WorldWideScience

Sample records for complex resource-bounded environments

  1. The pervasive reach of resource-bounded Kolmogorov complexity in computational complexity theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allender, E.; Koucký, Michal; Ronneburger, D.; Roy, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 1 (2011), s. 14-40 ISSN 0022-0000 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/0854; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545; GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Circuit complexity * Distinguishing complexity * FewEXP * Formula size * Kolmogorov complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.157, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022000010000887

  2. Decision theory with resource-bounded agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Joseph Y; Pass, Rafael; Seeman, Lior

    2014-04-01

    There have been two major lines of research aimed at capturing resource-bounded players in game theory. The first, initiated by Rubinstein (), charges an agent for doing costly computation; the second, initiated by Neyman (), does not charge for computation, but limits the computation that agents can do, typically by modeling agents as finite automata. We review recent work on applying both approaches in the context of decision theory. For the first approach, we take the objects of choice in a decision problem to be Turing machines, and charge players for the "complexity" of the Turing machine chosen (e.g., its running time). This approach can be used to explain well-known phenomena like first-impression-matters biases (i.e., people tend to put more weight on evidence they hear early on) and belief polarization (two people with different prior beliefs, hearing the same evidence, can end up with diametrically opposed conclusions) as the outcomes of quite rational decisions. For the second approach, we model people as finite automata, and provide a simple algorithm that, on a problem that captures a number of settings of interest, provably performs optimally as the number of states in the automaton increases. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Innovation in a complex environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Pellissier

    2012-11-01

    Objectives: The study objectives were, firstly, to establish the determinants for complexity and how these can be addressed from a design point of view in order to ensure innovation success and, secondly, to determine how this changes innovation forms and applications. Method: Two approaches were offered to deal with a complex environment – one allowing for complexity for organisational innovation and the other introducing reductionism to minimise complexity. These approaches were examined in a qualitative study involving case studies, open-ended interviews and content analysis between seven developing economy (South African organisations and seven developed economy (US organisations. Results: This study presented a proposed framework for (organisational innovation in a complex environment versus a framework that minimises complexity. The comparative organisational analysis demonstrated the importance of initiating organisational innovation to address internal and external complexity, with the focus being on the leadership actions, their selected operating models and resultant organisational innovations designs, rather than on technological innovations. Conclusion: This study cautioned the preference for technological innovation within organisations and suggested alternative innovation forms (such as organisational and management innovation be used to remain competitive in a complex environment.

  4. Innovation in a complex environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Pellissier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As our world becomes more global and competitive yet less predictable, the focus seems to be increasingly on looking to innovation activities to remain competitive. Although there is little doubt that a nation’s competitiveness is embedded in its innovativeness, the complex environment should not be ignored. Complexity is not accounted for in balance sheets or reported in reports; it becomes entrenched in every activity in the organisation. Innovation takes many forms and comes in different shapes.Objectives: The study objectives were, firstly, to establish the determinants for complexity and how these can be addressed from a design point of view in order to ensure innovation success and, secondly, to determine how this changes innovation forms and applications.Method: Two approaches were offered to deal with a complex environment – one allowing for complexity for organisational innovation and the other introducing reductionism to minimise complexity. These approaches were examined in a qualitative study involving case studies, open-ended interviews and content analysis between seven developing economy (South African organisations and seven developed economy (US organisations.Results: This study presented a proposed framework for (organisational innovation in a complex environment versus a framework that minimises complexity. The comparative organisational analysis demonstrated the importance of initiating organisational innovation to address internal and external complexity, with the focus being on the leadership actions, their selected operating models and resultant organisational innovations designs, rather than on technological innovations.Conclusion: This study cautioned the preference for technological innovation within organisations and suggested alternative innovation forms (such as organisational and management innovation be used to remain competitive in a complex environment

  5. Rapid Mission Design for Dynamically Complex Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Designing trajectories in dynamically complex environments is very challenging and easily becomes an intractable problem. More complex planning implies potentially...

  6. Probabilistic Geoacoustic Inversion in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Probabilistic Geoacoustic Inversion in Complex Environments Jan Dettmer School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria BC...long-range inversion methods can fail to provide sufficient resolution. For proper quantitative examination of variability, parameter uncertainty must...project aims to advance probabilistic geoacoustic inversion methods for complex ocean environments for a range of geoacoustic data types. The work is

  7. Brokering leadership in complex environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Miller

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study, set in the United States, presents an in-depth analysis of leadership in schools and community-based organizations that helped connect students and families to vital education resources. Data were collected from 132 interviews with those who experienced the social and organizational complexities of homelessness. The findings suggest that brokering leadership supports learning, symbolism, identity development, and responsibility. The study indicates that brokering leadership has promise for cultivating opportunities for those who are traditionally disconnected from important resources and relationships.

  8. Towards strategy formulation in a complex environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Pellissier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The management sciences offer mainly linear solutions to an environment that is becoming increasingly complex. This is aggravated by the need for innovation outcomes. Formulating and implementing strategy is therefore far more complicated. Since developing economies face far less stable environments, businesses operating in these domains are more accustomed (even adept to deal with complexity. This article compares the deployment of complexity in strategy to achieve innovation in either a developing or a developed economy setting. From interviews conducted with selected CEOs from both economies, it was found that the businesses in the developing economies include complexity factors in their strategies whereas those in developed economies focus on operational excellence and not on complexity. Therefore, at this point, businesses in developed economies may want to explore the strategies adopted by those in developing economies to accommodate diversity and the dynamic environment that require innovations.

  9. A generalization of resource-bounded measure, with an application (Extended abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrman, Harry; van Melkebeek, Dieter; Regan, Kenneth W.; Sivakumar, D.; Strauss, Martin

    We introduce resource-bounded betting games, and propose a generalization of Lutz's resource-bounded measure in which the choice of next string to bet on is fully adaptive. Lutz's martingales are equivalent to betting games constrained to bet on strings in lexicographic order. We show that if strong pseudo-random number generators exist, then betting games are equivalent to martingales, for measure on E and EXP. However, we construct betting games that succeed on certain classes whose Lutz measures are important open problems: the class of polynomial-time Turing-complete languages in EXP, and its superclass of polynomial-time Turing-autoreducible languages. If an EXP-martingale succeeds on either of these classes, or if betting games have the "finite union property" possessed by Lutz's measure, one obtains the non-relativizable consequence BPP ≠ EXP. We also show that if EXP ≠ MA, then the polynomial-time truth-table-autoreducible languages have Lutz measure zero, whereas if EXP = BPP, they have measure one.

  10. Micro-navigation in complex periodic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamolly, Alexander; Ishikawa, Takuji; Lauga, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Natural and artificial small-scale swimmers may often self-propel in environments subject to complex geometrical constraints. While most past theoretical work on low-Reynolds number locomotion addressed idealised geometrical situations, not much is known on the motion of swimmers in heterogeneous environments. We investigate theoretically and numerically the behaviour of a single spherical micro-swimmer located in an infinite, periodic body-centred cubic lattice consisting of rigid inert spheres of the same size as the swimmer. We uncover a surprising and complex phase diagram of qualitatively different trajectories depending on the lattice packing density and swimming actuation strength. These results are then rationalised using hydrodynamic theory. In particular we show that the far-field nature of the swimmer (pusher vs. puller) governs the behaviour even at high volume fractions. ERC Grant PhyMeBa (682754, EL); JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (A) (17H00853, TI).

  11. Project communication management in complex environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ying, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This unique book that deals with project communication management in complex environments, taking a leaf from China’s experience with a major earthquake in Sichuan, would be a timely contribution to fill this lacuna. Readers would be able to understand how companies and organizations that are unprepared for crisis management would react to their detriment. The lessons provided in this book are the only one of its kind to highlight the lessons for companies and organizations to prepare themselves for successful project communication management through the complexity-informed framework. Although the book is written by two building professionals, the concepts and lessons presented are generic and equally applicable for businesses outside of the construction industry; for example, for airports, resorts, hotels, shipyards, etc.

  12. Measuring Customer Profitability in Complex Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Morten; Kumar, V.; Rohde, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Customer profitability measurement is an important element in customer relationship management and a lever for enhanced marketing accountability. Two distinct measurement approaches have emerged in the marketing literature: Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) and Customer Profitability Analysis (CPA...... propositions. Additionally, the framework provides design and implementation guidance for managers seeking to implement customer profitability measurement models for resource allocation purposes....... that the degree of sophistication deployed when implementing customer profitability measurement models is determined by the type of complexity encountered in firms’ customer environments. This gives rise to a contingency framework for customer profitability measurement model selection and five research...

  13. Complex geologic characterization of the repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, T R [British Petroleum Research Center, Sunberry, England; Szymanski, J S

    1982-01-01

    The present basis for characterizing geological environments is identified in this paper, and the additional requirements imposed by the need to isolate high-level waste safely are discussed. Solutions to these additional requirements are proposed. The time scale of concern and the apparent complexity of the required multidisciplinary approach are identified. It is proposed that an increased use of the geologic record, together with a recognition that all geologic processes operate within an interdependent system, be a key feature in geologic characterization of deep repositories.

  14. FuGeF: A Resource Bound Secure Forwarding Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Idris Abubakar; Mohd Hanapi, Zurina; Sali, A; Zulkarnain, Zuriati A

    2016-06-22

    Resource bound security solutions have facilitated the mitigation of spatio-temporal attacks by altering protocol semantics to provide minimal security while maintaining an acceptable level of performance. The Dynamic Window Secured Implicit Geographic Forwarding (DWSIGF) routing protocol for Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) has been proposed to achieve a minimal selection of malicious nodes by introducing a dynamic collection window period to the protocol's semantics. However, its selection scheme suffers substantial packet losses due to the utilization of a single distance based parameter for node selection. In this paper, we propose a Fuzzy-based Geographic Forwarding protocol (FuGeF) to minimize packet loss, while maintaining performance. The FuGeF utilizes a new form of dynamism and introduces three selection parameters: remaining energy, connectivity cost, and progressive distance, as well as a Fuzzy Logic System (FLS) for node selection. These introduced mechanisms ensure the appropriate selection of a non-malicious node. Extensive simulation experiments have been conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed FuGeF protocol as compared to DWSIGF variants. The simulation results show that the proposed FuGeF outperforms the two DWSIGF variants (DWSIGF-P and DWSIGF-R) in terms of packet delivery.

  15. Antenna Miniaturization in Complex Electromagnetic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying

    improved compared to the 2-D planar electrically small loop antennas. Measurement Techniques for ESAs In this dissertation we proposed two novel measurement techniques for electrically small antennas. A modified Wheeler cap method for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small....... Moreover, the modified Wheeler cap method for measurements of small antennas in complex environments is further developed. A cable-free impedance and gain measurement technique for electrically small antennas is also proposed. The electromagnetic model of this technique is derived by using the spherical...... wave expansion, and it is valid for arbitrary electrically small AUT at arbitrary distances between the probe and AUT. The whole measurement setup is modeled by the cascade of three coupled multipleort networks. The electromagnetic model, the simulation results, and the obtained measurement results...

  16. Obesogenic environments: complexities, perceptions, and objective measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lake, Amelia A; Townshend, Tim G; Alvanides, Seraphim

    2010-01-01

    ... are to successfully address the issue. Beginning with an overarching introduction to obesity and its implications for health and wellbeing, the book will move on to consider such crucial areas as eating behaviours and food environments...

  17. Gender, Environment and the Theory of Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Di Ciommo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the theory of complexity to analise gender questions, showing that those are built by society in an exchange of interactions between nature and culture. The bioanthropological rootsand and the sociocultural characteristics contain different experiences, knowledge and wisdom, in a complex organization in which oposition does notmean extinction, and difference does not imply hierarchy. We can apply Morin’s “tetralogical ring” concept, which admits disorder, organization, order and interaction to the understanding of the impasse between masculine and feminine, humans and non-humans, towards a paradigmatic change in the social and environmental relations.

  18. Constructivist learning theories and complex learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R-J. Simons; Dr. S. Bolhuis

    2004-01-01

    Learning theories broadly characterised as constructivist, agree on the importance to learning of the environment, but differ on what exactly it is that constitutes this importance. Accordingly, they also differ on the educational consequences to be drawn from the theoretical perspective. Cognitive

  19. Obesogenic environments: complexities, perceptions, and objective measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lake, Amelia A; Townshend, Tim G; Alvanides, Seraphim

    2010-01-01

    ..., physical activity and food access. This groundbreaking book brings together for the first time the knowledge of dietitians, epidemiologists and town planners in order to offer a multidisciplinary approach to public health, suggesting new and exciting ways to shape our environment to better support healthful decisions"--Provided by publisher.

  20. Human Error Mechanisms in Complex Work Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations...

  1. Analysis and Design of Complex Network Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    and J. Lowe, “The myths and facts behind cyber security risks for industrial control systems ,” in the Proceedings of the VDE Kongress, VDE Congress...questions about 1) how to model them, 2) the design of experiments necessary to discover their structure (and thus adapt system inputs to optimize the...theoretical work that clarifies fundamental limitations of complex networks with network engineering and systems biology to implement specific designs and

  2. Organizational Development and Coaching in Complex Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Skarp, Ari-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the thesis is to first study the mainstream thinking of organizational development and coaching that is widely used in organizations around the world and taught in most business schools and universities. After this, another way of thinking about organizations is introduced, namely the “complex responsive processes of relating”. This thesis then develops conclusions of how this new way of viewing organizations might affect the practices of organizational development and coaching. T...

  3. Human error mechanisms in complex work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1988-01-01

    Human error taxonomies have been developed from analysis of industrial incident reports as well as from psychological experiments. In this paper the results of the two approaches are reviewed and compared. It is found, in both cases, that a fairly small number of basic psychological mechanisms will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations. The implications for system safety and briefly mentioned, together with the implications for system design. (author)

  4. Human error mechanisms in complex work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Danmarks Tekniske Hoejskole, Copenhagen)

    1988-01-01

    Human error taxonomies have been developed from analysis of industrial incident reports as well as from psychological experiments. In this paper the results of the two approaches are reviewed and compared. It is found, in both cases, that a fairly small number of basic psychological mechanisms will account for most of the action errors observed. In addition, error mechanisms appear to be intimately related to the development of high skill and know-how in a complex work context. This relationship between errors and human adaptation is discussed in detail for individuals and organisations. The implications for system safety are briefly mentioned, together with the implications for system design. (author)

  5. A marketing mix model for a complex and turbulent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Mason

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is based on the proposition that the choice of marketing tactics is determined, or at least significantly influenced, by the nature of the company’s external environment. It aims to illustrate the type of marketing mix tactics that are suggested for a complex and turbulent environment when marketing and the environment are viewed through a chaos and complexity theory lens. Design/Methodology/Approach: Since chaos and complexity theories are proposed as a good means of understanding the dynamics of complex and turbulent markets, a comprehensive review and analysis of literature on the marketing mix and marketing tactics from a chaos and complexity viewpoint was conducted. From this literature review, a marketing mix model was conceptualised. Findings: A marketing mix model considered appropriate for success in complex and turbulent environments was developed. In such environments, the literature suggests destabilising marketing activities are more effective, whereas stabilising type activities are more effective in simple, stable environments. Therefore the model proposes predominantly destabilising type tactics as appropriate for a complex and turbulent environment such as is currently being experienced in South Africa. Implications: This paper is of benefit to marketers by emphasising a new way to consider the future marketing activities of their companies. How this model can assist marketers and suggestions for research to develop and apply this model are provided. It is hoped that the model suggested will form the basis of empirical research to test its applicability in the turbulent South African environment. Originality/Value: Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand how to cope in complex, turbulent environments is necessary, but has not been widely researched. In fact, most chaos and complexity theory work in marketing has concentrated on marketing strategy, with

  6. Semantic Support for Complex Ecosystem Research Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawonn, M.; McGuinness, D. L.; Pinheiro, P.; Santos, H. O.; Chastain, K.

    2015-12-01

    As ecosystems come under increasing stresses from diverse sources, there is growing interest in research efforts aimed at monitoring, modeling, and improving understanding of ecosystems and protection options. We aimed to provide a semantic infrastructure capable of representing data initially related to one large aquatic ecosystem research effort - the Jefferson project at Lake George. This effort includes significant historical observational data, extensive sensor-based monitoring data, experimental data, as well as model and simulation data covering topics including lake circulation, watershed runoff, lake biome food webs, etc. The initial measurement representation has been centered on monitoring data and related provenance. We developed a human-aware sensor network ontology (HASNetO) that leverages existing ontologies (PROV-O, OBOE, VSTO*) in support of measurement annotations. We explicitly support the human-aware aspects of human sensor deployment and collection activity to help capture key provenance that often is lacking. Our foundational ontology has since been generalized into a family of ontologies and used to create our human-aware data collection infrastructure that now supports the integration of measurement data along with simulation data. Interestingly, we have also utilized the same infrastructure to work with partners who have some more specific needs for specifying the environmental conditions where measurements occur, for example, knowing that an air temperature is not an external air temperature, but of the air temperature when windows are shut and curtains are open. We have also leveraged the same infrastructure to work with partners more interested in modeling smart cities with data feeds more related to people, mobility, environment, and living. We will introduce our human-aware data collection infrastructure, and demonstrate how it uses HASNetO and its supporting SOLR-based search platform to support data integration and semantic browsing

  7. Air Traffic Complexity Measurement Environment (ACME): Software User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A user's guide for the Air Traffic Complexity Measurement Environment (ACME) software is presented. The ACME consists of two major components, a complexity analysis tool and user interface. The Complexity Analysis Tool (CAT) analyzes complexity off-line, producing data files which may be examined interactively via the Complexity Data Analysis Tool (CDAT). The Complexity Analysis Tool is composed of three independently executing processes that communicate via PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) and Unix sockets. The Runtime Data Management and Control process (RUNDMC) extracts flight plan and track information from a SAR input file, and sends the information to GARP (Generate Aircraft Routes Process) and CAT (Complexity Analysis Task). GARP in turn generates aircraft trajectories, which are utilized by CAT to calculate sector complexity. CAT writes flight plan, track and complexity data to an output file, which can be examined interactively. The Complexity Data Analysis Tool (CDAT) provides an interactive graphic environment for examining the complexity data produced by the Complexity Analysis Tool (CAT). CDAT can also play back track data extracted from System Analysis Recording (SAR) tapes. The CDAT user interface consists of a primary window, a controls window, and miscellaneous pop-ups. Aircraft track and position data is displayed in the main viewing area of the primary window. The controls window contains miscellaneous control and display items. Complexity data is displayed in pop-up windows. CDAT plays back sector complexity and aircraft track and position data as a function of time. Controls are provided to start and stop playback, adjust the playback rate, and reposition the display to a specified time.

  8. Scintillometry in urban and complex environments: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Helen C

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of turbulent exchange in complex environments is relevant to a wide range of hydro-meteorological applications. Observations are required to improve understanding and inform model parameterisations but the very nature of complex environments presents challenges for measurements. Scintillometry offers several advantages as a technique for providing spatially-integrated turbulence data (structure parameters and fluxes), particularly in areas that would be impracticable to monitor using eddy covariance, such as across a valley, above a city or over heterogeneous landscapes. Despite much of scintillometry theory assuming flat, homogeneous surfaces and ideal conditions, over the last 20 years scintillometers have been deployed in increasingly complex locations, including urban and mountainous areas. This review draws together fundamental and applied research in complex environments, to assess what has been learnt, summarise the state-of-the-art and identify key areas for future research. Particular attention is given to evidence, or relative lack thereof, of the impact of complex environments on scintillometer data. Practical and theoretical considerations to account for the effects of complexity are discussed, with the aim of developing measurement capability towards more reliable and accurate observations in future. The usefulness of structure parameter measurements (in addition to fluxes, which must be derived using similarity theory) should not be overlooked, particularly when comparing or combining scintillometry with other measurement techniques and model simulations. (paper)

  9. RESEARCH ON COMPLEX, LARGE INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS IN TRANSNATIONAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin POPESCU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available More and more projects from different industrial sectors developed in transnational environment are becoming more characterized as "complex". In recent years, there has been much discussion and controversy about the complexity of the projects, and, despite what has been written and said in various papers, journals and professional conferences, more confusion than clarification was created, complexity of projects being interpreted differently from one author to another. Most of the literature studied is based on linear, analytical and rational approach, focusing on the size of project management planning and control and actually less on projects that are characterized as taking place and grow into a dynamic socio-human environment in a continuous change. This study represents a critical review of existing theoretical models found in literature, highlighting their limitations. The output of this literature study represents an integration of different approaches concerning complexity under one umbrella to provide a common understanding of the evolution of this concept.

  10. Criteria for the Development of Complex Teaching-Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtenhagen, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Relates aspects of the didactic tradition, especially the German didactic tradition, to the theory and practice of instructional design. Focuses on processes that are necessary to the modeling of reality and describes the design and development of a virtual enterprise as a complex teaching-learning environment in a German business school.…

  11. Situation awareness and workload in complex tactical environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper provides an example of a method to get insight into workload changes over time, executed tasks and situation awareness (SA) in complex task environments. The method is applied to measure the workload of a helicopter crew. The method has three components: 1) task analysis, 2) video

  12. Widening the scope of incident analysis in complex work environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuuren, van W.; Kanse, L.; Manser, T.

    2003-01-01

    Incident analysis is commonly used as a tooi to provide information on how to improve health and safety in complex work environments. The effectiveness of this tooi, however, depends on how the analysis is actually carried out. The traditional view on incident analysis highlights the role of human

  13. Environment-Gene interaction in common complex diseases: New approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Toscano, Jr.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 different environmental chemicals that are in use as high production volume chemicals confront us in our daily lives. Many of the chemicals we encounter are persistent and have long half-lives in the environment and our bodies. These compounds are referred to as Persistent Organic Pollutants, or POPS. The total environment however is broader than just toxic pollutants. It includes social capital, social economic status, and other factors that are not commonly considered in traditional approaches to studying environment-human interactions. The mechanism of action of environmental agents in altering the human phenotype from health to disease is more complex than once thought. The focus in public health has shifted away from the study of single-gene rare diseases and has given way to the study of multifactorial complex diseases that are common in the population. To understand common complex diseases, we need teams of scientists from different fields working together with common aims. We review some approaches for studying the action of the environment by discussing use-inspired research, and transdisciplinary research approaches. The Genomic era has yielded new tools for study of gene-environment interactions, including genomics, epigenomics, and systems biology. We use environmentally-driven diabetes mellitus type two as an example of environmental epigenomics and disease. The aim of this review is to start the conversation of how the application of advances in biomedical science can be used to advance public health.

  14. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-02-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

  15. CHANGE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES RELATED TO THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT COMPLEXITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena DOVAL

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The changes in organizations appear as a reaction to the organizational environment changes. In order to manage these changes successfully, the managers need to anticipate and design alternative strategies by preparing different options.  Nevertheless, the complexity of the global environment forces the managers to adopt strategies for their organizations that are facilitating the creation of new strategic competences and competitive advantages to face the environmental rapid changes. In this context, this paper is aiming to illustrate the main directions the change management may consider to change the organization strategies in order to harmonize them to the external environment, such as: integration versus externalization, flexible specialization and flexible organization, standardization versus adaptation, market segmentation, relationship building and maintaining and communication integration.  However, the new strategies are based on a changed attitude of the managers towards the competitive advantage that is dynamic and focused on creation rather then to operations.

  16. Visualizing Complex Environments in the Geo- and BioSciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, A.; Fox, P. A.; Zhong, H.; Eleish, A.; Ma, X.; Zednik, S.; Morrison, S. M.; Moore, E. K.; Muscente, D.; Meyer, M.; Hazen, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Earth's living and non-living components have co-evolved for 4 billion years through numerous positive and negative feedbacks. Earth and life scientists have amassed vast amounts of data in diverse fields related to planetary evolution through deep time-mineralogy and petrology, paleobiology and paleontology, paleotectonics and paleomagnetism, geochemistry and geochrononology, genomics and proteomics, and more. Integrating the data from these complimentary disciplines is very useful in gaining an understanding of the evolution of our planet's environment. The integrated data however, represent many extremely complex environments. In order to gain insights and make discoveries using this data, it is important for us to model and visualize these complex environments. As part of work in understanding the "Co-Evolution of Geo and Biospheres using Data Driven Methodologies," we have developed several visualizations to help represent the information stored in the datasets from complimentary disciplines. These visualizations include 2D and 3D force directed Networks, Chord Diagrams, 3D Klee Diagrams. Evolving Network Diagrams, Skyline Diagrams and Tree Diagrams. Combining these visualizations with the results of machine learning and data analysis methods leads to a powerful way to discover patterns and relationships about the Earth's past and today's changing environment.

  17. Computation of 3D form factors in complex environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, N.

    1989-01-01

    The calculation of radiant interchange among opaque surfaces in a complex environment poses the general problem of determining the visible and hidden parts of the environment. In many thermal engineering applications, surfaces are separated by radiatively non-participating media and may be idealized as diffuse emitters and reflectors. Consenquently the net radiant energy fluxes are intimately related to purely geometrical quantities called form factors, that take into account hidden parts: the problem is reduced to the form factor evaluation. This paper presents the method developed for the computation of 3D form factors in the finite-element module of the system TRIO, which is a general computer code for thermal and fluid flow analysis. The method is derived from an algorithm devised for synthetic image generation. A comparison is performed with the standard contour integration method also implemented and suited to convex geometries. Several illustrative examples of finite-element thermal calculations in radiating enclosures are given

  18. Complex monitoring of aerospace and mountain environment at Beo Mussala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, I.; Angelov, C.; Barnekov, L. and others

    2006-01-01

    The mission of BEO Moussala is the observing, complex monitoring and studies of global change processes, aerospace and mountain environment, natural hazards and technological risks. BEO Moussala is the focal point of the BEO Centre of Excellence established and promoted in the framework of FP5 project HIMONTONET essentially improving its research capacities in frame of the FP6 project BEOBAL. The basic fields of current and future activities and studies at BEO Moussala are: global change, aerospace and mountain environment, natural hazards and technological risks and not at least development, design and enhancement of measurement devices and systems. The basic parameters and characteristics of the new measuring facilities are given and discussed from the point of view of the requirements of Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) and Global Change Programs

  19. Dynamics of a Simple Quantum System in a Complex Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bulgac, A; Kusnezov, D; Bulgac, Aurel; Dang, Gui Do; Kusnezov, Dimitri

    1998-01-01

    We present a theory for the dynamical evolution of a quantum system coupled to a complex many-body intrinsic system/environment. By modelling the intrinsic many-body system with parametric random matrices, we study the types of effective stochastic models which emerge from random matrix theory. Using the Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism, we derive the influence functional and obtain either analytical or numerical solutions for the time evolution of the entire quantum system. We discuss thoroughly the structure of the solutions for some representative cases and make connections to well known limiting results, particularly to Brownian motion, Kramers classical limit and the Caldeira-Leggett approach.

  20. Managing Complex Battlespace Environments Using Attack the Network Methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Dr. William L.

    This paper examines the last 8 years of development and application of Attack the Network (AtN) intelligence methodologies for creating shared situational understanding of complex battlespace environment and the development of deliberate targeting frameworks. It will present a short history...... of their development, how they are integrated into operational planning through strategies of deliberate targeting for modern operations. The paper will draw experience and case studies from Iraq, Syria, and Afghanistan and will offer some lessons learned as well as insight into the future of these methodologies....... Including their possible application on a national security level for managing longer strategic endeavors....

  1. Chemistry of complexing molecules and environment. Report of the working group of the Cea ''mission environment''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Working group 'Chemistry of Complexing Molecules and Environment' of the Mission Environment (AG/ENV) identified themes for an original positioning of CEA on important issues of environmental research if a sufficiently strong demand appears. The research of CEA on the environment should be complementary to actions undertaken by other partners (official institutions, research organizations and industrial firms). The themes suggested are: the synthesis of new chelating molecules and new materials having specific properties, with the support of theoretical chemistry and modeling, analytical physical chemistry and speciation of species in relation to their eco-toxicity and their biogeochemical mobility in the natural environment. These themes, illustrated by examples of actions in progress at CEA or likely to be launched quickly, draw largely from recognized competences of the teams, generally developed for finalized nuclear applications: experimental, theoretical and instrumental competences. (author)

  2. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Jesús M; Rufo, Montaña; Jiménez, Antonio; Antolín, Alicia; Sánchez, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10(-4)) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10(-4)). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  3. Electrical stimulation vs thermal effects in a complex electromagnetic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua, Jesus M.; Rufo, Montana; Jimenez, Antonio; Antolin, Alicia; Sanchez, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Studies linking exposure to low levels of radiofrequencies with adverse health effects, notwithstanding their present apparent inconsistency, have contributed to a steady improvement in the quality of evaluating that exposure. In complex electromagnetic environments, with a multitude of emissions of different frequencies acting simultaneously, knowledge of the spectral content is fundamental to evaluating human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In the present work, we quantify the most significant spectral components in the frequency band 0.5-2200 MHz in an urban area. The measurements were made with a spectrum analyzer and monopole, biconical, and log-periodic antennas. Power density levels were calculated separately for the medium wave, short wave, and frequency modulation radio broadcasting bands, and for the television and GSM, DCS, and UMTS mobile telephony bands. The measured levels were compared with the ICNIRP reference levels for exposure to multiple frequency sources for thermal effects and electrical stimulation. The results showed the criterion limiting exposure on the basis of preventing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves and muscles to be stricter (exposure quotient 24.7 10 -4 ) than that based on thermal considerations (exposure quotient 0.16 10 -4 ). The bands that contribute most to the latter are short wave, with 46.2%, and mobile telephony with 32.6% of the total exposure. In a complex electromagnetic environment, knowledge of the radiofrequency spectrum is essential in order to quantify the contribution of each type of emission to the public's exposure. It is also necessary to evaluate the electrical effects as well as the thermal effects because the criterion to limit exposure on the basis of the effect of the electrical stimulation of tissues is stricter than that based on thermal effects.

  4. Educational complex of light-colored modeling of urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpenko Vladimir E.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms, methodological tools and structure of a training complex of light-colored modeling of the urban environment are developed in this paper. The following results of the practical work of students are presented: light composition and installation, media facades, lighting of building facades, city streets and embankment. As a result of modeling, the structure of the light form is determined. Light-transmitting materials and causing characteristic optical illusions, light-visual and light-dynamic effects (video-dynamics and photostatics, basic compositional techniques of light form are revealed. The main elements of the light installation are studied, including a light projection, an electronic device, interactivity and relationality of the installation, and the mechanical device which becomes a part of the installation composition. The meaning of modern media facade technology is the transformation of external building structures and their facades into a changing information cover, into a media content translator using LED technology. Light tectonics and the light rhythm of the plastics of the architectural object are built up through point and local illumination, modeling of the urban ensemble assumes the structural interaction of several light building models with special light-composition techniques. When modeling the social and pedestrian environment, the lighting parameters depend on the scale of the chosen space and are adapted taking into account the visual perception of the pedestrian, and the atmospheric effects of comfort and safety of the environment are achieved with the help of special light compositional techniques. With the aim of realizing the tasks of light modeling, a methodology has been created, including the mechanisms of models, variability and complementarity. The perspectives of light modeling in the context of structural elements of the city, neuropsychology, wireless and bioluminescence technologies are proposed

  5. Automated Ground Penetrating Radar hyperbola detection in complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Laurence; Lambot, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    used on-ground. Second, we investigated the efficiency of this method for field data taken with a time-domain system connected to 400 and 900 MHz antennas in a forest environment. For all the tests explained above, the computational time is around 56 s for 10000 edge dots detected in a b-scan for the 900 MHz antenna and 228 s for the 400 MHz antenna. This value depends on the complexity of the images. For the given examples, the rate of non-detection is negligible and the rate of false alarms varies from 0 to 8.3% , although it is worth noting that these performance rates become difficult to evaluate for reflections that are ambiguous for our own eyes. Finally, we conducted a sensitivity analysis showing that all these criteria are needed and sufficient for a correct detection. In conclusion, the low computational time and its considerations to take into account the hyperbola irregularities make the proposed algorithm very suitable and robust for complex environments. The false alarms are easily removed by studying the continuity of the reflections between consecutive transects for linear targets such as pipes. This research is funded by the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS, Belgium) and benefits from networking activities carried out within the EU COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  6. Toward humanoid robots for operations in complex urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jerry E.; Neuhaus, Peter; Johnson, Matthew; Carff, John; Krupp, Ben

    2010-04-01

    Many infantry operations in urban environments, such as building clearing, are extremely dangerous and difficult and often result in high casualty rates. Despite the fast pace of technological progress in many other areas, the tactics and technology deployed for many of these dangerous urban operation have not changed much in the last 50 years. While robots have been extremely useful for improvised explosive device (IED) detonation, under-vehicle inspection, surveillance, and cave exploration, there is still no fieldable robot that can operate effectively in cluttered streets and inside buildings. Developing a fieldable robot that can maneuver in complex urban environments is challenging due to narrow corridors, stairs, rubble, doors and cluttered doorways, and other obstacles. Typical wheeled and tracked robots have trouble getting through most of these obstacles. A bipedal humanoid is ideally shaped for many of these obstacles because its legs are long and skinny. Therefore it has the potential to step over large barriers, gaps, rocks, and steps, yet squeeze through narrow passageways, and through narrow doorways. By being able to walk with one foot directly in front of the other, humanoids also have the potential to walk over narrow "balance beam" style objects and can cross a narrow row of stepping stones. We describe some recent advances in humanoid robots, particularly recovery from disturbances, such as pushes and walking over rough terrain. Our disturbance recovery algorithms are based on the concept of Capture Points. An N-Step Capture Point is a point on the ground in which a legged robot can step to in order to stop in N steps. The N-Step Capture Region is the set of all N-Step Capture Points. In order to walk without falling, a legged robot must step somewhere in the intersection between an N-Step Capture Region and the available footholds on the ground. We present results of push recovery using Capture Points on our humanoid robot M2V2.

  7. Modelling study of sea breezes in a complex coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.-M.; Steyn, D. G.

    This study investigates a mesoscale modelling of sea breezes blowing from a narrow strait into the lower Fraser valley (LFV), British Columbia, Canada, during the period of 17-20 July, 1985. Without a nudging scheme in the inner grid, the CSU-RAMS model produces satisfactory wind and temperature fields during the daytime. In comparison with observation, the agreement indices for surface wind and temperature during daytime reach about 0.6 and 0.95, respectively, while the agreement indices drop to 0.4 at night. In the vertical, profiles of modelled wind and temperature generally agree with tethersonde data collected on 17 and 19 July. The study demonstrates that in late afternoon, the model does not capture the advection of an elevated warm layer which originated from land surfaces outside of the inner grid. Mixed layer depth (MLD) is calculated from model output of turbulent kinetic energy field. Comparison of MLD results with observation shows that the method generates a reliable MLD during the daytime, and that accurate estimates of MLD near the coast require the correct simulation of wind conditions over the sea. The study has shown that for a complex coast environment like the LFV, a reliable modelling study depends not only on local surface fluxes but also on elevated layers transported from remote land surfaces. This dependence is especially important when local forcings are weak, for example, during late afternoon and at night.

  8. A PROMPT METHODOLOGY TO GEOREFERENCE COMPLEX HYPOGEA ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Troisi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Actually complex underground structures and facilities occupy a wide space in our cities, most of them are often unsurveyed; cable duct, drainage system are not exception. Furthermore, several inspection operations are performed in critical air condition, that do not allow or make more difficult a conventional survey. In this scenario a prompt methodology to survey and georeferencing such facilities is often indispensable. A visual based approach was proposed in this paper; such methodology provides a 3D model of the environment and the path followed by the camera using the conventional photogrammetric/Structure from motion software tools. The key-role is played by the lens camera; indeed, a fisheye system was employed to obtain a very wide field of view (FOV and therefore high overlapping among the frames. The camera geometry is in according to a forward motion along the axis camera. Consequently, to avoid instability of bundle adjustment algorithm a preliminary calibration of camera was carried out. A specific case study was reported and the accuracy achieved.

  9. a Prompt Methodology to Georeference Complex Hypogea Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, S.; Baiocchi, V.; Del Pizzo, S.; Giannone, F.

    2017-02-01

    Actually complex underground structures and facilities occupy a wide space in our cities, most of them are often unsurveyed; cable duct, drainage system are not exception. Furthermore, several inspection operations are performed in critical air condition, that do not allow or make more difficult a conventional survey. In this scenario a prompt methodology to survey and georeferencing such facilities is often indispensable. A visual based approach was proposed in this paper; such methodology provides a 3D model of the environment and the path followed by the camera using the conventional photogrammetric/Structure from motion software tools. The key-role is played by the lens camera; indeed, a fisheye system was employed to obtain a very wide field of view (FOV) and therefore high overlapping among the frames. The camera geometry is in according to a forward motion along the axis camera. Consequently, to avoid instability of bundle adjustment algorithm a preliminary calibration of camera was carried out. A specific case study was reported and the accuracy achieved.

  10. Proceedings of "Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sension, R; Tokmakoff, A

    2008-04-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the symposium on Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments, which organized as part of the 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, LA from April 6 to 10, 2008. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time ƒresolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time resolved spectroscopy is central to all of DOEs grand challenges for fundamental energy science. This symposium brought together leaders in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy, including experimentalists, theoretical chemists, and simulators, to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. DOE support for this conference was used to help young US and international scientists travel to the meeting. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, optical, and xray spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  11. PREFACE: Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Kahl, Gerhard; Krakoviack, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    . In fact, theory and simulations were recently able to predict new and surprising dynamical features, such as the occurrence of sub-diffusive laws, which result from the trapping due to the geometric and topological constraints and/or quenched disorder, the presence of both continuous and discontinuous glass transitions, and diffusion-localization transitions. Together, theory and simulations are thus able to contribute to a deeper insight into the complex dynamical behaviour of fluids in disordered confinement. Still, many yet unsolved problems remain. The fact that theoretical and simulation approaches have caught up with experimental investigations, has motivated us to organize a workshop on the dynamics of fluids confined in disordered environments, so as to bring together the different communities working in this field: theory and simulations, with their recent developments based on the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition, and experiments, with particular emphasis on colloidal systems and novel techniques. In an effort to give credit to recent developments in related problems of biophysical relevance, an entire session of the programme was dedicated to anomalous diffusion in crowded environments. The workshop was thus aimed at providing a deeper understanding of the complex dynamics of fluids in confinement as well as up-to-date perspectives on the interdisciplinary applications of this field of research. We are proud to say that all 32 contacted speakers accepted our invitation. Additional participants were attracted by our scientific programme, contributing poster presentations to the workshop. In total, close to 50 participants were registered, arriving from 11 different countries (including the US, Japan, and Mexico). Thus we conclude that the workshop indeed addressed a highly topical scientific field. From the scientific point of view a broad range of problems was covered, ranging from biophysics over soft matter to fermion systems. From the vivid

  12. COMPOEX Technology to Assist Leaders in Planning and Executing Campaigns in Complex Operational Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kott, Alexander; Corpac, Peter S

    2007-01-01

    ... in a complex operational environment. Leaders must understand the operational environment, develop campaign plans that include multiple lines of effort such as security, governance, political-economic development, rule of law and employ...

  13. Metal–organic complexation in the marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witter Amy

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the voltammetric methods that are used to assess metal–organic complexation in seawater. These consist of titration methods using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV and cathodic stripping voltammetry competitive ligand experiments (CSV-CLE. These approaches and a kinetic approach using CSV-CLE give similar information on the amount of excess ligand to metal in a sample and the conditional metal ligand stability constant for the excess ligand bound to the metal. CSV-CLE data using different ligands to measure Fe(III organic complexes are similar. All these methods give conditional stability constants for which the side reaction coefficient for the metal can be corrected but not that for the ligand. Another approach, pseudovoltammetry, provides information on the actual metal–ligand complex(es in a sample by doing ASV experiments where the deposition potential is varied more negatively in order to destroy the metal–ligand complex. This latter approach gives concentration information on each actual ligand bound to the metal as well as the thermodynamic stability constant of each complex in solution when compared to known metal–ligand complexes. In this case the side reaction coefficients for the metal and ligand are corrected. Thus, this method may not give identical information to the titration methods because the excess ligand in the sample may not be identical to some of the actual ligands binding the metal in the sample.

  14. Modeling Dynamic Perceptual Attention in Complex Virtual Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Youngjun; van Velsen, Martin; Hill, Jr, Randall W

    2005-01-01

    An important characteristic of a virtual human is the ability to direct its perceptual attention to entities and areas in a virtual environment in a manner that appears believable and serves a functional purpose...

  15. Understanding and Designing Military Organizations for a Complex Dynamic Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hicks, Christopher E

    2008-01-01

    .... The two theories will be used to describe the external environment and how it relates to DoD organizations, current DoD organizational structures, and transformational concepts related to organizational design...

  16. Mental Models and the Control of Actions in Complex Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1987-01-01

    of human activities. The need for analysis of complex work scenarios is discussed, together with the necessity of considering several levels of cognitive control depending upon different kinds of internal representations. The development of mental representations during learning and adaptation...

  17. Energy and environment efficiency analysis based on an improved environment DEA cross-model: Case study of complex chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, ZhiQiang; Dong, JunGen; Han, YongMing; Zhu, QunXiong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •An improved environment DEA cross-model method is proposed. •Energy and environment efficiency analysis framework of complex chemical processes is obtained. •This proposed method is efficient in energy-saving and emission reduction of complex chemical processes. -- Abstract: The complex chemical process is a high pollution and high energy consumption industrial process. Therefore, it is very important to analyze and evaluate the energy and environment efficiency of the complex chemical process. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is used to evaluate the relative effectiveness of decision-making units (DMUs). However, the traditional DEA method usually cannot genuinely distinguish the effective and inefficient DMU due to its extreme or unreasonable weight distribution of input and output variables. Therefore, this paper proposes an energy and environment efficiency analysis method based on an improved environment DEA cross-model (DEACM) method. The inputs of the complex chemical process are divided into energy and non-energy inputs. Meanwhile, the outputs are divided into desirable and undesirable outputs. And then the energy and environment performance index (EEPI) based on the cross evaluation is used to represent the overall performance of each DMU. Moreover, the improvement direction of energy-saving and carbon emission reduction of each inefficiency DMU is quantitatively obtained based on the self-evaluation model of the improved environment DEACM. The results show that the improved environment DEACM method has a better effective discrimination than the original DEA method by analyzing the energy and environment efficiency of the ethylene production process in complex chemical processes, and it can obtain the potential of energy-saving and carbon emission reduction of ethylene plants, especially the improvement direction of inefficient DMUs to improve energy efficiency and reduce carbon emission.

  18. Expertise and Power: Agencies Operating in Complex Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Zito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution investigates the strategies that environmental agencies develop to enhance their policy autonomy, in order to fulfil their organisational missions for protecting the environment. This article asks whether there are particular strategic moves that an agency can make to augment this policy autonomy in the face of the principals. Critiquing principal agent theory, it investigates the evolution of three environmental agencies (the European Environment Agency, the England and Wales Environment Agency and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, focusing on the case study of climate change. The contribution examines how the agencies influence environmental policy on domestic, regional and global levels, with a special focus on the principals that constrain agency autonomy. A greater focus on different multi-level contexts, which the three agencies face, may create other possible dynamics and opportunities for agency strategies. Agencies can use particular knowledge, network and alliance building to strengthen their policy/political positions.

  19. Temperature field simulation of complex structures in fire environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weifen; Hao Zhiming; Li Minghai

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the typical model of the system of dangerous goods - steel - wood composite structure including components of explosives is used as the research object. Using MARC program, the temperature field of the structure in the fire environment is simulated. Radiation, conduction and convection heat transfer within the gap of the structure are taken into account, contact heat transfer is also considered. The phenomenon of thermal decomposition of wood in high temperature is deal with by equivalent method. The results show that the temperature of the explosives is not high in the fire environment. The timber inside the composite structure has played a very good insulation effect of explosives.

  20. Navigation for Characters and Crowds in Complex Virtual Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Toll, W.G.

    2017-01-01

    In a crowd simulation, virtual walking characters need to compute and traverse paths through a virtual environment while avoiding collisions. Simulations of large crowds occur increasingly often in computer games, in which real-time performance is required. Also, there is an increasing demand for

  1. Managing Complex Distance Education Projects in a Telework Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Mohamed; Cleveland-Innes, Marti; Wiseman, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The advances of communication technologies have allowed professionals to work on distance education projects in a telework environment. Managers of these projects must have the skills to manage the projects from a distance. They must be able to select the appropriate team members to work on the project, orient team members, and monitor team…

  2. [Elderly human being with ostomy and environments of care: reflection on the perspective of complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Edaiane Joana Lima; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo

    2012-01-01

    This is discussion about the relationship between elderly human beings with ostomy and their environments care, under the perspective of Complexity Edgar Morin. An axis holds the reflection: environments of care for elderly humans with ostomy. In this sense, we present three types of environment that surround the context of elderly humans with ostomy: home environment, group environment and hospital environment. This brings, as a social contribution, a new look about resizing caring of elderly humans with ostomy in their environment. It is considered that the environment hosting this human being contains a diversity of feelings, emotions, experiences; it binds multiple meanings, from the Complexity perspective, about the relationship between the environment and the caring process.

  3. Subsidies which are harmful to the environment, a complex reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourquier, Francois-Xavier; Monnoyer-Smith, Laurence; Demeulenaere, Laurence

    2017-12-01

    As the reduction of public supports which are harmful to the environment is a major stake in terms of struggle against pollutions and greenhouse gases, this publication proposes a discussion of these subsidies which are still important in France despite recent improvements, notably regarding wastes and fuels. The author first discusses how these harmful subsidies are defined by international or research bodies. He outlines that some subsidies have been suppressed since 2013, that important reforms have been initiated, and that, however, the level of harmful subsidies remains high. Then, he discusses the necessary reconciliation of different objectives, and briefly evokes the German and Italian assessment examples

  4. Scientific foundations of addressing risk in complex and dynamic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotan, T.O.; Storseth, F.; Albrechtsen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Development, deployment and application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and digital infrastructure continue with unabated intensity in the petroleum-related activity on the Norwegian shelf. This development towards what is denoted Integrated Operations (IO) creates new ways of organizing work, new work processes and increased automation, e.g. closer collaboration offshore-onshore, cooperation across organizational and geographical borders. This creates new challenges for managing risk. Although there are different versions of IO today, we argue that it is possible to identify and study generic properties within such IO manifestations. The current paper focus on the potential complexity of IO in the generic sense, and some scientific implications in terms of addressing risk. The paper uses the century-old metaphor of 'wildness in wait' to engage the wide field of complexity theory in a productive way to address systemic properties of risk. The paper further uses the Cynefin sensemaking framework in order to identify and address the crucial distinction between directed (resultant) and un-directed (emergent) order. The paper finally discusses the importance of seeing risk assessment as a social knowledge practice.

  5. Novel hybrid adaptive controller for manipulation in complex perturbation environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M C Smith

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a hybrid control scheme, combining the advantages of task-space and joint-space control. The controller is based on a human-like adaptive design, which minimises both control effort and tracking error. Our novel hybrid adaptive controller has been tested in extensive simulations, in a scenario where a Baxter robot manipulator is affected by external disturbances in the form of interaction with the environment and tool-like end-effector perturbations. The results demonstrated improved performance in the hybrid controller over both of its component parts. In addition, we introduce a novel method for online adaptation of learning parameters, using the fuzzy control formalism to utilise expert knowledge from the experimenter. This mechanism of meta-learning induces further improvement in performance and avoids the need for tuning through trial testing.

  6. Emergent sensing of complex environments by mobile animal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, Andrew; Torney, Colin J; Ioannou, Christos C; Faria, Jolyon J; Couzin, Iain D

    2013-02-01

    The capacity for groups to exhibit collective intelligence is an often-cited advantage of group living. Previous studies have shown that social organisms frequently benefit from pooling imperfect individual estimates. However, in principle, collective intelligence may also emerge from interactions between individuals, rather than from the enhancement of personal estimates. Here, we reveal that this emergent problem solving is the predominant mechanism by which a mobile animal group responds to complex environmental gradients. Robust collective sensing arises at the group level from individuals modulating their speed in response to local, scalar, measurements of light and through social interaction with others. This distributed sensing requires only rudimentary cognition and thus could be widespread across biological taxa, in addition to being appropriate and cost-effective for robotic agents.

