUL 2016 (2016), s. 8-14 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G151; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05677S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : boranes * carbaboranes * glassy carbon electrode Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  2. Spectral studies of lanthanide-nucleic acid component interaction: complexes of adenine, adenosine, adenosine 5'-mono-, adenosine 5'-di- and adenosine 5' tri-phosphates with praseodymium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, George; Anjaiah, K.; Misra, S.N.

    1990-01-01

    The interactions of adenine, adenosine, adenosine 5'-mono-, adenosine 5'-di-and adenosine 5'-tri-phosphates with praseodymium(III) have been studied in different stoichiometries and at varying hydrogen ion concentrations by absorption spectral studies. The sharp bands in the spectra have been individually analysed by Gaussian curve analysis, and various spectral parameters have been computed using partial and multiple regression methods on an HP-1000/45 computer. The changes in and the magnitudes of these parameters have been correlated with the degrees of outer- and inner-sphere coordination around praseodymium(III). Crystalline complexes of the type: Pr(nucleotide) 2 (H 2 O) 2 (where nucleotide = AMP, ADP and ATP) have been characterized on the basis of analytical, IR and 1 H NMR spectral data. These studies indicate that the binding of the nucleotide is through phosphoric oxygen. These complexes in aqueous medium show significant ionization which supports the observed weak 4f-4f bands, lower values of nephelauxetic effect and the parameters derived from coulombic and spin-orbit interactions. (author). 3 t abs., 28 refs

  3. Symmetry and structure of carbon-nitrogen complexes in gallium arsenide from infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künneth, Christopher; Kölbl, Simon; Wagner, Hans Edwin; Häublein, Volker; Kersch, Alfred; Alt, Hans Christian

    2018-04-01

    Molecular-like carbon-nitrogen complexes in GaAs are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Two characteristic high-frequency stretching modes at 1973 and 2060 cm-1, detected by Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) spectroscopy, appear in carbon- and nitrogen-implanted and annealed layers. From isotopic substitution, it is deduced that the chemical composition of the underlying complexes is CN2 and C2N, respectively. Piezospectroscopic FTIR measurements reveal that both centers have tetragonal symmetry. For density functional theory (DFT) calculations, linear entities are substituted for the As anion, with the axis oriented along the 〈1 0 0 〉 direction, in accordance with the experimentally ascertained symmetry. The DFT calculations support the stability of linear N-C-N and C-C-N complexes in the GaAs host crystal in the charge states ranging from + 3 to -3. The valence bonds of the complexes are analyzed using molecular-like orbitals from DFT. It turns out that internal bonds and bonds to the lattice are essentially independent of the charge state. The calculated vibrational mode frequencies are close to the experimental values and reproduce precisely the isotopic mass splitting from FTIR experiments. Finally, the formation energies show that under thermodynamic equilibrium CN2 is more stable than C2N.

  4. The distribution and amount of carbon in the largest peatland complex in Amazonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, Frederick C; Baker, Timothy R; Roucoux, Katherine H; Lawson, Ian T; Mitchard, Edward T A; Honorio Coronado, Euridice N; Zaráte, Ricardo; Lähteenoja, Outi; Torres Montenegro, Luis; Valderrama Sandoval, Elvis

    2014-01-01

    Peatlands in Amazonian Peru are known to store large quantities of carbon, but there is high uncertainty in the spatial extent and total carbon stocks of these ecosystems. Here, we use a multi-sensor (Landsat, ALOS PALSAR and SRTM) remote sensing approach, together with field data including 24 forest census plots and 218 peat thickness measurements, to map the distribution of peatland vegetation types and calculate the combined above- and below-ground carbon stock of peatland ecosystems in the Pastaza-Marañon foreland basin in Peru. We find that peatlands cover 35 600 ± 2133 km 2 and contain 3.14 (0.44–8.15) Pg C. Variation in peat thickness and bulk density are the most important sources of uncertainty in these values. One particular ecosystem type, peatland pole forest, is found to be the most carbon-dense ecosystem yet identified in Amazonia (1391 ± 710 Mg C ha −1 ). The novel approach of combining optical and radar remote sensing with above- and below-ground carbon inventories is recommended for developing regional carbon estimates for tropical peatlands globally. Finally, we suggest that Amazonian peatlands should be a priority for research and conservation before the developing regional infrastructure causes an acceleration in the exploitation and degradation of these ecosystems. (letter)

  5. About the structure and stability of complex carbonates of thorium (IV), cerium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervin, Jacqueline

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the study of complex carbonates of cations of metals belonging to the IV A column, i.e. thorium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV), and also cerium (IV) and uranium (VI), and more particularly focused on ionic compounds formed in solution, and also on the influence of concentration and nature of cations on stability and nature of the formed solid. The author first presents methods used in this study, discusses their precision and scope of validity. She reports the study of the formation of different complex ions which have been highlighted in solution, and the determination of their formation constants. She reports the preparation and study of the stability domain of solid complexes. The next part reports the use of thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectrometry, and crystallography for the structural study of these compounds

  6. Stability constants important to the understanding of plutonium in environmental waters, hydroxy and carbonate complexation of PuO2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.A.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1990-01-01

    The formation constants for the reactions PuO 2 + + H 2 O = PuO 2 (OH) + H + and PuO 2 + + CO 3 2 = PuO 2 (CO 3 ) - were determined in aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions by laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy. The molar absorptivity of the PuO 2 + band at 569 nm decreased with increasing hydroxide concentration. Similarly, spectral changes occurred between 540 and 580 nm as the carbonate concentration was increased. The absorption data were analyzed by the non-linear least-squares program SQUAD to yield complexation constants. Using the specific ion interaction theory, both complexation constants were extrapolated to zero ionic strength. These thermodynamic complexation constants were combined with the oxidation-reduction potentials of Pu to obtain Eh versus pH diagrams. 120 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs

  7. Supramolecular Complexes Formed by the Self-assembly of Hydrophobic Bis(Zn(2+)-cyclen) Complexes, Copper, and Di- or Triimide Units for the Hydrolysis of Phosphate Mono- and Diesters in Two-Phase Solvent Systems (Cyclen=1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamatsu, Yosuke; Miyazawa, Yuya; Yoneda, Kakeru; Miyauchi, Miki; Zulkefeli, Mohd; Aoki, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported on supramolecular complexes 4 and 5, formed by the 4 : 4 : 4 or 2 : 2 : 2 assembly of a dimeric zinc(II) complex (Zn2L(1)) having 2,2'-bipyridyl linker, dianion of cyanuric acid (CA) or 5,5-diethylbarbituric acid (Bar), and copper(II) ion (Cu(2+)) in an aqueous solution. The supermolecule 4 possesses Cu2(μ-OH)2 centers and catalyzes hydrolysis of phosphate monoester dianion, mono(4-nitrophenyl)phosphate (MNP), at neutral pH. In this manuscript, we report on design and synthesis of hydrophobic supermolecules 9 and 10 by 4 : 4 : 4 and 2 : 2 : 2 self-assembly of hydrophobic Zn2L(2) and Zn2L(3) containing long alkyl chains, CA or Bar, and Cu(2+) and their phosphatase activity for the hydrolysis of MNP and bis(4-nitrophenyl)phosphate (BNP) in two-phase solvent systems. We assumed that the Cu2(μ-OH)2 active sites of 9 and 10 would be more stable in organic solvent than in aqueous solution and that product inhibition of the supermolecules might be avoided by the release of HPO4(2-) into the aqueous layer. The findings indicate that 9 and 10 exhibit phosphatase activity in the two-phase solvent system, although catalytic turnover was not observed. Furthermore, the hydrolysis of BNP catalyzed by the hydrophobic 2 : 2 : 2 supermolecules in the two-phase solvent system is described.

  8. Response of the carbon cycle in an intermediate complexity model to the different climate configurations of the last nine interglacials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouttes, Nathaelle; Swingedouw, Didier; Roche, Didier M.; Sanchez-Goni, Maria F.; Crosta, Xavier

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric CO2 levels during interglacials prior to the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE, ˜ 430 ka BP) were around 40 ppm lower than after the MBE. The reasons for this difference remain unclear. A recent hypothesis proposed that changes in oceanic circulation, in response to different external forcings before and after the MBE, might have increased the ocean carbon storage in pre-MBE interglacials, thus lowering atmospheric CO2. Nevertheless, no quantitative estimate of this hypothesis has been produced up to now. Here we use an intermediate complexity model including the carbon cycle to evaluate the response of the carbon reservoirs in the atmosphere, ocean and land in response to the changes of orbital forcings, ice sheet configurations and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last nine interglacials. We show that the ocean takes up more carbon during pre-MBE interglacials in agreement with data, but the impact on atmospheric CO2 is limited to a few parts per million. Terrestrial biosphere is simulated to be less developed in pre-MBE interglacials, which reduces the storage of carbon on land and increases atmospheric CO2. Accounting for different simulated ice sheet extents modifies the vegetation cover and temperature, and thus the carbon reservoir distribution. Overall, atmospheric CO2 levels are lower during these pre-MBE simulated interglacials including all these effects, but the magnitude is still far too small. These results suggest a possible misrepresentation of some key processes in the model, such as the magnitude of ocean circulation changes, or the lack of crucial mechanisms or internal feedbacks, such as those related to permafrost, to fully account for the lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations during pre-MBE interglacials.

  9. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    control of micro and macro pore structure, to maximize bone healing and provide sufficient mechanical strength. It also permits the complete removal of the polymeric binders that are resided in the SLS process. In collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and BioMedical Enterprises, Inc., porous implants based on anatomical geometry have been successfully implanted in rabbits and dogs. These histologic animal studies reveal excellent biocompatibility and show its great potential for commercial custom-fit implant manufacture. The second research effort involves fabrication of fully dense bone for application in dental restoration and load-bearing orthopedic functions. Calcium phosphate glass melts, proven to be biocompatible in the first effort, were cast into carbon molds. Processes were developed for preparing the molds. These carbon molds of anatomic shape can be prepared from either Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling of slab stock or SLS processing of thermoset-coated graphite powder. The CNC milling method provides accurate dimension of the molds in a short period of time, however, the capable geometries are limited; generally two pieces of molds are required for complex shapes. The SLS method provides very complex shape green molds. However, they need to go through pyrolysis of thermoset binder to provide the high temperature capability reached at calcium phosphate melt temperatures (1100°C) and noticeable shrinkage was observed during pyrolysis. The cast glass was annealed to develop polycrystalline calcium phosphate. This process also exhibits great potential.

  10. Chemical behaviour of plutonium in natural, aquatic systems: Hydrolysis, carbonate complexation and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lierse, C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to clear up the geochemical behaviour of plutonium and its migration mechanisms in groundwater, hydrolysis, redox behaviour, compound formation in carbonate solutions and colloid formation were examined in groundwater conditions, i.e. at pH values between 5 and 8 and at redox potentials of between -300 and +700 mV. Solubility measurements, spectroscopic processes (UV, VIS, IR spectroscopy and laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy) and electrochemical processes (cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse polarography) are used as methods of investigation. The hydrolysis constants of Pu IV and Pu VI and the solubility product of Pu (OH) 4 were determined and hydrolysis products of divalent and trivalent type are described. From solubility experiments, the stability constants for Pu (IV) carbonate compounds and the solubility product for the carbonate system of stable bodies of Pu (OH) 2 CO 3 were calculated. Using absorption spectroscopy, the disproportionate kinetics of Pu (V) in carbonate was determined at various pH values. A slow, but continuous, reduction in Pu (VI) was found in carbonate solution, which was derived from radiolytic effects. The speed of this auto-reduction was determined, depending on various experimental parameters. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Quantum-Chemical Insights into the Self-Assembly of Carbon-Based Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Calbo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how molecular systems self-assemble to form well-organized superstructures governed by noncovalent interactions is essential in the field of supramolecular chemistry. In the nanoscience context, the self-assembly of different carbon-based nanoforms (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene with, in general, electron-donor molecular systems, has received increasing attention as a means of generating potential candidates for technological applications. In these carbon-based systems, a deep characterization of the supramolecular organization is crucial to establish an intimate relation between supramolecular structure and functionality. Detailed structural information on the self-assembly of these carbon-based nanoforms is however not always accessible from experimental techniques. In this regard, quantum chemistry has demonstrated to be key to gain a deep insight into the supramolecular organization of molecular systems of high interest. In this review, we intend to highlight the fundamental role that quantum-chemical calculations can play to understand the supramolecular self-assembly of carbon-based nanoforms through a limited selection of supramolecular assemblies involving fullerene, fullerene fragments, nanotubes and graphene with several electron-rich π-conjugated systems.

  12. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin, SW Iran: An assessment of highly-complex geological heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-05-01

    North Africa and the Middle East possess rich geological heritage, but the latter is yet to be fully identified and described. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, which corresponds to the lower part of the Asmari Formation, has significant potential for geoconservation and geotourism. The types of the geological heritage, their value, and the possible geosites have been assessed. The studied deposits are interesting because of lithology (carbonate rocks), fossils (larger foraminifera, other microfossils, diverse marine invertebrates, fish microremains, and trace fossils), biostratigraphical developments, facies (homoclinal carbonate ramp) and signature of global events (glacioeustatic fluctuations), and outstanding hydrocarbon resources. The five main geological heritage types are sedimentary, palaeontological, stratigraphical, palaeogeographical, and economical, from which the palaeontological, palaeogeographical, and economical types are of global rank. The Khollar and Kavar sections in the Fars Province of Iran are recommended as geosites suitable for research, education, and tourism. The high complexity of the geological heritage linked to the Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin implies the phenomenon of geodiversity should be understood with regard to the relationships between types and their values.

  13. Potentially Prebiotic Syntheses of Condensed Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1996-01-01

    In view of the importance of a prebiotic source of high energy phosphates, we have investigated a number of potentially prebiotic processes to produce condensed phosphates from orthophosphate and cyclic trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. The reagents investigated include polymerizing nitriles, acid anhydrides, lactones, hexamethylene tetramine and carbon suboxide. A number of these processes give substantial yields of pyrophosphate from orthophosphate and trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. Although these reactions may have been applicable in local areas, they are not sufficiently robust to have been of importance in the prebiotic open ocean.

  14. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  15. Correction: A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee Koon; Wu, Jie; Hor, T S Andy; Luo, He-Kuan

    2016-12-22

    Correction for 'A binary catalyst system of a cationic Ru-CNC pincer complex with an alkali metal salt for selective hydroboration of carbon dioxide' by Chee Koon Ng et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 11842-11845.

  16. Final Report: Optimal Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Response Surface Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ye [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2018-01-17

    equivalency, all the stratigraphic models were successfully upscaled from the reference heterogeneous model for bulk flow and transport predictions (Zhang & Zhang, 2015). GCS simulation was then simulated with all models, yielding insights into the level of parameterization complexity that is needed for the accurate simulation of reservoir pore pressure, CO2 storage, leakage, footprint, and dissolution over both short (i.e., injection) and longer (monitoring) time scales. Important uncertainty parameters that impact these key performance metrics were identified for the stratigraphic models as well as for the heterogeneous model, leading to the development of reduced/simplified models at lower characterization cost that can be used for the reservoir uncertainty analysis. All the CO2 modeling was conducted using PFLOTRAN – a massively parallel, multiphase, multi-component, and reactive transport simulator developed by a multi-laboratory DOE/SciDAC (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing) project (Zhang et al., 2017, in review). Within the uncertainty analysis framework, increasing reservoir depth were investigated to explore its effect on the uncertainty outcomes and the potential for developing gravity-stable injection with increased storage security (Dai et al., 20126; Dai et al., 2017, in review). Finally, to accurately model CO2 fluid-rock reactions and resulting long-term storage as secondary carbonate minerals, a modified kinetic rate law for general mineral dissolution and precipitation was proposed and verified that is invariant to a scale transformation of the mineral formula weight. This new formulation will lead to more accurate assessment of mineral storage over geologic time scales (Lichtner, 2016).

  17. Spectrophotometric Analysis of the Kinetic of Pd(II Chloride Complex Ions Sorption Process from Diluted Aqua Solutions Using Commercially Available Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnicki M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, results of adsorption kinetic studies of Pd(II chloride complex ions on activated carbon Organosrob 10 CO are presented. Spectorphotometrical method was applied to investigate the process. Kinetic model was proposed, and fundamental thermodynamic parameters were determined. Proposed kinetic model describes well observed phenomenon in the studied range of concentration of Pd(II chloride complex ions as well, as concentration of activated carbon.

  18. An efficient polymeric micromotor doped with Pt nanoparticle@carbon nanotubes for complex bio-media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yana; Wu, Jie; Xie, Yuzhe; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-04-14

    A highly efficient polymeric tubular micromotor doped with Pt nanoparticle@carbon nanotubes is fabricated by template-assisted electrochemical growth. The micromotors preserve good navigation in multi-media and surface modification, along with simple synthesis, easy functionalization and good biocompatibility, displaying great promise in biological applications.

  19. Modeling complex effects of multiple environmental stresses on carbon dynamics of Mid-Atlantic temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yude Pan; Richard Birdsey; John Hom; Kevin McCullough

    2007-01-01

    We used our GIS variant of the PnET-CN model to investigate changes of forest carbon stocks and fluxes in Mid-Atlantic temperate forests over the last century (1900-2000). Forests in this region are affected by multiple environmental changes including climate, atmospheric CO2 concentration, N deposition and tropospheric ozone, and extensive land disturbances. Our...

