WorldWideScience

Sample records for complex dna probes

  1. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  2. DNA binding studies of hematoxylin-Dy(ш) complex by spectrometry using acridine orange as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Huang, Jianhang; Wang, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a hematoxylin(HE)-Dy(Ш) complex with herring sperm DNA(hsDNA) was studied using acridine orange(AO) as a probe by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism(CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. From the results of the probe experiment, we found that the HE-Dy(Ш) complex could compete with AO for intercalating into hsDNA. The binding constants of the HE-Dy(Ш) complex to hsDNA was obtained by the double reciprocal method and indicated that the affinity between hsDNA and the complex is weaker than that between hsDNA and classical intercalators. The thermodynamic parameters(ΔH°, ΔG°, ΔS°) were calculated from the UV-vis absorption data measured at two different temperatures. Further experimental results suggested that there exist groove binding and partial intercalation binding between hsDNA and HE-Dy(Ш) complex.

  3. Probing heterobivalent binding to the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex by DNA-based spatial screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diezmann, F; von Kleist, L; Haucke, V; Seitz, O

    2015-08-01

    The double helical DNA scaffold offers a unique set of properties, which are particularly useful for studies of multivalency in biomolecular interactions: (i) multivalent ligand displays can be formed upon nucleic acid hybridization in a self-assembly process, which facilitates spatial screening (ii) valency and spatial arrangement of the ligand display can be precisely controlled and (iii) the flexibility of the ligand display can be adjusted by integrating nick sites and unpaired template regions. Herein we describe the use of DNA-based spatial screening for the characterization of the adaptor complex 2 (AP-2), a central interaction hub within the endocytic protein network in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2 is comprised of a core domain and two, so-called appendage domains, the α- and the β2-ear, which associate with cytoplasmatic proteins required for the formation or maturation of clathrin/AP-2 coated pits. Each appendage domain has two binding grooves which recognize distinct peptide motives with micromolar affinity. This provides opportunities for enhanced interactions with protein molecules that contain two (or more) different peptide motives. To determine whether a particular, spatial arrangement of binding motifs is required for high affinity binding we probed the distance-affinity relationships by means of DNA-programmed spatial screening with self-assembled peptide-DNA complexes. By using trimolecular and tetramolecular assemblies two different peptides were positioned in 2-22 nucleotide distance. The binding data obtained with both recombinant protein in well-defined buffer systems and native AP-2 in brain extract suggests that the two binding sites of the AP-2 α-appendage can cooperate to provide up to 40-fold enhancement of affinity compared to the monovalent interaction. The distance between the two recognized peptide motives was less important provided that the DNA duplex segments were connected by flexible, single strand segments. By

  4. Methods of staining target chromosomal DNA employing high complexity nucleic acid probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Ol' li-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2006-10-03

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. Synthesis of novel fluorescent probe Tb(III)-7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex for sensing of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Belal H.M., E-mail: belalhussein102@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Azab, Hassan A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Fathalla, Walid [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Port-Said University, Port-Said (Egypt); Ali, Sherin A.M. [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2013-02-15

    New fluorescent probe Tb(III) (7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin)2(SCN) (C2H5OH)(H2O) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of 7-carboxymethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (CMMC) and Tb(III)-CMMC complex have been measured in different solvents. The interactions of Tb(III)-CMMC complex with calf thymus nucleic acid (CT-DNA) have been investigated using steady state fluorescence measurements. The changes in the fluorescence intensity have been used for the quantitative determination of DNA with LOD of 3.45 ng in methanol-water (9:1, v/v). The association constants of DNA with Tb(III)-CMMC complex was found to be 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 1010 M{sup -1}. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New fluorescent probe Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin complex has been synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR spectrum of Tb(III)-complex shows a characteristic band for thiocyanate group. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA interaction with Terbium (III)-7-carboxy methoxy-4-methylcoumarin has been studied by fluorescence techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The change in the fluorescence intensity has been used for the quantitative determination of DNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result was better than most of the well-known methods including the ethidium bromide method.

  6. Fluorescent Probes Detecting the Phagocytic Phase of Apoptosis: Enzyme-Substrate Complexes of Topoisomerase and DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace L. Minchew

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In apoptosis, the initial self-driven suicide phase generates cellular corpses which are digested in the phagolysosomes of professional and amateur phagocytes during the subsequent waste-management phase. This ensures the complete elimination of the genetic material which often contains pathological, viral or cancerous DNA sequences. Although the phagocytic phase is critical for the efficient execution of apoptosis, there are currently few methods specifically adapted for its detailed visualization in the fixed tissue section format. To resolve this we developed new fluorescent probes for in situ research. The probes selectively visualize active phagocytic cells of any lineage (professional, amateur phagocytes or surrounding tissue cells which engulf and digest apoptotic cell DNA. These fluorescent probes are the covalently-bound enzyme-DNA intermediates produced in a topoisomerase reaction with specific “starting” oligonucleotides. They detect a specific marker of DNase II cleavage activity, which occurs exclusively in phagolysosomes of the cells that engulfed apoptotic nuclei. The probes provide snap-shot images of the digestion process occurring in cellular organelles responsible for the actual execution of phagocytic degradation of apoptotic cell corpses. We applied the probes for visualization of the phagocytic reaction in tissue sections of normal thymus and in several human lymphomas. We also discuss the nature, stability and properties of DNase II-type breaks as a marker of phagocytic activity. This development provides a useful fluorescent tool for studies of pathologies where clearance of dying cells is essential, such as cancers, inflammation, infection and auto-immune disorders.

  7. Application of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) to study DNA-drug complexes and probing helical propensity of amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orzechowski, Marek [Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University, 1 Pasteura Street, Warsaw, 02-093 (Poland); Cieplak, Piotr [Accelrys Incorporated, 9685 Scranton Road, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2005-05-11

    We present the preliminary results of two computer experiments involving the application of an external force to molecular systems. In the first experiment we simulated the process of pulling out a simple intercalator, the 9-aminoacridine molecule, from its complex with a short DNA oligonucleotide in aqueous solution. Removing a drug from the DNA is assumed to be an opposite process to the complex formation. The force and energy profiles suggest that formation of the DNA-9-aminoacridine complex is preferred when the acridine approaches the DNA from the minor groove rather than the major groove side. For a given mode of pulling the intercalation process is also shown to be nucleotide sequence dependent. In another computer experiment we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations for stretching short, containing 15 amino acids, helical polypeptides in aqueous solution using an external force. The purpose of these simulations is to check whether this type of approach is sensitive enough to probe the sequence dependent helical propensity of short polypeptides.

  8. Solution structures of 2 : 1 and 1 : 1 DNA polymerase-DNA complexes probed by ultracentrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Niebuhr, Marc; Aulabaugh, Ann; Tsai, Ming-Daw [OSU; (Wyeth); (SSRL)

    2008-03-25

    We report small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and sedimentation velocity (SV) studies on the enzyme-DNA complexes of rat DNA polymerase β (Pol β) and African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (ASFV Pol X) with one-nucleotide gapped DNA. The results indicated formation of a 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex, whereas only 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complex was observed. Three-dimensional structural models for the 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA and 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complexes were generated from the SAXS experimental data to correlate with the functions of the DNA polymerases. The former indicates interactions of the 8 kDa 5'-dRP lyase domain of the second Pol β molecule with the active site of the 1 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex, while the latter demonstrates how ASFV Pol X binds DNA in the absence of DNA-binding motif(s). As ASFV Pol X has no 5'-dRP lyase domain, it is reasonable not to form a 2 : 1 complex. Based on the enhanced activities of the 2 : 1 complex and the observation that the 8 kDa domain is not in an optimal configuration for the 5'-dRP lyase reaction in the crystal structures of the closed ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes, we propose that the asymmetric 2 : 1 Pol β-DNA complex enhances the function of Pol β.

  9. Solution Structures of 2 : 1 And 1 : 1 DNA Polymerase - DNA Complexes Probed By Ultracentrifugation And Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K.H.; /Ohio State U.; Niebuhr, M.; /SLAC, SSRL; Aulabaugh, A.; /Wyeth Res. Biophys., Pearl River; Tsai, M.D.; /Ohio State U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    We report small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and sedimentation velocity (SV) studies on the enzyme-DNA complexes of rat DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) and African swine fever virus DNA polymerase X (ASFV Pol X) with one-nucleotide gapped DNA. The results indicated formation of a 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex, whereas only 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complex was observed. Three-dimensional structural models for the 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA and 1 : 1 Pol X-DNA complexes were generated from the SAXS experimental data to correlate with the functions of the DNA polymerases. The former indicates interactions of the 8 kDa 5{prime}-dRP lyase domain of the second Pol {beta} molecule with the active site of the 1 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex, while the latter demonstrates how ASFV Pol X binds DNA in the absence of DNA-binding motif(s). As ASFV Pol X has no 5{prime}-dRP lyase domain, it is reasonable not to form a 2 : 1 complex. Based on the enhanced activities of the 2 : 1 complex and the observation that the 8 kDa domain is not in an optimal configuration for the 5{prime}-dRP lyase reaction in the crystal structures of the closed ternary enzyme-DNA-dNTP complexes, we propose that the asymmetric 2 : 1 Pol {beta}-DNA complex enhances the function of Pol {beta}.

  10. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. (Nestle Research Centre, Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  11. Novel DNA probes for sensitive DNA detection

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, James Alistair

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and interrogate DNA sequences allows further understanding and\\ud diagnosis of genetic disease. The ability to perform such analysis of genetic material\\ud requires highly selective and reliable technologies. Furthermore techniques which can use\\ud simple and cheap equipment allow the use of such technologies for point of care analysis.\\ud \\ud Described in this thesis are two novel DNA probe systems designed for mutation\\ud discrimination and sequence recognition of PCR ...

  12. DNA interstrand cross-links of an antitumor trinuclear platinum(II) complex: thermodynamic analysis and chemical probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Jaroslav; Farrell, Nicholas P; Brabec, Viktor

    2011-06-06

    The trinuclear platinum compound [{trans-PtCl(NH(3))(2)}(2)(μ-trans-Pt(NH(3))(2){NH(2)(CH(2))(6)NH(2)}(2))](4+) (BBR3464) belongs to the polynuclear class of platinum-based anticancer agents. These agents form in DNA long-range (Pt,Pt) interstrand cross-links, whose role in the antitumor effects of BBR3464 predominates. Our results show for the first time that the interstrand cross-links formed by BBR3464 between two guanine bases in opposite strands separated by two base pairs (1,4-interstrand cross-links) exist as two distinct conformers, which are not interconvertible, not only if these cross-links are formed in the 5'-5', but also in the less-usual 3'-3' direction. Analysis of the conformers by differential scanning calorimetry, chemical probes of DNA conformation, and minor groove binder Hoechst 33258 demonstrate that each of the four conformers affects DNA in a distinctly different way and adopts a different conformation. The results also support the thesis that the molecule of antitumor BBR3464 when forming DNA interstrand cross-links may adopt different global structures, including different configurations of the linker chain of BBR3464 in the minor groove of DNA. Our findings suggest that the multiple DNA interstrand cross-links available to BBR3464 may all contribute substantially to its cytotoxicity.

  13. Non-viral gene delivery carrier of probe type host molecule --Interactions between DNA and β-cyclodextrin derivative complexes (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A host type non-virus gene delivery carrier, phenanthroline-β-cyclodextrin derivative host molecule, was produced which can be used as molecular probe. Interactions between DZY-1 and DNA were investigated by electrophoresis assay. Hind III enzyme inhibition assay was carried out using DNA condensates induced by host molecules or host- guest molecule complexes to explore their ability to inhibit enzyme digestion. Micro-structure of DNA condensates induced by host molecules and host-guest molecule complexes was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our work indicates the delivery mechanism of DZY-1 used as a gene delivery carrier and also provides a method to design and produce non-virus gene delivery carriers.

  14. Thermodynamic and structural study of phenanthroline derivative ruthenium complex/DNA interactions: probing partial intercalation and binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueso, E; López-Pérez, G; Castellano, M; Prado-Gotor, R

    2012-01-01

    The binding of [Ru(PDTA-H(2))(phen)]Cl (PDTA = propylene-1,2-diaminetetra-acetic acid; phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) with ctDNA (=calf thymus DNA) has been investigated through intrinsic and induced circular dichroism, UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, steady-state fluorescence, thermal denaturation technique, viscosity and electrochemical measurements. The latter indicate that the cathodic and anodic peak potentials of the ruthenium complex shift to more positive values on increasing the DNA concentration, this behavior being a direct consequence of the interaction of both the reduced and oxidized form with DNA binding. From spectrophotometric titration experiments, the equilibrium binding constant and the number of monomer units of the polymer involved in the binding of one ruthenium molecule (site size) have been quantified. The intrinsic circular dichroism (CD) spectra show an unwinding and a conformational change of the DNA helix upon interaction of the ruthenium complex. Quenching process, thermal denaturation experiments and induced circular dichroism (ICD) are consistent with a partial intercalative binding mode. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA Probe and Cleavage Studies Based on the Interaction between DNA and Yb, Er Complexes of 2-[(Trifluoroaceto)aceto]thinophene-piperidine Ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Caixia; HUO Fangjun; WU Yanbo; LIU Yanlin; YANG Pin

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of Ln complexes of [Ln(TTA)4]·Hp (Ln=Yb or Er, TrA=2-[(Trifluoroaceto)aceto]thinophene, HP =piperidine) have been synthesized and characterized, and their DNA-binding properties investigated using UV spectra, fluorescent spectra, viscometry and molecular modeling. The results show that they can intercalate into the double helices of DNA. More important thing is that their fluorescence intensity can be enhanced by DNA, thererfore, a sensitive fluorescence method for the determination of DNA may be developed. The cleavage reaction on plasmid DNA has been monitored by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, the complexes can cleave circular plasmid pBR322 DNA at pH=7.2 and 37 ℃. In addition, BDNPP [bis(2,4-dinitropheny1)-phosphate] was chosen as a model compound to further study their cleavage mechanism of pBR322 DNA. From the first-order kinetics equation, it was proved indirectly that the mechanism may be a hydrolytic cleavage.

  16. DNA complexes: Durable binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Adam R.

    2011-11-01

    A tetra-intercalator compound that threads through a DNA double-helix to form a remarkably stable complex exhibits an unusual combination of sequence specificity and rapid association yet slow dissociation.

  17. Probe and method for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  18. Development and application of DNA molecular probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Vizzini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of DNA probes started from 1950's for diagnostic purposes and it is still growing. DNA probes are applied in several fields such as food, medical, veterinary, environment and security, with the aim of prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The use of DNA probes permits microorganism identification, including pathogen detection, and their quantification when used in specific systems. Various techniques obtained success by the utilization of specific DNA probes, that allowed the obtainment of rapid and specific results. From PCR, qPCR and blotting techniques that were first used in well equipped laboratories to biosensors such as fiber optic, surface plasmon resonance (SPR, electrochemical, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensors that use different transduction systems. This review describes i the design and production of primers and probes, and their utilization from the traditional techniques to the new emerging techniques like biosensors used in current applications; ii the possibility to use labelled-free probes and probes labelled with an enzyme/fluorophore, etc.; iii the different sensitivity obtained by using specific systems; and iv the advantage obtained by using biosensors.

  19. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  20. DNA binding hydroxyl radical probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Vicky J.; Konigsfeld, Katie M.; Aguilera, Joe A. [Department of Radiology, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States); Milligan, Jamie R., E-mail: jmilligan@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0610 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores, which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. - Highlights: > Examined four aromatic groups as a means to detect hydroxyl radicals by fluorescence. > Coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. > Characterized its reactivity when linked to a hexa-arginine peptide.

  1. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  2. Universal microbial diagnostics using random DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Amirali; Lin, Adam Y.; Sheikh, Mona A.; Chen, Allen L.; Atkins, Lisa M.; Johnson, Coreen L.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Baraniuk, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of pathogens is essential for limiting development of therapy-resistant pathogens and mitigating infectious disease outbreaks. Most bacterial detection schemes use target-specific probes to differentiate pathogen species, creating time and cost inefficiencies in identifying newly discovered organisms. We present a novel universal microbial diagnostics (UMD) platform to screen for microbial organisms in an infectious sample, using a small number of random DNA probes that are agnostic to the target DNA sequences. Our platform leverages the theory of sparse signal recovery (compressive sensing) to identify the composition of a microbial sample that potentially contains novel or mutant species. We validated the UMD platform in vitro using five random probes to recover 11 pathogenic bacteria. We further demonstrated in silico that UMD can be generalized to screen for common human pathogens in different taxonomy levels. UMD’s unorthodox sensing approach opens the door to more efficient and universal molecular diagnostics. PMID:27704040

  3. Functions and applications of polypyridyl complexes in DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The syntheses and desymmetration of a series of novel polypyridyl ligands as well as their complexes, and their DNA-binding properties are reported in this review.The stresses are focused on the functions and potential applications of such complexes as DNA structural probe, DNA molecular light switches, anti-cancer drugs, and photoactivated cleavage agents.

  4. Protocols for 16S rDNA Array Analyses of Microbial Communities by Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Rudi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of complex microbial communities are becoming increasingly important. Bottlenecks in these analyses, however, are the tools to actually describe the biodiversity. Novel protocols for DNA array-based analyses of microbial communities are presented. In these protocols, the specificity obtained by sequence-specific labeling of DNA probes is combined with the possibility of detecting several different probes simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. The gene encoding 16S ribosomal RNA was chosen as the target in these analyses. This gene contains both universally conserved regions and regions with relatively high variability. The universally conserved regions are used for PCR amplification primers, while the variable regions are used for the specific probes. Protocols are presented for DNA purification, probe construction, probe labeling, and DNA array hybridizations.

  5. Microarray of DNA probes on carboxylate functional beads surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄承志; 李原芳; 黄新华; 范美坤

    2000-01-01

    The microarray of DNA probes with 5’ -NH2 and 5’ -Tex/3’ -NH2 modified terminus on 10 um carboxylate functional beads surface in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) is characterized in the preseni paper. it was found that the microarray capacity of DNA probes on the beads surface depends on the pH of the aqueous solution, the concentra-tion of DNA probe and the total surface area of the beads. On optimal conditions, the minimum distance of 20 mer single-stranded DNA probe microarrayed on beads surface is about 14 nm, while that of 20 mer double-stranded DNA probes is about 27 nm. If the probe length increases from 20 mer to 35 mer, its microarray density decreases correspondingly. Mechanism study shows that the binding mode of DNA probes on the beads surface is nearly parallel to the beads surface.

  6. Microarray of DNA probes on carboxylate functional beads surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The microarray of DNA probes with 5′-NH2 and 5′-Tex/3′-NH2 modified terminus on 10 m m carboxylate functional beads surface in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)- carbodiimide (EDC) is characterized in the present paper. It was found that the microarray capacity of DNA probes on the beads surface depends on the pH of the aqueous solution, the concentration of DNA probe and the total surface area of the beads. On optimal conditions, the minimum distance of 20 mer single-stranded DNA probe microarrayed on beads surface is about 14 nm, while that of 20 mer double-stranded DNA probes is about 27 nm. If the probe length increases from 20 mer to 35 mer, its microarray density decreases correspondingly. Mechanism study shows that the binding mode of DNA probes on the beads surface is nearly parallel to the beads surface.

  7. Fluoroquinolone-Gyrase-DNA Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M.; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Drlica, Karl

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys466 gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly81 and GyrB-Glu466 residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  8. Multilayers Assembly of DNA Probe for Biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢文章; 路英杰; 隋森芳

    2002-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was a sensitive method to study molecular interactions. Based on the specific binding, this paper presented the molecular assembly of protein-nucleic acid multilayers on the surface of a gold film. The first layer was a biotin-lipid (B-DMPE/DMPE) containing a monolayer prepared using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique. The second and third layers were avidin and DNA labeled biotin, respectively. The fourth layer was anti-DNA antibody extracted from the serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). These interactions provide stability in the multilayer films of the complexes. The multilayer formation process was detected by SPR spectroscopy. The results show that the chip-based sensor system can be used for functional characterization of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions.

  9. DNA/chitosan electrostatic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Anaya, Lourdes Mónica; Soltero, J F Armando; Rinaudo, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Up to now, chitosan and DNA have been investigated for gene delivery due to chitosan advantages. It is recognized that chitosan is a biocompatible and biodegradable non-viral vector that does not produce immunological reactions, contrary to viral vectors. Chitosan has also been used and studied for its ability to protect DNA against nuclease degradation and to transfect DNA into several kinds of cells. In this work, high molecular weight DNA is compacted with chitosan. DNA-chitosan complex stoichiometry, net charge, dimensions, conformation and thermal stability are determined and discussed. The influence of external salt and chitosan molecular weight on the stoichiometry is also discussed. The isoelectric point of the complexes was found to be directly related to the protonation degree of chitosan. It is clearly demonstrated that the net charge of DNA-chitosan complex can be expressed in terms of the ratio [NH3(+)]/[P(-)], showing that the electrostatic interactions between DNA and chitosan are the main phenomena taking place in the solution. Compaction of DNA long chain complexed with low molar mass chitosan gives nanoparticles with an average radius around 150nm. Stable nanoparticles are obtained for a partial neutralization of phosphate ionic sites (i.e.: [NH3(+)]/[P(-)] fraction between 0.35 and 0.80).

  10. Directly labeled fluorescent DNA probes for chromosome mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, B.L.; Deaven, L.L.; Chen, D.J.; Park, Min S.; MacInnes, M.A.; Salzman, G.C.; Yoshida, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A new strategy is briefly described for employing nucleic acid probes that are directly labeled with fluorochromes in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. These probes will permit the detection, quantitation, and high-precision spatial analysis of multiple DNA sequences along a single chromosome using video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing and analysis. Potential advantages of direct labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization far surpass currently available, indirect DNA probe labeling techniques in ease of use, versatility, and increased signal- to-noise ratio.

  11. Probing complex RNA structures by mechanical force

    CERN Document Server

    Harlepp, S; Robert, J; Leger, J F; Xayaphoummine, A; Isambert, H; Chatenay, D

    2003-01-01

    RNA secondary structures of increasing complexity are probed combining single molecule stretching experiments and stochastic unfolding/refolding simulations. We find that force-induced unfolding pathways cannot usually be interpretated by solely invoking successive openings of native helices. Indeed, typical force-extension responses of complex RNA molecules are largely shaped by stretching-induced, long-lived intermediates including non-native helices. This is first shown for a set of generic structural motifs found in larger RNA structures, and then for Escherichia coli's 1540-base long 16S ribosomal RNA, which exhibits a surprisingly well-structured and reproducible unfolding pathway under mechanical stretching. Using out-of-equilibrium stochastic simulations, we demonstrate that these experimental results reflect the slow relaxation of RNA structural rearrangements. Hence, micromanipulations of single RNA molecules probe both their native structures and long-lived intermediates, so-called "kinetic traps",...

  12. Electroactive crown ester-Cu(2+) complex with in-situ modification at molecular beacon probe serving as a facile electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of CaMV 35s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Fengping; Liao, Xiaolei; Gao, Feng; Qiu, Weiwei; Wang, Qingxiang

    2017-06-15

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor has been facilely constructed by in-situ assembly of electroactive 4'-aminobenzo-18-crown-6-copper(II) complex (AbC-Cu(2+)) on the free terminal of the hairpin-structured molecule beacon. The 3'-SH modified molecule beacon probe was first immobilized on the gold electrode (AuE) surface through self-assembly chemistry of Au-S bond. Then the crow ester of AbC was covalently coupled with 5'-COOH on the molecule beacon, and served as a platform to attach the Cu(2+) by coordination with ether bond (-O-) of the crown cycle. Thus, an electroactive molecule beacon-based biosensing interface was constructed. In comparison with conventional methods for preparation of electroactive molecule beacon, the approach presented in this work is much simpler, reagent- and labor-saving. Selectivity study shows that the in-situ fabricated electroactive molecule beacon remains excellent recognition ability of pristine molecule beacon probe to well differentiate various DNA fragments. The target DNA can be quantatively determined over the range from 0.10pM to 0.50nM. The detection limit of 0.060pM was estimated based on signal-to-noise ratio of 3. When the biosensor was applied for the detection cauliflower mosaic virus 35s (CaMV 35s) in soybean extraction samples, satisfactory results are achieved. This work opens a new strategy for facilely fabricating electrochemical sensing interface, which also shows great potential in aptasensor and immurosensor fabrication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Complex DNA structures and structures of DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazin, W.J.; Carlstroem, G.; Shiow-Meei Chen; Miick, S.; Gomez-Paloma, L.; Smith, J.; Rydzewski, J. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Complex DNA structures (for example, triplexes, quadruplexes, junctions) and DNA-ligand complexes are more difficult to study by NMR than standard DNA duplexes are because they have high molecular weights, show nonstandard or distorted local conformations, and exhibit large resonance linewidths and severe {sup 1}H spectral overlap. These systems also tend to have limited solubility and may require specialized solution conditions to maintain favorable spectral characteristics, which adds to the spectroscopic difficulties. Furthermore, with more atoms in the system, both assignment and structure calculation become more challenging. In this article, we focus on demonstrating the current status of NMR studies of such systems and the limitations to further progress; we also indicate in what ways isotopic enrichment can be useful.