  7. Structural investigations of sodium caseinate micelles in complex environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huck Iriart, C.; Herrera, M.L.; Candal, R. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Oliveira, C.L.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Torriani, I. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The most frequent destabilization mechanisms in Sodium Caseinate (NaCas) emulsions are creaming and flocculation. Coarse or fine emulsions with low protein con- tent destabilize mainly by creaming. If migration mechanism is suppressed, flocculation may become the main mechanism of destabilization. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) technique was applied to investigate sodium caseinate micelles structure in different environments. As many natural products, Sodium Caseinate samples have large polydisperse size distribution. The experimental data was analyzed using advanced modeling approaches. The Form Factor for the Caseinate micelle subunits was described by an ellipsoidal core shell model and the structure factor was split into two contributions, one corresponding to the particle-particle interactions and another one for the long range correlation of the subunits in the supramolecular structure. For the first term the hard sphere structure factor using the Percus-Yevick approximation for closure relation was used and for the second term a fractal model was applied. Three concentrations of sodium Caseinate (2, 5 and 7.5 %wt.) were measured in pure water, sugar solutions (20 %wt.) and in three different lipid phase emulsions containing 10 %wt. sunflower seed, olive and fish oils. Data analysis provided an average casein subunit radius of 4 nm, an average distance between the subunits of around 20nm and a fractal dimension value of around 3 for all samples. As indicated by the values of the correlation lengths for the set of studied samples, the casein aggregation is strongly affected by simple sugar additions and it is enhanced by emulsion droplets hydrophobic interaction. As will be presented, these nanoscale structural results provided by scattering experiments is consistent with macroscopic results obtained from several techniques, providing a new understanding of NaCas emulsions. (author)

  8. Structural investigations of sodium caseinate micelles in complex environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huck Iriart, C.; Herrera, M.L.; Candal, R.; Oliveira, C.L.P.; Torriani, I.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The most frequent destabilization mechanisms in Sodium Caseinate (NaCas) emulsions are creaming and flocculation. Coarse or fine emulsions with low protein con- tent destabilize mainly by creaming. If migration mechanism is suppressed, flocculation may become the main mechanism of destabilization. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) technique was applied to investigate sodium caseinate micelles structure in different environments. As many natural products, Sodium Caseinate samples have large polydisperse size distribution. The experimental data was analyzed using advanced modeling approaches. The Form Factor for the Caseinate micelle subunits was described by an ellipsoidal core shell model and the structure factor was split into two contributions, one corresponding to the particle-particle interactions and another one for the long range correlation of the subunits in the supramolecular structure. For the first term the hard sphere structure factor using the Percus-Yevick approximation for closure relation was used and for the second term a fractal model was applied. Three concentrations of sodium Caseinate (2, 5 and 7.5 %wt.) were measured in pure water, sugar solutions (20 %wt.) and in three different lipid phase emulsions containing 10 %wt. sunflower seed, olive and fish oils. Data analysis provided an average casein subunit radius of 4 nm, an average distance between the subunits of around 20nm and a fractal dimension value of around 3 for all samples. As indicated by the values of the correlation lengths for the set of studied samples, the casein aggregation is strongly affected by simple sugar additions and it is enhanced by emulsion droplets hydrophobic interaction. As will be presented, these nanoscale structural results provided by scattering experiments is consistent with macroscopic results obtained from several techniques, providing a new understanding of NaCas emulsions. (author)

  9. Preview of the Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol (MAAP): Assessing Risk and Opportunity in Complex Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alberts, Christopher; Dorofee, Audrey; Marino, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    .... A MAAP assessment provides a systematic, in-depth analysis of the potential for success in distributed, complex, and uncertain environments and can be applied across the life cycle and throughout the supply chain...

  10. Analysis of computational complexity for HT-based fingerprint alignment algorithms on java card environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mlambo, CS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, implementations of three Hough Transform based fingerprint alignment algorithms are analyzed with respect to time complexity on Java Card environment. Three algorithms are: Local Match Based Approach (LMBA), Discretized Rotation Based...

  11. Improvement of Inquiry in a Complex Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Kori, Külli; Maeots, Mario; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Riopel, Martin; Smyrnaiou, Zacharoula

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry learning is an effective approach in science education. Complex technology-enhanced learning environments are needed to apply inquiry worldwide to support knowledge gain and improvement of inquiry skills. In our study, we applied an ecology mission in the SCY-Lab learning environment and

  12. Understanding the determinants of problem-solving behavior in a complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, Stephen A.

    1994-01-01

    It is often argued that problem-solving behavior in a complex environment is determined as much by the features of the environment as by the goals of the problem solver. This article explores a technique to determine the extent to which measured features of a complex environment influence problem-solving behavior observed within that environment. In this study, the technique is used to determine how complex flight deck and air traffic control environment influences the strategies used by airline pilots when controlling the flight path of a modern jetliner. Data collected aboard 16 commercial flights are used to measure selected features of the task environment. A record of the pilots' problem-solving behavior is analyzed to determine to what extent behavior is adapted to the environmental features that were measured. The results suggest that the measured features of the environment account for as much as half of the variability in the pilots' problem-solving behavior and provide estimates on the probable effects of each environmental feature.

  13. Laboratory results of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubes in a complex environment - An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Olivier; Pavageau, Ellen-Mary; Vaillant, Francois [EDF R and D, Materials and Mechanics of Components Department, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Bouvier, Odile de [EDF Nuclear Engineering Division, Centre d' Expertise et d' Inspection dans les Domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation, 93206 Saint Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs in the flow-restricted areas on the secondary side of steam generator tubes of Pressured Water Reactors (PWR), where water pollutants are likely to concentrate. Chemical analyses carried out during the shutdowns gave some insight into the chemical composition of these areas, which has evolved during these last years (i.e. less sodium as pollutants). It has been modeled in laboratory by tests in two different typical environments: the sodium hydroxide and the sulfate environments. These models satisfactorily describe the secondary side corrosion of steam generator tubes for old plant units. Furthermore, a third typical environment - the complex environment - which corresponds to an All Volatile Treatment (AVT) environment containing alumina, silica, phosphate and acetic acid has been recently studied. This particular environment satisfactorily reproduces the composition of the deposits observed on the surface of the steam generator tubes as well as the degradation of the tubes. A review of the recent laboratory results obtained by considering the complex environment are presented here. Several tests have been carried out in order to study initiation and propagation of secondary side corrosion cracking for some selected materials in such an environment. 600 Thermally Treated (TT) alloy reveals to be less sensitive to secondary side corrosion cracking than 600 Mill Annealed (MA) alloy. Finally, the influence of some related factors like stress, temperature and environmental factors are discussed. (authors)

  14. Laboratory results of stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubes in a complex environment - An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, Olivier; Pavageau, Ellen-Mary; Vaillant, Francois; Bouvier, Odile de

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs in the flow-restricted areas on the secondary side of steam generator tubes of Pressured Water Reactors (PWR), where water pollutants are likely to concentrate. Chemical analyses carried out during the shutdowns gave some insight into the chemical composition of these areas, which has evolved during these last years (i.e. less sodium as pollutants). It has been modeled in laboratory by tests in two different typical environments: the sodium hydroxide and the sulfate environments. These models satisfactorily describe the secondary side corrosion of steam generator tubes for old plant units. Furthermore, a third typical environment - the complex environment - which corresponds to an All Volatile Treatment (AVT) environment containing alumina, silica, phosphate and acetic acid has been recently studied. This particular environment satisfactorily reproduces the composition of the deposits observed on the surface of the steam generator tubes as well as the degradation of the tubes. A review of the recent laboratory results obtained by considering the complex environment are presented here. Several tests have been carried out in order to study initiation and propagation of secondary side corrosion cracking for some selected materials in such an environment. 600 Thermally Treated (TT) alloy reveals to be less sensitive to secondary side corrosion cracking than 600 Mill Annealed (MA) alloy. Finally, the influence of some related factors like stress, temperature and environmental factors are discussed. (authors)

  15. Environmental Complexity Related Information for the Assessment of Country Logistics Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinra, Aseem

    2015-01-01

    logistics assessment generates some of this information, its relevance for the decision makers, and relationship to their unpredictability from foreign national logistics systems remains indefinite. This paper identifies and categorises the relevant, available information on country logistics environments...... by using a content analysis approach. We demonstrate the immensity and nature of this information, are able to confirm the changing spatial transaction cost structures, and to reflect upon the overall conditions of information-related complexity and globalisation in the environment. Besides making...

  16. Sustainable development of the wind power industry in a complex environment: a flexibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Zhu, Jiang; Zuo, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As a new and developing green energy business in emerging economies such as China, the wind power industry chain faces some complex issues that are further compounded by turbulent internal and external environments. To deal with the complex environment, the wind power industry needs to improve its level of flexibility so that it can become more adaptable to the changing environment. Hence it is important to explore the dynamics of the wind power industry chain flexibility with respect to the ever changing environment. This study uses questionnaire surveys and expert interviews to identify the influential flexibility components of the wind power industry chain. Subsequently a fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) methodology was used to establish a flexibility operating mechanism model. The research found that special attention should be paid to competition flexibility, technology flexibility, and intellectual property and talent flexibility. Policies play a pivotal role in regulating the driving effects of these components of flexibility with the aim being long term sustainability of a healthy level of overall flexibility of the wind power industry chain. This should in turn facilitate the sustainable development of the industry. - Highlights: • Wind power industry shall improve flexibility to deal with complex environment. • Critical components of flexibility of wind power industry chain were identified. • An operating mechanism model for flexibility of wind power industry is proposed. • Fuzzy cognitive mapping method is employed to model the dynamics of flexibility. • Policies play a pivotal role in fostering an industry environment toward flexibility

  17. Complex Genotype by Environment interactions and changing genetic architectures across thermal environments in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowling Damian K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists studying adaptation under sexual selection have spent considerable effort assessing the relative importance of two groups of models, which hinge on the idea that females gain indirect benefits via mate discrimination. These are the good genes and genetic compatibility models. Quantitative genetic studies have advanced our understanding of these models by enabling assessment of whether the genetic architectures underlying focal phenotypes are congruent with either model. In this context, good genes models require underlying additive genetic variance, while compatibility models require non-additive variance. Currently, we know very little about how the expression of genotypes comprised of distinct parental haplotypes, or how levels and types of genetic variance underlying key phenotypes, change across environments. Such knowledge is important, however, because genotype-environment interactions can have major implications on the potential for evolutionary responses to selection. Results We used a full diallel breeding design to screen for complex genotype-environment interactions, and genetic architectures underlying key morphological traits, across two thermal environments (the lab standard 27°C, and the cooler 23°C in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. In males, complex three-way interactions between sire and dam parental haplotypes and the rearing environment accounted for up to 23 per cent of the scaled phenotypic variance in the traits we measured (body mass, pronotum width and testes mass, and each trait harboured significant additive genetic variance in the standard temperature (27°C only. In females, these three-way interactions were less important, with interactions between the paternal haplotype and rearing environment accounting for about ten per cent of the phenotypic variance (in body mass, pronotum width and ovary mass. Of the female traits measured, only ovary mass for crickets

  18. Complexity in built environment, health, and destination walking: a neighborhood-scale analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Cynthia; Aytur, Semra; Gardner, Kevin; Rogers, Shannon

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates the relationships between the built environment, the physical attributes of the neighborhood, and the residents' perceptions of those attributes. It focuses on destination walking and self-reported health, and does so at the neighborhood scale. The built environment, in particular sidewalks, road connectivity, and proximity of local destinations, correlates with destination walking, and similarly destination walking correlates with physical health. It was found, however, that the built environment and health metrics may not be simply, directly correlated but rather may be correlated through a series of feedback loops that may regulate risk in different ways in different contexts. In particular, evidence for a feedback loop between physical health and destination walking is observed, as well as separate feedback loops between destination walking and objective metrics of the built environment, and destination walking and perception of the built environment. These feedback loops affect the ability to observe how the built environment correlates with residents' physical health. Previous studies have investigated pieces of these associations, but are potentially missing the more complex relationships present. This study proposes a conceptual model describing complex feedback relationships between destination walking and public health, with the built environment expected to increase or decrease the strength of the feedback loop. Evidence supporting these feedback relationships is presented.

  19. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Büscher, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care. Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units. built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions); "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context); "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions); "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy) and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences). confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  20. The Living, Dynamic and Complex Environment Care in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Terezinha Stein Backes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care, experienced by professionals working in this unit, managers, patients, families and professional support services, as well as build a theoretical model about the Adult Intensive Care Unit environment of care.METHOD: Grounded Theory, both for the collection and for data analysis. Based on theoretical sampling, we carried out 39 in-depth interviews semi-structured from three different Adult Intensive Care Units.RESULTS: built up the so-called substantive theory "Sustaining life in the complex environment of care in the Intensive Care Unit". It was bounded by eight categories: "caring and continuously monitoring the patient" and "using appropriate and differentiated technology" (causal conditions; "Providing a suitable environment" and "having relatives with concern" (context; "Mediating facilities and difficulties" (intervenienting conditions; "Organizing the environment and managing the dynamics of the unit" (strategy and "finding it difficult to accept and deal with death" (consequences.CONCLUSION: confirmed the thesis that "the care environment in the Intensive Care Unit is a living environment, dynamic and complex that sustains the life of her hospitalized patients".

  1. Controlling Uncertainty: A Review of Human Behavior in Complex Dynamic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Complex dynamic control (CDC) tasks are a type of problem-solving environment used for examining many cognitive activities (e.g., attention, control, decision making, hypothesis testing, implicit learning, memory, monitoring, planning, and problem solving). Because of their popularity, there have been many findings from diverse domains of research…

  2. The Effect of Contextualized Conversational Feedback in a Complex Open-Ended Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segedy, James R.; Kinnebrew, John S.; Biswas, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Betty's Brain is an open-ended learning environment in which students learn about science topics by teaching a virtual agent named Betty through the construction of a visual causal map that represents the relevant science phenomena. The task is complex, and success requires the use of metacognitive strategies that support knowledge acquisition,…

  3. Instructional Control of Cognitive Load in the Design of Complex Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Kester, L., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). Instructional control of cognitive load in the design of complex learning environments. In J. L. Plass, R. Moreno, & Roland Brünken (Eds.), Cognitive Load Theory (pp. 109-130). New York: Cambridge University Press.

  4. Spatial subdivision of complex indoor environments for 3D indoor navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diakite, A.A.; Zlatanova, S.

    2018-01-01

    As we realize that we spend most of our time in increasingly complex indoor environments, applications to assist indoor activities (e.g. guidance) have gained a lot of attention in the recent years. The advances in ubiquitous computing made possible the development of several spatial models

  5. Autonomous Collision-Free Navigation of Microvehicles in Complex and Dynamically Changing Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianlong; Chang, Xiaocong; Wu, Zhiguang; Li, Jinxing; Shao, Guangbin; Deng, Xinghong; Qiu, Jianbin; Guo, Bin; Zhang, Guangyu; He, Qiang; Li, Longqiu; Wang, Joseph

    2017-09-26

    Self-propelled micro- and nanoscale robots represent a rapidly emerging and fascinating robotics research area. However, designing autonomous and adaptive control systems for operating micro/nanorobotics in complex and dynamically changing environments, which is a highly demanding feature, is still an unmet challenge. Here we describe a smart microvehicle for precise autonomous navigation in complicated environments and traffic scenarios. The fully autonomous navigation system of the smart microvehicle is composed of a microscope-coupled CCD camera, an artificial intelligence planner, and a magnetic field generator. The microscope-coupled CCD camera provides real-time localization of the chemically powered Janus microsphere vehicle and environmental detection for path planning to generate optimal collision-free routes, while the moving direction of the microrobot toward a reference position is determined by the external electromagnetic torque. Real-time object detection offers adaptive path planning in response to dynamically changing environments. We demonstrate that the autonomous navigation system can guide the vehicle movement in complex patterns, in the presence of dynamically changing obstacles, and in complex biological environments. Such a navigation system for micro/nanoscale vehicles, relying on vision-based close-loop control and path planning, is highly promising for their autonomous operation in complex dynamic settings and unpredictable scenarios expected in a variety of realistic nanoscale scenarios.

  6. Multi-person tracking with overlapping cameras in complex, dynamic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-camera system to track multiple persons in complex, dynamic environments. Position measurements are obtained by carving out the space defined by foreground regions in the overlapping camera views and projecting these onto blobs on the ground plane. Person appearance is

  7. Multi-view 3D Human Pose Estimation in Complex Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, K.M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a framework for unconstrained 3D human upper body pose estimation from multiple camera views in complex environment. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single-frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model texture adaptation. Single-frame pose recovery

  8. Distribution tactics for success in turbulent versus stable environments: A complexity theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bruce Mason

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the external environment influences the choice of distribution tactics. Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand such environments is necessary, but it has not been widely researched. A qualitative case method using in-depth interviews investigated four successful, versus less successful, companies in turbulent versus stable environments. The results tentatively confirmed that the more successful company, in a turbulent market, sees distribution activities as less important than other aspects of the marketing mix, but uses them to stabilise customer relationships and to maintain distribution processes. These findings can benefit marketers by emphasising a new way to consider place activities. How marketers can be assisted, and suggestions for further research, are provided.

  9. Electromagnetic interference analysis of magnetic resistance sensors inside a projectile under complex electromagnetic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Qingwei; Gao, Min; Lu, Zhicai; Yang, Peijie

    2013-01-01

    Accurate measurement of angular motion has long been recognized as a daunting task. In recent years the measurement of projectiles utilizing magnetic resistance sensors has become a hot research field. Electromagnetic interference on attitude measurement cannot be ignored in complex electromagnetic environments such as battlefield conditions. In this paper, the influence and function pattern of electromagnetic interference on the measuring performance are theoretically analyzed, and the shielding effectiveness (SE) simulation of projectile is conducted via software Computer Simulation Technology (CST). Considering the specific tests, the intensity of the influence is judged. The simulation indicates that the battlefield's complex electromagnetic environment influences the environment inside the projectile, especially its electronic components and capability. The research results can provide important theoretical support on the errors compensation and precision improvement of the projectile attitude measurement with Magnetic Resistance sensor.

  10. The influence of the physical environment on simulations of complex aquatic ecosystem dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Fenjuan

    hydrodynamics. To test the hypothesis that the physical environment may induce strong influence on ecosystem processes, we applied and compared PCLake applications, with the same standard ecosystem model parameterization, for three different physical environment representations of the same volume of water body......The field of aquatic ecosystem modelling has been active since the late 1970s, and in recent decades the models have grown in complexity in terms of ecosystem components and included processes. However, the complexity in ecosystem conceptualizations generally comes at the expense of simple...... or no hydrodynamic representation, in particular for ecosystem models where higher trophic levels, such as fish, are included. On the other hand, physically resolved hydrodynamic models often include none or only simple representations of ecosystem dynamics. To overcome this discrepancy in complexity between...

  11. Complexity in organizations and environment - adaptive changes and adaptive decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fabac

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The features of complexity are ever more present in modern organizations and in environments in which they operate, trying to survive and be as competitive as possible. In the processes of, the so-called emergence, the formal organizational structure, designed purposefully and with a plan, is going through a change due to complexity and the need for adaptation. As a result, there is a variety of new informal groups. At the same time, the intended structural changes and business process changes occur because of the perception that the leadership and senior organizational management have of the strategic situation. Managers in modern organizations often use business intelligence (BI systems when making important business decisions. These systems offer support to the decision-making by gathering and processing relevant data and information about the company performance, but also about the data on conditions in close and remote environment. A modern company is characterized by the complex adaptive system, but the environment in which it operates together with other business subjects (agents is also complex. Consequently, the requirements for appropriate or optimal decisions and successfully completed activities are hard to meet. Given that expected future events and circumstances often occur in nonlinear mechanisms, the decisions made by following the models of traditional predicting and planning are not satisfactory. This calls for new approaches to decision making and acting.

  12. Binding of canonical Wnt ligands to their receptor complexes occurs in ordered plasma membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Azbazdar, Yagmur; Ng, Xue W; Teh, Cathleen; Simons, Kai; Weidinger, Gilbert; Wohland, Thorsten; Eggeling, Christian; Ozhan, Gunes

    2017-08-01

    While the cytosolic events of Wnt/β-catenin signaling (canonical Wnt signaling) pathway have been widely studied, only little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in Wnt binding to its receptors at the plasma membrane. Here, we reveal the influence of the immediate plasma membrane environment on the canonical Wnt-receptor interaction. While the receptors are distributed both in ordered and disordered environments, Wnt binding to its receptors selectively occurs in more ordered membrane environments which appear to cointernalize with the Wnt-receptor complex. Moreover, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is significantly reduced when the membrane order is disturbed by specific inhibitors of certain lipids that prefer to localize at the ordered environments. Similarly, a reduction in Wnt signaling activity is observed in Niemann-Pick Type C disease cells where trafficking of ordered membrane lipid components to the plasma membrane is genetically impaired. We thus conclude that ordered plasma membrane environments are essential for binding of canonical Wnts to their receptor complexes and downstream signaling activity. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Cross-modal links among vision, audition, and touch in complex environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Thomas K; Sarter, Nadine B

    2008-02-01

    This study sought to determine whether performance effects of cross-modal spatial links that were observed in earlier laboratory studies scale to more complex environments and need to be considered in multimodal interface design. It also revisits the unresolved issue of cross-modal cuing asymmetries. Previous laboratory studies employing simple cues, tasks, and/or targets have demonstrated that the efficiency of processing visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli is affected by the modality, lateralization, and timing of surrounding cues. Very few studies have investigated these cross-modal constraints in the context of more complex environments to determine whether they scale and how complexity affects the nature of cross-modal cuing asymmetries. Amicroworld simulation of battlefield operations with a complex task set and meaningful visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli was used to investigate cuing effects for all cross-modal pairings. Significant asymmetric performance effects of cross-modal spatial links were observed. Auditory cues shortened response latencies for collocated visual targets but visual cues did not do the same for collocated auditory targets. Responses to contralateral (rather than ipsilateral) targets were faster for tactually cued auditory targets and each visual-tactile cue-target combination, suggesting an inhibition-of-return effect. The spatial relationships between multimodal cues and targets significantly affect target response times in complex environments. The performance effects of cross-modal links and the observed cross-modal cuing asymmetries need to be examined in more detail and considered in future interface design. The findings from this study have implications for the design of multimodal and adaptive interfaces and for supporting attention management in complex, data-rich domains.

  14. Using an Insect Mushroom Body Circuit to Encode Route Memory in Complex Natural Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ardin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ants, like many other animals, use visual memory to follow extended routes through complex environments, but it is unknown how their small brains implement this capability. The mushroom body neuropils have been identified as a crucial memory circuit in the insect brain, but their function has mostly been explored for simple olfactory association tasks. We show that a spiking neural model of this circuit originally developed to describe fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster olfactory association, can also account for the ability of desert ants (Cataglyphis velox to rapidly learn visual routes through complex natural environments. We further demonstrate that abstracting the key computational principles of this circuit, which include one-shot learning of sparse codes, enables the theoretical storage capacity of the ant mushroom body to be estimated at hundreds of independent images.

  15. Cybersecurity vulnerabilities in medical devices: a complex environment and multifaceted problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia Ah; Woodward, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The increased connectivity to existing computer networks has exposed medical devices to cybersecurity vulnerabilities from which they were previously shielded. For the prevention of cybersecurity incidents, it is important to recognize the complexity of the operational environment as well as to catalog the technical vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity protection is not just a technical issue; it is a richer and more intricate problem to solve. A review of the factors that contribute to such a potentially insecure environment, together with the identification of the vulnerabilities, is important for understanding why these vulnerabilities persist and what the solution space should look like. This multifaceted problem must be viewed from a systemic perspective if adequate protection is to be put in place and patient safety concerns addressed. This requires technical controls, governance, resilience measures, consolidated reporting, context expertise, regulation, and standards. It is evident that a coordinated, proactive approach to address this complex challenge is essential. In the interim, patient safety is under threat.

  16. Cybersecurity vulnerabilities in medical devices: a complex environment and multifaceted problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia AH; Woodward, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The increased connectivity to existing computer networks has exposed medical devices to cybersecurity vulnerabilities from which they were previously shielded. For the prevention of cybersecurity incidents, it is important to recognize the complexity of the operational environment as well as to catalog the technical vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity protection is not just a technical issue; it is a richer and more intricate problem to solve. A review of the factors that contribute to such a potentially insecure environment, together with the identification of the vulnerabilities, is important for understanding why these vulnerabilities persist and what the solution space should look like. This multifaceted problem must be viewed from a systemic perspective if adequate protection is to be put in place and patient safety concerns addressed. This requires technical controls, governance, resilience measures, consolidated reporting, context expertise, regulation, and standards. It is evident that a coordinated, proactive approach to address this complex challenge is essential. In the interim, patient safety is under threat. PMID:26229513

  17. Fatigue analysis of assembled marine floating platform for special purposes under complex water environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guang-ying; Yao, Yun-long

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the fatigue lives of a new type of assembled marine floating platform for special purposes were studied. Firstly, by using ANSYS AQWA software, the hydrodynamic model of the platform was established. Secondly, the structural stresses under alternating change loads were calculated under complex water environments, such as wind, wave, current and ice. The minimum fatigue lives were obtained under different working conditions. The analysis results showed that the fatigue life of the platform structure can meet the requirements

  18. The Control Based on Internal Average Kinetic Energy in Complex Environment for Multi-robot System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mao; Tian, Yantao; Yin, Xianghua

    In this paper, reference trajectory is designed according to minimum energy consumed for multi-robot system, which nonlinear programming and cubic spline interpolation are adopted. The control strategy is composed of two levels, which lower-level is simple PD control and the upper-level is based on the internal average kinetic energy for multi-robot system in the complex environment with velocity damping. Simulation tests verify the effectiveness of this control strategy.

  19. Interpretative approaches to identifying sources of hydrocarbons in complex contaminated environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, T.C.; Brown, J.S.; Boehm, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent advances in analytical instrumental hardware and software have permitted the use of more sophisticated approaches in identifying or fingerprinting sources of hydrocarbons in complex matrix environments. In natural resource damage assessments and contaminated site investigations of both terrestrial and aquatic environments, chemical fingerprinting has become an important interpretative tool. The alkyl homologues of the major polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., phenanthrenes/anthracenes, dibenzothiophenes, chrysenes) have been found to the most valuable hydrocarbons in differentiating hydrocarbon sources, but there are other hydrocarbon analytes, such as the chemical biomarkers steranes and triterpanes, and alkyl homologues of benzene, and chemical methodologies, such as scanning UV fluorescence, that have been found to be useful in certain environments. This presentation will focus on recent data interpretative approaches for hydrocarbon source identification assessments. Selection of appropriate targets analytes and data quality requirements will be discussed and example cases including the Arabian Gulf War oil spill results will be presented

  20. Examining Motivation in Online Distance Learning Environments: Complex, Multifaceted, and Situation-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Hartnett

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Existing research into motivation in online environments has tended to use one of two approaches. The first adopts a trait-like model that views motivation as a relatively stable, personal characteristic of the learner. Research from this perspective has contributed to the notion that online learners are, on the whole, intrinsically motivated. The alternative view concentrates on the design of online learning environments to encourage optimal learner motivation. Neither approach acknowledges a contemporary view of motivation that emphasises the situated, mutually constitutive relationship of the learner and the learning environment. Using self-determination theory (SDT as a framework, this paper explores the motivation to learn of preservice teachers in two online distance-learning contexts. In this study, learners were found to be not primarily intrinsically motivated. Instead, student motivation was found to be complex, multifaceted, and sensitive to situational conditions.

  1. Managing Multiple Sources of Competitive Advantage in a Complex Competitive Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Howard Henry Lapersonne

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the literature on the topic of sustained and temporary competitive advantage creation, specifically in dynamic markets, and to propose further research possibilities. After having analyzed the main trends and scholars’ works on the subject, it was concluded that a firm which has been experiencing erosion of its core sources of economic rent generation, should have diversified its strategy portfolio in a search for new sources of competitive advantage, ones that could compensate for the decline of profits provoked by intensive competitive environments. This review concludes with the hypothesis that firms, who have decided to enter and manage multiple competitive environments, should have developed a multiple strategies framework approach. The management of this source of competitive advantage portfolio should have allowed persistence of a firm’s superior economic performance through the management of diverse temporary advantages lifecycle and through a resilient effect, where a very successful source of competitive advantage compensates the ones that have been eroded. Additionally, the review indicates that economies of emerging countries, such as the ones from the BRIC block, should present a more complex competitive environment due to their historical nature of cultural diversity, social contrasts and frequent economic disruption, and also because of recent institutional normalization that has turned the market into hypercompetition. Consequently, the study of complex competition should be appropriate in such environments.

  2. Using evaluation to adapt health information outreach to the complex environments of community-based organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Cynthia A

    2005-10-01

    After arguing that most community-based organizations (CBOs) function as complex adaptive systems, this white paper describes the evaluation goals, questions, indicators, and methods most important at different stages of community-based health information outreach. This paper presents the basic characteristics of complex adaptive systems and argues that the typical CBO can be considered this type of system. It then presents evaluation as a tool for helping outreach teams adapt their outreach efforts to the CBO environment and thus maximize success. Finally, it describes the goals, questions, indicators, and methods most important or helpful at each stage of evaluation (community assessment, needs assessment and planning, process evaluation, and outcomes assessment). Literature from complex adaptive systems as applied to health care, business, and evaluation settings is presented. Evaluation models and applications, particularly those based on participatory approaches, are presented as methods for maximizing the effectiveness of evaluation in dynamic CBO environments. If one accepts that CBOs function as complex adaptive systems-characterized by dynamic relationships among many agents, influences, and forces-then effective evaluation at the stages of community assessment, needs assessment and planning, process evaluation, and outcomes assessment is critical to outreach success.

  3. Applying nonlinear MODM model to supply chain management with quantity discount policy under complex fuzzy environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this paper is to deal with the supply chain management (SCM with quantity discount policy under the complex fuzzy environment, which is characterized as the bi-fuzzy variables. By taking into account the strategy and the process of decision making, a bi-fuzzy nonlinear multiple objective decision making (MODM model is presented to solve the proposed problem.Design/methodology/approach: The bi-fuzzy variables in the MODM model are transformed into the trapezoidal fuzzy variables by the DMs's degree of optimism ?1 and ?2, which are de-fuzzified by the expected value index subsequently. For solving the complex nonlinear model, a multi-objective adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm (MO-APSO is designed as the solution method.Findings: The proposed model and algorithm are applied to a typical example of SCM problem to illustrate the effectiveness. Based on the sensitivity analysis of the results, the bi-fuzzy nonlinear MODM SCM model is proved to be sensitive to the possibility level ?1.Practical implications: The study focuses on the SCM under complex fuzzy environment in SCM, which has a great practical significance. Therefore, the bi-fuzzy MODM model and MO-APSO can be further applied in SCM problem with quantity discount policy.Originality/value: The bi-fuzzy variable is employed in the nonlinear MODM model of SCM to characterize the hybrid uncertain environment, and this work is original. In addition, the hybrid crisp approach is proposed to transferred to model to an equivalent crisp one by the DMs's degree of optimism and the expected value index. Since the MODM model consider the bi-fuzzy environment and quantity discount policy, so this paper has a great practical significance.

  4. An Intelligent Complex Event Processing with D Numbers under Fuzzy Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyuan Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient matching of incoming mass events to persistent queries is fundamental to complex event processing systems. Event matching based on pattern rule is an important feature of complex event processing engine. However, the intrinsic uncertainty in pattern rules which are predecided by experts increases the difficulties of effective complex event processing. It inevitably involves various types of the intrinsic uncertainty, such as imprecision, fuzziness, and incompleteness, due to the inability of human beings subjective judgment. Nevertheless, D numbers is a new mathematic tool to model uncertainty, since it ignores the condition that elements on the frame must be mutually exclusive. To address the above issues, an intelligent complex event processing method with D numbers under fuzzy environment is proposed based on the Technique for Order Preferences by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS method. The novel method can fully support decision making in complex event processing systems. Finally, a numerical example is provided to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. How Attending Physician Preceptors Negotiate Their Complex Work Environment: A Collective Ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Jane B; Wallace, Jean E; Sargious, Peter M; Bacchus, Maria; Zarnke, Kelly; Ward, David R; Ghali, William A

    2017-12-01

    To generate an empiric, detailed, and updated view of the attending physician preceptor role and its interface with the complex work environment. In 2013, the authors conducted a modified collective ethnography with observations of internal medicine medical teaching unit preceptors from two university hospitals in Canada. Eleven observers conducted 32 observations (99.5 hours) of 26 preceptors (30 observations [93.5 hours] of 24 preceptors were included in the analysis). An inductive thematic approach was used to analyze the data with further axial coding to identify connections between themes. Four individuals coded the main data set; differences were addressed through discussion to achieve consensus. Three elements or major themes of the preceptor role were identified: (1) competence or the execution of traditional physician competencies, (2) context or the extended medical teaching unit environment, and (3) conduct or the manner of acting or behaviors and attitudes in the role. Multiple connections between the elements emerged. The preceptor role appeared to depend on the execution of professional skills (competence) but also was vulnerable to contextual factors (context) independent of these skills, many of which were unpredictable. This vulnerability appeared to be tempered by preceptors' use of adaptive behaviors and attitudes (conduct), such as creativity, interpersonal skills, and wellness behaviors. Preceptors not only possess traditional competencies but also enlist additional behaviors and attitudes to deal with context-driven tensions and to negotiate their complex work environment. These skills could be incorporated into role training, orientation, and mentorship.

  6. Smelling in chemically complex environments: an optofluidic Bragg fiber array for differentiation of methanol adulterated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Adem; Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2013-07-02

    A novel optoelectronic nose for analysis of alcohols (ethanol and methanol) in chemically complex environments is reported. The cross-responsive sensing unit of the optoelectronic nose is an array of three distinct hollow-core infrared transmitting photonic band gap fibers, which transmit a specific band of IR light depending on their Bragg mirror structures. The presence of alcohol molecules in the optofluidic core quenches the fiber transmissions if there is an absorption band of the analyte overlapping with the transmission band of the fiber; otherwise they remain unchanged. The cumulative response data of the fiber array enables rapid, reversible, and accurate discrimination of alcohols in chemically complex backgrounds such as beer and fruit juice. In addition, we observed that humidity of the environment has no effect on the response matrix of the optoelectronic nose, which is rarely achieved in gas-sensing applications. Consequently, it can be reliably used in virtually any environment without precalibration for humidity or drying the analytes. Besides the discussed application in counterfeit alcoholic beverages, with its superior sensor parameters, this novel concept proves to be a promising contender for many other applications including food quality control, environmental monitoring, and breath analysis for disease diagnostics.

  7. Gas and aerosol radionuclide transfers in complex environments: experimental studies of atmospheric dispersion and interfaces exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maro, Denis

    2011-01-01

    In situations of chronic or accidental releases, the atmosphere is the main pathway of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities to the environment and, consequently, to humans. It is therefore necessary to have sufficient information on this pathway to accurately assess the radiological impact on man and his environment. Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety develops its own tools of dispersion and atmospheric transfer for its expertise, under normal operation conditions of a facility, but especially in crisis or post-accident. These tools must have a national and international recognition in particular through scientific validation against benchmark experiments performed internationally, nationally or within the IRSN. The Radioecology Laboratory of Cherbourg-Octeville provides, and will increasingly make, a significant contribution to the scientific influence of the Institute in this field. The work presented in this report has contributed to the development or improvement of experimental techniques in the fields of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides and transfer at interfaces, in complex environments (complex topography, urban area). These experimental techniques, applied during field campaigns, have allowed to acquire new data in order to get a better understanding of radionuclide transfers in the form of gases and aerosols. (author)

  8. The niche construction of cultural complexity: interactions between innovations, population size and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Laurel; Creanza, Nicole

    2017-12-05

    Niche construction is a process through which organisms alter their environments and, in doing so, influence or change the selective pressures to which they are subject. 'Cultural niche construction' refers specifically to the effect of cultural traits on the selective environments of other biological or cultural traits and may be especially important in human evolution. In addition, the relationship between population size and cultural accumulation has been the subject of extensive debate, in part because anthropological studies have demonstrated a significant association between population size and toolkit complexity in only a subset of studied cultures. Here, we review the role of cultural innovation in constructing human evolutionary niches and introduce a new model to describe the accumulation of human cultural traits that incorporates the effects of cultural niche construction. We consider the results of this model in light of available data on human toolkit sizes across populations to help elucidate the important differences between food-gathering societies and food-producing societies, in which niche construction may be a more potent force. These results support the idea that a population's relationship with its environment, represented here by cultural niche construction, should be considered alongside population size in studies of cultural complexity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Evaluation of the cognitive effects of travel technique in complex real and virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, Evan A; Finkelstein, Samantha L; Reid, Myra; V Babu, Sabarish; Ulinski, Amy C; Hodges, Larry F

    2010-01-01

    We report a series of experiments conducted to investigate the effects of travel technique on information gathering and cognition in complex virtual environments. In the first experiment, participants completed a non-branching multilevel 3D maze at their own pace using either real walking or one of two virtual travel techniques. In the second experiment, we constructed a real-world maze with branching pathways and modeled an identical virtual environment. Participants explored either the real or virtual maze for a predetermined amount of time using real walking or a virtual travel technique. Our results across experiments suggest that for complex environments requiring a large number of turns, virtual travel is an acceptable substitute for real walking if the goal of the application involves learning or reasoning based on information presented in the virtual world. However, for applications that require fast, efficient navigation or travel that closely resembles real-world behavior, real walking has advantages over common joystick-based virtual travel techniques.

  10. A survey of simultaneous localization and mapping on unstructured lunar complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqiao; Zhang, Wei; An, Pei

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) technology is the key to realizing lunar rover's intelligent perception and autonomous navigation. It embodies the autonomous ability of mobile robot, and has attracted plenty of concerns of researchers in the past thirty years. Visual sensors are meaningful to SLAM research because they can provide a wealth of information. Visual SLAM uses merely images as external information to estimate the location of the robot and construct the environment map. Nowadays, SLAM technology still has problems when applied in large-scale, unstructured and complex environment. Based on the latest technology in the field of visual SLAM, this paper investigates and summarizes the SLAM technology using in the unstructured complex environment of lunar surface. In particular, we focus on summarizing and comparing the detection and matching of features of SIFT, SURF and ORB, in the meanwhile discussing their advantages and disadvantages. We have analyzed the three main methods: SLAM Based on Extended Kalman Filter, SLAM Based on Particle Filter and SLAM Based on Graph Optimization (EKF-SLAM, PF-SLAM and Graph-based SLAM). Finally, this article summarizes and discusses the key scientific and technical difficulties in the lunar context that Visual SLAM faces. At the same time, we have explored the frontier issues such as multi-sensor fusion SLAM and multi-robot cooperative SLAM technology. We also predict and prospect the development trend of lunar rover SLAM technology, and put forward some ideas of further research.

  11. A novel approach to simulate gene-environment interactions in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicodemi Mario

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex diseases are multifactorial traits caused by both genetic and environmental factors. They represent the major part of human diseases and include those with largest prevalence and mortality (cancer, heart disease, obesity, etc.. Despite a large amount of information that has been collected about both genetic and environmental risk factors, there are few examples of studies on their interactions in epidemiological literature. One reason can be the incomplete knowledge of the power of statistical methods designed to search for risk factors and their interactions in these data sets. An improvement in this direction would lead to a better understanding and description of gene-environment interactions. To this aim, a possible strategy is to challenge the different statistical methods against data sets where the underlying phenomenon is completely known and fully controllable, for example simulated ones. Results We present a mathematical approach that models gene-environment interactions. By this method it is possible to generate simulated populations having gene-environment interactions of any form, involving any number of genetic and environmental factors and also allowing non-linear interactions as epistasis. In particular, we implemented a simple version of this model in a Gene-Environment iNteraction Simulator (GENS, a tool designed to simulate case-control data sets where a one gene-one environment interaction influences the disease risk. The main aim has been to allow the input of population characteristics by using standard epidemiological measures and to implement constraints to make the simulator behaviour biologically meaningful. Conclusions By the multi-logistic model implemented in GENS it is possible to simulate case-control samples of complex disease where gene-environment interactions influence the disease risk. The user has full control of the main characteristics of the simulated population and a Monte

  12. Distribution of radium and chemical toxins in the environment of a uranium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markose, P.M.; Eapen, K.P.; Venkataraman, S.; Kamath, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    The discharge of waste effluents from mining and milling of uranium ore brings into the aquatic environment radioactive pollutants and chemical toxins. The radioactive element of primary concern is radium and the nonactive pollutants are manganese, chlorides, sulphates and water hardness. In the Uranium Complex, Bihar (India), the low grade ore is mined and processed for recovery of uranium. The waste slurries from the process are neutralised and discharged into the tailings pond(TP) where the solids settle and the effluents flow out into a natural stream, Jurianala. The TP effluent mixes with mine water and floor washings from the mill in the canal on its down stream course to the river, R. Subarnarekha. This study was conducted to assess the total pollution from the liquid discharges in the environment and the impact of discharge on water quality. The results of the study of movement of pollutants in the biosphere and laboratory investigations on containment are presented. (author)

  13. Fluctuations in an established transmission in the presence of a complex environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Dmitry V.; Richter, Martin; Kuhl, Ulrich; Legrand, Olivier; Mortessagne, Fabrice

    2017-09-01

    In various situations where wave transport is preeminent, like in wireless communication, a strong established transmission is present in a complex scattering environment. We develop a nonperturbative approach to describe emerging fluctuations which combines a transmitting channel and a chaotic background in a unified effective Hamiltonian. Modeling such a background by random matrix theory, we derive exact results for both transmission and reflection distributions at arbitrary absorption that is typically present in real systems. Remarkably, in such a complex scattering situation, the transport is governed by only two parameters: an absorption rate and the ratio of the so-called spreading width to the natural width of the transmission line. In particular, we find that the established transmission disappears sharply when this ratio exceeds unity. The approach exemplifies the role of the chaotic background in dephasing the deterministic scattering.

  14. Better decision making in complex, dynamic tasks training with human-facilitated interactive learning environments

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    This book describes interactive learning environments (ILEs) and their underlying concepts. It explains how ILEs can be used to improve the decision-making process and how these improvements can be empirically verified. The objective of this book is to enhance our understanding of and to gain insights into the process by which human facilitated ILEs are effectively designed and used in improving users’ decision making in complex, dynamic tasks. This book is divided into four major parts. Part I serves as an introduction to the importance and complexity of decision making in dynamic tasks. Part II provides background material, drawing upon relevant literature, for the development of an integrated process model on the effectiveness of human facilitated ILEs in improving decision making in dynamic tasks. Part III focuses on the design, development, and application of FishBankILE in laboratory experiments to gather empirical evidence for the validity of the process model. Finally, part IV presents a comprehensi...

  15. Validation of Experimental whole-body SAR Assessment Method in a Complex Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bamba, Aliou; Joseph, Wout; Vermeeren, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    Assessing experimentally the whole-body specific absorption rate (SARwb) in a complex indoor environment is very challenging. An experimental method based on room electromagnetics theory (accounting only the Line-Of-Sight as specular path) to assess the whole-body SAR is validated by numerical...... of the proposed method is that it allows discarding the computation burden because it does not use any discretizations. Results show good agreement between measurement and computation at 2.8 GHz, as long as the plane wave assumption is valid, i.e., for high distances from the transmitter. Relative deviations 0...

  16. A Stable Coordination Complex of Rh(IV) in an N,O-Donor Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Shashi B. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Shopov, Dimitar Y. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Sharninghausen, Liam S. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Vinyard, David J. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Mercado, Brandon Q. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Brudvig, Gary W. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect; Crabtree, Robert H. [Department of Chemistry, Yale University, 225 Prospect

    2015-12-10

    We describe facial and meridional isomers of [RhIII(pyalk)3], as well as meridional [RhIV(pyalk)3]+ {pyalk =2-(2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate}, the first coordination complex in an N,O-donor environment to show a clean, reversible RhIII/IV redox couple and to have a stable Rh(IV) form, which we characterize by EPR and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as X-ray crystallography. The unprecedented stability of the Rh(IV) species is ascribed to the exceptional donor strength of the ligands, their oxidation resistance, and the meridional coordination geometry.

  17. Hydrodynamic analysis of floating platform for special purposes under complex water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guang-ying; Yao, Yun-long

    2018-03-01

    This article studied a new floating offshore platform for special purposes, which was assembled by standard floating modules. By using ANSYS AQWA software, the hydrodynamic model of the platform was established. The time history responses of the platform motions and the cable tension forces were calculate under complex water environments, such as wind, wave, current and mooring. The results showed that the tension of the four cables are far less than the breaking tension of the cable, so that the cable will not break. This study can be referenced by the relevant researchers and engineers.

  18. Simulation-Based Learning Environments to Teach Complexity: The Missing Link in Teaching Sustainable Public Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Deegan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While public-sector management problems are steeped in positivistic and socially constructed complexity, public management education in the management of complexity lags behind that of business schools, particularly in the application of simulation-based learning. This paper describes a Simulation-Based Learning Environment for public management education that includes a coupled case study and System Dynamics simulation surrounding flood protection, a domain where stewardship decisions regarding public infrastructure and investment have direct and indirect effects on businesses and the public. The Pointe Claire case and CoastalProtectSIM simulation provide a platform for policy experimentation under conditions of exogenous uncertainty (weather and climate change as well as endogenous effects generated by structure. We discuss the model in some detail, and present teaching materials developed to date to support the use of our work in public administration curricula. Our experience with this case demonstrates the potential of this approach to motivate sustainable learning about complexity in public management settings and enhance learners’ competency to deal with complex dynamic problems.

  19. Teaching Architecture - Contemporary Challenges and Threats in the Complexity of Built Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borucka, Justyna; Macikowski, Bartosz

    2017-10-01

    The complexity of the modern built environment is a problem not only of architectural and urban issues. This issue extends to many other disciplines as well as covering a wide range of social engagements. The idea of writing this paper is generally initiated by the debate which took place in Gdańsk on 22.01.2016, and was prepared in order to meet representatives of the four circles of interest within the architectural sphere: universities, professional architectural organisations and associations, architectural practice (professionals running their own studios, managing projects and leading construction) and local social organisations active in city of Gdańsk. This paper is a comparison of the results of this discussion in relation to the policy and methodology of architecture teaching on the University level. Teaching architecture and urban planning according to the present discussion needs to be improved and advanced to meet the increasing complexity of both disciplines. Contemporary dynamic development of cities creates the necessity of engaging multiple stakeholders, participants and users of architecture and urban space. This is crucial to make them conscious of sharing responsibility for increasing the quality of living in the built environment. This discussion about architectural education is open and has the nature of an ongoing process adapting to a changing environment and is in fact a constant challenge which brings questions rather than simple answers. Transformation of architecture and urban planning, and consequently its education are increasingly entering into the related fields, especially into the professional practice and social environment. The question of how to teach architecture and urban planning and educate users of urban space should take place in the context of a wide discussion. This interdisciplinary debate seems to be a crucial and challenging step towards improving the future education of architecture and urban planning leading to a

  20. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON A COMPLEX RELATION BETWEEN GLOBULAR CLUSTER COLORS AND ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Puzia, Thomas H.; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ángel, Simón [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Schönebeck, Frederik; Grebel, Eva K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstraße 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, S. D. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Durrell, Patrick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kuntschner, Harald, E-mail: mathieu.powalka@astro.unistra.fr [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-09-20

    We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW), based on Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color–color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color–color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color–color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, Initial Mass Function variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.

  1. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON A COMPLEX RELATION BETWEEN GLOBULAR CLUSTER COLORS AND ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Lançon, Ariane; Puzia, Thomas H.; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Ángel, Simón; Peng, Eric W.; Lim, Sungsoon; Schönebeck, Frederik; Grebel, Eva K.; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kuntschner, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of high-quality photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in the Virgo cluster core region, based on data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) pilot field, and in the Milky Way (MW), based on Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter spectrophotometry. We find significant discrepancies in color–color diagrams between sub-samples from different environments, confirming that the environment has a strong influence on the integrated colors of GCs. GC color distributions along a single color are not sufficient to capture the differences we observe in color–color space. While the average photometric colors become bluer with increasing radial distance to the cD galaxy M87, we also find a relation between the environment and the slope and intercept of the color–color relations. A denser environment seems to produce a larger dynamic range in certain color indices. We argue that these results are not due solely to differential extinction, Initial Mass Function variations, calibration uncertainties, or overall age/metallicity variations. We therefore suggest that the relation between the environment and GC colors is, at least in part, due to chemical abundance variations, which affect stellar spectra and stellar evolution tracks. Our results demonstrate that stellar population diagnostics derived from model predictions which are calibrated on one particular sample of GCs may not be appropriate for all extragalactic GCs. These results advocate a more complex model of the assembly history of GC systems in massive galaxies that goes beyond the simple bimodality found in previous decades.

  2. Cybersecurity vulnerabilities in medical devices: a complex environment and multifaceted problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams PAH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patricia AH Williams, Andrew J Woodward eHealth Research Group and Security Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: The increased connectivity to existing computer networks has exposed medical devices to cybersecurity vulnerabilities from which they were previously shielded. For the prevention of cybersecurity incidents, it is important to recognize the complexity of the operational environment as well as to catalog the technical vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity protection is not just a technical issue; it is a richer and more intricate problem to solve. A review of the factors that contribute to such a potentially insecure environment, together with the identification of the vulnerabilities, is important for understanding why these vulnerabilities persist and what the solution space should look like. This multifaceted problem must be viewed from a systemic perspective if adequate protection is to be put in place and patient safety concerns addressed. This requires technical controls, governance, resilience measures, consolidated reporting, context expertise, regulation, and standards. It is evident that a coordinated, proactive approach to address this complex challenge is essential. In the interim, patient safety is under threat. Keywords: cybersecurity, security, safety, wireless, risk, medical devices

  3. 3D MODELS COMPARISON OF COMPLEX SHELL IN UNDERWATER AND DRY ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Troisi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In marine biology the shape, morphology, texture and dimensions of the shells and organisms like sponges and gorgonians are very important parameters. For example, a particular type of gorgonian grows every year only few millimeters; this estimation was conducted without any measurement instrument but it has been provided after successive observational studies, because this organism is very fragile: the contact could compromise its structure and outliving. Non-contact measurement system has to be used to preserve such organisms: the photogrammetry is a method capable to assure high accuracy without contact. Nevertheless, the achievement of a 3D photogrammetric model of complex object (as gorgonians or particular shells is a challenge in normal environments, either with metric camera or with consumer camera. Indeed, the successful of automatic target-less image orientation and the image matching algorithms is strictly correlated to the object texture properties and of camera calibration quality as well. In the underwater scenario, the environment conditions strongly influence the results quality; in particular, water’s turbidity, the presence of suspension, flare and other optical aberrations decrease the image quality reducing the accuracy and increasing the noise on the 3D model. Furthermore, seawater density variability influences its refraction index and consequently the interior orientation camera parameters. For this reason, the camera calibration has to be performed in the same survey conditions. In this paper, a comparison between the 3D models of a Charonia Tritonis shell are carried out through surveys conducted both in dry and underwater environments.