  20. From simple to complex prebiotic chemistry in a carbon-rich universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Suárez, O.; Bendjoya, P.; Gadotti, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    It is well known that the main components of important biomolecules are quite common not only in the Solar System, but also in other planetary systems and in the Galactic ISM. The ubiquitous presence of C in the Universe and the unique carbon chemical properties and carbon bonding thermodynamics supports the spontaneous self-replication of monomers into larger polymers, yielding the formation of large molecules. The detection of an ever increasing number of organic molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM) by radio-telescopes and chemical analysis of meteorites boosted astrochemical theories on radiation-induced chemistry, supported by laboratory experiments. In this scenario of exogenous origin of carbon compounds, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may represent a resilient way of accumulating carbon as a robust cosmic reservoir. Consisting of a family of compounds with fused aromatic rings, the abundances of its larger members (50-100 carbon atoms) were estimated to be on top scores just after H2 and CO. PAHs have been detected in the ISM, in star-forming regions, ~14% of low-mass premainsequence stars, and, remarkably, in some 54% of intermediate mass stars. They have also been detected by SPITZER in distant galaxies up to z = 3. PAHs were promptly photolysed into a family of radicals if exposed to UV and oxygen-bearing molecules in laboratory. The presence of oxygenbearing molecules was shown in the laboratory to bring aromatic rings into an unstable chemistry leading to the production of e.g. alcohols, ketones and ether radicals. It has already been observed that carbon-and oxygen-rich stellar envelopes give rise to richer carbon chemistry. It appears very tempting to think that key prebiotic fragments should appear along planetary formation as C-O reaction byproducts such as methanol (CH3OH), formaldehyde (H2CO) and also simpler hydrocarbons as methyl acetylene (CH3CCH). Under an Astrobiology perspective it is plausible to map PAHs and oxygen compounds

  1. Cellular interactions of a water-soluble supramolecular polymer complex of carbon nanotubes with human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonju; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2012-08-01

    Water-soluble, PAX-loaded carbon nanotubes are fabricated by employing a synthetic polyampholyte, PDM. To investigate the suitability of the polyampholyte and the nanotubes as drug carriers, different cellular interactions such as the human epithelial Caco-2 cells viability, their effect on the cell growth, and the change in the transepithelial electrical resistance in Caco-2 cells are studied. The resulting complex is found to exhibit an effective anti-cancer effect against colon cancer cells and an increased the reduction of the electrical resistance in the Caco-2 cells when compared to the precursor PAX. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Radiolytic and photochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in solution catalyzed by transition metal complexes with some selected macrocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodkowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of the work presented in this report is an explanation of the mechanism of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) reduction catalyzed by transition metal complexes with some selected macrocycles. The catalytic function of two electron exchange centers in the reduction of CO 2 , an inner metal and a macrocycle ring, was defined. Catalytic effects of rhodium, iron and cobalt porphyrins, cobalt and iron phthalocyanines and corroles as well as cobalt corrins have been investigated. CO 2 reduction by iron ions without presence of macrocycles and also in presence of copper compounds in aqueous solutions have been studied as well

  3. Controlled adsorption and release onto calcium phosphates materials and drug delivery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barroug A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive properties of synthetic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral were examined with respect to cisplatin and risedronate, two biological active drugs; the uptake and release experiments were carried out under various conditions in order to understand the basic mechanism of interaction. The effect of temperature and solution composition were highlighted and discussed. The adsorption results obtained for the therapeutic agents demonstrated that, depending on the conditions investigated (nature of the sorbent, concentration range, ionic composition, temperature…, the shape of the isotherms is of Freundlich or Langmuir type. The adsorption is described as an ion-exchange process in dilute solutions, while the interaction appears to be reactive for concentrated solutions (dissolution of mineral ions from the apatite substrate and formation of soluble calcium complex and/or precipitation of calcium salts involving sorbate molecules. The information gained on the surface reactivity of calcium phosphate were exploited to associate an antibiotic to calcium phosphate cements for drug delivery applications. The specimens were obtained by combination of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate powders upon mixing with water. The physicochemical properties of the paste were altered by the drug loading method (in the liquid or solid phase. Thus, a dose-dependent effect was noticed for the paste setting time, hardening and the release process.

  4. Uranium leaching from phosphatic sandstone and shale of Qatrani using citrate as a new leaching reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium is found in Qatrani area (Southwest of Cairo and North of lake Qarun) in various forms in sedimentary rocks. Two important ore materials have been chosen for studying the recovery of their uranium contents namely; the phosphatic sandstone and the carbonaceous shale. The main emphasis in this thesis is the choice of an acid that would selectively leach uranium from thesis ores while leaving calcium phosphate and carbonate minerals minerals almost completely intact. Citric acid was indeed found advantageous due primarily to its strong ability to form stable complexes with uranium over a wide range of PH values beside the possibility of controlling thr solubility of calcium-bearing compounds by adding calcium citrate. The latter is actually characterized by its ability to exist in an unionized or associated from in citric acid solutions. From the general leaching characteristics of both uranium and P 2 O 5 from Qatrani phosphatic sandstone by citric acid, it was found that uranium could be completely leached beside the possibility of realizing a differential leaching percent values vs P 2 O 5 which is generally of limited solubility. Such a low solubility of P 2 O 5 has even been completely inhibited by providing calcium citrate to the citric acid solutions in amounts sufficient to exist in an optimum ionized non-associated state. Such a provision would render the solution unable to carry any further calcium ions thus the breakdown of the phosphate mineral was hindered while uranium has completely been selectively

  5. Role of Phosphate Transport System Component PstB1 in Phosphate Internalization by Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudek, L; Premachandra, D; Webster, W A J; Bräu, L

    2016-11-01

    synthesis of active uptake systems. The Pst phosphate transport system is one such system, responsible for the internalization of phosphate when cells are in phosphate-limited environments. Our investigations reveal the presence of multiple Pst phosphate uptake systems that exist across three distinct operons in Nostoc punctiforme and functionally characterize the role of the gene product PstB1 as being crucial for the maintenance of phosphate accumulation. We demonstrate that the genes pstB2, pstB3, and pstB4 show alterations in expression to compensate for the deletion of pstB1 The overall outcomes of this work provide insights as to the complex transport mechanisms that exist in cyanobacteria like N. punctiforme, allowing them to thrive in low-phosphate environments. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and biological calcium phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, G R; Zunic, W B; Durig, J R; Wuthier, R E

    1994-05-01

    Fourier-transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the organic and mineral components of biological and synthetic calcium phosphate minerals. Raman spectroscopy provides information on biological minerals that is complimentary to more widely used infrared methodologies as some infrared-inactive vibrational modes are Raman-active. The application of FT-Raman technology has, for the first time, enabled the problems of high sample fluorescence and low signal-to-noise that are inherent in calcified tissues to be overcome. Raman spectra of calcium phosphates are dominated by a very strong band near 960 cm-1 that arises from the symmetric stretching mode (v1) of the phosphate group. Other Raman-active phosphate vibrational bands are seen at approximately 1075 (v3), 590 (v4), and 435 cm-1 (v2). Minerals containing acidic phosphate groups show additional vibrational modes. The different calcium phosphate mineral phases can be distinguished from one another by the relative positions and shapes of these bands in the Raman spectra. FT-Raman spectra of nascent, nonmineralized matrix vesicles (MV) show a distinct absence of the phosphate v1 band even though these structures are rich in calcium and phosphate. Similar results were seen with milk casein and synthetic Ca-phosphatidyl-serine-PO4 complexes. Hence, the phosphate and/or acidic phosphate ions in these noncrystalline biological calcium phosphates is in a molecular environment that differs from that in synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. In MV, the first distinct mineral phase to form contained acidic phosphate bands similar to those seen in octacalcium phosphate. The mineral phase present in fully mineralized MV was much more apatitic, resembling that found in bones and teeth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Evaluation of intestinal phosphate binding to improve the safety profile of oral sodium phosphate bowel cleansing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Robijn

    Full Text Available Prior to colonoscopy, bowel cleansing is performed for which frequently oral sodium phosphate (OSP is used. OSP results in significant hyperphosphatemia and cases of acute kidney injury (AKI referred to as acute phosphate nephropathy (APN; characterized by nephrocalcinosis are reported after OSP use, which led to a US-FDA warning. To improve the safety profile of OSP, it was evaluated whether the side-effects of OSP could be prevented with intestinal phosphate binders. Hereto a Wistar rat model of APN was developed. OSP administration (2 times 1.2 g phosphate by gavage with a 12h time interval induced bowel cleansing (severe diarrhea and significant hyperphosphatemia (21.79 ± 5.07 mg/dl 6h after the second OSP dose versus 8.44 ± 0.97 mg/dl at baseline. Concomitantly, serum PTH levels increased fivefold and FGF-23 levels showed a threefold increase, while serum calcium levels significantly decreased from 11.29 ± 0.53 mg/dl at baseline to 8.68 ± 0.79 mg/dl after OSP. OSP administration induced weaker NaPi-2a staining along the apical proximal tubular membrane. APN was induced: serum creatinine increased (1.5 times baseline and nephrocalcinosis developed (increased renal calcium and phosphate content and calcium phosphate deposits on Von Kossa stained kidney sections. Intestinal phosphate binding (lanthanum carbonate or aluminum hydroxide was not able to attenuate the OSP induced side-effects. In conclusion, a clinically relevant rat model of APN was developed. Animals showed increased serum phosphate levels similar to those reported in humans and developed APN. No evidence was found for an improved safety profile of OSP by using intestinal phosphate binders.

  8. Phosphate application to firing range soils for Pb immobilization: The unclear role of phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysochoou, Maria; Dermatas, Dimitris; Grubb, Dennis G.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphate treatment has emerged as a widely accepted approach to immobilize Pb in contaminated soils and waste media, relying on the formation of the highly insoluble mineral pyromorphite as solubility-controlling phase for Pb. As such, phosphate treatment has been proposed as a Best Management Practice (BMP) for firing ranges where Pb occurs in its metallic forms and several other phases (carbonates, oxides). While pyromorphite thermodynamically has the potential to control Pb solubility at low levels, its formation is kinetically controlled by pH, the solubility of the phosphate source, and the solubility of Pb species. Treatability studies have shown that excess quantities of soluble and acidic phosphate sources, such as phosphoric acid, are necessary for successful in situ treatment. Even under these conditions, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), the only reliable method to identify and quantify Pb speciation, showed that Pb conversion to pyromorphite in in situ treated soils was less than 45% after 32 months. Furthermore, the use of lime (CaO) to restore soil pH in acidified soil treatments inhibited further conversion. Additionally, phosphate treatment is known to reduce bioavailability through pyromorphite formation in the intestinal tract, and the phytoaccumulation of Pb; both desirable effects for Pb-impacted areas. Given the costs of phosphate treatment, the use of biogenic phosphate sources, such as bone meal, may be a more environmentally sustainable approach toward this end. In the many studies focusing on phosphate treatment, the attendant P leaching and eutrophication have been largely overlooked, along with other issues such as the enhanced leaching of oxyanionic contaminants, such as Se, As and W. The success and sustainability of applying phosphate as a BMP in firing range soils therefore remain questionable

  9. Catalysis with Gold Complexes Immobilised on Carbon Nanotubes by π-π Stacking Interactions: Heterogeneous Catalysis versus the Boomerang Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriamont, Charles; Devillers, Michel; Riant, Olivier; Hermans, Sophie

    2013-09-02

    A new pyrene-tagged gold(I) complex has been synthesised and tested as a homogeneous catalyst. First, a simple 1,6-enyne was chosen as a model substrate for cyclisation by using different solvents to optimise the reaction conditions. The non-covalent immobilisation of our pyrene-tagged gold complex onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes through π-π stacking interactions was then explored to obtain a supported homogeneous catalyst. The heterogenised catalyst and its homogeneous counterpart exhibited similar activity in a range of enyne cyclisation reactions. Bearing in mind that π-π interactions are affected by temperature and solvent polarity, the reuse and robustness of the supported homogeneous catalyst was tested to explore the scope and limitations of the recyclability of this catalyst. Under the optimised conditions, recyclability was observed by using the concept of the boomerang effect. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Porous structured niobium pentoxide/carbon complex for lithium-ion intercalation pseudocapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Guoming; Li, Heshun; Gao, Lixin; Zhang, Daquan; Lin, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple one-pot in situ hydrothermal method to prepare T-Nb_2O_5/C. • The composite has well-dispersed C among nano-scale Nb_2O_5. • The composite has excellent large-current discharge property. • The composite has no obvious drop after 1000 cycles at 5 A g"−"1. - Abstract: A facile soft-templated synthesis of the niobium pentoxide/carbon (Nb_2O_5/C) from the polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde under the hydrothermal condition is introduced. This material has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) techniques. The carbon is well-dispersed in the nanostructure along with Nb_2O_5 and the material is porous. The intimate contact between Nb_2O_5 and carbon improves its conductivity. The electrochemical studies revealed that the porous Nb_2O_5/C displayed good pseudocapacitive response. The specific capacitance of the Nb_2O_5/C was 387 F g"−"1 at 0.1 A g"−"1 and 210 F g"−"1 at 5 A g"−"1. The Nb_2O_5/C exhibits superior cycling performance, which can remain about 96% of its initial capacitance after 1000 cycles at 5 A g"−"1.

  11. Comparison of calcium carbonate and aluminium hydroxide as phosphate binders on biochemical bone markers, PTH(1-84), and bone mineral content in dialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, B; Jensen, J D; Nielsen, H K

    1991-01-01

    Bone mineral content, estimated by single-photon absorptiometry of the forearm, serum values of intact parathyroid hormone (PTH(1-84], osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3), and aluminium were determined during treatment with calcium carbonate (CaCO3......) or aluminium hydroxide (Al(OH)3) in 11 dialysis patients participating in a randomised cross-over study. Each treatment period lasted 6 months. Serum phosphorus was maintained in the range 1.5-2.0 mmol/l. During Al(OH)3 treatment bone mineral content (BMC) decreased by 11% per half-year (mean), but only by 3...... 0.05), osteocalcin decreased (89% versus 117%, P less than 0.01), alkaline phosphatase decreased (92% versus 116%, P less than 0.05), and aluminium decreased (56% versus 189%, P less than 0.05). 1,25(OH)2D3 remained unchanged in both periods. No increase in soft-tissue calcification was demonstrated...

  12. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Impregnated with Potassium Phosphate in a Hydrogen Atmosphere for the Production of Phenol and Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Wang, Xin; Guo, Hao-qiang; Cui, Min-shu; Yang, Yong-ping

    2018-01-01

    A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC) from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K3PO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K3PO4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K3PO4 at 550°C in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1,605 m2/g. PMID:29515994

  13. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with potassium phosphate in a hydrogen atmosphere for the production of phenol and activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Wang, Xin; Guo, Hao-qiang; Cui, Min-shu; Yang, Yong-ping

    2018-02-01

    A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC) from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K3PO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K3PO4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K3PO4 at 550 oC in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1605 m2/g.

  14. Carbon-Based Oxamate Cobalt(III) Complexes as Bioenzyme Mimics for Contaminant Elimination in High Backgrounds of Complicated Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zheng, Yun; Jiang, Xuemei; Zhang, Ran; Pei, Kemei; Chen, Wenxing

    2017-10-12

    Complex wastewater with massive components is now a serious environmental issue facing humanity. Selective removal of low-concentration contaminants in mixed constituents holds great promise for increasing water supplies. Bioenzymes like horseradish peroxidase exhibit oxidizing power and selectivity. Here, we manufactured its mimic through immobilizing non-heme oxamate anionic cobalt(III) complex ([Co III (opba)] - , opba = o-phenylenebis(oxamate)) onto pyridine (Py) modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes ([Co III (opba)] - -Py-MWCNTs, MWCNTs = multiwalled carbon nanotubes), where MWCNTs captured substrates and Py functioned as the fifth ligand. We chose typical azo dye (C.I. Acid Red 1) and antibiotic (ciprofloxacin) as model substrates. Without •OH, this catalyst could detoxify target micropollutants efficiently at pH from 8 to 11. It also remained efficient in repetitive tests, and the final products were non-poisonous OH-containing acids. Combined with radical scavenger tests and electron paramagnetic resonance result, we speculated that high-valent cobalt-oxo active species and oxygen atom transfer reaction dominated in the reaction pathway. According to density functional theory calculations, the electron spin density distribution order showed that electron-withdrawing ligand was beneficial for inward pulling the excess electron and lowering the corresponding energy levels, achieving an electrophilic-attack enhancement of the catalyst. With target removal property and recyclability, this catalyst is prospective in water detoxication.

  15. Bacterial formation of phosphatic laminites off Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arning, E T; Birgel, D; Brunner, B; Peckmann, J

    2009-06-01

    Authigenic phosphatic laminites enclosed in phosphorite crusts from the shelf off Peru (10 degrees 01' S and 10 degrees 24' S) consist of carbonate fluorapatite layers, which contain abundant sulfide minerals including pyrite (FeS(2)) and sphalerite (ZnS). Low delta(34)S(pyrite) values (average -28.8 per thousand) agree with bacterial sulfate reduction and subsequent pyrite formation. Stable sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfate bound in carbonate fluorapatite are lower than that of sulfate from ambient sea water, suggesting bacterial reoxidation of sulfide by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. The release of phosphorus and subsequent formation of the autochthonous phosphatic laminites are apparently caused by the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria and associated sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Following an extraction-phosphorite dissolution-extraction procedure, molecular fossils of sulfate-reducing bacteria (mono-O-alkyl glycerol ethers, di-O-alkyl glycerol ethers, as well as the short-chain branched fatty acids i/ai-C(15:0), i/ai-C(17:0) and 10MeC(16:0)) are found to be among the most abundant compounds. The fact that these molecular fossils of sulfate-reducing bacteria are distinctly more abundant after dissolution of the phosphatic laminite reveals that the lipids are tightly bound to the mineral lattice of carbonate fluorapatite. Moreover, compared with the autochthonous laminite, molecular fossils of sulfate-reducing bacteria are: (1) significantly less abundant and (2) not as tightly bound to the mineral lattice in the other, allochthonous facies of the Peruvian crusts consisting of phosphatic coated grains. These observations confirm the importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the formation of the phosphatic laminite. Model calculations highlight that organic matter degradation by sulfate-reducing bacteria has the potential to liberate sufficient phosphorus for phosphogenesis.

  16. Cobalt(III) complexes of [3(5)]adamanzane, 1,5,9,13-tetraazabicyclo[7.7.3]nonadecane. Report of an inert, chelate hydrogen carbonate ion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broge, Louise; Søtofte, Inger; Olsen, Carl Erik

    2001-01-01

    .H2O (3a). The coordination geometry around the cobalt(III) ion is a distorted octahedron with the inorganic ligands at cis-positions. Complex 2 is the second example of a cobalt(III) complex for which the X-ray structure,sfiows a chelate binding mode of the hydrogen carbonate entity. The pK(a) value...

  17. Uranium extraction from Uro area phosphate ore, Nuba mountains, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, A. A.; Eltayeb, M. A. H.