  14. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer G Mulle

    Full Text Available DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  15. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulle, Jennifer G; Patel, Viren C; Warren, Stephen T; Hegde, Madhuri R; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-03-29

    DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  16. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  17. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  18. Eddy Current Flexible Probes for Complex Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles-Pascaud, C.; Decitre, J. M.; Vacher, F.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier, M.; Cattiaux, G.

    2006-03-01

    The inspection of materials used in aerospace, nuclear or transport industry is a critical issue for the safety of components exposed to stress or/and corrosion. The industry claims for faster, more sensitive, and more flexible techniques. Technologies based on Eddy Current (EC) flexible array probe and magnetic sensor with high sensitivity such as giant magneto-resistance (GMR) could be a good solution to detect surface-breaking flaws in complex shaped surfaces. The CEA has recently developed, with support from the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), a flexible array probe based on micro-coils etched on Kapton. The probe's performances have been assessed for the inspection of reactor residual heat removal pipes, and for aeronautical applications within the framework of the European project VERDICT. The experimental results confirm the very good detection of narrow cracks on plane and curve shaped surfaces. This paper also describes the recent progresses concerning the application of GMR sensors to EC testing, and the results obtained for the detection of small surface breaking flaws.

  19. Plasma polymerized epoxide functional surfaces for DNA probe immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Li-Qiang; Knoll, Wolfgang; Förch, Renate

    2008-09-15

    The development of functional surfaces for the immobilization of DNA probe is crucial for a successful design of a DNA sensor. In this report, epoxide functional thin films were achieved simply by pulsed plasma polymerization (PP) of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) at low duty cycle. The presence of epoxide groups in the resulting ppGMA films was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ppGMA coatings were found to be resistant to the non-specific adsorption of DNA strands, while the epoxide groups obtained could react with amine-modified DNA probes in a mild basic environment without any activation steps. A DNA sensor was made, and was successfully employed to distinguish different DNA sequences with one base pair mismatch as seen by surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The regeneration of the present DNA sensor was also discussed. This result suggests that surface modification with ppGMA films is very promising for the fabrication of various DNA sensors.

  20. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  1. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed.

  2. Structural Complexity of DNA Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yuan Liou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern bioinformatics, finding an efficient way to allocate sequence fragments with biological functions is an important issue. This paper presents a structural approach based on context-free grammars extracted from original DNA or protein sequences. This approach is radically different from all those statistical methods. Furthermore, this approach is compared with a topological entropy-based method for consistency and difference of the complexity results.

  3. The detection of HBV DNA with gold nanoparticle gene probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Xi; Xiaoping Luo; Qin Ning; Qianghua Lu; Kailun Yao; Zuli Liu

    2007-01-01

    Objective:Gold nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Methods:Alkanethiol modified oligonucleotide was bound with self-made Au nanoparticles to form nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes, through covalent binding of Au-S. By using a fluorescence-based method, the number of thiol-derivatized, single-stranded oligonucleotides and their hybridization efficiency with complementary oligonucleotides in solution was determined. With the aid of Au nanoparticle-supported mercapto-modified oligonucleotides serving as detection probes, and oligonucleotides immobilized on a nylon membrane surface acting as capturing probes,HBV DNA was detected visually by sandwich hybridization based on highly sensitive aggregation and silver staining. The modified nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were also used to detect the HBV DNA extracted from serum in patients with hepatitis B. Results:Compared with bare Au nanoparticles, oligonucleotide modified nanoparticles had a higher stability in NaCl solution or under high temperature environment and the absorbance peak of modified Au nanoparticles shifted from 520nm to 524nm. For Au nanoparticles, the maximal oligonucleotide surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotide was (132 ± 10) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and the percentage of hybridization strands on nanoparticles was (22 ± 3% ). Based on a two-probe sandwich hybridization/nanoparticle amplification/silver staining enhancement method, Au nanoparticle gene probes could detect as low as 10-11 mol/L composite HBV DNA molecules on a nylon membrane and the PCR products of HBV DNA visually. As made evident by transmission electron microscopy, the nanoparticles assembled into large network aggregates when nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were applied to detect HBV DNA molecules in liquid. Conclusion:Our results showed that successfully prepared Au nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes could be used to

  4. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  5. Combining ligation reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis to obtain reliable long DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Mondello, Monica; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-05-01

    New DNA amplification methods are continuously developed for sensitive detection and quantification of specific DNA target sequences for, e.g. clinical, environmental or food applications. These new applications often require the use of long DNA oligonucleotides as probes for target sequences hybridization. Depending on the molecular technique, the length of DNA probes ranges from 40 to 450 nucleotides, solid-phase chemical synthesis being the strategy generally used for their production. However, the fidelity of chemical synthesis of DNA decreases for larger DNA probes. Defects in the oligonucleotide sequence result in the loss of hybridization efficiency, affecting the sensitivity and selectivity of the amplification method. In this work, an enzymatic procedure has been developed as an alternative to solid-phase chemical synthesis for the production of long oligonucleotides. The enzymatic procedure for probe production was based on ligation of short DNA sequences. Long DNA probes were obtained from smaller oligonucleotides together with a short sequence that acts as bridge stabilizing the molecular complex for DNA ligation. The ligation reactions were monitored by capillary gel electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CGE-LIF) using a bare fused-silica capillary. The capillary gel electrophoresis-LIF method demonstrated to be very useful and informative for the characterization of the ligation reaction, providing important information about the nature of some impurities, as well as for the fine optimization of the ligation conditions (i.e. ligation cycles, oligonucleotide and enzyme concentration). As a result, the yield and quality of the ligation product were highly improved. The in-lab prepared DNA probes were used in a novel multiplex ligation-dependent genome amplification (MLGA) method for the detection of genetically modified maize in samples. The great possibilities of the whole approach were demonstrated by the specific and sensitive

  6. [Cu(phen)2](2+) acts as electrochemical indicator and anchor to immobilize probe DNA in electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Xi; Yan, Songling; Ren, Yinna; Wang, Mengmeng; Liu, Peng; Dong, Yulin; Zhang, Chaocan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel protocol for sensitive in situ label-free electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization based on copper complex ([Cu(phen)2](2+), where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and graphene (GR) modified glassy carbon electrode. Here, [Cu(phen)2](2+) acted advantageously as both the electrochemical indicator and the anchor for probe DNA immobilization via intercalative interactions between the partial double helix structure of probe DNA and the vertical aromatic groups of phen. GR provided large density of docking site for probe DNA immobilization and increased the electrical conductivity ability of the electrode. The modification procedure was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Square-wave voltammetry (SWV) was used to explore the hybridization events. Under the optimal conditions, the designed electrochemical DNA biosensor could effectively distinguish different mismatch degrees of complementary DNA from one-base mismatch to noncomplementary, indicating that the biosensor had high selectivity. It also exhibited a reasonable linear relationship. The oxidation peak currents of [Cu(phen)2](2+) were linear with the logarithm of the concentrations of complementary target DNA ranging from 1 × 10(-12) to 1 × 10(-6) M with a detection limit of 1.99 × 10(-13) M (signal/noise = 3). Moreover, the stability of the electrochemical DNA biosensor was also studied.

  7. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-06-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au-S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5'-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain with absolute pairing with methylated p16 sequence (Met- p16). The probe, paired with Met- p16, clearly changed the color of aggregating GNPs probe in 5 mol/L NaCl solution. Utilizing the probe, p16 gene methylation in HCT116 cells was semi-quantified. Further, the methylation of E-cadherin, p15, and p16 gene in Caco2, HepG2, and HCT116 cell lines were detected by the corresponding probes, constructed with three domains. This simple and cost-effective method was useful for the diagnosis of DNA methylation-related diseases.

  8. Probing the elastic limit of DNA bending

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Tung T

    2014-01-01

    Many structures inside the cell such as nucleosomes and protein-mediated DNA loops contain sharply bent double-stranded (ds) DNA. Therefore, the energetics of strong dsDNA bending constitutes an essential part of cellular thermodynamics. Although the thermomechanical behavior of long dsDNA is well described by the worm-like chain (WLC) model, the length limit of such elastic behavior remains controversial. To investigate the energetics of strong dsDNA bending, we measured the opening rate of small dsDNA loops with contour lengths of 40-200 bp using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). From the measured relationship of loop stability to loop size, we observed a transition between two separate bending regimes at a critical loop size below 100 bp. Above this loop size, the loop lifetime decreased with decreasing loop size in a manner consistent with an elastic bending stress. Below the critical loop size, however, the loop lifetime became less sensitive to loop size, indicative of softening of the doub...

  9. Probe Selection for DNA Microarrays using OligoWiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Juncker, Agnieszka; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    Nucleotide abundance measurements using DNA microarray technology are possible only if appropriate probes complementary to the target nucleotides can be identified. Here we present a protocol for selecting DNA probes for microarrays using the OligoWiz application. OligoWiz is a client......-server application that offers a detailed graphical interface and real-time user interaction on the client side, and massive computer power and a large collection of species databases (400, summer 2007) on the server side. Probes are selected according to five weighted scores: cross-hybridization, deltaT(m), folding...... computer skills and can be executed from any Internet-connected computer. The probe selection procedure for a standard microarray design targeting all yeast transcripts can be completed in 1 h....

  10. Colorimetric DNA detection of transgenic plants using gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourisaeid, Elham; Mousavi, Amir; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a DNA colorimetric detection system based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with L-shaped DNA probes was prepared and evaluated. We investigated the hybridization efficiency of the L-shaped probes and studied the effect of nanoparticle size and the L-shaped DNA probe length on the performance of the as-prepared system. Probes were attached to the surface of gold nanoparticles using an adenine sequence. An optimal sequence of 35S rRNA gene promoter from the cauliflower mosaic virus, which is frequently used in the development of transgenic plants, and the two complementary ends of this gene were employed as model target strands and probe molecules, respectively. The spectrophotometric properties of the as-prepared systems indicated that the large NPs show better changes in the absorption spectrum and consequently present a better performance. The results of this study revealed that the probe/Au-NPs prepared using a vertical spacer containing 5 thymine oligonucleotides exhibited a stronger spectrophotometric response in comparison to that of larger probes. These results in general indicate the suitable performance of the L-shaped DNA probe-functionalized Au-NPs, and in particular emphasize the important role of the gold nanoparticle size and length of the DNA probes in enhancing the performance of such a system.

  11. Probing the microscopic flexibility of DNA from melting temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gerald; Essex, Jonathan W.; Neylon, Cameron

    2009-10-01

    The microscopic flexibility of DNA is a key ingredient for understanding its interaction with proteins and drugs but is still poorly understood and technically challenging to measure. Several experimental methods probe very long DNA samples, but these miss local flexibility details. Others mechanically disturb or modify short molecules and therefore do not obtain flexibility properties of unperturbed and pristine DNA. Here, we show that it is possible to extract very detailed flexibility information about unmodified DNA from melting temperatures with statistical physics models. We were able to retrieve, from published melting temperatures, several established flexibility properties such as the presence of highly flexible TATA regions of genomic DNA and support recent findings that DNA is very flexible at short length scales. New information about the nanoscale Na+ concentration dependence of DNA flexibility was determined and we show the key role of ApT and TpA steps when it comes to ion-dependent flexibility and melting temperatures.

  12. Evolving DNA motifs to predict GeneChip probe performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison AP

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affymetrix High Density Oligonuclotide Arrays (HDONA simultaneously measure expression of thousands of genes using millions of probes. We use correlations between measurements for the same gene across 6685 human tissue samples from NCBI's GEO database to indicated the quality of individual HG-U133A probes. Low correlation indicates a poor probe. Results Regular expressions can be automatically created from a Backus-Naur form (BNF context-free grammar using strongly typed genetic programming. Conclusion The automatically produced motif is better at predicting poor DNA sequences than an existing human generated RE, suggesting runs of Cytosine and Guanine and mixtures should all be avoided.

  13. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes for human chromosome 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, P C

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated effort to map and sequence the human genome has recently become a national priority. Chromosome 21, the smallest human chromosome accounting for less than 2% of the human genome, is an attractive model system for developing and evaluating genome mapping technology. Several strategies are currently being explored including the development of chromosome 21 libraries from somatic cell hybrids as reported here, the cloning of chromosome 21 in yeast artificial chromosomes (McCormick et al., 1989b), and the construction of chromosome 21 libraries using chromosome flow-sorting techniques (Fuscoe et al., 1989). This report describes the approaches used to identify DNA probes that are useful for mapping chromosome 21. Probes were successfully isolated from both phage and cosmid libraries made from two somatic cell hybrids that contain human chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome. The 15 cosmid clones from the WA17 library, reduced to cloned DNA sequences of an average size of 3 kb, total 525 kb of DNA which is approximately 1% of chromosome 21. From these clones, a set of polymorphic DNA markers that span the length of the long arm of chromosome 21 has been generated. All of the probes thus far analyzed from the WA17 libraries have been mapped to chromosome 21 both by physical and genetic mapping methods. It is therefore likely that the WA17 hybrid cell line contains human chromosome 21 as the only human component, in agreement with cytogenetic observation. The 153E7b cosmid libraries will provide an alternative source of cloned chromosome 21 DNA. Library screening techniques can be employed to obtain cloned DNA sequences from the same genetic loci of the two different chromosome 21s. Comparative analysis will allow direct estimation of DNA sequence variation for different regions of chromosome 21. Mapped DNA probes make possible the molecular analysis of chromosome 21 at a level of resolution not achievable by classical cytogenetic techniques (Graw et al

  14. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories.

  15. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmul Arfin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ∼ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t, which follows the scaling, S(t ∼ tβ/ln (t. Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  16. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfin, Najmul; Yadav, Avinash Chand; Bohidar, H. B.

    2013-11-01

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement ⟨R2⟩ exhibits a scaling with time as ⟨R2⟩ ˜ tα, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ˜ tβ/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  17. Sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics of neutral and charged probes in DNA-protein coacervates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arfin, Najmul [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Yadav, Avinash Chand [Nonlinear Dynamics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Bohidar, H. B., E-mail: bohi0700@mail.jnu.ac.in [Polymer and Biophysics Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India); Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-11-15

    The physical mechanism leading to the formation of large intermolecular DNA-protein complexes has been studied. Our study aims to explain the occurrence of fast coacervation dynamics at the charge neutralization point, followed by the appearance of smaller complexes and slower coacervation dynamics as the complex experiences overcharging. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential and probe mobility was investigated to mimic the transport of DNA / DNA-protein complex in a DNA-protein complex coacervate medium [N. Arfin and H. B. Bohidar, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 13192 (2012)] by assigning neutral, negative, or positive charge to the probe particle. The mobility of the neutral probe was maximal at low matrix concentrations and showed random walk behavior, while its mobility ceased at the jamming concentration of c = 0.6, showing sub-diffusion and trapped dynamics. The positively charged probe showed sub-diffusive random walk followed by trapped dynamics, while the negatively charged probe showed trapping with occasional hopping dynamics at much lower concentrations. Sub-diffusion of the probe was observed in all cases under consideration, where the electrostatic interaction was used exclusively as the dominant force involved in the dynamics. For neutral and positive probes, the mean square displacement 〈R{sup 2}〉 exhibits a scaling with time as 〈R{sup 2}〉 ∼ t{sup α}, distinguishing random walk and trapped dynamics at α = 0.64 ± 0.04 at c = 0.12 and c = 0.6, respectively. In addition, the same scaling factors with the exponent β = 0.64 ± 0.04 can be used to distinguish random walk and trapped dynamics for the neutral and positive probes using the relation between the number of distinct sites visited by the probe, S(t), which follows the scaling, S(t) ∼ t{sup β}/ln (t). Our results established the occurrence of a hierarchy of diffusion dynamics experienced by a probe in a dense medium that is either charged or neutral.

  18. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM, is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids.

  19. Study on the toxic interactions of Ni{sup 2+} with DNA using neutral red dye as a fluorescence probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Li [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.c [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Teng Yue [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-04-15

    The interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was investigated in simulated physiological buffer (pH 7.4) using the Neutral Red (NR) dye as a spectral probe by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as CD spectra. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by Ni{sup 2+} are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. From the experimental results, conclusion can be drawn that Ni{sup 2+} can cause structural changes of ctDNA and bind with DNA by electrostatic interaction. At the same time, the paper proved that conformation changes of DNA can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems. - Research Highlights: The formation of new non-fluorescence complex or competing binding sites between small molecules and probe are usually the reason of fluorescence quenching in DNA-probe systems. This study proved that conformation changes of DNA induced by Ni{sup 2+} can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems.

  20. Probing Nucleosome Stability with a DNA Origami Nanocaliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jenny V; Luo, Yi; Darcy, Michael A; Lucas, Christopher R; Goodwin, Michelle F; Poirier, Michael G; Castro, Carlos E

    2016-07-26

    The organization of eukaryotic DNA into nucleosomes and chromatin undergoes dynamic structural changes to regulate genome processing, including transcription and DNA repair. Critical chromatin rearrangements occur over a wide range of distances, including the mesoscopic length scale of tens of nanometers. However, there is a lack of methodologies that probe changes over this mesoscopic length scale within chromatin. We have designed, constructed, and implemented a DNA-based nanocaliper that probes this mesoscopic length scale. We developed an approach of integrating nucleosomes into our nanocaliper at two attachment points with over 50% efficiency. Here, we focused on attaching the two DNA ends of the nucleosome to the ends of the two nanocaliper arms, so the hinge angle is a readout of the nucleosome end-to-end distance. We demonstrate that nucleosomes integrated with 6, 26, and 51 bp linker DNA are partially unwrapped by the nanocaliper by an amount consistent with previously observed structural transitions. In contrast, the nucleosomes integrated with the longer 75 bp linker DNA remain fully wrapped. We found that the nanocaliper angle is a sensitive measure of nucleosome disassembly and can read out transcription factor (TF) binding to its target site within the nucleosome. Interestingly, the nanocaliper not only detects TF binding but also significantly increases the probability of TF occupancy at its site by partially unwrapping the nucleosome. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA nanotechnology to both detect and manipulate nucleosome structure, which provides a foundation of future mesoscale studies of nucleosome and chromatin structural dynamics.

  1. A simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide hybridization probes from heterologous gene sequences and probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, E S; Sarge, K D

    1988-11-30

    We describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide probes for hybridization analysis and/or cDNA/genomic library screening. With this method, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide derived from a known heterologous DNA/RNA/protein sequence is annealed to an RNA preparation containing the gene transcript of interest. Any unpaired 3'-terminal oligonucleotides of the heterologous DNA primer are then removed using the 3' exonuclease activity of the DNA Polymerase I Klenow fragment before primer extension/dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the annealed RNA species with AMV reverse transcriptase. From the determined RNA sequence, a completely homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe is then prepared. This approach has been used to prepare a homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe for the successful library screening of the yeast hybRNA gene starting with a heterologous mouse hybRNA DNA oligonucleotide probe.

  2. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne' , Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  3. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas P.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-12-04

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-{kappa}B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  4. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich-Bode, Karin; Wang, Mei; Rhein, Andreas; Weier, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli

    2008-12-16

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific {approx}6kb plasmid onto an unusually small, {approx}55kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-?B2 locus. The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  5. Validation of DNA probes for molecular cytogenetics by mapping onto immobilized circular DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhein Andreas P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is a sensitive and rapid procedure to detect gene rearrangements in tumor cells using non-isotopically labeled DNA probes. Large insert recombinant DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC or P1/PAC clones have established themselves in recent years as preferred starting material for probe preparations due to their low rates of chimerism and ease of use. However, when developing probes for the quantitative analysis of rearrangements involving genomic intervals of less than 100 kb, careful probe selection and characterization are of paramount importance. Results We describe a sensitive approach to quality control probe clones suspected of carrying deletions or for measuring clone overlap with near kilobase resolution. The method takes advantage of the fact that P1/PAC/BAC's can be isolated as circular DNA molecules, stretched out on glass slides and fine-mapped by multicolor hybridization with smaller probe molecules. Two examples demonstrate the application of this technique: mapping of a gene-specific ~6 kb plasmid onto an unusually small, ~55 kb circular P1 molecule and the determination of the extent of overlap between P1 molecules homologous to the human NF-κB2 locus. Conclusion The relatively simple method presented here does not require specialized equipment and may thus find widespread applications in DNA probe preparation and characterization, the assembly of physical maps for model organisms or in studies on gene rearrangements.

  6. Protein-DNA complexes: specificity and DNA readout mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shestopalova A. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid recognition is essential in a number of cellular processes, in particular, gene regulation, DNA replication and compaction. Studies on the recognition mechanisms show that DNA sequence carries information which is read out by proteins that selectively bind to specific DNA sites. The review is focused on the processes taking place during formation of specific and nonspecific complexes of proteins and DNA. Special attention is paid to direct and indirect mechanisms of sequence-specific recognition. Several examples of protein-nucleic acid complexes are given to illustrate the variety of recognition mechanisms

  7. Probing DNA-Protein Interactions on Surfaces Using Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Droge, Peter; Swan, Anna K.; Unlu, Selim; Goldberg, Bennett B.

    2007-03-01

    We are probing the interactions between double-stranded DNA and integration host factor (IHF) proteins [1] on surfaces using Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy (SSFM) [2].The probing technique utilizes the spectral fringes produced by interference of direct and reflected emission from fluorescent molecules. The modified spectrum provides a unique signature of the axial position of the fluorophores. Using the SSFM technique, we probe the average location of the fluorescent markers attached to the DNA molecules to study the conformational changes in double-stranded DNA tethered to SiO2 surfaces. In the presence of IHF, a DNA bending protein, we observe reduction in the vertical position of fluorescent molecules suggesting the formation of IHF-DNA complex and IHF-induced DNA bending. We also discuss the results with different IHF strains and different binding conditions. [1] Q. Bao et. al., Gene, Vol.343 pp.99-106 (2004) [2] L.A. Moiseev et. al., Journal of Applied Physics, Vol.96, pp. 5311-5315 (2004)

  8. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  9. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokkala, Johannes; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-05-01

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the probing of their spectral density, structure, and topology. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. Our results show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed quantum probe for virtually any network configuration. Moreover, we show how the entire network structure can be reconstructed by using a single quantum probe. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities and topology probing for networks of genuine complexity.

  10. DNA detection using water-soluble conjugated polymers and peptide nucleic acid probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, Brent S.; Heeger, Alan J.; Bazan, Guillermo C.

    2002-08-01

    The light-harvesting properties of cationic conjugated polymers are used to sensitize the emission of a dye on a specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence for the purpose of homogeneous, "real-time" DNA detection. Signal transduction is controlled by hybridization of the neutral PNA probe and the negative DNA target. Electrostatic interactions bring the hybrid complex and cationic polymer within distances required for Förster energy transfer. Conjugated polymer excitation provides fluorescein emission >25 times higher than that obtained by exciting the dye, allowing detection of target DNA at concentrations of 10 pM with a standard fluorometer. A simple and highly sensitive assay with optical amplification that uses the improved hybridization behavior of PNA/DNA complexes is thus demonstrated.

  11. Chemical Biology Probes from Advanced DNA-encoded Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Hazem; Klika Škopić, Mateja; Jung, Kathrin; Bugain, Olivia; Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2016-02-19

    The identification of bioactive compounds is a crucial step toward development of probes for chemical biology studies. Screening of DNA-encoded small molecule libraries (DELs) has emerged as a validated technology to interrogate vast chemical space. DELs consist of chimeric molecules composed of a low-molecular weight compound that is conjugated to a DNA identifier tag. They are screened as pooled libraries using selection to identify "hits." Screening of DELs has identified numerous bioactive compounds. Some of these molecules were instrumental in gaining a deeper understanding of biological systems. One of the main challenges in the field is the development of synthesis methodology for DELs.