  4. Foraging in a complex naturalistic environment: capacity of spatial working memory in flower bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, York; Stich, Kai Petra

    2005-02-01

    Memory systems have evolved under selection pressures, such as the need to remember the locations of resources or past events within spatiotemporally dynamic natural environments. The full repertoire of complex behaviours exhibited by animals in dynamic surroundings are, however, difficult to elicit within simply structured laboratory environments. We have developed a computer-controlled naturalistic environment with 64 feeders for simulating dynamic patterns of water or food resource availability (depletion and replenishment) within the laboratory. The combination of feeder and cage remote control permits the automated transfer of animals between cage and test arena and, therefore, high experimental throughput and minimal disturbance to the animals (bats and mice). In the present study, we investigated spatial working memory in nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina, Phyllostomidae) collecting food from a 64-feeder array. Feeders gave only single rewards within trials so that efficient foraging required bats to avoid depleted locations. Initially, bats tended to revisit feeders (win-stay), but within three trials changed towards a win-shift strategy. The significant avoidance of revisits could not be explained by algorithmic search guiding movement through the array nor by scent cues left by the bats themselves and, thus, the data suggest that bats remembered spatial locations depleted of food. An examination of the recency effect on spatial working memory after bats shifted to a win-shift strategy indicated that bats held more than 40 behaviour actions (feeder visits) in working memory without indication of decay. This result surpasses previous findings for other taxa.

  5. Sustainable development goals for global health: facilitating good governance in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffeld, Just

    2013-11-01

    Increasing complexity is following in the wake of rampant globalization. Thus, the discussion about Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires new thinking that departs from a critique of current policy tools in exploration of a complexity-friendly approach. This article argues that potential SDGs should: treat stakeholders, like states, business and civil society actors, as agents on different aggregate levels of networks; incorporate good governance processes that facilitate early involvement of relevant resources, as well as equitable participation, consultative processes, and regular policy and programme implementation reviews; anchor adoption and enforcement of such rules to democratic processes in accountable organizations; and include comprehensive systems evaluations, including procedural indicators. A global framework convention for health could be a suitable instrument for handling some of the challenges related to the governance of a complex environment. It could structure and legitimize government involvement, engage stakeholders, arrange deliberation and decision-making processes with due participation and regular policy review, and define minimum standards for health services. A monitoring scheme could ensure that agents in networks comply according to whole-systems targets, locally defined outcome indicators, and process indicators, thus resolving the paradox of government control vs. local policy space. A convention could thus exploit the energy created in the encounter between civil society, international organizations and national authorities. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  7. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  8. Understanding valve program complexity in a refurbishment environment - learning from the past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of Valve Program development, planning, execution and management in a refurbishment environment is an enormous undertaking requiring the proper coordination and integration of many moving parts. As such, lack of attention and understanding of this complexity has led to significant cost and schedule overruns in past refurbishment projects in the province. OPEX indicates the challenges in completing valve scope during refurbishments are related but not limited to; lack of detailed condition assessments, improper scope development, insignificant strategic approach to work task planning, scheduling and procurement, absence of contingency planning for common ‘as found’ conditions during execution, lack of proper training requirements, etc. In addition, past contracting strategies to employ numerous companies in collaboration to complete such a complex and specialized program, has resulted in further complications surrounding the management and integration of multiple quality programs and internal company processes. Finally, the aftermath of such fragmented projects results in an absolute closeout nightmare, often times taking years to locate, sift through and re-integrate pertinent information back into customer systems. Valve Program complexity cannot be understood by just anyone, only those that have lived through a refurbishment project and experienced the challenges mentioned above have the knowledge, skill, and ability to appreciate how to tactically apply past learning to realize future improvements. Furthermore, effective contractor-customer collaboration is crucial; true and in-depth knowledge and understanding of the customer quality programs, engineering and work management processes, configuration management requirements, and most importantly the imperative significance of nuclear safety, are all essential components to ensure overall alignment and program success. (author)

  9. Understanding valve program complexity in a refurbishment environment - learning from the past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, H.E. [Babcock & Wilcox Canada Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The complexity of Valve Program development, planning, execution and management in a refurbishment environment is an enormous undertaking requiring the proper coordination and integration of many moving parts. As such, lack of attention and understanding of this complexity has led to significant cost and schedule overruns in past refurbishment projects in the province. OPEX indicates the challenges in completing valve scope during refurbishments are related but not limited to; lack of detailed condition assessments, improper scope development, insignificant strategic approach to work task planning, scheduling and procurement, absence of contingency planning for common ‘as found’ conditions during execution, lack of proper training requirements, etc. In addition, past contracting strategies to employ numerous companies in collaboration to complete such a complex and specialized program, has resulted in further complications surrounding the management and integration of multiple quality programs and internal company processes. Finally, the aftermath of such fragmented projects results in an absolute closeout nightmare, often times taking years to locate, sift through and re-integrate pertinent information back into customer systems. Valve Program complexity cannot be understood by just anyone, only those that have lived through a refurbishment project and experienced the challenges mentioned above have the knowledge, skill, and ability to appreciate how to tactically apply past learning to realize future improvements. Furthermore, effective contractor-customer collaboration is crucial; true and in-depth knowledge and understanding of the customer quality programs, engineering and work management processes, configuration management requirements, and most importantly the imperative significance of nuclear safety, are all essential components to ensure overall alignment and program success. (author)

  10. Molecular complexity in astrophysical environments: From astrochemistry to “astrobiology”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d’Hendecourt L. Le Sergeant

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I present in this paper my own view about the intricate problem between the evolution of molecular complexity as observed from an astrophysicist point of view and its possible relation to the problem of the origin of life as we know it on Earth. Using arguments from observational astrophysics, I propose that life cannot really be based on other elements that the ones organizing our own so that other life forms based on totally different elemental and molecular processes are highly improbable. As a consequence terrestrial-type environments are probably the most favorable ones to life’s “emergence” and subsequent evolution. Discussing molecular (organic complexity, I show where this molecular complexity is located in astrophysical environments, mostly within inter/circumstellar solid state materials known as “grains” which, at least partly, end up in comets and asteroids and finally on planetary surfaces as meteorites. Considerations based on non directed laboratory simulations experiments, recent results regarding chiral asymmetry in potentially prebiotic matter and the possible explanation to the determinism about the choice of the L sign of the enantiomeric excesses in meteoritic amino acids, following a plausible astrophysical scenario, lead to the idea that the origin of life on Earth was indeed the result of a rather deterministic phenomenon, albeit difficult if not impossible to apprehend in its intimate mechanisms via a complete understanding of all the processes involved. Finally, the crucial point in supporting the idea of life’s ubiquity and wide distribution in our Galaxy (or universe? lies in the fact that planetary evolution, another astrophysical argument, is a major and very strong constraint for the development of life above its “minimal definition”. Life, particularly the complex and evolved one, could be indeed very rare in our Galaxy, although the very large number of exoplanets may be a counter-argument to this

  11. Formative assessment in an online learning environment to support flexible on-the-job learning in complex professional domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamara van Gog; Desirée Joosten-ten Brinke; F. J. Prins; Dominique Sluijsmans

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a blueprint for an online learning environment that is based on prominent instructional design and assessment theories for supporting learning in complex domains. The core of this environment consists of formative assessment tasks (i.e., assessment for learning) that center on

  12. Workstations as consoles for the CERN-PS complex, setting-up the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsanti, P.; Arruat, M.; Bouche, J.M.; Cons, L.; Deloose, Y.; Di Maio, F.

    1992-01-01

    Within the framework of the rejuvenation project of the CERN control systems, commercial workstations have to replace existing home-designed operator consoles. RISC-based workstations with UNIX, X-window TM and OSF/Motif TM have been introduced for the control of the PS complex. The first versions of general functionalities like synoptic display, program selection and control panels have been implemented and the first large scale application has been realized. This paper describes the different components of the workstation environment for the implementation of the applications. The focus is on the set of tools which have been used, developed or integrated, and on how we plan to make them evolve. (author)

  13. Using social media to facilitate knowledge transfer in complex engineering environments: a primer for educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glen; Salomone, Sonia

    2013-03-01

    While highly cohesive groups are potentially advantageous they are also often correlated with the emergence of knowledge and information silos based around those same functional or occupational clusters. Consequently, an essential challenge for engineering organisations wishing to overcome informational silos is to implement mechanisms that facilitate, encourage and sustain interactions between otherwise disconnected groups. This paper acts as a primer for those seeking to gain an understanding of the design, functionality and utility of a suite of software tools generically termed social media technologies in the context of optimising the management of tacit engineering knowledge. Underpinned by knowledge management theory and using detailed case examples, this paper explores how social media technologies achieve such goals, allowing for the transfer of knowledge by tapping into the tacit and explicit knowledge of disparate groups in complex engineering environments.

  14. Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E; Rojas, Bibiana; Mappes, Johanna; Rautiala, Petri; Kemp, Darrell J

    2017-09-01

    Much of what we know about human colour perception has come from psychophysical studies conducted in tightly-controlled laboratory settings. An enduring challenge, however, lies in extrapolating this knowledge to the noisy conditions that characterize our actual visual experience. Here we combine statistical models of visual perception with empirical data to explore how chromatic (hue/saturation) and achromatic (luminant) information underpins the detection and classification of stimuli in a complex forest environment. The data best support a simple linear model of stimulus detection as an additive function of both luminance and saturation contrast. The strength of each predictor is modest yet consistent across gross variation in viewing conditions, which accords with expectation based upon general primate psychophysics. Our findings implicate simple visual cues in the guidance of perception amidst natural noise, and highlight the potential for informing human vision via a fusion between psychophysical modelling and real-world behaviour. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Biofuels are (Not the Future! Legitimation Strategies of Sustainable Ventures in Complex Institutional Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A. Thompson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable ventures often lack legitimacy (perceived to be desirable and appropriate because various stakeholder groups use contradictory institutions (rules and norms to make their judgements, which leads to there being fewer resources available and higher failure rates. Using an institutional theory framework and a multi-case research design with 15 biofuel ventures operating in the Netherlands, this study asks how sustainable entrepreneurs attempt to gain legitimacy in these circumstances. Analysis reveals that the entrepreneurs use a combination of rhetorical, reconciliatory and institutional change strategies to obtain legitimacy from different stakeholder groups. These findings further our understanding of sustainable entrepreneurial behavior by revealing how and why different legitimation strategies are used in complex institutional environments.

  16. Distributed optimization-based control of multi-agent networks in complex environments

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a concise and in-depth exposition of specific algorithmic solutions for distributed optimization based control of multi-agent networks and their performance analysis. It synthesizes and analyzes distributed strategies for three collaborative tasks: distributed cooperative optimization, mobile sensor deployment and multi-vehicle formation control. The book integrates miscellaneous ideas and tools from dynamic systems, control theory, graph theory, optimization, game theory and Markov chains to address the particular challenges introduced by such complexities in the environment as topological dynamics, environmental uncertainties, and potential cyber-attack by human adversaries. The book is written for first- or second-year graduate students in a variety of engineering disciplines, including control, robotics, decision-making, optimization and algorithms and with backgrounds in aerospace engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and operations research. Resea...

  17. Adaptation and heterogeneity of Escherichia coli MC1000 growing in complex environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puentes-Téllez, Pilar; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    In a study aiming to assess bacterial evolution in complex growth media, we evaluated the long-term adaptive response of Escherichia coli MC1000 in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. Seven parallel populations were founded and followed over 150 days in sequential batch cultures under three different oxygen...... conditions (defined environments), and 19 evolved forms were isolated. The emergence of forms with enhanced fitness was evident in competition experiments of all evolved forms versus the ancestral strain. The evolved forms were then subjected to phenotypic and genomic analyses relative to the ancestor...... in galR, a repressor of the galactose operon. Concomitantly, the new forms revealed enhanced growth on galactose as well as galactose-containing disaccharides. This response was likely driven by the LB medium....

  18. Accurately Localize and Recognize Instruments with Substation Inspection Robot in Complex Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Song

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper designs and develops an automatic detection system in the substation environment where complex and multi-inspecting objects exist. The inspection robot is able to fix and identify the objects quickly using a visual servo control system. This paper focuses on the analysis of fast lockup and recognition method of the substation instruments based on an improved Adaboost algorithm. The robot adjusts its position to the best view point and best resolution for the instrument in real-time. The dial and pointer of the instruments are detected with an improved Hough algorithm, and the angle of the pointer is converted to the corresponding readings. The experimental results indicate that the inspection robot can fix and identify the substation instruments quickly, and has a wide range of practical applications.

  19. Systems Engineering Design Via Experimental Operation Research: Complex Organizational Metric for Programmatic Risk Environments (COMPRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mog, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Unique and innovative graph theory, neural network, organizational modeling, and genetic algorithms are applied to the design and evolution of programmatic and organizational architectures. Graph theory representations of programs and organizations increase modeling capabilities and flexibility, while illuminating preferable programmatic/organizational design features. Treating programs and organizations as neural networks results in better system synthesis, and more robust data modeling. Organizational modeling using covariance structures enhances the determination of organizational risk factors. Genetic algorithms improve programmatic evolution characteristics, while shedding light on rulebase requirements for achieving specified technological readiness levels, given budget and schedule resources. This program of research improves the robustness and verifiability of systems synthesis tools, including the Complex Organizational Metric for Programmatic Risk Environments (COMPRE).

  20. Implementing the European policies for alien species – networking, science, and partnership in a complex environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Katsanevakis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The European Commission has recognized the need for more stringent action to manage biological invasions and has committed to develop adedicated legislative instrument. Under this upcoming legislation, European countries and their relevant institutions will have additional obligations and commitments in respect to invasive alien species. In September 2012, the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC launched the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN to facilitate the exploration of existing alien species information from distributed sources and to assist the implementation of European policies on biological invasions. Subsequent to the launching of EASIN, there was an evident need to define its niche within a complex environment of global, European, regional and national information systems. Herein we propose an organizational chart clearly defining the role of each actor in this framework, and we emphasize the need for collaboration in order to effectively support EU policies.

  1. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  2. Applying a Framework for Student Modeling in Exploratory Learning Environments: Comparing Data Representation Granularity to Handle Environment Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratamico, Lauren; Conati, Cristina; Kardan, Samad; Roll, Ido

    2017-01-01

    Interactive simulations can facilitate inquiry learning. However, similarly to other Exploratory Learning Environments, students may not always learn effectively in these unstructured environments. Thus, providing adaptive support has great potential to help improve student learning with these rich activities. Providing adaptive support requires a…

  3. Sustainability of environment-assisted energy transfer in quantum photobiological complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zloshchastiev, Konstantin G. [Institute of Systems Science, Durban University of Technology (South Africa)

    2017-09-15

    It is shown that quantum sustainability is a universal phenomenon which emerges during environment-assisted electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) in photobiological complexes (PBCs), such as photosynthetic reaction centers and centers of melanogenesis. We demonstrate that quantum photobiological systems must be sustainable for them to simultaneously endure continuous energy transfer and keep their internal structure from destruction or critical instability. These quantum effects occur due to the interaction of PBCs with their environment which can be described by means of the reduced density operator and effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian (NH). Sustainable NH models of EET predict the coherence beats, followed by the decrease of coherence down to a small, yet non-zero value. This indicates that in sustainable PBCs, quantum effects survive on a much larger time scale than the energy relaxation of an exciton. We show that sustainable evolution significantly lowers the entropy of PBCs and improves the speed and capacity of EET. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Experimental control versus realism: methodological solutions for simulator studies in complex operating environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skraaning, Gyrd Jr.

    2004-03-15

    This report is a reprint of a dr.philos. thesis written by Gyrd Skraaning Jr. The text was submitted and accepted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in 2003 (ISBN 82-471-5237-1). The thesis suggests a nonlinear model of the theoretical relationship between experimental control and realism, claiming that high degrees of realism and experimental control can be obtained simultaneously if the experimental methods are utilized strategically and developed further. This is in opposition to the conventional opinion that realism and experimental control are mutually excluding objectives. The thesis debates the impact of the operating task on human performance during simulator studies in HAMMLAB, and suggests how task variation can be experimentally controlled. In a within subject design, every subject is tested under all experimental conditions, and the presentation order of the conditions is counterbalanced to compensate for order effects. In realistic settings, it is essential that the experimental design imposes few artificial constrains on the research environment. At the same time, the design should be able to uncover experimental effects in situations where the number of participants is low. Within-subject design represents a reasonable compromise between these aspirations. In this respect, an alternative counterbalancing method is proposed (dis-ORDER). A theoretical analysis of the human performance concept and a discussion about performance measurement in complex operating environments, are followed by a debate on the shortcomings of traditional performance indicators. Two specialized operator performance assessment techniques are then presented and evaluated (OPAS and ORT). (Author)

  5. Modeling and Analyzing Operational Decision-Making Synchronization of C2 Organization in Complex Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve capability of operational decision-making synchronization (ODMS in command and control (C2 organization, the paper puts forward that ODMS is the negotiation process of situation cognition with three phases about “situation cognition, situation interaction and decision-making synchronization” in complex environment, and then the model and strategies of ODMS are given in quantity. Firstly, measure indexes of three steps above are given in the paper based on the time consumed in negotiation, and three patterns are proposed for negotiating timely in high quality during situation interaction. Secondly, the ODMS model with two stages in continuous changing situation is put forward in the paper, and ODMS strategies are analyzed within environment influence and time restriction. Thirdly, simulation cases are given to validate the process of ODMS under different continuous changing situations the results of this model are better than the other previous models to fulfill the actual restrictions, and the process of ODMS can be adjusted more reasonable for improving the capability of ODMS. Then we discuss the case and summarize the influence factors of ODMS in the C2 organization as organization structure, shared information resources, negotiation patterns, and allocation of decision rights.

  6. Experimental control versus realism: methodological solutions for simulator studies in complex operating environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skraaning, Gyrd Jr.

    2004-03-01

    This report is a reprint of a dr.philos. thesis written by Gyrd Skraaning Jr. The text was submitted and accepted by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in 2003 (ISBN 82-471-5237-1). The thesis suggests a nonlinear model of the theoretical relationship between experimental control and realism, claiming that high degrees of realism and experimental control can be obtained simultaneously if the experimental methods are utilized strategically and developed further. This is in opposition to the conventional opinion that realism and experimental control are mutually excluding objectives. The thesis debates the impact of the operating task on human performance during simulator studies in HAMMLAB, and suggests how task variation can be experimentally controlled. In a within subject design, every subject is tested under all experimental conditions, and the presentation order of the conditions is counterbalanced to compensate for order effects. In realistic settings, it is essential that the experimental design imposes few artificial constrains on the research environment. At the same time, the design should be able to uncover experimental effects in situations where the number of participants is low. Within-subject design represents a reasonable compromise between these aspirations. In this respect, an alternative counterbalancing method is proposed (dis-ORDER). A theoretical analysis of the human performance concept and a discussion about performance measurement in complex operating environments, are followed by a debate on the shortcomings of traditional performance indicators. Two specialized operator performance assessment techniques are then presented and evaluated (OPAS and ORT). (Author)

  7. HyMoTrack: A Mobile AR Navigation System for Complex Indoor Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Kaufmann, Hannes

    2015-12-24

    Navigating in unknown big indoor environments with static 2D maps is a challenge, especially when time is a critical factor. In order to provide a mobile assistant, capable of supporting people while navigating in indoor locations, an accurate and reliable localization system is required in almost every corner of the building. We present a solution to this problem through a hybrid tracking system specifically designed for complex indoor spaces, which runs on mobile devices like smartphones or tablets. The developed algorithm only uses the available sensors built into standard mobile devices, especially the inertial sensors and the RGB camera. The combination of multiple optical tracking technologies, such as 2D natural features and features of more complex three-dimensional structures guarantees the robustness of the system. All processing is done locally and no network connection is needed. State-of-the-art indoor tracking approaches use mainly radio-frequency signals like Wi-Fi or Bluetooth for localizing a user. In contrast to these approaches, the main advantage of the developed system is the capability of delivering a continuous 3D position and orientation of the mobile device with centimeter accuracy. This makes it usable for localization and 3D augmentation purposes, e.g. navigation tasks or location-based information visualization.

  8. HyMoTrack: A Mobile AR Navigation System for Complex Indoor Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Gerstweiler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Navigating in unknown big indoor environments with static 2D maps is a challenge, especially when time is a critical factor. In order to provide a mobile assistant, capable of supporting people while navigating in indoor locations, an accurate and reliable localization system is required in almost every corner of the building. We present a solution to this problem through a hybrid tracking system specifically designed for complex indoor spaces, which runs on mobile devices like smartphones or tablets. The developed algorithm only uses the available sensors built into standard mobile devices, especially the inertial sensors and the RGB camera. The combination of multiple optical tracking technologies, such as 2D natural features and features of more complex three-dimensional structures guarantees the robustness of the system. All processing is done locally and no network connection is needed. State-of-the-art indoor tracking approaches use mainly radio-frequency signals like Wi-Fi or Bluetooth for localizing a user. In contrast to these approaches, the main advantage of the developed system is the capability of delivering a continuous 3D position and orientation of the mobile device with centimeter accuracy. This makes it usable for localization and 3D augmentation purposes, e.g. navigation tasks or location-based information visualization.

  9. Surface complexation models for uranium adsorption in the sub-surface environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    Adsorption experiments with soil component minerals under a range of conditions are being used to develop models of uranium(VI) uptake in the sub-surface environment. The results show that adsorption of U on iron oxides and clay minerals is influenced by chemical factors including the pH, partial pressure of CO 2 , and the presence of ligands such as phosphate. Surface complexation models (SCMs) can be used to simulate U adsorption on these minerals. The SCMs are based on plausible mechanistic assumptions and describe the experimental data more adequately than Kd values or sorption isotherms. It is conceptually possible to simulate U sorption data on complex natural samples by combining SCMs for individual component minerals. This approach was used to develop a SCM for U adsorption to mineral assemblages from Koongarra (Australia), and produced a reasonable description of U uptake. In order to assess the applicability of experimental data to the field situation, in-situ measurements of U distributions between solid and liquid phases were undertaken at the Koongarra U deposit. This field partitioning data showed a satisfactory agreement with laboratory sorption data obtained under comparable conditions. (author)

  10. Anomalies in the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of correlated ions in complex molecular environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2017-11-01

    Emergent statistical attributes, and therefore the equations of state, of an assembly of interacting charge carriers embedded within a complex molecular environment frequently exhibit a variety of anomalies, particularly in the high-density (equivalently, the concentration) regime, which are not well understood, because they do not fall under the low-concentration phenomenologies of Debye-Hückel-Onsager and Poisson-Nernst-Planck, including their variants. To go beyond, we here use physical concepts and mathematical tools from quantum scattering theory, transport theory with the Stosszahlansatz of Boltzmann, and classical electrodynamics (Lorentz gauge) and obtain analytical expressions both for the average and the frequency-wave vector-dependent longitudinal and transverse current densities, diffusion coefficient, and the charge density, and therefore the analytical expressions for (a) the chemical potential, activity coefficient, and the equivalent conductivity for strong electrolytes and (b) the current-voltage characteristics for ion-transport processes in complex molecular environments. Using a method analogous to the notion of Debye length and thence the electrical double layer, we here identify a pair of characteristic length scales (longitudinal and the transverse), which, being wave vector and frequency dependent, manifestly exhibit nontrivial fluctuations in space-time. As a unifying theme, we advance a quantity (inverse length dimension), gscat(a ), which embodies all dynamical interactions, through various quantum scattering lengths, relevant to molecular species a, and the analytical behavior which helps us to rationalize the properties of strong electrolytes, including anomalies, in all concentration regimes. As an example, the behavior of gscat(a ) in the high-concentration regime explains the anomalous increase of the Debye length with concentration, as seen in a recent experiment on electrolyte solutions. We also put forth an extension of the

  11. Complex small pelagic fish population patterns arising from individual behavioral responses to their environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochier, Timothée; Auger, Pierre-Amaël; Pecquerie, Laure; Machu, Eric; Capet, Xavier; Thiaw, Modou; Mbaye, Baye Cheikh; Braham, Cheikh-Baye; Ettahiri, Omar; Charouki, Najib; Sène, Ousseynou Ndaw; Werner, Francisco; Brehmer, Patrice

    2018-05-01

    Small pelagic fish (SPF) species are heavily exploited in eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) as their transformation products are increasingly used in the world's food chain. Management relies on regular monitoring, but there is a lack of robust theories for the emergence of the populations' traits and their evolution in highly variable environments. This work aims to address existing knowledge gaps by combining physical and biogeochemical modelling with an individual life-cycle based model applied to round sardinella (Sardinella aurita) off northwest Africa, a key species for regional food security. Our approach focused on the processes responsible for seasonal migrations, spatio-temporal size-structure, and interannual biomass fluctuations. Emergence of preferred habitat resulted from interactions between natal homing behavior and environmental variability that impacts early life stages. Exploration of the environment by the fishes was determined by swimming capabilities, mesoscale to regional habitat structure, and horizontal currents. Fish spatio-temporal abundance variability emerged from a complex combination of distinct life-history traits. An alongshore gradient in fish size distributions is reported and validated by in situ measurements. New insights into population structure are provided, within an area where the species is abundant year-round (Mauritania) and with latitudinal migrations of variable (300-1200 km) amplitude. Interannual biomass fluctuations were linked to modulations of fish recruitment over the Sahara Bank driven by variability in alongshore current intensity. The identified processes constitute an analytical framework that can be implemented in other EBUS and used to explore impacts of regional climate change on SPF.

  12. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  13. Influence of humic-acid complexing on the mobility of Americium in the soil aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Campbell, M.J.; Kittrick, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    Diffusion data indicate the Am, Cm and Np migrate 1.2, 0.8, and 26 centimeters, respectively, in a thousand years. Thus, excluding mass transport by moving water or wind, actinide elements, such as Cm, Am, and Np that find their way to the soil-aquatic environment are relatively immobile. Measured diffusion coefficients, corrected for distribution between the aqueous and soil phases, tortuosity, negative absorption, and relative fluidity are in reasonable agreement with aqueous diffusion coefficients. However, agreement depends strongly on measurement method used to determine distribution ratios. Two sets of experiments with 241 Am and 152 Eu tracers have been done to measure distribution ratios as a function of the aqueous humic acid concentration. In the first experiments the solid phase was kaolinite and in the second series of distribution ratios were measured with Burbank sandy loam. Both of these experiments indicated that Am(III) and Eu(III) form very strong humic acid complexes with formation constants of approximately 10 5 . Additional experiments are being done to establish the average number of Am(III)s or Eu(III)s bound to the humic acid polymer

  14. Search strategy in a complex and dynamic environment (the Indian Ocean case)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loire, Sophie; Arbabi, Hassan; Clary, Patrick; Ivic, Stefan; Crnjaric-Zic, Nelida; Macesic, Senka; Crnkovic, Bojan; Mezic, Igor; UCSB Team; Rijeka Team

    2014-11-01

    The disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370) in the early morning hours of 8 March 2014 has exposed the disconcerting lack of efficient methods for identifying where to look and how to look for missing objects in a complex and dynamic environment. The search area for plane debris is a remote part of the Indian Ocean. Searches, of the lawnmower type, have been unsuccessful so far. Lagrangian kinematics of mesoscale features are visible in hypergraph maps of the Indian Ocean surface currents. Without a precise knowledge of the crash site, these maps give an estimate of the time evolution of any initial distribution of plane debris and permits the design of a search strategy. The Dynamic Spectral Multiscale Coverage search algorithm is modified to search a spatial distribution of targets that is evolving with time following the dynamic of ocean surface currents. Trajectories are generated for multiple search agents such that their spatial coverage converges to the target distribution. Central to this DSMC algorithm is a metric for the ergodicity.

  15. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  16. The development and application of composite complexity models and a relative complexity metric in a software maintenance environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hops, J. M.; Sherif, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    A great deal of effort is now being devoted to the study, analysis, prediction, and minimization of software maintenance expected cost, long before software is delivered to users or customers. It has been estimated that, on the average, the effort spent on software maintenance is as costly as the effort spent on all other software costs. Software design methods should be the starting point to aid in alleviating the problems of software maintenance complexity and high costs. Two aspects of maintenance deserve attention: (1) protocols for locating and rectifying defects, and for ensuring that noe new defects are introduced in the development phase of the software process; and (2) protocols for modification, enhancement, and upgrading. This article focuses primarily on the second aspect, the development of protocols to help increase the quality and reduce the costs associated with modifications, enhancements, and upgrades of existing software. This study developed parsimonious models and a relative complexity metric for complexity measurement of software that were used to rank the modules in the system relative to one another. Some success was achieved in using the models and the relative metric to identify maintenance-prone modules.

  17. Resource-Bounded Information Acquisition and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Different combinations of voting and confidence evaluation schemes...H. Wang, ... Facial Expression Decomposition..., ICCV, 2003. (E)..., H. Wang, ... Tensor Approximation..., SIGGRAPH. 2005. (F)..., H. Wang, ... High...two of the possible schemes for combining the evidence in the output space. In the first scheme, we take a majority 67 vote , i.e., the class with the

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Divalent Manganese, Iron, and Cobalt Complexes in Tripodal Phenolate/N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käß, Martina; Hohenberger, Johannes; Adelhardt, Mario

    2014-01-01

    . The complete ligand series offers a convenient way of tuning the electronic and steric environment around the metal center, thus, allowing for control of the complex’s reactivity. This series of divalent complexes of Mn, Fe, and Co was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, IR, and UV/vis spectroscopy...... as well as by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Variable-temperature SQUID magnetization measurements in the range from 2 to 300 K confirmed high-spin ground states for all divalent complexes and revealed a trend of increasing zero-field splitting |D| from Mn(II), to Fe(II), to Co(II) complexes...

  19. Using cognitive architectures to study issues in team cognition in a complex task environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Paul R.; Sycara, Katia; Tang, Yuqing

    2014-05-01

    Cognitive social simulation is a computer simulation technique that aims to improve our understanding of the dynamics of socially-situated and socially-distributed cognition. This makes cognitive social simulation techniques particularly appealing as a means to undertake experiments into team cognition. The current paper reports on the results of an ongoing effort to develop a cognitive social simulation capability that can be used to undertake studies into team cognition using the ACT-R cognitive architecture. This capability is intended to support simulation experiments using a team-based problem solving task, which has been used to explore the effect of different organizational environments on collective problem solving performance. The functionality of the ACT-R-based cognitive social simulation capability is presented and a number of areas of future development work are outlined. The paper also describes the motivation for adopting cognitive architectures in the context of social simulation experiments and presents a number of research areas where cognitive social simulation may be useful in developing a better understanding of the dynamics of team cognition. These include the use of cognitive social simulation to study the role of cognitive processes in determining aspects of communicative behavior, as well as the impact of communicative behavior on the shaping of task-relevant cognitive processes (e.g., the social shaping of individual and collective memory as a result of communicative exchanges). We suggest that the ability to perform cognitive social simulation experiments in these areas will help to elucidate some of the complex interactions that exist between cognitive, social, technological and informational factors in the context of team-based problem-solving activities.

  20. Utilizing NASA DISCOVER-AQ Data to Examine Spatial Gradients in Complex Emission Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzanowicz, M. E.; Moore, W.; Crawford, J. H.; Schroeder, J.

    2017-12-01

    Although many regulations have been enacted with the goal of improving air quality, many parts of the US are still classified as `non-attainment areas' because they frequently violate federal air quality standards. Adequately monitoring the spatial distribution of pollutants both within and outside of non-attainment areas has been an ongoing challenge for regulators. Observations of near-surface pollution from space-based platforms would provide an unprecedented view of the spatial distribution of pollution, but this goal has not yet been realized due to fundamental limitations of satellites, specifically because the footprint size of satellite measurements may not be sufficiently small enough to capture true gradients in pollution, and rather represents an average over a large area. NASA's DISCOVER-AQ was a multi-year field campaign aimed at improving our understanding of the role that remote sensing, including satellite-based remote sensing, could play in air quality monitoring systems. DISCOVER-AQ data will be utilized to create a metric to examine spatial gradients and how satellites can capture those gradients in areas with complex emission environments. Examining horizontal variability within a vertical column is critical to understanding mixing within the atmosphere. Aircraft spirals conducted during DISCOVER-AQ were divided into octants, and averages of a given a species were calculated, with certain points receiving a flag. These flags were determined by calculating gradients between subsequent octants. Initial calculations have shown that over areas with large point source emissions, such as Platteville and Denver-La Casa in Colorado, and Essex, Maryland, satellite retrievals may not adequately capture spatial variability in the atmosphere, thus complicating satellite inversion techniques and limiting our ability to understand human exposure on sub-grid scales. Further calculations at other locations and for other trace gases are necessary to determine

  1. Multisectoral Actions for Health: Challenges and Opportunities in Complex Policy Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Tangcharoensathien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Multisectoral actions for health, defined as actions undertaken by non-health sectors to protect the health of the population, are essential in the context of inter-linkages between three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, social, and environmental. These multisectoral actions can address the social and economic factors that influence the health of a population at the local, national, and global levels. This editorial identifies the challenges, opportunities and capacity development for effective multisectoral actions for health in a complex policy environment. The root causes of the challenges lie in poor governance such as entrenched political and administrative corruption, widespread clientelism, lack of citizen voice, weak social capital, lack of trust and lack of respect for human rights. This is further complicated by the lack of government effectiveness caused by poor capacity for strong public financial management and low levels of transparency and accountability which leads to corruption. The absence of or rapid changes in government policies, and low salary in relation to living standards result in migration out of qualified staff. Tobacco, alcohol and sugary drink industries are major risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs and had interfered with health policy through regulatory capture and potential law suits against the government. Opportunities still exist. Some World Health Assembly (WHA and United Nations General Assembly (UNGA resolutions are both considered as external driving forces for intersectoral actions for health. In addition, Thailand National Health Assembly under the National Health Act is another tool providing opportunity to form trust among stakeholders from different sectors.

  2. Modeling Groundwater Flow System of a Drainage Basin in the Basement Complex Environment of Southwestern Nigera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinwumiju, Akinola S.; Olorunfemi, Martins O.

    2018-05-01

    This study attempted to model the groundwater flow system of a drainage basin within the Basement Complex environment of Southwestern Nigeria. Four groundwater models were derived from Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) Data, remotely sensed data, geological information (hydrolineaments and lithology) and borehole data. Subsequently, two sub-surface (local and regional) flow systems were delineated in the study area. While the local flow system is controlled by surface topography, the regional flow system is controlled by the networks of intermediate and deep seated faults/fractures. The local flow system is characterized by convergence, divergence, inflow and outflow in places, while the regional flow system is dominated by NNE-SSW and W-E flow directions. Minor flow directions include NNW-SSE and E-W with possible linkages to the main flow-paths. The NNE-SSW regional flow system is a double open ended flow system with possible linkage to the Niger Trough. The W-E regional flow system is a single open ended system that originates within the study area (with possible linkage to the NNE-SSW regional flow system) and extends to Ikogosi in the adjoining drainage basin. Thus, the groundwater drainage basin of the study area is much larger and extensive than its surface drainage basin. The all year round flowing (perennial) rivers are linked to groundwater outcrops from faults/fractures and contact zones. Consequently, larger percentage of annual rainwater usually leaves the basin in form of runoff and base flow. Therefore, the basin is categorized as a donor basin but with suspected subsurface water input at its northeastern axis.

  3. Chemistry of complexing molecules and environment. Report of the working group of the Cea ''mission environment''; Chimie des complexants en environnements. Rapport du groupe de travail de la mission environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J.C

    1998-07-01

    The Working group 'Chemistry of Complexing Molecules and Environment' of the Mission Environment (AG/ENV) identified themes for an original positioning of CEA on important issues of environmental research if a sufficiently strong demand appears. The research of CEA on the environment should be complementary to actions undertaken by other partners (official institutions, research organizations and industrial firms). The themes suggested are: the synthesis of new chelating molecules and new materials having specific properties, with the support of theoretical chemistry and modeling, analytical physical chemistry and speciation of species in relation to their eco-toxicity and their biogeochemical mobility in the natural environment. These themes, illustrated by examples of actions in progress at CEA or likely to be launched quickly, draw largely from recognized competences of the teams, generally developed for finalized nuclear applications: experimental, theoretical and instrumental competences. (author)

  4. Chemistry of complexing molecules and environment. Report of the working group of the Cea ''mission environment''; Chimie des complexants en environnements. Rapport du groupe de travail de la mission environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J C

    1998-07-01

    The Working group 'Chemistry of Complexing Molecules and Environment' of the Mission Environment (AG/ENV) identified themes for an original positioning of CEA on important issues of environmental research if a sufficiently strong demand appears. The research of CEA on the environment should be complementary to actions undertaken by other partners (official institutions, research organizations and industrial firms). The themes suggested are: the synthesis of new chelating molecules and new materials having specific properties, with the support of theoretical chemistry and modeling, analytical physical chemistry and speciation of species in relation to their eco-toxicity and their biogeochemical mobility in the natural environment. These themes, illustrated by examples of actions in progress at CEA or likely to be launched quickly, draw largely from recognized competences of the teams, generally developed for finalized nuclear applications: experimental, theoretical and instrumental competences. (author)

  5. A novel complex air supply model for indoor air quality control via the occupant micro-environment demand ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Bo; Jin, Maozhu; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protection of indoor air quality and human health can be achieved via ventilation, which has becomes one of the most important tasks for sustainable buildings. This approach also requires highly efficient and energy saving methods for modern building ventilations consisting of a set of parameters of the complex indoor system. Therefore, the advancement in understanding the characteristics of various ventilation methods is highly necessary. This study presents one novel air supply model for the complex occupant micro-environment demand control ventilations, to analyze the efficiency of various ventilation types. This model is established primarily according to the momentum and mass conservations, and goal of occupant micro-environment demand, which is a complex system with the characteristics of diversity and dynamic variation. As for different occupant densities, characteristics of outdoor air supply for controlling gaseous pollutant and three basic features of outdoor airflow supply reaching occupant micro-environment were obtained. This research shows that for various types of occupant density and storey height, the rising and descending rates of the demand outdoor airflow in mixing ventilation are higher than those under displacement ventilation conditions. In addition, since the structure is better designed and sewage flow is more efficient, the mixing ventilation also requires a much higher peak demand outdoor airflow than its counterpart. The increase of storey height will lead to a decline of pollutants in the breathing zone and the demand outdoor airflow. Fluctuations of air flow diffusion caused by the change of occupant density in architectural space, will lead to variations of outdoor airflow reaching occupant micro-environment. Accordingly, it would lead to the different peak values of demand outdoor airflow, and the difference becomes even significant if the occupant density increases. The variations of the air supply and fraction of air reaching the

  6. Towards Service Robots for Everyday Environments Recent Advances in Designing Service Robots for Complex Tasks in Everyday Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Zöllner, Marius; Bischoff, Rainer; Burgard, Wolfram; Haschke, Robert; Hägele, Martin; Lawitzky, Gisbert; Nebel, Bernhard; Plöger, Paul; Reiser, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    People have dreamed of machines, which would free them from unpleasant, dull, dirty and dangerous tasks and work for them as servants, for centuries if not millennia. Service robots seem to finally let these dreams come true. But where are all these robots that eventually serve us all day long, day for day? A few service robots have entered the market: domestic and professional cleaning robots, lawnmowers, milking robots, or entertainment robots. Some of these robots look more like toys or gadgets rather than real robots. But where is the rest? This is a question, which is asked not only by customers, but also by service providers, care organizations, politicians, and funding agencies. The answer is not very satisfying. Today’s service robots have their problems operating in everyday environments. This is by far more challenging than operating an industrial robot behind a fence. There is a comprehensive list of technical and scientific problems, which still need to be solved. To advance the state of the art...

  7. Modeling Hydrodynamics on the Wave Group Scale in Topographically Complex Reef Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyns, J.; Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. A.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of the characteristics of waves and the associated wave-driven currents is important for sediment transport and morphodynamics, nutrient dynamics and larval dispersion within coral reef ecosystems. Reef-lined coasts differ from sandy beaches in that they have a steep offshore slope, that the non-sandy bottom topography is very rough, and that the distance between the point of maximum short wave dissipation and the actual coastline is usually large. At this short wave breakpoint, long waves are released, and these infragravity (IG) scale motions account for the bulk of the water level variance on the reef flat, the lagoon and eventually, the sandy beaches fronting the coast through run-up. These IG energy dominated water level motions are reinforced during extreme events such as cyclones or swells through larger incident band wave heights and low frequency wave resonance on the reef. Recently, a number of hydro(-morpho)dynamic models that have the capability to model these IG waves have successfully been applied to morphologically differing reef environments. One of these models is the XBeach model, which is curvilinear in nature. This poses serious problems when trying to model an entire atoll for example, as it is extremely difficult to build curvilinear grids that are optimal for the simulation of hydrodynamic processes, while maintaining the topology in the grid. One solution to remediate this problem of grid connectivity is the use of unstructured grids. We present an implementation of the wave action balance on the wave group scale with feedback to the flow momentum balance, which is the foundation of XBeach, within the framework of the unstructured Delft3D Flexible Mesh model. The model can be run in stationary as well as in instationary mode, and it can be forced by regular waves, time series or wave spectra. We show how the code is capable of modeling the wave generated flow at a number of topographically complex reef sites and for a number of

  8. Navigating a strange and complex environment: experiences of Sudanese refugee women using a new nutrition resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannion CA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cynthia A Mannion, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal, Christena Jane HenshawFaculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaBackground: Refugees experience dietary changes as part of the daily challenges they face resettling in a new country. Sudanese women seek to care and feed their families, but face language barriers in the marketplace, limited access to familiar foods, and forced new food choices. This study aimed to understand the acceptability of a purse-sized nutrition resource, “The Market Guide”, which was developed to help recently immigrated Sudanese refugee women identify and purchase healthy foods and navigate grocery stores.Methods: Eight women participated in a focus group, four of whom were also observed during accompanied grocery store visits. Individual interviews were conducted with four health care workers at the resettlement center to gather perceptions about the suitability of The Market Guide. Focus groups and interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Data from field notes and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory for preliminary open codes, followed by selective and theoretical coding.Results: The Market Guide was of limited use to Sudanese women. Their response to this resource revealed the struggles of women acculturating during their first year in Calgary, Canada. We discovered the basic social process, “Navigating through a strange and complex environment: learning ways to feed your family.” Language, transportation, and an unfamiliar marketplace challenged women and prevented them from exercising their customary role of “knowing” which foods were “safe and good” for their families. The nutrition resource fell short of informing food choices and purchases, and we discovered that “learning to feed your family” is a relational process where trusted persons, family, and friends help navigate dietary acculturation.Conclusion: Emergent theory based on the basic social process may

  9. Multisectoral Actions for Health: Challenges and Opportunities in Complex Policy Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangcharoensathien, Viroj; Srisookwatana, Orapan; Pinprateep, Poldej; Posayanonda, Tipicha; Patcharanarumol, Walaiporn

    2017-05-16

    Multisectoral actions for health, defined as actions undertaken by non-health sectors to protect the health of the population, are essential in the context of inter-linkages between three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, social, and environmental. These multisectoral actions can address the social and economic factors that influence the health of a population at the local, national, and global levels. This editorial identifies the challenges, opportunities and capacity development for effective multisectoral actions for health in a complex policy environment. The root causes of the challenges lie in poor governance such as entrenched political and administrative corruption, widespread clientelism, lack of citizen voice, weak social capital, lack of trust and lack of respect for human rights. This is further complicated by the lack of government effectiveness caused by poor capacity for strong public financial management and low levels of transparency and accountability which leads to corruption. The absence of or rapid changes in government policies, and low salary in relation to living standards result in migration out of qualified staff. Tobacco, alcohol and sugary drink industries are major risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and had interfered with health policy through regulatory capture and potential law suits against the government. Opportunities still exist. Some World Health Assembly (WHA) and United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) resolutions are both considered as external driving forces for intersectoral actions for health. In addition, Thailand National Health Assembly under the National Health Act is another tool providing opportunity to form trust among stakeholders from different sectors. Capacity development at individual, institutional and system level to generate evidence and ensure it is used by multisectoral agencies is as critical as strengthening the health literacy of people and the overall good governance of a

  10. Radio elements / bottom salts separation by nano-filtration aided by complexation in a highly saline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubert, Eric

    1997-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the use of a membrane-based technique, nano-filtration, aided or not by complexation, for the processing of highly saline liquid effluents produced by radio-chemical decontamination. The objective is to separate non-radioactive elements (sodium nitrate) from radio-elements (caesium, strontium and actinides) in order to reduce the volume of wastes. Within the perspective of an industrial application, a system to concentrate the effluent is firstly defined. Different nano-filtration membranes are tested and reveal to be insufficient in highly saline environment. A stage of selective complexation of radio-elements is therefore considered before nano-filtration. The main factors affecting performance of nano-filtration-complexation (for a given membrane system) are identified: ionic force, pH, ligand content, trans-membrane pressure. Finally, a nano-filtration pilot is implemented to perform nano-filtration-complexation operations by remote handling on radioactive substances [fr

  11. Comparing Virtual and Physical Robotics Environments for Supporting Complex Systems and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Matthew; Wilensky, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Both complex systems methods (such as agent-based modeling) and computational methods (such as programming) provide powerful ways for students to understand new phenomena. To understand how to effectively teach complex systems and computational content to younger students, we conducted a study in four urban middle school classrooms comparing…

  12. Hänsel, Gretel and the slime mould—how an external spatial memory aids navigation in complex environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Ferguson, Jules; Reid, Chris R.; Latty, Tanya; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-10-01

    The ability to navigate through an environment is critical to most organisms’ ability to survive and reproduce. The presence of a memory system greatly enhances navigational success. Therefore, natural selection is likely to drive the creation of memory systems, even in non-neuronal organisms, if having such a system is adaptive. Here we examine if the external spatial memory system present in the acellular slime mould, Physarum polycephalum, provides an adaptive advantage for resource acquisition. P. polycephalum lays tracks of extracellular slime as it moves through its environment. Previous work has shown that the presence of extracellular slime allows the organism to escape from a trap in laboratory experiments simply by avoiding areas previously explored. Here we further investigate the benefits of using extracellular slime as an external spatial memory by testing the organism’s ability to navigate through environments of differing complexity with and without the ability to use its external memory. Our results suggest that the external memory has an adaptive advantage in ‘open’ and simple bounded environments. However, in a complex bounded environment, the extracellular slime provides no advantage, and may even negatively affect the organism’s navigational abilities. Our results indicate that the exact experimental set up matters if one wants to fully understand how the presence of extracellular slime affects the slime mould’s search behaviour.

  13. Hänsel, Gretel and the slime mould—how an external spatial memory aids navigation in complex environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith-Ferguson, Jules; Latty, Tanya; Beekman, Madeleine; Reid, Chris R

    2017-01-01

    The ability to navigate through an environment is critical to most organisms’ ability to survive and reproduce. The presence of a memory system greatly enhances navigational success. Therefore, natural selection is likely to drive the creation of memory systems, even in non-neuronal organisms, if having such a system is adaptive. Here we examine if the external spatial memory system present in the acellular slime mould, Physarum polycephalum , provides an adaptive advantage for resource acquisition. P. polycephalum lays tracks of extracellular slime as it moves through its environment. Previous work has shown that the presence of extracellular slime allows the organism to escape from a trap in laboratory experiments simply by avoiding areas previously explored. Here we further investigate the benefits of using extracellular slime as an external spatial memory by testing the organism’s ability to navigate through environments of differing complexity with and without the ability to use its external memory. Our results suggest that the external memory has an adaptive advantage in ‘open’ and simple bounded environments. However, in a complex bounded environment, the extracellular slime provides no advantage, and may even negatively affect the organism’s navigational abilities. Our results indicate that the exact experimental set up matters if one wants to fully understand how the presence of extracellular slime affects the slime mould’s search behaviour. (paper)

  14. Modeling of Complex Material Systems in Extreme Environments for Space Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Among the many enabling technologies of space research is the design of materials which are stable in the environments of interest for a given application. At the...

  15. Training Decision Makers for Complex Environments: Implications of the Naturalistic Decision Making Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Canon-Bowers, Janis A; Bell, Herbert H

    1997-01-01

    Perhaps the most significant contribution of the Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM) perspective is that it has forced researchers to reevaluate the assumptions they hold about how people make decisions in "real" environments...

  16. Generalizing a complex model for gully threshold identification in the Mediterranean environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torri, D.; Borselli, L.; Iaquinta, P.; Iovine, G.; Poesen, J.; Terranova, O.