    2003-01-01

    This study was carried out mainly to extract uranium from Uro area phosphate ore in the eastern part of Nuba mountains near Abu Gibiha town in southern Kurdufan state. For this purpose first, the phosphate ore samples were decomposed with sulphuric acid. the resulting phosphoric acid was filtered off, and pretreated with pyrite and activated charcoal. the chemical analysis of the obtained grain phosphoric acid showed that about 98% of uranium content of the phosphate ore was rendered soluble in the phosphoric acid. The clear green phosphoric acid was introduced to uranium extraction by 25% tributylphosphate (Tbp) in kerosene. The effect of several factors on the extraction and stripping processes namely, interference's effect, the suitable strip solution, the required number of extraction and stripping stages, the optimum phase ratio have been studied in details. A three stage extraction at a phase ratio (aqueous/organic) of 1:2, followed by two stages stripping using 0.5 M sodium carbonate solution at a phase ratio (A/O) of 1:4 were found to be the optimum conditions to report more than 98% of uranium content in green phosphoric acid to the aqueous phase as uranyl tricarbonate complex (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4- . By applying sodica decomposition upon the stripping carbonate solution using 50% sodium hydroxide, about 98% of uranium content was precipitated as sodium diuranate concentrate (Na 2 U 2 O 7 ). The chemical analysis using atomic absorption spectrometry (Aas) showed a good agreement between the specification of the obtained uranium concentrate with the standard commercial specification of sodium diuranate concentrate. Further purification was achieved for the yellow cake by selective precipitation of uranium from the solution as uranium peroxide (UO 4 .2H 2 O) using 30% hydrogen peroxide. Finally the uranium peroxide precipitated was calcined at 450 degree C to obtain the orange powder uranium trioxide (UO 3 ). The chemical analysis of the final uranium trioxide

  18. Thermodynamical, kinetic and structural properties of simple and mixed complexes of zirconium (IV) with the hydroxyl and carbonate ions. Study by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veyland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of zirconium production is used by the nuclear industry for the cladding of nuclear fuels and for the storage of radioactive wastes. The aim of this work is the qualitative and quantitative study of the complexes made by zirconium with the hydroxyl and carbonate ions in order to evaluate the long-term pollution risks linked with the corrosion of confinement containers. The zirconium(IV)/hydroxyl system is studied by proto-metry and follows a protocol which reduces the local over-concentrations of reagent and the precipitation of zirconium hydroxide. In potassium nitrate environment and in a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5, three soluble species are evidenced: Zr(OH) 3 + , Zr 2 (OH) 7 + and Zr(OH) 4 . Their apparent constant of formation and the solubility product of zirconium hydroxide are determined with 4 ionic forces. Using these results, the corresponding thermodynamic constants are calculated by applying the theory of specific interactions. The formation of zirconium (IV) hydroxo-carbonate complexes is evidenced by proto-metry and 17 O and 13 C NMR. The number of carbonates fixed by zirconium varies from 0 to 4. The dialysis indicates that the degree of poly-condensation of species is an inverse function of the number of complex carbonates. The Raman polarized spectra and the 13 C NMR results demonstrate for all complexes the bidentate character of the complexation mode of the carbonates. The dynamical study made by 13 C NMR of the exchange between complexed carbonates of the tetra-carbonate-zirconate ion and free carbonates in solution allows to determine the kinetic constants and the corresponding velocity law. An associative mechanism is proposed, in agreement with the results obtained by mass spectroscopy with electro-spray ionization. These new thermodynamical and kinetic data allow to model the speciation of zirconium in natural waters. (J.S.)

  19. Bio-treatment of phosphate from synthetic wastewater using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    effect of carbon sources (glucose, starch, sucrose and lactose) at 0.5% on the ... to be maximum of 68 % in synthetic phosphate wastewater with glucose carbon ... possible entry of this ion into aquatic environment is ... Therefore it is essential to control the emission of ... Mumbai, India) was prepared and selected bacterial.

  20. Adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on activated carbon by complexation with surface functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella; Alberti, Giancarla; Conti, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    The adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on an activated carbon (Filtrasorb 300, Chemviron) was characterized assuming that it takes place by formation of complexes with functional groups, present in the activated carbon. Their concentration and conditional adsorption coefficients were determined for each metal by titration of the carbon in suspension in aqueous phase, at constant acidity, with the metal itself. For each titration point, the concentration of the metal in the solution phase after equilibration was determined, and the data were processed by the Ruzic linearization method, to obtain the concentration of the active sites involved in the sorption, and the conditional constant. The effect of the pH was also examined, in the range 4-6, obtaining that the adsorption increases at increasing pH. The protonation and adsorption constants were determined from the conditional adsorption coefficients obtained at the different acidities. The concentration of the active sites is 0.023 and 0.042 mmol g -1 , and the protonation constants are 1.0x10 6 and 4.6x10 4 M -1 for Pb(II) and Cu(II). The corresponding adsorption constants are respectively 1.4x10 5 and 6.3x10 3 M -1 . All the parameters are affected by a large uncertainty, probably due to the heterogeneity of the active groups in the activated carbon. Even if so, these parameters make it possible a good prediction of the adsorption in a wide range of conditions. Other sorption mechanism can be set up at different conditions, in particular at different pH, as it has been demonstrated in the case of copper(II)

  1. Adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on activated carbon by complexation with surface functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella; Alberti, Giancarla; Conti, Fabio

    2003-03-17

    The adsorption of lead(II) and copper(II) on an activated carbon (Filtrasorb 300, Chemviron) was characterized assuming that it takes place by formation of complexes with functional groups, present in the activated carbon. Their concentration and conditional adsorption coefficients were determined for each metal by titration of the carbon in suspension in aqueous phase, at constant acidity, with the metal itself. For each titration point, the concentration of the metal in the solution phase after equilibration was determined, and the data were processed by the Ruzic linearization method, to obtain the concentration of the active sites involved in the sorption, and the conditional constant. The effect of the pH was also examined, in the range 4-6, obtaining that the adsorption increases at increasing pH. The protonation and adsorption constants were determined from the conditional adsorption coefficients obtained at the different acidities. The concentration of the active sites is 0.023 and 0.042 mmol g{sup -1}, and the protonation constants are 1.0x10{sup 6} and 4.6x10{sup 4} M{sup -1} for Pb(II) and Cu(II). The corresponding adsorption constants are respectively 1.4x10{sup 5} and 6.3x10{sup 3} M{sup -1}. All the parameters are affected by a large uncertainty, probably due to the heterogeneity of the active groups in the activated carbon. Even if so, these parameters make it possible a good prediction of the adsorption in a wide range of conditions. Other sorption mechanism can be set up at different conditions, in particular at different pH, as it has been demonstrated in the case of copper(II)

  2. Carbon dioxide is tightly bound in the [Co(Pyridine)(CO2)](-) anionic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jacob D; Buytendyk, Allyson M; Zhang, Xinxing; Kim, Seong K; Bowen, Kit H

    2015-11-14

    The [Co(Pyridine)(CO2)](-) anionic complex was studied through the combination of photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. This complex was envisioned as a primitive model system for studying CO2 binding to negatively charged sites in metal organic frameworks. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) measured via the photoelectron spectrum is 2.7 eV. Our calculations imply a structure for [Co(Pyridine)(CO2)](-) in which a central cobalt atom is bound to pyridine and CO2 moieties on either sides. This structure was validated by acceptable agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values. Based on our calculations, we found CO2 to be bound within the anionic complex by 1.4 eV.

  3. Carbon dioxide is tightly bound in the [Co(Pyridine)(CO2)]- anionic complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jacob D.; Buytendyk, Allyson M.; Zhang, Xinxing; Kim, Seong K.; Bowen, Kit H.

    2015-11-01

    The [Co(Pyridine)(CO2)]- anionic complex was studied through the combination of photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. This complex was envisioned as a primitive model system for studying CO2 binding to negatively charged sites in metal organic frameworks. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) measured via the photoelectron spectrum is 2.7 eV. Our calculations imply a structure for [Co(Pyridine)(CO2)]- in which a central cobalt atom is bound to pyridine and CO2 moieties on either sides. This structure was validated by acceptable agreement between the calculated and measured VDE values. Based on our calculations, we found CO2 to be bound within the anionic complex by 1.4 eV.

  4. Porous structured niobium pentoxide/carbon complex for lithium-ion intercalation pseudocapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Guoming; Li, Heshun; Gao, Lixin [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhang, Daquan, E-mail: zhangdaquan@shiep.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Lin, Tong [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A simple one-pot in situ hydrothermal method to prepare T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/C. • The composite has well-dispersed C among nano-scale Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • The composite has excellent large-current discharge property. • The composite has no obvious drop after 1000 cycles at 5 A g{sup −1}. - Abstract: A facile soft-templated synthesis of the niobium pentoxide/carbon (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/C) from the polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde under the hydrothermal condition is introduced. This material has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) techniques. The carbon is well-dispersed in the nanostructure along with Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and the material is porous. The intimate contact between Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and carbon improves its conductivity. The electrochemical studies revealed that the porous Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/C displayed good pseudocapacitive response. The specific capacitance of the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/C was 387 F g{sup −1} at 0.1 A g{sup −1} and 210 F g{sup −1} at 5 A g{sup −1}. The Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/C exhibits superior cycling performance, which can remain about 96% of its initial capacitance after 1000 cycles at 5 A g{sup −1}.

  5. Conduction properties of thin films from a water soluble carbon nanotube/hemicellulose complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dongkai; Yotprayoonsak, Peerapong; Saunajoki, Ville; Ahlskog, Markus; Virtanen, Jorma; Kangas, Veijo; Volodin, Alexander; Van Haesendonck, Chris; Burdanova, Maria; Mosley, Connor D. W.; Lloyd-Hughes, James

    2018-04-01

    We have examined the conductive properties of carbon nanotube based thin films, which were prepared via dispersion in water by non-covalent functionalization of the nanotubes with xylan, a type of hemicellulose. Measurements of low temperature conductivity, Kelvin probe force microscopy, and high frequency (THz) conductivity elucidated the intra-tube and inter-tube charge transport processes in this material. The measurements show excellent conductive properties of the as prepared thin films, with bulk conductivity up to 2000 S cm-1. The transport results demonstrate that the hemicellulose does not seriously interfere with the inter-tube conductance.

  6. The impact of economic complexity on carbon emissions: evidence from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Muhlis; Gozgor, Giray

    2017-07-01

    This paper reanalyzes the determinants of the CO 2 emissions in France. For this purpose, it considers the unit root test with two structural breaks and a dynamic ordinary least squares estimation. The paper also considers the effects of the energy consumption and the economic complexity on CO 2 emissions. First, it is observed that the EKC hypothesis is valid in France. Second, the positive effect of the energy consumption on CO 2 emissions is obtained. Third, it is observed that a higher economic complexity suppresses the level of CO 2 emissions in the long run. The findings imply noteworthy environmental policy implications to decrease the level of CO 2 emissions in France.

  7. Designing tough and fracture resistant polypropylene/multi wall carbon nanotubes nanocomposites by controlling stereo-complexity and dispersion morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Dibyendu; Satapathy, Bhabani K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New pathway to improve dispersion and toughness by tacticity modification. • >330% toughness enhancement in PP/MWCNT nanocomposites with stereo-complex PP. • Prominent dispersion and distribution morphology due to matrix stereocomplexity. • Tacticity induced “Semi-ductile-to-tough-to-quasi-brittle” transitions in the PP/MWCNT. • Two-fold reduced steady state CTOD rate in i-PP+s-PP/ MWCNT nanocomposites. - Abstract: A remarkable toughness enhancement (>330%) of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) filled stereo-complex polypropylene (PP) matrix i.e. blend of isotactic-PP and syndiotactic-PP (70:30) with differences in stereo-regularity has been observed. The enhancement has been correlated to quantifiable morphological parameters such as free-space lengths concerning dispersion and relatively greater reduction in crystallite size/lamellar thickness. Systematic analysis of glass transition data and estimation of multi wall carbon nanotubes induced reduction in interfacial polymer chain immobilization reiterates susceptibility of polymer segments to ready-mobility. The extent of toughening has quantitatively been analyzed by fracture-energy partitioning, essential work of fracture (EWF), approach enabling the detection of a “semi-ductile-to-tough-to-quasi-brittle” transition in the MWCNT filled stereo-complex polypropylene. Real-time fracture kinetics analysis revealed toughening mechanism to be primarily blunting-assisted; an aspect also corroborated by extensive plastic flow without much energy dissipation in the inner fracture process zone. Thus the study establishes a new pathway of tacticity-defined matrix modification to toughen nanocomposites

  8. Peculiarities of extraction of carbonate complexes of trivalent transplutonium elements by alkylpyrocatechins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karalova, Z.K.; Bukina, T.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Fedorov, L.A.; Sokolovskij, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Extraction of trivalent americium, curium, californium and europium by technical mixture of mono- and didecylpyrocatechin (TAP) in various diluents from carbonate solutions is investigated. Effect of many factors (pH, K 2 CO 3 concentration, TAP, metal; the time of phase contact) on the completeness of element isolation and separation is clarified. It is ascertained that the elements listed are quantitatively extracted by TAP solution in toluene and cyclohexane in the range of K 2 CO 3 concentrations from 0.25 to 1.5 mol/l. The difference in americium and curium distribution coefficient during their extraction by TAP from 0.25 mol/l of K 2 CO 3 solution is detected. Separation coefficients of the pair increase with the increase of carbonate solution pH. The separation can be improved at the stage of element reextraction by the mixture of K 2 CO 3 and DTPA or EDTA from alkylpyrocatechin, sunce rate constants of americium and curium reextraction differ greatly. Using 13 C NMR the composition of compounds in organic phase on the basis of 4-(α, α-dioctylethyl)pyrocatechin is investigated

  9. Complex forest dynamics indicate potential for slowing carbon accumulation in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulston, John W; Wear, David N; Vose, James M

    2015-01-23

    Over the past century forest regrowth in Europe and North America expanded forest carbon (C) sinks and offset C emissions but future C accumulation is uncertain. Policy makers need insights into forest C dynamics as they anticipate emissions futures and goals. We used land use and forest inventory data to estimate how forest C dynamics have changed in the southeastern United States and attribute changes to land use, management, and disturbance causes. From 2007-2012, forests yielded a net sink of C because of net land use change (+6.48 Tg C yr(-1)) and net biomass accumulation (+75.4 Tg C yr(-1)). Forests disturbed by weather, insect/disease, and fire show dampened yet positive forest C changes (+1.56, +1.4, +5.48 Tg C yr(-1), respectively). Forest cutting caused net decreases in C (-76.7 Tg C yr(-1)) but was offset by forest growth (+143.77 Tg C yr(-1)). Forest growth rates depend on age or stage of development and projected C stock changes indicate a gradual slowing of carbon accumulation with anticipated forest aging (a reduction of 9.5% over the next five years). Additionally, small shifts in land use transitions consistent with economic futures resulted in a 40.6% decrease in C accumulation.

  10. Erosion and sedimentation effects on soil : organic carbon redistribution in a complex landscape of western Ecuador

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corre, M.D.; Schoorl, J.M.; Koning, de F.; López-Ulloa, M.; Veldkamp, E.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate how land-use changes affect the distribution of SOC within a complex tropical landscape through the processes of erosion and sedimentation. The objectives were: (i) to estimate the present SOC storage at a landscape scale using predictors such as slope,

  11. Simultaneous quantification of dissolved organic carbon fractions and copper complexation using solid-phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElmurry, Shawn P.; Long, David T.; Voice, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Trace metal cycling in natural waters is highly influenced by the amount and type of dissolved organic C (DOC). Although determining individual species of DOC is unrealistic, there has been success in classifying DOC by determining operationally defined fractions. However, current fractionation schemes do not allow for the simultaneous quantification of associated trace metals. Using operational classifications, a scheme was developed to fractionate DOC based on a set of seven solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. The cartridges isolated fractions based on a range of specific mechanisms thought to be responsible for DOC aggregation in solution, as well as molecular weight. The method was evaluated to determine if it can identify differences in DOC characteristics, including differences in Cu-DOC complexation. Results are that: (1) cartridge blanks were low for both DOC and Cu, (2) differences are observed in the distribution of DOC amongst the fractions from various sources that are consistent with what is known about the DOC materials and the mechanisms operative for each cartridge, (3) when present as a free cation, Cu was not retained by non-cationic cartridges allowing the method to be used to assess Cu binding, (4) the capability of the method to provide quantitative assessment of Cu-DOC complexation was demonstrated for a variety of DOC standards, (5) Cu was found to preferentially bind with high molecular weight fractions of DOC, and (6) estimated partitioning coefficients and conditional binding constants for Cu were similar to those reported elsewhere. The method developed describes DOC characteristics based on specific bonding mechanisms (hydrogen, donor-acceptor, London dispersion, and ionic bonding) while simultaneously quantifying Cu-DOC complexation. The method provides researchers a means of describing not only the extent of DOC complexation but also how that complex will be behave in natural waters.

  12. Age-related patterns of forest complexity and carbon storage in pine and aspen-birch ecosystems of northern Minnesota, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.B.; Kastendick, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    Forest managers are now developing strategies to mitigate increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and help stands to adapt to new climatic conditions. This study characterized the influence of stand age on carbon storage and sequestration in chronosequences of even-aged red pine and aspen-birch stands in northern Minnesota. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of age-related management strategies on carbon storage and forest complexity. The pine chronosequences ranged from 7 to 160 years. Aspen chronosequences ranged from 6 to 133 years. Field measurements of the trees were compiled into 5 carbon pools. Carbon storage variables were averaged within each stand in order to conduct a regression analysis. The study showed that forest complexity was positively related to stand age in all of the measured response variables except species richness. Relationships between compositional complexity and stand age depended on forest type. Total carbon storage also increased with age. Results of the study showed that age plays an important role in overall ecosystem carbon storage. The study can be used to provide insights into the overall costs and benefits of forest management strategies that favour younger or older forests. 45 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Biodegradation of tributyl phosphate by granular biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Hiren M.; Nancharaiah, Y.V.; Venugopalan, V.P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is used as plasticizer for cellulose esters, lacquers, plastic and vinyl resins and as a solvent extractant of rare earth metals. In nuclear power industry, it is used as a solvent for the extraction of uranium and plutonium salts during fuel reprocessing. TBP does not occur naturally in the environment. It is sparingly soluble in water and once released into soil or aquatic systems, is only moderately biodegradable. There are many proposed mechanisms for TBP biodegradation, which involve stepwise enzymatic hydrolysis to orthophosphate and n-butanol and mono-oxygenase based transformation and then degradation. Microbial processes involving multispecies consortia offer better choice over monoculture processes for degradation of complex wastes. Processes based on immobilized microbial consortia are characterized by significantly reduced settling time, high stability in presence of varying organic load, effective mineralization and amenability to bioaugmentation, which make them a good choice for bioremediation and waste water treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of aerobic microbial granules (also known as granular biofilms) for efficient biodegradation of TBP. For this purpose, we set up 4 litre cylindrical sequencing batch reactors (SBR) in triplicates and inoculated them with sludge (mean sludge size ∼ 60 mm) obtained from an operating wastewater treatment plant. The SBRs were operated on a 6h cycle with 66% volumetric exchange ratio. The reactors were fed with synthetic waste water along with 90 mM acetate and 0.5 mM TBP. The concentration of TBP was slowly raised to 2mM. After 3 months of operation, microbial granules (mean size: 2.05 mm) capable of TBP degradation were observed in the reactors. Gas chromatographic analysis of samples showed that after 6h of operational cycle 2 mM initial concentration of TBP was reduced to 0.2 mM, after which there was no further degradation. Cessation

  14. A Phosphate Starvation-Inducible Ribonuclease of Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Trung; Nguyen, Minh Hung; Nguyen, Huy Thuan; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Le, Thi Hoi; Schweder, Thomas; Jürgen, Britta

    2016-08-28

    The BLi03719 protein of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 belongs to the most abundant extracellular proteins under phosphate starvation conditions. In this study, the function of this phosphate starvation inducible protein was determined. An amino-acid sequence analysis of the BLi03719-encoding gene showed a high similarity with genes encoding the barnase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and binase-like RNase of Bacillus pumilus SARF-032. The comparison of the control strain and a BLi03719-deficient strain revealed a strongly reduced extracellular ribonuclease activity of the mutant. Furthermore, this knockout mutant exhibited delayed growth with yeast RNA as an alternative phosphate and carbon source. These results suggest that BLi03719 is an extracellular ribonuclease expressed in B. licheniformis under phosphate starvation conditions. Finally, a BLi03719 mutant showed an advantageous effect on the overexpression of the heterologous amyE gene under phosphate-limited growth conditions.