  12. Probing the mechanics of the complete DNA transcription cycle in real-time using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christoph G; Cross, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a DNA-dependent motor protein that links ribonucleotide polymerization to force generation and DNA translocation through its active site, i.e., mechanical work. Single-molecule studies using optical tweezers have allowed researchers to probe the load-dependent ribonucleotide incorporation rate and processivity of both single-subunit viral and multisubunit prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNAPs engaged in transcription elongation. A single-molecule method is described here, which allows the complete transcription cycle (i.e., promoter binding, initiation, elongation and termination) to be followed in real-time using dual-trap optical tweezers and a unique "three-bead" geometry. This single-molecule transcription assay can be used to probe the mechanics of both stationary and moving RNAP-DNA complexes engaged in different stages of transcription.

  13. Photoenzyme probes of photodamage to cells and cellular DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Development of photoenzyme probes for detection of ultraviolet damage to cells and DNA is reviewed with special emphasis on a process using polyethylene glycol to induce cell fusion. Polyethylene glycol is easy to obtain and handle, is gentle to the cells and does not induce latent or productive virus infection; therefore, it may be a general method for insertion of exogenous enzymes into mammalian cells. (PCS)

  14. Label-Free Potentiometry for Detecting DNA Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid and DNA Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miyahara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptide nucleic acid (PNA has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  15. Label-free potentiometry for detecting DNA hybridization using peptide nucleic acid and DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tatsuro; Singi, Ankit Balram; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Akira; Torimura, Masaki; Aoki, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Yuji

    2013-02-07

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) has outstanding affinity over DNA for complementary nucleic acid sequences by forming a PNA-DNA heterodimer upon hybridization via Watson-Crick base-pairing. To verify whether PNA probes on an electrode surface enhance sensitivity for potentiometric DNA detection or not, we conducted a comparative study on the hybridization of PNA and DNA probes on the surface of a 10-channel gold electrodes microarray. Changes in the charge density as a result of hybridization at the solution/electrode interface on the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-formed microelectrodes were directly transformed into potentiometric signals using a high input impedance electrometer. The charge readout allows label-free, reagent-less, and multi-parallel detection of target oligonucleotides without any optical assistance. The differences in the probe lengths between 15- to 22-mer dramatically influenced on the sensitivity of the PNA and DNA sensors. Molecular type of the capturing probe did not affect the degree of potential shift. Theoretical model for charged rod-like duplex using the Gouy-Chapman equation indicates the dominant effect of electrostatic attractive forces between anionic DNA and underlying electrode at the electrolyte/electrode interface in the potentiometry.

  16. RNA probes, transcribed from synthetic DNA, for in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brysch, W.; Hagendorff, G.; Schlingensiepen, K.H.

    1988-03-25

    Single stranded cRNA probes are ideal for in-situ-hybridization. Synthetic oligodesoxy-ribonucleotides on the other hand allow one to chose nucleotide sequences independently of restriction sites and availability of cloned templates. To combine the advantages of these two methods, the authors used an oligonucleotide, containing a T7-RNA-polymerase promotor sequence and a starting sequence of 6 bases as a template for an in-vitro-transcription reaction with T7-RNA-polymerase. A second oligonucleotide, complementary to basepairs 1-101 was also synthesized and the two strands heated to 95/sup 0/ for 3 min, then kept at 65/sup 0/C for one hour in 80 mM Tris, 12mM MgCl, 4 mM Spermidine, 0,04% Triton and finally cooled on ice. The resulting double stranded DNA was used as a template to transcribe /sup 35/S-labelled cRNA, using DNA, T7-Polymerase, /sup 35/S-UTP, ATP, GTP and CTP and RNasin (Promega). No difference could be observed comparing the resulting hybridization pattern with that obtained by using a plasmid derived cRNA probe of rat brain sodium channel II. Moreover the hybridization signal was clearly distinct from the background labelling resulting from hybridization with a sense control probe of the same specific activity.

  17. Isolation of human minisatellite loci detected by synthetic tandem repeat probes: direct comparison with cloned DNA fingerprinting probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Vergnaud, G; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-08-01

    As a direct comparison with cloned 'DNA fingerprinting' probes, we present the results of screening an ordered array Charomid library for hypervariable human loci using synthetic tandem repeat (STR) probes. By recording the coordinates of positive hybridization signals, the subset of clones within the library detected by each STR probe can be defined, and directly compared with the set of clones detected by naturally occurring (cloned) DNA fingerprinting probes. The STR probes vary in the efficiency of detection of polymorphic minisatellite loci; among the more efficient probes, there is a strong overlap with the sets of clones detected by the DNA fingerprinting probes. Four new polymorphic loci were detected by one or more of the STR probes but not by any of the naturally occurring repeats. Sequence comparisons with the probe(s) used to detect the locus suggest that a relatively poor match, for example 10 out of 14 bases in a limited region of each repeat, is sufficient for the positive detection of tandem repeats in a clone in this type of library screening by hybridization. These results not only provide a detailed evaluation of the usefulness of STR probes in the isolation of highly variable loci, but also suggest strategies for the use of these multi-locus probes in screening libraries for clones from hypervariable loci.

  18. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Labeled DNA for Graphene Oxide-Based Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingcheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Li, Yingying; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jian

    2016-02-02

    There has been growing interest in utilizing highly photostable iridium(III) complexes as new luminescent probes for biotechnology and life science. Herein, iridium(III) complex with carboxyl group was synthesized and activated with N-hydroxysuccinimide, followed by tagging to the amino terminate of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The Ir-ssDNA probe was further combined with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to develop a GO-based biosensor for target ssDNA detection. The quenching efficiency of GO, and the photostability of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor, were also investigated. On the basis of the high luminescence quenching efficiency of GO toward iridium(III) complex, the GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor exhibited minimal background signals, while strong emission was observed when Ir-ssDNA desorbed from GO nanosheets and formed a double helix with the specific target, leading to a high signal-to-background ratio. Moreover, it was found that luminescent intensities of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor were around 15 and 3 times higher than those of the traditional carboxyl fluorescein (FAM) dye and the GO-FAM-ssDNA biosensor after UV irradiation, respectively. Our study suggested the sensitive and selective Ir-ssDNA probe was suitable for the development of highly photostable GO-based detection platforms, showing promise for application beyond the OLED (organic light emitting diode) area.

  19. Melanesian mtDNA complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Friedlaender

    Full Text Available Melanesian populations are known for their diversity, but it has been hard to grasp the pattern of the variation or its underlying dynamic. Using 1,223 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences from hypervariable regions 1 and 2 (HVR1 and HVR2 from 32 populations, we found the among-group variation is structured by island, island size, and also by language affiliation. The more isolated inland Papuan-speaking groups on the largest islands have the greatest distinctions, while shore dwelling populations are considerably less diverse (at the same time, within-group haplotype diversity is less in the most isolated groups. Persistent differences between shore and inland groups in effective population sizes and marital migration rates probably cause these differences. We also add 16 whole sequences to the Melanesian mtDNA phylogenies. We identify the likely origins of a number of the haplogroups and ancient branches in specific islands, point to some ancient mtDNA connections between Near Oceania and Australia, and show additional Holocene connections between Island Southeast Asia/Taiwan and Island Melanesia with branches of haplogroup E. Coalescence estimates based on synonymous transitions in the coding region suggest an initial settlement and expansion in the region at approximately 30-50,000 years before present (YBP, and a second important expansion from Island Southeast Asia/Taiwan during the interval approximately 3,500-8,000 YBP. However, there are some important variance components in molecular dating that have been overlooked, and the specific nature of ancestral (maternal Austronesian influence in this region remains unresolved.

  20. Probing the binding of coumarins and cyclothialidines to DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Gormley, N A; Tranter, R

    1999-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the target of a number of antibacterial agents, including the coumarins and the cyclothialidines. To extend our understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, we have examined the previously published crystal structures of the complexes between the 24 kDa fragment of Gyr...

  1. Cationic lipids and cationic ligands induce DNA helix denaturation: detection of single stranded regions by KMnO4 probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T K; Gopal, Vijaya; Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2003-09-25

    Cationic lipids and cationic polymers are widely used in gene delivery. Using 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid, we have investigated the stability of the DNA in DOTAP:DNA complexes by probing with potassium permanganate (KMnO4). Interestingly, thymidines followed by a purine showed higher susceptibility to cationic ligand-mediated melting. Similar studies performed with other water-soluble cationic ligands such as polylysine, protamine sulfate and polyethyleneimine also demonstrated melting of the DNA but with variations. Small cations such as spermine and spermidine and a cationic detergent, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, also rendered the DNA susceptible to modification by KMnO4. The data presented here provide direct proof for melting of DNA upon interaction with cationic lipids. Structural changes subsequent to binding of cationic lipids/ligands to DNA may lead to instability and formation of DNA bubbles in double-stranded DNA.

  2. COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT ENZYMES AND PROBES AND THEIR COMBINATIONS IN DNA FINGERPRINTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, eight combinations of restriction enzymes and oligonucleotide probes were tested for detecting VNTR polymorphism. More than a hundred loci were detected by all enzyme-probe combi nations. The influences of breed, enzyme and probe as well as their interactions were analysed, and the mean value of DNA fingerprint data was calculated for the enzymes and probes. The results will provide some valu- able information for studying the genetic relationship of individuals or populations using DNA fingerprinting.

  3. Creating complex molecular topologies by configuring DNA four-way junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di; Chen, Gang; Akhter, Usman; Cronin, Timothy M.; Weizmann, Yossi

    2016-10-01

    The realization of complex topologies at the molecular level represents a grand challenge in chemistry. This necessitates the manipulation of molecular interactions with high precision. Here we show that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) knots and links can be created by utilizing the inherent topological properties that pertain to the DNA four-way junction, at which the two helical strands form a node and can be configured conveniently and connected for complex topological construction. Using this strategy, we produced series of ssDNA topoisomers with the same sequences. By finely designing the curvature and torsion, double-stranded DNA knots were accessed by hybridizing and ligating the complementary strands with the knotted ssDNA templates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a constructed ssDNA knot both to probe the topological conversion catalysed by DNA topoisomerase and to study the DNA replication under topological constraint.

  4. Probing the Structure of DNA Aptamers with a Classic Heterocycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reid Bishop

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA aptamers are synthetic, single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides selectedby SELEX methods for their binding with specific ligands. Here we present ethidiumbinding results for three related DNA aptamers (PDB code: 1OLD, 1DB6, and 2ARGthat bind L-argininamide (L-Arm. The ligand bound form of each aptamer's structurehas been reported and each are found to be composed primarily of two domainsconsisting of a stem helical region and a loop domain that forms a binding pocket for thecognate ligand. Previous thermodynamic experiments demonstrated that the DNAaptamer 1OLD undergoes a large conformational ordering upon binding to L-Arm. Herewe extend those linkage binding studies by examining the binding of the heterocyclicintercalator ethidium to each of the three aptamers by fluorescence and absorptionspectrophotometric titrations. Our results reveal that ethidium binds to each aptamer with∆Go's in the range of -8.7 to -9.4 kcal/mol. The stoichiometry of binding is 2:1 for eachaptamer and is quantitatively diminished in the presence of L-Arm as is the overallfluorescence intensity of ethidium. Together, these results demonstrate that a portion ofthe bound ethidium is excluded from the aptamer in the presence of a saturating amountof L-Arm. These results demonstrate the utility of ethidium and related compounds forthe probing of non-conventional DNA structures and reveal an interesting fundamentalthermodynamic linkage in DNA aptamers. Results are discussed in the context of thethermodynamic stability and structure of each of the aptamers examined.

  5. Electrochemical techniques for characterization of stem-loop probe and linear probe-based DNA sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rebecca Y; Walker, Bryce; Stormberg, Kent; Zaitouna, Anita J; Yang, Weiwei

    2013-12-15

    Here we present a summary of the sensor performance of the stem-loop probe (SLP) and linear probe (LP) electrochemical DNA sensors when interrogated using alternating current voltammetry (ACV), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Specifically, we identified one critical parameter for each voltammetric technique that can be adjusted for optimal sensor performance. Overall, the SLP sensor displayed good sensor performance (i.e., 60+% signal attenuation in the presence of the target) over a wider range of experimental conditions when compared to the LP sensor. When used with ACV, the optimal frequency range was found to be between 5 and 5000 Hz, larger than the 5-100 Hz range observed with the LP sensor. A similar trend was observed for the two sensors in CV; the LP sensor was operational only at scan rates between 30 and 100 V/s, whereas the SLP sensor performed well at scan rates between 1 and 1000 V/s. Unlike ACV and CV, DPV has demonstrated to be a more versatile sensor interrogation technique for this class of sensors. Despite the minor differences in total signal attenuation upon hybridization to the target DNA, both SLP and LP sensors performed optimally under most pulse widths used in this study. More importantly, when used with longer pulse widths, both sensors showed "signal-on" behavior, which is generally more desirable for sensor applications.

  6. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  7. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology for epidemiological studies of tegumentary leishmaniasis in Mato Grosso state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Octavio [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Tropical; Heub, Marcia; Fontes, Cor Jesus [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso, Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Julio Muller; Carvalho, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro; Melo, Maria Norma de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia

    2005-10-15

    DNA hybridisation, using probes labelled with 32 P, was used to type Leishmania samples isolated from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso State (Brazil), and clinically diagnosed as having tegumentary leishmaniasis. k DNA cloned mini-circle probes specific for the Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania braziliensis complexes were used. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. Sixty-eight samples were typed, 64 samples (94.1%) belonging to the L. braziliensis complex and only four (5.9%) belonging to the L. mexicana complex. Accurate identification of the Leishmania permits better orientation of the medical follow-up, since clinical manifestations may vary depending on the complex to which the parasite belongs. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of the Leishmania in given endemic area is also essential for the design of appropriate control measures. (author)

  8. Cloning chromosome specific genes by reciprocal probing of arrayed cDNA and cosmid libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Lee, C.C.; Wehnert, M. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A human gene map will greatly facilitate the association of genes to single locus diseases and provide candidates for genes involved in complex genetic traits. Given the estimated 100,000 human genes an integrated strategy with a high throughput approach for isolation and mapping of expressed sequences is needed to create such a gene map. We have developed an approach that allows high throughput gene isolation and mapping using arrayed genomic and cDNA lambda libraries. Reciprocal probing of the arrayed genomic and cDNA cosmic libraries can rapidly establish cDNA-cosmid associations. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosomal mapping and expressed sequence tag/sequence tag site (EST/STS) primers generated from DNA sequence of PCR-based mapping using somatic hybrid cell line mapping panels were utilized to characterize further the hybridization-based cDNA cosmid association. We have applied this approach to chromosome 17 using a placental cDNA library and have identified a total of 30 genes out of which 11 are novel. Furthermore seven cDNAs were mapped to 17q21 in this study, providing novel candidate genes for BRCA-1 gene for early onset breast cancer. The results of our study clearly show that an integration of an expression map into physical and genetic maps can provide candidate genes for human diseases that have been mapped to specific regions. This approach combined with the current physical mapping efforts could efficiently provide a detailed human gene map.

  9. Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA Using Enzymatically Stable Phosphorothioate Invader Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke A. Anderson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of probes that allow for sequence-unrestricted recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA continues to attract much attention due to the prospect for molecular tools that enable detection, regulation, and manipulation of genes. We have recently introduced so-called Invader probes as alternatives to more established approaches such as triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids and polyamides. These short DNA duplexes are activated for dsDNA recognition by installment of +1 interstrand zippers of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides such as 2′-N-(pyren-1-ylmethyl-2′-N-methyl-2′-aminouridine and 2′-O-(pyren-1-ylmethyluridine, which results in violation of the nearest neighbor exclusion principle and duplex destabilization. The individual probes strands have high affinity toward complementary DNA strands, which generates the driving force for recognition of mixed-sequence dsDNA regions. In the present article, we characterize Invader probes that are based on phosphorothioate backbones (PS-DNA Invaders. The change from the regular phosphodiester backbone furnishes Invader probes that are much more stable to nucleolytic degradation, while displaying acceptable dsDNA-recognition efficiency. PS-DNA Invader probes therefore present themselves as interesting probes for dsDNA-targeting applications in cellular environments and living organisms.

  10. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  11. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus M204I Mutation by Quantum Dot-Labeled DNA Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are semiconductor nanoparticles with a diameter of less than 10 nm, which have been widely used as fluorescent probes in biochemical analysis and vivo imaging because of their excellent optical properties. Sensitive and convenient detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV gene mutations is important in clinical diagnosis. Therefore, we developed a sensitive, low-cost and convenient QDs-mediated fluorescent method for the detection of HBV gene mutations in real serum samples from chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients who had received lamivudine or telbivudine antiviral therapy. We also evaluated the efficiency of this method for the detection of drug-resistant mutations compared with direct sequencing. In CHB, HBV DNA from the serum samples of patients with poor response or virological breakthrough can be hybridized to probes containing the M204I mutation to visualize fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy, where fluorescence intensity is related to the virus load, in our method. At present, the limits of the method used to detect HBV genetic variations by fluorescence quantum dots is 103 IU/mL. These results show that QDs can be used as fluorescent probes to detect viral HBV DNA polymerase gene variation, and is a simple readout system without complex and expensive instruments, which provides an attractive platform for the detection of HBV M204I mutation.

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory complex I probed by delayed luminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Irina; Ionescu, Diana; Privitera, Simona; Scordino, Agata; Mocanu, Maria Magdalena; Musumeci, Francesco; Grasso, Rosaria; Gulino, Marisa; Iftime, Adrian; Tofolean, Ioana Teodora; Garaiman, Alexandru; Goicea, Alexandru; Irimia, Ruxandra; Dimancea, Alexandru; Ganea, Constanta

    2013-12-01

    The role of mitochondrial complex I in ultraweak photon-induced delayed photon emission [delayed luminescence (DL)] of human leukemia Jurkat T cells was probed by using complex I targeting agents like rotenone, menadione, and quercetin. Rotenone, a complex I-specific inhibitor, dose-dependently increased the mitochondrial level of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), decreased clonogenic survival, and induced apoptosis. A strong correlation was found between the mitochondrial levels of NADH and oxidized flavin mononucleotide (FMNox) in rotenone-, menadione- and quercetin-treated cells. Rotenone enhanced DL dose-dependently, whereas quercetin and menadione inhibited DL as well as NADH or FMNox. Collectively, the data suggest that DL of Jurkat cells originates mainly from mitochondrial complex I, which functions predominantly as a dimer and less frequently as a tetramer. In individual monomers, both pairs of pyridine nucleotide (NADH/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) sites and flavin (FMN-a/FMN-b) sites appear to bind cooperatively their specific ligands. Enhancement of delayed red-light emission by rotenone suggests that the mean time for one-electron reduction of ubiquinone or FMN-a by the terminal Fe/S center (N2) is 20 or 284 μs, respectively. All these findings suggest that DL spectroscopy could be used as a reliable, sensitive, and robust technique to probe electron flow within complex I in situ.

  13. Coordination ligand exchange of a xanthene probe-Ce(III) complex for selective fluorescence sensing of inorganic pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittiloespaisan, Ekkachai; Takashima, Ippei; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Wongkongkatep, Jirarut; Ojida, Akio

    2014-02-28

    A fluorescence sensing system for inorganic pyrophosphate based on ligand exchange of the Ce(III) complex of a xanthene-type probe is developed. This sensing system is successfully applied to the fluorescence detection of polymerase-catalyzed DNA amplification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

  14. Detection of Babesia bigemina infection: use of a DNA probe - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald M. Buening

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a repetitive DNA probe for Babesia bigemina was reviewed. The original plasmid (p(Bbi16 contained an insert of B. bigemina DNA of approximately 6.3 kb. This probe has been evaluated for specificityand analytical sensitivity by dot hybridization with isolates from Mexico, the Caribbean region and Kenya. A partial restriction map has been constructed and insert fragments have been subcloned and utilized as specific DNA probes. A comparison of 32P labelled and non-radioactive DNA probes was presented. Non-radioctive detection systems that have been used include digoxigenin dUTP incorporation, and detection by colorimetric substrate methods. Derivatives from the original DNA probe have been utilized to detect B. bigemina infection in a experimentally inoculated cattle, b field exposed cattle, c infected Boophilus microplus ticks, and d the development of a PCR amplification system.

  15. DNA aptamers as molecular probes for colorectal cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Sefah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular features of specific tumors can increase our knowledge about the mechanism(s underlying disease development and progression. This is particularly significant for colorectal cancer, which is a heterogeneous complex of diseases developed in a sequential manner through a multistep carcinogenic process. As such, it is likely that tumors with similar characteristics might originate in the same manner and have a similar molecular behavior. Therefore, specific mapping of the molecular features can be potentially useful for both tumor classification and the development of appropriate therapeutic regimens. However, this can only be accomplished by developing high-affinity molecular probes with the ability to recognize specific markers associated with different tumors. Aptamers can most easily meet this challenge based on their target diversity, flexible manipulation and ease of development. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Using a method known as cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX and colorectal cancer cultured cell lines DLD-1 and HCT 116, we selected a panel of target-specific aptamers. Binding studies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that these aptamers have high affinity and selectivity. Our data further show that these aptamers neither recognize normal colon cells (cultured and fresh, nor do they recognize most other cancer cell lines tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected aptamers can identify specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancers. We believe that these probes could be further developed for early disease detection, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers.

  16. Effect of a Dual Charge on the DNA-Conjugated Redox Probe on DNA Sensing by Short Hairpin Beacons Tethered to Gold Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kékedy-Nagy, László; Shipovskov, Stepan; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2016-08-16

    Charges of redox species can critically affect both the interfacial state of DNA and electrochemistry of DNA-conjugated redox labels and, as a result, the electroanalytical performance of those systems. Here, we show that the kinetics of electron transfer (ET) between the gold electrode and methylene blue (MB) label conjugated to a double-stranded (ds) DNA tethered to gold strongly depend on the charge of the MB molecule, and that affects the performance of genosensors exploiting MB-labeled hairpin DNA beacons. Positively charged MB binds to dsDNA via electrostatic and intercalative/groove binding, and this binding allows the DNA-mediated electrochemistry of MB intercalated into the duplex and, as a result, a complex mode of the electrochemical signal change upon hairpin hybridization to the target DNA, dominated by the "on-off" signal change mode at nanomolar levels of the analyzed DNA. When MB bears an additional carboxylic group, the negative charge provided by this group prevents intimate interactions between MB and DNA, and then the ET in duplexes is limited by the diffusion of the MB-conjugated dsDNA (the phenomenon first shown in Farjami , E. ; Clima , L. ; Gothelf , K. ; Ferapontova , E. E. Anal. Chem. 2011 , 83 , 1594 ) providing the robust "off-on" nanomolar DNA sensing. Those results can be extended to other intercalating redox probes and are of strategic importance for design and development of electrochemical hybridization sensors exploiting DNA nanoswitchable architectures.

  17. Dynamics of DNA/intercalator complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, J. M.; Wu, Pengguang; Fujimoto, Bryant S.

    1990-05-01

    Complexes of linear and supercoiled DNAs with different intercalating dyes are studied by time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy using intercalated ethidium as the probe. Existing theory is generalized to take account of excitation transfer between intercalated ethidiums, and Forster theory is shown to be valid in this context. The effects of intercalated ethidium, 9-aminoacridine, and proflavine on the torsional rigidity of linear and supercoiled DNAs are studied up to rather high binding ratios. Evidence is presented that metastable secondary structure persists in dye-relaxed supercoiled DNAs, which contradicts the standard model of supercoiled DNAs.

  18. DNA-based stable isotope probing enables the identification of active bacterial endophytes in potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Frank; Lueders, Tillmann; Schloter, Michael; Schaefer, Sabine; Buegger, Franz; Gattinger, Andreas; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca C; Sessitsch, Angela

    2009-03-01

    A (13)CO2 (99 atom-%, 350 ppm) incubation experiment was performed to identify active bacterial endophytes in two cultivars of Solanum tuberosum, cultivars Desirée and Merkur. We showed that after the assimilation and photosynthetic transformation of (13)CO2 into (13)C-labeled metabolites by the plant, the most directly active, cultivar specific heterotrophic endophytic bacteria that consume these labeled metabolite scan be identified by DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP).Density-resolved DNA fractions obtained from SIP were subjected to 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of generated gene libraries.Community profiling revealed community compositions that were dominated by plant chloroplast and mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes for the 'light' fractions of (13)CO2-incubated potato cultivars and of potato cultivars not incubated with (13)CO2. In the 'heavy' fractions of the (13)CO2-incubated endophyte DNA, a bacterial 492-bp terminal restriction fragment became abundant, which could be clearly identified as Acinetobacter and Acidovorax spp. in cultivars Merkur and Desirée,respectively, indicating cultivar-dependent distinctions in (13)C-label flow. These two species represent two common potato endophytes with known plant-beneficial activities.The approach demonstrated the successful detection of active bacterial endophytes in potato. DNA-SIP therefore offers new opportunities for exploring the complex nature of plant-microbe interactions and plant-dependent microbial metabolisms within the endosphere.