    2012-04-01

    Among the physical processes leading to land degradation, soil erosion by water is the most important and gully erosion may contribute, at places, to 70% of the total soil loss. Nevertheless, gully erosion has often been neglected in water soil erosion modeling, whilst more prominence has been given to rill and interrill erosion. Both to facilitate the processing by agricultural machinery and to take advantage of all the arable land, gullies are commonly removed at each crop cycle, with significant soil losses due to the repeated excavation of the channel by the successive rainstorm. When the erosive forces of overland flow exceed the strength of the soil particles to detachment and displacement, water erosion occurs and usually a channel is formed. As runoff is proportional to the local catchment area, a relationship between local slope, S, and contributing area, A, is supposed to exists. A "geomorphologic threshold" scheme is therefore suitable to interpret the physical process of gully initiation: accordingly, a gully is formed when a hydraulic threshold for incision exceeds the resistance of the soil particles to detachment and transport. Similarly, it appears reasonable that a gully ends when there is a reduction of slope, or the concentrated flow meets more resistant soil-vegetation complexes. This study aims to predict the location of the beginning of gullies in the Mediterranean environment, based on an evaluation of S and A by means of a mathematical model. For the identification of the areas prone to gully erosion, the model employs two empirical thresholds relevant to the head (Thead) and to the end (Tend) of the gullies (of the type SA^ b>Thead, SA^ bsituations (usually after abandonment), and c) databases for cropland have been merged. Selected data have been examined and interpreted mathematically to assess a value to be taken as a constant for the exponent "b" of the above equation. Literature data on the problem of topological thresholds Tend are

  17. Nonlinear complexity behaviors of agent-based 3D Potts financial dynamics with random environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yani; Wang, Jun

    2018-02-01

    A new microscopic 3D Potts interaction financial price model is established in this work, to investigate the nonlinear complexity behaviors of stock markets. 3D Potts model, which extends the 2D Potts model to three-dimensional, is a cubic lattice model to explain the interaction behavior among the agents. In order to explore the complexity of real financial markets and the 3D Potts financial model, a new random coarse-grained Lempel-Ziv complexity is proposed to certain series, such as the price returns, the price volatilities, and the random time d-returns. Then the composite multiscale entropy (CMSE) method is applied to the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and the corresponding shuffled data to study the complexity behaviors. The empirical results indicate that the 3D financial model is feasible.

  18. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  19. An Improved Indoor Positioning System Using RGB-D Cameras and Wireless Networks for Use in Complex Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Duque Domingo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an Indoor Positioning System to estimate the location of people navigating in complex indoor environments. The developed technique combines WiFi Positioning Systems and depth maps, delivering promising results in complex inhabited environments, consisting of various connected rooms, where people are freely moving. This is a non-intrusive system in which personal information about subjects is not needed and, although RGB-D cameras are installed in the sensing area, users are only required to carry their smart-phones. In this article, the methods developed to combine the above-mentioned technologies and the experiments performed to test the system are detailed. The obtained results show a significant improvement in terms of accuracy and performance with respect to previous WiFi-based solutions as well as an extension in the range of operation.

  20. Comparing the accuracy of ABC and time-driven ABC in complex and dynamic environments: a simulation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S. HOOZÉE; M. VANHOUCKE; W. BRUGGEMAN; -

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of traditional ABC and time-driven ABC in complex and dynamic environments through simulation analysis. First, when unit times in time-driven ABC are known or can be flawlessly estimated, time-driven ABC coincides with the benchmark system and in this case our results show that the overall accuracy of traditional ABC depends on (1) existing capacity utilization, (2) diversity in the actual mix of productive work, and (3) error in the estimated percentage mix. ...

  1. Epistasis × environment interactions among Arabidopsis thaliana glucosinolate genes impact complex traits and fitness in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, Rachel E; Feusier, Julie; Muok, Alise; Lin, Catherine; Larson, Brandon; Copeland, Daniel; Corwin, Jason A; Rubin, Matthew J; Francisco, Marta; Li, Baohua; Joseph, Bindu; Weinig, Cynthia; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Despite the growing number of studies showing that genotype × environment and epistatic interactions control fitness, the influences of epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait evolution remain largely uncharacterized. Across three field trials, we quantified aliphatic glucosinolate (GSL) defense chemistry, leaf damage, and relative fitness using mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana varying at pairs of causal aliphatic GSL defense genes to test the impact of epistatic and epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait variation. We found that aliphatic GSL accumulation was primarily influenced by additive and epistatic genetic variation, leaf damage was primarily influenced by environmental variation and relative fitness was primarily influenced by epistasis and epistasis × environment interactions. Epistasis × environment interactions accounted for up to 48% of the relative fitness variation in the field. At a single field site, the impact of epistasis on relative fitness varied significantly over 2 yr, showing that epistasis × environment interactions within a location can be temporally dynamic. These results suggest that the environmental dependency of epistasis can profoundly influence the response to selection, shaping the adaptive trajectories of natural populations in complex ways, and deserves further consideration in future evolutionary studies. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Environment-dependent regulation of spliceosome activity by the LSM2-8 complex in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-López, Cristian; Hernández-Verdeja, Tamara; Perea-Resa, Carlos; Abia, David; Catalá, Rafael; Salinas, Julio

    2017-07-07

    Spliceosome activity is tightly regulated to ensure adequate splicing in response to internal and external cues. It has been suggested that core components of the spliceosome, such as the snRNPs, would participate in the control of its activity. The experimental indications supporting this proposition, however, remain scarce, and the operating mechanisms poorly understood. Here, we present genetic and molecular evidence demonstrating that the LSM2-8 complex, the protein moiety of the U6 snRNP, regulates the spliceosome activity in Arabidopsis, and that this regulation is controlled by the environmental conditions. Our results show that the complex ensures the efficiency and accuracy of constitutive and alternative splicing of selected pre-mRNAs, depending on the conditions. Moreover, miss-splicing of most targeted pre-mRNAs leads to the generation of nonsense mediated decay signatures, indicating that the LSM2-8 complex also guarantees adequate levels of the corresponding functional transcripts. Interestingly, the selective role of the complex has relevant physiological implications since it is required for adequate plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. These findings unveil an unanticipated function for the LSM2-8 complex that represents a new layer of posttranscriptional regulation in response to external stimuli in eukaryotes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Effects of structural complexity on within-canopy light environments and leaf traits in a northern mixed deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotis, Alexander T; Curtis, Peter S

    2017-10-01

    Canopy structure influences forest productivity through its effects on the distribution of radiation and the light-induced changes in leaf physiological traits. Due to the difficulty of accessing and measuring forest canopies, few field-based studies have quantitatively linked these divergent scales of canopy functioning. The objective of our study was to investigate how canopy structure affects light profiles within a forest canopy and whether leaves of mature trees adjust morphologically and biochemically to the light environments characteristic of canopies with different structural complexity. We used a combination of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and hemispherical photographs to quantify canopy structure and light environments, respectively, and a telescoping pole to sample leaves. Leaf mass per area (LMA), nitrogen on an area basis (Narea) and chlorophyll on a mass basis (Chlmass) were measured in red maple (Acer rubrum), american beech (Fagus grandifolia), white pine (Pinus strobus), and northern red oak (Quercus rubra) at different heights in plots with similar leaf area index but contrasting canopy complexity (rugosity). We found that more complex canopies had greater porosity and reduced light variability in the midcanopy while total light interception was unchanged relative to less complex canopies. Leaf phenotypes of F. grandifolia, Q. rubra and P. strobus were more sun-acclimated in the midstory of structurally complex canopies while leaf phenotypes of A. rubrum were more shade-acclimated (lower LMA) in the upper canopy of more complex stands, despite no differences in total light interception. Broadleaf species showed further differences in acclimation with increased Narea and reduced Chlmass in leaves with higher LMA, while P. strobus showed no change in Narea and Chlmass with higher LMA. Our results provide new insight on how light distribution and leaf acclimation in mature trees might be altered when natural and anthropogenic

  4. Autonomous Dirigible Airships: A Comparative Analysis and Operational Efficiency Evaluation for Logistical Use in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    using unmanned vehicles, also known as autonomous vehicles . These autonomous vehicles can be controlled remotely via satellite or radio signals...assault purposes across all services. This major shift to autonomous vehicles has kept a large number of troops out of dangerous environments such as Iraq

  5. Examining Motivation in Online Distance Learning Environments: Complex, Multifaceted, and Situation-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Maggie; St. George, Alison; Dron, John

    2011-01-01

    Existing research into motivation in online environments has tended to use one of two approaches. The first adopts a trait-like model that views motivation as a relatively stable, personal characteristic of the learner. Research from this perspective has contributed to the notion that online learners are, on the whole, intrinsically motivated. The…

  6. Design and evaluation of virtual environments mechanisms to support remote collaboration on complex process diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, E.; Brown, R.; Recker, J.; Johnson, D.; Vanderfeesten, I.T.P.

    2017-01-01

    Many organizational analysis tasks are solved by collaborating teams. In technology-mediated collaborations, enabling relevant visual cues is a core issue with existing technology. We explore whether avatars can provide relevant cues in collaborative virtual environments. To do so, we develop a

  7. How do animals communicate in complex hydrodynamic environments? Linking hydraulics and ecology in rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew; Rice, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Animals make decisions about the suitability of habitat and their reaction to other organisms based on the sensory information that they first obtain from the environment and other organisms within that environment. Sensory information, such as sounds, scents, vibrations and visual cues, is transported, transmitted, masked and filtered by fluvial processes, such as turbulent flow. Despite the fundamental importance of this information in dictating how animals interact with the environment, only limited attention has been paid to the environmental controls on the propagation of sensory signals and cues through fluvial systems. Aquatic animals use and respond to hydraulic characteristics when navigating their environment and selecting habitat. There is evidence that some animals can also sense the presence of other organisms from the hydraulic characteristics of their wake. This implies that at least some aquatic animals can differentiate between the turbulent flow generated by the presence of living organisms and ambient turbulence generated by the environment. We investigate whether there are specific flow characteristics, distinct from the ambient environment, that potentially flag the presence of organisms to other animals. Acoustic Doppler and Particle Image Velocimetry measurements in a series of laboratory flume experiments quantified the flow around living Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and two inanimate objects of equivalent shape and size. Experiments were repeated across a gradient of turbulence intensities generated over nine combinations of flow velocity and relative submergence. Flows downstream of living crayfish were distinct from inanimate objects, with greater turbulent intensities, higher energy in low- to intermediate frequencies, and flow structures that were less coherent in comparison to those measured downstream of inanimate objects. However, the hydrodynamic signature of crayfish became masked as the intensity of ambient

  8. Eliminating Inhibition of Return by Changing Salient Nonspatial Attributes in a Complex Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Frank K.; Samuel, Arthur G.; Chan, Agnes S.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) occurs when a target is preceded by an irrelevant stimulus (cue) at the same location: Target detection is slowed, relative to uncued locations. In the present study, we used relatively complex displays to examine the effect of repetition of nonspatial attributes. For both color and shape, attribute repetition produced a…

  9. Complex Reaction Environments and Competing Reaction Mechanisms in Zeolite Catalysis: Insights from Advanced Molecular Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wispelaere, K.; Ensing, B.; Ghysels, A.; Meijer, E.J.; van Van Speybroeck, V.

    2015-01-01

    The methanol-to-olefin process is a showcase example of complex zeolite-catalyzed chemistry. At real operating conditions, many factors affect the reactivity, such as framework flexibility, adsorption of various guest molecules, and competitive reaction pathways. In this study, the strength of first

  10. Gene-Environment Interplay in Common Complex Diseases: Forging an Integrative Model—Recommendations From an NIH Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, Ebony B.; McAllister, Kimberly; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Wanke, Kay; Balshaw, David; Rutter, Joni; Reedy, Jill; Shaughnessy, Daniel; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Paltoo, Dina; Atienza, Audie; Bierut, Laura; Kraft, Peter; Fallin, M. Daniele; Perera, Frederica; Turkheimer, Eric; Boardman, Jason; Marazita, Mary L.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Suomi, Stephen J.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Jacobson, Kristen C.; Lowe, William L.; Goldman, Lynn R.; Duggal, Priya; Gunnar, Megan R.; Manolio, Teri A.; Green, Eric D.; Olster, Deborah H.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is recognized that many common complex diseases are a result of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors, studies of gene-environment interaction remain a challenge and have had limited success to date. Given the current state-of-the-science, NIH sought input on ways to accelerate investigations of gene-environment interplay in health and disease by inviting experts from a variety of disciplines to give advice about the future direction of gene-environment interaction studies. Participants of the NIH Gene-Environment Interplay Workshop agreed that there is a need for continued emphasis on studies of the interplay between genetic and environmental factors in disease and that studies need to be designed around a multifaceted approach to reflect differences in diseases, exposure attributes, and pertinent stages of human development. The participants indicated that both targeted and agnostic approaches have strengths and weaknesses for evaluating main effects of genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. The unique perspectives represented at the workshop allowed the exploration of diverse study designs and analytical strategies, and conveyed the need for an interdisciplinary approach including data sharing, and data harmonization to fully explore gene-environment interactions. Further, participants also emphasized the continued need for high-quality measures of environmental exposures and new genomic technologies in ongoing and new studies. PMID:21308768

  11. Abrupt changes in the patterns and complexity of anterior cingulate cortex activity when food is introduced into an environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barak Francisco Caracheo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractForaging typically involves two distinct phases, an exploration phase where an organism explores its local environment in search of needed resources and an exploitation phase where a discovered resource is consumed. The behavior and cognitive requirements of exploration and exploitation are quite different and yet organisms can quickly and efficiently switch between them many times during a foraging bout. The present study investigated neural activity state dynamics in the anterior cingulate sub-region of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC when a reliable food source was introduced into an environment. Distinct and largely independent states were detected using a Hidden Markov Model (HMM when food was present or absent in the environment. Measures of neural entropy or complexity decreased when rats went from exploring the environment to exploiting a reliable food source. Exploration in the absence of food was associated with many weak activity states, while bouts of food consumption were characterized by fewer stronger states. Widespread activity state changes in the mPFC may help to inform foraging decisions and focus behavior on what is currently most prominent or valuable in the environment.

  12. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate sensitizing effect on the photophysical properties of environment friendly fluorescent films containing europium complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chaolong, E-mail: yclzjun@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Zhang, Pan; Zhou, Hualin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Xu, Jing [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Azaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan); Li, Youbing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Lu, Mangeng [Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials for Electronics, Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Lei, Lei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Shaopeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2016-10-15

    A series of environment friendly Eu/PHB fluorescent films through doped the Eu-complex precursor Eu(TTA){sub 2}(Tpy-OCH{sub 3})(2H{sub 2}O) into polymer matrices poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) with doping percentage at 1, 3, 5, and 7 (mass) were designed, fabricated and characterized. TGA and PL results indicated the Eu-complex precursor was immobilized in PHB matrix through the interaction between the Eu-complex. DSC results indicated the crystallinity of Eu/PHB films decreased with the increase of Eu-complex doping percentage. The emission spectra of the Eu-complex and Eu/PHB films recorded at room temperature exhibited the characteristic bands arising from the {sup 5}D{sub 0}/{sup 7}F{sub J}. The fact that the quantum efficiencies (η) of the doped film increased significantly revealed that the PHB matrix acts as an efficient co-sensitizer for Eu{sup 3+} ions luminescent center and therefore enhances the quantum efficiency of the emitter {sup 5}D{sub 0} level. In particular, all Eu/PHB films can be excited by visible light (410 nm), and also showed good photoluminescent properties. So the new Eu/PHB fluorescent films showed considerable promise for polymer light-emitting diode, active polymer optical fiber and biomedical analysis applications.

  13. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate sensitizing effect on the photophysical properties of environment friendly fluorescent films containing europium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chaolong; Zhang, Pan; Zhou, Hualin; Xu, Jing; Li, Youbing; Lu, Mangeng; Lei, Lei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Shaopeng

    2016-01-01

    A series of environment friendly Eu/PHB fluorescent films through doped the Eu-complex precursor Eu(TTA) 2 (Tpy-OCH 3 )(2H 2 O) into polymer matrices poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) with doping percentage at 1, 3, 5, and 7 (mass) were designed, fabricated and characterized. TGA and PL results indicated the Eu-complex precursor was immobilized in PHB matrix through the interaction between the Eu-complex. DSC results indicated the crystallinity of Eu/PHB films decreased with the increase of Eu-complex doping percentage. The emission spectra of the Eu-complex and Eu/PHB films recorded at room temperature exhibited the characteristic bands arising from the 5 D 0 / 7 F J . The fact that the quantum efficiencies (η) of the doped film increased significantly revealed that the PHB matrix acts as an efficient co-sensitizer for Eu 3+ ions luminescent center and therefore enhances the quantum efficiency of the emitter 5 D 0 level. In particular, all Eu/PHB films can be excited by visible light (410 nm), and also showed good photoluminescent properties. So the new Eu/PHB fluorescent films showed considerable promise for polymer light-emitting diode, active polymer optical fiber and biomedical analysis applications.

  14. Camouflaging in a complex environment--octopuses use specific features of their surroundings for background matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Josef

    Full Text Available Living under intense predation pressure, octopuses evolved an effective and impressive camouflaging ability that exploits features of their surroundings to enable them to "blend in." To achieve such background matching, an animal may use general resemblance and reproduce characteristics of its entire surroundings, or it may imitate a specific object in its immediate environment. Using image analysis algorithms, we examined correlations between octopuses and their backgrounds. Field experiments show that when camouflaging, Octopus cyanea and O. vulgaris base their body patterns on selected features of nearby objects rather than attempting to match a large field of view. Such an approach enables the octopus to camouflage in partly occluded environments and to solve the problem of differences in appearance as a function of the viewing inclination of the observer.

  15. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestner, Stefan [CERN (Switzerland)], E-mail: koestner@mpi-halle.mpg.de

    2009-09-11

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  16. Embedding Approach to Modeling Electromagnetic Fields in a Complex Two-Dimensional Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Tijhuis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach is presented to combine the response of a two-dimensionally inhomogeneous dielectric object in a homogeneous environment with that of an empty inhomogeneous environment. This allows an efficient computation of the scattering behavior of the dielectric cylinder with the aid of the CGFFT method and a dedicated extrapolation procedure. Since a circular observation contour is adopted, an angular spectral representation can be employed for the embedding. Implementation details are discussed for the case of a closed 434 MHz microwave scanner, and the accuracy and efficiency of all steps in the numerical procedure are investigated. Guidelines are proposed for choosing computational parameters such as truncation limits and tolerances. We show that the embedding approach does not increase the CPU time with respect to the forward problem solution in a homogeneous environment, if only the fields on the observation contour are computed, and that it leads to a relatively small increase when the fields on the mesh are computed as well.

  17. Amblypygids: Model Organisms for the Study of Arthropod Navigation Mechanisms in Complex Environments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D Wiegmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Navigation is an ideal behavioral model for the study of sensory system integration and the neural substrates associated with complex behavior. For this broader purpose, however, it may be profitable to develop new model systems that are both tractable and sufficiently complex to ensure that information derived from a single sensory modality and path integration are inadequate to locate a goal. Here, we discuss some recent discoveries related to navigation by amblypygids, nocturnal arachnids that inhabit the tropics and sub-tropics. Nocturnal displacement experiments under the cover of a tropical rainforest reveal that these animals possess navigational abilities that are reminiscent, albeit on a smaller spatial scale, of true-navigating vertebrates. Specialized legs, called antenniform legs, which possess hundreds of olfactory and tactile sensory hairs, and vision appear to be involved. These animals also have enormous mushroom bodies, higher-order brain regions that, in insects, integrate contextual cues and may be involved in spatial memory. In amblypygids, the complexity of a nocturnal rainforest may impose navigational challenges that favor the integration of information derived from multimodal cues. Moreover, the movement of these animals is easily studied in the laboratory and putative neural integration sites of sensory information can be manipulated. Thus, amblypygids could serve as a model system for the discovery of neural substrates associated with a unique and potentially sophisticated navigational capability. The diversity of habitats in which amblypygids are found also offers an opportunity for comparative studies of sensory integration and ecological selection pressures on navigation mechanisms.

  18. Energy-based method for near-real time modeling of sound field in complex urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasareanu, Stephanie M; Remillieux, Marcel C; Burdisso, Ricardo A

    2012-12-01

    Prediction of the sound field in large urban environments has been limited thus far by the heavy computational requirements of conventional numerical methods such as boundary element (BE) or finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods. Recently, a considerable amount of work has been devoted to developing energy-based methods for this application, and results have shown the potential to compete with conventional methods. However, these developments have been limited to two-dimensional (2-D) studies (along street axes), and no real description of the phenomena at issue has been exposed. Here the mathematical theory of diffusion is used to predict the sound field in 3-D complex urban environments. A 3-D diffusion equation is implemented by means of a simple finite-difference scheme and applied to two different types of urban configurations. This modeling approach is validated against FDTD and geometrical acoustic (GA) solutions, showing a good overall agreement. The role played by diffraction near buildings edges close to the source is discussed, and suggestions are made on the possibility to predict accurately the sound field in complex urban environments, in near real time simulations.

  19. Challenges and complexities of multifrequency atomic force microscopy in liquid environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper illustrates through numerical simulation the complexities encountered in high-damping AFM imaging, as in liquid enviroments, within the specific context of multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM). The focus is primarily on (i) the amplitude and phase relaxation of driven higher eigenmodes between successive tip-sample impacts, (ii) the momentary excitation of non-driven higher eigenmodes and (iii) base excitation artifacts. The results and discussion are mostly applicable to the cases where higher eigenmodes are driven in open loop and frequency modulation within bimodal schemes, but some concepts are also applicable to other types of multifrequency operations and to single-eigenmode amplitude and frequency modulation methods.

  20. Human guidance of mobile robots in complex 3D environments using smart glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopinsky, Ryan; Sharma, Aneesh; Gupta, Nikhil; Ordonez, Camilo; Collins, Emmanuel; Barber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In order for humans to safely work alongside robots in the field, the human-robot (HR) interface, which enables bi-directional communication between human and robot, should be able to quickly and concisely express the robot's intentions and needs. While the robot operates mostly in autonomous mode, the human should be able to intervene to effectively guide the robot in complex, risky and/or highly uncertain scenarios. Using smart glasses such as Google Glass∗, we seek to develop an HR interface that aids in reducing interaction time and distractions during interaction with the robot.

  1. Tests over time: Evaluating the currency of normative data in a complex multilingual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brebner, Chris; Chandler Yeo, Helen; Goh, Magdeline Meilin; Kam, Karryn Wanlin; Yeo, Wendy Su Fen

    2015-04-23

    Assessment of oral language skills is challenging in multilingual environments. With language policies promoting increased use of English and reduction of dialectal varieties of languages, rapid changes in language further confound assessment. This study explores the currency of normative data on an expressive language screening tool in English for English-Mandarin bilingual Singaporean children. Spoken language samples in English from 101 pre-school children were compared with those from 481 children in the original data collection in 2002. Scores for expressive vocabulary and morphosyntax were compared for the two main language groups. Results indicate that the normative data for English-dominant children are still current. The data for younger Mandarin-dominant children showed improved test scores, indicating improvement in expressive morphosyntax in English. English language competency has changed over time for Mandarin-dominant children in Singapore, likely due to the influence of language policy on language use. This is a particular challenge in multilingual environments. Current literature emphasizes the need to develop language assessments specific to populations and language groups for standardized assessments to be valid and reliable. These results demonstrate the need to monitor normative data and characteristics of language over time and to update standardized language assessments accordingly.

  2. An evaluation of the performance of two binaural beamformers in complex and dynamic multitalker environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Virginia; Mejia, Jorge; Freeston, Katrina; van Hoesel, Richard J; Dillon, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Binaural beamformers are super-directional hearing aids created by combining microphone outputs from each side of the head. While they offer substantial improvements in SNR over conventional directional hearing aids, the benefits (and possible limitations) of these devices in realistic, complex listening situations have not yet been fully explored. In this study we evaluated the performance of two experimental binaural beamformers. Testing was carried out using a horizontal loudspeaker array. Background noise was created using recorded conversations. Performance measures included speech intelligibility, localization in noise, acceptable noise level, subjective ratings, and a novel dynamic speech intelligibility measure. Participants were 27 listeners with bilateral hearing loss, fitted with BTE prototypes that could be switched between conventional directional or binaural beamformer microphone modes. Relative to the conventional directional microphones, both binaural beamformer modes were generally superior for tasks involving fixed frontal targets, but not always for situations involving dynamic target locations. Binaural beamformers show promise for enhancing listening in complex situations when the location of the source of interest is predictable.

  3. Modelling and simulation of complex sociotechnical systems: envisioning and analysing work environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Kirlik, Alex; Goh, Yang Miang; Buckle, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Accurate comprehension and analysis of complex sociotechnical systems is a daunting task. Empirically examining, or simply envisioning the structure and behaviour of such systems challenges traditional analytic and experimental approaches as well as our everyday cognitive capabilities. Computer-based models and simulations afford potentially useful means of accomplishing sociotechnical system design and analysis objectives. From a design perspective, they can provide a basis for a common mental model among stakeholders, thereby facilitating accurate comprehension of factors impacting system performance and potential effects of system modifications. From a research perspective, models and simulations afford the means to study aspects of sociotechnical system design and operation, including the potential impact of modifications to structural and dynamic system properties, in ways not feasible with traditional experimental approaches. This paper describes issues involved in the design and use of such models and simulations and describes a proposed path forward to their development and implementation. Practitioner Summary: The size and complexity of real-world sociotechnical systems can present significant barriers to their design, comprehension and empirical analysis. This article describes the potential advantages of computer-based models and simulations for understanding factors that impact sociotechnical system design and operation, particularly with respect to process and occupational safety. PMID:25761227

  4. Perspectives on counseling patients about menopausal hormone therapy: strategies in a complex data environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Sharon J; Nappi, Rossella E; Kingsberg, Sheryl

    2018-03-05

    This narrative review strives to give healthcare providers (HCPs) who care for menopausal women better tools and skills to initiate discussions with women about menopause and hormone therapy (HT), communicate complex concepts and data, and promote shared decision-making. We review relevant studies on HT, barriers to treatment of menopausal symptoms, and effective communication strategies. We also provide recommendations for communicating with patients about HT based on the medical literature and our own professional experience. Both patient and HCP-related barriers can prevent women from accessing treatment for bothersome symptoms of menopause. Many women and HCPs have a poor understanding of the complex, nuanced data regarding HT. The benefits and risks vary with patient age and time since menopause, duration of use, inclusion of a progestin, and patient medical history. Women may also have fears about potential side effects of HT and feel unable to make informed choices. Strategies for effective patient communication and shared decision-making include use of open-ended questions to elicit patient's concerns and preferences, reflecting back to the patient what the HCP heard, presenting evidence about benefits and risks in language the patient can understand, keeping risks in perspective (eg, provide absolute, and also relative risks) without minimizing them, and making conscious efforts to minimize potential bias. Necessary components for achieving high-quality, shared decisions about HT involve a combination of medical evidence, communication skills, and recognition of patient goals and concerns. Use of such strategies can enhance women's satisfaction with care.

  5. Gaining insight into the physics of dynamic atomic force microscopy in complex environments using the VEDA simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) continues to grow in popularity among scientists in many different fields, and research on new methods and operating modes continues to expand the resolution, capabilities, and types of samples that can be studied. But many promising increases in capability are accompanied by increases in complexity. Indeed, interpreting modern dAFM data can be challenging, especially on complicated material systems, or in liquid environments where the behavior is often contrary to what is known in air or vacuum environments. Mathematical simulations have proven to be an effective tool in providing physical insight into these non-intuitive systems. In this article we describe recent developments in the VEDA (virtual environment for dynamic AFM) simulator, which is a suite of freely available, open-source simulation tools that are delivered through the cloud computing cyber-infrastructure of nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org). Here we describe three major developments. First, simulations in liquid environments are improved by enhancements in the modeling of cantilever dynamics, excitation methods, and solvation shell forces. Second, VEDA is now able to simulate many new advanced modes of operation (bimodal, phase-modulation, frequency-modulation, etc.). Finally, nineteen different tip-sample models are available to simulate the surface physics of a wide variety different material systems including capillary, specific adhesion, van der Waals, electrostatic, viscoelasticity, and hydration forces. These features are demonstrated through example simulations and validated against experimental data, in order to provide insight into practical problems in dynamic AFM.

  6. Complex analysis of hazards to the man and natural environment due to electricity production in nuclear and coal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.

    1990-01-01

    The report presents a complex analysis of hazards connected with electrical energy production in nuclear power plants and coal power plants, starting with fuel mining, through power plant construction, operation, possible accidents and decommissioning to long term global effects. The comparison is based on contemporary, proven technologies of coal fired power plants and nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. The hazards to environment and man due to nuclear power are shown to be much smaller than those due to coal power cycle. The health benefits due to electrical power availability are shown to be much larger than the health losses due to its production. (author). 71 refs, 17 figs, 12 tabs

  7. Application of the modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas in complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, application of a modified Wheeler cap method for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas is presented. It is shown that the limitations on the cavity dimension can be overcome and thus measurement in a large cavity is possible. The cavity loss...... is investigated, and a modified radiation efficiency formula that includes the cavity loss is introduced. Moreover, a modification of the technique is proposed that involves the antenna working complex environment inside the Wheeler Cap and thus makes possible measurement of an antenna close to a hand or head...

  8. Complex-Spectrum Magnetic Environment enhances and/or modifies Bioeffects of Hypokinetic Stress Condition: an Animal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuriantz, N. A.; Martinyuk, V. S.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Iucci, N.; Tyasto, M. I.; Dorman, L. I.

    During last decades it was shown by many authors that ultra-low and extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields ULF 0-10 Hz ELF 10-1000 Hz may produce biological effects and consequently may be a possible source for health problems Spaceflight electric and magnetic environments are characterized by complex combination of static and time-varying components in ULF-ELF range and by high variability The objective of this study was to investigate the possible influence of such magnetic fields on rats to understand the pathway regarding functional state of cardiovascular system Magnetic field MF pattern with variable complex spectra in 0-150 Hz frequency range was simulated using 3-axial Helmholtz coils and special computer-based equipment The effect of the real world MF exposure on rats was also tested in combination with hypokinetic stress condition which is typical for spaceflights It was revealed that variable complex-spectrum MF acts as a weak or moderate stress-like factor which amplifies and or modifies the functional shifts caused by other stress-factors The value and direction of the functional shifts caused by MF exposure significantly depend on gender individual-typological constitutional features and also on the physiological state norm stress of organism Our results support the idea that variable complex-spectrum MF action involves sympathetic activation overload in cholesterol transport in blood and also secretor activation of tissue basophyls mast cells that can influence the regional haemodynamics These

  9. The focused use of posters for graduate education in the complex technological nursing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, D

    1993-10-01

    Posters are increasingly recognised as both a method of professional communication and a strategy for learning and assessment in nurse education. Rapid technological developments in health care and the nursing practice environment are generating specific educational needs in relation to the use of technology. There is a move to incorporate within the traditional rational technical focus a broader, more comprehensive understanding of technology, technological equipment and procedures. Technological innovations are an ideal subject matter for poster presentations at the graduate level particularly as broader dimensions such as the impetus for introduction, the research base, the evaluation strategy and the cost can be incorporated. Each poster can become a teaching focus for a student presentation to classmates or other professional forums in order to catalyse discussions of these wider dimensions. A description of the use of posters for these purposes with examples and comments by participants is included.

  10. Concept of the Interactive Platform for Real Time Energy Consumption Analysis in the Complex Urban Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Podgornik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a concept of interactive and comprehensive platform based on advanced metering infrastructure for exchanging information on energy consumption and consequently on energy efficiency in urban and industrial environment which can serve as powerful tool for monitoring of progress in transition toward low carbon society. Proposed concept aims at supporting energy utilities in optimizing energy performance of both supply and demand side aspect of their work and have a potential to fill the gap and help in harmonization of interests between the energy utilities, energy service providers, local energy agencies and citizens. The proposed concept should be realized as a platform with the modular architecture, allowing future expansion of user’s portfolio and inventory management (new energy efficiency measures, technologies, different industries, urban districts and regions.

  11. The Hydrodynamic Distinctiveness of Living Organisms: Communication in Complex Hydraulic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Animals make decisions about the suitability of habitat and their reaction to other organisms based on the sensory information that they first obtain. This information is transmitted, masked and filtered by fluvial processes, such as turbulent flow. Despite governing how animals interact with the environment, limited attention has been paid to the controls on the propagation of sensory signals through rivers. Some animals interpret hydraulic events and use the characteristics of wakes to sense the presence of other organisms. This implies that at least some animals can differentiate turbulent flow generated by the presence of living organisms from ambient environmental turbulence. We investigate whether there are specific flow characteristics, distinct from the ambient environment, that potentially flag the presence of organisms to other animals. ADV and PIV measurements in a series of laboratory flume experiments quantified the flow around living Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and two inanimate objects of equivalent shape and size. Experiments were repeated across a gradient of turbulence intensities generated over nine combinations of flow velocity and relative submergence. Flows downstream of living crayfish were distinct from inanimate objects, with greater turbulent intensities, higher energy in low- to intermediate frequencies, and flow structures that were less coherent in comparison to those measured downstream of inanimate objects. However, the hydrodynamic signature of crayfish became masked as the intensity of ambient turbulence exceeded that generated by living crayfish. These results demonstrate the importance of the fluvial processes in the transmission of sensory information and suggest that the ability of animals to perceive hydraulic signatures is likely to be limited in many situations in rivers. Thus, animals may need to rely on other senses, such as sight or hearing, especially where depth is shallow relative to grain size.

  12. Metal Sulfide Cluster Complexes and their Biogeochemical Importance in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, George W.; Rickard, David T.

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous clusters of FeS, ZnS and CuS constitute a major fraction of the dissolved metal load in anoxic oceanic, sedimentary, freshwater and deep ocean vent environments. Their ubiquity explains how metals are transported in anoxic environmental systems. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations show that they have high stability in oxic aqueous environments, and are also a significant fraction of the total metal load in oxic river waters. Molecular modeling indicates that the clusters are very similar to the basic structural elements of the first condensed phase forming from aqueous solutions in the Fe-S, Zn-S and Cu-S systems. The structure of the first condensed phase is determined by the structure of the cluster in solution. This provides an alternative explanation of Ostwald's Rule, where the most soluble, metastable phases form before the stable phases. For example, in the case of FeS, we showed that the first condensed phase is nanoparticulate, metastable mackinawite with a particle size of 2 nm consisting of about 150 FeS subunits, representing the end of a continuum between aqueous FeS clusters and condensed material. These metal sulfide clusters and nanoparticles are significant in biogeochemistry. Metal sulfide clusters reduce sulfide and metal toxicity and help drive ecology. FeS cluster formation drives vent ecology and AgS cluster formation detoxifies Ag in Daphnia magna neonates. We also note a new reaction between FeS and DNA and discuss the potential role of FeS clusters in denaturing DNA

  13. Dose assessment for inhalation intakes in complex, energetic environments: experience from the US Capstone study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmette, Raymond A.; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Because of the lack of existing information needed to evaluate the risks from inhalation exposures to depleted uranium (DU) aerosols of US soldiers during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, the US Department of Defense funded an experimental study to measure the characteristics of DU aerosols created when Abrams tanks and Bradley fighting vehicles are struck with large-caliber DU penetrators, and a dose and risk assessment for individuals present in such vehicles. This paper describes some of the difficulties experienced in dose assessment modelling of the very complex DU aerosols created in the Capstone studies, e.g. high concentrations, heterogeneous aerosol properties, non-lognormal particle size distributions, triphasic in vitro dissolution and rapid time-varying functions of both DU air concentration and particle size. The approaches used to solve these problems along with example results are presented. (authors)

  14. Challenges and complexities of multifrequency atomic force microscopy in liquid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago D. Solares

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates through numerical simulation the complexities encountered in high-damping AFM imaging, as in liquid enviroments, within the specific context of multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM. The focus is primarily on (i the amplitude and phase relaxation of driven higher eigenmodes between successive tip–sample impacts, (ii the momentary excitation of non-driven higher eigenmodes and (iii base excitation artifacts. The results and discussion are mostly applicable to the cases where higher eigenmodes are driven in open loop and frequency modulation within bimodal schemes, but some concepts are also applicable to other types of multifrequency operations and to single-eigenmode amplitude and frequency modulation methods.

  15. Habitats as complex odour environments: how does plant diversity affect herbivore and parasitoid orientation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Wäschke

    Full Text Available Plant diversity is known to affect success of host location by pest insects, but its effect on olfactory orientation of non-pest insect species has hardly been addressed. First, we tested in laboratory experiments the hypothesis that non-host plants, which increase odour complexity in habitats, affect the host location ability of herbivores and parasitoids. Furthermore, we recorded field data of plant diversity in addition to herbivore and parasitoid abundance at 77 grassland sites in three different regions in Germany in order to elucidate whether our laboratory results reflect the field situation. As a model system we used the herb Plantago lanceolata, the herbivorous weevil Mecinus pascuorum, and its larval parasitoid Mesopolobus incultus. The laboratory bioassays revealed that both the herbivorous weevil and its larval parasitoid can locate their host plant and host via olfactory cues even in the presence of non-host odour. In a newly established two-circle olfactometer, the weeviĺs capability to detect host plant odour was not affected by odours from non-host plants. However, addition of non-host plant odours to host plant odour enhanced the weeviĺs foraging activity. The parasitoid was attracted by a combination of host plant and host volatiles in both the absence and presence of non-host plant volatiles in a Y-tube olfactometer. In dual choice tests the parasitoid preferred the blend of host plant and host volatiles over its combination with non-host plant volatiles. In the field, no indication was found that high plant diversity disturbs host (plant location by the weevil and its parasitoid. In contrast, plant diversity was positively correlated with weevil abundance, whereas parasitoid abundance was independent of plant diversity. Therefore, we conclude that weevils and parasitoids showed the sensory capacity to successfully cope with complex vegetation odours when searching for hosts.

  16. The effect of brain lesions on sound localization in complex acoustic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zündorf, Ida C; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Lewald, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Localizing sound sources of interest in cluttered acoustic environments--as in the 'cocktail-party' situation--is one of the most demanding challenges to the human auditory system in everyday life. In this study, stroke patients' ability to localize acoustic targets in a single-source and in a multi-source setup in the free sound field were directly compared. Subsequent voxel-based lesion-behaviour mapping analyses were computed to uncover the brain areas associated with a deficit in localization in the presence of multiple distracter sound sources rather than localization of individually presented sound sources. Analyses revealed a fundamental role of the right planum temporale in this task. The results from the left hemisphere were less straightforward, but suggested an involvement of inferior frontal and pre- and postcentral areas. These areas appear to be particularly involved in the spectrotemporal analyses crucial for effective segregation of multiple sound streams from various locations, beyond the currently known network for localization of isolated sound sources in otherwise silent surroundings.

  17. Designing automation for complex work environments under different levels of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Nickel, Peter; Wastell, David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of different forms of static and adaptable automation under low- and high-stress conditions. Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions, comparing three levels of static automation (low, medium and high) and one level of adaptable automation, with the environmental stressor (noise) being varied as a within-subjects variable. Participants were trained for 4 h on a simulation of a process control environment, called AutoCAMS, followed by a 2.5-h testing session. Measures of performance, psychophysiology and subjective reactions were taken. The results showed that operators preferred higher levels of automation under noise than under quiet conditions. A number of parameters indicated negative effects of noise exposure, such as performance impairments, physiological stress reactions and higher mental workload. It also emerged that adaptable automation provided advantages over low and intermediate static automation, with regard to mental workload, effort expenditure and diagnostic performance. The article concludes that for the design of automation a wider range of operational scenarios reflecting adverse as well as ideal working conditions needs to be considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of automation: Measurement of performance, workload and behaviour in a complex control environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfe, Nora; Sharples, Sarah; Wilson, John R

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes an experiment that was undertaken to compare three levels of automation in rail signalling; a high level in which an automated agent set routes for trains using timetable information, a medium level in which trains were routed along pre-defined paths, and a low level where the operator (signaller) was responsible for the movement of all trains. These levels are described in terms of a Rail Automation Model based on previous automation theory (Parasuraman et al., 2000). Performance, subjective workload, and signaller activity were measured for each level of automation running under both normal operating conditions and abnormal, or disrupted, conditions. The results indicate that perceived workload, during both normal and disrupted phases of the experiment, decreased as the level of automation increased and performance was most consistent (i.e. showed the least variation between participants) with the highest level of automation. The results give a strong case in favour of automation, particularly in terms of demonstrating the potential for automation to reduce workload, but also suggest much benefit can achieved from a mid-level of automation potentially at a lower cost and complexity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Short message service or disService: issues with text messaging in a complex medical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert; Appel, Lora; Morra, Dante; Lo, Vivian; Kitto, Simon; Quan, Sherman

    2014-04-01

    Hospitals today are experiencing major changes in their clinical communication workflows as conventional numeric paging and face-to-face verbal conversations are being replaced by computer mediated communication systems. In this paper, we highlight the importance of understanding this transition and discuss some of the impacts that may emerge when verbal clinical conversations are replaced by short text messages. In-depth interviews (n=108) and non-participatory observation sessions (n=260h) were conducted on the General Internal Medicine wards at five academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Canada. From our analysis of the qualitative data, we identified two major themes. De-contextualization of complex issues led to an increase in misinterpretation and an increase in back and forth messaging for clarification. Depersonalization of communication was due to less verbal conversations and face-to-face interactions and led to a negative impact on work relationships. Text-based communication in hospital settings led to the oversimplification of messages and the depersonalization of communication. It is important to recognize and understand these unintended consequences of new technology to avoid the negative impacts to patient care and work relationships. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, A.D.; Turnbull, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the hydrocarbon resources of the North Sea has resulted in both offshore and onshore environmental repercussions, involving the existing physical attributes of the sea and seabed, the coastline and adjoining land. The social and economic repercussions of the industry were equally widespread. The dramatic and speedy impact of the exploration and exploitation of the northern North Sea resources in the early 1970s, on the physical resources of Scotland was quickly realised together with the concern that any environmental and social damage to the physical and social fabric should be kept to a minimum. To this end, a wide range of research and other activities by central and local government, and other interested agencies was undertaken to extend existing knowledge on the marine and terrestrial environments that might be affected by the oil and gas industry. The outcome of these activities is summarized in this paper. The topics covered include a survey of the marine ecosystems of the North Sea, the fishing industry, the impact of oil pollution on seabirds and fish stocks, the ecology of the Scottish coastline and the impact of the petroleum industry on a selection of particular sites. (author)

  1. Investigation of the subsurface environment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, B.F.; Mizell, S.A.; Hull, L.C.; Smith, T.H.; Lewis, B.D.; Barraclough, J.T.; Humphrey, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive, 10-year plan to investigate radionuclide migration in the subsurface at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) has been prepared and initiated (in FY-84). The RWMC Subsurface Investigation is designed to address two objectives set forth by the DOE Idaho Operations Office: (1) determine the extent of radionuclide migration, if any, from the buried waste, and (2) develop and calibrate a computer model to simulate long-term radionuclide migration. At the RWMC, the Snake River Plain Aquifer underlies about 177 m of partially saturated, fractured basalts and thin sedimentary units. Three sedimentary units, accounting for no more than 20 m of the partially saturated thickness, appear to be continuous throughout the area. Thinner sedimentary units are discontinuous. Low-level waste and (prior to 1970) transuranic waste have been buried in the surficial sediments at the RWMC. The first burials took place in 1952. Due to the complicated disposal system, a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art vadose zone monitoring instrumentation and techniques, an analysis of conceptual migration pathways, and an evaluation of potential hazard from buried radionuclides were conducted to guide preparation of the investigation plan. The plan includes an overview of the RWMC facility, subsurface work conducted to date at the RWMC and other DOE laboratory facilities, an evaluation and selection of the methods and studies to be used, a radionuclide hazard evaluation, a cost analysis, and external peer review results. In addition, an Appendix contains the details for each method/study to be employed. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  2. Combining Passive Sampling with Toxicological Characterization of Complex Mixtures of Pollutants from the Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Annika; Witt, Gesine; Schäfer, Sabine; Haase, Nora; Escher, Beate I

    The combination of polymer-based passive sampling to collect complex environmental mixtures of pollutants, the transfer of these mixtures into bioassays, and their related toxicological characterization is still in its infancy. However, this approach has considerable potential to improve environmental hazard and risk assessment for two reasons. First, the passive sampler collects a broad range of chemicals representing the fraction of compounds available for diffusion and (bio)uptake, excluding a large part of the matrix; thus, extensive sample cleanup which could discriminate certain compounds can be avoided. Second, the toxicological characterization of samples using bioassays is complementary to chemical (target) analysis within environmental monitoring because it captures all chemicals exerting the same mode of toxic action and acting jointly in mixtures, thus providing a comprehensive picture of their overall combined effects. The scientific literature describes a range of examples from the water phase where passive sampling is usually carried out in the kinetic uptake regime for most chemicals although some may already have reached equilibrium. The composition of the chemical mixture changes from the water phase to the passive sampling material because of kinetic effects and polymer/water partition coefficients which depend on the chemicals' hydrophobicity. In contrast, only a few applications in sediment and biota have been described, but amongst these some pioneering studies have demonstrated the feasibility and potential of this combined approach. This chapter gives an overview of what has been carried out in this research area, focusing on opportunities and challenges, and points out desirable future developments with a focus on the importance of choosing a suitable combination of sampling and dosing to transfer (or re-establish) the environmental mixture into the bioassay.

  3. Survey on bio-chemical complex harmonized with global environment. 3; Kankyo chowagata seibutsu kagaku konbinato ni kansuru chosa. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A survey was conducted of bio-chemical complex harmonized with the global environment for the purpose of constructing the material production process harmonized with the environment by the process fusion between biological conversion and chemical reaction. Palm oil was taken up as renewable raw material plant resource. The process utilizing bio-chemical reaction advances at normal temperature and pressure and is high in reaction specificity and selectivity. This is a recycling, circulation and environmental harmony type production technology which brings high yield, energy conservation, resource conservation, and low environmental loads. Waste water treatment and production of useful substances from sludge were thought as elementary technology. A possibility was studied of enzyme production by culturing solid waste, and the enzyme was applied to the hydrolysis process. The paper indicated trace components in the palm oil and the extraction method and proposed the production process of new derivatives for adding value to hydrolysate. A study was also made of the overall process flow which integrated these new processes and the material balance. The comprehensive evaluation of this new process was made from the aspect of the product structure, the market, construction cost, economical efficiency, and the environment. 133 refs., 65 figs., 56 tabs.

  4. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTS OF 51 PLANCK COLD CLUMPS IN THE ORION COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2012-09-15

    A mapping survey of 51 Planck cold clumps projected on the Orion complex was performed with J = 1-0 lines of {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO with the 13.7 m telescope at the Purple Mountain Observatory. The mean column densities of the Planck gas clumps range from 0.5 to 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, with an average value of (2.9 {+-} 1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. The mean excitation temperatures of these clumps range from 7.4 to 21.1 K, with an average value of 12.1 {+-} 3.0 K and the average three-dimensional velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub 3D} in these molecular clumps is 0.66 {+-} 0.24 km s{sup -1}. Most of the clumps have {sigma}{sub NT} larger than or comparable to {sigma}{sub Therm}. The H{sub 2} column density of the molecular clumps calculated from molecular lines correlates with the aperture flux at 857 GHz of the dust emission. By analyzing the distributions of the physical parameters, we suggest that turbulent flows can shape the clump structure and dominate their density distribution on large scales, but not function on small scales due to local fluctuations. Eighty-two dense cores are identified in the molecular clumps. The dense cores have an average radius and local thermal equilibrium (LTE) mass of 0.34 {+-} 0.14 pc and 38{sup +5}{sub -30} M{sub Sun }, respectively. The structures of low column density cores are more affected by turbulence, while the structures of high column density cores are more affected by other factors, especially by gravity. The correlation of velocity dispersion versus core size is very weak for the dense cores. The dense cores are found to be most likely gravitationally bounded rather than pressure confined. The relationship between M{sub vir} and M{sub LTE} can be well fitted with a power law. The core mass function here is much flatter than the stellar initial mass function. The lognormal behavior of the core mass distribution is most likely determined by internal turbulence.

  5. MOLECULAR ENVIRONMENTS OF 51 PLANCK COLD CLUMPS IN THE ORION COMPLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei

    2012-01-01

    A mapping survey of 51 Planck cold clumps projected on the Orion complex was performed with J = 1–0 lines of 12 CO and 13 CO with the 13.7 m telescope at the Purple Mountain Observatory. The mean column densities of the Planck gas clumps range from 0.5 to 9.5 × 10 21 cm –2 , with an average value of (2.9 ± 1.9) × 10 21 cm –2 . The mean excitation temperatures of these clumps range from 7.4 to 21.1 K, with an average value of 12.1 ± 3.0 K and the average three-dimensional velocity dispersion σ 3D in these molecular clumps is 0.66 ± 0.24 km s –1 . Most of the clumps have σ NT larger than or comparable to σ Therm . The H 2 column density of the molecular clumps calculated from molecular lines correlates with the aperture flux at 857 GHz of the dust emission. By analyzing the distributions of the physical parameters, we suggest that turbulent flows can shape the clump structure and dominate their density distribution on large scales, but not function on small scales due to local fluctuations. Eighty-two dense cores are identified in the molecular clumps. The dense cores have an average radius and local thermal equilibrium (LTE) mass of 0.34 ± 0.14 pc and 38 +5 –30 M ☉ , respectively. The structures of low column density cores are more affected by turbulence, while the structures of high column density cores are more affected by other factors, especially by gravity. The correlation of velocity dispersion versus core size is very weak for the dense cores. The dense cores are found to be most likely gravitationally bounded rather than pressure confined. The relationship between M vir and M LTE can be well fitted with a power law. The core mass function here is much flatter than the stellar initial mass function. The lognormal behavior of the core mass distribution is most likely determined by internal turbulence.