  15. Enhancing Carbon Fixation by Metabolic Engineering: A Model System of Complex Network Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Gregory Stephanopoulos

    2008-04-10

    In the first two years of this research we focused on the development of a DNA microarray for transcriptional studies in the photosynthetic organism Synechocystis and the elucidation of the metabolic pathway for biopolymer synthesis in this organism. In addition we also advanced the molecular biological tools for metabolic engineering of biopolymer synthesis in Synechocystis and initiated a series of physiological studies for the elucidation of the carbon fixing pathways and basic central carbon metabolism of these organisms. During the last two-year period we focused our attention on the continuation and completion of the last task, namely, the development of tools for basic investigations of the physiology of these cells through, primarily, the determination of their metabolic fluxes. The reason for this decision lies in the importance of fluxes as key indicators of physiology and the high level of information content they carry in terms of identifying rate limiting steps in a metabolic pathway. While flux determination is a well-advanced subject for heterotrophic organisms, for the case of autotrophic bacteria, like Synechocystis, some special challenges had to be overcome. These challenges stem mostly from the fact that if one uses {sup 13}C labeled CO{sub 2} for flux determination, the {sup 13}C label will mark, at steady state, all carbon atoms of all cellular metabolites, thus eliminating the necessary differentiation required for flux determination. This peculiarity of autotrophic organisms makes it imperative to carry out flux determination under transient conditions, something that had not been accomplished before. We are pleased to report that we have solved this problem and we are now able to determine fluxes in photosynthetic organisms from stable isotope labeling experiments followed by measurements of label enrichment in cellular metabolites using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. We have conducted extensive simulations to test the method and

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis from sodium dihydroxycetyl phosphate, a new cosmetic allergen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, H; Rastogi, S C; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2001-01-01

    Sodium dihydroxycetyl phosphate (trade name Dragophos S 2/918501) was identified as a contact allergen in a herbal moisturizing cream causing severe acute contact dermatitis on the hands and face of a 41-year-old woman. Sodium dihydroxycetyl phosphate is a complex mixture of phosphate esters of d...

  17. PEGylated anticancer-carbon nanotubes complex targeting mitochondria of lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Lee, Jong Yeon; Hong, Jeong Hee; Khang, Dongwoo

    2017-11-01

    Although activating apoptosis in cancer cells by targeting the mitochondria is an effective strategy for cancer therapy, insufficient targeting of the mitochondria in cancer cells restricts the availability in clinical treatment. Here, we report on a polyethylene glycol-coated carbon nanotube (CNT)-ABT737 nanodrug that improves the mitochondrial targeting of lung cancer cells. The polyethylene glycol-coated CNT-ABT737 nanodrug internalized into the early endosomes via macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis in advance of early endosomal escape and delivered into the mitochondria. Cytosol release of the nanodrug led to apoptosis of lung cancer cells by abruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inducing Bcl-2-mediated apoptosis and generating intracellular reactive oxygen species. As such, this study provides an effective strategy for increasing the anti-lung cancer efficacy by increasing mitochondria accumulation rate of cytosol released anticancer nanodrugs.

  18. Iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex on polyallylamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes: immobilization, direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hailing; Cui, Yanyun; Li, Pan; Zhou, Yiming; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Tang, Yawen; Chen, Yu; Lu, Tianhong

    2013-05-07

    A nonenzymatic iron(III) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Fe(III)-DETPA) complex based amperometric sensor for the analytical determination of hydrogen peroxide was developed. By combining the electrostatic interaction between the Fe(III)-DETPA complex and polyallylamine (PAH) functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as well as the ionotropic crosslinking interaction between PAH and ethylenediamine-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), the electroactive Fe(III)-DETPA complex was successfully incorporated within the MWCNT matrix, and firmly immobilized on the Au substrate electrode. The fabricated electrochemical sensor was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical methods. The influences of solution pH and ionic strength on the electrochemical sensor were investigated. The prepared electrochemical sensor had a fast response to hydrogen peroxide (<3 s) and an excellent linear range of concentration from 1.25 × 10(-8) to 4.75 × 10(-3) M with a detection limit of 6.3 × 10(-9) M under the optimum conditions.

  19. Chemistry of Carbon Monoxide Free Cyclopentadienylvanadium(I) Alkene and Alkyne Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, Bart; Meetsma, Auke; Bolhuis, Fré van; Teuben, Jan H.; Helgesson, Göran; Jagner, Susan

    The compounds CpV(L)(PMe3)2 (L = η2-ethene (2), η2-alkyne) form a new class of highly reactive CO-free CpVI complexes. Paramagnetic 2 was prepared from CpVCl(PMe3)2 and 0.5 mol of BrMg(CH2)4MgBr. An X-ray structure determination shows a relatively short ethene C=C distance of 1.365 (5) Å. The

  20. Reductive Coupling of Carbon Monoxide in a Rhenium Carbonyl Complex with Pendant Lewis Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Alexander J. M.; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphinoborane ligands impart unique reactivity to a rhenium carbonyl cation relative to simple phosphine complexes. Addition of either triethylborohydride or a platinum hydride (that can be formed from H2) forms a rhenium boroxycarbene. This carbene, which crystallizes as a dimer, disproportionates over a period of days to afford the starting cation and a structurally unprecedented boroxy(boroxymethyl)carbene, in which a new C−C bond has been formed between two reduced CO ligands. This prod...

  1. End-labeling of peptide nucleic acid with osmium complex. Voltammetry at carbon and mercury electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Trefulka, Mojmír; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2009), s. 359-362 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : peptide nucleic acid end-labeling * osmium tetroxide complexes * electroactive labels Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.243, year: 2009

  2. Metal cation controls phosphate release in the myosin ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinghua; Huang, Furong; Nesmelov, Yuri E

    2017-11-01

    Myosin is an enzyme that utilizes ATP to produce a conformational change generating a force. The kinetics of the myosin reverse recovery stroke depends on the metal cation complexed with ATP. The reverse recovery stroke is slow for MgATP and fast for MnATP. The metal ion coordinates the γ phosphate of ATP in the myosin active site. It is accepted that the reverse recovery stroke is correlated with the phosphate release; therefore, magnesium "holds" phosphate tighter than manganese. Magnesium and manganese are similar ions in terms of their chemical properties and the shell complexation; hence, we propose to use these ions to study the mechanism of the phosphate release. Analysis of octahedral complexes of magnesium and manganese show that the partial charge of magnesium is higher than that of manganese and the slightly larger size of manganese ion makes its ionic potential smaller. We hypothesize that electrostatics play a role in keeping and releasing the abstracted γ phosphate in the active site, and the stronger electric charge of magnesium ion holds γ phosphate tighter. We used stable myosin-nucleotide analog complex and Raman spectroscopy to examine the effect of the metal cation on the relative position of γ phosphate analog in the active site. We found that in the manganese complex, the γ phosphate analog is 0.01 nm further away from ADP than in the magnesium complex. We conclude that the ionic potential of the metal cation plays a role in the retention of the abstracted phosphate. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Phosphate control in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cupisti A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adamasco Cupisti,1 Maurizio Gallieni,2 Maria Antonietta Rizzo,2 Stefania Caria,3 Mario Meola,4 Piergiorgio Bolasco31Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 3Territorial Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, ASL Cagliari, Italy; 4Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source

  4. Uranium production from phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzinel, Z.; Folkman, Y.

    1979-05-01

    According to estimates of the world's uranium consumption, exploitation of most rich sources is expected by the 1980's. Forecasts show that the rate of uranium consumption will increase towards the end of the century. It is therefore desirable to exploit poor sources not yet in use. In the near future, the most reasonable source for developing uranium is phosphate rock. Uranium reserves in phosphates are estimated at a few million tons. Production of uranium from phosphates is as a by-product of phosphate rock processing and phosphoric acid production; it will then be possible to save the costs incurred in crushing and dissolving the rock when calculating uranium production costs. Estimates show that the U.S. wastes about 3,000 tons of uranium per annum in phosphoric acid based fertilisers. Studies have also been carried out in France, Yugoslavia and India. In Israel, during the 1950's, a small plant was operated in Haifa by 'Chemical and Phosphates'. Uranium processes have also been developed by linking with the extraction processes at Arad. Currently there is almost no activity on this subject because there are no large phosphoric acid plants which would enable production to take place on a reasonable scale. Discussions are taking place about the installation of a plant for phosphoric acid production utilising the 'wet process', producing 200 to 250,000 tons P 2 O 5 per annum. It is necessary to combine these facilities with uranium production plant. (author)

  5. Iron phosphate materials as cathodes for lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    ""Iron Phosphate Materials as Cathodes for Lithium Batteries"" describes the synthesis and the chemical-physical characteristics of iron phosphates, and presents methods of making LiFePO4 a suitable cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The author studies carbon's ability to increase conductivity and to decrease material grain size, as well as investigating the electrochemical behaviour of the materials obtained. ""Iron Phosphate Materials as Cathodes for Lithium Batteries"" also proposes a model to explain lithium insertion/extraction in LiFePO4 and to predict voltage profiles at variou

  6. Radiation accelerated formation of oxygen and carbon related complexes in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazrak, A.; Magnea, N.; Pautrat, J.L.

    1984-06-01

    During the pulling of silicon monocrystals by the Czochralsky method, oxygen is incorporated into the lattice. It is known from early works that low temperature annealings (400-1000 0 C) make this oxygen to precipitate and a number of different defects to be generated. In order to check whether the fast diffusivity of an oxygen silicon interstitial complex has to be taken in consideration it was interesting to examinate the possible role of radiation damage on the formation of oxygen related defects. Experimental results of an experiment are presented and discussed

  7. Reductive coupling of carbon monoxide in a rhenium carbonyl complex with pendant Lewis acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexander J M; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2008-09-10

    Phosphinoborane ligands impart unique reactivity to a rhenium carbonyl cation relative to simple phosphine complexes. Addition of either triethylborohydride or a platinum hydride (that can be formed from H2) forms a rhenium boroxycarbene. This carbene, which crystallizes as a dimer, disproportionates over a period of days to afford the starting cation and a structurally unprecedented boroxy(boroxymethyl)carbene, in which a new C-C bond has been formed between two reduced CO ligands. This product of C-C bond formation can be independently synthesized by addition of 2 equiv of hydride to the rhenium carbonyl cation.

  8. Effects of cryoprotectants on the structure and thermostability of the human carbonic anhydrase II–acetazolamide complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Boone, Christopher D.; Kondeti, Bhargav; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N.; McKenna, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Here, a case study of the effects of cryoprotectants on the kinetics of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and its inhibition by the clinically used inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) is presented. Protein X-ray crystallography has seen a progressive shift from data collection at cool/room temperature (277–298 K) to data collection at cryotemperature (100 K) because of its ease of crystal preparation and the lessening of the detrimental effects of radiation-induced crystal damage, with 20–25%(v/v) glycerol (GOL) being the preferred choice of cryoprotectant. Here, a case study of the effects of cryoprotectants on the kinetics of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and its inhibition by the clinically used inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) is presented. Comparative studies of crystal structure, kinetics, inhibition and thermostability were performed on CA II and its complex with AZM in the presence of either GOL or sucrose. These results suggest that even though the cryoprotectant GOL was previously shown to be directly bound in the active site and to interact with AZM, it affects neither the thermostability of CA II nor the binding of AZM in the crystal structure or in solution. However, addition of GOL does affect the kinetics of CA II, presumably as it displaces the water proton-transfer network in the active site

  9. Effects of cryoprotectants on the structure and thermostability of the human carbonic anhydrase II–acetazolamide complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mayank; Boone, Christopher D.; Kondeti, Bhargav; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N.; McKenna, Robert, E-mail: rmckenna@ufl.edu [University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Road, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Here, a case study of the effects of cryoprotectants on the kinetics of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and its inhibition by the clinically used inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) is presented. Protein X-ray crystallography has seen a progressive shift from data collection at cool/room temperature (277–298 K) to data collection at cryotemperature (100 K) because of its ease of crystal preparation and the lessening of the detrimental effects of radiation-induced crystal damage, with 20–25%(v/v) glycerol (GOL) being the preferred choice of cryoprotectant. Here, a case study of the effects of cryoprotectants on the kinetics of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) and its inhibition by the clinically used inhibitor acetazolamide (AZM) is presented. Comparative studies of crystal structure, kinetics, inhibition and thermostability were performed on CA II and its complex with AZM in the presence of either GOL or sucrose. These results suggest that even though the cryoprotectant GOL was previously shown to be directly bound in the active site and to interact with AZM, it affects neither the thermostability of CA II nor the binding of AZM in the crystal structure or in solution. However, addition of GOL does affect the kinetics of CA II, presumably as it displaces the water proton-transfer network in the active site.

  10. A highly efficient nano-cluster artificial peroxidase and its direct electrochemistry on a nano complex modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Wang, Wei; Huang, Kun; Yang, Wei-Yun; Zhao, Ying-Xue; Xiao, Bao-Lin; Gao, Yun-Fei; Moosavi-Movahedi, Zainab; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cluster with highly efficient peroxide activity was constructed based on nafion (NF) and cytochrome c (Cyt c). UV-Vis spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were utilized for characterization of the nano-structured enzyme or artificial peroxidase (AP). The nano-cluster was composed of a Chain-Ball structure, with an average ball size of about 40 nm. The Michaelis-Menten (K(m)) and catalytic rate (k(cat)) constants of the AP were determined to be 2.5 ± 0.4 µM and 0.069 ± 0.001 s(-1), respectively, in 50 mM PBS at pH 7.0. The catalytic efficiency of the AP was evaluated to be 0.028 ± 0.005 µM(-1) s(-1), which was 39 ± 5% as efficient as the native horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The AP was also immobilized on a functional multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNCTs)-gold colloid nanoparticles (AuNPs) nano-complex modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The cyclic voltammetry of AP on the nano complex modified GC electrode showed a pair of well-defined redox peaks with a formal potential (E°') of -45 ± 2 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) was evaluated to be 0.65 s(-1). The surface concentration of electroactive AP on GC electrode (Γ) was 7 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)(app)) was 0.23 nM.

  11. Interaction of a Ni(II) tetraazaannulene complex with elongated fullerenes as simple models for carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2015-06-01

    Nickel(II) complex of 5,14-dihydro-6,8,15,17-tetramethyldibenzo[b,i][1,4,8,11] tetraazacyclotetradecine (NiTMTAA), which can be employed for noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), represents a more complex and interesting case in terms of structure of the resulting nanohybrids, as compared to the related materials functionalized with porphyrins and phthalocyanines. Due to its saddle shape, the NiTMTAA molecule adsorbed can adopt different, energetically non-equivalent orientations with respect to CNT, depending on whether CH3 or C6H4 groups contact the latter. The main goal of the present work was to provide information on the interactions of NiTMTAA with simple single-walled CNT (SWNT) models accessible for dispersion-corrected DFT calculations. For reasons of comparison, we employed three such functionals: M06-2X and LC-BLYP as implemented in Gaussian 09 package, and PBE-G as implemented in Materials Studio 6.0. In order to roughly estimate the effect of nanotube chirality on the interaction strenght, we considered two short closed-end SWNT models (also referred to as 'elongated fullerenes'), one armchair and one zigzag, derived from C60 and C80 hemispheres. In addition, we calculated similar complexes with C60, as well as I h and D 5h isomers of C80. The results were analyzed in terms of optimized geometries, formation energies, HOMO-LUMO gap energies, and intermolecular separations. Graphical Abstract Interaction of Ni(II) tetraazaannulene complex with elongated fullerenes.

  12. High Oxygen Reduction Reaction Performances of Cathode Materials Combining Polyoxometalates, Coordination Complexes, and Carboneous Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Oms, Olivier; Hao, Long; Liu, Rongji; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yaqin; He, Hong-Yan; Dolbecq, Anne; Marrot, Jérôme; Keita, Bineta; Zhi, Linjie; Mialane, Pierre; Li, Bin; Zhang, Guangjin

    2017-11-08

    A series of carbonaceous-supported precious-metal-free polyoxometalate (POM)-based composites which can be easily synthesized on a large scale was shown to act as efficient cathode materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in neutral or basic media via a four-electron mechanism with high durability. Moreover, exploiting the versatility of the considered system, its activity was optimized by the judicious choice of the 3d metals incorporated in the {(PW 9 ) 2 M 7 } (M = Co, Ni) POM core, the POM counterions and the support (thermalized triazine-based frameworks (TTFs), fluorine-doped TTF (TTF-F), reduced graphene oxide, or carbon Vulcan XC-72. In particular, for {(PW 9 ) 2 Ni 7 }/{Cu(ethylenediamine) 2 }/TTF-F, the overpotential required to drive the ORR compared well with those of Pt/C. This outstanding ORR electrocatalytic activity is linked with two synergistic effects due to the binary combination of the Cu and Ni centers and the strong interaction between the POM molecules and the porous and highly conducting TTF-F framework. To our knowledge, {(PW 9 ) 2 Ni 7 }/{Cu(ethylenediamine) 2 }/TTF-F represents the first example of POM-based noble-metal-free ORR electrocatalyst possessing both comparable ORR electrocatalytic activity and much higher stability than that of Pt/C in neutral medium.

  13. Effect of humic substances on the precipitation of calcium phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yong-hui; Hermann H. HAHN; Erhard HOFFMANN; Peter G. WEIDLER

    2006-01-01

    For phosphorus (P) recovery from wastewater, the effect of humic substances (HS) on the precipitation of calcium phosphate was studied. Batch experiments of calcium phosphate precipitation were undertaken with synthetic water that contained 20 mg/L phosphate (as P) and 20 mg/L HS (as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) at a constant pH value in the range of 8.0-10.0. The concentration variations of phosphate, calcium (Ca) and HS were measured in the precipitation process; the crystalline state and compositions of the precipitates were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, respectively. It showed that at solution pH 8.0, the precipitation rate and removal efficiency of phosphate were greatly reduced by HS, but at solution pH ≥9.0,the effect of HS was very small. The Ca consumption for the precipitation of phosphate increased when HS was added; HS was also removed from solution with the precipitation of calcium phosphate. At solution pH 8.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 3.5 mg/L, and at pH ≥ 9.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 10 mg/L, the final precipitates were proved to be hydroxyapatite (HAP) by XRD. The increases of solution pH value and initial Ca/P ratio helped reduce the influence of HS on the precipitation of phosphate.

  14. Dry season limnological conditions and basin geology exhibit complex relationships with δ13C and δ15N of carbon sources in four Neotropical floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia Alves, Gustavo H; Hoeinghaus, David J; Manetta, Gislaine I; Benedito, Evanilde

    2017-01-01

    Studies in freshwater ecosystems are seeking to improve understanding of carbon flow in food webs and stable isotopes have been influential in this work. However, variation in isotopic values of basal production sources could either be an asset or a hindrance depending on study objectives. We assessed the potential for basin geology and local limnological conditions to predict stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of six carbon sources at multiple locations in four Neotropical floodplain ecosystems (Paraná, Pantanal, Araguaia, and Amazon). Limnological conditions exhibited greater variation within than among systems. δ15N differed among basins for most carbon sources, but δ13C did not (though high within-basin variability for periphyton, phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon was observed). Although δ13C and δ15N values exhibited significant correlations with some limnological factors within and among basins, those relationships differed among carbon sources. Regression trees for both carbon and nitrogen isotopes for all sources depicted complex and in some cases nested relationships, and only very limited similarity was observed among trees for different carbon sources. Although limnological conditions predicted variation in isotope values of carbon sources, we suggest the resulting models were too complex to enable mathematical corrections of source isotope values among sites based on these parameters. The importance of local conditions in determining variation in source isotope values suggest that isotopes may be useful for examining habitat use, dispersal and patch dynamics within heterogeneous floodplain ecosystems, but spatial variability in isotope values needs to be explicitly considered when testing ecosystem models of carbon flow in these systems.