  19. Preparation of multi-locus DNA probe cocktail by liquid-phase reassociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Y; Fukuda, M; Kishida, T; Wang, W

    1995-08-01

    We developed a simple, rapid method for the preparation of a DNA-fingerprinting probe cocktail, and tested its usefulness in paternity testing. Exploiting the property of tandemly repetitive DNA segments to be rapidly renatured after heat denaturation, we enriched restriction fragments of a child's genomic DNA for minisatellites by liquid phase reassociation followed by capture with immobilized streptavidin. We amplified and simultaneously labeled the reassociation product by anchored PCR using a digoxigenin-labeling mixture. Using this probe cocktail, we were able to detect fingerprints of paternity case trios, and the results were corroborated by DNA fingerprinting with a commercially available probe as well as by conventional phenotyping. Our method enables one to prepare a fresh cocktail of probes from the DNA sample under study during the overnight electrophoresis and Southern transfer steps in DNA fingerprinting, and eliminates the need of having an expensive probe of limited shelf life. If one has a practical outlook on DNA fingerprinting and regard it as a preliminary test, one does not have to use a cloned DNA probe. The present study demonstrates that a multi-locus probe cocktail serves such a practical purpose.

  20. Thermally forced transitions of DNA-CTMA complex microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizioł, Jacek; Ekiert, Robert; Śniechowski, Maciej; Słomiany, Magdalena; Marzec, Mateusz M.

    2016-06-01

    DNA complexed with amphiphilic cationic surfactants is a new class of optical material. In this work DNA and its complex with cetyltrimetyl ammonium chloride were thermally annealed. X-ray diffractometry revealed irreversible changes of DNA-CTMA microstructure. The new microstucture that appeared in result of the first heating course was stable, despite the further thermal annealing. Agarose gel electrophoresis indicated fundamental differences between thermally treated native DNA and DNA-CTMA complex.

  1. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  2. AFM characterization of ss-DNA probes immobilization: a sequence effect on surface organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, D [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Rouillat, M H [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Dugas, V [BioTray, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, 46 allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Chevolot, Y [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Souteyrand, E [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Phaner-Goutorbe, M [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Optoelectronique et Microsystemes, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France)

    2007-03-15

    The biological sensitivity of a DNA chip depends on the molecular organization of the immobilized probe molecules, single stranded DNA (ss-DNA), on the substrate in terms of accessibility and non specific interactions between probes and substrate. In this article, Amplitude Modulation - Atomic Force Microscopy (AM-AFM) was used to characterize at a molecular scale, the morphological organization of different immobilized probes. In our system, three different ss-DNA were covalently grafted on a silicon substrate with the same deposit process. We studied the influence of probe length (25 bases, 12 bases) and sequence arrangement (two different 25 base oligoprobes) on the morphological organization. We showed that immobilized probes organize themselves in different structures depending on their sequence.

  3. Study on the Interaction of Mitomycin C with ct-DNA by Pd-Porphin Room Temperature Phosphorescence Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Anticancer drug Mitomycin C (MMC) quenches remarkably phosphorescence and reduces lifetime of phosphorescence probe, Pd-meso-tetrakis-(4-trimethylaminophenyl)porphin (Pd-TAPP), in the presence of calf thymus DNA. These results may be attributed to the site competition of MMC with the probe and electron transfer between MMC and probe. MMC also increases polarization degree of the probe by covalent drug-DNA or DNA-drug-DNA crosslinking.

  4. Surface density dependence of PCR amplicon hybridization on PNA/DNA probe layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Danfeng; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Fang

    2005-01-01

    at an intermediate sodium concentration (approximately 100 mM). These effects were mainly ascribed to the electrostatic cross talk among the hybridized DNA molecules and the secondary structure of PCR amplicons. For the negatively charged DNA probes, the hybridization reaction was subjected additionally to the DNA...

  5. Iodination as a probe for small regions of disrupted secondary structure in double-stranded DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Nes, Ingolf F.; Wells, Robert D.

    1976-01-01

    Conditions were established where the thallium-catalyzed iodination of random coil DNA proceeded 100–200 times faster than for native DNA. This reaction was explored as a probe for localized regions of disrupted base pairs in duplex DNA. A heteroduplex was constructed between DNA fragments produced......, if they existed within an otherwise helical DNA fragment 789 base pairs long. Iodination studies were performed on superhelical SV40 DNA and on linear plac DNA. Analysis of the relative amount of iodine in restriction endonuclease fragments of these DNAs revealed the absence of localized single-stranded regions....

  6. A Microfluidic Microbeads Fluorescence Assay with Quantum Dots-Bead-DNA Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankireddy, S R; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    A microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for the detection of tumor causing N-Ras genes using quantum dots has been developed. Presently, quantum dots-bead-DNA probe based hybridization detection methods are often called as 'bead based assays' and their success is substantially influenced by the dispensing and manipulation capability of the microfluidic technology. This study reports the detection of N-Ras cancer gene by fluorescence quenching of quantum dots immobilized on the surface of polystyrene beads. A microfluidic chip was constructed in which the quantum dots-bead-DNA probes were packed in the channel. The target DNA flowed across the beads and hybridized with immobilized probe sequences. The target DNA can be detected by the fluorescence quenching of the quantum dots due to their transfer of emission energy to intercalation dye after DNA hybridization. The mutated gene also induces fluorescence quenching but with less degree than the perfectly complementary target DNA.

  7. HBx-DNA probe preparation and its application in study of hepatocarcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-Guang; Sun, Wen-Sheng; Cao, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Li-Ning; Song, Jing; Li, Hua-Fen; Yan, Shi-Kun

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of HBV especially HBx Open Reading Frame (ORF) in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: HBV 3.2 kb fragment was retrieved by digesting recombinant plasmid pBR322-2HBV with EcoR I, and HBx 0.59 kb fragments by digesting HBV-DNA with BamH I and Bgl II. These fragments were labelled with digoxigenin to get HBV-DNA and HBx-DNA probes. HBV-DNA was detected in HCC by dot blot and Southern blot hybridization with HBV-DNA probe, so the positive specimens in which HBV-DNA were integrated were selected. HBx-DNA was subsequently detected in the selected specimens with HBx-DNA probe. RESULTS: HBV-DNA was detected in 75% HCC, among which integrated type, integrated + free type covered 63.6% and 36.4%. There was no free type. HBx-DNA was detected in 90.5% specimens of integrated type. CONCLUSION: Hepatocarcinogenesis was highly related to HBV-DNA integration, and HBV-DNA mainly integrated into chromosome with incomplete virus DNA fragments among which HBx fragment was the predominant one. PMID:11819309

  8. DNA profiling of extended tracts of primitive DNA repeats: Direct identification of unstable simple repeat loci in complex genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogaeva, E.A.; Korovaitseva, G.; St. George-Hyslop, P. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The most simple DNA repetitive elements, with repetitive monomer units of only 1-10 bp in tandem tracts, are an abundant component of the human genome. The expansion of at least one type of these repeats ((CCG)n and (CTG)n) have been detected for a several neurological diseases with anticipation in successive generations. We propose here a simple method for the identification of particularly expanded repeats and for the recovery of flanking sequences. We generated DNA probes using PCR to create long concatamers (n>100) by amplification of the di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeat oligonucleotide primer pairs. To reduce the complexity of the background band pattern, the genomic DNA was restricted with a mixture of at least five different endonucleases, thereby reducing the size of restriction fragments containing short simple repeat arrays while leaving intact the large fragments containing the longer simple repeats arrays. Direct blot hybridization has shown different {open_quotes}DNA fingerprint{close_quotes} patterns with all arbitrary selected di-hexa nucleotide repeat probes. Direct hybridization of the (CTG)n and (CCG)n probes revealed simple or multiple band patterns depending upon stringency conditions. We were able to detect the presence of expanded unstable tri-nucleotide alleles by (CCG)n probe for some FRAXA subjects and by (CTG)n probe for some myotonic dystrophy subjects which were not present in the parental DNA patterns. The cloning of the unstable alleles for simple repeats can be performed by direct recover from agarose gels of the aberrant unstable bands detected above. The recovered flanking regions can be cloned, sequenced and used for PCR detection of expanded alleles or can be used to screen cDNA. This method may be used for testing of small families with diseases thought to display clinical evidence of anticipation.

  9. Effect of salts, solvents and buffer on miRNA detection using DNA silver nanocluster (DNA/AgNCs) probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun; Waaben Thulstrup, Peter; Bhang, Yong-Joo; Ahn, Jong Cheol; Choi, Suk Won; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Yang, Seong Wook

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs (size ˜21 nt to ˜25 nt) which regulate a variety of important cellular events in plants, animals and single cell eukaryotes. Especially because of their use in diagnostics of human diseases, efforts have been directed towards the invention of a rapid, simple and sequence selective detection method for miRNAs. Recently, we reported an innovative method for the determination of miRNA levels using the red fluorescent properties of DNA/silver nanoclusters (DNA/AgNCs). Our method is based on monitoring the emission drop of a DNA/AgNCs probe in the presence of its specific target miRNA. Accordingly, the accuracy and efficiency of the method relies on the sensitivity of hybridization between the probe and target. To gain specific and robust hybridization between probe and target, we investigated a range of diverse salts, organic solvents, and buffer to optimize target sensing conditions. Under the newly adjusted conditions, the target sensitivity and the formation of emissive DNA/AgNCs probes were significantly improved. Also, fortification of the Tris-acetate buffer with inorganic salts or organic solvents improved the sensitivity of the DNA/AgNC probes. On the basis of these optimizations, the versatility of the DNA/AgNCs-based miRNA detection method can be expanded.

  10. Spectroscopic quantification of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in genomic DNA using boric acid-functionalized nano-microsphere fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Yan; Wei, Jing-Ru; Pan, Jiong-Xiu; Zhang, Wei; Dang, Fu-Quan; Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-15

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is the sixth base of DNA. It is involved in active DNA demethylation and can be a marker of diseases such as cancer. In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive 2-(4-boronophenyl)quinoline-4-carboxylic acid modified poly (glycidyl methacrylate (PBAQA-PGMA) fluorescent probe to detect the 5hmC content of genomic DNA based on T4 β-glucosyltransferase-catalyzed glucosylation of 5hmC. The fluorescence-enhanced intensity recorded from the DNA sample was proportional to its 5-hydroxymethylcytosine content and could be quantified by fluorescence spectrophotometry. The developed probe showed good detection sensitivity and selectivity and a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of 5 hmC within a 0-100nM range. Compared with other fluorescence detection methods, this method not only could determine trace amounts of 5 hmC from genomic DNA but also could eliminate the interference of fluorescent dyes and the need for purification. It also could avoid multiple labeling. Because the PBAQA-PGMA probe could enrich the content of glycosyl-5-hydroxymethyl-2-deoxycytidine from a complex ground substance, it will broaden the linear detection range and improve sensitivity. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.167nM after enrichment. Furthermore, the method was successfully used to detect 5-hydroxymethylcytosine from mouse tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Probing structural changes of self assembled i-motif DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Iljoon

    2015-01-01

    We report an i-motif structural probing system based on Thioflavin T (ThT) as a fluorescent sensor. This probe can discriminate the structural changes of RET and Rb i-motif sequences according to pH change. This journal is

  12. Immobilization-free electrochemical DNA detection with anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongpeth, Jutatip; Jampasa, Sakda; Chaumpluk, Piyasak; Chailapakul, Orawon; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical detection provides a simple, rapid, sensitive and inexpensive method for DNA detection. In traditional electrochemical DNA biosensors, the probe is immobilized onto the electrode. Hybridization with the DNA target causes a change in electrochemical signal, either from the intrinsic signal of the probe/target or through a label or a redox indicator. The major drawback of this approach is the requirement for probe immobilization in a controlled fashion. In this research, we take the advantage of different electrostatic properties between PNA and DNA to develop an immobilization-free approach for highly sequence-specific electrochemical DNA sensing on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) using a square-wave voltammetric (SWV) technique. Anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (AQ-PNA) was employed as a probe together with an SPCE that was modified with a positively-charged polymer (poly quaternized-(dimethylamino-ethyl)methacrylate, PQDMAEMA). The electrostatic attraction between the negatively-charged PNA-DNA duplex and the positively-charged modified SPCE attributes to the higher signal of PNA-DNA duplex than that of the electrostatically neutral PNA probe, resulting in a signal change. The calibration curve of this proposed method exhibited a linear range between 0.35 and 50 nM of DNA target with a limit of detection of 0.13 nM (3SD(blank)/Slope). The sub-nanomolar detection limit together with a small sample volume required (20 μL) allowed detection of DNA. With the high specificity of the pyrrolidinyl PNA probe used, excellent discrimination between complementary and various single-mismatched DNA targets was obtained. An application of this new platform for a sensitive and specific detection of isothermally-amplified shrimp's white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) DNA was successfully demonstrated.

  13. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology in epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fernandes, Octavio [Fundacao Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Tropical; Gomes, Rosangela Fatima; Melo, Maria Norma de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia]|[Cor Jesus Fontes Mato Grosso Univ., Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Julio Muller

    2000-07-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis are due to different species that belongs to Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana complex and Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex, respectively. Cutaneous leishmaniasis ulcers may persist for months to years but eventually they heal, while mucocutaneous leishmaniasis can result in destructive lesions on the nose, oral pharynx, lips or face. The specific diagnosis of the disease is important because of the high cost and toxicity of the treatment and the subsequent medical follow-up depends on the precise identification of the complex that causes the infection. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of parasites of a given endemic region is also essential for the design of appropriate control measures. In this work we typed, using specific DNA probes labelled with {sup 32}P radionuclide, samples collected from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso state. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. We have typed, up to the moment 68 samples. 64 samples (94.1%) belonged to the L. braziliensis complex and only 4 (5.9%) belonged to the L. mexicana complex. (author)

  14. Fabrication of Unimolecular Double-stranded DNA Microarrays on Solid Surfaces for Probing DNA-Protein/Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for fabricating unimole cular double-stranded DNA microarrays on solid surfaces, which were used to probe sequence-specific DNA/protein interactions. For manufacturing the unimolecular double-stranded DNA microarrays, two kinds of special single-stranded oligonucleotides, constant oligonucleotide and target oligonucleotide, were chemically synthesized. The constant oligonucleotides with internal aminated dT were used to capture and immobilize the target oligonucleotides onto the solid surface, and also to provide a primer for later enzymatic extension reactions, while target oligonucleotides took the role of harbouring DNA-binding sites of DNA-binding proteins. The variant target oligonucleotides were annealed and ligated with the constant oligonucleotides to form the new unimolecular oligonucleotides for microspotting. The prepared unimolecular oligonucleotides were microspotted on aldehyde-derivatized glass slides to make partial-dsDNA microarrays. Finally, the partial-dsDNA microarrays were converted into a unimolecular complete-dsDNA microarray by a DNA polymerase extension reaction. The efficiency and accuracy of the polymerase synthesis were demonstrated by the fluorescent-labeled dUTP incorporation in the enzymatic extension reaction and the restriction endonuclease digestion of the fabricated unimolecular complete-dsDNA microarray. The accessibility and specificity of the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins binding to the immobilized unimolecular dsDNA probes were demonstrated by the binding of Cy3 labeled NF-?B (p50·p50 to the unimolecular dsDNA microarray. This unimolecular dsDNA microarray provides a general technique for high-throughput DNA-protein or DNA-drugs interactions.

  15. Preparation of fluorescent DNA probe by solid-phase organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent DNA probe based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET was prepared by solid-phase organic synthesis when CdTe quantum dots (QDs were as energy donors and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs were as energy accepters. The poly(divinylbenzene core/poly(4-vinylpyridine shell microspheres, as solid-phase carriers, were prepared by seeds distillation-precipitation polymerization with 2,2′-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN as initiator in neat acetonitrile. The CdTe QDs and AuNPs were self-assembled on the surface of core/shell microspheres, and then the linkage of CdTe QDs with oligonucleotides (CdTe-DNA and AuNPs with complementary single-stranded DNA (Au-DNA was on the solid-phase carriers instead of in aqueous solution. The hybridization of complementary double stranded DNA (dsDNA bonded to the QDs and AuNPs (CdTe-dsDNA-Au determined the FRET distance of CdTe QDs and AuNPs. Compared with the fluorescence of CdTe-DNA, the fluorescence of CdTe-dsDNA-Au conjugates (DNA probes decreased extremely, which indicated that the FRET occurred between CdTe QDs and AuNPs. The probe system would have a certain degree recovery of fluorescence when the complementary single stranded DNA was introduced into this system, which showed that the distance between CdTe QDs and AuNPs was increased.

  16. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Shimada, Shogo; Okada, Tomoko

    2017-06-29

    The interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The platinum dichloride complex, di-dimethylsulfoxide-dichloroplatinum (II) (Pt(DMSO)2Cl2), was immobilized on an AFM probe by coordinating the platinum to two amino groups to form a complex similar to Pt(en)Cl2, which is structurally similar to cisplatin. The retraction forces were measured between the platinum complex and DNA molecules immobilized on mica plates using force curve measurements. The histogram of the retraction force for λ-DNA showed several peaks; the unit retraction force was estimated to be 130 pN for a pulling rate of 60 nm/s. The retraction forces were also measured separately for four single-base DNA oligomers (adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine). Retraction forces were frequently observed in the force curves for the DNA oligomers of guanine and adenine. For the guanine DNA oligomer, the most frequent retraction force was slightly lower than but very similar to the retraction force for λ-DNA. A higher retraction force was obtained for the adenine DNA oligomer than for the guanine oligomer. This result is consistent with a higher retraction activation energy of adenine with the Pt complex being than that of guanine because the kinetic rate constant for retraction correlates to exp(FΔx - ΔE) where ΔE is an activation energy, F is an applied force, and Δx is a displacement of distance.

  17. Development of a specific DNA probe and PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadersohi, A; Coelen, R J; Hirst, R G

    1997-05-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is responsible for several production diseases in cattle, including mastitis, arthritis, pneumonia, abortion and infertility. Current methodologies for detecting and identifying M. bovis are time consuming and difficult. Tests which rely on antigen or antibody detection have poor sensitivity and specificity. In this paper associated protocols for the development of a hybridization probe and PCR are described. A genomic library (SauIIIA digested) was prepared from M. bovis DNA (Colindale Reference Strain: NC10131:02) and cloned into pUC19. Colony hybridization, using a probe preparation made from purified M. bovis DNA, was used to identify colonies of interest. M. bovis DNA fragments were retrieved from recombinant plasmids by digestion with EcoRI and HindIII. This DNA was used to prepare randomly primed probes for dot blot hybridization analysis with immobilized DNA from M. bovis (two strains), M. dispar, M. agalactiae, M. bovigenitalium (two strains), M. ovipneumoniae, a Group 7 strain, M. arginini and bacteria belonging to different genera. Four probes were found to hybridize only with M. bovis and M. ovipneumoniae DNA, whereas one probe reacted with genomic DNA from only one of the two M. bovis strains. The level of sensitivity of the dot blot hybridization assay was 200 CFU (colony forming units)/mL. To enhance the sensitivity further, an M. bovis-specific PCR assay was developed. The primers were designed using sequences obtained from the probe DNA which discriminated M. bovis from all other Mycoplasma DNA tested. The minimum amount of target DNA that could be detected by the PCR assay was that isolated from 10-20 CFU/mL. The PCR assay was therefore 10 times more sensitive than dot blot hybridization.

  18. Release of DNA binary complexes from the ternary complexes by carboxymethyl poly(L-histidine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, Shoichiro; Sudo, Miyuki; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The DNA ternary complexes with carboxymethyl poly(L-histidine) (CM-PLH) and poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) have released the DNA binary complexes with PEI by the protonation of CM-PLH at endosomal/lysosomal pH. The dissociation of the CM-PLH from the CM-PLH/PEI/DNA ternary complexes is proved by the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis between the CM-PLH and PEI. The resulting PEI/DNA binary complexes easily released DNA, as compared with the CM-PLH/PEI/DNA ternary complexes, which was examined by competitive exchange with dextran sulfate. The release of the DNA binary complexes from the ternary complexes is promising mechanism for higher transfection activity by the CM-PLH/PEI/DNA ternary complexes.

  19. Streching of (DNA/functional molecules) complex between electrodes towards DNA molecular wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norihisa; Nishizawa, Makoto; Inoue, Shintarou; Nakamura, Kazuki

    2009-08-01

    DNA/functional molecules such as (Ru(bpy)32+ complex, conducting polymer etc.) complex was prepared to study molecular structure and I-V characteristics towards DNA molecular wire. For example, Ru(bpy)32+ was associated with duplex of DNA by not only electrostatic interaction but also intercalation in the aqueous solution. Singlemolecular structure of DNA/Ru(bpy)32+ complex was analyzed with AFM. We found a network structure of DNA/Ru(bpy)32+ complex on the mica substrate, which is similar to native DNA. The height of DNA/Ru(bpy)32+ complex on the mica substrate was ranging from 0.8 to 1.6 nm, which was higher than the naked DNA (0.5-1.0 nm). This indicates that single-molecular DNA/Ru(bpy)32+ complex also connects to each other to form network structure on a mica substrate. In order to stretch DNA complex between electrodes, we employed high frequency and high electric field stretching method proposed by Washizu et al. We stretched and immobilized DNA single molecules between a pair of electrodes and its structures were analyzed with AFM technique. The I-V characteristics of DNA single molecules between electrodes were improved by the association of functional molecules with DNA. The molecular structure and I-V characteristics of DNA complex were discussed.

  20. Hairpin DNA probe based surface plasmon resonance biosensor used for the activity assay of E. coli DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Qingfen; Xue, Ying; Yao, Xin; Lu, Wu

    2010-02-01

    Using hairpin DNA probe self-structure change during DNA ligation process, a sensitive, label-free and simple method of E. coli DNA ligase assay via a home-built high-resolution surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument was developed. The DNA ligation process was monitored in real-time and the effects of single-base mutation on the DNA ligation process were investigated. Then an assay of E. coli DNA ligase was completed with a lower detection limit (0.6 nM), wider concentration range and better reproducibility. Moreover, the influence of Quinacrine on the activity of E. coli DNA ligase was also studied, which demonstrated that our method was useful for drug screening.

  1. LD-RTPCR:\tA NEW METHOD FOR LABELLING TRACE cDNA MICROARRAY PROBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范保星; 孙敬芬; 梁好; 王升启; 周平坤; 吴德昌

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the usefulness of long distance reverse transcript combining linear amplification (LD-RTPCR) in labeling slight trace probe used for cDNA microarray. Methods: Total RNA from BEP2D cells was extracted and labeled by two different methods, LD-RTPCR with Cy3-dCTP as fluorescent dye and traditionally used RNA reverse transcript (RT) with Cy5-dCTP as fluorescent dye. Then, the probes labeled by two methods were mixed equally and hybridized with the cDNA microarray. Results: Scan and analysis of the microarray showed that the two methods labeled probes had consistent results. Conclusion: LD-RTPCR was proved useful for labeling cDNA microarray probe, especially for limited RNA material.

  2. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  3. A novel fluorescent probe: europium complex hybridized T7 phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chin-Mei; Jin, Qiaoling; Sutton, April; Chen, Liaohai

    2005-01-01

    We report on the creation of a novel fluorescent probe of europium-complex hybridized T7 phage. It was made by filling a ligand-displayed T7 ghost phage with a fluorescent europium complex particle. The structure of the hybridized phage, which contains a fluorescent inorganic core surrounded by a ligand-displayed capsid shell, was confirmed by electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), bioassays, and fluorescence spectrometer. More importantly, as a benefit of the phage display technology, the hybridized phage has the capability to integrate an affinity reagent against virtually any target molecules. The approach provides an original method to fluorescently "tag" a bioligand and/or to "biofunctionalize" a fluorophore particle. By using other types of materials such as radioactive or magnetic particles to fill the ghost phage, we envision that the hybridized phages represent a new class of fluorescent, magnetic, or radioprobes for imaging and bioassays and could be used both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. DNA interaction studies of a novel Cu(II) complex as an intercalator containing curcumin and bathophenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2013-05-05

    A new copper(II) complex; [Cu(Cur)(DIP)](+2) in which Cur=curcumin and DIP=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, was synthesized and characterized using different physico-chemical methods. Binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus (CT-DNA) has been investigated by emission, absorption, circular dichroism, viscosity, and differential pulse voltammetry and fluorescence techniques. The complex displays significant binding properties to the CT-DNA. In fluorimeteric studies, the binding mode of the complex with CT-DNA was investigated using methylene blue as a fluorescence probe. Fluorescence of methylene blue-DNA solution increased in the presence of increasing amounts of the complex. It was found that the complex is able to displace the methylene blue completely. This indicate intercalation of the complex between base pairs of DNA. The cleavage of plasmid DNA by the complex was also studied. We found that the copper(II) complex can cleave puC18 DNA. Furthermore, mentioned complex induces detectable changes in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA, a decrease in absorption spectrum, and an increase in its viscosity. All of the experimental results showed that the Cu(II) complex bound to DNA by an intercalative mode of binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. ESR study of the direct radiolysis of DNA, DNA-histones and DNA-intercalators complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucitano, A.; Buttafava, A.; Martinotti, F.; Pedraly-Noy, G.