  6. Study on dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Kohyama, A.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    A Japan-USA Program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, 'JUPITER', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment using fission reactors. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. The irradiation capsules for in-situ measurement and varying temperature were developed successfully. It was found that insulating ceramics were worked up to 3 dpa. The property changes and related issues in low activation structural materials were summarized. (author)

  7. Educational renewal of physician training in Australia and New Zealand: Multiple educational innovations in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udemans, Rebecca; Stokes, Marie-Louise; Rigby, Louise; Khanna, Priya; Christiansen, Jonathan

    2018-03-21

    The Royal Australasian College of Physicians is renewing its specialty training programs and shifting towards competency-based medical education. Our aim is to improve the quality and rigor of training and graduate outcomes, and promote high standards of physician practice to serve the health of patients, families, and communities in a changing healthcare environment. We are progressing holistic change and multiple educational innovations in a complex environment. Numerous stakeholders, a disparate training landscape and a largely volunteer supervisor workforce pose challenges in supporting effective implementation. This paper describes our progress and experience with three key components of our education renewal program: curricular renewal, a new selection process and faculty development. It offers reflections on the practical challenges, lessons learned and factors critical for success. Our experience highlights opportunities for training organizations to maximize their influence over workplace training experiences and outcomes by taking a systems approach to the design, delivery and evaluation of the components of education renewal. We found that design, development and delivery of our multiple educational innovations have benefited from co-design approaches, progressive and concurrent development, continual exploration of new strategies, and implementation as soon as viable with a commitment to iterative improvements over time.

  8. Effects of training on short- and long-term skill retention in a complex multiple-task environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, J; Hockey, G R; Wastell, D G

    2000-12-01

    The paper reports the results of an experiment on the performance and retention of a complex task. This was a computer-based simulation of the essential elements of a spacecraft's life support system. It allowed the authors to take a range of measures, including primary and secondary task performance, system intervention and information sampling strategies, mental model structure, and subjective operator state. The study compared the effectiveness of two methods of training, based on low level (procedure-based) and high level (system-based) understanding. Twenty-five participants were trained extensively on the task, then given a 1-h testing session. A second testing session was carried out 8 months after the first (with no intervening practice) with 17 of the original participants. While training had little effect on control performance, there were considerable effects on system management strategies, as well as in structure of operator's mental model. In the second testing session, the anticipated general performance decrement did not occur, though for complex faults there was an increase in selectivity towards the primary control task. The relevance of the findings for training and skill retention in real work environments is discussed in the context of a model of compensatory control.

  9. Assessing hydrodynamic space use of brown trout, Salmo trutta, in a complex flow environment: a return to first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, James R; Manes, Costantino; Kemp, Paul S

    2016-11-01

    It is commonly assumed that stream-dwelling fish should select positions where they can reduce energetic costs relative to benefits gained and enhance fitness. However, the selection of appropriate hydrodynamic metrics that predict space use is the subject of recent debate and a cause of controversy. This is for three reasons: (1) flow characteristics are often oversimplified, (2) confounding variables are not always controlled and (3) there is limited understanding of the explanatory mechanisms that underpin the biophysical interactions between fish and their hydrodynamic environment. This study investigated the space use of brown trout, Salmo trutta, in a complex hydrodynamic flow field created using an array of different sized vertically oriented cylinders in a large open-channel flume in which confounding variables were controlled. A hydrodynamic drag function (D) based on single-point time-averaged velocity statistics that incorporates the influence of turbulent fluctuations was used to infer the energetic cost of steady swimming. Novel hydrodynamic preference curves were developed and used to assess the appropriateness of D as a descriptor of space use compared with other commonly used metrics. Zones in which performance-enhancing swimming behaviours (e.g. Kármán gaiting, entraining and bow riding) that enable fish to hold position while reducing energetic costs (termed 'specialised behaviours') were identified and occupancy was recorded. We demonstrate that energy conservation strategies play a key role in space use in an energetically taxing environment with the majority of trout groups choosing to frequently occupy areas in which specialised behaviours may be adopted or by selecting low-drag regions. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Analyzing Katana referral hospital as a complex adaptive system: agents, interactions and adaptation to a changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karemere, Hermès; Ribesse, Nathalie; Marchal, Bruno; Macq, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the adaptation of Katana referral hospital in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in a changing environment that is affected for more than a decade by intermittent armed conflicts. His objective is to generate theoretical proposals for addressing differently the analysis of hospitals governance in the aims to assess their performance and how to improve that performance. The methodology applied approach uses a case study using mixed methods ( qualitative and quantitative) for data collection. It uses (1) hospital data to measure the output of hospitals, (2) literature review to identify among others, events and interventions recorded in the history of hospital during the study period and (3) information from individual interviews to validate the interpretation of the results of the previous two sources of data and understand the responsiveness of management team referral hospital during times of change. The study brings four theoretical propositions: (1) Interaction between key agents is a positive force driving adaptation if the actors share a same vision, (2) The strength of the interaction between agents is largely based on the nature of institutional arrangements, which in turn are shaped by the actors themselves, (3) The owner and the management team play a decisive role in the implementation of effective institutional arrangements and establishment of positive interactions between agents, (4) The analysis of recipient population's perception of health services provided allow to better tailor and adapt the health services offer to the population's needs and expectations. Research shows that it isn't enough just to provide support (financial and technical), to manage a hospital for operate and adapt to a changing environment but must still animate, considering that it is a complex adaptive system and that this animation is nothing other than the induction of a positive interaction between agents.

  11. A Proteome Translocation Response to Complex Desert Stress Environments in Perennial Phragmites Sympatric Ecotypes with Contrasting Water Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Chen, Xiaodan; Shi, Lu; Wang, Chuanjing; Fu, Bing; Qiu, Tianhang; Cui, Suxia

    2017-01-01

    After a long-term adaptation to desert environment, the perennial aquatic plant Phragmites communis has evolved a desert-dune ecotype. The desert-dune ecotype (DR) of Phragmites communis showed significant differences in water activity and protein distribution compared to its sympatric swamp ecotype (SR). Many proteins that were located in the soluble fraction of SR translocated to the insoluble fraction of DR, suggesting that membrane-associated proteins were greatly reinforced in DR. The unknown phenomenon in plant stress physiology was defined as a proteome translocation response. Quantitative 2D-DIGE technology highlighted these 'bound' proteins in DR. Fifty-eight kinds of proteins were identified as candidates of the translocated proteome in Phragmites . The majority were chloroplast proteins. Unexpectedly, Rubisco was the most abundant protein sequestered by DR. Rubisco activase, various chaperons and 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin were major components in the translocation response. Conformational change was assumed to be the main reason for the Rubisco translocation due to no primary sequence difference between DR and SR. The addition of reductant in extraction process partially reversed the translocation response, implying that intracellular redox status plays a role in the translocation response of the proteome. The finding emphasizes the realistic significance of the membrane-association of biomolecule for plant long-term adaptation to complex stress conditions.

  12. Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Precisely Controlled Micro and Nano Scale Environments for Complex Tissue Regeneration and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Benjamin

    As modern medicine advances, it is still very challenging to cure joint defects due to their poor inherent regenerative capacity, complex stratified architecture, and disparate biomechanical properties. The current clinical standard for catastrophic or late stage joint degradation is a total joint implant, where the damaged joint is completely excised and replaced with a metallic or artificial joint. However, these procedures still only lasts for 10-15 years, and there are hosts of recovery complications which can occur. Thus, these studies have sought to employ advanced biomaterials and scaffold fabricated techniques to effectively regrow joint tissue, instead of merely replacing it with artificial materials. We can hypothesize here that the inclusion of biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials with highly functional electrospun and 3D printed scaffold can improve physical characteristics (mechanical strength, surface interactions and nanotexture) enhance cellular growth and direct stem cell differentiation for bone, cartilage and vascular growth as well as cancer metastasis modeling. Nanomaterial inclusion and controlled 3D printed features effectively increased nano surface roughness, Young's Modulus and provided effective flow paths for simulated arterial blood. All of the approaches explored proved highly effective for increasing cell growth, as a result of increasing micro-complexity and nanomaterial incorporation. Additionally, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, cell to cell interaction and vascular formation were enhanced. Finally, growth-factor(gf)-loaded polymer nanospheres greatly improved vascular cell behavior, and provided a highly bioactive scaffold for mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture and bone formation. In conclusion, electrospinning and 3D printing when combined effectively with biomimetic and bioactive nanomaterials (i.e. carbon nanomaterials, collagen, nHA, polymer

  13. Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex III: Neutron Devices and Computational and Sample Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sakasai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neutron devices such as neutron detectors, optical devices including supermirror devices and 3He neutron spin filters, and choppers are successfully developed and installed at the Materials Life Science Facility (MLF of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC, Tokai, Japan. Four software components of MLF computational environment, instrument control, data acquisition, data analysis, and a database, have been developed and equipped at MLF. MLF also provides a wide variety of sample environment options including high and low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and high pressures. This paper describes the current status of neutron devices, computational and sample environments at MLF.

  14. Modelling of genotype by environment interaction and prediction of complex traits across multiple environments as a synthesis of crop growth modelling, genetics and statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bustos-Korts, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of plant breeders is to create and identify genotypes that are well-adapted to the target population of environments (TPE). The TPE corresponds to the future growing conditions in which the varieties produced by a breeding program will be grown. All possible genotypes that

  15. The Impact of Environmental Complexity and Team Training on Team Processes and Performance in Multi-Team Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cobb, Marshall

    1999-01-01

    This study examined how manipulating the level of environmental complexity and the type of team training given to subject volunteers impacted important team process behaviors and performance outcomes...

  16. Modelling of genotype by environment interaction and prediction of complex traits across multiple environments as a synthesis of crop growth modelling, genetics and statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Bustos-Korts, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of plant breeders is to create and identify genotypes that are well-adapted to the target population of environments (TPE). The TPE corresponds to the future growing conditions in which the varieties produced by a breeding program will be grown. All possible genotypes that could be considered as selection candidates for a specific TPE are said to belong to the target population of genotypes, TPG. Genotypes commonly show different sensitivities to environmental gradients and...

  17. Distinctive EPR signals provide an understanding of the affinity of bis-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinonato) copper(II) complexes for hydrophobic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Maria; Leite, Andreia; Silva, André M N; Moniz, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Amorim, M João; Queirós, Carla; Cunha-Silva, Luís; Gameiro, Paula; Burgess, John

    2014-07-07

    In this work we report the synthesis and characterization of a set of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone copper(ii) complexes with variable lipophilicity. EPR spectroscopy was used to characterize the structure of copper(ii) complexes in solution, and as a tool to gain insight into solvent interactions. EPR spectra of solutions of the [CuL2] complexes recorded in different solvents reveal the presence of two copper species whose ratio depends on the nature of the solvent. Investigation of EPR spectra in the pure solvents methanol, dimethylsulfoxide, dichloromethane and their 50% (v/v) mixtures with toluene allowed the characterization of two types of copper signals (gzz = 2.30 and gzz = 2.26) whose spin-Hamiltonian parameters are consistent with solvated and non-solvated square-planar copper(ii) complexes. Regarding the potential biological application of ligands and complexes and to get insight into the partition properties in water-membrane interfaces, EPR spectra were also obtained in water-saturated octanol, an aqueous solution buffered at pH = 7.4 and liposome suspensions, for three compounds representative of different hydro-lipophilic balances. Analysis of the EPR spectra obtained in liposomes allowed establishment of the location of the complexes in the water and lipid phases. In view of the results of this work we put forward the use of EPR spectroscopy to assess the affinity of copper(ii) complexes for a hydrophobic environment and also to obtain indirect information about the lipophilicity of the ligands and similar EPR silent complexes.

  18. Epistasis × environment interactions among Arabidopsis thaliana glucosinolate genes impact complex traits and fitness in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerwin, Rachel E.; Feusier, Julie; Muok, Alise

    2017-01-01

    (GSL) defense chemistry, leaf damage, and relative fitness using mutant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana varying at pairs of causal aliphatic GSL defense genes to test the impact of epistatic and epistasis × environment interactions on adaptive trait variation. We found that aliphatic GSL accumulation...

  19. Complex carbon cycling processes and pathways in a tropical coastal marine environment (Saco do Mamangua, RJ - Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgioni, M.; Jovane, L.; Millo, C.; Sawakuchi, H. O.; Bertassoli, D. J., Jr.; Gamba Romano, R.; Pellizari, V.; Castillo Franco, D.; Krusche, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The Saco do Mamangua is a narrow and elongated gulf located along the southeastern coast of Brazil, in the state of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). It is surrounded by high relieves, which form a peculiar environment called riá, with little river input and limited water exchange with the Atlantic Ocean. These features make the Saco do Mamangua an ideal environment to study sedimentary carbon cycling under well-constrained boundary conditions in order to investigate if tropical coastal environments serve dominantly as potential carbon sinks or sources. In this work we integrate geochemical data from marine sediments and pore waters in the Saco do Mamangua with mapping of benthic microbial communities, in order to unravel the biogeochemical carbon cycling linked to the production of biogenic methane. Our results reveal that carbon cycling occurs in two parallel pathways. The Saco do Mamangua receives organic carbon both by surface runoff and by primary production in the water column. A large part of this organic carbon is buried within the sediment resulting in the production of biogenic methane, which gives rise to methane seepages at the sea floor. These methane seeps sustain methanotrophic microbial communities in the sediment pore water, but also escapes into the atmosphere by ebullition. Consequently, the sediments of Saco do Mamangua acts simultaneously as carbon sink and carbon source. Future work will allow us to accurately quantify the actual carbon fluxes and calculate the net carbon balance in the local environment.

  20. Seven "Chilis": Making Visible the Complexities in Leveraging Cultural Repertories of Practice in a Designed Teaching and Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiacomo, Daniela Kruel; Gutiérrez, Kris D.

    2017-01-01

    Drawing upon four years of research within a social design experiment, we focus on how teacher learning can be supported in designed environments that are organized around robust views of learning, culture, and equity. We illustrate both the possibility and difficulty of helping teachers disrupt the default teaching scripts that privilege…

  1. Mathematics Teachers' Visualization of Complex Number Multiplication and the Roots of Unity in a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Gunhan

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research, drawing on the theoretical frameworks by Even (1990, 1993) and Sfard (2007), investigated five high school mathematics teachers' geometric interpretations of complex number multiplication along with the roots of unity. The main finding was that mathematics teachers constructed the modulus, the argument, and the conjugate…

  2. Electricity generation of Maritsa-Iztok coal-fired power plant in Bulgaria and its complex impact on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrikov, M.; Antonov, A.; Hristov, Hr.

    2001-01-01

    Soil, water and vegetable samples from the region of Maritsa-Iztok Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPP) in Bulgaria have been studied using a large variety of methods for analysis: γ- and neutron activation analysis, γ-spectrometry, radiometry, mass- spectrometry, physicochemical analysis, soil sciences study. Detailed information about the concentration of ecologically important elements in the chain coal bottom ash, fly ashes environment (soil, water, air, vegetation) has been obtained, allowing to estimate the present ecological state of the region. (author)

  3. Development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to detect alternate transportation fuel hydrocarbon intermediates in complex combustion environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekoto, Isaac W.; Barlow, Robert S.

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectra for important hydrocarbon fuels and combustion intermediates were recorded over a range of low-to-moderate flame temperatures using the multiscalar measurement facility located at Sandia/CA. Recorded spectra were extrapolated to higher flame temperatures and then converted into empirical spectral libraries that can readily be incorporated into existing post-processing analysis models that account for crosstalk from overlapping hydrocarbon channel signal. Performance testing of the developed libraries and reduction methods was conducted through an examination of results from well-characterized laminar reference flames, and was found to provide good agreement. The diagnostic development allows for temporally and spatially resolved flame measurements of speciated hydrocarbon concentrations whose parent is more chemically complex than methane. Such data are needed to validate increasingly complex flame simulations.

  4. Use of X-Ray Absorption Spectra as a ``Fingerprint'' of the Local Environment in Complex Chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branci, C.; Womes, M.; Lippens, P. E.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J. C.

    2000-03-01

    The local environment of tin, titanium, iron, and sulfur in spinel compounds Cu2FeSn3S8 and Cu2FeTi3S8 was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the titanium, iron, sulfur K edges, and the tin LI-edge. As detailed calculations of the electronic structure of these compounds are difficult to carry out due to the large number of atoms contained in the unit cell, the XAS spectra of the spinels are compared to those of relatively simple binary sulfides like SnS2, TiS2, and FeS. Indeed, the metal environments in these binary compounds are very similar to those in the spinels, and they can be considered good model compounds allowing the interpretation of electronic transitions observed in the spectra of quaternary phases. In the latter, the bottom of the conduction band is mainly formed by Sn 5s-S 3p, Sn 5p-S 3p antibonding states for the tin-based compounds and by Ti 3dt2g-S 3p, Ti 3deg-S 3p antibonding states for the titanium-based compounds. It it shown that the local environment of iron atoms remains unchanged when substituting tin with titanium atoms, according to a topotactic substitution.

  5. Study of the interaction of multiply charged ions and complex systems of biological interest: effects of the molecular environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This PhD thesis describes the experimental study of the interaction between slow multiply charged ions (tens of keV) and molecular systems of biological interest (amino acids and nucleobases). It is the aim to identify and to better understand the effect of a molecular environment on different collision induced phenomena. To do so, the time of flight spectra of cationic products emerging from collisions with isolated molecules as well as clusters are compared. It is shown that the molecular environment protects the molecule as it allows to distribute the transferred energies and charges over the whole system (global decrease of the fragmentation and quenching of some fragmentation channels). Furthermore, in the case of adenine clusters, the molecular environment weakens some intramolecular bonds. Moreover, products of chemical reactions are observed concerning proton transfer processes in hydrated cluster of adenine and the formation of peptides bonds between beta-alanine molecules in a cluster. The latter finding is studied as a function of the cluster size and type of the projectile. Some criteria for peptide bond formation, such as flexibility and geometry of the molecule, are investigated for different amino acids. (author)

  6. Good distractions: Testing the effects of listening to an audiobook on driving performance in simple and complex road environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Robert J; Trick, Lana M; Toxopeus, Ryan

    2018-02-01

    Distracted driving (driving while performing a secondary task) causes many collisions. Most research on distracted driving has focused on operating a cell-phone, but distracted driving can include eating while driving, conversing with passengers or listening to music or audiobooks. Although the research has focused on the deleterious effects of distraction, there may be situations where distraction improves driving performance. Fatigue and boredom are also associated with collision risk and it is possible that secondary tasks can help alleviate the effects of fatigue and boredom. Furthermore, it has been found that individuals with high levels of executive functioning as measured by the OSPAN (Operation Span) task show better driving while multitasking. In this study, licensed drivers were tested in a driving simulator (a car body surrounded by screens) that simulated simple or complex roads. Road complexity was manipulated by increasing traffic, scenery, and the number of curves in the drive. Participants either drove, or drove while listening to an audiobook. Driving performance was measured in terms of braking response time to hazards (HRT): the time required to brake in response to pedestrians or vehicles that suddenly emerged from the periphery into the path of the vehicle, speed, standard deviation of speed, standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP). Overall, braking times to hazards were higher on the complex drive than the simple one, though the effects of secondary tasks such as audiobooks were especially deleterious on the complex drive. In contrast, on the simple drive, driving while listening to an audiobook lead to faster HRT. We found evidence that individuals with high OSPAN scores had faster HRTs when listening to an audiobook. These results suggest that there are environmental and individual factors behind difference in the allocation of attention while listening to audiobooks while driving. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2013-01-01

    The structure of a SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex from Yersinia reveals the bacterial state of a protein that adopts different folds in the host and pathogen environments. Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycH–YopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-called β-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the β-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the β-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed

  8. ``Carbon Credits'' for Resource-Bounded Computations Using Amortised Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Steffen; Loidl, Hans-Wolfgang; Hammond, Kevin; Scaife, Norman; Hofmann, Martin

    Bounding resource usage is important for a number of areas, notably real-time embedded systems and safety-critical systems. In this paper, we present a fully automatic static type-based analysis for inferring upper bounds on resource usage for programs involving general algebraic datatypes and full recursion. Our method can easily be used to bound any countable resource, without needing to revisit proofs. We apply the analysis to the important metrics of worst-case execution time, stack- and heap-space usage. Our results from several realistic embedded control applications demonstrate good matches between our inferred bounds and measured worst-case costs for heap and stack usage. For time usage we infer good bounds for one application. Where we obtain less tight bounds, this is due to the use of software floating-point libraries.

  9. Designing Resource-Bounded Reasoners using Bayesian Networks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this work we are concerned with the conceptual design of large-scale diagnostic and health management systems that use Bayesian networks. While they are...

  10. Use of a field model to analyze probable fire environments encountered within the complex geometries of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Usher, J.L.; Singhal, A.K.; Tam, L.T.

    1985-08-01

    A fire in a nuclear power plant (NPP) can damage equipment needed to safely operate the plant and thereby either directly cause an accident or else reduce the plant's margin of safety. The development of a field-model fire code to analyze the probable fire environments encountered within NPP is discussed. A set of fire tests carried out under the aegis of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is described. The results of these tests are then utilized to validate the field model

  11. The Benefits and Complexities of Operating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in a High Performance Computing (HPC) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, J.; Carriere, L.; Duffy, D.; Hoy, E.; Peters, J.; Shen, Y.; Kirschbaum, D.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center is building and maintaining an Enterprise GIS capability for its stakeholders, to include NASA scientists, industry partners, and the public. This platform is powered by three GIS subsystems operating in a highly-available, virtualized environment: 1) the Spatial Analytics Platform is the primary NCCS GIS and provides users discoverability of the vast DigitalGlobe/NGA raster assets within the NCCS environment; 2) the Disaster Mapping Platform provides mapping and analytics services to NASA's Disaster Response Group; and 3) the internal (Advanced Data Analytics Platform/ADAPT) enterprise GIS provides users with the full suite of Esri and open source GIS software applications and services. All systems benefit from NCCS's cutting edge infrastructure, to include an InfiniBand network for high speed data transfers; a mixed/heterogeneous environment featuring seamless sharing of information between Linux and Windows subsystems; and in-depth system monitoring and warning systems. Due to its co-location with the NCCS Discover High Performance Computing (HPC) environment and the Advanced Data Analytics Platform (ADAPT), the GIS platform has direct access to several large NCCS datasets including DigitalGlobe/NGA, Landsat, MERRA, and MERRA2. Additionally, the NCCS ArcGIS Desktop Windows virtual machines utilize existing NetCDF and OPeNDAP assets for visualization, modelling, and analysis - thus eliminating the need for data duplication. With the advent of this platform, Earth scientists have full access to vast data repositories and the industry-leading tools required for successful management and analysis of these multi-petabyte, global datasets. The full system architecture and integration with scientific datasets will be presented. Additionally, key applications and scientific analyses will be explained, to include the NASA Global Landslide Catalog (GLC) Reporter crowdsourcing application, the

  12. Virtual educational complex of the course “Methods of design of experiments” in distance learning environment of Moodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Guseva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently the information technologies have penetrated to all spheres of human activity, including education. The main objective of the article is to show the advantages of the developed complex and to familiarize with its structure too. The article presents the arguments that the use of the distance learning tools has a significant impact on Russian education. This approach provides the conditions for the development of innovative teaching methods. The approach describes the capabilities offered by the virtual education center of distance learning Moodle too. It is attractive not only openness but because it contains a large set of libraries, classes and functions in the programming language PHP too, which makes it a convenient tool for developing various online information systems. It is shown that the effectiveness of distance learning depends on the organization of educational material. The basic modules of the course were underlined. This section provides a comprehensive understanding of material. For the verification and control of students knowledge the testing system was developed. In addition, the training package has been developed which contains the information, helping to assess the level of students knowledge. The testing system includes a list of tests divided into sections and consists of a set of questions of different complexity. The questions are stored in the single database (“The bank of questions” and can be reused in one or more courses or sections. After passing the correct answers to the test questions can be available for the student. In addition, this module includes tools for grading by the teacher. The article concludes that the virtual educational complex enables to teach students, has a friendly interface that stimulate the students to continue the work and its successful completion.

  13. Biological water-oxidizing complex: a nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide in a protein environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Moghaddam, Atefeh Nemati; Yang, Young Nam; Aro, Eva-Mari; Carpentier, Robert; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2012-10-01

    The resolution of Photosystem II (PS II) crystals has been improved using isolated PS II from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus. The new 1.9 Å resolution data have provided detailed information on the structure of the water-oxidizing complex (Umena et al. Nature 473: 55-61, 2011). The atomic level structure of the manganese-calcium cluster is important for understanding the mechanism of water oxidation and to design an efficient catalyst for water oxidation in artificial photosynthetic systems. Here, we have briefly reviewed our knowledge of the structure and function of the cluster.

  14. Influence of complex circumstances and risks related to human relibaility: case of integral circuits fabrication in sterile environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniol-Shaw, G.

    1991-08-01

    Concepts of operating the complex and risk bearing utilities tend to separate operators from potential sources of risk (automation, and remote control). Since isolation of operators from risk sources is not always possible and constant their exposure to risks during operation, the question of human errors is always an important issue. In such situations, independent of the control and failure detection systems, operators are responsible for achieving two objectives simultaneously: operation and safety. This presentation shows how human behaviour can be determined by safety conditions of a plant, in the frame of managing minor real risks that would cause minor

  15. Driver’s Cognitive Workload and Driving Performance under Traffic Sign Information Exposure in Complex Environments: A Case Study of the Highways in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengchao Lyu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex traffic situations and high driving workload are the leading contributing factors to traffic crashes. There is a strong correlation between driving performance and driving workload, such as visual workload from traffic signs on highway off-ramps. This study aimed to evaluate traffic safety by analyzing drivers’ behavior and performance under the cognitive workload in complex environment areas. First, the driving workload of drivers was tested based on traffic signs with different quantities of information. Forty-four drivers were recruited to conduct a traffic sign cognition experiment under static controlled environment conditions. Different complex traffic signs were used for applying the cognitive workload. The static experiment results reveal that workload is highly related to the amount of information on traffic signs and reaction time increases with the information grade, while driving experience and gender effect are not significant. This shows that the cognitive workload of subsequent driving experiments can be controlled by the amount of information on traffic signs. Second, driving characteristics and driving performance were analyzed under different secondary task driving workload levels using a driving simulator. Drivers were required to drive at the required speed on a designed highway off-ramp scene. The cognitive workload was controlled by reading traffic signs with different information, which were divided into four levels. Drivers had to make choices by pushing buttons after reading traffic signs. Meanwhile, the driving performance information was recorded. Questionnaires on objective workload were collected right after each driving task. The results show that speed maintenance and lane deviations are significantly different under different levels of cognitive workload, and the effects of driving experience and gender groups are significant. The research results can be used to analyze traffic safety in highway

  16. Capturing the complexity: Content, type, and amount of instruction and quality of the classroom learning environment synergistically predict third graders' vocabulary and reading comprehension outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Spencer, Mercedes; Day, Stephanie L; Giuliani, Sarah; Ingebrand, Sarah W; McLean, Leigh; Morrison, Frederick J

    2014-08-01

    We examined classrooms as complex systems that affect students' literacy learning through interacting effects of content and amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction along with the global quality of the classroom-learning environment. We observed 27 third grade classrooms serving 315 target students using two different observation systems. The first assessed instruction at a more micro-level; specifically, the amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction defined by the type of instruction, role of the teacher, and content. The second assessed the quality of the classroom-learning environment at a more macro level focusing on classroom organization, teacher responsiveness, and support for vocabulary and language. Results revealed that both global quality of the classroom learning environment and time individual students spent in specific types of literacy instruction covering specific content interacted to predict students' comprehension and vocabulary gains whereas neither system alone did. These findings support a dynamic systems model of how individual children learn in the context of classroom literacy instruction and the classroom-learning environment, which can help to improve observations systems, advance research, elevate teacher evaluation and professional development, and enhance student achievement.

  17. Capturing the complexity: Content, type, and amount of instruction and quality of the classroom learning environment synergistically predict third graders’ vocabulary and reading comprehension outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Spencer, Mercedes; Day, Stephanie L.; Giuliani, Sarah; Ingebrand, Sarah W.; McLean, Leigh; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2014-01-01

    We examined classrooms as complex systems that affect students’ literacy learning through interacting effects of content and amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction along with the global quality of the classroom-learning environment. We observed 27 third grade classrooms serving 315 target students using two different observation systems. The first assessed instruction at a more micro-level; specifically, the amount of time individual students spent in literacy instruction defined by the type of instruction, role of the teacher, and content. The second assessed the quality of the classroom-learning environment at a more macro level focusing on classroom organization, teacher responsiveness, and support for vocabulary and language. Results revealed that both global quality of the classroom learning environment and time individual students spent in specific types of literacy instruction covering specific content interacted to predict students’ comprehension and vocabulary gains whereas neither system alone did. These findings support a dynamic systems model of how individual children learn in the context of classroom literacy instruction and the classroom-learning environment, which can help to improve observations systems, advance research, elevate teacher evaluation and professional development, and enhance student achievement. PMID:25400293

  18. The ‘migration’ of reality in virtual scenarios: databases and documentation systems for the musealization of complex environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Parrinello

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the digital survey and the use of specialized software, the elements and the relations of contemporary are made accessible to an increasingly knowledgeable and demanding public. Digital databases, wherein the acquired information is collected, increasingly require the development of narrative systems for the use of information and the preservation of memory. Some experimental research explain how the “migration” of the reality in virtual environment strongly depends on the structure of a design database that tries to reproduce the real space and the structure of the relations during the visit of the place. In the digital space, the user can interface with the structural elements of the database to develop critical analysis models. 

  19. Optimizing the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the MLZ for small samples and complex sample environment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utschick, C.; Skoulatos, M.; Schneidewind, A.; Böni, P.

    2016-11-01

    The cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the neutron source FRM II has been serving an international user community studying condensed matter physics problems. We report on a new setup, improving the signal-to-noise ratio for small samples and pressure cell setups. Analytical and numerical Monte Carlo methods are used for the optimization of elliptic and parabolic focusing guides. They are placed between the monochromator and sample positions, and the flux at the sample is compared to the one achieved by standard monochromator focusing techniques. A 25 times smaller spot size is achieved, associated with a factor of 2 increased intensity, within the same divergence limits, ± 2 ° . This optional neutron focusing guide shall establish a top-class spectrometer for studying novel exotic properties of matter in combination with more stringent sample environment conditions such as extreme pressures associated with small sample sizes.

  20. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A.; Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G.; Lebrero, Mariano C. González

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data

  1. VOCABULARY, TEXTUAL COMPLEXITY AND READING COMPREHENSION IN DIGITAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS: AN INITIAL INVESTIGATION WITH HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Bocorny Finatto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe an initial investigation that intended to qualify the elaboration and usability of didactic resources for Distance Learning (DL in the field of Languages/Portuguese Language and Reading. We present the planning of the resource, the selection of materials and the theoretical notions involved, and the initial design of the activity, which consisted in reading and evaluating the complexity of a set of short texts. The experience was successful only for a small controlled group of students and unsuccessful for the large uncontrolled group. In order to improve the devised resource and implement it didactically, there is the need to perform previous presential learning activities with the involved groups and proceed with the student’s evaluation of the results after the task is accomplished.

  2. Actinide immobilization in the subsurface environment by in-situ treatment with a hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus complexant: Uranyl uptake by calcium phytate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, K.L.; Jensen, M.P.; Schmidt, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    In addition to naturally occurring uranium and thorium, actinide ions exist in the subsurface environment as a result of accidental releases and intentional disposal practices associated with nuclear weapons production. These species present a significant challenge to cost-effective remediation of contaminated environments. An attractive approach to decreasing the probability of actinide migration in the subsurface is to transform the ions into a less mobile form by remote treatment. We have under development a process which relies on a polyfunctional organophosphorus complexant to sequester the mobile metal ions by complexation/cation exchange in the near term, and to subsequently decompose, transforming the actinides into insoluble phosphate mineral forms in the long term. Studies to date include identification of a suitable organophosphorus reagent, profiling of its decomposition kinetics, verification of the formation of phosphate mineral phases upon decomposition of the reagent, and extensive comparison of the actinide uptake ability of the calcium salt of the reagent as compared with hydroxyapatite. In this report, we briefly describe the process with focus on the cation exchange behavior of the calcium salt of the organophosphorus sequestrant

  3. Performance-oriented Architecture and the Spatial and Material Organisation Complex. Rethinking the Definition, Role and Performative Capacity of the Spatial and Material Boundaries of the Built Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ulrich Hensel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the proposition that performance-oriented design is characterised by four domains of ‘active agency’: the human subject, the spatial and material organisation complex and the environment (Hensel, 2010. While these four domains are seen to be interdependent and interacting with one another, it is nevertheless necessary to examine each in its own right. However, the spatial and material organisation complex contains both the spatial and material domains, which are interdependent to such a degree that these need to be examined in relation to one another and also in relation to the specific environment they are set within and interacting with. To explore this combined domain within the context of performance-oriented design is the aim of this article, in particularly in relation to the question of the definition and performative capacity of spatial and material boundaries. The various sections are accompanied by research by design efforts undertaken in specified academic contexts, which are intended as examples of modes and areas of inquiry relative to the purpose of this article.

  4. Extraterrestrial organic chemistry: from the interstellar medium to the origins of life. Part 2: complex organic chemistry in the environment of planets and satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulin, F; Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    During COSPAR'00 in Warsaw, Poland, in the frame of Sub-Commission F.3 events (Planetary Biology and Origins of Life), part of COSPAR Commission F (Life Sciences as Related to Space), and Commission B events (Space Studies of the Earth-Moon System, Planets, and Small Bodies of the Solar System) a large joint symposium (F.3.4/B0.8) was held on extraterrestrial organic chemistry. Part 2 of this symposium was devoted to complex organic chemistry in the environment of planets and satellites. The aim of this event was to cover and review new data which have been recently obtained and to give new insights on data which are expected in the near future to increase our knowledge of the complex organic chemistry occurring in several planets and satellites of the Solar System, outside the earth, and their implications for exobiology and life in the universe. The event was composed of two main parts. The first part was mainly devoted to the inner planets and Europa and the search for signatures of life or organics in those environments. The second part was related to the study of the outer solar system.

  5. Complex interplay of body condition, life history, and prevailing environment shapes immune defenses of garter snakes in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Maria G; Cunnick, Joan E; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    The immunocompetence "pace-of-life" hypothesis proposes that fast-living organisms should invest more in innate immune defenses and less in adaptive defenses compared to slow-living ones. We found some support for this hypothesis in two life-history ecotypes of the snake Thamnophis elegans; fast-living individuals show higher levels of innate immunity compared to slow-living ones. Here, we optimized a lymphocyte proliferation assay to assess the complementary prediction that slow-living snakes should in turn show stronger adaptive defenses. We also assessed the "environmental" hypothesis that predicts that slow-living snakes should show lower levels of immune defenses (both innate and adaptive) given the harsher environment they live in. Proliferation of B- and T-lymphocytes of free-living individuals was on average higher in fast-living than slow-living snakes, opposing the pace-of-life hypothesis and supporting the environmental hypothesis. Bactericidal capacity of plasma, an index of innate immunity, did not differ between fast-living and slow-living snakes in this study, contrasting the previously documented pattern and highlighting the importance of annual environmental conditions as determinants of immune profiles of free-living animals. Our results do not negate a link between life history and immunity, as indicated by ecotype-specific relationships between lymphocyte proliferation and body condition, but suggest more subtle nuances than those currently proposed.

  6. Bloch Surface Waves Biosensors for High Sensitivity Detection of Soluble ERBB2 in a Complex Biological Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Sampaoli, Camilla; Danz, Norbert; Munzert, Peter; Sonntag, Frank; Centola, Fabio; Occhicone, Agostino; Tremante, Elisa; Giacomini, Patrizio; Michelotti, Francesco

    2017-08-17

    We report on the use of one-dimensional photonic crystals to detect clinically relevant concentrations of the cancer biomarker ERBB2 in cell lysates. Overexpression of the ERBB2 protein is associated with aggressive breast cancer subtypes. To detect soluble ERBB2, we developed an optical set-up which operates in both label-free and fluorescence modes. The detection approach makes use of a sandwich assay, in which the one-dimensional photonic crystals sustaining Bloch surface waves are modified with monoclonal antibodies, in order to guarantee high specificity during the biological recognition. We present the results of exemplary protein G based label-free assays in complex biological matrices, reaching an estimated limit of detection of 0.5 ng/mL. On-chip and chip-to-chip variability of the results is addressed too, providing repeatability rates. Moreover, results on fluorescence operation demonstrate the capability to perform high sensitive cancer biomarker assays reaching a resolution of 0.6 ng/mL, without protein G assistance. The resolution obtained in both modes meets international guidelines and recommendations (15 ng/mL) for ERBB2 quantification assays, providing an alternative tool to phenotype and diagnose molecular cancer subtypes.

  7. An adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system for short-term natural gas demand estimation: Uncertain and complex environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azadeh, A.; Asadzadeh, S.M.; Ghanbari, A.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate short-term natural gas (NG) demand estimation and forecasting is vital for policy and decision-making process in energy sector. Moreover, conventional methods may not provide accurate results. This paper presents an adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for estimation of NG demand. Standard input variables are used which are day of the week, demand of the same day in previous year, demand of a day before and demand of 2 days before. The proposed ANFIS approach is equipped with pre-processing and post-processing concepts. Moreover, input data are pre-processed (scaled) and finally output data are post-processed (returned to its original scale). The superiority and applicability of the ANFIS approach is shown for Iranian NG consumption from 22/12/2007 to 30/6/2008. Results show that ANFIS provides more accurate results than artificial neural network (ANN) and conventional time series approach. The results of this study provide policy makers with an appropriate tool to make more accurate predictions on future short-term NG demand. This is because the proposed approach is capable of handling non-linearity, complexity as well as uncertainty that may exist in actual data sets due to erratic responses and measurement errors.

  8. Risk assessment and adaptive runoff utilization in water resource system considering the complex relationship among water supply, electricity generation and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J.; Zeng, X.; Mo, L.; Chen, L.; Jiang, Z.; Feng, Z.; Yuan, L.; He, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Generally, the adaptive utilization and regulation of runoff in the source region of China's southwest rivers is classified as a typical multi-objective collaborative optimization problem. There are grim competitions and incidence relation in the subsystems of water supply, electricity generation and environment, which leads to a series of complex problems represented by hydrological process variation, blocked electricity output and water environment risk. Mathematically, the difficulties of multi-objective collaborative optimization focus on the description of reciprocal relationships and the establishment of evolving model of adaptive systems. Thus, based on the theory of complex systems science, this project tries to carry out the research from the following aspects: the changing trend of coupled water resource, the covariant factor and driving mechanism, the dynamic evolution law of mutual feedback dynamic process in the supply-generation-environment coupled system, the environmental response and influence mechanism of coupled mutual feedback water resource system, the relationship between leading risk factor and multiple risk based on evolutionary stability and dynamic balance, the transfer mechanism of multiple risk response with the variation of the leading risk factor, the multidimensional coupled feedback system of multiple risk assessment index system and optimized decision theory. Based on the above-mentioned research results, the dynamic method balancing the efficiency of multiple objectives in the coupled feedback system and optimized regulation model of water resources is proposed, and the adaptive scheduling mode considering the internal characteristics and external response of coupled mutual feedback system of water resource is established. In this way, the project can make a contribution to the optimal scheduling theory and methodology of water resource management under uncertainty in the source region of Southwest River.

  9. Developing software to "track and catch" missed follow-up of abnormal test results in a complex sociotechnical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M; Murphy, D; Laxmisan, A; Sittig, D; Reis, B; Esquivel, A; Singh, H

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal test results do not always receive timely follow-up, even when providers are notified through electronic health record (EHR)-based alerts. High workload, alert fatigue, and other demands on attention disrupt a provider's prospective memory for tasks required to initiate follow-up. Thus, EHR-based tracking and reminding functionalities are needed to improve follow-up. The purpose of this study was to develop a decision-support software prototype enabling individual and system-wide tracking of abnormal test result alerts lacking follow-up, and to conduct formative evaluations, including usability testing. We developed a working prototype software system, the Alert Watch And Response Engine (AWARE), to detect abnormal test result alerts lacking documented follow-up, and to present context-specific reminders to providers. Development and testing took place within the VA's EHR and focused on four cancer-related abnormal test results. Design concepts emphasized mitigating the effects of high workload and alert fatigue while being minimally intrusive. We conducted a multifaceted formative evaluation of the software, addressing fit within the larger socio-technical system. Evaluations included usability testing with the prototype and interview questions about organizational and workflow factors. Participants included 23 physicians, 9 clinical information technology specialists, and 8 quality/safety managers. Evaluation results indicated that our software prototype fit within the technical environment and clinical workflow, and physicians were able to use it successfully. Quality/safety managers reported that the tool would be useful in future quality assurance activities to detect patients who lack documented follow-up. Additionally, we successfully installed the software on the local facility's "test" EHR system, thus demonstrating technical compatibility. To address the factors involved in missed test results, we developed a software prototype to account for

  10. Pollution going multimodal: the complex impact of the human-altered sensory environment on animal perception and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfwerk, Wouter; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic sensory pollution is affecting ecosystems worldwide. Human actions generate acoustic noise, emanate artificial light and emit chemical substances. All of these pollutants are known to affect animals. Most studies on anthropogenic pollution address the impact of pollutants in unimodal sensory domains. High levels of anthropogenic noise, for example, have been shown to interfere with acoustic signals and cues. However, animals rely on multiple senses, and pollutants often co-occur. Thus, a full ecological assessment of the impact of anthropogenic activities requires a multimodal approach. We describe how sensory pollutants can co-occur and how covariance among pollutants may differ from natural situations. We review how animals combine information that arrives at their sensory systems through different modalities and outline how sensory conditions can interfere with multimodal perception. Finally, we describe how sensory pollutants can affect the perception, behaviour and endocrinology of animals within and across sensory modalities. We conclude that sensory pollution can affect animals in complex ways due to interactions among sensory stimuli, neural processing and behavioural and endocrinal feedback. We call for more empirical data on covariance among sensory conditions, for instance, data on correlated levels in noise and light pollution. Furthermore, we encourage researchers to test animal responses to a full-factorial set of sensory pollutants in the presence or the absence of ecologically important signals and cues. We realize that such approach is often time and energy consuming, but we think this is the only way to fully understand the multimodal impact of sensory pollution on animal performance and perception. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. THE COMPLEX CIRCUMNUCLEAR ENVIRONMENT OF THE BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXY 3C 390.3 REVEALED BY CHANDRA HETG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tombesi, F.; Kallman, T.; Leutenegger, M. A. [X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Reeves, J. N. [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Reynolds, C. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Behar, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Braito, V. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Cappi, M., E-mail: francesco.tombesi@nasa.gov, E-mail: ftombesi@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics, Technion 32000, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-10-20

    We present the first high spectral resolution X-ray observation of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 390.3 obtained with the high-energy transmission grating spectrometer on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory . The spectrum shows complex emission and absorption features in both the soft X-rays and Fe K band. We detect emission and absorption lines in the energy range E = 700–1000 eV associated with ionized Fe L transitions (Fe XVII–XX). An emission line at the energy of E ≃ 6.4 keV consistent with the Fe K α is also observed. Our best-fit model requires at least three different components: (i) a hot emission component likely associated with the hot interstellar medium in this elliptical galaxy with temperature kT = 0.5 ± 0.1 keV; (ii) a warm absorber with ionization parameter log ξ = 2.3 ± 0.5 erg s{sup −1} cm, column density log N {sub H} = 20.7 ± 0.1 cm{sup −2}, and outflow velocity v {sub out} < 150 km s{sup −1}; and (iii) a lowly ionized reflection component in the Fe K band likely associated with the optical broad-line region or the outer accretion disk. These evidences suggest the possibility that we are looking directly down the ionization cone of this active galaxy and that the central X-ray source only photoionizes along the unobscured cone. This is overall consistent with the angle-dependent unified picture of active galactic nuclei.

  12. Neighbourhood food, physical activity, and educational environments and black/white disparities in obesity: a complex systems simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Mark G; Kaplan, George A; Galea, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    Multiple approaches that can contribute to reducing obesity have been proposed. These policies may share overlapping pathways, and may have unanticipated consequences, creating considerable complexity. Aiming to illuminate the use of agent-based models to explore the consequences of key policies, this paper simulates the effects of increasing neighbourhood availability of good food stores, physical activity infrastructure and higher school quality on the reduction of black/white disparities in body mass index (BMI) in the USA. We used an agent-based model, with parameters derived from the empirical literature, which included individual and neighbourhood characteristics over the life course as determinants of behaviours thought to impact BMI. We systematically varied the strength of the 3 policy interventions, examining the impact of 125 different policy scenarios on black/white BMI disparities. In the absence of any of these policies, black/white BMI disparities generally increased over time. However, we found that some combinations of these policies resulted in reductions in BMI, yielding decreases in the black/white BMI disparity as large as a 90%. Within the structure of relationships captured in this simulation model, there is support for the further use of agent-based simulation models to explore upstream policies as plausible candidates for the reduction of black/white disparities in BMI. These results highlight the potential insights into important public health problems, such as obesity, that can come from uniting the systems science approach with policy analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Dust Grain Charging in Space Environments: Measurements on Apollo 11 and 17 Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10- 400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approximately 0.2 to 13 microns diameters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  14. A programming environment for distributed complex computing. An overview of the Framework for Interdisciplinary Design Optimization (FIDO) project. NASA Langley TOPS exhibit H120b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James C.; Weston, Robert P.; Eidson, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    The Framework for Interdisciplinary Design Optimization (FIDO) is a general programming environment for automating the distribution of complex computing tasks over a networked system of heterogeneous computers. For example, instead of manually passing a complex design problem between its diverse specialty disciplines, the FIDO system provides for automatic interactions between the discipline tasks and facilitates their communications. The FIDO system networks all the computers involved into a distributed heterogeneous computing system, so they have access to centralized data and can work on their parts of the total computation simultaneously in parallel whenever possible. Thus, each computational task can be done by the most appropriate computer. Results can be viewed as they are produced and variables changed manually for steering the process. The software is modular in order to ease migration to new problems: different codes can be substituted for each of the current code modules with little or no effect on the others. The potential for commercial use of FIDO rests in the capability it provides for automatically coordinating diverse computations on a networked system of workstations and computers. For example, FIDO could provide the coordination required for the design of vehicles or electronics or for modeling complex systems.

  15. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  16. Integration of potential and quasipotential geophysical fields and GPR data for delineation of buried karst terranes in complex environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.; Alperovich, L. S.; Zheludev, V.; Ezersky, M.; Al-Zoubi, A.; Levi, E.

    2012-04-01

    Karst is found on particularly soluble rocks, especially limestone, marble, and dolomite (carbonate rocks), but is also developed on gypsum and rock salt. Subsurface carbonate rocks involved in karst groundwater circulation considerably extend the active karst realm, to perhaps 14% of the world's land area (Price, 2009). The phenomenon of the solution weathering of limestone is the most widely known in the world. Active sinkholes growth appears under different industrial constructions, roads, railways, bridges, airports, buildings, etc. Regions with arid and semi-arid climate occupy about 30% of the Earth's land. Subsurface in arid regions is characterized by high variability of physical properties both on lateral and vertical that complicates geophysical survey analysis. Therefore for localization and monitoring of karst terranes effective and reliable geophysical methodologies should be applied. Such advanced methods were developed in microgravity (Eppelbaum et al., 2008; Eppelbaum, 2011b), magnetic (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum et al., 2000, 2004; Eppelbaum, 2011a), induced polarization (Khesin et al., 1997; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2002), VLF (Eppelbaum and Khesin, 1992; Eppelbaum and Mishne, 2012), near-surface temperature (Eppelbaum, 2009), self-potential (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2002), and resistivity (Eppelbaum, 1999, 2007a) surveys. Application of some of these methodologies in the western and eastern shores of the Dead Sea area (e.g., Eppelbaum et al., 2008; Ezersky et al., 2010; Al-Zoubi et al., 2011) and in other regions of the world (Eppelbaum, 2007a) has shown their effectiveness. The common procedures for ring structure identification against the noise background and probabilistic-deterministic methods for recognizing the desired targets in complex media are presented in Khesin and Eppelbaum (1997), Eppelbaum et al. (2003), and Eppelbaum (2007b). For integrated analysis of different geophysical fields (including GPR images) intended

  17. Tap and trill clusters in typical and protracted phonological development: Challenging segments in complex phonological environments. Introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemberger, Joseph Paul; Bernhardt, Barbara May

    2018-01-01

    The papers in this crosslinguistic issue address children's acquisition of word-initial rhotic clusters in languages with taps/trills, that is, the acquisition of challenging segments in complex environments. Several papers also include comparisons with singleton rhotics and/or /l/ as a singleton or in clusters. The studies are part of a larger investigation that uses similar methodologies across languages in order to enhance crosslinguistic comparability (Bernhardt and Stemberger, 2012, 2015). Participants for the current studies were monolingual preschoolers with typical or protracted phonological development who speak one of the following languages: Germanic (Icelandic/Swedish); Romance (Portuguese/Spanish); Slavic (Bulgarian/Slovenian) and Finno-Ugric (Hungarian). This introductory paper describes characteristics of taps/trills and general methodology across the studies, concluding with predicted patterns of acquisition. The seven papers that follow are in a sense the 'results' for this introduction. A concluding paper discusses major findings and their implications for theory, research and clinical practice.