  15. Formation and femtosecond photodissociation of Agn+andAun+ complexes with benzene and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2009-02-01

    The reactions of free, size selected gold and silver cluster cations Agn+andAun+ ( n = 3, 5) with C 6H 6 as well as with a mixture of C 6H 6 and CO were investigated in a radio frequency ion trap under multiple collision condition. While benzene was found to react with all investigated metal clusters exhibiting size dependent adsorbate coverages, the coadsorption of C 6H 6 and CO was only observed on the gold clusters. Photodissociation experiments at 353 and 393 nm, respectively, provided indications for charge transfer induced fragmentation in the case of the silver cluster-benzene complexes. In particular, for Ag(CH)2+ the femtosecond time resolved fragmentation dynamics could be measured.

  16. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zald, Harold S.J.; Spies, Thomas A.; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J.; Olsen, Keith A.; Steel, E. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    was also affected by finer scale topographic conditions associated with sheltered sites. Past wildfires only had a small influence on current ALC density, which may be a result of long times since fire and/or prevalence of non-stand replacing fire. Our results indicate that forest ALC density depends on a suite of multi-scale environmental drivers mediated by complex mountain topography, and that these relationships are dependent on stand age. The high and context-dependent spatial variability of forest ALC density has implications for quantifying forest carbon stores, establishing upper bounds of potential carbon sequestration, and scaling field data to landscape and regional scales. PMID:27041818

  17. Well log and seismic data analysis for complex pore-structure carbonate reservoir using 3D rock physics templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbing; Zhang, Jiajia

    2018-04-01

    The pore structure in heterogeneous carbonate rock is usually very complex. This complex pore system makes the relationship between the velocity and porosity of the rock highly scattered, so that for the classical two-dimensional rock physics template (2D RPT) it is not enough to accurately describe the quantitative relationship between the rock elastic parameters of this kind of reservoir and its porosity and water saturation. Therefore it is possible to attribute the effect of pore type to that of the porosity or water saturation, and leads to great deviations when applying such a 2D RPT to predict the porosity and water saturation in seismic reservoir prediction and hydrocarbon detection. This paper first presents a method to establish a new three-dimensional rock physics template (3D RPT) by integrating the Gassmann equations and the porous rock physics model, and use it to characterize the quantitative relation between rock elastic properties and the reservoir parameters including the pore aspect ratio, porosity and water saturation, and to predict these parameters from the known elastic properties. The test results on the real logging and seismic inversion data show that the 3D RPT can accurately describe the variations of elastic properties with the porosity, water saturation and pore-structure parameters, and effectively improve the accuracy of reservoir parameters prediction.

  18. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica; Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2013-04-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π-π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle-nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12,14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  19. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A., E-mail: basiuk@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Bassiouk, María [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-04-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π–π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle–nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12, 14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  20. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica; Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π–π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle–nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12, 14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  1. UV-Vis-IR spectral complex refractive indices and optical properties of brown carbon aerosol from biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumlin, Benjamin J.; Heinson, Yuli W.; Shetty, Nishit; Pandey, Apoorva; Pattison, Robert S.; Baker, Stephen; Hao, Wei Min; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.

    2018-02-01

    Constraining the complex refractive indices, optical properties and size of brown carbon (BrC) aerosols is a vital endeavor for improving climate models and satellite retrieval algorithms. Smoldering wildfires are the largest source of primary BrC, and fuel parameters such as moisture content, source depth, geographic origin, and fuel packing density could influence the properties of the emitted aerosol. We measured in situ spectral (375-1047 nm) optical properties of BrC aerosols emitted from smoldering combustion of Boreal and Indonesian peatlands across a range of these fuel parameters. Inverse Lorenz-Mie algorithms used these optical measurements along with simultaneously measured particle size distributions to retrieve the aerosol complex refractive indices (m = n + iκ). Our results show that the real part n is constrained between 1.5 and 1.7 with no obvious functionality in wavelength (λ), moisture content, source depth, or geographic origin. With increasing λ from 375 to 532 nm, κ decreased from 0.014 to 0.003, with corresponding increase in single scattering albedo (SSA) from 0.93 to 0.99. The spectral variability of κ follows the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation for a damped harmonic oscillator. For λ ≥ 532 nm, both κ and SSA showed no spectral dependency. We discuss differences between this study and previous work. The imaginary part κ was sensitive to changes in FPD, and we hypothesize mechanisms that might help explain this observation.

  2. Mechanistic deductions from multiple kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects and pH studies of pyridoxal phosphate dependent carbon-carbon lyases: escherichia coli tryptophan indole-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiick, D.M.; Phillips, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and competitive inhibitor Ki values for tryptophan indole-lyase suggests two enzymic groups must be unprotonated in order to facilitate binding and catalysis of tryptophan. The V/K for tryptophan and the pKi for oxindolyl-L-alanine, a putative transition state analogue and competitive inhibitor, decrease below two pK values of 7.6 and 6.0, while the Ki for L-alanine, also a competitive inhibitor, is 3300-fold larger (20 mM) than that for oxindolyl-L-alanine and increases below a single pK of 7.6. A single pK of 7.6 is also observed in the V/K profile for the alternate substrate, S-methyl-L-cysteine. Therefore, the enzymic group with a pK of 7.6 is responsible for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan, while the enzymic group with a pK of 6.0 interacts with the indole portion of tryptophan and probably catalyzes formation of the indolenine tautomer of tryptophan (in concert with proton transfer to C-3 of indole from the group with pK 7.6) to facilitate carbon-carbon bond cleavage and elimination of indole. The pH variation of the primary deuterium isotope effects for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan (DV = 2.5 and D(V/Ktrp) = 2.8) are pH independent, while the Vmax for tryptophan or S-methyl-L-cysteine is the same and also pH independent. Thus, substrates bind only to the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Further, tryptophan is not sticky, and the pK values observed in both V/K profiles are the correct ones

  3. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  4. Energy and carbon emissions analysis and prediction of complex petrochemical systems based on an improved extreme learning machine integrated interpretative structural model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yongming; Zhu, Qunxiong; Geng, Zhiqiang; Xu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The ELM integrated ISM (ISM-ELM) method is proposed. • The proposed method is more efficient and accurate than the ELM through the UCI data set. • Energy and carbon emissions analysis and prediction of petrochemical industries based ISM-ELM is obtained. • The proposed method is valid in improving energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions of ethylene plants. - Abstract: Energy saving and carbon emissions reduction of the petrochemical industry are affected by many factors. Thus, it is difficult to analyze and optimize the energy of complex petrochemical systems accurately. This paper proposes an energy and carbon emissions analysis and prediction approach based on an improved extreme learning machine (ELM) integrated interpretative structural model (ISM) (ISM-ELM). ISM based the partial correlation coefficient is utilized to analyze key parameters that affect the energy and carbon emissions of the complex petrochemical system, and can denoise and reduce dimensions of data to decrease the training time and errors of the ELM prediction model. Meanwhile, in terms of the model accuracy and the training time, the robustness and effectiveness of the ISM-ELM model are better than the ELM through standard data sets from the University of California Irvine (UCI) repository. Moreover, a multi-inputs and single-output (MISO) model of energy and carbon emissions of complex ethylene systems is established based on the ISM-ELM. Finally, detailed analyses and simulations using the real ethylene plant data demonstrate the effectiveness of the ISM-ELM and can guide the improvement direction of energy saving and carbon emissions reduction in complex petrochemical systems.

  5. Immobilization of [Cu(bpy)2]Br2 complex onto a glassy carbon electrode modified with alpha-SiMo12O40(4-) and single walled carbon nanotubes: application to nanomolar detection of hydrogen peroxide and bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Korani, Aazam; Hallaj, Rahman; Khoshnavazi, Roshan; Hadadzadeh, Hasan

    2009-03-02

    A simple procedure has been used for preparation of modified glassy carbon electrode with carbon nanotubes and copper complex. Copper complex [Cu(bpy)(2)]Br(2) was immobilized onto glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with silicomolybdate, alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Copper complex and silicomolybdate irreversibly and strongly adsorbed onto GC electrode modified with CNTs. Electrostatic interactions between polyoxometalates (POMs) anions and Cu-complex, cations mentioned as an effective method for fabrication of three-dimensional structures. The modified electrode shows three reversible redox couples for polyoxometalate and one redox couple for Cu-complex at wide range of pH values. The electrochemical behavior, stability and electron transfer kinetics of the adsorbed redox couples were investigated using cyclic voltammetry. Due to electrostatic interaction, copper complex immobilized onto GC/CNTs/alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) electrode shows more stable voltammetric response compared to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex modified electrode. In comparison to GC/CNTs/Cu-complex the GC/CNTs/alpha-SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) modified electrodes shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward reduction H(2)O(2) and BrO(3)(-) at more reduced overpotential. The catalytic rate constants for catalytic reduction hydrogen peroxide and bromate were 4.5(+/-0.2)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.0(+/-0.10)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The hydrodynamic amperommetry technique at 0.08 V was used for detection of nanomolar concentration of hydrogen peroxide and bromate. Detection limit, sensitivity and linear concentration range proposed sensor for bromate and hydrogen peroxide detection were 1.1 nM and 6.7 nA nM(-1), 10 nM-20 microM, 1 nM, 5.5 nA nM(-1) and 10 nM-18 microM, respectively.

  6. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco; Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Buonerba, Antonio; Nisi, Assunta De; Monari, Magda; Milione, Stefano; Grassi, Alfonso; Cavallo, Luigi; Capacchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide with Epoxides Efficiently Catalyzed by Thioether-Triphenolate Bimetallic Iron(III) Complexes: Catalyst Structure-Reactivity Relationship and Mechanistic DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Della Monica, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    A series of dinuclear iron(III)I complexes supported by thioether-triphenolate ligands have been prepared to attain highly Lewis acidic catalysts. In combination with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) they are highly active catalysts in the synthesis of cyclic organic carbonates through the coupling of carbon dioxide to epoxides with the highest initial turnover frequencies reported to date for the conversion of propylene oxide to propylene carbonate for iron-based catalysts (5200h-1; 120°C, 2MPa, 1h). In particular, these complexes are shown to be highly selective catalysts for the coupling of carbon dioxide to internal oxiranes affording the corresponding cyclic carbonates in good yield and with retention of the initial stereochemical configuration. A density functional theory (DFT) investigation provides a rational for the relative high activity found for these Fe(III) complexes, showing the fundamental role of the hemilabile sulfur atom in the ligand skeleton to promote reactivity. Notably, in spite of the dinuclear nature of the catalyst precursor only one metal center is involved in the catalytic cycle. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  9. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi-Arab, Nafiseh; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mehrparvar, Mohsen; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance to investigate both

  10. Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: Manaus LBA site--a complex terrain condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóta, Julio; Fitzjarrald, David Roy; da Silva Dias, Maria A F

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras--ZF2--02°36'17.1'' S, 60°12'24.4'' W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO(2) concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO(2) sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO(2)) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO(2) into those estimates.

  11. Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Tóta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras—ZF2—02°36′17.1′′ S, 60°12′24.4′′ W, subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO2 concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008 was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO2 sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12% was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO2 were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO2 into those estimates.

  12. Complex effects of fertilization on plant and herbivore performance in the presence of a plant competitor and activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Mahdavi-Arab

    Full Text Available Plant-herbivore interactions are influenced by host plant quality which in turn is affected by plant growth conditions. Competition is the major biotic and nutrient availability a major abiotic component of a plant's growth environment. Yet, surprisingly few studies have investigated impacts of competition and nutrient availability on herbivore performance and reciprocal herbivore effects on plants. We studied growth of the specialist aphid, Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria, and its host plant tansy, Tanacetum vulgare, under experimental addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer crossed with competition by goldenrod, Solidago canadensis. Because of evidence that competition by goldenrod is mediated by allelopathic compounds, we also added a treatment with activated carbon. Results showed that fertilization increased, and competition with goldenrod decreased, plant biomass, but this was likely mediated by resource competition. There was no evidence from the activated carbon treatment that allelopathy played a role which instead had a fertilizing effect. Aphid performance increased with higher plant biomass and depended on plant growth conditions, with fertilization and AC increasing, and plant competition decreasing aphid numbers. Feedbacks of aphids on plant performance interacted with plant growth conditions in complex ways depending on the relative magnitude of the effects on plant biomass and aphid numbers. In the basic fertilization treatment, tansy plants profited from increased nutrient availability by accumulating more biomass than they lost due to an increased number of aphids under fertilization. When adding additional fertilizer, aphid numbers increased so high that tansy plants suffered and showed reduced biomass compared with controls without aphids. Thus, the ecological cost of an infestation with aphids depends on the balance of effects of growth conditions on plant and herbivore performance. These results emphasize the importance

  13. Seasonal Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Carbon Under Complex Circulation Schemes on a Large Continental Shelf: The Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Feifei; Dai, Minhan; Cao, Zhimian; Wu, Kai; Zhao, Xiaozheng; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Junhui; Gan, Jianping

    2017-12-01

    We examined the distribution and seasonality of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) based on a large data set collected from the northern South China Sea (NSCS) shelf under complex circulation schemes influenced by river plume, coastal upwelling, and downwelling. The highest surface values of ˜117 μmol L-1 were observed nearshore in summer suggesting high DOC supplies from the river inputs, whereas the lowest surface values of ˜62 μmol L-1 were on the outer shelf in winter due to entrainment of DOC-poor subsurface water under strengthened vertical mixing. While the summer coastal upwelling brought lower DOC from offshore depth to the nearshore surface, the winter coastal downwelling delivered higher surface DOC to the midshelf deep waters from the inner shelf fueled by the China Coastal Current (CCC) transporting relatively high DOC from the East China Sea to the NSCS. The intensified winter downwelling generated a cross-shelf DOC transport of 3.1 × 1012 g C over a large shelf area, which induced a significant depression of the NSCS DOC inventory in winter relative to in autumn. In addition to the variable physical controls, net biological production of DOC was semiquantified in both the river plume (2.8 ± 3.0 μmol L-1) and coastal upwelling (3.1 ± 1.3 μmol L-1) in summer. We demonstrated that the NSCS shelf had various origins of DOC including riverine inputs, inter-shelf transport and in situ production. Via cross-shelf transport, the accumulated DOC would be exported to and stored in the deep ocean, suggesting that continental shelves are a potentially effective carbon sink.

  14. Age-related patterns of forest complexity and carbon storage in pine and aspen-birch ecosystems of northern Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Bradford; Douglas N. Kastendick

    2010-01-01

    Forest managers are seeking strategies to create stands that can adapt to new climatic conditions and simultaneously help mitigate increases in atmospheric CO2. Adaptation strategies often focus on enhancing resilience by maximizing forest complexity in terms of species composition and size structure, while mitigation involves sustaining carbon...

  15. An efficient method for qualitative screening of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Nautiyal, C S

    2001-07-01

    An efficient protocol was developed for qualitative screening of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria, based upon visual observation. Our results indicate that, by using our formulation containing bromophenol blue, it is possible to quickly screen on a qualitative basis the phosphate-solubilizing bacteria. Qualitative analysis of the phosphate solubilized by various groups correlated well with grouping based upon quantitative analysis of bacteria isolated from soil, effect of carbon, nitrogen, salts, and phosphate solubilization-defective transposon mutants. However, unlike quantitative analysis methods that involve time-consuming biochemical procedures, the time for screening phosphate-solubilizing bacteria is significantly reduced by using our simple protocol. Therefore, it is envisaged that usage of this formulation based upon qualitative analysis will be salutary for the quick screening of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria. Our results indicate that the formulation can also be used as a quality control test for expeditiously screening the commercial bioinoculant preparations, based on phosphate solubilizers.

  16. Determination of contents of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate in solutions for alkaline leading of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The new analytical method is based on the determination of the molar ratio carbonate - hydrogen carbonate using the measured concentration of hydrogen ions, the determination of the dissociation constant of carbonic acid for different values of ionic strength. The concentration of hydrogen ions was measured with a Metrohm 632 pH meter with the use of a combined glass electrode. The content of total carbonate carbon was determined coulometrically and the uranium content was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate and by spectrometry of the complex of uranyl ions with Arsenazo III. Model solutions were used for the experiments which contained a high concentration of sulfate ions, thiosulfate ions, uranium and various proportions of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The composition of the individual samples of the extraction solutions are tabulated. The calibration was made of the glass combined electrode at different ionic strength, the values determined of dissociation constants of carbonic acid for different ionic strength. The mathematical procedure is described for the calculation of molar concentrations of carbonate and hudrogen carbonate and the results are presented of the analysis of model solutions. (E.S.). 5 tabs., 1 fig., 5 refs

  17. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23 and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body.

  18. Adsorption of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole on copper surface from phosphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansky, L.P.; Selyaninov, I.A.; Kuznetsov, Yu.I.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the electrochemical and XPS results has shown that adsorption of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) on copper electrodes in neutral phosphate solutions proceeds through the formation of the chemical bonds by copper (I) cations with exo-sulfur and nitrogen atoms. A protection layer formed of Cu(I)MBT complex prevents precipitation of copper (II) phosphate on a copper surface. The thickness of the surface film consisting of a complex [Cu(I)MBT] n (having probably polymeric nature), where MBT acts as at least three-dentate ligand, increases depending on the exposure time, reaching 8-9 nm after immersing for 12 h in test solution. Even in a case of the preliminary formation of copper (II) phosphate on the copper electrode at the anodic potential addition of small amounts of MBT results in complete removal of copper (II) phosphate from the surface.

  19. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  20. Cooperative effect by monopodal silica-supported niobium com-plexes pairs enhancing catalytic cyclic carbonate production

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-05-07

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica supported Nb-species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor [NbCl5•OEt2] with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) or at 200 oC (SiO2-200) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO2-700 and [NbCl5•OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO2-200 with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3•OEt2]. 93Nb SSNMR spectra of 1a-3a and 31P SSNMR on their PMe3 derivatives (1b-3b) led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single site, monopodal Nb-species while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [≡S ONbCl3•OEt2]. Double-quantum/single-quantum 31P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprece-dented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of the NbCl5 catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase.