    The nature of the radicals contributing to the room temperature spectrum of irradiated "dry" DNA, with special reference to the central structure, is discussed, and the thesis of their ionic origin tested by irradiation experiments with intercalators. The mechanism of spin transfer protein→DNA has been investigated through a comparative ESR study on the DNA-histones complex, the structureless random molecular mixture of the DNA-histones and the neat components. The yield of spin transfer is enhanced in the random mixture, presumably because of the greater efficiency of molecular contacts. Evidence of the scavenging of electrons by the thymine and cytosine bases, as a key mechanism for the spin transfer, has been obtained.

  6. Proceedings of "Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sension, R; Tokmakoff, A

    2008-04-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the symposium on Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments, which organized as part of the 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, LA from April 6 to 10, 2008. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time ƒresolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time resolved spectroscopy is central to all of DOEs grand challenges for fundamental energy science. This symposium brought together leaders in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy, including experimentalists, theoretical chemists, and simulators, to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. DOE support for this conference was used to help young US and international scientists travel to the meeting. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, optical, and xray spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  7. Label-free DNA hybridization detection by various spectroscopy methods using triphenylmethane dyes as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Changqun; Ma, Ying; Luo, Lin; Weng, Chao; Chen, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    A new assay is developed for direct detection of DNA hybridization using triphenylmethane dye as a probe. It is based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), six triphenylmethane dyes interact with double strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA) were investigated, respectively. The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. Mechanism investigations have shown that groove binding occurs between dsDNA and these triphenylmethane dyes, which depends on G-C sequences of dsDNA and the molecular volumes of triphenylmethane dyes. Our present approaches display the advantages of simple and fast, accurate and reliable, and the artificial samples were determined with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron microscopy visualization of DNA-protein complexes formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Patricia; Zhang, Teri T; Hannah, Ryan; Yang, Hui; Hefferin, Melissa L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-02

    The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and genome stability. Aberrant repair of DSBs has been linked with cancer predisposition and aging. During the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), DNA ends are brought together, processed and then joined. In eukaryotes, this repair pathway is initiated by the binding of the ring-shaped Ku heterodimer and completed by DNA ligase IV. The DNA ligase IV complex, DNA ligase IV/XRRC4 in humans and Dnl4/Lif1 in yeast, is recruited to DNA ends in vitro and in vivo by an interaction with Ku and, in yeast, Dnl4/Lif1 stabilizes the binding of yKu to in vivo DSBs. Here we have analyzed the interactions of these functionally conserved eukaryotic NHEJ factors with DNA by electron microscopy. As expected, the ring-shaped Ku complex bound stably and specifically to DNA ends at physiological salt concentrations. At a ratio of 1 Ku molecule per DNA end, the majority of DNA ends were occupied by a single Ku complex with no significant formation of linear DNA multimers or circular loops. Both Dnl4/Lif1 and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 formed complexes with Ku-bound DNA ends, resulting in intra- and intermolecular DNA end bridging, even with non-ligatable DNA ends. Together, these studies, which provide the first visualization of the conserved complex formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV at juxtaposed DNA ends by electron microscopy, suggest that the DNA ligase IV complex mediates end-bridging by engaging two Ku-bound DNA ends.

  9. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Ahmad, Haslina; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd; Harun, Siti Norain

    2014-09-01

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+, (bpy = 2,2'bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy)2(PIP)]2+ with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  10. Fetal sex determination in the first trimester of pregnancy using a Y chromosome-specific DNA probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.; Huang, S.; Chen, M.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Dong, J.; Ku, A.; Xu, S.

    1987-05-01

    Prenatal determination of fetal sex is important for the prevention of X-linked disorders such as hemophilia, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The complex procedures of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked disorders are unnecessary if the fetus is female, because usually no clinical symptoms ever appear in female. pY 3.4 probe used in this work for sex determination is a 3.4 kilobase human repeat sequence. The probe is specific for the Y chromosome of males and can be used for sex determination. The other prove pBLUR used in this paper as control is a widely dispersed, highly repeated human Alu family DNA sequence, represented equally in male and female DNA. On the basis of the relative densities of the autoradiographic spots produced by hybridization of fetal DNA with pY3.4 and pBLUR, the sex of fetus can be clearly identified. Further the authors can determine the radioactive intensity (cpm) of the hybridized DNA spots and the ratio of hybridization with Y3.4 to pBLUR (Y3.4/pBLUR x 10). Results show that the hybridization ratio of DNA from chorionic villi of male (1.03 +/- 0.24) is significantly higher than that of female (0.16 +/- 0.09). Therefore, sex determination of the fetus can be made, based on the ratio of pY3.4/pBLUR x 10. If necessary they can also use Southern hybridization with pY 3.4 probe of DNA isolated from chorionic villi to confirm the result of dot hybridization.

  11. Probing the Conformational Distributions of Sub-Persistence Length DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Sivak, David; Geissler, Phillip; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-06-08

    We have measured the bending elasticity of short double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) chains through small-angle X-ray scattering from solutions of dsDNA-linked dimers of gold nanoparticles. This method, which does not require exertion of external forces or binding to a substrate, reports on the equilibrium distribution of bending fluctuations, not just an average value (as in ensemble FRET) or an extreme value (as in cyclization), and in principle provides a more robust data set for assessing the suitability of theoretical models. Our experimental results for dsDNA comprising 42-94 basepairs (bp) are consistent with a simple worm-like chain model of dsDNA elasticity, whose behavior we have determined from Monte Carlo simulations that explicitly represent nanoparticles and their alkane tethers. A persistence length of 50 nm (150 bp) gave a favorable comparison, consistent with the results of single-molecule force-extension experiments on much longer dsDNA chains, but in contrast to recent suggestions of enhanced flexibility at these length scales.

  12. Effect of different concentration of HPV DNA probe immobilization for cervical cancer detection based IDE biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshila, M. L.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.; Nadzirah, Sh.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2017-03-01

    This paper principally delineates to the detection process of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test. HPV is an extremely common virus infection that infected to human by the progressions cell in the cervix cell. The types of HPV that give a most exceedingly awful infected with cervical cancer is 16 and 18 other than 31 and 45. The HPV DNA probe is immobilized with a different concentration to stabilize the sensitivity. A technique of rapid and sensitive for the HPV identification was proposed by coordinating basic DNA extraction with a quality of DNA. The extraction of the quality of DNA will make a proficiency of the discovery procedure. It will rely on the sequence of the capture probes and the way to support their attached. The fabrication, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization procedures are described by current-voltage (I-V) estimation by utilizing KEITHLEY 6487. This procedure will play out a decent affectability and selectivity of HPV discovery.

  13. Comet-FISH with rDNA probes for the analysis of mutagen-induced DNA damage in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniewska, Jolanta; Grabowska, Marta; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Kolano, Bozena

    2012-06-01

    We used comet-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the model plant species Crepis capillaris following exposure of seedlings to maleic hydrazide (MH). FISH with 5S and 25S rDNA probes was applied to comets obtained under alkaline conditions to establish whether these DNA regions were preferentially involved in comet tail formation. MH treatment induced significant fragmentation of nuclear DNA and of rDNA loci. A 24-h post-treatment recovery period allowed a partial reversibility of MH-induced damage on nuclear and rDNA regions. Analyses of FISH signals demonstrated that rDNA sequences were always involved in tail formation and that 5S rDNA was more frequently present in the tail than 25S rDNA, regardless of treatment. The involvement of 25S rDNA in nucleolus formation and differences in chromatin structure between the two loci may explain the different susceptibility of the 25S and 5S rDNA regions to migrate into the tail. This work is the first report on the application of FISH to comet preparations from plants to analyze the distribution and repair of DNA damage within specific genomic regions after mutagenic treatment. Moreover, our work suggests that comet-FISH in plants may be a useful tool for environmental monitoring assessment.

  14. Effect of structure on sensing performance of a target induced signaling probe shifting DNA-based (TISPS-DNA) sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Fengqin; Xu, Yanmei; He, Xunjun; Xu, Lan; Shi, Wenbing; Zhang, Guiling; Yan, Hong

    2017-05-15

    A type of "signal on" displacement-based sensors named target induced signaling probe shifting DNA-based (TISPS-DNA) sensor were developed for a designated DNA detection. The signaling mechanism of the signaling probe (SP) shifting different from the classical conformation/flexibility change mode endows the sensor with high sensitivity. Through using thiolated or no thiolated capturing probe (CP), two 3-probe sensing structures, sensor-1 and sensor-2, were designed and constructed. The systematical comparing research results show that both sensors exhibit some similarities or big differences in sensing performance. On the one hand, the similarity in structures determines the similarity in some aspects of signaling mechanism, background signal, signal changing form, anti-fouling ability and versatility; on the other hand, the slight difference in structures also results in two opposite hybridization modes of gradual increasing resistance and gradual decreasing resistance which can affect the hybridization efficiency between the assistant probe (AP) and the SP, further producing some big differences in sensing performance, for example, apparently different signal enhancement (SE) change, point mutation discrimination ability and response speed. Under the optimized fabrication and detection conditions, both sensors feature high sensitivity for target DNAs with the detection limits of ∼10 fM for sensor-1 and ∼7 fM for sensor-2, respectively. Among many acquired sensing virtues, the sensor-1 shows a peculiar specificity adjustability which is also a highlight in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immobilization of human papillomavirus DNA probe for surface plasmon resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Ji, Yanhong; Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Yao; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2009-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a kind of double-stranded DNA virus whose subspecies have diversity. Near 40 kinds of subspecies can invade reproductive organ and cause some high risk disease, such as cervical carcinoma. In order to detect the type of the subspecies of the HPV DNA, we used the parallel scan spectral surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique, which is a novel type of two- dimensional bio-sensing method based on surface plasmon resonance and is proposed in our previous work, to study the immobilization of the HPV DNA probes on the gold film. In the experiment, four kinds of the subspecies of the HPV DNA (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV58) probes are fixed on one gold film, and incubate in the constant temperature condition to get a HPV DNA probe microarray. We use the parallel scan spectral SPR imaging system to detect the reflective indices of the HPV DNA subspecies probes. The benefits of this new approach are high sensitive, label-free, strong specificity and high through-put.

  16. Studies on the Interaction Mechanism of 1,10-Phenanthroline Cobalt(II Complex with DNA and Preparation of Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Wang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet (UV spectroscopy techniques coupled with cyclic voltammetry (CV were used to study the interaction between salmon sperm DNA and 1,10-Phenanthroline cobalt(II complex, [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]Cl·H2O, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline. The interaction between [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ and double-strand DNA (dsDNA was identified to be intercalative mode. An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by covalent immobilization of probe single-strand DNA (ssDNA related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV on the activated glassy carbon electrode (GCE. With [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ being the novel electrochemical hybridization indicator, the selectivity of ssDNA-modified electrode was investigated and selective detection of complementary ssDNA was achieved using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV.

  17. A New FRET-Based Sensitive DNA Sensor for Medical Diagnostics using PNA Probe and Water-Soluble Blue Light Emitting Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mathur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable, fast, and low-cost biosensor for medical diagnostics using DNA sequence detection has been developed and tested for the detection of the bacterium “Bacillus anthracis.” In this sensor, Poly [9,9-di (6,6′- N, N′ trimethylammonium hexylfluorenyl-2, 7-diyl-alt-co- (1,4-phenylene] dibromide salt (PFP has been taken as cationic conjugated polymer (CCP and PNA attached with fluorescein dye (PNAC∗ as a probe. The basic principle of this sensor is that when a PNAC∗ probe is hybridized with a single strand DNA (ssDNA having complementary sequence, Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET may take place from PFP to the PNAC∗/DNA complex. If the FRET is efficient, the photoluminescence from the PFP will be highly quenched and that from PNAC∗ will be enhanced. On the other hand, if the DNA sequence is noncomplementary to PNA, FRET will not occur.

  18. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  19. Specific Photocrosslinking of DNA-Protein Complexes: Identification of Contacts Between Integration Host Factor and Its Target DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Wei; Nash, Howard A.

    1994-12-01

    Azide moieties have been specifically placed in the backbone of DNA by chemical coupling between azidophenacyl bromide and uniquely positioned phosphorothioate residues. The derivatized DNA forms specific complexes with a DNA-binding protein and, following irradiation with 302-nm light, makes specific crosslinks to the protein. Isolation of this covalent complex, followed by tryptic digestion and Edman degradation of the resulting crosslinked peptide, identifies the portion of the protein that is near the derivatized segment of the target DNA. We use this method to probe the interaction between a specific DNA sequence and integration host factor (IHF) protein. A single IHF heterodimer is known to contact >25 bp of DNA and thereby introduce a sharp bend. Two segments of a typical IHF site were derivatized with aryl azide. Although the segments were separated by only 5 bp, they crosslinked to different subunits of IHF. The locations of the crosslinks support our current view for the way IHF protein binds to and bends its specific targets.

  20. Determining the topology of stable protein-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Isabel K; Vazquez, Mariel

    2013-04-01

    Difference topology is an experimental technique that can be used to unveil the topological structure adopted by two or more DNA segments in a stable protein-DNA complex. Difference topology has also been used to detect intermediates in a reaction pathway and to investigate the role of DNA supercoiling. In the present article, we review difference topology as applied to the Mu transpososome. The tools discussed can be applied to any stable nucleoprotein complex.

  1. Coaxial atomic force microscope probes for dielectrophoresis of DNA under different buffer conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinglei; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a coaxial AFM nanoprobe device for dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of DNA molecules in Tris-EDTA (TE) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffers. The DEP properties of 20 nm polystyrene beads were studied with coaxial probes in media with different conductivities. Due to the special geometry of our DEP probe device, sufficiently high electric fields were generated at the probe end to focus DNA molecules with positive DEP. DEP trapping for both polystyrene beads and DNA molecules was quantitatively analyzed over the frequency range from 100 kHz to 50 MHz and compared with the Clausius-Mossotti theory. Finally, we discussed the negative effect of medium salinity during DEP trapping.

  2. Molecular architecture of the preinitiation complex in adenovirus DNA replication

    OpenAIRE

    Mysiak, Monika Elzbieta

    2004-01-01

    After infection of a host cell, adenovirus (Ad) aims for generation of progeny viruses, and thus it rapidly replicates its genomic DNA. The replication process starts with the assembly of the preinitiation complex (PIC) on the origin DNA. The PIC consists of three viral proteins, DNA polymerase (pol), precursor terminal protein (pTP), DNA binding protein (DBP) and two transcription factors of the host cell, Nuclear Factor I (NFI) and Octamer binding protein (Oct-1). Both transcription factors...

  3. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbock, L J; Otto, O; Skarstam, D R; Jahn, S; Chimerel, C; Gornall, J L; Keyser, U F, E-mail: ufk20@cam.ac.u [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-17

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of {lambda}-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single {lambda}-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  4. Electrochemical DNA probe for Hg(2+) detection based on a triple-helix DNA and Multistage Signal Amplification Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Yihe; Ma, Hongmin; Ren, Xiang; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, an ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for detection of Hg(2+). Gold nanoparticles decorated bovine serum albumin reduction of graphene oxide (AuNP-BSA-rGO) were used as subsurface material for the immobilization of triple-helix DNA. The triple-helix DNA containing a thiol labelled single-stranded DNA (sDNA) and a thymine-rich DNA (T-rich DNA), which could be unwinded in the present of Hg(2+) to form more stable thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) complex. T-Hg(2+)-T complex was then removed and the sDNA was left on the electrode. At this time, gold nanoparticle carrying thiol labelled cytosine-rich complementary DNA (cDNA-AuNP) could bind with the free sDNA. Meanwhile, the other free cDNA on AuNP could bind with each other in the present of Ag(+) to form the stable cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine (C-Ag(+)-C) complex and circle amplification. Plenty of C-Ag(+)-C could form silver nanoclusters by electrochemical reduction and the striping signal of Ag could be measured for purpose of the final electrochemical detection of Hg(2+). This sensor could detect Hg(2+) over a wide concentration range from 0.1 to 130nM with a detection limit of 0.03nM.

  5. On the Cell Probe Complexity of Membership and Perfect Hashing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus

    2001-01-01

    We study two fundamental static data structure problems, membership and perfect hashing, in Yao's cell probe model. The first space and bit probe optimal worst case upper bound is given for the membership problem. We also give a new efficient membership scheme where the query algorithm makes just...

  6. DNA-DNA kissing complexes as a new tool for the assembly of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Anna; Kobbe, Daniela; Focke, Manfred

    2016-02-29

    Kissing-loop annealing of nucleic acids occurs in nature in several viruses and in prokaryotic replication, among other circumstances. Nucleobases of two nucleic acid strands (loops) interact with each other, although the two strands cannot wrap around each other completely because of the adjacent double-stranded regions (stems). In this study, we exploited DNA kissing-loop interaction for nanotechnological application. We functionalized the vertices of DNA tetrahedrons with DNA stem-loop sequences. The complementary loop sequence design allowed the hybridization of different tetrahedrons via kissing-loop interaction, which might be further exploited for nanotechnology applications like cargo transport and logical elements. Importantly, we were able to manipulate the stability of those kissing-loop complexes based on the choice and concentration of cations, the temperature and the number of complementary loops per tetrahedron either at the same or at different vertices. Moreover, variations in loop sequences allowed the characterization of necessary sequences within the loop as well as additional stability control of the kissing complexes. Therefore, the properties of the presented nanostructures make them an important tool for DNA nanotechnology. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Hydrodynamic properties of DNA and DNA-lipid complex in an elongational flow field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naoki; Ashitaka, Hidetomo; Ohtomo, Kenji; Fukui, Akimasa

    2007-03-10

    The aim of this study was to determine the difference between hydrodynamic properties of DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) complex and those of DNA, which may be related to the difference in fibre-forming ability of DNA-CTA from that of DNA. Responses of DNA and DNA-CTA complex to an elongational flow field were investigated. In both solution systems, results suggesting a coil-stretch transition were obtained. From a critical strain rate value, the radius of gyration of DNA-CTA molecules in ethanol-glycerol solution was revealed to be 0.3-0.5 times of that of DNA in aqueous NaCl solution. Shear viscosity of DNA-CTA solution was much smaller than that of DNA solution, also suggesting a smaller size of DNA-CTA in ethanol-glycerol solution than that of DNA in aqueous NaCl solution. The plateau birefringence value of the DNA-CTA system, a parameter that indicates the local molecular conformation and the molecular arrangement, was only about 1/10 of that of the DNA system. There is an empirically determined molecular model of DNA-CTA complex in which a DNA molecule is sheathed by a cylindrical crust made of CTA chains. This structure reduces the DNA molecular density in a pure elongational flow field region but cannot explain the observed reduction of birefringence intensity. The small plateau birefringence value of DNA-CTA compared with that of DNA was attributed to the reduced molecular polarizability by the particular conformation of DNA molecules and CTA chains in the DNA-CTA system such as that expected by the conformational models.

  8. Microarray long oligo probe designing for Escherichia coli: an in-silico DNA marker extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Payam; Najafi, Ali; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are predominant diseases which may be caused by different pathogenic microorganisms, particularly Escherichia coli (E.coli). DNA microarray technology is an accurate, rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic tool which may lead to definite diagnosis and treatment of several infectious diseases. DNA microarray is a multi-process method in which probe designing plays an important. Therefore, the authors of the present study have tried to design a range of effective and proper long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of different strains of pathogenic E.coli and in particular, uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC). E.coli O26 H11 11368 uid41021 was selected as the standard strain for probe designing. This strain encompasses the largest nucleotide sequence and the most number of genes among other pathogenic strains of E.coli. For performing this in silico survey, NCBI database, GReview Server, PanSeq Server, Oligoanalyzer tool, and AlleleID 7.7 were used to design accurate, appropriate, effective, and flexible long oligo microarray probes. Moreover, the genome of E.coli and its closely related microorganisms were compared. In this study, 15 long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying different strains of E.coli such as UPEC. These probes possessed the best physico-chemical characteristics. The functional and structural properties of the designed probes were recognized by practical tools and softwares. The use of reliable advanced technologies and methodologies for probe designing guarentees the high quality of microarray probes and makes DNA microarray technology more flexible and an effective diagnostic technique.

  9. An Integrated DNA Modified Dual-microelectrode Sensor Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Qin LIN; Li Ping LU; Xiao Hua JIANG

    2005-01-01

    A unique method for preparing a coaxial dual-microelectrode sensor by vaporizing the nano-thickness Au layer on the DNA modified carbon fiber micro-column electrode was illustrated.The dual-electrode showed particular merit for determination in biological systems.

  10. Increased detectability of somatic changes in the DNA from human tumours after probing with "synthetic" and "genome-derived" hypervariable multilocus probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagoda, P J; Seitz, G; Epplen, J T

    1989-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting with two minisatellite (33.15, M13) and two simple repeat probes [(GACA)4, (CAC)5/(GTG)s] was performed to screen for somatic changes in the DNA from various solid human tumours in comparison with constitutional DNA from the same patient. Loss of bands or changes in band...... intensities were observed. Together the probes 33.15 and (CAC)5/(GTG)5 detected deviating fingerprint patterns in 63% of the colorectal carcinomas investigated. In mammary and stomach carcinomas, only 1/11 and 2/11 tumours, respectively, showed differences with either of the three probes, 33.15, (GACA)4...

  11. Origin and molecular organization of supernumerary chromosomes of Prochilodus lineatus (characiformes, prochilodontidae) obtained by DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltolin, Tatiana Aparecida; Laudicina, Alejandro; Senhorini, José Augusto; Bortolozzi, Jehud; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio

    2010-12-01

    In Prochilodus lineatus B-chromosomes are visualized as reduced size extra elements identified as microchromosomes and are variable in morphology and number. We describe the specific total probe (B-chromosome probe) in P. lineatus obtained by chromosome microdissection and a whole genomic probe (genomic probe) from an individual without B-chromosome. The specific B-chromosome was scraped and processed to obtain DNA with amplification by DOP-PCR, and so did the genomic probe DNA. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using the B-chromosome probe labeled with dUTP-Tetramethyl-rhodamine and the genomic probe labeled with digoxigenin-FITC permitted to establish that in this species supernumerary chromosomes with varying number and morphology had different structure of chromatin when compared to that of the regular chromosomes or A complement, since only these extra elements were labeled in the metaphases. The present findings suggest that modifications in the chromatin structure of B-chromosomes to differentiate them from the A chromosomes could occur along their dispersion in the individuals of the population.

  12. Torsional dynamics and orientation of DNA-DAPI complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellona, ML; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    The flexibility of calf thymus DNA and several polynucleotides was measured using the anisotropy decay of DAPI bound to DNA, a minor groove probe. DNA torsional dynamics were analyzed using the Schurr model [Allison, S. A., and Schutt, J. M. (1979) Chem. Phys. 41, 35-44] in the infinite polymer length approximation. Time-resolved fluorescence depolarization was measured using a frequency-doubled mode-locked dye laser and frequency- domain acquisition methods. At very high P/D ratios, the anis...