  18. How Polycomb-Mediated Cell Memory Deals With a Changing Environment: Variations in PcG complexes and proteins assortment convey plasticity to epigenetic regulation as a response to environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasca, Federica; Bodega, Beatrice; Orlando, Valerio

    2018-04-01

    Cells and tissues are continuously exposed to a changing microenvironment, hence the necessity of a flexible modulation of gene expression that in complex organism have been achieved through specialized chromatin mechanisms. Chromatin-based cell memory enables cells to maintain their identity by fixing lineage specific transcriptional programs, ensuring their faithful transmission through cell division; in particular PcG-based memory system evolved to maintain the silenced state of developmental and cell cycle genes. In evolution the complexity of this system have increased, particularly in vertebrates, indicating combinatorial and dynamic properties of Polycomb proteins, in some cases even overflowing outside the cell nucleus. Therefore, their function may not be limited to the imposition of rigid states of genetic programs, but on the ability to recognize signals and allow plastic transcriptional changes in response to different stimuli. Here, we discuss the most novel PcG mediated memory functions in facing and responding to the challenges posed by a fluctuating environment. © 2018 The Authors. BioEssays Published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Is scale-up of community mobilisation among sex workers really possible in complex urban environments? The case of Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongelf, Anine; Bandewar, Sunita V S; Bharat, Shalini; Collumbien, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, community mobilisation (CM) interventions targeting female sex workers (FSWs) have been scaled-up in India's national response to the HIV epidemic. This included the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation's Avahan programme which adopted a business approach to plan and manage implementation at scale. With the focus of evaluation efforts on measuring effectiveness and health impacts there has been little analysis thus far of the interaction of the CM interventions with the sex work industry in complex urban environments. Between March and July 2012 semi-structured, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 63 HIV intervention implementers, to explore challenges of HIV prevention among FSWs in Mumbai. A thematic analysis identified contextual factors that impact CM implementation. Large-scale interventions are not only impacted by, but were shown to shape the dynamic social context. Registration practices and programme monitoring were experienced as stigmatising, reflected in shifting client preferences towards women not disclosing as 'sex workers'. This combined with urban redevelopment and gentrification of traditional red light areas, forcing dispersal and more 'hidden' ways of solicitation, further challenging outreach and collectivisation. Participants reported that brothel owners and 'pimps' continued to restrict access to sex workers and the heterogeneous 'community' of FSWs remains fragmented with high levels of mobility. Stakeholder engagement was poor and mobilising around HIV prevention not compelling. Interventions largely failed to respond to community needs as strong target-orientation skewed activities towards those most easily measured and reported. Large-scale interventions have been impacted by and contributed to an increasingly complex sex work environment in Mumbai, challenging outreach and mobilisation efforts. Sex workers remain a vulnerable and disempowered group needing continued support and more

  20. Is scale-up of community mobilisation among sex workers really possible in complex urban environments? The case of Mumbai, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anine Kongelf

    Full Text Available In the last decade, community mobilisation (CM interventions targeting female sex workers (FSWs have been scaled-up in India's national response to the HIV epidemic. This included the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation's Avahan programme which adopted a business approach to plan and manage implementation at scale. With the focus of evaluation efforts on measuring effectiveness and health impacts there has been little analysis thus far of the interaction of the CM interventions with the sex work industry in complex urban environments.Between March and July 2012 semi-structured, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 63 HIV intervention implementers, to explore challenges of HIV prevention among FSWs in Mumbai. A thematic analysis identified contextual factors that impact CM implementation. Large-scale interventions are not only impacted by, but were shown to shape the dynamic social context. Registration practices and programme monitoring were experienced as stigmatising, reflected in shifting client preferences towards women not disclosing as 'sex workers'. This combined with urban redevelopment and gentrification of traditional red light areas, forcing dispersal and more 'hidden' ways of solicitation, further challenging outreach and collectivisation. Participants reported that brothel owners and 'pimps' continued to restrict access to sex workers and the heterogeneous 'community' of FSWs remains fragmented with high levels of mobility. Stakeholder engagement was poor and mobilising around HIV prevention not compelling. Interventions largely failed to respond to community needs as strong target-orientation skewed activities towards those most easily measured and reported.Large-scale interventions have been impacted by and contributed to an increasingly complex sex work environment in Mumbai, challenging outreach and mobilisation efforts. Sex workers remain a vulnerable and disempowered group needing continued support

  1. The plastid genome of Najas flexilis: adaptation to submersed environments is accompanied by the complete loss of the NDH complex in an aquatic angiosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena L Peredo

    Full Text Available The re-colonization of aquatic habitats by angiosperms has presented a difficult challenge to plants whose long evolutionary history primarily reflects adaptations to terrestrial conditions. Many aquatics must complete vital stages of their life cycle on the water surface by means of floating or emergent leaves and flowers. Only a few species, mainly within the order Alismatales, are able to complete all aspects of their life cycle including pollination, entirely underwater. Water-pollinated Alismatales include seagrasses and water nymphs (Najas, the latter being the only freshwater genus in the family Hydrocharitaceae with subsurface water-pollination. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the plastid genome of Najas flexilis. The plastid genome of N. flexilis is a circular AT-rich DNA molecule of 156 kb, which displays a quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (IR separating the large single copy (LSC from the small single copy (SSC regions. In N. flexilis, as in other Alismatales, the rps19 and trnH genes are localized in the LSC region instead of within the IR regions as in other monocots. However, the N. flexilis plastid genome presents some anomalous modifications. The size of the SSC region is only one third of that reported for closely related species. The number of genes in the plastid is considerably less. Both features are due to loss of the eleven ndh genes in the Najas flexilis plastid. In angiosperms, the absence of ndh genes has been related mainly to the loss of photosynthetic function in parasitic plants. The ndh genes encode the NAD(PH dehydrogenase complex, believed essential in terrestrial environments, where it increases photosynthetic efficiency in variable light intensities. The modified structure of the N. flexilis plastid genome suggests that adaptation to submersed environments, where light is scarce, has involved the loss of the NDH complex in at least some photosynthetic angiosperms.

  2. Automating calibration, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of complex models using the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME): SWAT as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Liu, S.

    2012-01-01

    Parameter optimization and uncertainty issues are a great challenge for the application of large environmental models like the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which is a physically-based hydrological model for simulating water and nutrient cycles at the watershed scale. In this study, we present a comprehensive modeling environment for SWAT, including automated calibration, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities through integration with the R package Flexible Modeling Environment (FME). To address challenges (e.g., calling the model in R and transferring variables between Fortran and R) in developing such a two-language coupling framework, 1) we converted the Fortran-based SWAT model to an R function (R-SWAT) using the RFortran platform, and alternatively 2) we compiled SWAT as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL). We then wrapped SWAT (via R-SWAT) with FME to perform complex applications including parameter identifiability, inverse modeling, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in the R environment. The final R-SWAT-FME framework has the following key functionalities: automatic initialization of R, running Fortran-based SWAT and R commands in parallel, transferring parameters and model output between SWAT and R, and inverse modeling with visualization. To examine this framework and demonstrate how it works, a case study simulating streamflow in the Cedar River Basin in Iowa in the United Sates was used, and we compared it with the built-in auto-calibration tool of SWAT in parameter optimization. Results indicate that both methods performed well and similarly in searching a set of optimal parameters. Nonetheless, the R-SWAT-FME is more attractive due to its instant visualization, and potential to take advantage of other R packages (e.g., inverse modeling and statistical graphics). The methods presented in the paper are readily adaptable to other model applications that require capability for automated calibration, and sensitivity and uncertainty

  3. Fe(III) mobilisation by carbonate in low temperature environments: Study of the solubility of ferrihydrite in carbonate media and the formation of Fe(III) carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivé, Mireia; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have determined thermodynamic stabilities of Fe(III)-carbonate species. • We have determined the effect of those species on the solubility of ferrihydrite. • Results. • Highlight the importance of two Fe(III)-carbonate: FeOHCO 3 and Fe(CO 3 ) 3 3− . - Abstract: The linkage between the iron and the carbon cycles is of paramount importance to understand and quantify the effect of increased CO 2 concentrations in natural waters on the mobility of iron and associated trace elements. In this context, we have quantified the thermodynamic stability of mixed Fe(III) hydroxo-carbonate complexes and their effect on the solubility of Fe(III) oxihydroxides. We present the results of carefully performed solubility measurements of 2-line ferrihydrite in the slightly acidic to neutral–alkaline pH ranges (3.8–8.7) under constant pCO 2 varying between (0.982–98.154 kPa) at 25 °C. The outcome of the work indicates the predominance of two Fe(III) hydroxo carbonate complexes FeOHCO 3 and Fe(CO 3 ) 3 3− , with formation constants log * β° 1,1,1 = 10.76 ± 0.38 and log β° 1,0,3 = 24.24 ± 0.42, respectively. The solubility constant for the ferrihydrite used in this study was determined in acid conditions (pH: 1.8–3.2) in the absence of CO 2 and at T = (25 ± 1) °C, as log * K s,0 = 1.19 ± 0.41. The relative stability of the Fe(III)-carbonate complexes in alkaline pH conditions has implications for the solubility of Fe(III) in CO 2 -rich environments and the subsequent mobilisation of associated trace metals that will be explored in subsequent papers

  4. Flight Control in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Defense, Executive Services, Directorate (0704-0188).   Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall...Scales for the heat maps are shown below each eye. Areas of potential high resolution are shown with yellow/red colours . The two areas of

  5. Computational complexity a quantitative perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Zimand, Marius

    2004-01-01

    There has been a common perception that computational complexity is a theory of "bad news" because its most typical results assert that various real-world and innocent-looking tasks are infeasible. In fact, "bad news" is a relative term, and, indeed, in some situations (e.g., in cryptography), we want an adversary to not be able to perform a certain task. However, a "bad news" result does not automatically become useful in such a scenario. For this to happen, its hardness features have to be quantitatively evaluated and shown to manifest extensively. The book undertakes a quantitative analysis of some of the major results in complexity that regard either classes of problems or individual concrete problems. The size of some important classes are studied using resource-bounded topological and measure-theoretical tools. In the case of individual problems, the book studies relevant quantitative attributes such as approximation properties or the number of hard inputs at each length. One chapter is dedicated to abs...

  6. Development of Fast Error Compensation Algorithm for Integrated Inertial-Satellite Navigation System of Small-size Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Complex Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Fomichev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the structural features of small-size unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, and considering the feasibility of this project, the article studies an integrated inertial-satellite navigation system (INS. The INS algorithm development is based on the method of indirect filtration and principle of loosely coupled combination of output data on UAV positions and velocity. Data on position and velocity are provided from the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS and satellite navigation system (GPS. A difference between the output flows of measuring data on position and velocity provided from the SINS and GPS is used to evaluate SINS errors by means of the basic algorithm of Kalman filtering. Then the outputs of SINS are revised. The INS possesses the following advantages: a simpler mathematical model of Kalman filtering, high reliability, two independently operating navigation systems, and high redundancy of available navigation information.But in case of loosely coupled scheme, INS can meet the challenge of high precision and reliability of navigation only when the SINS and GPS operating conditions are normal all the time. The proposed INS is used with UAV moving in complex environment due to obstacles available, severe natural climatic conditions, etc. This case expects that it is impossible for UAV to receive successful GPS-signals frequently. In order to solve this problem, was developed an algorithm for rapid compensation for errors of INS information, which could effectively solve the problem of failure of the navigation system in case there are no GPS-signals .Since it is almost impossible to obtain the data of the real trajectory in practice, in the course of simulation in accordance with the kinematic model of the UAV and the complex environment of the terrain, the flight path generator is used to produce the flight path. The errors of positions and velocities are considered as an indicator of the INS effectiveness. The results

  7. Nucleophilic Aromatic Addition in Ionizing Environments: Observation and Analysis of New C-N Valence Bonds in Complexes between Naphthalene Radical Cation and Pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverati, Roberto; Platt, Sean P; Attah, Isaac K; Aziz, Saaudallah G; El-Shall, M Samy; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-08-30

    Radical organic ions can be stabilized by complexation with neutral organics via interactions that can resemble chemical bonds, but with much diminished bond energies. Those interactions are a key factor in cluster growth and polymerization reactions in ionizing environments such as regions of the interstellar medium and solar nebulae. Such radical cation complexes between naphthalene (Naph) and pyridine (Pyr) are characterized using mass-selected ion mobility experiments. The measured enthalpy of binding of the Naph +• (Pyr) heterodimer (20.9 kcal/mol) exceeds that of the Naph +• (Naph) homodimer (17.8 kcal/mol). The addition of 1-3 more pyridine molecules to the Naph +• (Pyr) heterodimer gives 10-11 kcal/mol increments in binding enthalpy. A rich array of Naph +• (Pyr) isomers are characterized by electronic structure calculations. The calculated Boltzmann distribution at 400 K yields an enthalpy of binding in reasonable agreement with experiment. The global minimum is a distonic cation formed by Pyr attack on Naph +• at the α-carbon, changing its hybridization from sp 2 to distorted sp 3 . The measured collision cross section in helium for the Naph +• (Pyr) heterodimer of 84.9 ± 2.5 Å 2 at 302 K agrees well with calculated angle-averaged cross sections (83.9-85.1 Å 2 at 302 K) of the lowest energy distonic structures. A remarkable 16 kcal/mol increase in the binding energy between Naph +• (Pyr) and Bz +• (Pyr) (Bz is benzene) is understood by energy decomposition analysis. A similar increase in binding from Naph +• (NH 3 ) to Naph +• (Pyr) (as well as between Bz +• (NH 3 ) and Bz +• (Pyr)) is likewise rationalized.

  8. Developing Abilities to Navigate Through the Grey Zones in Complex Environments: Nurses' Reasons for Applying to a Clinical Ethics Residency for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurchak, Martha; Grace, Pamela J; Lee, Susan M; Willis, Danny G; Zollfrank, Angelika A; Robinson, Ellen M

    2017-07-01

    Nurses face complex ethical issues in practice and have to determine appropriate actions. An inability to conceptualize or follow a preferred course of action can give rise to moral uncertainty or moral distress. Both moral uncertainty and moral distress are problematic for nurses and their patients. A program designed to increase nurse confidence in moral decision making, the clinical ethics residency for nurses (CERN), was offered selectively to nurses affiliated with two academic medical centers. This is a report of the analysis of their application essays. Over a 3-year period, 67 application essays were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Applicants comprised one third advanced practice nurses (APNs) and two thirds staff nurses. They were asked to describe their reasons for interest in the CERN and how they would apply the knowledge gained. For conventional content analyses, no theoretical presumptions are used; rather, codes are identified from the data in an iterative manner and eventually collapsed into themes. Initially, broad themes were identified by the CERN team. Subsequently, in-depth and recursive readings were completed by a subset of three members, resulting in refinement of themes and subthemes. The overarching theme identified was "developing abilities to navigate through the 'grey zones' in complex environments." Three subthemes were: (a) nurses encountering patients who are chronically critically ill, culturally diverse, and presenting with complex circumstances; (b) nurses desiring enhanced ethics knowledge and skills to improve quality of care, understand different perspectives, and act as a resource for others; and (c) nurses supporting and facilitating patient-centered ethical decision making. Findings are consistent with those appearing in the international literature but provide a more cohesive and comprehensive account than previously, and hold promise for the development of educational and policy strategies to address moral

  9. Removing Regional Trends in Microgravity in Complex Environments: Testing on 3D Model and Field Investigations in the Eastern Dead Sea Coast (Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Zoubi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity investigations are now recognized as a powerful tool for subsurface imaging and especially for the localization of underground karsts. However numerous natural (geological, technical, and environmental factors interfere with microgravity survey processing and interpretation. One of natural factors that causes the most disturbance in complex geological environments is the influence of regional trends. In the Dead Sea coastal areas the influence of regional trends can exceed residual gravity effects by some tenfold. Many widely applied methods are unable to remove regional trends with sufficient accuracy. We tested number of transformation methods (including computing gravity field derivatives, self-adjusting and adaptive filtering, Fourier series, wavelet, and other procedures on a 3D model (complicated by randomly distributed noise, and field investigations were carried out in Ghor Al-Haditha (the eastern side of the Dead Sea in Jordan. We show that the most effective methods for regional trend removal (at least for the theoretical and field cases here are the bilinear saddle and local polynomial regressions. Application of these methods made it possible to detect the anomalous gravity effect from buried targets in the theoretical model and to extract the local gravity anomaly at the Ghor Al-Haditha site. The local anomaly was utilized for 3D gravity modeling to construct a physical-geological model (PGM.

  10. Mapping epistasis and environment × QTX interaction based on four -omics genotypes for the detected QTX loci controlling complex traits in tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Zhou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Using newly developed methods and software, association mapping was conducted for chromium content and total sugar in tobacco leaf, based on four -omics datasets. Our objective was to collect data on genotype and phenotype for 60 leaf samples at four developmental stages, from three plant architectural positions and for three cultivars that were grown in two locations. Association mapping was conducted to detect genetic variants at quantitative trait SNP (QTS loci, quantitative trait transcript (QTT differences, quantitative trait protein (QTP variability, and quantitative trait metabolite (QTM changes, which can be summarized as QTX locus variation. The total heritabilities of the four -omics loci for both traits tested were 23.60% for epistasis and 15.26% for treatment interaction. Epistasis and environment × treatment interaction had important impacts on complex traits at all -omics levels. For decreasing chromium content and increasing total sugar in tobacco leaf, six methylated loci can be directly used for marker-assisted selection, and expression of ten QTTs, seven QTPs and six QTMs can be modified by selection or cultivation.

  11. Heuristic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Giunta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the identification of a paradigm which fixes the basic concepts and the type of logical relationships between them, whereby direct, govern and evaluate choises on new technologies. The contribution is based on the assumption that the complexity of knowledge is correlated with the complexity of the learning environment. From the existence of this correlation will descend a series of consequences that contribute to the definition of a theoretical construct in which the logical categories of learning become the guiding criteria on which to design learning environments and, consequently, also the indicators on by which to evaluate its effectiveness.

  12. Virtual learning environments in the light of the Complexity Paradigm: interface, affordances and equifinality Ambientes virtuais de aprendizagem à luz do Paradigma da Complexidade: interface, affordances e equifinalidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeska Virginia Soares Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I have investigated, through the lens of the Complexity Paradigm, aligned with the premises of the Theory of General Systems and the concept of affordances, two virtual learning environments (VLEs, defining them as systems composed of digital genres, regarding a VLE as a complex adaptive system. These VLEs were reconfigured from the platforms TelEduc and Moodle and used to teach the discipline "Digital Literacy", in the course of Languages and Literature Teaching degree at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG, during the second semester of 2007 and the second semester of 2008, respectively. The analyses have indicated that the textual production of the emerging online discourse communities was influenced by the coupling of different layers of the interface, the textual genres and the communicative and pedagogical purposes and, also, by the affordances which were perceived and acted upon by teachers and learners. The analyzed VLEs have portrayed the characteristic of equifinality, regardless of the possibilities and constraints offered by the platforms TelEduc and Moodle.Investigo, através da lente do Paradigma da Complexidade, juntamente com os pressupostos da Teoria Geral dos Sistemas e do conceito de affordances, dois ambientes virtuais de aprendizagem (AVAs, definindo-os como sistemas compostos por gêneros digitais, partindo do pressuposto de que um AVA é um sistema adaptativo complexo. Esses AVAs foram reconfigurados a partir das plataformas TelEduc e Moodle e utilizados para ministrar a disciplina "Letramento Digital", no curso de Letras da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG, nos semestres 2007-2 e 2008-2, respectivamente. As análises indicam que a produção textual das comunidades discursivas on-line emergentes nos AVAs foi influenciada pelo acoplamento aninhado de camadas distintas da interface, dos gêneros textuais e dos propósitos comunicativos e pedagógicos, e, ainda, pelas affordances percebidas e efetivadas

  13. Synthesis, chemistry and catalytic activity of complexes of lanthanide and actinide metals in unusual oxidation states and coordination environments. Progress report, February 1, 1978--January 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.

    1978-11-01

    Previous syntheses of Ln(olefin) complexes and their catalytic effect on the hydrogenation of the olefin are discussed. The tert-butyl complexes of Sn, Er, and Yb were synthesized and their decomposition studied

  14. Evolution of chemical and isotopic composition of inorganic carbon in a complex semi-arid zone environment: Consequences for groundwater dating using radiocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K. T.; Han, L. F.; Hollins, S. E.; Cendón, D. I.; Jacobsen, G. E.; Baker, A.

    2016-09-01

    Estimating groundwater age is important for any groundwater resource assessment and radiocarbon (14C) dating of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) can provide this information. In semi-arid zone (i.e. water-limited environments), there are a multitude of reasons why 14C dating of groundwater and traditional correction models may not be directly transferable. Some include; (1) the complex hydrological responses of these systems that lead to a mixture of different ages in the aquifer(s), (2) the varied sources, origins and ages of organic matter in the unsaturated zone and (3) high evaporation rates. These all influence the evolution of DIC and are not easily accounted for in traditional correction models. In this study, we determined carbon isotope data for; DIC in water, carbonate minerals in the sediments, sediment organic matter, soil gas CO2 from the unsaturated zone, and vegetation samples. The samples were collected after an extended drought, and again after a flood event, to capture the evolution of DIC after varying hydrological regimes. A graphical method (Han et al., 2012) was applied for interpretation of the carbon geochemical and isotopic data. Simple forward mass-balance modelling was carried out on key geochemical processes involving carbon and agreed well with observed data. High values of DIC and δ13CDIC, and low 14CDIC could not be explained by a simple carbonate mineral-CO2 gas dissolution process. Instead it is suggested that during extended drought, water-sediment interaction leads to ion exchange processes within the top ∼10-20 m of the aquifer which promotes greater calcite dissolution in saline groundwater. This process was found to contribute more than half of the DIC, which is from a mostly 'dead' carbon source. DIC is also influenced by carbon exchange between DIC in water and carbonate minerals found in the top 2 m of the unsaturated zone. This process occurs because of repeated dissolution/precipitation of carbonate that is dependent on

  15. Dynamic Modeling as a Cognitive Regulation Scaffold for Developing Complex Problem-Solving Skills in an Educational Massively Multiplayer Online Game Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseryel, Deniz; Ge, Xun; Ifenthaler, Dirk; Law, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Following a design-based research framework, this article reports two empirical studies with an educational MMOG, called "McLarin's Adventures," on facilitating 9th-grade students' complex problem-solving skill acquisition in interdisciplinary STEM education. The article discusses the nature of complex and ill-structured problem solving…

  16. Development of Web GIS for complex processing and visualization of climate geospatial datasets as an integral part of dedicated Virtual Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, Evgeny; Okladnikov, Igor; Titov, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    For comprehensive usage of large geospatial meteorological and climate datasets it is necessary to create a distributed software infrastructure based on the spatial data infrastructure (SDI) approach. Currently, it is generally accepted that the development of client applications as integrated elements of such infrastructure should be based on the usage of modern web and GIS technologies. The paper describes the Web GIS for complex processing and visualization of geospatial (mainly in NetCDF and PostGIS formats) datasets as an integral part of the dedicated Virtual Research Environment for comprehensive study of ongoing and possible future climate change, and analysis of their implications, providing full information and computing support for the study of economic, political and social consequences of global climate change at the global and regional levels. The Web GIS consists of two basic software parts: 1. Server-side part representing PHP applications of the SDI geoportal and realizing the functionality of interaction with computational core backend, WMS/WFS/WPS cartographical services, as well as implementing an open API for browser-based client software. Being the secondary one, this part provides a limited set of procedures accessible via standard HTTP interface. 2. Front-end part representing Web GIS client developed according to a "single page application" technology based on JavaScript libraries OpenLayers (http://openlayers.org/), ExtJS (https://www.sencha.com/products/extjs), GeoExt (http://geoext.org/). It implements application business logic and provides intuitive user interface similar to the interface of such popular desktop GIS applications, as uDIG, QuantumGIS etc. Boundless/OpenGeo architecture was used as a basis for Web-GIS client development. According to general INSPIRE requirements to data visualization Web GIS provides such standard functionality as data overview, image navigation, scrolling, scaling and graphical overlay, displaying map

  17. The Complex Interaction between Home Environment, Socioeconomic Status, Maternal IQ and Early Child Neurocognitive Development: A Multivariate Analysis of Data Collected in a Newborn Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Ronfani

    Full Text Available The relative role of socioeconomic status (SES, home environment and maternal intelligence, as factors affecting child cognitive development in early childhood is still unclear. The aim of this study is to analyze the association of SES, home environment and maternal IQ with child neurodevelopment at 18 months.The data were collected prospectively in the PHIME study, a newborn cohort study carried out in Italy between 2007 and 2010. Maternal nonverbal abilities (IQ were evaluated using the Standard Progressive Matrices, a version of the Raven's Progressive Matrices; a direct evaluation of the home environment was carried out with the AIRE instrument, designed using the HOME (Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment model; the socioeconomic characteristics were evaluated using the SES index which takes into account parents occupation, type of employment, educational level, homeownership. The study outcome was child neurodevelopment evaluated at 18 months, with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development Third Edition (BSID III. Linear regression analyses and mediation analyses were carried out to evaluate the association between the three exposures, and the scaled scores of the three main scales of BSID III (cognitive, language and motor scale, with adjustment for a wide range of potential explanatory variables.Data from 502 mother-child pairs were analyzed. Mediation analysis showed a relationship between SES and maternal IQ, with a complete mediation effect of home environment in affecting cognitive and language domains. A direct significant effect of maternal IQ on the BSID III motor development scale and the mediation effect of home environment were found.Our results show that home environment was the variable with greater influence on neurodevelopment at 18 months. The observation of how parents and children interact in the home context is crucial to adequately evaluate early child development.

  18. Enhancing the Reuse of Digital Resources for Integrated Systems to Represent, Understand and Dynamize Complex Interactions in Architectural Cultural Heritage Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F. J.; Martinez, R.; Finat, J.; Martinez, J.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we develop a multiply interconnected system which involves objects, agents and interactions between them from the use of ICT applied to open repositories, users communities and web services. Our approach is applied to Architectural Cultural Heritage Environments (ACHE). It includes components relative to digital accessibility (to augmented ACHE repositories), contents management (ontologies for the semantic web), semiautomatic recognition (to ease the reuse of materials) and serious videogames (for interaction in urban environments). Their combination provides a support for local real/remote virtual tourism (including some tools for low-level RT display of rendering in portable devices), mobile-based smart interactions (with a special regard to monitored environments) and CH related games (as extended web services). Main contributions to AR models on usual GIS applied to architectural environments, concern to an interactive support performed directly on digital files which allows to access to CH contents which are referred to GIS of urban districts (involving facades, historical or preindustrial buildings) and/or CH repositories in a ludic and transversal way to acquire cognitive, medial and social abilities in collaborative environments.

  19. Theoretical description of copper Cu(I)/Cu(II) complexes in mixed ammine-aqua environment. DFT and ab initio quantum chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelka, Matej; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2005-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigate the interactions of the Cu(I)/Cu(II) cation with variable ammonia-water ligand field by the quantum chemical approach. For that purpose, the optimization of the [Cu(NH 3 ) m (H 2 O) n ] 2+/+ complexes (where n varies from 0 to 4 or 6 and m + n = 4 or 6) has been performed at the DFT/6-31+G(d) level of theory in conjunction with the B3PW91 hybrid functional. Based on the results of the single-point B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd) calculations, the stabilization energies were determined. The two-coordinated copper(I) complexes appeared to be the most stable compounds with the remaining water or ammonia molecules in the second solvation shell. In the case of the Cu(II) systems, four-coordinated complexes were found to be the most stable. In order to examine and explain bonding characteristics, Morokuma interaction energy decomposition (for selected Cu + complexes) and Natural Population Analysis for all systems were performed. It was found that the most stable structures correlate with the highest donation effects. Therefore, more polarizable ammonia molecules exhibit higher donation than water and thus make stronger bonds to copper. This can be demonstrated by the fact that the NH 3 molecule always tries to occupy the first solvation shell in mixed ammine-aqua complexes

  20. Using ILD or ITD Cues for Sound Source Localization and Speech Understanding in a Complex Listening Environment by Listeners with Bilateral and with Hearing-Preservation Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiselle, Louise H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Yost, William A.; Cook, Sarah J.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of interaural time differences and interaural level differences in (a) sound-source localization, and (b) speech understanding in a cocktail party listening environment for listeners with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) and for listeners with hearing-preservation CIs. Methods: Eleven bilateral listeners with MED-EL…

  1. Synthesis, chemistry and catalytic activity of complexes of lanthanide and actinide metals in unusual oxidation states and coordination environments. Progress report, February 1, 1979-January 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.

    1979-10-01

    The new synthetic and catalytic reactions involving lanthanide metals which were discovered in the first years of this project have been examined in more detail in the past year. Synthetic and catalytic model systems have been theoretically developed and experimental testing of these hypotheses is in progress. New techniques are being applied to the lanthanide metals to further elucidate the chemistry of these complexes

  2. Fine-scale temporal and spatial variation of taxon and clonal structure in the Daphnia longispina hybrid complex in heterogeneous environments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yin, M.; Petrusek, A.; Seďa, Jaromír; Wolinska, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, January (2012), s. 1-12 ISSN 1471-2148 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600960901 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : species complex * genetic-structure * interspecific hybridization * cyclic parthenogenesis * population-dynamics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.285, year: 2012

  3. Non-coincidence of principal axis of g- and A-tensors of EPR spectra for certain Cr (5) and Mo (5) complexes with oxygen environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Z I [Kazanskij Pedagogicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1974-11-21

    As a result of this study, it has been revealed, for the first time, that the main axes of g- and A-tensors do not coincide in solutions of Cr (5) and Mo (5) complexes, which provides interesting information as to the structure of the examined paramagnetic compounds. The ESR spectra of liquid and frozen solutions of Cr (5) complexes with lactic, tartaric, glycolic, and amygdalic acids, as well as Cr (5) complexes with salicylic acid are presented. Analysis of these spectra has shown that the g-tensor has an axial symmetry, while the A-tensor has a rhombic symmetry. Comparison of ESR spectra of frozen solutions of Cr (5) and Mo (5) complexes with a natural content of odd isotopes and those of enriched Cr/sup 53/ and Mo/sup 95/ indicates that the maximum value of the g-tensor does not coincide with the maximum splitting of the A-tensor, forming, instead, an angle of about 90 deg.

  4. Spatial distribution of the .i.Daphnia longispina./i. species complex and other planktonic crustaceans in the heterogeneous environment of canyon-shaped reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seďa, Jaromír; Petrusek, A.; Macháček, Jiří; Šmilauer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2007), s. 619-628 ISSN 0142-7873 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/04/0190 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : Daphnia longispina species complex * canyon-shaped reservoirs Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2007

  5. Oligomeric protein complexes of apolipoproteins stabilize the internal fluid environment of organism in redfins of the Tribolodon genus [Pisces; Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Alla M; Serebryakova, Marina V; Lamash, Nina E

    2017-06-01

    One of the most important functions of plasma proteins in vertebrates is their participation in osmotic homeostasis in the organism. Modern concepts about plasma proteins and their capillary filtration are based on a model of large monomeric proteins that are able to penetrate the interstitial space. At the same time, it was revealed that a considerable amount of oligomeric complexes are present in the low-molecular-weight (LM) protein fraction in the extracellular fluids of fishes. The functions of these complexes are unknown. In the present study, we investigated the LM-fraction proteins in the plasma and interstitial fluid (IF) of redfins of the genus Tribolodon. This fish alternatively spends parts of its life cycle in saline and fresh waters. We identified the protein Wap65, serpins and apolipoproteins in this fraction. By combining the methods of 2D-E under native and denaturing conditions with MALDI, we demonstrated that only apolipoproteins formed complexes. We showed that serum apolipoproteins (АроА-I, Аро-14) were present in the form of homooligomeric complexes that were dissociated with the release of monomeric forms of proteins in the course of capillary filtration to IF. Dissociation of homooligomers is not directly correlated with the change in salinity but is correlated with seasonal dynamics. We found that there was a significant decrease in the total protein concentration in IF relative to plasma. Therefore, we suggested that dissociation of homooligomeric complexes from various apolipoproteins supports the isoosmoticity of extracellular fluids relative to capillary wall stabilization through a fluid medium in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The ALMA early science view of FUor/EXor objects - IV. Misaligned outflows in the complex star-forming environment of V1647 Ori and McNeil's Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, David A.; Cieza, Lucas; Hales, Antonio; Zurlo, Alice; Williams, Jonathan; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Dary; Canovas, Hector; Casassus, Simon; Mužić, Koraljka; Perez, Sebastian; Tobin, John J.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2018-01-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the star-forming environment surrounding V1647 Ori, an outbursting FUor/EXor pre-main sequence star. Dust continuum and the (J = 2 - 1) 12CO, 13CO, C18O molecular emission lines were observed to characterize the V1647 Ori circumstellar disc and any large scale molecular features present. We detect continuum emission from the circumstellar disc and determine a radius r = 40 au, inclination i = 17°+6-9 and total disc mass of Mdisc of ∼0.1 M⊙. We do not identify any disc structures associated with nearby companions, massive planets or fragmentation. The molecular cloud environment surrounding V1647 Ori is both structured and complex. We confirm the presence of an excavated cavity north of V1647 Ori and have identified dense material at the base of the optical reflection nebula (McNeil's Nebula) that is actively shaping its surrounding environment. Two distinct outflows have been detected with dynamical ages of ∼11 700 and 17 200 yr. These outflows are misaligned suggesting disc precession over ∼5500 yr as a result of anisotropic accretion events is responsible. The collimated outflows exhibit velocities of ∼2 km s-1, similar in velocity to that of other FUor objects presented in this series, but significantly slower than previous observations and model predictions. The V1647 Ori system is seemingly connected by an 'arm' of material to a large unresolved structure located ∼20 arcsec to the west. The complex environment surrounding V1647 Ori suggests it is in the early stages of star formation, which may relate to its classification as both a FUor and EXor type object.

  7. Influence of Microheterogeneous Environments of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on the Kinetics of Oxidation of l-Serine by Chloro and Chlorohydroxo Complexes of Gold(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Krishnendu; Sen, Pratik K; Barik, Anil K; Pal, Biswajit

    2018-06-21

    The oxidation of l-serine by chloro and chlorohydroxo complexes of gold(III) was spectrophotometrically investigated in acidic buffer media in the absence and presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The oxidation rate decreases with increase in either [H + ] or [Cl - ]. Gold(III) complex species react with the zwitterionic form of serine to yield acetaldehyde (principal reaction product) through oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent deamination processes. A reaction pathway involving one electron transfer from serine to Au(III) followed by homolytic cleavage of α-C-C bond with the concomitant formation of iminic cation intermediate has been proposed where Au(III) is initially reduced to Au(II). The surfactant in the submicellar region exhibits a catalytic effect on the reaction rate at [SDS] ≤ 4 mM; however, in the postmicellar region an inhibitory effect was prominent at [SDS] ≥ 4 mM. The catalytic effect below the critical micelle concentration (cmc) may be attributable to the electrostatic attraction between serine and SDS that, in turn, enhances the nucleophilicity of the carboxylate ion of the amino acid. The inhibition effect beyond cmc has been explained by considering the distribution of the reactant species between the aqueous and the micellar pseudophases that restricts the close association of the reactant species. The thermodynamic parameters Δ H 0 and Δ S 0 associated with the binding between serine and SDS micelle were calculated to be -14.4 ± 2 kJ mol -1 and -6.3 ± 0.5 J K -1 mol -1 , respectively. Water structure rearrangement and micelle-substrate binding play instrumental roles during the transfer of the reactant species from aqueous to micellar pseudophase.

  8. Relações de gênero, meio ambiente e a teoria da complexidade Gender, environment and the theory of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Célia Di Ciommo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho utiliza a teoria da complexidade para a análise das questões de gênero, mostrando que a sociedade as constrói em uma interação de informações entre natureza e cultura. O enraizamento bioantropológico e as características socioculturais comportam graus diversos de experiências, conhecimentos e sabedoria, em uma complexa organização em que as oposições não devem significar extinção e as diferenças não podem traduzir enfraquecimento ou superioridade. Dessa forma, podemos aplicar o conceito do "anel tetralógico" de Edgar Morin, que comporta desordem, organização, ordem e interação para a compreensão dos impasses entre seres masculinos e femininos, humanos e não-humanos, em direção a uma mudança paradigmática em nossas relações sociais e ambientais.We use the theory of complexity to analise gender questions, showing that those are built by society in an exchange of interactions between nature and culture. The bioanthropological rootsand and the sociocultural characteristics contain different experiences, knowledge and wisdom, in a complex organization in which oposition does notmean extinction, and difference does not imply hierarchy. We can apply Morin's "tetralogical ring" concept, which admits disorder, organization, order and interaction to the understanding of the impasse between masculine and feminine, humans and non-humans, towards a paradigmatic change in the social and environmental relations.

  9. Water oxidation catalyzed by mononuclear ruthenium complexes with a 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate (bda) ligand: how ligand environment influences the catalytic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehle, Robert; Tong, Lianpeng; Wang, Lei; Duan, Lele; Fischer, Andreas; Ahlquist, Mårten S G; Sun, Licheng; Rau, Sven

    2014-02-03

    A new water oxidation catalyst [Ru(III)(bda)(mmi)(OH2)](CF3SO3) (2, H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; mmi = 1,3-dimethylimidazolium-2-ylidene) containing an axial N-heterocyclic carbene ligand and one aqua ligand was synthesized and fully characterized. The kinetics of catalytic water oxidation by 2 were measured using stopped-flow technique, and key intermediates in the catalytic cycle were probed by density functional theory calculations. While analogous Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts [Ru(bda)L2] (L = pyridyl ligands) are supposed to catalyze water oxidation through a bimolecular coupling pathway, our study points out that 2, surprisingly, undergoes a single-site water nucleophilic attack (acid-base) pathway. The diversion of catalytic mechanisms is mainly ascribed to the different ligand environments, from nonaqua ligands to an aqua ligand. Findings in this work provide some critical proof for our previous hypothesis about how alternation of ancillary ligands of water oxidation catalysts influences their catalytic efficiency.

  10. The Identification of Complex Organic Molecules in the Interstellar Medium: Using Lasers and Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy to Simulate the Interstellar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bradley M.

    1998-01-01

    The Astrochemistry Group at NASA Ames Research Center is interested in the identification of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium Many smaller organic species (e.g. hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) have been previously identified by their radiofrequency signature due to molecular rotations. However, this becomes increasingly difficult to observe as the size of the molecule increases. Our group in interested in the identification of the carriers of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (absorption features observed throughout the visible and near-infrared in the spectra of stars, due to species in the interstellar medium). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related molecules are thought to be good candidates for these carriers. Laboratory experiments am performed at Ames to simulate the interstellar environment, and to compare spectra obtained from molecules in the laboratory to those derived astronomically. We are also interested in PAHs with respect to their possible connection to the UIR (Unidentified infrared) and ERE (Extended Red Emission) bands - emission features found to emanate from particular regions of our galaxy (e.g. Orion nebula, Red Rectangle, etc.). An old, "tried and proven spectroscopic technique, matrix isolation spectroscopy creates molecular conditions ideal for performing laboratory astrophysics.

  11. Novel europium (III)-gatifloxacin complex structure with dual functionality for pH sensing and metal recognition in aqueous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Muhua; Zheng, Yuhui; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Qianming

    2016-10-01

    A new type of Eu(III)-gatifloxacin complex with characteristic red luminescence has been prepared. Due to the presence of ionization effect linked to the organic chromophore, the molecular fluorescent sensor demonstrated variable pH-sensitive absorption and emission curves. The red emission derived from europium ions was strong during pH range 8-10. Between pH = 7 and 4, the europium emission remained relatively stable and fluorescence signals of gatifloxacin has been improved substantially. Under acidic conditions (pH = 1 to 3), the dramatic changes in the emission colors (from red, yellow to green) were clearly observed. Moreover, the excitation wavelength can be extended into the visible light range (Ex = 411 nm) by using the concentration effect experiment. Importantly, it gave turn-off emissions in the presence of Cu2+ or Fe3+ and the detection limits were determined to be 6.5 μM for Cu2+ and 6.2 μM for Fe3+ respectively.

  12. 试从家庭环境分析自卑感形成的影响因素%Inferiority Complex Formation Factors from the Family Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于见伟

    2012-01-01

    自从阿德勒建立个体心理学以来,其自卑理论流传全球,并对后世心理学理论产生了深远影响。关于自卑形成的内在机制及其影响因素众说纷纭,本文试从家庭微环境来探讨影响自卑形成的内在机制,主要从家庭的经济因素、家庭教育方式、孩子的出生顺序、家庭的和谐程度以及父母子三者的互动关系来探索自卑形成的影响因素。%Since Adler established individual psychology, the self-esteem theory spread to the world, and had a profound im- pact on future generations psychological theory. Divergent views on the inferiority complex formation of the internal mecha- nisms and their influencing factors, this article tries to explore the impact of low self-esteem inherent mechanism from the family microenvironment mainly from the economic factors of the family, family education, the child's birth order, the harmony of the family, and parental sub-interactions among these three relations to explore the impact factor of the inferiority.

  13. Detection and Estimation of 2-D Distributions of Greenhouse Gas Source Concentrations and Emissions over Complex Urban Environments and Industrial Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work highlights the use of the greenhouse-gas laser imaging tomography experiment (GreenLITETM) data in conjunction with a sparse tomography approach to identify and quantify both urban and industrial sources of CO2 and CH4. The GreenLITETM system provides a user-defined set of time-sequenced intersecting chords or integrated column measurements at a fixed height through a quasi-horizontal plane of interest. This plane, with unobstructed views along the lines of sight, may range from complex industrial facilities to a small city scale or urban sector. The continuous time phased absorption measurements are converted to column concentrations and combined with a plume based model to estimate the 2-D distribution of gas concentration over extended areas ranging from 0.04-25 km2. Finally, these 2-D maps of concentration are combined with ancillary meteorological and atmospheric data to identify potential emission sources and provide first order estimates of their associated fluxes. In this presentation, we will provide a brief overview of the systems and results from both controlled release experiments and a long-term system deployment in Paris, FR. These results provide a quantitative assessment of the system's ability to detect and estimate CO2 and CH4 sources, and demonstrate its ability to perform long-term autonomous monitoring and quantification of either persistent or sporadic emissions that may have both health and safety as well as environmental impacts.

  14. Realtime graphics support for remote handling operations in complex working environments within the framework of a control, simulation and off-line programming system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehnapfel, U.

    1992-05-01

    The application independent simulation system KISMET was developed. This tool gives a different approach compared to previously existing robot simulators. A hierarchical data structure approach is used for the definition of workcell geometry, assembly topology and mechanism kinematics. This database structure allows for presentation of interactively selectable levels of detail and is, therefore, especially useful for real-time rigid body simulation of complex RH-scenarios. With KISMET, assembly structures can be modelled in any number of detail levels. Workcell geometry, assembly topology and mechanisms can be defined interactively by means of the integrated modeller. The mechanism simulation allows for kinematical tree structures with any number of joints, planar closed chains, and interconnections between joints. Examples of novel simulation methods, data structures, and algorithms are presented for selected examples: the hidden surface problem, graphical presentation techniques, collision testing, and control of scene cameras (image simulation, fast positioning and tracking). Special attention is paid to the real-time problem. The way this system was realized within the UNIX world is shown as an example for geometric and kinematic modelling techniques that grant for the optimum use of the capabilities of high-performance graphics workstations. A further chapter is focussing on the use of standard interfaces for CAD model transfer (CAD * I, STEP) and robot programming (IRDATA). Examples of practical KISMET applications for remote handling in fusion reactors, in a nuclear fuel element reprocessing cell and in sensor based robotics are used to present the developed methods. (orig.) [de

  15. Consciência situacional, tomada de decisão e modos de controle cognitivo em ambientes complexos Situation awareness, decision making, and cognitive control in complex environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Henriqson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho tem como objetivo analisar a consciência situacional, os processos de tomada de decisão naturalística e os modos de controle cognitivo utilizados por pilotos de aeronaves em um experimento em simulador de voo. Dessa forma, diferentes situações foram propostas durante a simulação objetivando o estudo da consciência situacional e tomada de decisão dos tripulantes. As ações dos participantes foram investigadas e classificadas de acordo com o modelo de controle cognitivo proposto. Os resultados sugerem que os fatores de complexidade contextual afetam a gestão da dificuldade, influenciando a consciência situacional, a tomada de decisão e os modos de controle cognitivo dos pilotos.This work aims to analyze situation awareness, natural decision-making processes and cognitive control modes used by airplane pilots in a flight simulator experiment. In this way, different situations during flight simulation were considered in order to study the crew's situation awareness and natural decision-making. The participants' actions were investigated and classified according to the cognitive control model proposed. Results suggest that context complexity factors affect difficulty management, influencing situation awareness, decision-making and pilots' cognitive control modes.

  16. Biogeochemical typing of paddy field by a data-driven approach revealing sub-systems within a complex environment--a pipeline to filtrate, organize and frame massive dataset from multi-omics analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M O Ogawa

    Full Text Available We propose the technique of biogeochemical typing (BGC typing as a novel methodology to set forth the sub-systems of organismal communities associated to the correlated chemical profiles working within a larger complex environment. Given the intricate characteristic of both organismal and chemical consortia inherent to the nature, many environmental studies employ the holistic approach of multi-omics analyses undermining as much information as possible. Due to the massive amount of data produced applying multi-omics analyses, the results are hard to visualize and to process. The BGC typing analysis is a pipeline built using integrative statistical analysis that can treat such huge datasets filtering, organizing and framing the information based on the strength of the various mutual trends of the organismal and chemical fluctuations occurring simultaneously in the environment. To test our technique of BGC typing, we choose a rich environment abounding in chemical nutrients and organismal diversity: the surficial freshwater from Japanese paddy fields and surrounding waters. To identify the community consortia profile we employed metagenomics as high throughput sequencing (HTS for the fragments amplified from Archaea rRNA, universal 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA; to assess the elemental content we employed ionomics by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES; and for the organic chemical profile, metabolomics employing both Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR all these analyses comprised our multi-omics dataset. The similar trends between the community consortia against the chemical profiles were connected through correlation. The result was then filtered, organized and framed according to correlation strengths and peculiarities. The output gave us four BGC types displaying uniqueness in community and chemical distribution, diversity and richness. We conclude therefore that

  17. Laboratory and in situ determination of the migration processes of actinide complexes and colloids in a fissured granitic environment. El Berrocal project (preliminary activities - phase 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astudillo, J.; Del Olmo, C.; Commission of the European Communities, Ispra

    1993-01-01

    The experimental site of El Berrocal has been chosen for a study of the migration of natural radionuclides in a fractured granitic environment. The granite is classified as an alkaline feldspar-rich quartz granite with two micas. The fresh granite is affected by hydrothermal alteration processes related to fractures, which has led to a strong sericitization of albite, and the precipitation of secondary chlorites and carbonates. The most important U-bearing and Th-bearing accessory minerals are uraninite, thorite-auerlite, monazite, anatase, apatite and zircon. Approximately 65% of the total of U in the rock is held as uraninite. In the altered granite, most of the U is held as autunite. Hydrogeochemical data show that Co 2 /H 2 CO 3 is the dominant system, followed by the silica-silicate system. Based on their stability analyses, two zones can be defined: (i) waters north of the dyke and from deep zones where calcite is in equilibrium and albite and gibbsite precipitate, and (ii) surface waters, south of the dyke, subsaturated in relation to calcite, producing the alteration of albite and the precipitation of montmorillonite. The size distribution of the colloids varies, depending on the treatment given to the water samples. The particles are mainly composed of K-feldspars and clay minerals (smectite) and occasionally by quartz, mica, calcite and pollen. The El Berrocal groundwaters have a very low amount of organic matter. Column migration tests have been carried out and were performed with intact granitic cores and with crushed granite. Np proved to be an adequate radionuclide for these experiments. Under oxic conditions and in the absence of organic matter, it was completely retained in both types of columns, whereas in the presence of organic matter a more rapid breakthrough was observed. Under anoxic conditions, and with or without organic matter, Np was found to move faster than under oxic conditions. (author). 13 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs

  18. Complexities of holistic community-based participatory research for a low income, multi-ethnic population exposed to multiple built-environment stressors in Worcester, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Timothy J; Ross, Laurie; Patton, Suzanne; Rulnick, Sarah; Sinha, Deb; Mucciarone, Danielle; Calvache, Maria; Parmenter, Sarah; Subedi, Rajendra; Wysokenski, Donna; Anderson, Erin; Dezan, Rebecca; Lowe, Kate; Bowen, Jennifer; Tejani, Amee; Piersanti, Kelly; Taylor, Octavia; Goble, Robert

    2009-11-01

    Low income, multi-ethnic communities in Main South/Piedmont neighborhoods of Worcester, Massachusetts are exposed to cumulative, chronic built-environment stressors, and have limited capacity to respond, magnifying their vulnerability to adverse health outcomes. "Neighborhood STRENGTH", our community-based participatory research (CBPR) project, comprised four partners: a youth center; an environmental non-profit; a community-based health center; and a university. Unlike most CBPR projects that are single topic-focused, our 'holistic', systems-based project targeted five priorities. The three research-focused/action-oriented components were: (1) participatory monitoring of indoor and outdoor pollution; (2) learning about health needs and concerns of residents through community-based listening sessions; (3) engaging in collaborative survey work, including a household vulnerability survey and an asthma prevalence survey for schoolchildren. The two action-focused/research-informed components were: (4) tackling persistent street trash and illegal dumping strategically; and (5) educating and empowering youth to promote environmental justice. We used a coupled CBPR-capacity building approach to design, vulnerability theory to frame, and mixed methods: quantitative environmental testing and qualitative surveys. Process and outcomes yielded important lessons: vulnerability theory helps frame issues holistically; having several topic-based projects yielded useful information, but was hard to manage and articulate to the public; access to, and engagement with, the target population was very difficult and would have benefited greatly from having representative residents who were paid at the partners' table. Engagement with residents and conflict burden varied highly across components. Notwithstanding, we built enabling capacity, strengthened our understanding of vulnerability, and are able to share valuable experiential knowledge.