  1. Cooperative effect by monopodal silica-supported niobium com-plexes pairs enhancing catalytic cyclic carbonate production

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio; Dong, Hailin; Rossini, Aaron J; Widdifield, Cory M.; Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Minenkov, Yury; Poater, Albert; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Pelletier, Jeremie D. A.; Cavallo, Luigi; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica supported Nb-species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor [NbCl5•OEt2] with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) or at 200 oC (SiO2-200) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO2-700 and [NbCl5•OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO2-200 with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3•OEt2]. 93Nb SSNMR spectra of 1a-3a and 31P SSNMR on their PMe3 derivatives (1b-3b) led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single site, monopodal Nb-species while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [≡S ONbCl3•OEt2]. Double-quantum/single-quantum 31P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprece-dented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of the NbCl5 catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase.

  2. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, L; Andersen, K E; Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri......-m-cresyl phosphate, but no reaction to tri-p-cresyl phosphate. Gas chromatography of the tricresyl phosphate 5% pet. patch test material supplied from Trolab showed that it contained a mixture of a wide range of triaryl phosphates, including 0.08% triphenyl phosphate which is above the threshold for detecting...

  3. Phosphate-mediated electrochemical adsorption of cisplatin on gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, Adam; Figueiredo, Marta C.; Koper, Marc T.M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Rodriguez, Paramaconi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The potential-dependent adsorption and deposition of cisplatin on polycrystalline gold electrode is mediated by the adsorption of phosphate anions on gold electrode. •Quantitative analysis suggests that the stoichiometry of the phosphate species and the cisplatin adsorbed was 1:1. •Upon reduction of the phosphate-mediated cisplatin adsorption, the platinum deposits are formed by 3D nanoclusters -- Abstract: This manuscript reports the potential-dependent adsorption and deposition of cisplatin on polycrystalline gold electrode. It was found that this process is mediated by the adsorption of phosphate anions on the gold electrode and that the maximum coverage of Pt adsorbed is given by the maximum coverage of phosphate adsorbed at a given potential. The interaction of cisplatin with the phosphate groups was confirmed by in situ FTIR spectroscopy under external reflexion configuration. Quantitative analysis suggests that the stoichiometry of the phosphate species and the cisplatin adsorbed was 1:1. Moreover, the relationship between the charge of the Pt deposited and the charge of the electrochemical surface area of the Pt deposited on the gold electrodes indicates that 3D nanoclusters of a few atoms of Pt were formed over the gold electrode upon the electrochemical reduction of the adsorbed cisplatin. The Pt nanoclusters formed under these conditions were later evaluated for the oxidation of a monolayer of carbon monoxide. The Pt nanoclusters showed a high overpotential for the oxidation of the carbon monoxide monolayer and the high oxidation overpotential was attributed to the absence of adsorption sites for OH species on the Pt clusters: only at potentials where the OH species are adsorbed at the edge between the Pt nanocluster and the gold support, the oxidation of the carbon monoxide on the Pt nanoparticles takes place.

  4. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D.; Wang, Xuming; Li, Minhua

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  5. Complex carbon cycling processes and pathways in a tropical coastal marine environment (Saco do Mamangua, RJ - Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgioni, M.; Jovane, L.; Millo, C.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Bertassoli, D. J., Jr.; Gamba Romano, R.; Pellizari, V.; Castillo Franco, D.; Krusche, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Saco do Mamangua is a narrow and elongated gulf located along the southeastern coast of Brazil, in the state of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). It is surrounded by high relieves, which form a peculiar environment called riá, with little river input and limited water exchange with the Atlantic Ocean. These features make the Saco do Mamangua an ideal environment to study sedimentary carbon cycling under well-constrained boundary conditions in order to investigate if tropical coastal environments serve dominantly as potential carbon sinks or sources. In this work we integrate geochemical data from marine sediments and pore waters in the Saco do Mamangua with mapping of benthic microbial communities, in order to unravel the biogeochemical carbon cycling linked to the production of biogenic methane. Our results reveal that carbon cycling occurs in two parallel pathways. The Saco do Mamangua receives organic carbon both by surface runoff and by primary production in the water column. A large part of this organic carbon is buried within the sediment resulting in the production of biogenic methane, which gives rise to methane seepages at the sea floor. These methane seeps sustain methanotrophic microbial communities in the sediment pore water, but also escapes into the atmosphere by ebullition. Consequently, the sediments of Saco do Mamangua acts simultaneously as carbon sink and carbon source. Future work will allow us to accurately quantify the actual carbon fluxes and calculate the net carbon balance in the local environment.

  6. Spatial complexities in aboveground carbon stocks of a semi-arid mangrove community: A remote sensing height-biomass-carbon approach

    KAUST Repository

    Hickey, S.M.; Callow, N.J.; Phinn, S.; Lovelock, C.E.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    Mangroves are integral to ecosystem services provided by the coastal zone, in particular carbon (C) sequestration and storage. Allometric relationships linking mangrove height to estimated biomass and C stocks have been developed from field sampling

  7. Phosphorus and uranium recovery process from phosphated rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, M C.Y.; Long, R H

    1981-01-30

    Improvement of uranium recovery in phosphate rocks by treatment with nitric acid avoiding the formation of a precipitate including a part of the uranium. The separation of uranium from phosphoric acid is obtained by liquid-liquid extraction using dialkyl posphoric acid with at least 10 carbon atoms and a phosphoryl alkyl alkoxy compound with at least 10 carbon atoms and a non water miscible organic solvent.

  8. Integrated assessment of the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.; Cotter, S.J.

    1980-05-01

    The phosphate industry in the United States includes three major activities, namely, mining and milling of phosphate rock, phosphate product manufacture, and phosphate product use. Phosphatic materials contain uranium, thorium, and their decay products in greater than background amounts. This assessment of the radiological impacts associated with the redistribution of radioactive components of phosphate materials may provide insight into the effects of uranium extraction from phosphate materials for use in the nuclear fuel cycle

  9. Adsorption characteristics of activated carbon hollow fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Kaludjerović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon hollow fibers were prepared with regenerated cellulose or polysulfone hollow fibers by chemical activation using sodium phosphate dibasic followed by the carbonization process. The activation process increases the adsorption properties of fibers which is more prominent for active carbone fibers obtained from the cellulose precursor. Chemical activation with sodium phosphate dibasic produces an active carbon material with both mesopores and micropores.

  10. Better prospects for phosphate production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The extraction of uranium as a by product of phosphate production is discussed. Techniques being commercially developed are described. The trend towards the wet process, in which sulphuric acid is used to dissolve the phosphate, producing phosphoric acid, is also the preferred method for uranium recovery. Recovery from a wet process phosphoric acid stream, integrated with phosphate fertilizer manufacture, is becoming increasingly commercially viable for the production of yellow-cake.

  11. Metastable Equilibrium Solubility Distribution of Carbonated Apatite as a Function of Solution Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhettry; Wang; Hsu; Fox; Baig; Barry; Zhuang; Otsuka; Higuchi

    1999-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that carbonated apatites (CAPs) exhibit the phenomenon of metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) in weak acid media. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine two questions: first, whether the MES concept is applicable to a broader range of solution conditions and, second, whether a driving force function associated with a surface complex having a constant stoichiometry governs the dissolution of CAP and, if so, what is this stoichiometry. CAP preparations with carbonate contents of 1.8-5.7 wt% (synthesized by hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate anhydrate in solutions of varying bicarbonate levels or by direct precipitation from supersaturated calcium/phosphate/carbonate solutions) were studied as follows. MES distributions for each of the CAP preparations were determined by equilibrating the CAP under stirred conditions in a series of acetate buffers (0.10 M) containing various levels of calcium and phosphate in the pH range 4.5-6.5 and a solution calcium/phosphate ratio in the range 0.1-10. The amount dissolved in each instance was regarded as the fraction of the CAP possessing an MES value greater than that corresponding to the ion activity product (IAP) of the equilibrating solution. The solution IAPs were calculated from the solution compositions using plausible calcium phosphate stoichiometries, viz., dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, octacalcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, carbonated apatite (based on the bulk composition of the particular CAP involved in the experiment), and tetracalcium phosphate. The fraction of CAP dissolved was plotted against the solution IAPs for each experimental set using each of the six assumed stoichiometries for the surface complex. The results demonstrated that the MES concept was applicable to all of the CAP preparations in media of various solution compositions and different pH levels. The most important new outcome of this study was that MES profiles for each of the

  12. Engineering Potato Starch with a Higher Phosphate Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Xu

    Full Text Available Phosphate esters are responsible for valuable and unique functionalities of starch for industrial applications. Also in the cell phosphate esters play a role in starch metabolism, which so far has not been well characterized in storage starch. Laforin, a human enzyme composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and a dual-specificity phosphatase domain, is involved in the dephosphorylation of glycogen. To modify phosphate content and better understand starch (dephosphorylation in storage starch, laforin was engineered and introduced into potato (cultivar Kardal. Interestingly, expression of an (engineered laforin in potato resulted in significantly higher phosphate content of starch, and this result was confirmed in amylose-free potato genetic background (amf. Modified starches exhibited altered granule morphology and size compared to the control. About 20-30% of the transgenic lines of each series showed red-staining granules upon incubation with iodine, and contained higher phosphate content than the blue-stained starch granules. Moreover, low amylose content and altered gelatinization properties were observed in these red-stained starches. Principle component and correlation analysis disclosed a complex correlation between starch composition and starch physico-chemical properties. Ultimately, the expression level of endogenous genes involved in starch metabolism was analysed, revealing a compensatory response to the decrease of phosphate content in potato starch. This study provides a new perspective for engineering starch phosphate content in planta by making use of the compensatory mechanism in the plant itself.

  13. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  14. Prevention of radioactive contamination in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers; Prevencion de contaminacion radiactiva en la fabricacion de fertilizantes fosfatados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero G, E T

    1996-12-31

    In this work was studied the separation of uranium from the phosphate rock to decrease the level of radioactivity in the phosphate fertilizers, this prevents the redistribution of uranium in the environment. The uranium leaching conditions from phosphate rock were estimated using alkaline solutions. The changes in the natural phosphate rock after leaching were studied. The amenability to separate the uranium from phosphate rock with ammonium carbonate / bicarbonate solution was determined. The uranium extraction was approximately 40%. The leaching conditions showed high selectivity for uranium without changes in the ore structure. The bulk ore was not dissolved. (Author).

  15. Phosphate Recovery From Sewage Sludge Containing Iron Phosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilfert, P.K.

    2018-01-01

    The scope of this thesis was to lay the basis for a phosphate recovery technology that can be applied on sewage sludge containing iron phosphate. Such a technology should come with minimal changes to the existing sludge treatment configuration while keeping the use of chemicals or energy as small as

  16. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.175 Phosphated flour. Phosphated flour, phosphated white flour, and phosphated...

  17. Lar mountain phosphate ore processing using flotation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharabaghi, M.; Noaparast, M.; Shafaei Tonkaboni, S. Z.

    2007-01-01

    The sample of Lar Mountain Phosphate deposit which is located in the southwest of Iran, was studied to upgrade its phosphate grade. The results obtained from mineralogical studies showed the presence of apatite, CaO, Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 and SiO 2 , in which carbonate was detected as the main gangue. Two sets of direct and reverse flotation tests were performed using samples from this deposit with 10% P 2 O 5 . In phosphate flotation (direct approach), the samples were conditioned with sodium silica, oleic acid-fuel oil and Armac T-fuel oil. The direct flotation at pH=9.2 yielded a product with 23.2% of P 2 O 5 and 75.16% recovery. The reverse flotation tests were carried out at pH=5.2, with floating carbonate and pulp de-oiling, using H 2 SO 4 and wash water, and phosphate was then floated from siliceous gangue. In the second sets of the reverse approach, depressing the phosphate and floating silica with Amines in natural pH were done. However the best concentrate assay was 31.2% P 2 O 5 with a 71.12% recovery, which was obtained from reverse tests

  18. The electrochemical behavior of Co(TPTZ)2 complex on different carbon based electrodes modified with TiO2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortaboy, Sinem; Atun, Gülten

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical behavior of cobalt (II) complex with the N-donor ligand 2,2′-bipyridyl-1,3,5-tripyridyl-s-triazine (TPTZ) was investigated to elucidate the electron-proton transfer mechanisms. The electrochemical response of the complex was studied using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. A conventional three-electrode system, consisting of glassy carbon (GCE), TiO 2 modified glassy carbon (T/GCE), carbon paste (CPE) and TiO 2 modified carbon paste (T/CPE) working electrodes were employed. The ligand/metal ratio and stability constant of the complex as well as the mechanisms of the electrode processes were elucidated by examining the effects of pH, ligand concentration and frequency on the voltammograms. The EIS results indicated that the samples modified with TiO 2 had the higher charge transfer resistance than that of the bare electrodes and also suggested that the electroactivity of the electrode surfaces increased in the following order, T/CPE > CPE > T/GCE > GCE. The surface morphology of the working electrodes was also characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The values of surface roughness parameters were found to be consistent with the results obtained by EIS experiments. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the experimental process. - Highlights: • Electrochemical behavior of Co(TPTZ) 2 complex studied by SWV and EIS techniques. • GCE, CPE T/GCE and T/CPE were used as working electrodes for comparative studies. • The surface morphologies of the electrodes were characterized by AFM. • Mechanisms were proposed from the effects of pH, ligand concentration and frequency. • EIS and morphologic relationships of the surfaces were established successfully

  19. The electrochemical behavior of Co(TPTZ){sub 2} complex on different carbon based electrodes modified with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortaboy, Sinem, E-mail: ortaboy@istanbul.edu.tr; Atun, Gülten, E-mail: gatun@istanbul.edu.tr

    2015-04-15

    Electrochemical behavior of cobalt (II) complex with the N-donor ligand 2,2′-bipyridyl-1,3,5-tripyridyl-s-triazine (TPTZ) was investigated to elucidate the electron-proton transfer mechanisms. The electrochemical response of the complex was studied using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. A conventional three-electrode system, consisting of glassy carbon (GCE), TiO{sub 2} modified glassy carbon (T/GCE), carbon paste (CPE) and TiO{sub 2} modified carbon paste (T/CPE) working electrodes were employed. The ligand/metal ratio and stability constant of the complex as well as the mechanisms of the electrode processes were elucidated by examining the effects of pH, ligand concentration and frequency on the voltammograms. The EIS results indicated that the samples modified with TiO{sub 2} had the higher charge transfer resistance than that of the bare electrodes and also suggested that the electroactivity of the electrode surfaces increased in the following order, T/CPE > CPE > T/GCE > GCE. The surface morphology of the working electrodes was also characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The values of surface roughness parameters were found to be consistent with the results obtained by EIS experiments. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the experimental process. - Highlights: • Electrochemical behavior of Co(TPTZ){sub 2} complex studied by SWV and EIS techniques. • GCE, CPE T/GCE and T/CPE were used as working electrodes for comparative studies. • The surface morphologies of the electrodes were characterized by AFM. • Mechanisms were proposed from the effects of pH, ligand concentration and frequency. • EIS and morphologic relationships of the surfaces were established successfully.

  20. A phosphate transporter from the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus versiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M J; van Buuren, M L

    1995-12-07

    Vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi form symbiotic associations with the roots of most terrestrial plants, including many agriculturally important crop species. The fungi colonize the cortex of the root to obtain carbon from their plant host, while assisting the plant with the uptake of phosphate and other mineral nutrients from the soil. This association is beneficial to the plant, because phosphate is essential for plant growth and development, especially during growth under nutrient-limiting conditions. Molecular genetic studies of these fungi and their interaction with plants have been limited owing to the obligate symbiotic nature of the VA fungi, so the molecular mechanisms underlying fungal-mediated uptake and translocation of phosphate from the soil to the plant remain unknown. Here we begin to investigate this process by identifying a complementary DNA that encodes a transmembrane phosphate transporter (GvPT) from Glomus versiforme, a VA mycorrhizal fungus. The function of the protein encoded by GvPT was confirmed by complementation of a yeast phosphate transport mutant. Expression of GvPT was localized to the external hyphae of G. versiforme during mycorrhizal associations, these being the initial site of phosphate uptake from the soil.

  1. Isolation of phosphatase-producing phosphate solubilizing bacteria from Loriya hot spring: Investigation of phosphate solubilizing in the presence of different parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Parhamfar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biofertilizers are the microorganisms that can convert useless nutrient to usable compounds. Unlike fertilizer, cost of biofertilizer production is low and doesn’t produce ecosystem pollution. Phosphate fertilizers can be replaced by phosphate biofertilizer to produce improvement. So, it is necessary to screen the climate-compatible phosphate solubilizing bacteria. Materials and methods: In this project samples were picked up from Loriya hot spring, which are located in Jiroft. Samples were incubated in PKV medium for 3 days. Screening of phosphate solubilizing bacteria was performed on the specific media, based on clear area diameter. The best bacterium was identified based on 16s rDNA gene. Phosphate solubilizing activity of this strain was considered in different carbon, nitrogen, phosphate and pH sources. Results: Sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree results show that B. sp. LOR033 is closely related to Bacillus licheniformis, with 97% homology. In addition, results show that maximum enzyme production was performed after 2 days that incubation pH was decreased simultaneously when the time was increased. Carbon sources investigation show that glucose is the most appropriate in enzyme production and phosphate releasing. Furthermore, results show that the optimum initial pH for phytase production was pH5.0. Different phosphate sources show that tricalcium phosphate has the suitable effect on enzyme activity in three days of incubation. Discussion and conclusion: Phosphatase enzyme production capacity, growth in acidic pH and phosphate solubilizing potential in different salt and phosphate sources show that this strain has considerable importance as biofertilizers.

  2. Root developmental adaptation to phosphate starvation: better safe than sorry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péret, Benjamin; Clément, Mathilde; Nussaume, Laurent; Desnos, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial component of major organic molecules such as nucleic acids, ATP and membrane phospholipids. It is present in soils in the form of inorganic phosphate (Pi), which has low availability and poor mobility. To cope with Pi limitations, plants have evolved complex adaptive responses that include morphological and physiological modifications. This review describes how the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana adapts its root system architecture to phosphate deficiency through inhibition of primary root growth, increase in lateral root formation and growth and production of root hairs, which all promote topsoil foraging. A better understanding of plant adaptation to low phosphate will open the way to increased phosphorus use efficiency by crops. Such an improvement is needed in order to adjust how we manage limited phosphorus stocks and to reduce the disastrous environmental effects of phosphate fertilizers overuse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 3D printing of octacalcium phosphate bone substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir S. Komlev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible calcium phosphate ceramic grafts are able of supporting new bone formation in appropriate environment. The major limitation of these materials usage for medical implants is the absence of accessible methods for their patient-specific fabrication. 3D printing methodology is an excellent approach to overcome the limitation supporting effective and fast fabrication of individual complex bone substitutes. Here we proposed a relatively simple route for 3D printing of octacalcium phosphates in complexly shaped structures by the combination of inkjet printing with post-treatment methodology. The printed octacalcium phosphate blocks were further implanted in the developed cranial bone defect followed by histological evaluation. The obtained result confirmed the potential of the developed octacalcium phosphates bone substitutes, which allowed 2.5-time reducing of defect’s diameter at 6.5 months in a region where native bone repair is extremely inefficient.