  13. Photocleavage of DNA by copper(II) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil R Chakravarty

    2006-11-01

    The chemistry of ternary and binary copper(II) complexes showing efficient visible lightinduced DNA cleavage activity is summarized in this article. The role of the metal in photo-induced DNA cleavage reactions is explored by designing complex molecules having a variety of ligands. Ternary copper(II) complexes with amino acid like L-methionone or L-lysine and phenanthroline base are efficient photocleavers of DNA. Complexes of formulation [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4) with NSO-donor Schiff base (HL) and NN-donor heterocyclic base 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) show significant cleavage of supercoiled (SC) DNA on exposure to red light at ≈ 700 nm. The - and CT electronic bands of the copper(II) complexes play important roles in DNA cleavage reactions. The mechanistic pathways are found to be dependent on the types of ligands present in the copper(II) complexes and the photo-excitation energy. While UV exposure generally proceeds via a type-II process forming singlet oxygen as the reactive species, red-light exposure leads to DNA cleavage following different mechanistic pathways, viz. type-I, type-II and photo-redox pathways. Ternary copper(II) complexes with phen as DNA binder and Schiff base with a thiomethyl group as photosensitizer, cleave SC DNA to its nicked circular (NC) form in a type-II process in red-light. The binary complex [Cu(dpq)2(H2O)](ClO4)2 (dpq, dipyridoquinoxaline) cleaves DNA by photo-redox pathway at 694 nm. The binuclear complex [Cu$^{\\text{II}}_{2}$(RSSR)2], where H2RSSR is a Schiff base derived from 2-(thioethyl)salicylaldimine, cleaves SC DNA at 632.8 nm (CW He-Ne laser) and 694 nm (ruby laser) involving sulphide (type-I process) and hydroxyl radicals (photo-redox pathway) as the reactive species.

  14. Study of concentration of HPV DNA probe immobilization for cervical cancer detection based IDE biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshila, M. L.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper mainly illustrates regarding the detection process of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA probe. HPV is the most common virus that infected to human by a sexually transmitted virus. The most common high-risk HPV are 16 and 18. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) device used as based of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) acts as inorganic surface, where by using APTES as a linker between inorganic surface and organic surface. A strategy of rapid and sensitive for the HPV detection was proposed by integrating simple DNA extraction with a gene of DNA. The extraction of the gene of DNA will make an efficiency of the detection process. It will depend on the sequence of the capture probes and the way to support their attached. The fabrication, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization processes are characterized by current voltage (I-V) measurement by using KEITHLEY 6487. This strategy will perform a good sensitivity of HPV detection.

  15. Cryo-EM Imaging of DNA-PK DNA Damage Repair Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phoebe L. Stewart

    2005-06-27

    Exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that must be repaired for cell survival. Higher eukaryotes respond to DSBs by arresting the cell cycle, presumably to repair the DNA lesions before cell division. In mammalian cells, the nonhomologous end-joining DSB repair pathway is mediated by the 470 kDa DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) together with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. Mouse knock-out models of these three proteins are all exquisitely sensitive to low doses of ionizing radiation. In the presence of DNA ends, Ku binds to the DNA and then recruits DNA-PKcs. After formation of the complex, the kinase activity associated with DNA-PKcs becomes activated. This kinase activity has been shown to be essential for repairing DNA DSBs in vivo since expression of a kinase-dead form of DNA-PKcs in a mammalian cell line that lacks DNA-PKcs fails to complement the radiosensitive phenotype. The immense size of DNA-PKcs suggests that it may also serve as a docking site for other DNA repair proteins. Since the assembly of the DNA-PK complex onto DNA is a prerequisite for DSB repair, it is critical to obtain structural information on the complex. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle reconstruction methods provide a powerful way to image large macromolecular assemblies at near atomic (10-15 ?) resolution. We have already used cryo-EM methods to examine the structure of the isolated DNA-PKcs protein. This structure reveals numerous cavities throughout the protein that may allow passage of single or double-stranded DNA. Pseudo two-fold symmetry was found for the monomeric protein, suggesting that DNA-PKcs may interact with two DNA ends or two Ku heterodimers simultaneously. Here we propose to study the structure of the cross-linked DNA-PKcs/Ku/DNA complex. Difference imaging with our published DNA-PKcs structure will enable us to elucidate the architecture of the complex. A second

  16. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J J; Bartelt, M C; Orme, C A; Villacampa, A; Weeks, B L; Miller, A E

    2002-01-31

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies

  17. The Cell Probe Complexity of Succinct Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Anna; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2003-01-01

    In the cell probe model with word size 1 (the bit probe model), a static data structure problem is given by a map , where is a set of possible data to be stored, is a set of possible queries (for natural problems, we have ) and is the answer to question about data . A solution is given by a repre......In the cell probe model with word size 1 (the bit probe model), a static data structure problem is given by a map , where is a set of possible data to be stored, is a set of possible queries (for natural problems, we have ) and is the answer to question about data . A solution is given...

  18. Detecting variants with Metabolic Design, a new software tool to design probes for explorative functional DNA microarray development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravelat Fabrice

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms display vast diversity, and each one has its own set of genes, cell components and metabolic reactions. To assess their huge unexploited metabolic potential in different ecosystems, we need high throughput tools, such as functional microarrays, that allow the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes. However, most classical functional microarrays use specific probes that monitor only known sequences, and so fail to cover the full microbial gene diversity present in complex environments. We have thus developed an algorithm, implemented in the user-friendly program Metabolic Design, to design efficient explorative probes. Results First we have validated our approach by studying eight enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the model strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. EPA505 using a designed microarray of 8,048 probes. As expected, microarray assays identified the targeted set of genes induced during biodegradation kinetics experiments with various pollutants. We have then confirmed the identity of these new genes by sequencing, and corroborated the quantitative discrimination of our microarray by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we have assessed metabolic capacities of microbial communities in soil contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Results show that our probe design (sensitivity and explorative quality can be used to study a complex environment efficiently. Conclusions We successfully use our microarray to detect gene expression encoding enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation for the model strain. In addition, DNA microarray experiments performed on soil polluted by organic pollutants without prior sequence assumptions demonstrate high specificity and sensitivity for gene detection. Metabolic Design is thus a powerful, efficient tool that can be used to design explorative probes and monitor metabolic pathways in complex environments

  19. Efficient in situ detection of mRNAs using the Chlorella virus DNA ligase for padlock probe ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nils; Meier, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Padlock probes are single-stranded DNA molecules that are circularized upon hybridization to their target sequence by a DNA ligase. In the following, the circulated padlock probes are amplified and detected with fluorescently labeled probes complementary to the amplification product. The hallmark of padlock probe assays is a high detection specificity gained by the ligation reaction. Concomitantly, the ligation reaction is the largest drawback for a quantitative in situ detection of mRNAs due to the low affinities of common DNA or RNA ligases to RNA-DNA duplex strands. Therefore, current protocols require that mRNAs be reverse transcribed to DNA before detection with padlock probes. Recently, it was found that the DNA ligase from Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) is able to efficiently ligate RNA-splinted DNA. Hence, we designed a padlock probe assay for direct in situ detection of mRNAs using the PBCV-1 DNA ligase. Experimental single-cell data were used to optimize and characterize the efficiency of mRNA detection with padlock probes. Our results demonstrate that the PBCV-1 DNA ligase overcomes the efficiency limitation of current protocols for direct in situ mRNA detection, making the PBCV-1 DNA ligase an attractive tool to simplify in situ ligation sequencing applications.

  20. Complexation of DNA with ruthenium organometallic compounds: the high complexation ratio limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despax, Stéphane; Jia, Fuchao; Pfeffer, Michel; Hébraud, Pascal

    2014-06-14

    Interactions between DNA and ruthenium organometallic compounds are studied by using visible light absorption and circular dichroism measurements. A titration technique allowing for the absolute determination of the advancement degree of the complexation, without any assumption about the number of complexation modes is developed. When DNA is in excess, complexation involves intercalation of one of the organometallic compound ligands between DNA base pairs. But, in the high complexation ratio limit, where organometallic compounds are in excess relative to the DNA base pairs, a new mode of interaction is observed, in which the organometallic compound interacts weakly with DNA. The weak interaction mode, moreover, develops when all the DNA intercalation sites are occupied. A regime is reached in which one DNA base pair is linked to more than one organometallic compound.

  1. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-02

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases.

  2. Local probe investigation of emergent phenomena in complex oxide heterointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mengchen

    Complex oxide heterointerfaces exhibit rich physics as well as many veiled puzzles. LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) is one of the prototype of such heterointerfaces. In 2004, Ohtomo and Hwang first reported a conducing interface emerged between perovskite oxide insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. Following this seminal discovery, many emergent phenomena like metal-insulator transition, piezoresponse, superconductivity, magnetism, strong spin-orbit coupling and coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism were reported in the fascinating LAO/STO system. However, the origin of the conducting interface is still the subject of intense debate, and the physics behind these emergent phenomena remains a wild space to be explored. My Ph.D. study focused on the emergent phenomena in LAO/STO by using "local probes" -- nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography and the AFM itself. I used piezoresponse force microscope (PFM) to study the electromechanical response in LAO/STO and developed a high-resolution, non-destructive PFM imaging technique to visualize nanostructures at LAO/STO interface. The results indicate that the PFM signal is related to a carrier density mediated interfacial lattice distortion, and surface adsorbates can affect the PFM signal via coupling to the electrons at the interface. I integrated graphene on LAO/STO, created field-effect devices in graphene/LAO/STO and collaborated with Dr. Giriraj Jnawali to investigate the transport properties. The high quality single layer graphene on LAO/STO exhibited the half-integer quantum Hall effect and room temperature weak antilocalization behavior. I performed transport measurements in (110)-oriented LAO/STO to investigate anisotropic quasi one-dimensional superconductivity in nanowires. Based on the results I proposed a plausible explanation related to the Lifshitz transition and anisotropic band structures of nanowires in (110)-oriented LAO/STO. Co-worked with Dr. Keith Brown, I studied

  3. Scanning probe microscopy investigation of complex-oxide heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Feng

    Advances in the growth of precisely tailored complex-oxide heterostructures have led to new emergent behavior and associated discoveries. One of the most successful examples consists of an ultrathin layer of LaAlO 3 (LAO) deposited on TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO), where a high mobility quasi-two dimensional electron liquid (2DEL) is formed at the interface. Such 2DEL demonstrates a variety of novel properties, including field tunable metal-insulator transition, superconductivity, strong spin-orbit coupling, magnetic and ferroelectric like behavior. Particularly, for 3-unit-cell (3 u.c.) LAO/STO heterostructures, it was demonstrated that a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) tip can be used to "write" or "erase" nanoscale conducting channels at the interface, making LAO/STO a highly flexible platform to fabricate novel nanoelectronics. This thesis is focused on scanning probe microscopy studies of LAO/STO properties. We investigate the mechanism of c-AFM lithography over 3 u.c. LAO/STO in controlled ambient conditions by using a vacuum AFM, and find that the water molecules dissociated on the LAO surface play a critical role during the c-AFM lithography process. We also perform electro-mechanical response measurements over top-gated LAO/STO devices. Simultaneous piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and capacitance measurements reveal a correlation between LAO lattice distortion and interfacial carrier density, which suggests that PFM could not only serve as a powerful tool to map the carrier density at the interface but also provide insight into previously reported frequency dependence of capacitance enhancement of top-gated LAO/STO structures. To study magnetism at the LAO/STO interface, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetoelectric force microscopy (MeFM) are carried out to search for magnetic signatures that depend on the carrier density at the interface. Results demonstrate an electronicallycontrolled ferromagnetic phase on top-gated LAO

  4. Combination probes with intercalating anchors and proximal fluorophores for DNA and RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jieqiong; Wilson, Adam; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-09-30

    A new class of modified oligonucleotides (combination probes) has been designed and synthesised for use in genetic analysis and RNA detection. Their chemical structure combines an intercalating anchor with a reporter fluorophore on the same thymine nucleobase. The intercalator (thiazole orange or benzothiazole orange) provides an anchor, which upon hybridisation of the probe to its target becomes fluorescent and simultaneously stabilizes the duplex. The anchor is able to communicate via FRET to a proximal reporter dye (e.g. ROX, HEX, ATTO647N, FAM) whose fluorescence signal can be monitored on a range of analytical devices. Direct excitation of the reporter dye provides an alternative signalling mechanism. In both signalling modes, fluorescence in the unhybridised probe is switched off by collisional quenching between adjacent intercalator and reporter dyes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and RNA targets are identified by differences in the duplex melting temperature, and the use of short hybridization probes, made possible by the stabilisation provided by the intercalator, enhances mismatch discrimination. Unlike other fluorogenic probe systems, placing the fluorophore and quencher on the same nucleobase facilitates the design of short probes containing multiple modifications. The ability to detect both DNA and RNA sequences suggests applications in cellular imaging and diagnostics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. DNA-based digital tension probes reveal integrin forces during early cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Ge, Chenghao; Zhu, Cheng; Salaita, Khalid

    2014-10-01

    Mechanical stimuli profoundly alter cell fate, yet the mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction remain obscure because of a lack of methods for molecular force imaging. Here to address this need, we develop a new class of molecular tension probes that function as a switch to generate a 20- to 30-fold increase in fluorescence upon experiencing a threshold piconewton force. The probes employ immobilized DNA hairpins with tunable force response thresholds, ligands and fluorescence reporters. Quantitative imaging reveals that integrin tension is highly dynamic and increases with an increasing integrin density during adhesion formation. Mixtures of fluorophore-encoded probes show integrin mechanical preference for cyclized RGD over linear RGD peptides. Multiplexed probes with variable guanine-cytosine content within their hairpins reveal integrin preference for the more stable probes at the leading tip of growing adhesions near the cell edge. DNA-based tension probes are among the most sensitive optical force reporters to date, overcoming the force and spatial resolution limitations of traction force microscopy.

  6. Enhancement of the immobi- lization and discrimination of DNA probe on a biosensor using gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been widely utilized in biological research in recent years. 1,6-Hexanedithiol was used as the medium in this work to attach Au nanoparticles on thegold plates. We studied the immobilization and hybridization of DNA probes onto the resulted plates using the quartz crystal microbalance method. Approximately 3-5 times adsorption enhancement of HS-DNA on the plates was ob-tained under our experimental conditions. Using this DNA sensor, the sensitivity was promoted by approximately three times to 0.35 mg/mL.

  7. Cyanines as new fluorescent probes for DNA detection and two-photon excited bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin Jiang; Wu, Po Lam; Bolze, Frédéric; Leung, Heidi W C; Li, King Fai; Mak, Nai Ki; Kwong, Daniel W J; Nicoud, Jean-François; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2010-05-21

    A series of cyanine fluorophores based on fused aromatics as an electron donor for DNA sensing and two-photon bioimaging were synthesized, among which the carbazole-based biscyanine exhibits high sensitivity and efficiency as a fluorescent light-up probe for dsDNA, which shows selective binding toward the AT-rich regions. The synergetic effect of the bischromophoric skeleton gives a several-fold enhancement in a two-photon absorption cross-section as well as a 25- to 100-fold enhancement in two-photon excited fluorescence upon dsDNA binding.

  8. A DNA immunoprecipitation assay used in quantitative detection of in vitro DNA-protein complex binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Young; Chae, Ji Hyung; Oh, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chul Geun

    2013-10-15

    To begin gene transcription, several transcription factors must bind to specific DNA sequences to form a complex via DNA-protein interactions. We established an in vitro method for specific and sensitive analyses of DNA-protein interactions based on a DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) method. We verified the accuracy and efficiency of the DIP assay in quantitatively measuring DNA-protein binding using transcription factor CP2c as a model. With our DIP assay, we could detect specific interactions within a DNA-CP2c complex, with reproducible and quantitative binding values. In addition, we were able to effectively measure the changes in DNA-CP2c binding by the addition of a small molecule, FQI1 (factor quinolinone inhibitor 1), previously identified as a specific inhibitor of this binding. To identify a new regulator of DNA-CP2c binding, we analyzed several CP2c binding peptides and found that only one class of peptide severely inhibits DNA-CP2c binding. These data show that our DIP assay is very useful in quantitatively detecting the binding dynamics of DNA-protein complex. Because DNA-protein interaction is very dynamic in different cellular environments, our assay can be applied to the detection of active transcription factors, including promoter occupancy in normal and disease conditions. Moreover, it may be used to develop a targeted regulator of specific DNA-protein interaction.

  9. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  10. Segrosome complex formation during DNA trafficking in bacterial cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Oliva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialised partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  11. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  12. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  13. DNA binding activity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, So Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Doseok

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is believed to be a major player in the photo-signal transduction cascade, which is triggered by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin. Here, we characterized DNA binding activity of ASRT probed by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We observed clear decrease of diffusion coefficient of DNA upon binding of ASRT. The dissociation constant, K(D), of ASRT to 20 bp-long DNA fragments lied in micro-molar range and varied moderately with DNA sequence. Our results suggest that ASRT may interact with several different regions of DNA with different binding affinity for global regulation of several genes that need to be activated depending on the light illumination.

  14. Multiplex DNA assay based on nanoparticle probes by single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shixi; Han, Guojun; Xing, Zhi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2014-04-01

    A multiplex DNA assay based on nanoparticle (NP) tags detection utilizing single particle mode inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) as ultrasensitive readout has been demonstrated in the article. Three DNA targets associated with clinical diseases (HIV, HAV, and HBV) down to 1 pM were detected by DNA probes labeled with AuNPs, AgNPs, and PtNPs via DNA sandwich assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes can also be effectively discriminated. Since our method is unaffected by the sample matrix, it is well-suited for diagnostic applications. Moreover, with the high sensitivity of SP-ICP-MS and the variety of NPs detectable by SP-ICP-MS, high-throughput DNA assay could be achieved without signal amplification or chain reaction amplification.

  15. Cytotoxic, DNA binding, DNA cleavage and antibacterial studies of ruthenium-fluoroquinolone complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohan N Patel; Hardik N Joshi; Chintan R Patel

    2014-05-01

    Six new Ru(II) and Ru(III) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, LC-MS, electronic spectra, IR spectra and magnetic moment measurements. DNA-binding properties of Ru complexes have been studied by means of absorption spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements as well as their HS DNA cleavage properties by means of agarose gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that all the complexes can bind to DNA via partial intercalative mode. The b values of complexes were found in the range 2.14 × 104 to 2.70 × 105 M-1. All the complexes show excellent efficiency of cleaving DNA than respective fluoroquinolones. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay has been performed to check the cytotoxic activity. The IC50 values of the complexes are in the range of 6.27 to 16.05 g mL-1.

  16. Multi-Probe Based Artificial DNA Encoding and Matching Classifier for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a novel matching classification strategy inspired by the artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA technology has been proposed for hyperspectral remote sensing imagery. Such a method can describe brightness and shape information of a spectrum by encoding the spectral curve into a DNA strand, providing a more comprehensive way for spectral similarity comparison. However, it suffers from two problems: data volume is amplified when all of the bands participate in the encoding procedure and full-band comparison degrades the importance of bands carrying key information. In this paper, a new multi-probe based artificial DNA encoding and matching (MADEM method is proposed. In this method, spectral signatures are first transformed into DNA code words with a spectral feature encoding operation. After that, multiple probes for interesting classes are extracted to represent the specific fragments of DNA strands. During the course of spectral matching, the different probes are compared to obtain the similarity of different types of land covers. By computing the absolute vector distance (AVD between different probes of an unclassified spectrum and the typical DNA code words from the database, the class property of each pixel is set as the minimum distance class. The main benefit of this strategy is that the risk of redundant bands can be deeply reduced and critical spectral discrepancies can be enlarged. Two hyperspectral image datasets were tested. Comparing with the other classification methods, the overall accuracy can be improved from 1.22% to 10.09% and 1.19% to 15.87%, respectively. Furthermore, the kappa coefficient can be improved from 2.05% to 15.29% and 1.35% to 19.59%, respectively. This demonstrated that the proposed algorithm outperformed other traditional classification methods.

  17. The isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA based on a double-stranded fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Shang, Fanjin; Pan, Mei; Liu, Sen; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-06-15

    Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) based on double-stranded fluorescence probe (ds-probe). Target dsDNA repeatedly generated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with polymerase and nicking enzyme. The ds-probe as a primer hybridized with ssDNA and extended to its 5'-end. The displaced ssDNA served as a new detection target to initiate above-described reaction. Meanwhile, the extended ds-probe could dynamically dissociate from ssDNA and self-hybridize, converting into a turn-back structure to initiate another amplification reaction. In particular, the ds-probe played a key role in the entire experimental process, which not only was as a primer but also produced the fluorescent signal by an extension and displacement reaction. Our method could detect the pBluescript II KS(+) plasmid with a detection limit of 2.3 amol, and it was also verified to exhibit a high specificity, even one-base mismatch. Overall, it was a true isothermal dsDNA detection strategy with a strongly anti-jamming capacity and one-pot, only requiring one ds-probe, which greatly reduced the cost and the probability of contamination. With its advantages, the approach of dsDNA detection will offer a promising tool in the field of point-of-care testing (POCT).

  18. Differential diagnosis of Taenia saginata and Taenia solium infections: from DNA probes to polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Luis Miguel; Montero, Estrella; Sciutto, Edda; Harrison, Leslie J S; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Garate, Teresa

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this work was the rapid and easy differential diagnosis of Taenia saginata and T. solium. First, a T. saginata size-selected genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (gDNA) library was constructed in the vector lambda gt10 using the 2-4 kb fraction from the parasite DNA digested with EcoR1, under 'star' conditions. After differential screening of the library and hybridization analysis with DNA from T. saginata, T. solium, T. taeniaeformis, T. crassiceps, and Echinococcus granulosus (bovine, porcine, and human), 2 recombinant phages were selected. They were designated HDP1 and HDP2. HDP1 reacted specifically with T. saginata DNA, and HDP2 recognized DNA from both T. saginata and T. solium. The 2 DNA probes were then sequenced and further characterized. HDP1 was a repetitive sequence with a 53 bp monomeric unit repeated 24 times in direct tandem along the 1272 bp fragment, while the 3954 bp HDP2 was not a repetitive sequence. Using the sequencing data, oligonucleotides were designed and used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The 2 selected oligonucleotides from probe HDP1 (PTs4F1 and PTs4R1) specifically amplified gDNA from T. saginata, but not T. solium or other related cestodes, with a sensitivity of < 10 pg of T. saginata gDNA, about the quantity of DNA in one taeniid egg. The 3 oligonucleotides selected from the HDP2 sequence (PTs7S35F1, PTs7S35F2, and PTs7S35R1) allowed the differential amplification of gDNA from T. saginata, T. solium and E. granulosus in a multiplex PCR, again with a sensitivity of < 10 pg. These diagnostic tools have immediate application in the differential diagnosis of T. solium and T. saginata in humans and in the diagnosis of dubious cysts in the slaughterhouse. We also hope to apply them to epidemiological surveys of, for example, soil and water in endemic areas.

  19. Ethidium bromide as a probe of conformational heterogeneity of DNA in chromatin. The role of histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J J; Daune, M

    1976-07-27

    The accessibility and the tertiary structure of the DNA inside chromatin were studied by using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescent probe. The exclusion model of binding was refined by introductina a parameter alpha (0less than alpha less than 1) which measures the accessibility of the DNA and by taking into account when necessary the existence of two sets of binding sites. We were thus able to fit predicted and experimental isotherms and then to describe completely EB binding to native or partially histone depleted chromatin under various conditions. Itn native chromatin 95% of the DNA (alpha = 0.95) appears to be accessible to EB but two sets of sites are present. The first one corresponds to alpha = 0.13 and is characterized by an affinity constant which is higher by two orders of magnitude than that relative to pure DNA. The second set corresponds to alpha = 0.82 and the corresponding binding constant is only three or four times lower than that of pure DNA. The sites with high affinity are still present after treatment with formaldehyde but disappear after removal of histon H1. By comparison with chromatin treated with deoxycholate of with artifical complexes between H1 and DNA, high affinity sites were found only when all of the histons are bound to DNA. An alpha value around 0.8 is still obtained in 1 M NaC1 treated chromatin, pointing to the fact that histones H3 and H4 are preventing 20% of the DNA to intercalate EB.

  20. Chemiluminescence-imaging detection of DNA on a solid-phase membrane by using a peroxidase-labeled macromolecular probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Md Golam; Yamasuji, Mutsumi; Krawczyk, Tomasz; Shibata, Takayuki; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Kai, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a novel method for sensitive chemiluminescence (CL)-imaging detection of DNA by using a macromolecular probe synthesized by attaching multiple molecules of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and biotin in dextran backbone. The probe formed a macromolecular assembly by binding to streptavidin which specifically recognized biotinylated complementary DNA, which was hybridized to a target DNA on a solid-phase membrane. This methodology was applied to CL-imaging detection of a synthetic telomere DNA (TTAGGG)10 and human telomere DNA by using the CL probe comprising of dextranT2000 (MW=ca. 2000kDa) bonded to approximately 42 molecules of HRP and 210 molecules of biotin. The human telomere DNA in a small number of buccal mucous cells (ca. 70 cell numbers) of cheek tissue was quantitatively determined by the proposed CL detection method that afforded approximately 10 times higher sensitivity than that of the conventional CL method using commercially available HRP-avidin probe.