  19. Unusual centrosymmetric structure of [M(18-crown-6)](+) (M = Rb, Cs and NH4) complexes stabilized in an environment of hexachloridoantimonate(V) anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarova, Vira V; Rusanova, Julia A; Rusanov, Eduard B; Domasevitch, Konstantin V

    2015-10-01

    In (1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane)rubidium hexachloridoantimonate(V), [Rb(C12H24O6)][SbCl6], (1), and its isomorphous caesium {(1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane)caesium hexachloridoantimonate(V), [Cs(C12H24O6)][SbCl6]}, (2), and ammonium {ammonium hexachloridoantimonate(V)-1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane (1/1), (NH4)[SbCl6]·C12H24O6}, (3), analogues, the hexachloridoantimonate(V) anions and 18-crown-6 molecules reside across -3 axes passing through the Sb atoms and the centroids of the 18-crown-6 groups, both of which coincide with centres of inversion. The Rb(+) [in (1)], Cs(+) [in (2)] and NH4(+) [in (3)] cations are situated inside the cavity of the 18-crown-6 ring; they are situated on -3 axes and are equally disordered about centres of inversion, deviating from the centroid of the 18-crown-6 molecule by 0.4808 (13), 0.9344 (7) and 0.515 (8) Å, respectively. Interaction of the ammonium cation and the 18-crown-6 group is supported by three equivalent hydrogen bonds [N...O = 2.928 (3) Å and N-H...O = 162°]. The centrosymmetric structure of [Cs(18-crown-6)](+), with the large Cs(+) cation approaching the centre of the ligand cavity, is unprecedented and accompanied by unusually short Cs-O bonds [2.939 (2) and 3.091 (2) Å]. For all three compounds, the [M(18-crown-6)](+) cations and [SbCl6](-) anions afford linear stacks along the c axis, with the cationic complexes embedded between pairs of inversion-related anions.

  20. Complex relationships between occupation, environment, DNA adducts, genetic polymorphisms and bladder cancer in a case-control study using a structural equation modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Porru

    Full Text Available DNA adducts are considered an integrate measure of carcinogen exposure and the initial step of carcinogenesis. Their levels in more accessible peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs mirror that in the bladder tissue. In this study we explore whether the formation of PBL DNA adducts may be associated with bladder cancer (BC risk, and how this relationship is modulated by genetic polymorphisms, environmental and occupational risk factors for BC. These complex interrelationships, including direct and indirect effects of each variable, were appraised using the structural equation modeling (SEM analysis. Within the framework of a hospital-based case/control study, study population included 199 BC cases and 213 non-cancer controls, all Caucasian males. Data were collected on lifetime smoking, coffee drinking, dietary habits and lifetime occupation, with particular reference to exposure to aromatic amines (AAs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. No indirect paths were found, disproving hypothesis on association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk. DNA adducts were instead positively associated with occupational cumulative exposure to AAs (p = 0.028, whereas XRCC1 Arg 399 (p<0.006 was related with a decreased adduct levels, but with no impact on BC risk. Previous findings on increased BC risk by packyears (p<0.001, coffee (p<0.001, cumulative AAs exposure (p = 0.041 and MnSOD (p = 0.009 and a decreased risk by MPO (p<0.008 were also confirmed by SEM analysis. Our results for the first time make evident an association between occupational cumulative exposure to AAs with DNA adducts and BC risk, strengthening the central role of AAs in bladder carcinogenesis. However the lack of an association between PBL DNA adducts and BC risk advises that these snapshot measurements are not representative of relevant exposures. This would envisage new scenarios for biomarker discovery and new challenges such as repeated measurements at different

  1. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  2. Developing Software to “Track and Catch” Missed Follow-up of Abnormal Test Results in a Complex Sociotechnical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.; Murphy, D.; Laxmisan, A.; Sittig, D.; Reis, B.; Esquivel, A.; Singh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Abnormal test results do not always receive timely follow-up, even when providers are notified through electronic health record (EHR)-based alerts. High workload, alert fatigue, and other demands on attention disrupt a provider’s prospective memory for tasks required to initiate follow-up. Thus, EHR-based tracking and reminding functionalities are needed to improve follow-up. Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a decision-support software prototype enabling individual and system-wide tracking of abnormal test result alerts lacking follow-up, and to conduct formative evaluations, including usability testing. Methods We developed a working prototype software system, the Alert Watch And Response Engine (AWARE), to detect abnormal test result alerts lacking documented follow-up, and to present context-specific reminders to providers. Development and testing took place within the VA’s EHR and focused on four cancer-related abnormal test results. Design concepts emphasized mitigating the effects of high workload and alert fatigue while being minimally intrusive. We conducted a multifaceted formative evaluation of the software, addressing fit within the larger socio-technical system. Evaluations included usability testing with the prototype and interview questions about organizational and workflow factors. Participants included 23 physicians, 9 clinical information technology specialists, and 8 quality/safety managers. Results Evaluation results indicated that our software prototype fit within the technical environment and clinical workflow, and physicians were able to use it successfully. Quality/safety managers reported that the tool would be useful in future quality assurance activities to detect patients who lack documented follow-up. Additionally, we successfully installed the software on the local facility’s “test” EHR system, thus demonstrating technical compatibility. Conclusion To address the factors involved in missed

  3. Modeling of the radiative field in complex geometries using computerized graphical tools. Application to comfort characterization in environments equipped with important radiative sources; Modelisation du champ radiatif dans des geometries complexes a l`aide d`outils infographiques. Application a la caracterisation du confort dans les ambiances munies de sources radiatives importantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolescu, M; Sperandio, M; Allard, F [La Rochelle Universite, 17 - La Rochelle, LEPTAB (France)

    1997-12-31

    Bibliographic studies in the domain of radiant heat transfers in complex geometries demonstrate the impossibility of resolving such problems using classical analytical methods. The numerical analysis can theoretically be performed successfully but requires enormous computer means. The contribution of this study consists in using computerized graphical techniques to treat general problems of radiant heat transfers in complex geometries. This paper presents the model used, the calculation technique and the optimizations that allow to greatly reduce the computer memory required and the calculation time. The code developed uses evocative images for the synthetic presentation of results which facilitate the searcher`s and conceiver`s choices. Finally, an application to the characterization of thermal comfort in residential environments is developed to illustrate the potentialities of this method. (J.S.) 19 refs.

  4. Modeling of the radiative field in complex geometries using computerized graphical tools. Application to comfort characterization in environments equipped with important radiative sources; Modelisation du champ radiatif dans des geometries complexes a l`aide d`outils infographiques. Application a la caracterisation du confort dans les ambiances munies de sources radiatives importantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolescu, M.; Sperandio, M.; Allard, F. [La Rochelle Universite, 17 - La Rochelle, LEPTAB (France)

    1996-12-31

    Bibliographic studies in the domain of radiant heat transfers in complex geometries demonstrate the impossibility of resolving such problems using classical analytical methods. The numerical analysis can theoretically be performed successfully but requires enormous computer means. The contribution of this study consists in using computerized graphical techniques to treat general problems of radiant heat transfers in complex geometries. This paper presents the model used, the calculation technique and the optimizations that allow to greatly reduce the computer memory required and the calculation time. The code developed uses evocative images for the synthetic presentation of results which facilitate the searcher`s and conceiver`s choices. Finally, an application to the characterization of thermal comfort in residential environments is developed to illustrate the potentialities of this method. (J.S.) 19 refs.

  5. CyNC - towards a General Tool for Performance Analysis of Complex Distributed Real Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Jessen, Jan Jakob; Nielsen, Jens F. Dalsgaard

    2005-01-01

    The paper addresses the current state and the ongoing activities of a tool for performance analysis of complex real time systems. The tool named CyNC is based on network calculus allowing for the computation of backlogs and delays in a system from specified lower and upper bounds of external...... workflow and computational resources. The current version of the tool implements an extension to previous work in that it allows for general workflow and resource bounds and provides optimal solutions even to systems with cyclic dependencies. Despite the virtues of the current tool, improvements...... and extensions still remain, which are in focus of ongoing activities. Improvements include accounting for phase information to improve bounds, whereas the tool awaits extension to include flow control models, which both depend on the possibility of accounting for propagation delay. Since the current version...

  6. Complex Systems and Dependability

    CERN Document Server

    Zamojski, Wojciech; Sugier, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Typical contemporary complex system is a multifaceted amalgamation of technical, information, organization, software and human (users, administrators and management) resources. Complexity of such a system comes not only from its involved technical and organizational structure but mainly from complexity of information processes that must be implemented in the operational environment (data processing, monitoring, management, etc.). In such case traditional methods of reliability analysis focused mainly on technical level are usually insufficient in performance evaluation and more innovative meth

  7. How can we cope with the complexity of the environment? A "Learning by modelling" approach using qualitative reasoning for developing causal models and simulations with focus on Sustainable River Catchment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Michaela; Zitek, Andreas; Salles, Paulo; Bredeweg, Bert; Muhar, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    The education system needs strategies to attract future scientists and practitioners. There is an alarming decline in the number of students choosing science subjects. Reasons for this include the perceived complexity and the lack of effective cognitive tools that enable learners to acquire the expertise in a way that fits its qualitative nature. The DynaLearn project utilises a "Learning by modelling" approach to deliver an individualised and engaging cognitive tool for acquiring conceptual knowledge. The modelling approach is based on qualitative reasoning, a research area within artificial intelligence, and allows for capturing and simulating qualitative systems knowledge. Educational activities within the DynaLearn software address topics at different levels of complexity, depending on the educational goals and settings. DynaLearn uses virtual characters in the learning environment as agents for engaging and motivating the students during their modelling exercise. The DynaLearn software represents an interactive learning environment in which learners are in control of their learning activities. The software is able to coach them individually based on their current progress, their knowledge needs and learning goals. Within the project 70 expert models on different environmental issues covering seven core topics (Earth Systems and Resources, The Living World, Human population, Land and Water Use, Energy Resources and Consumption, Pollution, and Global Changes) will be delivered. In the context of the core topic "Land and Water Use" the Institute of Hydrobiology and Aquatic Ecosystem Management has developed a model on Sustainable River Catchment Management. River systems with their catchments have been tremendously altered due to human pressures with serious consequences for the ecological integrity of riverine landscapes. The operation of hydropower plants, the implementation of flood protection measures, the regulation of flow and sediment regime and intensive

  8. Obesogenic environments: complexities, perceptions, and objective measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lake, Amelia A; Townshend, Tim G; Alvanides, Seraphim

    2010-01-01

    .... In a world where obesity has now reached epidemic proportions, a thorough understanding of the underlying causes of the problem is essential if public health initiatives and government policies...

  9. CCIR for Complex and Uncertain Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spinuzzi, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    .... These purposes were all developed with conventional warfare in mind. Lessons learned from unconventional wars against insurgents or guerrillas were rarely applied to the concept of CCIR, and were systematically removed from doctrine when they did appear...

  10. Cognitive Agility Measurement in a Complex Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    validated by the corresponding psychological tests in the experiment. 15 Chapter 3 – Results 3.1. Result Summary from Thesis #1 (An...experiment using psychological tests and a military decision computer game called Make Goal to attempt to measure cognitive agility in military leaders...NPS thesis students. This document discusses the experimental design and the results from one of those theses. 14. SUBJECT TERMS cognitive agility

  11. Energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives and the proceedings are presented of the conference ''Energy and the environment'' held in Pardubice, Czechoslovakia, on 9-10 June, 1987. A total of 31 papers were presented; 4 papers were centred on nuclear power: an assessment of the impact of ionizing radiation from power generation on the health of the population and on the environment; an assessment of the impact of the nuclear power plant complex in the Jaslovske Bohunice locality on the environment; an assessment of the impact of the Vychodni Cechy (Eastern Bohemia) plant on the environment; and a paper on the ecological optimization of the landscape during the development of the uranium industry. (J.B.)

  12. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  13. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  14. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  15. Complexity science and leadership in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J P

    2001-10-01

    The emerging field of complexity science offers an alternative leadership strategy for the chaotic, complex healthcare environment. A survey revealed that healthcare leaders intuitively support principles of complexity science. Leadership that uses complexity principles offers opportunities in the chaotic healthcare environment to focus less on prediction and control and more on fostering relationships and creating conditions in which complex adaptive systems can evolve to produce creative outcomes.

  16. Coastal Modelling Environment version 1.0: a framework for integrating landform-specific component models in order to simulate decadal to centennial morphological changes on complex coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Payo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to model morphological changes on complex, multi-landform coasts over decadal to centennial timescales is essential for sustainable coastal management worldwide. One approach involves coupling of landform-specific simulation models (e.g. cliffs, beaches, dunes and estuaries that have been independently developed. An alternative, novel approach explored in this paper is to capture the essential characteristics of the landform-specific models using a common spatial representation within an appropriate software framework. This avoid the problems that result from the model-coupling approach due to between-model differences in the conceptualizations of geometries, volumes and locations of sediment. In the proposed framework, the Coastal Modelling Environment (CoastalME, change in coastal morphology is represented by means of dynamically linked raster and geometrical objects. A grid of raster cells provides the data structure for representing quasi-3-D spatial heterogeneity and sediment conservation. Other geometrical objects (lines, areas and volumes that are consistent with, and derived from, the raster structure represent a library of coastal elements (e.g. shoreline, beach profiles and estuary volumes as required by different landform-specific models. As a proof-of-concept, we illustrate the capabilities of an initial version of CoastalME by integrating a cliff–beach model and two wave propagation approaches. We verify that CoastalME can reproduce behaviours of the component landform-specific models. Additionally, the integration of these component models within the CoastalME framework reveals behaviours that emerge from the interaction of landforms, which have not previously been captured, such as the influence of the regional bathymetry on the local alongshore sediment-transport gradient and the effect on coastal change on an undefended coastal segment and on sediment bypassing of coastal structures.

  17. The combined use of micro-hydropyrolysis and compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) as a novel technique to identify coal-derived biodegraded PAH flux in the complex environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng-Gong Sun; Gbolagade Olalere; Wisdom Ivwurie; Mick Cooper; Colin Snape [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2007-07-01

    A novel analytical methodology combining CSIA and micro-hydropyrolysis (CSIA/micro-HyPy) has been developed to aid unambiguous source apportionment of PAHs in the complex environment where PAH matrices have been heavily biodegraded and/or their isotopic signatures are overlapping for some sources. Asphaltenes retain useful information of biogeochemical significance, which can be accessed via hydropyrolysis. The PAHs released from hydropyrolysis of asphaltenes, the bound PAHs, from different primary sources (e.g. crude oils, low and high temperature coal tars) were characterized and compared to free aromatics in regard to their molecular and 13C-isotopic profiles. It was found that hydropyrolysis of asphaltenes can generate molecular and isotopic profiles highly representative of their primary sources. For both low and high temperature coal tar, the bound aromatics have broadly similar molecular distributions to their free aromatic counterparts and have {sup 13}C-isotopic values almost identical to those of UK bituminous coals(-23{per_thousand}), indicating that the asphaltenes are actually released as representative fragments of coal structures during carbonization. As expected, the bound aromatics are more 13C-enriched by 1-3 {per_thousand} (-21 to -23{per_thousand}) compared to free aromatics (-24 to -26{per_thousand}). No significant isotopic difference was observed between free and bound aromatics for a North Sea crude oil, all having similar {sup 13}C-isotopic values (-27.2-30.2 {per_thousand}) that are significantly lighter than those for coal-derived aromatics. Applications of this novel methodological CSIA/micro-HyPy technique to samples previously examined from an area around a former carbonization plant have been successfully demonstrated where unambiguous source apportionment could not be achieved previously for the PAHs due to likely environmental alternation. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  19. Communication complexity and information complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratov, Denis

    Information complexity enables the use of information-theoretic tools in communication complexity theory. Prior to the results presented in this thesis, information complexity was mainly used for proving lower bounds and direct-sum theorems in the setting of communication complexity. We present three results that demonstrate new connections between information complexity and communication complexity. In the first contribution we thoroughly study the information complexity of the smallest nontrivial two-party function: the AND function. While computing the communication complexity of AND is trivial, computing its exact information complexity presents a major technical challenge. In overcoming this challenge, we reveal that information complexity gives rise to rich geometrical structures. Our analysis of information complexity relies on new analytic techniques and new characterizations of communication protocols. We also uncover a connection of information complexity to the theory of elliptic partial differential equations. Once we compute the exact information complexity of AND, we can compute exact communication complexity of several related functions on n-bit inputs with some additional technical work. Previous combinatorial and algebraic techniques could only prove bounds of the form theta( n). Interestingly, this level of precision is typical in the area of information theory, so our result demonstrates that this meta-property of precise bounds carries over to information complexity and in certain cases even to communication complexity. Our result does not only strengthen the lower bound on communication complexity of disjointness by making it more exact, but it also shows that information complexity provides the exact upper bound on communication complexity. In fact, this result is more general and applies to a whole class of communication problems. In the second contribution, we use self-reduction methods to prove strong lower bounds on the information

  20. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Representações sociais de ambientes sociais complexos através de desenhos e textos Representaciones sociales de ambientes sociales complejos a traves de dibujos y textos Social representations of complex social environments through drawings and texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson de Souza Filho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi observar representações de ambientes sociais complexos por meio de desenhos e textos. Adotamos a teoria de Moscovici, que supõe o fenômeno das representações sociais como manifestação de sociedades modernas e democráticas. Para contornar constrangimentos/desigualdades existentes, adotamos o desenho como forma de expressão. Solicitamos a estudantes de ensino médio, autodefinidos como negros, morenos e brancos, que desenhassem a sala de aula. O material foi analisado segundo temas manifestos. Houve diferenciação estatística quanto a objetos, perspectivas espaciais, professor, colegas e estudante. Notamos, entre negros com desempenho acadêmico alto, mais referências a colegas e conflito/negociação com professores.El objetivo de este trabajo fue observar representaciones de ambientes sociales complejos por medio de dibujos y textos. Adoptamos la teoría de Moscovici, que considera el fenómeno de las representaciones sociales como manifestación de sociedades modernas y democráticas. Para contornear las coacciones/desigualdades existentes, adoptamos el dibujo como forma de expresión. Solicitamos a estudiantes de secundaria, autodefinidos como negros, morenos y blancos, que dibujasen la clase. El material fue analizado según temas manifiestos. Hubo diferenciación estadística en cuanto a objetos, perspectivas espaciales, profesor, colegas y estudiante. Entre negros con alto rendimiento académico notamos más referencias a los colegas y conflicto / negociación con profesores.The objective of this work was to observe representations of complex social environments through drawings and texts. We adopted Moscovici's theory, which supposes that the social representations phenomenon is a modern and democratic societies' manifestation. To overcame existing constraints/unequalities, we adopted drawings as a means of expression. We asked secondary students, self-defined as African-Brazilians, Mixeds and

  2. Complexity-management in SME : organization of complex relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gregus, M.; Mandorf, S.

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of companies' environment IS growmg. Complexity management and restructuring of small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) become big challenges of business studies in the next future. A chance could be seen in the use of e-business strategies and the implementation of information

  3. Encapsulated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, Tom M.; Daanen, Hein A M; Cheung, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  4. Encapsulated Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, T.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Cheung, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  5. Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    A complex system consists of many interacting parts, generates new collective behavior through self organization, and adaptively evolves through time. Many theories have been developed to study complex systems, including chaos, fractals, cellular automata, self organization, stochastic processes, turbulence, and genetic algorithms.

  6. How to lead complex situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Pingel

    2013-01-01

    The military leader is experiencing increasingly more complex situations, whether it is as leader in a foreign combat environment or in the home-based public administration. Complex situations like these call for a special set of managerial responses and a special way of leading organisations...

  7. Qubits in a random environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhalwaya, I; Fannes, M; Petruccione, F

    2007-01-01

    Decoherence phenomena in a small quantum system coupled to a complex environment can be modelled with random matrices. We propose a simple deterministic model in the limit of a high dimensional environment. The model is investigated numerically and some analytically addressable questions are singled out

  8. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing.......This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dutch...

  9. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  10. Robotic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic architectural environments to be implemented and tested in the last decade in virtual and physical prototypes. These prototypes are incorporating sensing-actuating

  11. Performative Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bo Stjerne

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores how performative architecture can act as a collective environment localizing urban flows and establishing public domains through the integration of pervasive computing and animation techniques. The NoRA project introduces the concept of ‘performative environments,' focusing on ...... of local interactions and network behaviour, building becomes social infrastructure and prompts an understanding of architectural structures as quasiobjects, which can retain both variation and recognisability in changing social constellations.......The paper explores how performative architecture can act as a collective environment localizing urban flows and establishing public domains through the integration of pervasive computing and animation techniques. The NoRA project introduces the concept of ‘performative environments,' focusing...

  12. Softball Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jim

    1977-01-01

    The Parks and Recreation Department of Montgomery, Alabama, has developed a five-field softball complex as part of a growing community park with facilities for camping, golf, aquatics, tennis, and picnicking. (MJB)

  13. Lecithin Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Food Science and Engineering, Xinyang College of Agriculture and ... Results: The UV and IR spectra of the complex showed an additive effect of polydatin-lecithin, in which .... Monochromatic Cu Ka radiation (wavelength =.

  14. Three-dimensional-printed cardiac prototypes aid surgical decision-making and preoperative planning in selected cases of complex congenital heart diseases: Early experience and proof of concept in a resource-limited environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kappanayil

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: 3D-printed cardiac prototypes can radically assist decision-making, planning, and safe execution of complex congenital heart surgery by improving understanding of 3D anatomy and allowing anticipation of technical challenges.

  15. Physical Complexity and Cognitive Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Peter

    Our intuition tells us that there is a general trend in the evolution of nature, a trend towards greater complexity. However, there are several definitions of complexity and hence it is difficult to argue for or against the validity of this intuition. Christoph Adami has recently introduced a novel measure called physical complexity that assigns low complexity to both ordered and random systems and high complexity to those in between. Physical complexity measures the amount of information that an organism stores in its genome about the environment in which it evolves. The theory of physical complexity predicts that evolution increases the amount of `knowledge' an organism accumulates about its niche. It might be fruitful to generalize Adami's concept of complexity to the entire evolution (including the evolution of man). Physical complexity fits nicely into the philosophical framework of cognitive biology which considers biological evolution as a progressing process of accumulation of knowledge (as a gradual increase of epistemic complexity). According to this paradigm, evolution is a cognitive `ratchet' that pushes the organisms unidirectionally towards higher complexity. Dynamic environment continually creates problems to be solved. To survive in the environment means to solve the problem, and the solution is an embodied knowledge. Cognitive biology (as well as the theory of physical complexity) uses the concepts of information and entropy and views the evolution from both the information-theoretical and thermodynamical perspective. Concerning humans as conscious beings, it seems necessary to postulate an emergence of a new kind of knowledge - a self-aware and self-referential knowledge. Appearence of selfreflection in evolution indicates that the human brain reached a new qualitative level in the epistemic complexity.

  16. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  17. Tourism in Rural Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAI IELENICZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rural tourism is now determined by limited economic opportunities, poor infrastructure, low motivation to possible offers, lack of proper service guarantees. Nearly 500 Romanian villages are already tourist locations, with certain characteristics determined by a heritage item, or complex ones when multiple components lead to various activities. This paper includes a typology of tourist villages in Romania according to the types of practiced tourist activities, insisting on the use of a more comprehensive terminology: tourism in rural environment, participative and creative tourism in rural areas. Tourism becomes a system accepted in the rural environment as a real opportunity for economic development with multiple social consequences. By multiplying tourism potential to meet tourists’ demands, many villages will get tourism valences with various activities in this filed, including environment protection.

  18. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  19. Enacting Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Enacting Environments is an ethnography of the midst of the encounter between corporations, sustainable development and climate change. At this intersection 'environmental management' and 'carbon accounting' are put into practice. Purportedly, these practices green capitalism. Drawing on fieldwork...... of day-to-day practices of corporate environmental accountants and managers, Ingmar Lippert reconstructs their work as achieving to produce a reality of environment that is simultaneously stable and flexible enough for a particular corporate project: to stage the company, and in consequence capitalism......, as in control over its relations to an antecedent environment. Not confined to mere texts or meetings between shiny stakeholders co-governing the corporation – among them some of the world's biggest auditing firms, an environmental non-governmental organisation (NGO) and standards – control is found...

  20. Subgroup complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    This book is intended as an overview of a research area that combines geometries for groups (such as Tits buildings and generalizations), topological aspects of simplicial complexes from p-subgroups of a group (in the spirit of Brown, Quillen, and Webb), and combinatorics of partially ordered sets. The material is intended to serve as an advanced graduate-level text and partly as a general reference on the research area. The treatment offers optional tracks for the reader interested in buildings, geometries for sporadic simple groups, and G-equivariant equivalences and homology for subgroup complexes.

  1. Complex manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Morrow, James

    2006-01-01

    This book, a revision and organization of lectures given by Kodaira at Stanford University in 1965-66, is an excellent, well-written introduction to the study of abstract complex (analytic) manifolds-a subject that began in the late 1940's and early 1950's. It is largely self-contained, except for some standard results about elliptic partial differential equations, for which complete references are given. -D. C. Spencer, MathSciNet The book under review is the faithful reprint of the original edition of one of the most influential textbooks in modern complex analysis and geometry. The classic

  2. Environment-friendly building complex of the BBVA bank in Madrid, Spain. Sustainable and healthy indoor climate in a new office building; Spaans BBVA-cornplex milieuvriendelijk gebouwd. Duurzaam en gezond binnenklimaat nieuw hoofdkantoor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, G. [Swegon, Capelle aan den IJssel (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    In the design and construction of the new office building of the Spanish bank BBVA (Madrid) sustainability and environmental effects were important aspects. The office building complex will certified by the American company Leed Gold. The energy efficient installations are made possible by Eurovent-certified heat recovery units and comfort units. [Dutch] Bij de bouw van het nieuwe hoofdkantoor van de Spaanse bank BBVA in Madrid staan duurzaamheid en milieuvriendelijkheid hoog in het vaandel. Het complex zal na de oplevering worden gecertificeerd conform het Amerikaanse Leed Gold. De energiezuinige installatie wordt mede mogelijk gemaakt door Eurovent-gecertificeerde wtw-units en comfortunits.

  3. Cyclomatic Complexity: theme and variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Henderson-Sellers

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Focussing on the "McCabe family" of measures for the decision/logic structure of a program, leads to an evaluation of extensions to modularization, nesting and, potentially, to object-oriented program structures. A comparison of rated, operating and essential complexities of programs suggests two new metrics: "inessential complexity" as a measure of unstructuredness and "product complexity" as a potential objective measure of structural complexity. Finally, nesting and abstraction levels are considered, especially as to how metrics from the "McCabe family" might be applied in an object-oriented systems development environment.

  4. Ser humano idoso estomizado e ambientes de cuidado: reflexão sob a ótica da complexidade Ser humano anciano con estomia y entornos de cuidado: reflexión en la perspectiva de la complejidad Elderly human being with ostomy and environments of care: reflection on the perspective of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edaiane Joana Lima Barros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de discussão acerca da relação ser humano idoso estomizado e seus ambientes de cuidado sob o olhar da Complexidade de Edgar Morin. Um eixo sustenta a reflexão: ambientes de cuidado para o ser humano idoso com estomia. Nesse sentido, apresentam-se três tipos de ambiente que circundam o contexto de estomização do ser humano idoso: ambiente domiciliar, ambiente grupal e ambiente hospitalar. A reflexão traz como contribuição social um novo olhar acerca do redimensionamento do cuidado ao ser humano idoso estomizado em seu ambiente. Considera-se que o ambiente que abriga esse ser humano comporta uma diversidade de sentimentos, emoções, experiências, vincula múltiplos significados da relação do ambiente e o processo de cuidado a partir da Complexidade.Esta es una discusión sobre la relación entre los seres humanos ancianos con estomia y sus ambientes de cuidado, desde la perspectiva de la complejidad de Edgar Morin. Un eje sostiene la reflexión: los entornos de atención de los seres humanos ancianos con estomia. En este sentido, se presentan tres tipos de entorno que rodean el contexto de estomización de los seres humanos ancianos: ambiente familiar, ambiente de grupo y el entorno hospitalario. La reflexión tras, como una contribución social, una nueva mirada sobre el cuidado a los seres humanos ancianos estomizados en su entorno. Se considera que el entorno que hospeda este ser humano contiene una diversidad de sentimientos, emociones, experiencias, se une múltiples significados de la relación entre el ambiente y el proceso de atención de la Complejidad.This is discussion about the relationship between elderly human beings with ostomy and their environments care, under the perspective of Complexity Edgar Morin. An axis holds the reflection: environments of care for elderly humans with ostomy. In this sense, we present three types of environment that surround the context of elderly humans with ostomy: home environment

  5. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  6. African Environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental Studies and Regional Planning Bulletin African Environment is published in French and English, and for some issues, in Arabic. (only the issue below has been received by AJOL). Vol 10, No 3 (1999). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of ...

  7. Architecture & Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mary; Delahunt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most art teachers would agree that architecture is an important form of visual art, but they do not always include it in their curriculums. In this article, the authors share core ideas from "Architecture and Environment," a teaching resource that they developed out of a long-term interest in teaching architecture and their fascination with the…

  8. Complexing power of hydro-soluble degradation products from γ-irradiated polyvinylchloride. Influence on Eu(OH)_3(s) solubility and Eu(III) speciation in neutral to alkaline environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiller, Pascal E.; Badji, Hawa; Tabarant, Michel; Vercouter, Thomas; Fromentin, Elodie; Ferry, Muriel; Dannoux-Papin, Adeline

    2017-01-01

    The complexing power of hydrosoluble degradation products (HDPs) from an alkaline hydrolysis of a 10 MGy γ-irradiated polyvinylchloride is studied. The complexation of Eu(III), as an analogue of lanthanide and actinide radionuclides at their +III oxidation state for oxygen containing functions, is evidenced both from the increasing of Eu(OH)_3(s) dissolution, and from a complexometric titration by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The dissolution of Eu(OH)_3(s) in a simplified alkaline solution (0.3 M KOH/0.1 M NaOH) increases moderately, but significantly, with the HDPs concentration. The luminescence signal of the supernatant clearly indicates the presence of several complexed Eu(III) species. Performing a complexometric titration of Eu(III) from pH 6 by alkaline HDPs shows the formation of two different species with increasing HDPs' concentration and pH. Operational complexation constants - based on dissolved carbon concentration - are proposed. The analyses of the spectra and luminescence decays seem to confirm the presence of two different species.

  9. Complexing power of hydro-soluble degradation products from γ-irradiated polyvinylchloride. Influence on Eu(OH){sub 3}(s) solubility and Eu(III) speciation in neutral to alkaline environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiller, Pascal E.; Badji, Hawa; Tabarant, Michel; Vercouter, Thomas [CEA, Paris-Saclay Univ., Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d' Etudes Analytiques et de Reactivite des Surfaces (SEARS); Fromentin, Elodie; Ferry, Muriel [CEA, Paris-Saclay Univ., Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d' Etudes du Comportement des Radionucleides (SECR); Dannoux-Papin, Adeline [CEA, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). Service des Procedes de Decontamination et d' Enrobage

    2017-10-01

    The complexing power of hydrosoluble degradation products (HDPs) from an alkaline hydrolysis of a 10 MGy γ-irradiated polyvinylchloride is studied. The complexation of Eu(III), as an analogue of lanthanide and actinide radionuclides at their +III oxidation state for oxygen containing functions, is evidenced both from the increasing of Eu(OH){sub 3}(s) dissolution, and from a complexometric titration by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. The dissolution of Eu(OH){sub 3}(s) in a simplified alkaline solution (0.3 M KOH/0.1 M NaOH) increases moderately, but significantly, with the HDPs concentration. The luminescence signal of the supernatant clearly indicates the presence of several complexed Eu(III) species. Performing a complexometric titration of Eu(III) from pH 6 by alkaline HDPs shows the formation of two different species with increasing HDPs' concentration and pH. Operational complexation constants - based on dissolved carbon concentration - are proposed. The analyses of the spectra and luminescence decays seem to confirm the presence of two different species.

  10. Three-dimensional-printed cardiac prototypes aid surgical decision-making and preoperative planning in selected cases of complex congenital heart diseases: Early experience and proof of concept in a resource-limited environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappanayil, Mahesh; Koneti, Nageshwara Rao; Kannan, Rajesh R; Kottayil, Brijesh P; Kumar, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional. (3D) printing is an innovative manufacturing process that allows computer-assisted conversion of 3D imaging data into physical "printouts" Healthcare applications are currently in evolution. The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility and impact of using patient-specific 3D-printed cardiac prototypes derived from high-resolution medical imaging data (cardiac magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography [MRI/CT]) on surgical decision-making and preoperative planning in selected cases of complex congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Five patients with complex CHD with previously unresolved management decisions were chosen. These included two patients with complex double-outlet right ventricle, two patients with criss-cross atrioventricular connections, and one patient with congenitally corrected transposition of great arteries with pulmonary atresia. Cardiac MRI was done for all patients, cardiac CT for one; specific surgical challenges were identified. Volumetric data were used to generate patient-specific 3D models. All cases were reviewed along with their 3D models, and the impact on surgical decision-making and preoperative planning was assessed. Accurate life-sized 3D cardiac prototypes were successfully created for all patients. The models enabled radically improved 3D understanding of anatomy, identification of specific technical challenges, and precise surgical planning. Augmentation of existing clinical and imaging data by 3D prototypes allowed successful execution of complex surgeries for all five patients, in accordance with the preoperative planning. 3D-printed cardiac prototypes can radically assist decision-making, planning, and safe execution of complex congenital heart surgery by improving understanding of 3D anatomy and allowing anticipation of technical challenges.

  11. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  12. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, Mary Patricia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pKas and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pKa = 5.94, logβ120 = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pKa = 9.34, logβ120 = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is logβ120 = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of 242Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  13. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.P.

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK a s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK a = 5.94, logβ 120 = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK a = 9.34, logβ l20 = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is logβ 110 = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of 242 Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods

  14. Synthesis, chemistry and catalytic activity of complexes of lanthanide and actinide metals in unusual oxidation states and coordination environments. Progress report for period February 1, 1980-January 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.

    1980-10-01

    Investigations are being conducted on two classes of lanthanide compounds: metal vapor co-condensation reactions with unsaturated hydrocarbons and homoleptic and heteroleptic alkyl lanthanide complexes. Three models have been considered for the interaction of erbium atoms with 3-hexyne. The structure of the heteroleptic alkynide [(C 5 H 5 ) 2 ErC triple bond CCMe 3 ] 2 was studied. Some new organolanthanides have been prepared

  15. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  16. Governance in the marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Appleby, T.

    2015-01-01

    The governance of the UK Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies is complex, endlessly fascinating and often politically charged. There is no area where this complexity is more demonstrable than in the marine environment, where the issues of extended maritime boundaries granted under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, fishing and prospecting rights, marine conservation and competing sovereignty mean that the practical application of the law in this area is particularly d...

  17. State of the environment report of the Slovak Republic 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.

    2006-01-01

    The report on state of environment of the Slovak Republic in 2001 is presented. In this report the following parts are reviewed: Complex environmental monitoring and information system; Compositions of the environment and their protection; Main cumulative environmental problems; Nature protection and landscape management; Environmental regional classification of the environment and endangered regions; Reasons and consequences of the environment; Risk factors in the environment

  18. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  19. Fetal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinare, Arun

    2008-01-01

    The intrauterine environment has a strong influence on pregnancy outcome. The placenta and the umbilical cord together form the main supply line of the fetus. Amniotic fluid also serves important functions. These three main components decide whether there will be an uneventful pregnancy and the successful birth of a healthy baby. An insult to the intrauterine environment has an impact on the programming of the fetus, which can become evident in later life, mainly in the form of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and certain learning disabilities. The past two decades have witnessed major contributions from researchers in this field, who have included ultrasonologists, epidemiologists, neonatologists, and pediatricians. Besides being responsible for these delayed postnatal effects, abnormalities of the placenta, umbilical cord, and amniotic fluid also have associations with structural and chromosomal disorders. Population and race also influence pregnancy outcomes to some extent in certain situations. USG is the most sensitive imaging tool currently available for evaluation of these factors and can offer considerable information in this area. This article aims at reviewing the USG-related developments in this area and the anatomy, physiology, and various pathologies of the placenta, umbilical cord, and the amniotic fluid

  20. Environment and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirkner, H.; Kneller, P.

    1981-01-01

    FACIT is a periodical intended to provide the reader with a survey of outstanding publications on topical subjects. At the same time, it offers a first insight into the subject field, enabling the reader to select among the literature cited the publications he may need to enhance his knowledge and information. The periodical is aimed at serving as a guide to the complex variety of publications in a subject field, and to offer information in brief. Vol. 1, Environment and Energy, cites representative statements and samples from the German-language literature in this field and gives hints for further reading. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Simulating complex noise barrier reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerden, F.J.M. van der; Lutgendorf, D.; Roo, F. de

    2011-01-01

    Within the EU FP7 QUIESST project, QUIeting the Environment for a Sustainable Surface Transport, a test method is being developed for the reflectivity of noise barriers. The method needs to account for a complex shape of barriers and the use of various types of absorbing materials. The performance

  2. Learning To Live with Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosa, Marta

    Neither the design of information systems and networks nor the delivery of library services can claim true user centricity without an understanding of the multifaceted psychological environment of users and potential users. The complexity of the political process, social problems, challenges to scientific inquiry, entrepreneurship, and…

  3. A comparison of MCNP6-1.0 and GEANT 4-10.1 when evaluating the neutron output of a complex real world nuclear environment: The thermal neutron facility at the Tri Universities Meson facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monk, S.D., E-mail: s.monk@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Shippen, B.A. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Colling, B.R. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Cheneler, D.; Al Hamrashdi, H.; Alton, T. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of the use of MCNP6 and GEANT4 Monte Carlo software when large distances and thicknesses are considered. • The Thermal Neutron Facility (TNF) at TRIUMF used as an example real life example location. • The effects of water, aluminium, iron and lead considered over various thicknesses up to 3 m. - Abstract: A comparison of the Monte Carlo based simulation codes MCNP6-1.0 and GEANT4-10.1 as used for modelling large scale structures is presented here. The high-energy neutron field at the Tri Universities Meson Facility (TRIUMF) in Vancouver, British Columbia is the structure modelled in this work. Work with the emphasis on the modelling of the facility and comparing with experimental results has been published previously, whereas this work is focussed on comparing the performance of the codes over relatively high depths of material rather than the accuracy of the results themselves in comparison to experimental data. Comparisons of three different locations within the neutron facility are modelled and presented using both codes as well as analysis of the transport of typical neutrons fields through large blocks of iron, water, lead and aluminium in order to determine where any deviations are likely to have occurred. Results indicate that over short distances, results from the two codes are in broad agreement – although over greater distances and within more complex geometries, deviation increases dramatically. The conclusions reached are that it is likely the deviations between the codes is caused by both the compounding effect of slight differences between the cross section files used by the two codes to determine the neutron transport through iron, and differences in the processes used by both codes.

  4. Greening the built environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Maf; Whitelegg, John; Williams, Nick J.

    1998-07-15

    The built environment incorporates our homes, our workplaces and places of leisure. Under the influence of a complex web of social and economic processes, it is where many issues of human and environmental well-being come to a head - whether of space, mobility, energy consumption, pollution, health or security. All too often, concerns such as cost are put before the things we value for a fulfilling life, including peace and quiet and health and happiness. Getting the built environment right is fundamental to a sustainable society and requires an integrated approach. This important new book, published in association with the World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF-UK), provides us with a firm understanding of the interrelationships of many of the issues and problems of the built environment and describes the holistic models of development, management and planning necessary for urban sustainability. It draws attention to the major challenges and policy implications and offers analysis, approaches and vision for moving towards sustainable towns and cities that in turn will facilitate sustainable lifestyles. (Author)

  5. Spatial distribution of the Ocypode quadrata (Crustacea: Ocypodidae along estuarine environments in the Paranaguá Bay Complex, southern Brazil Distribuição espacial de Ocypode quadrata (Crustacea: Ocypodidae ao longo de ambientes estuarinos no sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo C. da Rosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the spatial distribution of the ghost crabs, Ocypode quadrata Fabricius, 1787, in thirteen estuarine sandy beaches located along two main axes of the Paranaguá Bay Estuarine Complex, southern Brazil. Burrow densities of ghost crabs were measured at three beach levels established around the high tide mark during the summer and winter of 2005. All beaches showed a steep beach face slope (2.6 to 8.3º with sediment composition varying from well sorted fine sand to very poorly sorted coarse sand towards the upper estuary. Water salinity ranged from around 31 at those beaches near the bay inlet, to 14 at beaches in the inner estuary. The burrow densities of O. quadrata in the estuarine beaches were similar to those observed in the oceanic beaches. However, the absence of burrows at the four innermost beaches suggests that low salinity and sediment penetrability may prevent ghost crabs from occurring in this region of the estuary. Burrow densities showed strong seasonal variability. The low densities observed during the winter are probably related to a delay crab activities due to low temperatures in the early morning during this season. The absence of a clear zonation pattern was related to estuarine beach morphology.O presente estudo avalia a distribuição espacial de Ocypode quadrata Fabricius, 1787 em treze praias estuarinas distribuídas ao longo dos dois principais eixos do complexo estuarino da Baia de Paranaguá, sul do Brasil. Em cada praia, a densidade de tocas do caranguejo em três níveis distribuídos em torno da marca da preamar foi estimada durante os períodos de verão e de inverno. Todas as praias apresentaram uma declividade bem acentuada (2,6 a 8,3º de inclinação e a composição do sedimento variando, em direção ao interior do estuário, de areia fina bem selecionada a areia grossa muito pobremente selecionada. A salinidade da água variou entre 31 (próximo à desembocadura da baía e 14 nas praias

  6. Family Environment and Cognitive Development: Twelve Analytic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walberg, Herbert J.; Marjoribanks, Kevin

    1976-01-01

    The review indicates that refined measures of the family environment and the use of complex statistical models increase the understanding of the relationships between socioeconomic status, sibling variables, family environment, and cognitive development. (RC)

  7. Sensorial Virtualization: Coupling Gaming and Virtual Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbaya, S.; Miraoui, C.; Wendrich, Robert E.; Lim, T.; Stanescu, I.A.; Hauge, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality and virtualization are currently used to design complex systems and demonstrate that they represent the functionalities of real systems. However, the design refinement of the virtual environment (VE) and distributed virtual environment (DVE) are still time consuming and costly, as it

  8. Creative Collaborative Exploration in Multiple Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overholt, Daniel; Turk, Matthew; Hollerer, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We seek to support creativity in science, engineering, and design applications by building infrastructure that offers new capabilities for creative collaborative exploration of complex data in a variety of non-traditional computing environments. We describe particular novel environments and devic...

  9. Performative Urban Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Thomsen, Bo Stjerne

    2008-01-01

    The chapter explores how temporary architectural structures can become media for bottom-up approaches to urban development. Urban interactions in the city developed from the sidewalks were seen as locally bounded neighbourhoods. However, with the advent of contemporary network technologies....... In investigating architectural media-constructions the paper draws on the notion of ‘Capsular Civilization'. Arguing that architectural capsules in the cities' in-between spaces may become the media and places of meaningful interaction by establishing a feedback loop guided by social interaction. Architecture thus......-organizing, communicative environments for an organized complexity between flows of local interactions and network behaviour. The chapter applies the concepts on the case of the Pavilion Project, NoRA, built for the 10th International Architecture Biennale in Venice for the network of Food College Denmark....

  10. The modern research environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    Information Technology, research environment, structured documents, networked information retrieval......Information Technology, research environment, structured documents, networked information retrieval...

  11. Microclimate risk evaluation in agroindustrial work environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monarca, D.; Porceddu, P.; Cecchini, M.; Babucci, V.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of workers' safety includes not only the prevention from accidents, as a result of improvements in the devices utilised, but also their welfare and comfort microclimate, i.e., the complex of parameters that affect the thermal exchange between workers and the surrounding environment is one of the main factors that affect the working environment. The paper describes the main risk assessment methodologies and the main actions to be taken for improving the working environment and workers' personal comfort [it

  12. Radar Methods in Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    and A. Nehorai, "A low-complexity multi-target tracking algorithm in urban environments using sparse modeling ,’’ Signal Processing, Vol. 92, pp. 2199...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0344 Radar Methods in Urban Environments Arye Nehorai WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY THE Final Report 10/26/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...of information   if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION . 1. REPORT DATE

  13. Complex Urban LiDAR Data Set

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Jinyong; Cho, Younggun; Shin, Young-Sik; Roh, Hyunchul; Kim, Ayoung

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data set that targets complex urban environments. Urban environments with high-rise buildings and congested traffic pose a significant challenge for many robotics applications. The presented data set is unique in the sense it is able to capture the genuine features of an urban environment (e.g. metropolitan areas, large building complexes and underground parking lots). Data of two-dimensional (2D) and threedimensional (3D) LiDAR, which...

  14. Plutonium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The first volume of the new series, Radioactivity in the Environment, focuses on the environmental occurrence, the speciation, the behaviour, the fate, the applications and the health consequences of that much-feared and much-publicised element, plutonium. Featuring a collection of selected, peer-reviewed, up-to-date papers by leading researchers in the field, this work provides a state-of-the-art description of plutonium in the environment. This title helps to explain where present frontiers are drawn in our continuing efforts to understand the science of environmental plutonium and will help to place widespread concerns into perspective. As a whole this new book series on environmental radioactivity addresses, at academic research level, the key aspects of this socially important and complex interdisciplinary subject. Presented objectively and with the ultimate authority gained from the many contributions by the world's leading experts, the negative and positive consequences of having a radioactive world around us will be documented and given perspective. refs

  15. CORPORATE COMMUNICATION CHALLENGES IN MULTICULTURAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrina Cristina VASILE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current economic environment where globalization is powerful and demographic changes complex and continuously changing, the cultural and structural dimensions inside and outside business are getting more intricate. Management and companies leaders search a more complex and valuable solution to increase shareholders satisfaction, to protect the environment and keep calm internal circumstances. The more complex the changes are, the higher the leaders challenges for setting the successful path to their organizations are and our aim in the current paper would be to present several solutions found through communication tools.

  16. Climate change, environment and development

    OpenAIRE

    Okereke, Chukwumerije; Massaquoi, Abu-Bakar S.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change, a quintessential environmental problem, is generally recognised as the most important development challenge in the 21st century (IPCC, 2014). In addition to acknowledging its many significant direct consequences, climate change is increasingly used to frame discussions on other important global challenges, such as health, energy and food security. This chapter provides understanding of the intricate and complex relationship between climate change, environment and development.

  17. Reducing the Cognitive Workload While Operating in Complex Sensory Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, Leon

    2004-01-01

    .... However, there are some problems and ambiguities at the level of sensory processing, and preprocessing of the signal, that cannot be resolved without taking into account cognitive level expectations...