  4. Structural Isosteres of Phosphate Groups in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuezhou; Borrel, Alexandre; Ghemtio, Leo; Regad, Leslie; Boije Af Gennäs, Gustav; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Xhaard, Henri

    2017-03-27

    We developed a computational workflow to mine the Protein Data Bank for isosteric replacements that exist in different binding site environments but have not necessarily been identified and exploited in compound design. Taking phosphate groups as examples, the workflow was used to construct 157 data sets, each composed of a reference protein complexed with AMP, ADP, ATP, or pyrophosphate as well other ligands. Phosphate binding sites appear to have a high hydration content and large size, resulting in U-shaped bioactive conformations recurrently found across unrelated protein families. A total of 16 413 replacements were extracted, filtered for a significant structural overlap on phosphate groups, and sorted according to their SMILES codes. In addition to the classical isosteres of phosphate, such as carboxylate, sulfone, or sulfonamide, unexpected replacements that do not conserve charge or polarity, such as aryl, aliphatic, or positively charged groups, were found.

  5. Inhibition of precipitation of carbonate apatite by trisodium citrate analysed in base of the formation of chemical complexes in growth solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prywer, Jolanta, E-mail: jolanta.prywer@p.lodz.pl [Institute of Physics, Lodz University of Technology, ul. Wólczańska 219, 93-005 Łódź (Poland); Olszynski, Marcin [Institute of Physics, Lodz University of Technology, ul. Wólczańska 219, 93-005 Łódź (Poland); Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa [Institute of Chemistry, Environment Protection and Biotechnology, Jan Długosz University of Częstochowa, ul. Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Częstochowa (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    Effect of trisodium citrate on the precipitation of carbonate apatite is studied. The experimental series are performed in the solution of artificial urine. The investigations are related to infectious urinary stones formation as carbonate apatite is one of the main components of this kind of stones. To mimic a real infection in urinary tract the aqueous ammonia solution was added to the solution of artificial urine. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that trisodium citrate increases induction time with respect to carbonate apatite formation and decreases the efficiency of carbonate apatite precipitation. The inhibitory effect of trisodium citrate on the precipitation of carbonate apatite is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. Such an analysis demonstrates that the inhibitory effect is mainly related with the fact that trisodium citrate binds Ca{sup 2+} ions and causes the formation of CaCit{sup −} and Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}CO{sub 3} complexes. Trisodium citrate binds Ca{sup 2+} ions in the range of pH from 6 to 9.5 for which carbonate apatite is favored to be formed. - Highlights: • Trisodium citrate (TC) increases induction time of carbonate apatite (CA) formation. • TC decreases the efficiency of CA precipitation. • The inhibitory effect of TC is explained in base of chemical speciation analysis. • The inhibitory effect is mainly related with the fact that TC binds Ca{sup 2+} ions. • TC binds Ca{sup 2+} ions in the range of pH from 6 to 9.5 for which CA is formed.

  6. The influence of dissolved H2O content in supercritical carbon dioxide to the inclusion complexes formation of ketoprofen/β-cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenawan, Joshua; Trisanti, P. N.; Sumarno

    2015-12-01

    This work studies the relation between dissolved H2O content in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) with the formation of ketoprofen (KP)/β-cyclodextrin(CD) inclusion complexes. The process involves a physical mixture of these two compounds into contact with the supercritical carbon dioxide which had been previously saturated with H2O over a certain duration. The pressure used for saturation process is 130 bar and saturation temperature was ranged between 30 °C to 50 °C. The inclusion process was achieved by keeping it for 2 hours at 160 bar and 200 bar with inclusion temperature of 50 °C. The results enable us to suggest explanations for the inclusion formation. The inclusion complexes can be formed by contacting the dissolved H2O in SC-CO2 to the physical mixture of KP and CD. An increase in the temperature of saturation process resulted in an increase of dissolved H2O content in the supercritical carbon dioxide. The increasing levels of this water soluble resulted an increase in the inclusion complexes that has been formed. The formation of inclusion complexes includes the water molecules enhancing the emptying of the CD cavities and being replaced by KP, towards a more stable energy state. The drug release used for analyzing the dissolution rate of the KP/CD complexes. The results vary from 79,85% to 99,98% after 45 minutes which is above the rate that has been assigned by Farmakope Indonesia at 70% dissolution rate for KP. The use of SC-CO2 offers a new methods for increasing the rate of dissolution of drugs that are hydrophobic such as KP. CO2 used as a supercritical fluid because of its relatively low cost, easily obtainable supercritical conditions, and lack of toxicity. The material samples were characterized by DSC and Spectrophotometer UV-vis technique.

  7. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, B. J.; Peterson, K.; McKane, R.; Lajtha, K.; Quandt, D. J.; Allen, S. T.; Sell, S.; Daly, C.; Harmon, M. E.; Johnson, S. L.; Spies, T.; Sollins, P.; Abdelnour, A. G.; Stieglitz, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site situated in Oregon’s central-western Cascade Range. Decades of long-term measurements and intensive research have revealed influences of topography on vegetation patterns, disturbance history, and hydrology. More recent research has shown surprising interactions between microclimates and synoptic weather patterns due to cold air drainage and pooling in mountain valleys. Using these data and insights, in addition to a recent LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) reconnaissance and a small sensor network, we are employing process-based models, including “SPA” (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere, developed by Mathew Williams of the University of Edinburgh), and “VELMA” (Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Alternatives, developed by Marc Stieglitz and colleagues of the Georgia Institute of Technology) to focus on two important features of mountainous landscapes: heterogeneity (both spatial and temporal) and connectivity (atmosphere-canopy-hillslope-stream). Our research questions include: 1) Do fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity result in emergent properties at the basin scale, and if so, what are they? 2) How does connectivity across ecosystem components affect system responses to climate variability and change? Initial results show that for environmental drivers that elicit non-linear ecosystem responses on the plot scale, such as solar radiation, soil depth and soil water content, fine-scale spatial heterogeneity may produce unexpected emergent properties at larger scales. The results from such modeling experiments are necessarily a function of the supporting algorithms. However, comparisons based on models such as SPA and VELMA that operate at much different spatial scales

  8. Phosphate glasses, containing nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyna, E.A.; Khalilev, V.D.; Koryavin, A.A.; Goncharova, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Possibilities of nitrogen-containing glass synthesis by the introduction into the charge of ammonium salts, as well as aluminium nitride, are studied. Zinc alumoyttrium phosphate glass (mol. %) Zn(PO 3 ) 2 - 4O, Al(PO 3 ) 3 - 3O, Y(PO 3 ) 3 -3O is suggested as a matrix. It is shown that the effect of amide and imide groups on the properties of the glass is less noticeable than the effect of nitride groups. Direct introduction of nitride constituent was realized using AlN, but aluminium introduction was taken into account so that the oxide was subtracted. The attempt to introduce more than 2.5 mass % of nitrogen into initial matrix by aluminium nitride has failed due to repeated restoration of glass with amorphous phosphorus isolation

  9. Phosphate-rich sedimentary rocks: significance for organic facies and petroleum exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waples, D W

    1982-03-01

    Phosphorus-bearing rocks and sediments can be divided into two genetically distinct classes: phosphatic shales or limestones and phosphorites. Phosphatic shales are primary sediments in which phosphate nodules or micronodules have formed diagenetically by precipitation of calcium phosphates derived mainly from organic phosphorus. The nodules form in reducing environments at shallow depths within the sediments, where loss of phosphate by diffusion to the overlying water column is minimized. Highly biogenic sediments containing large amounts of organic matter and some fine clastic debris provide ideal environments for the formation of phosphate nodules. Phosphorites, in contrast, represent concentrated accumulations of reworked phosphate nodules which originated in phosphatic shales or limestones. Currents, wave action, recrystallization, and erosion and resedimentation are important mechanisms in the concentration process. Phosphatic shales and limestones may become excellent oil source rocks if thermal maturity is achieved. They are useful facies indicators for anoxic or nearly anoxic depositional environments, and are often associated with restricted basins, or, during certain geologic periods, with broad shelves developed during transgressions. Phosphorites, in contrast, are often correlated with sea-level regressions or uplifts. They are modest source rocks because of their low organic carbon contents and the fact that they were reworked under oxidizing conditions. Nevertheless, because phosphorites are derived from, and often grade into, phosphatic shales, they also are of potential utility in the search for oil source beds.

  10. Phosphate and Cardiovascular Disease beyond Chronic Kidney Disease and Vascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinee Disthabanchong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate is essential for life but its accumulation can be detrimental. In end-stage renal disease, widespread vascular calcification occurs as a result of chronic phosphate load. The accumulation of phosphate is likely to occur long before the rise in serum phosphate above the normal range since several observational studies in both general population and early-stage CKD patients have identified the relationship between high-normal serum phosphate and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Consumption of food high in phosphate increases both fasting and postprandial serum phosphate and habitual intake of high phosphate diet is associated with aging, cardiac hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, and subclinical atherosclerosis. The decline in renal function and dietary phosphate load can increase circulating fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23 which may have a direct impact on cardiomyocytes. Increased FGF-23 levels in both CKD and general populations are associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and mortality. Increased extracellular phosphate directly affects endothelial cells causing cell apoptosis and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs causing transformation to osteogenic phenotype. Excess of calcium and phosphate in the circulation can promote the formation of protein-mineral complex called calciprotein particles (CPPs. In CKD, these CPPs contain less calcification inhibitors, induce inflammation, and promote VSMC calcification.

  11. Free Energy Minimization Calculation of Complex Chemical Equilibria. Reduction of Silicon Dioxide with Carbon at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, C. M.; Hutchinson, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of free energy in reactions between silicon dioxide and carbon. Describes several computer programs for calculating the free energy minimization and their uses in chemistry classrooms. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  12. Structural Insights Into The Bacterial Carbon-Phosphorus Lyase Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    the proteins encoded in the phn operon act in concert to catabolise phosphonate remain unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of a 240 kDa Escherichia coli carbon-phosphorus lyase core complex at 1.7 Å and show that it comprises a highly intertwined network of subunits with several unexpected......Phosphonate compounds act as a nutrient source for some microorganisms when phosphate is limiting but require a specialised enzymatic machinery due to the presence of the highly stable carbon-phosphorus bond. Despite the fundamental importance to microbial metabolism, the details of how...... structural features. The complex contains at least two different active sites and suggest a revision of current models of carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage. Using electron microscopy, we map the binding site of an additional protein subunit, which may use ATP for driving conformational changes during...

  13. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal ({beta}/a)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth {beta}-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ?T196, ?S197 and ?G198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the

  14. Preparation of DNA/Gold Nanoparticle Encapsulated in Calcium Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible DNA/gold nanoparticle complex with a protective calcium phosphate (CaP coating was prepared by incubating DNA/gold nanoparticle complex coated by hyaluronic acid in SBF (simulated body fluid with a Ca concentration above 2 mM. The CaP-coated DNA complex was revealed to have high compatibility with cells and resistance against enzymatic degradation. By immersion in acetate buffer (pH 4.5, the CaP capsule released the contained DNA complex. This CaP capsule including a DNA complex is promising as a sustained-release system of DNA complexes for gene therapy.

  15. Cage-Like Porous Carbon with Superhigh Activity and Br2 -Complex-Entrapping Capability for Bromine-Based Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenhui; Lai, Qinzhi; Xu, Pengcheng; Zheng, Daoyuan; Li, Xianfeng; Zhang, Huamin

    2017-06-01

    Bromine-based flow batteries receive wide attention in large-scale energy storage because of their attractive features, such as high energy density and low cost. However, the Br 2 diffusion and relatively low activity of Br 2 /Br - hinder their further application. Herein, a cage-like porous carbon (CPC) with specific pore structure combining superhigh activity and Br 2 -complex-entrapping capability is designed and fabricated. According to the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculation, the pore size of the CPC (1.1 nm) is well designed between the size of Br - (4.83 Å), MEP + (9.25 Å), and Br 2 complex (MEPBr 3 12.40 Å), wherein Br - is oxidized to Br 2 , which forms a Br 2 complex with the complexing agent immediately and is then entrapped in the cage via pore size exclusion. In addition, the active sites produced during the carbon dioxide activation process dramatically accelerate the reaction rate of Br 2 /Br - . In this way, combining a high Br 2 -entrapping-capability and high specific surface areas, the CPC shows very impressive performance. The zinc bromine flow battery assembled with the prepared CPC shows a Coulombic efficiency of 98% and an energy efficiency of 81% at the current density of 80 mA cm -2 , which are among the highest values ever reported. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Synthetic and mechanistic study of oxycarbene-like coupling reaction patterns of actinide eta2-acyl complexes with carbon monoxide and isocyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloy, K.G.; Fagan, P.J.; Manriquez, J.M.; Marks, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    This contribution reports the synthesis and characterization of the ylide complexes Cp' 2 Th[OC(CH 2 -t-Bu)C-(PR 3 )O[(Cl) (Cp' = eta 5 -C 5 Me 5 ; R = Me, Ph) formed by the carbonylation of Cp' 2 Th(Cl)(eta 2 -COCH 2 -t-Bu) (1) in the presence of phosphines. Isotopic tracer studies with 13 CO indicate that the labeled carbon atom is incorporated regiospecifically at the ylide α-carbon atom position. The carbonylation of 1 to yield the enedionediolate (Cp' 2 Th[OC(CH 2 -t-Bu)CO](Cl)] 2 (2) or the ylide complexes was found to obey a second-order rate law where rate = kP/sub CO/[1]; k = 1.50 (5) x 10 -5 min -1 torr -1 for both carbonylations at 30.8 0 C. The rate of formation of the ylide complexes was also found to be independent of solvent, phosphine concentration, and type of phosphine used. The carbonylation of 1 is therefore inferred to involve a rate-determining coupling of CO with the acyl to yield an intermediate ketene or ketene-like complex. 51 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  17. 13C and 17O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- and (UO 2 ) 3 (CO 3 ) 6 6- in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = -log(a H + ) versus p[H] = -log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA

  18. Control of surface topography in biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel O; Allo, Bedilu A; Klassen, Robert; Hutter, Jeffrey L; Dixon, S Jeffrey; Rizkalla, Amin S

    2012-02-28

    The behavior of cells responsible for bone formation, osseointegration, and bone bonding in vivo are governed by both the surface chemistry and topography of scaffold matrices. Bone-like apatite coatings represent a promising method to improve the osteoconductivity and bonding of synthetic scaffold materials to mineralized tissues for regenerative procedures in orthopedics and dentistry. Polycaprolactone (PCL) films were coated with calcium phosphates (CaP) by incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF). We investigated the effect of SBF ion concentration and soaking time on the surface properties of the resulting apatite coatings. CaP coatings were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Young's modulus (E(s)) was determined by nanoindentation, and surface roughness was assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mechanical stylus profilometry. CaP such as carbonate-substituted apatite were deposited onto PCL films. SEM and AFM images of the apatite coatings revealed an increase in topographical complexity and surface roughness with increasing ion concentration of SBF solutions. Young's moduli (E(s)) of various CaP coatings were not significantly different, regardless of the CaP phase or surface roughness. Thus, SBF with high ion concentrations may be used to coat synthetic polymers with CaP layers of different surface topography and roughness to improve the osteoconductivity and bone-bonding ability of the scaffold. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  19. MEDUSA-2.0: an intermediate complexity biogeochemical model of the marine carbon cycle for climate change and ocean acidification studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yool

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available MEDUSA-1.0 (Model of Ecosystem Dynamics, nutrient Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification was developed as an "intermediate complexity" plankton ecosystem model to study the biogeochemical response, and especially that of the so-called "biological pump", to anthropogenically driven change in the World Ocean (Yool et al., 2011. The base currency in this model was nitrogen from which fluxes of organic carbon, including export to the deep ocean, were calculated by invoking fixed C:N ratios in phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. However, due to anthropogenic activity, the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 has significantly increased above its natural, inter-glacial background. As such, simulating and predicting the carbon cycle in the ocean in its entirety, including ventilation of CO2 with the atmosphere and the resulting impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems, requires that both organic and inorganic carbon be afforded a more complete representation in the model specification. Here, we introduce MEDUSA-2.0, an expanded successor model which includes additional state variables for dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, dissolved oxygen and detritus carbon (permitting variable C:N in exported organic matter, as well as a simple benthic formulation and extended parameterizations of phytoplankton growth, calcification and detritus remineralisation. A full description of MEDUSA-2.0, including its additional functionality, is provided and a multi-decadal spin-up simulation (1860–2005 is performed. The biogeochemical performance of the model is evaluated using a diverse range of observational data, and MEDUSA-2.0 is assessed relative to comparable models using output from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5.

  20. Response of the carbon cycle in an intermediate complexity model to the different climate configurations of the last nine interglacials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bouttes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 levels during interglacials prior to the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE,  ∼  430 ka BP were around 40 ppm lower than after the MBE. The reasons for this difference remain unclear. A recent hypothesis proposed that changes in oceanic circulation, in response to different external forcings before and after the MBE, might have increased the ocean carbon storage in pre-MBE interglacials, thus lowering atmospheric CO2. Nevertheless, no quantitative estimate of this hypothesis has been produced up to now. Here we use an intermediate complexity model including the carbon cycle to evaluate the response of the carbon reservoirs in the atmosphere, ocean and land in response to the changes of orbital forcings, ice sheet configurations and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last nine interglacials. We show that the ocean takes up more carbon during pre-MBE interglacials in agreement with data, but the impact on atmospheric CO2 is limited to a few parts per million. Terrestrial biosphere is simulated to be less developed in pre-MBE interglacials, which reduces the storage of carbon on land and increases atmospheric CO2. Accounting for different simulated ice sheet extents modifies the vegetation cover and temperature, and thus the carbon reservoir distribution. Overall, atmospheric CO2 levels are lower during these pre-MBE simulated interglacials including all these effects, but the magnitude is still far too small. These results suggest a possible misrepresentation of some key processes in the model, such as the magnitude of ocean circulation changes, or the lack of crucial mechanisms or internal feedbacks, such as those related to permafrost, to fully account for the lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations during pre-MBE interglacials.