  1. Mechanism of replication machinery assembly as revealed by the DNA ligase-PCNA-DNA complex architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-03-24

    The 3D structure of the ternary complex, consisting of DNA ligase, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp, and DNA, was investigated by single-particle analysis. This report presents the structural view, where the crescent-shaped DNA ligase with 3 distinct domains surrounds the central DNA duplex, encircled by the closed PCNA ring, thus forming a double-layer structure with dual contacts between the 2 proteins. The relative orientations of the DNA ligase domains, which remarkably differ from those of the known crystal structures, suggest that a large domain rearrangement occurs upon ternary complex formation. A second contact was found between the PCNA ring and the middle adenylation domain of the DNA ligase. Notably, the map revealed a substantial DNA tilt from the PCNA ring axis. This structure allows us to propose a switching mechanism for the replication factors operating on the PCNA ring.

  2. Computational and analytical modeling of cationic lipid-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farago, Oded; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2007-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the physical properties of cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes--a promising synthetically based nonviral carrier of DNA for gene therapy. The study is based on a coarse-grained molecular model, which is used in Monte Carlo simulations of mesoscopically large systems over timescales long enough to address experimental reality. In the present work, we focus on the statistical-mechanical behavior of lamellar complexes, which in Monte Carlo simulations self-assemble spontaneously from a disordered random initial state. We measure the DNA-interaxial spacing, d(DNA), and the local cationic area charge density, sigma(M), for a wide range of values of the parameter (c) representing the fraction of cationic lipids. For weakly charged complexes (low values of (c)), we find that d(DNA) has a linear dependence on (c)(-1), which is in excellent agreement with x-ray diffraction experimental data. We also observe, in qualitative agreement with previous Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of the system, large fluctuations in the local area charge density with a pronounced minimum of sigma(M) halfway between adjacent DNA molecules. For highly-charged complexes (large (c)), we find moderate charge density fluctuations and observe deviations from linear dependence of d(DNA) on (c)(-1). This last result, together with other findings such as the decrease in the effective stretching modulus of the complex and the increased rate at which pores are formed in the complex membranes, are indicative of the gradual loss of mechanical stability of the complex, which occurs when (c) becomes large. We suggest that this may be the origin of the recently observed enhanced transfection efficiency of lamellar CL-DNA complexes at high charge densities, because the completion of the transfection process requires the disassembly of the complex and the release of the DNA into the cytoplasm. Some of the structural properties of the system are also predicted by a continuum

  3. Oxytricha telomeric nucleoprotein complexes reconstituted with synthetic DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The telomere binding protein from macronuclei of Oxytricha nova binds macronuclear DNA in vitro, protecting the 3'-terminal single-stranded (T4G4)2 tail from chemical and enzymatic probes. We have used synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides to study the binding properties of the telomere protein. It binds at the 3' end of single-stranded oligonucleotides that have the sequence (T4G4)n, where n greater than or equal to 2, reconstituting the methylation protection seen with macronuclear DNA. Three oli...

  4. Preclinical detection of porcine circovirus type 2 infection using an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Huang

    Full Text Available Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 has emerged as one of the most important pathogens affecting swine production globally. Preclinical identification of PCV2 is very important for effective prophylaxis of PCV2-associated diseases. In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (UNDP-PCR for PCV2 detection. Magnetic microparticles coated with PCV2 specific DNA probes were used to enrich PCV2 DNA from samples, then gold nanoparticles coated with PCV2 specific oligonucleotides were added to form a sandwich nucleic acid-complex. After the complex was formed, the oligonucleotides were released and characterized by PCR. This assay exhibited about 500-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR, with a detection limit of 2 copies of purified PCV2 genomic DNA and 10 viral copies of PCV2 in serum. The assay has a wide detection range for all of PCV2 genotypes with reliable reproducibility. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other related viruses including porcine circovirus type 1, porcine parvovirus, porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and classical swine fever virus. The positive detection rate of PCV2 specific UNDP-PCR in 40 preclinical field samples was 27.5%, which appeared greater than that by conventional and real-time PCR and appeared application potency in evaluation of the viral loads levels of preclinical infection samples. The UNDP-PCR assay reported here can reliably rule out false negative results from antibody-based assays, provide a nucleic acid extraction free, specific, ultrasensitive, economic and rapid diagnosis method for preclinical PCV2 infection in field, which may help prevent large-scale outbreaks.

  5. Quercetin-Iron Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, DNA Cleavage, and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Xu, Xiuquan; Xia, Li; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin-iron (II) complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron micrography and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal:ligand) of the complex. Antioxidant study of the quercetin and its metal complex against 2, 2-di-phenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical showed that the complex has much more radical scavenging activity than free quercetin. The interaction of quercetin-iron (II) complex with DNA was determined using ultraviolet visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that quercetin-iron (II) complex can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form to nicked circular form and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was an oxidative cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of complex to cleave DNA. In addition, antibacterial activity of complex on E.coli and S. aureus was also investigated. The results showed that complex has higher antibacterial activity than ligand.

  6. From the complex system leadership perspective: DNA leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Basri Gündüz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional leadership models are based on the paradigm of bureaucratic top-down administration. These models were suitable for industrial societies and organizations. However, the complex and quickly changing structure of information societies and because market conditions become more and more challenging conditions require different and more flexible organizational structures and leadership approaches. Complexity leadership approach is one of the approaches that were put forward to meet these needs. This approach suggests a new paradigm for leadership, and leadership is defined as a complex interactive dynamic from which adaptive outcomes (learning, innovation, and adaptability emerge.  Multi-cellular higher organisms are complex systems like information societies. In this context, DNA that leads the processes in multi-cellular higher organisms may be taken as a metaphor for leadership. In this study, considering the functions and role of DNA in a cell, the concept of DNA leadership was discussed from the complex system leadership perspective.

  7. The path for metal complexes to a DNA target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komor, Alexis C; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of cisplatin as a therapeutic agent stimulated a new era in the application of transition metal complexes for therapeutic design. Here we describe recent results on a variety of transition metal complexes targeted to DNA to illustrate many of the issues involved in new therapeutic design. We describe first structural studies of complexes bound covalently and non-covalently to DNA to identify potential lesions within the cell. We then review the biological fates of these complexes, illustrating the key elements in obtaining potent activity, the importance of uptake and subcellular localization of the complexes, as well as the techniques used to delineate these characteristics. Genomic DNA provides a challenging but valuable target for new transition metal-based therapeutics.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels.

  9. Single and multiple molecular beacon probes for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Xiaojing; Tan, Weihong

    1999-05-01

    Surface immobilizable molecular beacons have been developed for DNA hybridization studies on a silica glass plate. Molecular beacons are a new class of oligonucleotide probes that have a loop-and-stem structure with a fluorophore and a quencher attached to the two ends of the stem. They only emit intense fluorescence when hybridize to their target molecules. This provides an excellent selectivity for the detection of DNA molecules. We have designed biotinylated molecular beacons which can be immobilized onto a solid surface. The molecular beacon is synthesized using DABCYL as the quencher and an optical stable dye, tetramethylrhodamine, as the fluorophore. Mass spectrometry is used to confirm the synthesized molecular beacon. The molecular beacons have been immobilized onto a silica surface through biotin-avidin binding. The surface immobilized molecular beacons have been used for the detection of target DNA with subnanomolar analytical sensitivity. have also immobilized two different molecular beacons on a silica surface in spatially resolved microscopic regions. The hybridization study of these two different molecular beacon probes has shown excellent selectivity for their target sequences. The newly designed molecular beacons are intended for DNA molecular interaction studies at an interface and for the development of ultrasensitive DNA sensors for a variety of applications including disease diagnosis, disease mechanism studies, new drug development, and in the investigation of molecular interactions between DNA molecules and other interesting biomolecules.

  10. [Fluorescence in situ hybridization with DNA probes derived from individual chromosomes and chromosome regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A G; Karamysheva, T V; Rubtsov, N B

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the eukaryotic genomes consists of repetitive DNA, which can form large clusters or distributed along euchromatic chromosome regions. Repeats located in chromosomal regions make a problem in analysis and identification of the chromosomal material with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In most cases, the identification of chromosome regions using FISH requires detection of the signal produced with unique sequences. The feasibility, advantages and disadvantages of traditional methods of suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization, methods of repeats-free probe construction and methods of chromosome-specific DNA sequences visualization using image processing of multicolor FISH results are considered in the paper. The efficiency of different techniques for DNA probe generation, different FISH protocols, and image processing of obtained microscopic images depends on the genomic size and structure of analyzing species. This problem was discussed and different approaches were considered for the analysis of the species with very large genome, rare species and species which specimens are too small in size to obtain the amount of genomic and Cot-1 DNA required for suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization.

  11. Highly selective and sensitive DNA assay based on electrocatalytic oxidation of ferrocene bearing zinc(II)-cyclen complexes with diethylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Torriero, Angel A J; Zeng, Zhanghua; Spiccia, Leone; Bond, Alan M

    2010-07-28

    A highly selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensor has been developed that detects DNA hybridization by employing the electrocatalytic activity of ferrocene (Fc) bearing cyclen complexes (cyclen = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane, Fc[Zn(cyclen)H(2)O](2)(ClO(4))(4) (R1), Fc(cyclen)(2) (R2), Fc[Zn(cyclen)H(2)O](ClO(4))(2) (R3), and Fc(cyclen) (R4)). A sandwich-type approach, which involves hybridization of a target probe hybridized with the preimmobilized thiolated capture probe attached to a gold electrode, is employed to fabricate a DNA duplex layer. Electrochemical signals are generated by voltammetric interrogation of a Fc bearing Zn-cyclen complexes that selectively and quantitatively binds to the duplex layers through strong chelation between the cyclen complexes and particular nucleobases within the DNA sequence. Chelate formation between R1 or R3 and thymine bases leads to the perturbation of base-pair (A-T) stacking in the duplex structure, which greatly diminishes the yield of DNA-mediated charge transport and displays a marked selectivity to the presence of the target DNA sequence. Coupling the redox chemistry of the surface-bound Fc bearing Zn-cyclen complex and dimethylamine provides an electrocatalytic pathway that increases sensitivity of the assay and allows the 100 fM target DNA sequence to be detected. Excellent selectivity against even single-base sequence mismatches is achieved, and the DNA sensor is stable and reusable.

  12. Diversity and Complexity in DNA Recognition by Transcription Factors**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badis, Gwenael; Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Talukder, Shaheynoor; Gehrke, Andrew R.; Jaeger, Savina A.; Chan, Esther T.; Metzler, Genita; Vedenko, Anastasia; Chen, Xiaoyu; Kuznetsov, Hanna; Wang, Chi-Fong; Coburn, David; Newburger, Daniel E.; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2010-01-01

    Sequence preferences of DNA-binding proteins are a primary mechanism by which cells interpret the genome. Despite these proteins’ central importance in physiology, development, and evolution, comprehensive DNA-binding specificities have been determined experimentally for few proteins. Here, we used microarrays containing all 10-base-pair sequences to examine the binding specificities of 104 distinct mouse DNA-binding proteins representing 22 structural classes. Our results reveal a complex landscape of binding, with virtually every protein analyzed possessing unique preferences. Roughly half of the proteins each recognized multiple distinctly different sequence motifs, challenging our molecular understanding of how proteins interact with their DNA binding sites. This complexity in DNA recognition may be important in gene regulation and in evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19443739

  13. Probing DNA-DNA Interactions with a Combination of Quadruple-Trap Optical Tweezers and Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Ineke; King, Graeme A; Heller, Iddo; Biebricher, Andreas S; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-01-01

    DNA metabolism and DNA compaction in vivo involve frequent interactions of remote DNA segments, mediated by proteins. In order to gain insight into such interactions, quadruple-trap optical tweezers have been developed. This technique provides an unprecedented degree of control through the ability to independently manipulate two DNA molecules in three dimensions. In this way, discrete regions of different DNA molecules can be brought into contact with one another, with a well-defined spatial configuration. At the same time, the tension and extension of the DNA molecules can be monitored. Furthermore, combining quadruple-trap optical tweezers with microfluidics makes fast buffer exchange possible, which is important for in situ generation of the dual DNA-protein constructs needed for these kinds of experiments. In this way, processes such as protein-mediated inter-DNA bridging can be studied with unprecedented control. This chapter provides a step-by-step description of how to perform a dual DNA manipulation experiment using combined quadruple-trap optical tweezers and microfluidics.

  14. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  15. Statistical mechanics of topologically constrained DNA and nucleoprotein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovan, Stefan Michael

    A complex connection exists between the 3 dimensional topological state of DNA in living organisms and biological processes including gene expression, DNA replication, recombination and repair. A significant limitation in developing a detailed, quantitative understanding of this connection is due to a lack of rigorous methods to calculate statistical mechanical properties of DNA molecules with complex topologies, including supercoiling, looping and knotting. This dissertation's main focus is on developing such methods and applying them to realistic DNA and nucleoprotein models. In chapter 2, a method is presented to calculate free energies and J factors of protein mediated DNA loops by normal mode analysis (NMA). This method is similar to calculations performed previously but with several significant advances. We apply the method to the specific case of DNA looping mediated by Cre recombinase protein. J factors calculated by our method are compared to experimental measurements to extract geometric and elastic properties of the Cre-DNA synaptic complex. In particular, the results suggest the existence of a synaptic complex that is more flexible than previously expected and may be explained by a stable intermediate in the reaction pathway that deviates significantly from the planar crystal structure. Calculating free energies of DNA looping is difficult in general, especially when considering intermediate length scales such as plasmid sized DNA which may readily adopt multiple topological states. In chapter 3, a novel method is presented to obtain free energies of semiflexible biopolymers with fixed topologies and arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. High accuracy is demonstrated by calculating free energies of specific DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex

  16. A sensitive DNA biosensor based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction for capture probe immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Ding, Yingtao; Gao, Feng [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Jiang, Shulian [Zhangzhou Product Quality Supervision and Inspection Institute, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhang, Bin; Ni, Jiancong; Gao, Fei [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction between probe DNA and the sulfonic dye of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid that electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode. -- Highlights: •A versatile sulfonic dye of ANS was electrodeposited on a GCE. •A DNA biosensor was fabricated based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. •High probe DNA density of 3.18 × 10{sup 13} strands cm{sup −2} was determined. •A wide linear range and a low detection limit were obtained. -- Abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. First, the versatile sulfonic dye molecule of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonate (AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −}) was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to form a steady and ordered AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −} layer. Then the amino-terminated capture probe was covalently grafted to the surface of SO{sub 3}{sup −}-AN deposited GCE through the sulfamide coupling reaction between the amino groups in the probe DNA and the sulfonic groups in the AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −}. The step-by-step modification process was characterized by electrochemistry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Using Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} as probe, the probe density and the hybridization efficiency of the biosensor were determined to be 3.18 × 10{sup 13} strands cm{sup −2} and 86.5%, respectively. The hybridization performance of the biosensor was examined by differential pulse voltammetry using Co(phen){sub 3}{sup 3+/2+} (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) as the indicator. The selectivity experiments showed that the biosensor presented distinguishable response after hybridization with the three-base mismatched, non-complementary and complementary sequences. Under the optimal conditions, the oxidation peak currents of Co(phen){sub 3}{sup 3+/2+} increased linearly with the logarithm values of the concentration

  17. DNA binding, DNA cleavage, and cytotoxicity studies of two new copper (II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Rezvani, Alireza; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2011-05-01

    The DNA binding behavior of [Cu(phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (1) and [Cu(bpy)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (2) was studied with a series of techniques including UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and viscometric methods. Cytotoxicity effect and DNA unwinding properties were also investigated. The results indicate that the Cu(II) complexes interact with calf-thymus DNA by both partially intercalative and hydrogen binding. These findings have been further substantiated by the determination of intrinsic binding constants spectrophotometrically, 12.5 × 10(5) and 5 × 10(5) for 1 and 2, respectively. Our findings suggest that the type of ligands and structure of complexes have marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes involving CT-DNA. Circular dichroism results show that complex 1 causes considerable increase in base stacking of DNA, whereas 2 decreases the base stacking, which is related to more extended aromatic area of 1,10-phenanthroline in 1 rather than bipyridine in 2. Slow decrease in DNA viscosity indicates partially intercalative binding in addition to hydrogen binding on the surface of DNA. The second binding mode was also confirmed by additional tests: interaction in denaturation condition and acidic pH. Also, these new complexes induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) cells.

  18. Honey, I Shrunk the DNA : DNA Length as a Probe for Nucleic-Acid Enzyme Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2007-01-01

    The replication, recombination, and repair of DNA are processes essential for the maintenance of genomic information and require the activity of numerous enzymes that catalyze the polymerization or digestion of DNA. This review will discuss how differences in elastic properties between single- and d

  19. Honey, I Shrunk the DNA : DNA Length as a Probe for Nucleic-Acid Enzyme Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2007-01-01

    The replication, recombination, and repair of DNA are processes essential for the maintenance of genomic information and require the activity of numerous enzymes that catalyze the polymerization or digestion of DNA. This review will discuss how differences in elastic properties between single- and d

  20. Improving Probe Immobilization for Label-Free Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization on Microfabricated Gold Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Carrara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative approaches to labeled optical detection for DNA arrays are actively investigated for low-cost point-of-care applications. In this domain, label-free capacitive detection is one of the most intensely studied techniques. It is based on the idea to detect the Helmholtz ion layer displacements when molecular recognition occurs at the electrodes/solution interface. The sensing layer is usually prepared by using thiols terminated DNA single-strength oligonucleotide probes on top of the sensor electrodes. However, published data shows evident time drift, which greatly complicates signal conditioning and processing and ultimately increases the uncertainty in DNA recognition sensing. The aim of this work is to show that newly developed ethylene-glycol functionalized alkanethiols greatly reduce time drift, thereby significantly improving capacitance based label-free detection of DNA.

  1. DNA probes for distinguishing Psychodopygus wellcomei from Psychodopygus complexus (Diptera: Psychodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Ready

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA fragments from males of Psychodopygus wellcomei were isolated and shown to be useful as sensitive diagnostic probles for positively separting individuals of this species from those of Ps. complexus. These two members of the Ps. squamiventris series are found sympatrically in foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the hill forests of southern Pará State. Of the two species, only Ps. welcomei is thought to be an important vector of Leishmania braziliensis sensu stricto, buth this is based on circumstantial evidence because of the difficulties of identifying female sandflies wothin the series. The diagnostic probes were isolated from a library of Ps. wellcomei built by ligationg short fragments of Sau 3A-resistricted, genomic DNA into the plasmid vector PUC 18. Differential screening of 1316 library clones with total genomic DNA of Ps. Wellcomei and Ps. complexus identified 5 recombinants, with cross-hybridizing inserts of repetitive DNA, that showed strong specificity for Ps. wellcomei. As little as 0.4% of the DNA extracted from an individual sandfly (=ca. 0.5 namograms was specifically detected. The diagnostic probes were used to identify as Ps. wellcomei a wild-caught female sandfly found infected with L. braziliensis s.s., providing only the second positive association between these two species.

  2. Nanoparticle probes and mid-infrared chemical imaging for DNA microarray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossoba, Magdi M; Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Schoen, Brianna; Yakes, Betsy Jean

    2010-11-01

    To date most mid-infrared spectroscopic studies have been limited, due to lack of sensitivity, to the structural characterization of a single oligonucleotide probe immobilized over the entire surface of a gold-coated slide or other infrared substrate. By contrast, widely used and commercially available glass slides and a microarray spotter that prints approximately 120-μm-diameter DNA spots were employed in the present work. To our knowledge, mid-infrared chemical imaging (IRCI) in the external reflection mode has been applied in the present study for the first time to the detection of nanostructure-based DNA microarrays spotted on glass slides. Alkyl amine-modified oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on glass slides that had been prefunctionalized with succinimidyl ester groups. This molecular fluorophore-free method entailed the binding of gold-nanoparticle-streptavidin conjugates to biotinylated DNA targets. Hybridization was visualized by the silver enhancement of gold nanoparticles. The adlayer of silver, selectively bound only to hybridized spots in a microarray, formed the external reflective infrared substrate that was necessary for the detection of DNA hybridization by IRCI in the present proof-of-concept study. IRCI made it possible to discriminate between diffuse and specular external reflection modes. The promising qualitative results are presented herein, and the implications for quantitative determination of DNA microarrays are discussed.

  3. Synthesis of RNA probes by the direct in vitro transcription of PCR-generated DNA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, R; McNiven, M A; Kachar, B

    1993-05-01

    We describe a novel method for the generation of RNA probes based on the direct in vitro transcription of DNA templates amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers with sequence hybrids between the target gene and those of the T7 and T3 RNA polymerases promoters. This method circumvents the need for cloning and allows rapid generation of strand-specific RNA molecules that can be used for the identification of genes in hybridization experiments. We have successfully applied this method to the identification of DNA sequences by Southern blot analysis and library screening.

  4. Effect of DNA-CTMA complex on optical properties of LDS 821 dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayan, Sony; Ramachandran, Vijesh Kavumoottil; Sebastian, Mathew; Chandran, Pradeep; Nampoori, Vadakkedath Parameswaran Narayanan; Thomas, Sheenu

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated the fluorescence behavior of LDS 821 dye (Styryl 9 M) with deoxyribonucleic acid attached with cetyltrimethyl-ammonium (DNA-CTMA). Optical absorption studies confirm the intercalation of the dye molecules with DNA-CTMA. Fluorescence studies show an enhancement of fluorescence intensity of dye with DNA-CTMA, which suggest the reduction of TICT states of the dye molecule. The FWHM of the fluorescence spectrum increases from 95 nm to 161 nm indicating the formation of new energy levels when DNA-CTMA forms a complex with LDS 821 dye. Fluorescence lifetime measurements shows that lifetime of LDS 821 varies from 507ps to 953 ps with the addition of DNA-CTMA, which also confirms the deactivation of TICT states of dye molecule. Results show that the incorporation of DNA-CTMA with LDS 821 dye improves the optical characteristics of LDS 821 dye and therefore, can be used as a good fluorescence probe for DNA visualization as well as in lasing applications.

  5. The Cell Probe Complexity of Dynamic Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new technique for proving lower bounds on the update time and query time of dynamic data structures in the cell probe model. With this technique, we prove the highest lower bound to date for any explicit problem, namely a lower bound of tq = ((lg n/ lg(wtu))2). Here n...... is the number of update operations, w the cell size, tq the query time and tu the update time. In the most natural setting of cell size w = (lg n), this gives a lower bound of tq = ((lg n/ lg lg n)2) for any polylogarithmic update time. This bound is almost a quadratic improvement over the highest previous...... is specified by a point q = (x, y), and the goal is to report the sum of the weights assigned to the points dominated by q, where a point (x0, y0) is dominated by q if x0 x and y0 y. In addition to being the highest cell probe lower bound to date, our lower bound is also tight for data struc- tures with update...

  6. The Cell Probe Complexity of Dynamic Range Counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new technique for proving lower bounds on the update time and query time of dynamic data structures in the cell probe model. With this technique, we prove the highest lower bound to date for any explicit problem, namely a lower bound of tq = ((lg n/ lg(wtu))2). Here n...... is the number of update operations, w the cell size, tq the query time and tu the update time. In the most natural setting of cell size w = (lg n), this gives a lower bound of tq = ((lg n/ lg lg n)2) for any polylogarithmic update time. This bound is almost a quadratic improvement over the highest previous...... is specified by a point q = (x, y), and the goal is to report the sum of the weights assigned to the points dominated by q, where a point (x0, y0) is dominated by q if x0 x and y0 y. In addition to being the highest cell probe lower bound to date, our lower bound is also tight for data struc- tures with update...

  7. Theoretical and Instrumental Studies of the Competitive Interaction Between Aromatic α-Aminobisphosphonates with DNA Using Binding Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, M B; Peyman, H; Gholivand, Kh; Roshanfekr, H; Taherpour, A A; Yaghobi, R

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, viscometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were applied to investigate the competitive interaction of DNA with two aromatic α-aminobisphosphonates and neutral red dye (NR, intercalator) and Hoechst (Ho, groove binder) as spectroscopic probes, in a Tris-hydrogen chloride buffer solution (pH 7.4). The principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to determine the number of chemical components presented in complexation equilibrium of DNA with the aromatic α-aminobisphosphonates (B1 and B2). The spectroscopic and voltammetric studies showed that the groove binding mode of interaction is predominant in the solution containing DNA and α-aminobisphosphonates. Furthermore, the results indicated that α-aminobisphosphonate with the lengthy N-alkyl chains had a stronger interaction. The PCA and theoretical quantum mechanical and molecular mechanic methods were also utilized to determine the structure of DNA with the two α-aminobisphosphonates (B1 and B2).