  18. Homeland Security Organizations: Design Contingencies in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    intelligence agencies did not anticipate the adaptation of al-Qaeda from a central command structure to the current collection of regional franchises ...suspicious activities by terrorist groups throughout the summer, culminating in the December explosion at the Great Western Forum sports venue in...Great Western Forum sports arena in Inglewood, California. The target of the attack was an event organized to honor military personnel who had served

  19. Adopting the Transformational Leadership Perspective in a Complex Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Timothy N.; Pilgreen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Transformational Leadership is a popular topic among leadership scholars, but for research administrators, Transformational Leadership might seem like an enigmatic approach given its various contexts. Research administrators might think the transformational approach is only for executives, or that they do not have enough staff to call themselves…

  20. A Complex Adaptive Systems Approach to the Future Operational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-22

    interesting to use this viewpoint to study the growing need for resilience training in the prevention of suicides and other mental health issues...sometimes seem like a runner stumbling from the starting blocks, 291Bennis, The Temporary... resiliency provides a tool to navigate complicated problems to return robustly to a level of development we have already achieved. Both strength and

  1. Problem analysis of geotechnical well drilling in complex environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasenov, A K; Biletskiy, M T; Ratov, B T; Korotchenko, T V

    2015-01-01

    The article examines primary causes of problems occurring during the drilling of geotechnical wells (injection, production and monitoring wells) for in-situ leaching to extract uranium in South Kazakhstan. Such a drilling problem as hole caving which is basically caused by various chemical and physical factors (hydraulic, mechanical, etc.) has been thoroughly investigated. The analysis of packing causes has revealed that this problem usually occurs because of insufficient amount of drilling mud being associated with small cross section downward flow and relatively large cross section upward flow. This is explained by the fact that when spear bores are used to drill clay rocks, cutting size is usually rather big and there is a risk for clay particles to coagulate

  2. Cognition 2035: Surviving a Complex Environment Through Unprecedented Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-12

    challenge yet, competing with her generation’s elite in her fancy new law school. 14 … How does she explain what the enhanced kids are like...super goal” of philanthropy into the core logic of the artificial intelligence.48 Lower magnitude, non- existential threats to safety are more likely

  3. Reducing the Cognitive Workload While Operating in Complex Sensory Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, Leon

    2004-01-01

    .... The major goal of our research within this project was to construct a functioning recognition system, based upon fundamental principles of human perception and cognition that exhibits the following properties...

  4. Where Do I Start? Decision Making in Complex Novel Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    dozers, aerial support) Evacuations Other public safety rge (law, ncy t ) Housing developments Refusal to evacuate health, eme managemen The m... Operationally , this means stabilizing the incident to the point that standard operating procedures now apply consistently. This is done by...Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and

  5. Population Matters Policy Brief. Population and Environment. A Complex Relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    .... In many ways, this reflected good news for humanity: child mortality rates plummeted, life expectancy increased, and people were on average healthier and better nourished than at any time in history...

  6. Towards support for collaborative navigation in complex indoor environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwer, A.; Nack, F.; Evers, V.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present first results of an observation study on indoor navigation behaviour of visitors at a large public fair. As an outcome we present a number of requirements for mobile indoor navigation systems that support collaborative destination and path finding tasks.

  7. Tracking Activities in Complex Settings Using Smart Environment Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Geetika; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. A primary challenge that needs to be tackled to meet this need is the ability to recognize and track functional activities that people perform in their own homes and everyday settings. In this paper we look at approaches to perform real-time recognition of Activities of Daily Living. We enhance other related research efforts to develop approaches that are effective when activities are interrupted and interleaved. To evaluate the accuracy of our recognition algorithms we assess them using real data collected from participants performing activities in our on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  8. 21st Century Military Operations in a Complex Electromagnetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Natalie Crawford RAND Corporation RDML Jon P. Cryer, USN (ret) Northrop Grumman Mr. Stephen Cummings Raytheon Dr. Eric Evans MIT Lincoln...Heyer U.S. Navy Ms. Leslie Litton U.S. Army Dr. Charles Perkins National Reconnaissance Office Mr. Marvin Potts U.S. Air Force Dr. Stephen ...Neil Fox Virginia Tech Applied Research Corporation Ms. Hannah Freeman Strategic Analysis, Inc. Mr. Marcus Hawkins Strategic Analysis, Inc. Dr

  9. Interactive Acoustic Simulation in Urban and Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-21

    techniques based on ray tracing [83, 166, 88] or radiosity [159] have been developed for modeling diffuse reflections, but these energy- based formulations...method[7, 22], ray tracing[167, 149], frustum tracing[148], beam tracing[46, 32], sonal mapping[19, 38, 79], path tracing[136], and radiosity [160]. The...ray tracing[167, 149], frustum tracing[148], beam tracing[46, 32], sonal mapping[19, 38, 79], path tracing[136], and radiosity [160]. The ray models

  10. Multilevel use of coherence for complex radiosity environments

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaplana Pasto, Josep; Pueyo Sánchez, Xavier

    1993-01-01

    The performance of radiosity algorithm has been improved in the last years by means of using coherence when evaluating the visibility function for form factor computation. We present here a characterization of the uses of coherence for this goal. The characterization includes both, previously proposed techniques and unexplored ones. Afterwards we propose new uses of coherence for visibility computation in form factor determination and we discuss the results of its implementation.

  11. Organizational memory and forgetfulness generating vulnerabilities in complex environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Quinello

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relationship between organizational memory and forgetfulness in the generation of operational vulnerabilities, based on a case study carried out with a highly specialized technical team from a multinational company of the automotive sector. The article starts with the presentation of the complexitycontext of the Brazilian automotive sector in the last decades. It then goes on to discuss the theoretical referential on learning organizations, organizational memory and forgetfulness and organizations with high operational reliability characteristics. Finally, a case study is presented, carried out based on the theoretical concepts described in the body of the article, showing the contradictions and evidence of this relationship.

  12. Model for measuring complex performance in an aviation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to identify models of pilot performance through the attainment and analysis of concurrent verbal protocols. Sixteen models were identified. Novice and expert pilots differed with respect to the models they used. Models were correlated to performance, particularly in the case of expert subjects. Models were not correlated to performance shaping factors (i.e. workload). 3 refs., 1 tab

  13. Operational Risk Defined Through a Complex Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-26

    analysis . But the report noted that “CJTF-HOA’s presence in Africa offers benefits such as its ability to respond to contingencies, provide forces for...18 Analysis ...Development JOPP Joint Operations Planning Process NGO Non-Governmental Organization PRC Profitable Risk Control SWOT Strengths, Weaknesses

  14. Managing Complex Programs in a Post-LSI Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mockensturm, Jeffery J

    2008-01-01

    .... External forces played a major role in the evolution of these practices: A defense procurement holiday throughout the 1990s significantly reduced defense procurement spending and commensurate programs to manage...

  15. THE QUALITY IMPORTANCE IN A PROJECT MANAGEMENT COMPLEXITY ENVIRONMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian UNGUREANU; Anca VARGA

    2009-01-01

    A project is a temporary endeaver undertaken to creat a unique product, service or result. The temporary nature of project indicates a definite beginning and end. The end is reached when the project’s objectives have been achieved or when the project is terminated becouse its objectives will not or cannot be met, when the need for the project no longer exist. Temporary does not necessarily mean short in duration. Temporary does not generally apply to the product, service, or result created by...

  16. Striker Suitability Challenges in a Complex Threat Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-23

    áåÑçêãÉÇ=ÅÜ~åÖÉ=======- 163 - = = large number of wheel spindles developed fatigue cracks and had to be replaced early. Drive shafts are also failing... spindles developing fatigue cracks – drive shafts breaking – prescribed tire pressure is 80 PSI, however, with slat armor/sandbags – must maintain...drive shafts , differentials – Impairs off-road ops, larger footprint • Though not designed primarily for the urban fight (MOUT), Stryker is well-suited

  17. Miniature Brain Decision Making in Complex Visual Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyer, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    .... In particular, the grantee investigated the problem of face invariance to understand the role that experience with stimuli can play in permitting a brain to learn how to reliably recognize target...

  18. Socioeconomic impact assessment in a complex economic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petterson, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    This presentation was to have been given in coordination with several others which shared, as a common focus, the analysis of potential socioeconomic impacts of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at the Hanford Site, Washington. In December of 1987, Congress removed the Hanford Site from consideration as a repository location and, effectively and immediately, terminated the socioeconomic study. The immediate drawback to all of this is that this paper cannot be presented in the context created by the other papers as intended. This paper presents one important aspect of the difficulties associated with long-term socioeconomic impact projections at the Hanford Site, and has a narrower focus than otherwise would have been the case

  19. Battlespace Awareness: Heterogeneous Sensor Maps of Large Scale, Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-13

    intelligence , machine learning, mapping, autonomous vehicles, optimization 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS...M. Tanner, P. Piniés, L. M. Paz, and P. Newman. “DENSER Cities: A System for Dense Efficient Reconstructions of Cities”. In: ArXiv e- prints (Apr...Efficient Reconstructions of Cities”. In: ArXiv e- prints (Apr. 2016). arXiv: arXiv:1604.03734 [cs.CV]. [8] Michael Tanner et al. “Keep Geometry in

  20. ISS Local Environment Spectrometers (ISLES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Linda Habash; Gilchrist, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the complex interactions between the space environment surrounding the ISS and the ISS surface materials, we propose to use lowcost, high-TRL plasma sensors on the ISS robotic arm to probe the ISS space environment. During many years of ISS operation, we have been able to condut effective (but not perfect) extravehicular activities (both human and robotic) within the perturbed local ISS space environment. Because of the complexity of the interaction between the ISS and the LEO space environment, there remain important questions, such as differential charging at solar panel junctions (the so-called "triple point" between conductor, dielectric, and space plasma), increased chemical contamination due to ISS surface charging and/or thruster activation, water dumps, etc, and "bootstrap" charging of insulating surfaces. Some compelling questions could synergistically draw upon a common sensor suite, which also leverages previous and current MSFC investments. Specific questions address ISS surface charging, plasma contactor plume expansion in a magnetized drifting plasma, and possible localized contamination effects across the ISS.

  1. Complex Decision Making Theory and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan; Spector, J Michael

    2007-01-01

    The increasingly complex environment of today's world, characterized by technological innovation and global communication, generates myriads of possible and actual interactions while limited physical and intellectual resources severely impinge on decision makers, be it in the public or private domains. At the core of the decision-making process is the need for quality information that allows the decision maker to better assess the impact of decisions in terms of outcomes, nonlinear feedback processes and time delays on the performance of the complex system invoked. This volume is a timely review on the principles underlying complex decision making, the handling of uncertainties in dynamic envrionments and of the various modeling approaches used. The book consists of five parts, each composed of several chapters: I: Complex Decision Making: Concepts, Theories and Empirical Evidence II: Tools and Techniques for Decision Making in Complex Environments and Systems III: System Dynamics and Agent-Based Modeling IV:...

  2. An Action Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Brand, Mark; Iversen, Jørgen; Mosses, Peter David

    2004-01-01

    constructs underlying Core ML. The paper also describes the Action Environment, a new environment supporting use and validation of ASDF descriptions. The Action Environment has been implemented on top of the ASF+SDF Meta-Environment, exploiting recent advances in techniques for integration of different...... formalisms, and inheriting all the main features of the Meta-Environment....

  3. European Conference on Complex Systems 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkilionis, Markus; Nicolis, Gregoire

    2013-01-01

    The European Conference on Complex Systems, held under the patronage of the Complex Systems Society, is an annual event that has become the leading European conference devoted to complexity science. ECCS'12, its ninth edition, took place in Brussels, during the first week of September 2012. It gathered about 650 scholars representing a wide range of topics relating to complex systems research, with emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches. More specifically, the following tracks were covered:  1. Foundations of Complex Systems 2. Complexity, Information and Computation 3. Prediction, Policy and Planning, Environment 4. Biological Complexity 5. Interacting Populations, Collective Behavior 6. Social Systems, Economics and Finance This book contains a selection of the contributions presented at the conference and its satellite meetings. Its contents reflect the extent, diversity and richness of research areas in the field, both fundamental and applied.  

  4. State of the environment report of the Slovak Republic 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.

    2006-01-01

    The report on state of environment of the Slovak Republic in 2002 is presented. In this report the following parts are reviewed: Complex environmental monitoring and information system; Compositions of the environment and their protection; Main cumulative environmental problems; Nature protection and landscape management; Environmental regional classification of the environment and endangered regions; Reasons and consequences of the environment; Risk factors in the environment; Environmental care; International cooperation

  5. Environment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Argonne National Laboratory Toggle Navigation Toggle Search Energy Environment Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us Environment Atmospheric and Climate Science Ecological

  6. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  7. Complex Systems: An Introduction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 9. Complex Systems: An Introduction - Anthropic Principle, Terrestrial Complexity, Complex Materials. V K Wadhawan. General Article Volume 14 Issue 9 September 2009 pp 894-906 ...

  8. Childhood temperament: passive gene-environment correlation, gene-environment interaction, and the hidden importance of the family environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Kao, Karen; Swann, Gregory; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2013-02-01

    Biological parents pass on genotypes to their children, as well as provide home environments that correlate with their genotypes; thus, the association between the home environment and children's temperament can be genetically (i.e., passive gene-environment correlation) or environmentally mediated. Furthermore, family environments may suppress or facilitate the heritability of children's temperament (i.e., gene-environment interaction). The sample comprised 807 twin pairs (mean age = 7.93 years) from the longitudinal Wisconsin Twin Project. Important passive gene-environment correlations emerged, such that home environments were less chaotic for children with high effortful control, and this association was genetically mediated. Children with high extraversion/surgency experienced more chaotic home environments, and this correlation was also genetically mediated. In addition, heritability of children's temperament was moderated by home environments, such that effortful control and extraversion/surgency were more heritable in chaotic homes, and negative affectivity was more heritable under crowded or unsafe home conditions. Modeling multiple types of gene-environment interplay uncovered the complex role of genetic factors and the hidden importance of the family environment for children's temperament and development more generally.

  9. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  10. Fluid leadership: inviting diverse inputs to address complex problems

    OpenAIRE

    Moir, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited History is replete with examples of misapplied leadership strategies. When singular methods are used to solve multifaceted problems, negative results are often the consequence. Complex issues in a complex environment require complex perspectives; the homeland security enterprise (HSE) needs leaders who can adapt their leadership styles according to emerging environments. Furthermore, the diverse agencies within the HSE must work togeth...

  11. International environment, enterprise environment and energy environment giving different look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Shunsuke

    1987-04-01

    0he international environment, enterprise environment and energy environment surrounding Japan are changing their looks. In such situation, what Japan should do for the development of the world was discussed. Internationally, in the Western Pacific economical block including Japan and Asian NICs, Japan promotes the international exchange of materials, capital, technology, information and people, and creates various international public properties. Enterprisers should have global mind, and cope with the internationalization, technical innovation and information orientation which are in progress at present through international exchange, interindustrial exchange, industry-university-government exchange and so on. In the aspect of energy environment, Japan carries out the technical development of energy conservation, energy, creation and the exploration of energy resources, in this way, contributes to the stabilization of energy in the world. (3 figs, 1 tab)

  12. An operating environment for control systems on transputer networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillema, H.G.; Schoute, Albert L.; Wijbrans, K.C.J.; Wijbrans, K.C.J.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes an operating environment for control systems. The environment contains the basic layers of a distributed operating system. The design of this operating environment is based on the requirements demanded by controllers which can be found in complex control systems. Due to the

  13. Pesticides and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ; Environment Human Health Animal Health Safe Use Practices Food Safety Environment Air Water Soil Wildlife Home Page Pesticides and the Environment Related Topics: What Happens to Pesticides Released into the Environment? Pesticide Storage Pesticide Disposal Pesticide Products Integrated Pest Management (IPM) How Safe

  14. Global Environment Facility |

    Science.gov (United States)

    environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Ringtail lemur mom with two of paradise Nations rally to protect global environment Countries pledge US$4.1 billion to the Global Environment Facility Stockholm, Sweden birds-eye view Events GEF-7 Replenishment Trung Truong Son Landscapes

  15. Product development projects dynamics and emergent complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Schlick, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This book primarily explores two topics: the representation of simultaneous, cooperative work processes in product development projects with the help of statistical models, and the assessment of their emergent complexity using a metric from theoretical physics (Effective Measure Complexity, EMC). It is intended to promote more effective management of development projects by shifting the focus from the structural complexity of the product being developed to the dynamic complexity of the development processes involved. The book is divided into four main parts, the first of which provides an introduction to vector autoregression models, periodic vector autoregression models and linear dynamical systems for modeling cooperative work in product development projects. The second part presents theoretical approaches for assessing complexity in the product development environment, while the third highlights and explains closed-form solutions for the complexity metric EMC for vector autoregression models and linear dyn...

  16. 40 CFR 725.1075 - Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burkholderia cepacia complex. 725.1075... Specific Microorganisms § 725.1075 Burkholderia cepacia complex. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganisms identified as the Burkholderia cepacia complex defined as...

  17. Reduction of Subjective and Objective System Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    in finding the optimal or 'best balance' of the system functions and interrelationships. This is achievable following von Bertalanffy's approach of describing systems as a set of equations representing both the system functions and the system interrelationships. Reduction is found based on an objective function defining the system output given variations in the system inputs and the system operating environment. By minimizing the objective function with respect to these inputs and environments, a reduced system can be found. Thus, a reduction of the system complexity is feasible.

  18. Report on state of the environment of the Slovak Republic 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2002-01-01

    The report on state of environment of the Slovak Republic in 2001 is presented. In this report the following parts are reviewed: Complex environmental monitoring and information system; Compositions of the environment and their protection; Main cumulative environmental problems; Nature protection and landscape management; Environmental regional classification of the environment and endangered regions; Reasons and consequences of the environment; Risk factors in the environment

  19. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  20. Leptogenesis in Complex Hybrid Inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Prieto, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    We study the transference of an initial leptonic charge contained in a complex scalar field (waterfall field) at the end of the inflation to the leptons of the standard model and then convert this leptonic charge in baryonic charge by sphaleron process. The proposal is that this is done trough the decay of the complex scalar field particles into the the right-handed neutrino which in turn decays into the left-handed lepton doublet and the Higgs field of the standard model. It must be analyzed in what environment the transference is done. We propose that the inflaton (the dominant energy density of the universe) decay into ultrarelativistic fermions before the waterfall field particles decay in the right handed-neutrino, leaving a thermalized bath where the transference of the leptonic asymmetry can be achieved.

  1. Complex-Valued Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, Akira

    2012-01-01

    This book is the second enlarged and revised edition of the first successful monograph on complex-valued neural networks (CVNNs) published in 2006, which lends itself to graduate and undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, informatics, control engineering, mechanics, robotics, bioengineering, and other relevant fields. In the second edition the recent trends in CVNNs research are included, resulting in e.g. almost a doubled number of references. The parametron invented in 1954 is also referred to with discussion on analogy and disparity. Also various additional arguments on the advantages of the complex-valued neural networks enhancing the difference to real-valued neural networks are given in various sections. The book is useful for those beginning their studies, for instance, in adaptive signal processing for highly functional sensing and imaging, control in unknown and changing environment, robotics inspired by human neural systems, and brain-like information processing, as well as interdisciplina...

  2. Computational models of complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dabbaghian, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Computational and mathematical models provide us with the opportunities to investigate the complexities of real world problems. They allow us to apply our best analytical methods to define problems in a clearly mathematical manner and exhaustively test our solutions before committing expensive resources. This is made possible by assuming parameter(s) in a bounded environment, allowing for controllable experimentation, not always possible in live scenarios. For example, simulation of computational models allows the testing of theories in a manner that is both fundamentally deductive and experimental in nature. The main ingredients for such research ideas come from multiple disciplines and the importance of interdisciplinary research is well recognized by the scientific community. This book provides a window to the novel endeavours of the research communities to present their works by highlighting the value of computational modelling as a research tool when investigating complex systems. We hope that the reader...

  3. Ubiquitous Computing, Complexity and Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    environments, experience time, and develop identities individually and socially. Interviews with working media artists lend further perspectives on these cultural transformations. Drawing on cultural theory, new media art studies, human-computer interaction theory, and software studies, this cutting-edge book......The ubiquitous nature of mobile and pervasive computing has begun to reshape and complicate our notions of space, time, and identity. In this collection, over thirty internationally recognized contributors reflect on ubiquitous computing’s implications for the ways in which we interact with our...... critically unpacks the complex ubiquity-effects confronting us every day....

  4. Transuranium nuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Projected development of nuclear power up to the year 2000 entails a substantial increase in the number of nuclear power reactors, of irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and of various other supporting facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. In this period, transuranium elements, especially plutonium, will be produced in substantial quantities as by-products of the fission process and for use as fuel in present and future nuclear power reactors; these elements will have other peaceful applications as well. Growing world-wide interest and a natural desire to protect man and his environment have led to increasing concern in public, scientific and governmental sectors about the, release of such radionuclides into the environment. Although releases of transuranium nuclides from existing nuclear facilities can be controlled to very low levels, it is essential, in view of their long half-lives and high relative radiotoxicities, that their fate in the environment be understood well enough to permit associated potential impacts to be assessed and hence effective control to be provided. Extensive studies for many years have investigated the distribution and behaviour of these elements and potential detriments resulting from their release to the environment. More recently, scientists have begun to make projections for evaluating the degree of control necessary if such materials are to enter the complex chain of commercial activities associated with nuclear power production

  5. Complex and symplectic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Medori, Costantino; Tomassini, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    This book arises from the INdAM Meeting "Complex and Symplectic Geometry", which was held in Cortona in June 2016. Several leading specialists, including young researchers, in the field of complex and symplectic geometry, present the state of the art of their research on topics such as the cohomology of complex manifolds; analytic techniques in Kähler and non-Kähler geometry; almost-complex and symplectic structures; special structures on complex manifolds; and deformations of complex objects. The work is intended for researchers in these areas.

  6. Build and Execute Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-21

    At exascale, the challenge becomes to develop applications that run at scale and use exascale platforms reliably, efficiently, and flexibly. Workflows become much more complex because they must seamlessly integrate simulation and data analytics. They must include down-sampling, post-processing, feature extraction, and visualization. Power and data transfer limitations require these analysis tasks to be run in-situ or in-transit. We expect successful workflows will comprise multiple linked simulations along with tens of analysis routines. Users will have limited development time at scale and, therefore, must have rich tools to develop, debug, test, and deploy applications. At this scale, successful workflows will compose linked computations from an assortment of reliable, well-defined computation elements, ones that can come and go as required, based on the needs of the workflow over time. We propose a novel framework that utilizes both virtual machines (VMs) and software containers to create a workflow system that establishes a uniform build and execution environment (BEE) beyond the capabilities of current systems. In this environment, applications will run reliably and repeatably across heterogeneous hardware and software. Containers, both commercial (Docker and Rocket) and open-source (LXC and LXD), define a runtime that isolates all software dependencies from the machine operating system. Workflows may contain multiple containers that run different operating systems, different software, and even different versions of the same software. We will run containers in open-source virtual machines (KVM) and emulators (QEMU) so that workflows run on any machine entirely in user-space. On this platform of containers and virtual machines, we will deliver workflow software that provides services, including repeatable execution, provenance, checkpointing, and future proofing. We will capture provenance about how containers were launched and how they interact to annotate

  7. Towards a Reactive Semantic Execution Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komazec, Srdjan; Facca, Federico Michele

    Managing complex and distributed software systems built on top of the service-oriented paradigm has never been more challenging. While Semantic Web Service technologies offer a promising set of languages and tools as a foundation to resolve the heterogeneity and scalability issues, they are still failing to provide an autonomic execution environment. In this paper we present an approach based on Semantic Web Services to enable the monitoring and self-management of a Semantic Execution Environment (SEE), a brokerage system for Semantic Web Services. Our approach is founded on the event-triggered reactivity paradigm in order to facilitate environment control, thus contributing to its autonomicity, robustness and flexibility.

  8. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Environment, Trade, and Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environment, trade, and investment are fundamentally linked as the environment provides many basic inputs of economic activity – forests, fisheries, metals, minerals – as well as the energy used to process those materials.

  10. Molds in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Molds in the Environment What are molds? What are some of the ... molds found? Molds are found in virtually every environment and can be detected, both indoors and outdoors, ...

  11. BISEN: Biochemical simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanlier, J.; Wu, F.; Qi, F.; Vinnakota, K.C.; Han, Y.; Dash, R.K.; Yang, F.; Beard, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Biochemical Simulation Environment (BISEN) is a suite of tools for generating equations and associated computer programs for simulating biochemical systems in the MATLAB® computing environment. This is the first package that can generate appropriate systems of differential equations for

  12. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  13. Photocytotoxic lanthanide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Among many applications of lanthanides, gadolinium complexes are used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents in clinical radiology and luminescent lanthanides for bioanalysis, imaging and sensing. The chemistry of photoactive lanthanide complexes showing biological applications is of recent origin.

  14. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  15. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  16. ComplexRec 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    a single step in the user's more complex background need. These background needs can often place a variety of constraints on which recommendations are interesting to the user and when they are appropriate. However, relatively little research has been done on these complex recommendation scenarios....... The ComplexRec 2017 workshop addressed this by providing an interactive venue for discussing approaches to recommendation in complex scenarios that have no simple one-size-fits-all-solution....

  17. Radioiodine in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauby, A.; Saas, A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed in order to follow the pathways of radioiodine, 129 I especially, through the various compartments of nuclear plant environment: atmosphere, soil, plants, precipitations, ... A partial evaluation of the results is made. Data are supplied on iodine transfer into soil, iodine distribution one year later, release of iodine at the level of soil and plants. The intake of various forms of iodine in a soil and the evaluation of availability to plants by chemical tests showed that radioactive iodine ( 125 I) reached equilibrium with stable iodine after 120 - 140 days of incubation. During this time, there was a large amount of iodine exchangeable against a KI solution N/10. Equilibrium was reached progressively by iodine transfer on soil organic molecules. According to the origin of contamination, the transfer was more or less fast and differences were especially noticed in volatile iodine release and on chemical mobility. During intake, potential hazard of soil, groundwater, plant and atmospheric contaminations was greater. Iodine-129 is presently one of the chief contributors to air pollution around nuclear installations because of its radioactive half-life (1.72 x 10 7 yr) rather than on account of the amounts released. Just as with iodine-131, it is released into the atmosphere under many chemical forms. However, 129 I reaches man through several food chains and not only through the air-grass-cow-milk food chain. The values of its deposition rate on soil and plants are fairly dispersed because of its changing reactivity due to its chemical instability. On account of this chemical complexity, the transfer of iodine along the air-soil-plant system was studied using 125 I. (author)

  18. Hacking the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne Bank; Thomsen, Stine Legarth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. METHODS: We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon...

  19. The PSIM environment architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossenaerts, J.B.M.; Reyneri, C.; van den Berg, R.J.; Eijnatten, van F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. This chapter describes the architecture of the PSIM environment. It briefly presents the PSIM objectives and the role the PSIM environment plays in meeting these objectives. It then states the role and place of each of technological components of the environment: the ontology, the

  20. Computing environment logbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  1. The complexity paradigm in management reconceptualizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Slavica P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaos and complexity theory is a special, functionalist systems approach to dealing with complex, dynamic, nonlinear systems. Through treating organizations as complex, with their environments coevolving, nonlinear systems, complexity theory is aimed at creative research of their erratic nature. When an organization is in a state of bounded instability, at the edge of chaos, order and disorder are intertwined, its behavior is irregular and unpredictable but has some pattern. According to the complexity paradigm organizations have to strive to avoid the equilibrium states of stability and instability. They have instead to strive to remain in a state of bounded instability, at the edge of chaos, where they are able to display their full potential for creativity and innovation.

  2. Uranium nucleophilic carbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourneux, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The only stable f-metal carbene complexes (excluding NHC) metals f present R 2 C 2- groups having one or two phosphorus atoms in the central carbon in alpha position. The objective of this work was to develop the chemistry of carbenes for uranium (metal 5f) with the di-anion C{Ph 2 P(=S)} 2 2- (SCS 2- ) to extend the organometallic chemistry of this element in its various oxidation states (+3-+6), and to reveal the influence of the 5f orbitals on the nature and reactivity of the double bond C=U. We first isolated the reactants M(SCHS) (M = Li and K) and demonstrated the role of the cation M + on the evolution of the di-anion M 2 SCS (M = Li, K, Tl) which is transformed into LiSCHS in THF or into product of intramolecular cyclization K 2 [C(PhPS) 2 (C 6 H 4 )]. We have developed the necessary conditions mono-, bis- and tris-carbene directly from the di-anion SCS 2- and UCl 4 , as the precursor used in uranium chemistry. The protonolysis reactions of amides compounds (U-NEt 2 ) by the neutral ligand SCH 2 S were also studied. The compounds [Li(THF)] 2 [U(SCS)Cl 3 ] and [U(SCS)Cl 2 (THF) 2 ] were then used to prepare a variety of cyclopentadienyl and mono-cyclo-octa-tetra-enyliques uranium(IV) carbene compounds of the DFT analysis of compounds [M(SCS)Cl 2 (py) 2 ] and [M(Cp) 2 (SCS)] (M = U, Zr) reveals the strong polarization of the M=C double bond, provides information on the nature of the σ and π interactions in this binding, and shows the important role of f orbitals. The influence of ancillary ligands on the M=C bond is revealed by examining the effects of replacing Cl - ligands and pyridine by C 5 H 5 - groups. Mulliken and NBO analyzes show that U=C bond, unlike the Zr=C bond, is not affected by the change in environment of the metal center. While the oxidation tests of carbene complexes of U(IV) were disappointing, the first carbene complex of uranium (VI), [UO 2 (SCS)(THF) 2 ], was isolated with the uranyl ion UO 2 2+ . The reactions of compounds UO 2 X 2

  3. Managing the complexity of collective architectural designing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebastian, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the complexity of architectural designing whereby multiple designer work in close collaboration to conceive the design of an integrated building project at urban context. collaborative design conception has only recently been observed as a phenomenon of the built environment

  4. Integrated pollution control for oil refinery complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiperstok, A. [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil); Sharratt, P.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology

    1993-12-31

    Improving environmental performance of oil refineries is a complex task. Emission limits, operating constraints, available technologies, operating techniques, and local environment sensitivity must all be considered. This work describes efforts to build an interactive software to deal with this problem. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Joining Distributed Complex Objects: Definition and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.B.; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Blanken, Henk

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a non-standard distributed database system is strongly ifluenced by complex objects. The effective exploitation of parallelism in querying them and a suitable structure to store them are required in order to obtain acceptable response times in these database environments where

  6. Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

  7. Integrated pollution control for oil refinery complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiperstok, A [Bahia Univ., Salvador, BA (Brazil); Sharratt, P N [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology

    1994-12-31

    Improving environmental performance of oil refineries is a complex task. Emission limits, operating constraints, available technologies, operating techniques, and local environment sensitivity must all be considered. This work describes efforts to build an interactive software to deal with this problem. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Obesity: lessons from evolution and the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, B L; Westerterp, K R; Loos, R J F

    2012-01-01

    The 9th Stock Conference acknowledged the complex background of genetic, cultural, environmental and evolutionary factors of obesity. Gene-environment interactions underlie the flexibility in body-weight and body-fat regulation, illustrated by the hunter-gatherers' feast and famine lifestyle, the...

  9. Health and the environment: Examining some interconnections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, G.; Castelino, J.; Parr, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    In various ways, the IAEA is working with national and international agencies to broaden scientific understanding of the interconnections between the environment and human health. Often nuclear and related technologies are applied in the search for answers to complex and puzzling questions. This article highlights some of that work, illustrating the dimensions of both the problems and the potential solutions

  10. Texture mapping in a distributed environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolae, Goga; Racovita, Zoea; Telea, Alexandru

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a tool for texture mapping in a distributed environment. A parallelization method based on the master-slave model is described. The purpose of this work is to lower the image generation time in the complex 3D scenes synthesis process. The experimental results concerning the

  11. Problem solving environment for distributed interactive applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rycerz, K.; Bubak, M.; Sloot, P.; Getov, V.; Gorlatch, S.; Bubak, M.; Priol, T.

    2008-01-01

    Interactive Problem Solving Environments (PSEs) offer an integrated approach for constructing and running complex systems, such as distributed simulation systems. To achieve efficient execution of High Level Architecture (HLA)-based distributed interactive simulations on the Grid, we introduce a PSE

  12. Fluid Mechanics of Urban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra J.

    2008-11-01

    The rapid urbanization of the Earth has led to highly populated cities that act as concentrated centers of anthropogenic stressors on the natural environment. The degradation of environmental quality due to such stressors, in turn, greatly impacts human behavior. Anthropogenic stressors largely originate as a result of coupling between man-made urban elements (i.e., networks of engineering and socio-economic infrastructures) and the environment, for which surrounding fluid motions play a key role. In recent years, research efforts have been directed at the understanding and modeling of fluid motions in urban areas, infrastructure dynamics and interactions thereof, with the hope of identifying environmental impacts of urbanization and complex outcomes (or ``emergent properties'') of nominally simple interactions between infrastructures and environment. Such consequences play an important role in determining the ``resilience'' of cities under anthropogenic stressors, defined as maintaining the structure and essential functions of an urbanity without regime shifts. Holistic integrated models that meld the dynamics of infrastructures and environment as well as ``quality of life'' attributes are becoming powerful decision-making tools with regard to sustainability of urban areas (continuance or even enhancement of socio-economic activities in harmony with the environment). The rudimentary forms of integrated models are beginning to take shape, augmented by comprehensive field studies and advanced measurement platforms to validate them. This presentation deals with the challenges of modeling urban atmosphere, subject to anthropogenic forcing. An important emergent property, the Urban Heat Island, and its role in determining resilience and sustainability of cities will be discussed based on the prediction of a coupled model.

  13. Complex Correspondence Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Meisinger, Peter N.; Hook, Daniel W.; Wang Qinghai

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and classical mechanics are distinctly different theories, but the correspondence principle states that quantum particles behave classically in the limit of high quantum number. In recent years much research has been done on extending both quantum and classical mechanics into the complex domain. These complex extensions continue to exhibit a correspondence, and this correspondence becomes more pronounced in the complex domain. The association between complex quantum mechanics and complex classical mechanics is subtle and demonstrating this relationship requires the use of asymptotics beyond all orders.

  14. Uranium thiolate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverd, Pascal C.

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a new approach to the chemistry of uranium thiolate complexes as these compounds are very promising for various uses (in bio-inorganic chemistry, in some industrial processes like oil desulphurization). It more particularly addresses the U-S bond or more generally bonds between polarizable materials and hard metals. The author thus reports the study of uranium organometallic thiolates (tricyclo-penta-dienic and mono-cyclo-octa-tetraenylic complexes), and of uranium homoleptic thiolates (tetra-thiolate complexes, hexa-thiolate complexes, reactivity of homoleptic thiolate complexes) [fr

  15. RIPE [robot independent programming environment]: A robot independent programming environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.J.; Lennox, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Remote manual operations in radiation environments are typically performed very slowly. Sensor-based computer-controlled robots hold great promise for increasing the speed and safety of remote operations; however, the programming of robotic systems has proven to be expensive and difficult. Generalized approaches to robot programming that reuse available software modules and employ programming languages which are independent of the specific robotic and sensory devices being used are needed to speed software development and increase overall system reliability. This paper discusses the robot independent programming environment (RIPE) developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The RIPE is an object-oriented approach to robot system architectures; it is a software environment that facilitates rapid design and implementation of complex robot systems for diverse applications. An architecture based on hierarchies of distributed multiprocessors provides the computing platform for a layered programming structure that models applications using software objects. These objects are designed to support model-based automated programming of robotic and machining devices, real-time sensor-based control, error handling, and robust communication

  16. Environment-quality demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfini, M.G.; Leenhouts, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    In the framework of the Environment Quality Requirements (MKE) project a model has been designed in which environment-quality demands have been defined and quantified, and a measuring strategy has been developed. In the model it is required for the quality of the environment that the radionuclide concentration in the various environment compartiments remains limited in order to keep the effective dose equivalence for the 'reference man' under a certain reference level. In order to be able to determine the maximum nuclide concentration it is necessary to quantify the relation between the concentration in the environment and the dose for the people. The quantitative relation between concentration and dose has been established on the base of parameters (Derived Activity Limits (DAL's) which have to be calculated for each environment compartiment, each nuclide and each exposure pathway. This model has been described and, as example, the DAL's have been calculated for the compartiment air (for which the two exposure pathways inhalation and direct radiation were considered). For the other environment compartiments a similar elaboration is needed. The feasibility of application of the MKE-model in the actual practice of measurements in the environment and examination of dose for the population depends upon the possibility for performing nuclide specific measurements in all environment compartiments, the level of the dose resulting from the contamination of the environment and the related accurateness of the measurements

  17. Encoding of coordination complexes with XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth, P; Sankar, P

    2017-09-01

    An in-silico system to encode structure, bonding and properties of coordination complexes is developed. The encoding is achieved through a semantic XML markup frame. Composition of the coordination complexes is captured in terms of central atom and ligands. Structural information of central atom is detailed in terms of electron status of valence electron orbitals. The ligands are encoded with specific reference to the electron environment of ligand centre atoms. Behaviour of ligands to form low or high spin complexes is accomplished by assigning a Ligand Centre Value to every ligand based on the electronic environment of ligand centre atom. Chemical ontologies are used for categorization purpose and to control different hybridization schemes. Complexes formed by the central atoms of transition metal, non-transition elements belonging to s-block, p-block and f-block are encoded with a generic encoding platform. Complexes of homoleptic, heteroleptic and bridged types are also covered by this encoding system. Utility of the encoded system to predict redox electron transfer reaction in the coordination complexes is demonstrated with a simple application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishing a methodology to develop complex sociotechnical systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oosthuizen, R

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Many modern management systems, such as military command and control, tend to be large and highly interconnected sociotechnical systems operating in a complex environment. Successful development, assessment and implementation of these systems...

  19. Designing an Interactive Multimedia Environment for Learning and Aiding Troubleshooting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolodner, Janet

    1997-01-01

    .... However troubleshooting is a complex process both to learn and perform. This report examines the prospects for designing an interactive learning environment that helps users acquire and engage in effective troubleshooting...

  20. Simplicial complexes of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    A graph complex is a finite family of graphs closed under deletion of edges. Graph complexes show up naturally in many different areas of mathematics, including commutative algebra, geometry, and knot theory. Identifying each graph with its edge set, one may view a graph complex as a simplicial complex and hence interpret it as a geometric object. This volume examines topological properties of graph complexes, focusing on homotopy type and homology. Many of the proofs are based on Robin Forman's discrete version of Morse theory. As a byproduct, this volume also provides a loosely defined toolbox for attacking problems in topological combinatorics via discrete Morse theory. In terms of simplicity and power, arguably the most efficient tool is Forman's divide and conquer approach via decision trees; it is successfully applied to a large number of graph and digraph complexes.

  1. On Complex Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwer Khurshid

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE In this paper, it is shown that a complex multivariate random variable  is a complex multivariate normal random variable of dimensionality if and only if all nondegenerate complex linear combinations of  have a complex univariate normal distribution. The characteristic function of  has been derived, and simpler forms of some theorems have been given using this characterization theorem without assuming that the variance-covariance matrix of the vector  is Hermitian positive definite. Marginal distributions of  have been given. In addition, a complex multivariate t-distribution has been defined and the density derived. A characterization of the complex multivariate t-distribution is given. A few possible uses of this distribution have been suggested.

  2. Fermi UNIX trademark environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    The introduction of UNIX at Fermilab involves multiple platforms and multiple vendors. Additionally, a single user may have to use more than one platform. This heterogeneity and multiplicity makes it necessary to define a Fermilab environment for UNIX so that as much as possible the systems ''look and feel'' the same. We describe our environment, including both the commercial products and the local tools used to support it. Other products designed for the UNIX environment are also described. 19 refs

  3. The marketing environment

    OpenAIRE

    Camilleri, Mark Anthony

    2017-01-01

    The tourism marketing environment consists of internal and external forces which could impact the organisations’ performance. To be successful, companies must adapt to ongoing trends and developments in their macro and micro environments. When organisations scan their marketing environment they will be in a position to deal with any possible threats from the market and to capitalise on any available opportunities. Therefore, this chapter explains the external environmental factors, including;...

  4. Environment, safety and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzianovich, L.Ch.; Fardeau, J.C.; Darras, M.

    2000-01-01

    Environment, safety and health were the three topics discussed by the WOC 8 working group of the worldwide gas congress. Environment protection has become a major preoccupation and constraint for natural gas industry at the dawn of the new millennium. It is closely linked with the safety of installation and with the health of workmen who exploit or use natural gas energy: methane emissions, health and safety in gas industry, environment management and evaluation. (J.S.)

  5. Cobalt(III) complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    e, 40 µM complex, 10 hrs after dissolution, f, 40 µM complex, after irradiation dose 15 Gy. and H-atoms result in reduction of Co(III) to Co. (II). 6. It is interesting to see in complex containing multiple ligands what is the fate of electron adduct species formed by electron addition. Reduction to. Co(II) and intramolecular transfer ...

  6. Lanthanide complexes with pivaloylacetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseeva, S.V.; Chugarov, N.V.; Kuz'mina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.; Nichiporuk, R.V.; Ivanov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Complexes Ln(pa) 3 ·2H 2 O (Ln=La, Gd, Lu, Hpa - pivaloylacetone) are synthesized and investigated by the methods of element, IR spectroscopic and thermal analyses. Behaviour of the complexes during heating in vacuum is compared with such one for acetylacetonates and dipivaloylmethanates. Structure of the complexes in solution is studied by 1 H NMR and MALDI-MS [ru

  7. Parliamentarians and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, D.

    2004-01-01

    The data presented in this report come from an inquiry carried out by Sofres between March 5 and April 23, 2003, with a sample of 200 parliamentarians (122 deputies and 78 senators) who explained their attitude with respect to the question of environment. The questionnaire comprises 5 main dimensions dealing with: the relative importance of the environment stake, the attitudes with respect to past, present and future environment policies, the attitude with respect to specific stakes (energy, wastes), the attitude with respect to some problems of conservation of the natural heritage, and the attitude with respect to the participation of the public to some environment-related decisions. (J.S.)

  8. Virtual interface environment workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, S. S.; Wenzel, E. M.; Coler, C.; Mcgreevy, M. W.

    1988-01-01

    A head-mounted, wide-angle, stereoscopic display system controlled by operator position, voice and gesture has been developed at NASA's Ames Research Center for use as a multipurpose interface environment. This Virtual Interface Environment Workstation (VIEW) system provides a multisensory, interactive display environment in which a user can virtually explore a 360-degree synthesized or remotely sensed environment and can viscerally interact with its components. Primary applications of the system are in telerobotics, management of large-scale integrated information systems, and human factors research. System configuration, research scenarios, and research directions are described.

  9. Virtual Environments for Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stiles, R

    1998-01-01

    .... Progress on productization of the VET Training Studio software includes increased robustness for Vista virtual environment display and interaction services, a new capability to use the STEVE visual...

  10. Mining the Home Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J.; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25506128

  11. Mining the Home Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-12-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area.

  12. Phospholyl-uranium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradoz, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    After having reported a bibliographical study on penta-methylcyclopentadienyl uranium complexes, and a description of the synthesis and radioactivity of uranium (III) and (IV) boron hydrides compounds, this research thesis reports the study of mono and bis-tetramethyl-phospholyl uranium complexes comprising chloride, boron hydride, alkyl and alkoxide ligands. The third part reports the comparison of structures, stabilities and reactions of homologue complexes in penta-methylcyclopentadienyl and tetramethyl-phospholyl series. The last part addresses the synthesis of tris-phospholyl uranium (III) and (IV) complexes. [fr

  13. Nuclear weapons complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezendes, V.S.

    1991-03-01

    In this book, GAO characterizes DOE's January 1991 Nuclear Weapons Complex Reconfiguration Study as a starting point for reaching agreement on solutions to many of the complex's safety and environmental problems. Key decisions still need to be made about the size of the complex, where to relocate plutonium operations, what technologies to use for new tritium production, and what to do with excess plutonium. The total cost for reconfiguring and modernizing the complex is still uncertain, and some management issues remain unresolved. Congress faces a difficult task in making test decisions given the conflicting demands for scarce resources in a time of growing budget deficits and war in the Persian Gulf

  14. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound......Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  15. Influence of Hydrophobicity on Polyelectrolyte Complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadman, Kazi [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Wang, Qifeng [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Chen, Yaoyao [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Keshavarz, Bavand [Department; Jiang, Zhang [X-ray; Shull, Kenneth R. [Department; amp, Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States

    2017-11-16

    Polyelectrolyte complexes are a fascinating class of soft materials that can span the full spectrum of mechanical properties from low viscosity fluids to glassy solids. This spectrum can be accessed by modulating the extent of electrostatic association in these complexes. However, to realize the full potential of polyelectrolyte complexes as functional materials their molecular level details need to be clearly correlated with their mechanical response. The present work demonstrates that by making simple amendments to the chain architecture it is possible to affect the salt responsiveness of polyelectrolyte complexes in a systematic manner. This is achieved by quaternizing poly(4-vinylpyridine) (QVP) with methyl, ethyl and propyl substituents– thereby increasing the hydrophobicity with increasing side chain length– and complexing them with a common anionic polyelectrolyte, poly(styrene sulfonate). The mechanical 1 ACS Paragon Plus Environment behavior of these complexes is compared to the more hydrophilic system of poly(styrene sulfonate) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium) by quantifying the swelling behavior in response to salt stimuli. More hydrophobic complexes are found to be more resistant to doping by salt, yet the mechanical properties of the complex remain contingent on the overall swelling ratio of the complex itself, following near universal swelling-modulus master curves that are quantified in this work. The rheological behavior of QVP complex coacervates are found to be approximately the same, only requiring higher salt concentrations to overcome strong hydrophobic interactions, demonstrating that hydrophobicity can be used as an important parameter for tuning the stability of polyelectrolyte complexes in general, while still preserving the ability to be processed “saloplastically”.

  16. Signs, Systems and Complexity of Transmedia Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renira Rampazzo Gambarato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses key concepts such as sign, system and complexity in order to approach transmedia storytelling and better understand its intricate nature. The theoretical framework chosen to investigate transmedia storytelling meanders is Semiotics by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914 and General Systems Theory by Mario Bunge (1919-. The complexity of transmedia storytelling is not simply the one of the signs of the works included in a transmedia franchise. It also includes the complexity of the dispositions of users/consumers/players as interpreters of semiotic elements (e.g. characters, themes, environments, events and outcomes presented by transmedia products. It extends further to the complexity of social, cultural, economical and political constructs. The German transmedia narrative The Ultimate SuperHero-Blog by Stefan Gieren and Sofia’s Diary, a Portuguese multiplatform production by BeActive, are presented as examples of closed and open system transmedia storytelling respectively.

  17. Organochlorine Pesticides in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.

    1968-01-01

    Each year for nearly 20 years, thousands of pounds of persistent organochlorine pesticides have been applied to outdoor areas in many countries. These compounds may last for a very long time in the environment, and be carried by wind, water, and animals to places far distant from where they are used. As a result, most living organisms now contain organochlorine residues. This paper constitutes a selective review of the literature concerning the occurrence, distribution, and effects of organochlorines in the environment. Highest concentrations generally occur in carnivorous species. Thus predatory and fish-eating birds ordinarily have higher residues than do herbivores; quantities are similar in birds of similar habits in different countries. Any segment of the ecosystem - marshland, pond, forest, or field - receives various amounts and kinds of pesticides at irregular intervals. The different animals absorb, detoxify, store, and excrete pesticides at different rates. Different degrees of magnification of pesticide residues by living organisms in an environment are the practical result of many interactions that are far more complex than implied by the statement of magnification up the food chain. These magnifications may be millions of times from water to mud or only a few times from food to first consumer. Direct mortality of wild animals as an aftermath of recommended pesticide treatments has been recorded in the literature of numerous countries. However, accidents and carelessness also accompany pesticide use on a percentage basis and are a part of the problem. More subtle effects on the size and species composition of populations are more difficult to perceive in time to effect remedies. The possibility of ecological effects being mediated through changes in physiology and behavior has received some attention and has resulted in some disquieting findings. These include discovery of the activity of organochlorines in stimulating the breakdown of hormones or in

  18. Physical approach to complex systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Drożdż, Stanisław

    2012-06-01

    Typically, complex systems are natural or social systems which consist of a large number of nonlinearly interacting elements. These systems are open, they interchange information or mass with environment and constantly modify their internal structure and patterns of activity in the process of self-organization. As a result, they are flexible and easily adapt to variable external conditions. However, the most striking property of such systems is the existence of emergent phenomena which cannot be simply derived or predicted solely from the knowledge of the systems’ structure and the interactions among their individual elements. This property points to the holistic approaches which require giving parallel descriptions of the same system on different levels of its organization. There is strong evidence-consolidated also in the present review-that different, even apparently disparate complex systems can have astonishingly similar characteristics both in their structure and in their behaviour. One can thus expect the existence of some common, universal laws that govern their properties. Physics methodology proves helpful in addressing many of the related issues. In this review, we advocate some of the computational methods which in our opinion are especially fruitful in extracting information on selected-but at the same time most representative-complex systems like human brain, financial markets and natural language, from the time series representing the observables associated with these systems. The properties we focus on comprise the collective effects and their coexistence with noise, long-range interactions, the interplay between determinism and flexibility in evolution, scale invariance, criticality, multifractality and hierarchical structure. The methods described either originate from “hard” physics-like the random matrix theory-and then were transmitted to other fields of science via the field of complex systems research, or they originated elsewhere but

  19. Lessons learned on solar powered wireless sensor network deployments in urban, desert environments

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Ahmad H.; Mousa, Mustafa; Claudel, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    The successful deployment of a large scale solar powered wireless sensor network in an urban, desert environment is a very complex task. Specific cities of such environments cause a variety of operational problems, ranging from hardware faults

  20. Environment stakes and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronquoy, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    This document devoted to the environment discusses on the following topics: the environmental policies, the threats for the environment (climatic change, water management and risks), the deforestation, the sustainable development of cities, the safety first principle, the energy challenge, the international cooperation, the North-South relations. (A.L.B.)