  1. Electrochemical Reduction of Zinc Phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Hwan; Lee, Jung Hyun; Shin, Woon Sup

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated first that the electrochemical reduction of zinc phosphate in neutral phosphate buffer is possible and potentially applicable to bio-compatible rechargeable battery. The actual redox component is Zn(s)/Zn phosphate(s) and the future research about the control of crystal formation for the better cyclability is required. In lead-acid battery, the electrochemical redox reaction of Pb (s) /PbSO 4(s) is used by reducing Pb(II) and oxidizing Pb(0) in sulfate rich solution. Since both reduced form and oxidized form are insoluble, they cannot diffuse to the opposite electrodes and react. It is a very common strategy to make a stable battery electrode that a metal element is reduced and oxidized in solution containing an abundance of anion readily precipitating with the metal ion. For the application of this strategy to construction of rechargeable battery using bio-compatible electrode materials and electrolytes, the use of phosphate ion can be considered as anion readily precipitating with metal ions. If phosphate buffer with neutral pH is used as electrolyte, the better bio-compatibility will be achieved than most of rechargeable battery using strong acid, strong base or organic solvent as electrolyte solution. There are many metal ions readily precipitating with phos-phate ion, and zinc is one of them

  2. PHOSPHATE CRYSTALLURIA IN VARIOUS FORMS OF UROLITHIASIS AND POSSIBILITIES OF ITS PROGNOSTICATION IN PATIENTS WITH PHOSPHATE STONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Konstantinova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Definition of types of crystalluria in various forms of urolithiasis and biochemical signs of phosphate crystals in the urine, while phosphate urolithiasis (infectious origin.Patients and methods. The study involved 144 patients with recurrent urolithiasis — 75 women and 69 men. Of these, 46 — diagnosed calculi with uric acid, 44 — calcium oxalate or mixed with a prevalence of calcium oxalate, in 54 — phosphate rocks (carbonate-apatite and/or struvite. The age of patients ranged from 21 to 74 years. 93 people have been under long-term, within 2–15 years, outpatient observation. The examination included the collection of anamnesis, general and microbiological analysis of urine, biochemical blood serum and urine on 10 indicators, reflecting renal function, state of the protein, water and electrolyte metabolism, uric acid metabolism, the chemical composition of the stone analysis.Results. It was found that in patients with calcium oxalate stones phosphaturia has been diagnosed in 2% of cases. And, along with calcium phosphate crystals they had oxalate crystals. In patients with phosphate urolithiasis phosphaturia observed in 96% of patients, in two patients (4% they determined except phosphates also oxalate salt in urine sediment. Patients with phosphate urolithiasis at occurrence of phosphate crystalluria have metabolic state changes: increased serum uric acid concentration from 0.322 ± 0.009 to 0.367 ± 0.018 mmol/l daily renal excretion of inorganic phosphate 23.94 ± 2.93 mmol/day to 32.12 ± 4.39 mmol/day, and reduced total calcium content in urine 6.61 ± 0.94 mmol/day to 3.37 ± 0.89 mmol/day. The results led to the following conclusion.Conclusion. Biochemical signs of occurrence of phosphate crystalluria in patients with stones of infectious origin can be: the approaching level of excretion in the urine of inorganic phosphates to 32,12 ± 4,39 mmol/day, serum uric acid concentration to 0,367 ± 0,018 mmol/l, and the

  3. Trehalose-6-Phosphate: connecting plant metabolism and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jathish ePonnu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Beyond their metabolic roles, sugars can also act as messengers in signal transduction. Trehalose, a sugar found in many species of plants and animals, is a non-reducing disaccharide composed of two glucose moieties. Its synthesis in plants is a two-step process, involving the production of trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P catalyzed by TREHALOSE-6-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (TPS and its consecutive dephosphorylation to trehalose, catalyzed by TREHALOSE-6-PHOSPHATE PHOSPHATASE (TPP. T6P has recently emerged as an important signaling metabolite, regulating carbon assimilation and sugar status in plants. In addition, T6P has also been demonstrated to play an essential role in plant development. This review recapitulates the recent advances in our understanding the role of T6P in coordinating diverse metabolic and developmental processes.

  4. ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J.

    1959-04-14

    An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

  5. Modeling uranium(VI) adsorption onto montmorillonite under varying carbonate concentrations: A surface complexation model accounting for the spillover effect on surface potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournassat, C.; Tinnacher, R. M.; Grangeon, S.; Davis, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    The prediction of U(VI) adsorption onto montmorillonite clay is confounded by the complexities of: (1) the montmorillonite structure in terms of adsorption sites on basal and edge surfaces, and the complex interactions between the electrical double layers at these surfaces, and (2) U(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, anionic and neutral species. Previous U(VI)-montmorillonite adsorption and modeling studies have typically expanded classical surface complexation modeling approaches, initially developed for simple oxides, to include both cation exchange and surface complexation reactions. However, previous models have not taken into account the unique characteristics of electrostatic surface potentials that occur at montmorillonite edge sites, where the electrostatic surface potential of basal plane cation exchange sites influences the surface potential of neighboring edge sites ('spillover' effect). A series of U(VI) - Na-montmorillonite batch adsorption experiments was conducted as a function of pH, with variable U(VI), Ca, and dissolved carbonate concentrations. Based on the experimental data, a new type of surface complexation model (SCM) was developed for montmorillonite, that specifically accounts for the spillover effect using the edge surface speciation model by Tournassat et al. (2016a). The SCM allows for a prediction of U(VI) adsorption under varying chemical conditions with a minimum number of fitting parameters, not only for our own experimental results, but also for a number of published data sets. The model agreed well with many of these datasets without introducing a second site type or including the formation of ternary U(VI)-carbonato surface complexes. The model predictions were greatly impacted by utilizing analytical measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in individual sample solutions rather than assuming solution equilibration with a specific partial pressure of CO2, even when the gas phase was

  6. Hydrogen permeation resistant phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for reducing hydrogen diffusion through metal wherein the metal is coated with a phosphate-radical-containing, phosphate-glass-forming material on at least one surface thereof. The coating is then heated to at least 350 0 C to form a phosphate glass. This method is especially applicable to nuclear reactors to minimize tritium diffusion. The coating is preferably formed with a solution of phosphoric acid which may also contain compounds such as MnSO 4 , SiO 2 and Na 2 Cr 2 0 7 . (author)

  7. Hydrogen permeation resistant phosphate coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for reducing hydrogen diffusion through metal is described. The metal is coated with a phosphate-radical-containing, phosphate-glass-forming material on at least one surface. The coating is then heated to at least 350 0 C to form a phosphate glass. This method is especially applicable to nuclear reactors to minimize tritium diffusion. The coating is preferably formed with a solution of phosphoric acid which may also contain compounds such as MnSO 4 , SiO 2 and Na 2 Cr 2 O 7 . (author)

  8. Consortium inoculum of five thermo-tolerant phosphate solubilizing Actinomycetes for multipurpose biofertilizer preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandimath, Arusha P; Karad, Dilip D; Gupta, Shantikumar G; Kharat, Arun S

    2017-10-01

    Alkaline pH of the soil facilitates the conversion of phosphate present in phosphate fertilizer applied in the field to insoluble phosphate which is not available to plants. Problem of soluble phosphate deficiency arises, primarily due to needless use of phosphate fertilizer. We sought to biofertilizer with the thermo-tolerant phosphate solubilizing actinomycetes consortium that could convert insoluble phosphate to soluble phosphate at wider temperature range. In the present investigation consortium of five thermo-tolerant phosphate solubilizing actinomycetes was applied for preparation of inoculum to produce multipurpose bio-fertilizer. Phosphates solubilizing thermo-tolerant 32 actinomycetes strains were processed for identification with the use of PIBWIN software and were screened for phosphate solubilizing activity. Amongst these five actinomycetes were selected on the basis of their ability to produce cellulase, chitinase, pectinase, protease, lipase, amylase and phosphate solubilizing enzymes. Ability to produce these enzymes at 28°C and 50°C were examined. Biofertilizer was prepared by using agricultural waste as a raw material. While preparation of bio-fertilizer the pH decreased from 7.5 to 4.3 and temperature increased up to 74°C maximum at the end of 4 th week and in subsequent week it started to decline gradually till it reached around 50°C, which was found to be stable up to eighth week. This thermo-tolerant actinomycetes consortium released soluble phosphate of up to 46.7 μg ml -1 . As the mesophilic organisms die out at high temperature of composting hence thormo-tolerant actinomycetes would be the better substitute for preparation of phosphate solubilizing bio-fertilizer with added potential to degrade complex macromolecules in composting.

  9. THERMODINAMIC PARAMETERS ON THE SORPTION OF PHOSPHATE IONS BY MONTMORILLONITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhsan Jaslin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of phosphate by montmorillonite at 10, 30, and 50 oC were investigated aiming to mainly determine thermodynamic parameters for the formation of surface complexes in the adsorption of phosphate ions by montmorillonite. Data were collected by adsorption edge experiments investigating the effect of pH, adsorption isotherms enabling the effect of sorbate concentration, and acid-base titration calculating protons released or taken up by adsorption process. Data analysis was carried out using surface complexation model to fit the data collected in this study using the parameters obtained from previous study, as well as to calculate the values of ΔH and ΔS. Previous study reported that phosphate ions formed two outer-sphere surface complexes with active sites of montmorillonite through hydrogen bonding. In the first complex,  [(XH0– H2L─]─, the phosphate was held to permanent-charge X─ sites on the tetrahedral siloxane faces, and the second complex, [[(SO─(SOH]– – [H2L]─] 2─ was formed through the interaction between the phosphate and variable charge surface hydroxyl groups at the edges of montmorillonite crystals and on the octahedral alumina faces. The values of ΔH for the first and second reactions are 39.756 and 3.765x10-7 kJ mol‒1 respectively. Since both reactions have positive enthalpy values, it can be concluded that the reactions are endothermic. Large energy for the first reaction is needed by X─  sites (permanent negatively charge sites of montmorillonite to be partially desolvated, on which K+ or other surface cations are replaced by H+ ions in the surface protonated process, and are then ready to interact phosphate ions in the solution. Small values of ΔH for the second reactions indicates that hydrogen bonds formed by phosphate and SOH sites in the second reaction are easily broken out, and the phosphate can easily desorbed from the surface. The values of ΔS for the first and second reactions are

  10. Phosphoketolase pathway contributes to carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Lee, Tai-Chi; Rommelfanger, Sarah; Gjersing, Erica; Cano, Melissa; Maness, Pin-Ching; Ghirardi, Maria; Yu, Jianping

    2015-12-07

    Central carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria comprises the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle, glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Redundancy in this complex metabolic network renders the rational engineering of cyanobacterial metabolism for the generation of biomass, biofuels and chemicals a challenge. Here we report the presence of a functional phosphoketolase pathway, which splits xylulose-5-phosphate (or fructose-6-phosphate) to acetate precursor acetyl phosphate, in an engineered strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis (ΔglgC/xylAB), in which glycogen synthesis is blocked, and xylose catabolism enabled through the introduction of xylose isomerase and xylulokinase. We show that this mutant strain is able to metabolise xylose to acetate on nitrogen starvation. To see whether acetate production in the mutant is linked to the activity of phosphoketolase, we disrupted a putative phosphoketolase gene (slr0453) in the ΔglgC/xylAB strain, and monitored metabolic flux using (13)C labelling; acetate and 2-oxoglutarate production was reduced in the light. A metabolic flux analysis, based on isotopic data, suggests that the phosphoketolase pathway metabolises over 30% of the carbon consumed by ΔglgC/xylAB during photomixotrophic growth on xylose and CO2. Disruption of the putative phosphoketolase gene in wild-type Synechocystis also led to a deficiency in acetate production in the dark, indicative of a contribution of the phosphoketolase pathway to heterotrophic metabolism. We suggest that the phosphoketolase pathway, previously uncharacterized in photosynthetic organisms, confers flexibility in energy and carbon metabolism in cyanobacteria, and could be exploited to increase the efficiency of cyanobacterial carbon metabolism and photosynthetic productivity.

  11. Assignment of hyperfine shifted haem methyl carbon resonances in paramagnetic low-spin met-cyano complex of sperm whale myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    1987-09-28

    The hyperfine shifted resonances arising from all four individual haem carbons of the paramagnetic low-spin met-cyano complex of sperm whale myoglobin have been clearly identified and assigned for the first time with the aid of /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C heteronuclear chemical shift correlated spectroscopy. Alteration of the in-plane symmetry of the electronic structure of haem induced by the ligation of proximal histidyl imidazole spreads the haem carbon resonances to 32 ppm at 22/sup 0/C, indicating the sensitivity of those resonances to the haem electronic/molecular structure. Those resonances are potentially powerful probes in characterizing the nature of haem electronic structure. 25 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table.

  12. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Increased Extracellular Phosphate Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Anemia in renal insufficiency results in part from impaired erythrocyte formation due to erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Beyond that, renal insufficiency enhances eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis may be stimulated by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Several uremic toxins have previously been shown to stimulate eryptosis. Renal insufficiency is further paralleled by increase of plasma phosphate concentration. The present study thus explored the effect of phosphate on erythrocyte death. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: Following a 48 hours incubation, the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes markedly increased as a function of extracellular phosphate concentration (from 0-5 mM. The exposure to 2 mM or 5 mM phosphate was followed by slight but significant hemolysis. [Ca2+]i did not change significantly up to 2 mM phosphate but significantly decreased at 5 mM phosphate. The effect of 2 mM phosphate on phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly augmented by increase of extracellular Ca2+ to 1.7 mM, and significantly blunted by nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, by additional presence of pyrophosphate as well as by presence of p38 inhibitor SB203580. Conclusion: Increasing phosphate concentration stimulates erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect depending on extracellular but not intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is hypothesized that suicidal erythrocyte death is triggered by complexed CaHPO4.

  13. Propensity of a single-walled carbon nanotube-peptide to mimic a KK10 peptide in an HLA-TCR complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-12-01

    The application of nanotechnology to improve disease diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and prevention is the goal of nanomedicine. We report here a theoretical study of a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) mimic binding to a human leukocyte antigen-T cell receptor (HLA-TCR) immune complex as a first attempt of a potential nanomedicine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine development. The carbon nanotube was coated with three arginine residues to imitate the HIV type 1 immunodominant viral peptide KK10 (gag 263-272: KRWIILGLNK), named CNT-peptide hereafter. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the CNT-peptide and KK10 binding to an important HLA-TCR complex. Our results suggest that the CNT-peptide and KK10 bind comparably to the HLA-TCR complex, but the CNT-peptide forms stronger interactions with the TCR. Desorption simulations highlight the innate flexibility of KK10 over the CNT-peptide, resulting in a slightly higher desorption energy required for KK10 over the CNT-peptide. Our findings indicate that the designed CNT-peptide mimic has favorable propensity to activate TCR pathways and should be further explored to understand therapeutic potential.

  14. Ultraviolet-B radiation mobilizes uranium from uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes in aquatic systems, demonstrated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, Sachin Vilas; Christensen, Terje; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian

    2017-05-05

    Humic substances have a tendency to form complexes with metal ions in aquatic medium, impacting the metal mobility, decreasing bioavailability and toxicity. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure degrades the humic substance, changes their molecular weight distribution and their metal binding capacity in aquatic medium. In this study, we experimented the effect of UV-B radiation on the uranium complexed with fulvic acids and humic acids in a soft water system at different pH, uranium concentrations and radiant exposure. The concentration and distribution of uranium in a complexed form were investigated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi detection technique (AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS). The major concentration of uranium present in complexes was primarily associated with average and higher molecular weight fulvic and humic acids components. The concentration of uranium in a complexed form increased with increasing fulvic and humic acid concentrations as well as pH of the solution. The higher molecular weight fraction of uranium was degraded due to the UV-B exposure, transforming about 50% of the uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes into low molecular weight uranium species in complex form with organic ligands and/or free form. The result also suggests AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS to be an important separation and detection technique for understanding the interaction of radionuclides with dissolved organic matter, tracking size distribution changes during degradation of organic complexes for understanding mobility, bioavailability and ecosystem transfer of radionuclides as well as metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Novel C-2 epimerization of aldoses promoted by nickel(II) diamine complexes, involving a stereospecific pinacol-type 1,2-carbon shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Fumihiko; Kuse, Manabu; Yano, Shigenobu; Hidai, Masanobu; Yoshikawa, Sadao

    1988-01-01

    The newly discovered C-2 epimerization of aldoses promoted by nickel(II) diamine complexes has been investigated in detail by using 13 C-enriched D-glucose, 13 C NMR spectroscopy, and EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) analysis. Aldoses treated with nickel(II) diamine complexes (diamine = N,N,N'-trimethylethylenediamine (N,N,N'-Me 3 en), N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (N,N,N',N'-Me 4 en), etc.) in methanolic solutions were rapidly (60 degree C, 3-5 min) epimerized at C-2 to give equilibrium mixtures where the ratio of C-2 epimers shifts to the side of the naturally rare mannose-type aldoses (having the cis arrangement of C-2 and C-3 hydroxyl groups) compared with those in the thermodynamic equilibrium states. The epimerization product of D-[1- 13 C]glucose was exclusively D-[2- 13 C]mannose, demonstrating that the reaction involves a stereospecific 1,2-shift of the carbon skeleton resulting in inversion of configuration at C-2. Furthermore, the absorption and circular dichroism spectra of the reaction solutions indicated the presence of an intermediate nickel(II) complex containing both diamine and sugar components, which was directly revealed by EXAFS analysis to be a mononuclear nickel(II) complex having octahedral coordination geometry. All these observations strongly suggest that the C-2 epimerization proceeds through an intermediate mononuclear nickel(II) complex, where the carbinolamine-like adduct of aldose with diamine in an open-chain form is epimerized at C-2 by a stereospecific rearrangement of the carbon skeleton or a pinacol-type rearrangement involving a cyclic transition state. 44 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, nitrate, phosphate, temperature and other variables collected from time series observations at Heron Island Reef Flat from 2010-06-01 to 2010-12-13 (NODC Accession 0127256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains carbonate chemistry and environmental parameters data that were collected from a 200-day time series monitoring on the Heron Island...

  17. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Canillas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies.

  18. Variability of nitrate and phosphate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Sundar, D.

    Nitrate and phosphate are important elements of the biogeochemical system of an estuary. Observations carried out during the dry season April-May 2002, and March 2003 and wet season September 2002, show temporal and spatial variability of these two...

  19. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  20. Inhibition of calcium phosphate precipitation under environmentally-relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Xinde; Harris, Willie G.; Josan, Manohardeep S.; Nair, Vimala D.

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation of Ca phosphates plays an important role in controlling P activity and availability in environmental systems. The purpose of this study was to determine inhibitory effects on Ca phosphate precipitation by Mg 2+ , SO 4 2- , CO 3 2- , humic acid, oxalic acid, biogenic Si, and Si-rich soil clay commonly found in soils, sediments, and waste streams. Precipitation rates were determined by measuring decrease of P concentration in solutions during the first 60 min; and precipitated solid phases identified using X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Poorly-crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP: Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 OH) formed in control solutions over the experiment period of 24 h, following a second-order dependence on P concentration. Humic acid and Mg 2+ significantly inhibited formation of HAP, allowing formation of a more soluble amorphous Ca phosphate phase (ACP), and thus reducing the precipitation rate constants by 94-96%. Inhibition caused by Mg 2+ results from its incorporation into Ca phosphate precipitates, preventing formation of a well-crystalline phase. Humic acid likely suppressed Ca phosphate precipitation by adsorbing onto the newly-formed nuclei. Presence of oxalic acid resulted in almost complete inhibition of HAP precipitation due to preemptive Ca-oxalate formation. Carbonate substituted for phosphate, decreasing the crystallinity of HAP and thus reducing precipitation rate constant by 44%. Sulfate and Si-rich solids had less impact on formation of HAP; while they reduced precipitation in the early stage, they did not differ from the control after 24 h. Results indicate that components (e.g., Mg 2+ , humic acid) producing relatively soluble ACP are more likely to reduce P stability and precipitation rate of Ca phosphate in soils and sediments than are components (e.g., SO 4 2- , Si) that have less effect on the crystallinity