  8. A highly polymorphic locus in human DNA revealed by cosmid-derived probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Litt, M.; White, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Human gene mapping would be greatly facilitated if marker loci with sufficient heterozygosity were generally available. As a source of such markers, we have used cosmids from a human genomic library. We have developed a rapid method for screening random cosmids to identify those that are homologous to genomic regions especially rich in restriction fragment length polymorphisms. This method allows whole cosmids to be used as probes against Southern transfers of genomic DNA; regions of cosmid p...

  9. DNA quantification via ICP-MS using lanthanide-labeled probes and ligation-mediated amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Kathrin; Schwarz, Kathleen; Beck, Sebastian; Linscheid, Michael W

    2014-01-07

    The combination of lanthanide-tagged oligonucleotide probes with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the detection technique is a novel labeling and analysis strategy for heterogeneous nucleic acid quantification assays. We describe a hybridization assay based on biotin-streptavidin affinity using lanthanide-labeled reporter probes and biotinylated capture probes. For the basic sandwich type assay, performed in streptavidin-coated microtitration wells, the limit of detection (LOD) was 7.2 fmol of DNA target, corresponding to a final concentration of 6 pM terbium-labeled probes detectable by ICP-MS after elution from the solid support. To improve the sensitivity and sequence specificity of the approach, it was combined with established molecular biological techniques, i.e., elution with a restriction endonuclease and signal and target amplification by the ligase detection reaction (LDR) and ligase chain reaction (LCR), respectively. Initial experiments showed that the enzymes facilitated the discrimination of single-base mismatches within the recognition or ligation site. Furthermore, LCR as a target amplification step resulted in a 6000-fold increase of sensitivity, and finally an LOD of 2.6 amol was achieved with an artificial double-stranded DNA target.

  10. Rutin-Nickel Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, and DNA Cleavage Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Bano, Shumaila; Xu, Xiuquan; Zhang, Rong Xian; Khalid, Haider; Iqbal, Furqan Muhammad; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-12-17

    The rutin-nickel (II) complex (RN) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-visible spectroscopy, IR, mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, TG-DSC, SEM, and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal/ligand) of the complex. An antioxidant study of rutin and its metal complex against DPPH radical showed that the complex has more radical scavenging activity than free rutin. The interaction of complex RN with DNA was determined using fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that RN can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide (EB), and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form (SC) to nicked circular form (NC), and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was a hydrolytic cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of the complex to cleave DNA.

  11. Visualization of recombinant DNA and protein complexes using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Shannon, Morgan; Goertz, John

    2011-07-18

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the visualizing of individual proteins, DNA molecules, protein-protein complexes, and DNA-protein complexes. On the end of the microscope's cantilever is a nano-scale probe, which traverses image areas ranging from nanometers to micrometers, measuring the elevation of macromolecules resting on the substrate surface at any given point. Electrostatic forces cause proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids to loosely attach to the substrate in random orientations and permit imaging. The generated data resemble a topographical map, where the macromolecules resolve as three-dimensional particles of discrete sizes (Figure 1). Tapping mode AFM involves the repeated oscillation of the cantilever, which permits imaging of relatively soft biomaterials such as DNA and proteins. One of the notable benefits of AFM over other nanoscale microscopy techniques is its relative adaptability to visualize individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in aqueous buffers, including near-physiologic buffered conditions, in real-time, and without staining or coating the sample to be imaged. The method presented here describes the imaging of DNA and an immunoadsorbed transcription factor (i.e. the glucocorticoid receptor, GR) in buffered solution (Figure 2). Immunoadsorbed proteins and protein complexes can be separated from the immunoadsorbing antibody-bead pellet by competition with the antibody epitope and then imaged (Figure 2A). This allows for biochemical manipulation of the biomolecules of interest prior to imaging. Once purified, DNA and proteins can be mixed and the resultant interacting complex can be imaged as well. Binding of DNA to mica requires a divalent cation, such as Ni(2+) or Mg(2+), which can be added to sample buffers yet maintain protein activity. Using a similar approach, AFM has been utilized to visualize individual enzymes, including RNA polymerase and a repair enzyme, bound to individual DNA strands. These experiments provide

  12. Characterization of an In Vivo Z-DNA Detection Probe Based on a Cell Nucleus Accumulating Intrabody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulis, Galina; Silva, Izabel Cristina Rodrigues; Sousa, Herdson Renney; Sousa, Isabel Garcia; Bezerra, Maryani Andressa Gomes; Quilici, Luana Salgado; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo

    2016-09-01

    Left-handed Z-DNA is a physiologically unstable DNA conformation, and its existence in vivo can be attributed to localized torsional distress. Despite evidence for the existence of Z-DNA in vivo, its precise role in the control of gene expression is not fully understood. Here, an in vivo probe based on an anti-Z-DNA intrabody is proposed for native Z-DNA detection. The probe was used for chromatin immunoprecipitation of potential Z-DNA-forming sequences in the human genome. One of the isolated putative Z-DNA-forming sequences was cloned upstream of a reporter gene expression cassette under control of the CMV promoter. The reporter gene encoded an antibody fragment fused to GFP. Transient co-transfection of this vector along with the Z-probe coding vector improved reporter gene expression. This improvement was demonstrated by measuring reporter gene mRNA and protein levels and the amount of fluorescence in co-transfected CHO-K1 cells. These results suggest that the presence of the anti-Z-DNA intrabody can interfere with a Z-DNA-containing reporter gene expression. Therefore, this in vivo probe for the detection of Z-DNA could be used for global correlation of Z-DNA-forming sequences and gene expression regulation.

  13. Lanthanide complexes as luminogenic probes to measure sulfide levels in industrial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Megan K; Ung, Phuc; Leaver, Franklin M; Corbin, Teresa S; Tuck, Kellie L; Graham, Bim; Barrios, Amy M

    2015-10-08

    A series of lanthanide-based, azide-appended complexes were investigated as hydrogen sulfide-sensitive probes. Europium complex 1 and Tb complex 3 both displayed a sulfide-dependent increase in luminescence, while Tb complex 2 displayed a decrease in luminescence upon exposure to NaHS. The utility of the complexes for monitoring sulfide levels in industrial oil and water samples was investigated. Complex 3 provided a sensitive measure of sulfide levels in petrochemical water samples (detection limit ∼ 250 nM), while complex 1 was capable of monitoring μM levels of sulfide in partially refined crude oil.

  14. Condensation of nonstochiometric DNA/polycation complexes by divalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Vladimir; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Wolff, Jon A

    2006-12-15

    This study found that divalent cations induced the further condensation of partially condensed DNA within nonstochiometric polycation complexes. The addition of a few mmol of a divalent cation such as calcium reduced by half the inflection point at which DNA became fully condensed by poly-L-lysine (PLL) and a variety of other polycations. The effect on DNA condensation was initially observed using a new method, which is based on the concentration-dependent self-quenching of fluorescent moieties (e.g., rhodamine) covalently linked to the DNA backbone at relatively high densities. Additional analyses, which employed ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy, confirmed the effect of divalent cations. These results provide an additional accounting of the process by which divalent cations induce greater chromatin compaction that is based on the representation of chromatin fibers as a nonstoichiometric polyelectrolyte complex. They also offer a new approach to assemble nonviral vectors for gene therapy.

  15. A reliable method for detecting complexed DNA in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, C.; Keeney, M.; Newland, B.; Mathew, A.; Wang, W.; Pandit, A.

    2010-12-01

    Quantification of eluted nucleic acids is a critical parameter in characterizing biomaterial based gene-delivery systems. The most commonly used method is to assay samples with an intercalating fluorescent dye such as PicoGreen®. However, this technique was developed for unbound DNA and the current trend in gene delivery is to condense DNA with transfection reagents, which interfere with intercalation. Here, for the first time, the DNA was permanently labeled with the fluorescent dye Cy5 prior to complexation, an alternative technique hypothesized to allow quantification of both bound and unbound DNA. A comparison of the two methods was performed by quantifying the elution of six different varieties of DNA complexes from a model biomaterial (collagen) scaffold. After seven days of elution, the PicoGreen® assay only allowed detection of three types of complexes (those formed using Lipofectin™ and two synthesised copolymers). However, the Cy5 fluorescent labeling technique enabled detection of all six varieties including those formed via common transfection agents poly(ethylene imine), poly-l-lysine and SuperFect™. This allowed reliable quantification of the elution of all these complexes from the collagen scaffold. Thus, while intercalating dyes may be effective and reliable for detecting double-stranded, unbound DNA, the technique described in this work allowed reliable quantification of DNA independent of complexation state.Quantification of eluted nucleic acids is a critical parameter in characterizing biomaterial based gene-delivery systems. The most commonly used method is to assay samples with an intercalating fluorescent dye such as PicoGreen®. However, this technique was developed for unbound DNA and the current trend in gene delivery is to condense DNA with transfection reagents, which interfere with intercalation. Here, for the first time, the DNA was permanently labeled with the fluorescent dye Cy5 prior to complexation, an alternative technique

  16. Characterization of DNA antigens from immune complexes deposited in the skin of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾凡钦; 尹若菲; 谭国珍; 郭庆; 许德清

    2004-01-01

    Background Skin lesions are common manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is still unknown what the definite pathogenesis of skin involvement was and whether DNA participated in it. Our study was designed to explore the pathogenetic role and nature of nuclear antigen (DNA) deposited in the skin lesions of patients with SLE.Methods Thirty skin samples from patients with SLE and 2 normal skin samples were studied. Extracellular DNA was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence methods. The deposited immune complexes were extracted by cryoprecipitation, and DNA was then isolated with phenol and chloroform. DNA fragment sizes were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Finally, 8 different probes were used to analyze the origin of these DNA molecules using Dot hybridization.Results Extracellular DNA staining was found only in skin lesions, mainly those located in the basement membrane zone, vascular wall, and hair follicle wall. Normal skin and non-lesion SLE skin showed no fluorescence at locations outside the nuclei. There were no differences in the rate and intensity of extracellular DNA staining when comparing active phase to remission phase patients. No relationship was found between extracellular DNA and circulating anti-dsDNA antibodies. Deposited DNA fragments clustered into four bands of somewhat discrete sizes: 20 000 bp, 1300 bp, 800-900 bp, 100-200 bp. Small sized fragments (100-200 bp) were positively correlated with disease activity (P<0.05, r=0.407). Dot hybridization showed significant homology of the various extracellular DNA fragments examined with human genomic DNA, but not with DNA from the microorganisms and viruses we examined. There were also homologies between DNA samples from different individuals.Conclusions DNA and its immune complexes may contribute to the pathogenesis of skin lesions in SLE. These DNA molecules range in size from 100 bp to 20 kb and may be endogenous in origin.

  17. Accuracy of the Clinical Diagnosis of Vaginitis Compared to a DNA Probe Laboratory Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Nancy K.; Neal, Jeremy L.; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of the three most common causes of acute vulvovaginal symptoms (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis vaginitis, and trichomoniasis vaginalis) using a traditional, standardized clinical diagnostic protocol compared to a DNA probe laboratory standard. Methods This prospective clinical comparative study had a sample of 535 active duty United States military women presenting with vulovaginal symptoms. Clinical diagnoses were made by research staff using a standardized protocol of history, physical examination including pelvic examination, determination of vaginal pH, vaginal fluid amines test, and wet-prep microscopy. Vaginal fluid samples were obtained for DNA analysis. The research clinicians were blinded to the DNA results. Results The participants described a presenting symptom of abnormal discharge (50%), itching/irritation (33%), malodor (10%), burning (4%), or others such as vulvar pain and vaginal discomfort. According to laboratory standard, there were 225 cases (42%) of bacterial vaginosis 76 cases (14%) of candidiasis vaginitis, 8 cases (1.5%) of trichomoniasis vaginalis, 87 cases of mixed infections (16%), and 139 negative cases (26%). For each single infection, the clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity and specificity of 80.8% and 70.0% for bacterial vaginosis; 83.8% and 84.8% for candidiasis vaginitis; and 84.6% and 99.6% for trichomoniasis vaginalis when compared to the DNA probe standard. Conclusion Compared to a DNA probe standard, clinical diagnosis is 81-85% sensitive and 70- 99% specific for bacterial vaginosis, candida vaginitis, and trichomoniasis. Even under research conditions that provided clinicians with sufficient time and materials to conduct a thorough and standardized clinical evaluation, the diagnosis and therefore, subsequent treatment of these common vaginal problems remains difficult. PMID:19104364

  18. BaitFisher: A Software Package for Multispecies Target DNA Enrichment Probe Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christoph; Sann, Manuela; Donath, Alexander; Meixner, Martin; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Peters, Ralph S; Petersen, Malte; Meusemann, Karen; Liere, Karsten; Wägele, Johann-Wolfgang; Misof, Bernhard; Bleidorn, Christoph; Ohl, Michael; Niehuis, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Target DNA enrichment combined with high-throughput sequencing technologies is a powerful approach to probing a large number of loci in genomes of interest. However, software algorithms that explicitly consider nucleotide sequence information of target loci in multiple reference species for optimizing design of target enrichment baits to be applicable across a wide range of species have not been developed. Here we present an algorithm that infers target DNA enrichment baits from multiple nucleotide sequence alignments. By applying clustering methods and the combinatorial 1-center sequence optimization to bait design, we are able to minimize the total number of baits required to efficiently probe target loci in multiple species. Consequently, more loci can be probed across species with a given number of baits. Using transcript sequences of 24 apoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae, Sphecidae) from the 1KITE project and the gene models of Nasonia vitripennis, we inferred 57,650, 120-bp-long baits for capturing 378 coding sequence sections of 282 genes in apoid wasps. Illumina reduced-representation library sequencing confirmed successful enrichment of the target DNA when applying these baits to DNA of various apoid wasps. The designed baits furthermore enriched a major fraction of the target DNA in distantly related Hymenoptera, such as Formicidae and Chalcidoidea, highlighting the baits' broad taxonomic applicability. The availability of baits with broad taxonomic applicability is of major interest in numerous disciplines, ranging from phylogenetics to biodiversity monitoring. We implemented our new approach in a software package, called BaitFisher, which is open source and freely available at https://github.com/cmayer/BaitFisher-package.git. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. In situ SAXS experiment during DNA and liposome complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperini, A.A.; Cavalcanti, L.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Balbino, T.A.; Torre, L.G. de la [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Oliveira, C.L.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Gene therapy is an exciting research area that allows the treatment of different diseases. Basically, an engineered DNA that codes a protein is the therapeutic drug that has to be delivered to the cell nucleus. After that, the DNA transfection process allows the protein production using the cell machinery. However, the efficient delivery needs DNA protection against nucleases and interstitial fluids. In this context, the use of cationic liposome/DNA complexes is a promising strategy for non-viral gene therapy. Liposomes are lipid systems that self-aggregate in bilayers and the use of cationic lipids allows the electrostatic complexation with DNA. In this work, we used SAXS technique to study the complexation kinetics between cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA and evaluate the liposome structural modifications in the presence of DNA. Liposomes were prepared according to [1] using as plasmid DNA vector model a modified version of pVAX1-GFP with luciferase as reporter gene [2]. The complexation was promoted in a SAXS sample holder containing a microchannel to get access to the compartment between two mica windows where the X-ray beam could cross through [3]. We obtained in situ complexation using such sample holder coupled to a fed-batch reactor through a peristaltic pump. The scattering curves were recorded each 30 seconds during the cycles. The DNA was added until a certain final ratio between surface charges previously determined. We studied the form and structure factor model for the liposome bilayer to fit the scattering curves [4]. Structural information such as the bilayer electronic density profiles, number of bilayers and fluidity were determined as a function of the complexation with DNA. These differences can reflect in singular in vitro and in vivo effects. [1] L. G. de la Torre et al. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 73, 175 (2009) [2] A. R. Azzoni et al. The Journal of Gene Medicine, 9, 392 (2007) [3] L. P. Cavalcanti et al. Review of

  20. DETECTION OF BRUGIA MALAYI INFECTED MOSQUITOES WITH SPECIES SPECIFIC DNA PROBE pBm 15, IN RIAU, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kurniawan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A species specific DNA probe (pBm15 was used in a field area where 2 filarial infections coexist: B.malayi in man and B.pahangi in cats. In our laboratory in Jakarta, this DNA probe proved to be sensitive enough to detect 500 ng DNA. One to two infective larvae of B.malayi could be detected with ease. This DNA probe did not react with infective larvae of wuchereria bancrofti, B.pahangi, and Dirofilaria spp. Non specific binding caused by undefined mosquito components was overcome with proteinase K and chitinase treatment. This additional step, made it possible for whole body mosquitoes to be squashed directly onto nitrocellulose paper. A comparative study of experimental infections of laboratory bred mosquitoes infected with B.malayi, showed no difference in infection rate between the group examined by dissection or by DNA probing. Mosquitoes which are vectors in Riau were collected and fed on microfilaremic patients of Riau. The set of mosquitoes were tested in parallel with mosquitoes infected with B.pahangi from cats. All fed mosquitoes were tested after 10-12 days. Only mosquitoes infected with B.malayi reacted in the assay. This study shows a success in applying the DNA probe technique in Jakarta. Further application in the field should be encouraged, with some modification of the DNA probing technique, for cheaper and easier implementation.

  1. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of asaccharolytic anaerobic pigmented bacterial rods from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D; Bastin, D

    1992-06-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using isolated high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes of the cat pigmented asaccharolytic Bacteroides/Porphyromonas species was used against both purified high molecular weight DNA and DNA released on membranes from whole cells for the identification of B. salivosus and for its differentiation from the other anaerobic species isolated from normal and diseased mouths of cats and horses. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes (Boehringer-Mannheim). The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. salivosus from a variety of species (including members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. Likewise, asaccharolytic black pigmented Group 2 strains were distinguishable from all strains tested. However, cat strains of P. gingivalis which show 68-76% DNA-DNA homology with human strain P. gingivalis ATCC 33277T, were not distinguishable from each other using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. The minimum amount of pure Bacteroides DNA which could be detected by the 32P-labelled probe was 100-300 pg, while the amount of pure DNA detected by the DIG system was 1-3 mg after room temperature colour development for 1 h and 100-300 pg after 6 h colour development.

  2. The use of radionuclide DNA probe technology for epidemiological studies of tegumentary leishmaniasis in Mato Grosso state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antero Silva Ribeiro de Andrade

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA hybridisation, using probes labelled with 32P, was used to type Leishmania samples isolated from patients living in endemic areas of Mato Grosso State (Brazil, and clinically diagnosed as having tegumentary leishmaniasis. kDNA cloned mini-circle probes specific for the Leishmania mexicana and Leishmania braziliensis complexes were used. The results showed that L. braziliensis is the predominant group infecting human patients in the state. Sixty-eight samples were typed, 64 samples (94.1% belonging to the L. braziliensis complex and only four (5.9% belonging to the L. mexicana complex. Accurate identification of the Leishmania permits better orientation of the medical follow-up, since clinical manifestations may vary depending on the complex to which the parasite belongs. The epidemiological information furnished by the identification of the Leishmania in given endemic area is also essential for the design of appropriate control measuresHibridização, utilizando sondas de DNA marcadas com 32P, foi utilizada para a tipagem de amostras de Leishmania isoladas de pacientes do estado do Mato Grosso (Brasil, diagnosticados clinicamente como portadores de leishmaniose tegumentar. Sondas de minicírculos clonados de kDNA, específicas para os complexos Leishmania mexicana e Leishmania braziliensis, foram utilizadas. Os resultados demonstraram que o complexo L. brasiliensis é o grupo predominante infectando pacientes humanos no estado do Mato Grosso. Foram tipadas 68 amostras: 64 (94,1% foram identificadas como pertencentes ao complexo L. brasiliensis e somente 4 (5,9% como pertencentes ao complexo L. mexicana. A tipagem de Leishmania é importante para um melhor acompanhamento médico, uma vez que as manifestações clínicas podem variar em função do complexo ao qual o parasita pertence. A informação fornecida pela identificação também é essencial para a definição das medidas de controle mais adequadas e compreensão da epidemiologia da

  3. A biostatistical study into the efficiency of individualism using nonisotopic chemiluminescent-enhanced NICE multilocus DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, P P; Watt, E H; Hau, C M

    1997-10-01

    The efficiency of individualisation using nonisotopic chemiluminescent- enhanced probes (NICE) was investigated by analysing DNA fingerprints obtained from 190 unrelated Caucasians. Novel analysis of the scoring procedure enabled us to include the comparison of 585 pairs of samples for each of two probes. When the results of NICE probes 33.6 and 33.15 were combined, the mean percentage band share between two unrelated individuals was 16.8% and the mean number of bands identified in an individual DNA fingerprint was 54.8. Results were compared with those obtained using isotopically labelled probes and suggest that the two labelling systems gave similar efficiencies for differentiating between individuals. Analysis of DNA fingerprints from 37 family trios (mother, child and father groups) gave a mutation rate of 0.10% when using NICE probes. The two labelling systems compared were equally efficient in establishing family relationships.

  4. Modeling Hybridization Kinetics of Gene Probes in a DNA Biochip Using FEMLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Munir

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic DNA biochips capable of detecting specific DNA sequences are useful in medical diagnostics, drug discovery, food safety monitoring and agriculture. They are used as miniaturized platforms for analysis of nucleic acids-based biomarkers. Binding kinetics between immobilized single stranded DNA on the surface and its complementary strand present in the sample are of interest. To achieve optimal sensitivity with minimum sample size and rapid hybridization, ability to predict the kinetics of hybridization based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the probe is crucial. In this study, a computer aided numerical model for the design and optimization of a flow-through biochip was developed using a finite element technique packaged software tool (FEMLAB; package included in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate the transport of DNA through a microfluidic chamber to the reaction surface. The model accounts for fluid flow, convection and diffusion in the channel and on the reaction surface. Concentration, association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, recirculation flow rate, and temperature were key parameters affecting the rate of hybridization. The model predicted the kinetic profile and signal intensities of eighteen 20-mer probes targeting vancomycin resistance genes (VRGs. Predicted signal intensities and hybridization kinetics strongly correlated with experimental data in the biochip (R2 = 0.8131.

  5. Real-time electrochemical PCR with a DNA intercalating redox probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deféver, Thibaut; Druet, Michel; Evrard, David; Marchal, Damien; Limoges, Benoit

    2011-03-01

    The proof-of-principle of a nonoptical real-time PCR method based on the electrochemical monitoring of a DNA intercalating redox probe that becomes considerably less easily electrochemically detectable once intercalated to the amplified double-stranded DNA is demonstrated. This has been made possible thanks to the finding of a redox intercalator that (i) strongly and specifically binds to the amplified double-stranded DNA, (ii) does not significantly inhibit PCR, (iii) is chemically stable under PCR cycling, and (iv) is sensitively detected by square wave voltammetry during PCR cycling. Among the different DNA intercalating redox probes that we have investigated, namely, methylene blue, Os[(bpy)(2)phen](2+), Os[(bpy)(2)DPPZ](2+), Os[(4,4'-dimethyl-bpy)(2)DPPZ](2+) and Os[(4,4'-diamino-bpy)(2)DPPZ](2+) (with bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, phen = phenanthroline, and DPPZ = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), the one and only compound with which it has been possible to demonstrate the proof-of-concept is the Os[(bpy)(2)DPPZ](2+). In terms of analytical performances, the methodology described here compares well with optical-based real-time PCRs, offering finally the same advantages than the popular and routinely used SYBR Green-based real-time fluorescent PCR, but with the additional incomes of being potentially much cheaper and easier to integrate in a hand-held miniaturized device.

  6. A novel DNA tetrahedron-hairpin probe for in situ"off-on" fluorescence imaging of intracellular telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Zhu, Meng-Jiao; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-04-21

    A novel three-dimensionally structured DNA probe is reported to realize in situ"off-on" imaging of intracellular telomerase activity. The probe consists of a DNA tetrahedron and a hairpin DNA on one of the vertices of the DNA tetrahedron. It is composed of four modified DNA segments: S1-Au nanoparticle (NP) inserting a telomerase strand primer (TSP) and S2-S4, three Cy5 dye modified DNA segments. Fluorescence of Cy5 at three vertices of the DNA tetrahedron is quenched by the Au NP at the other vertex due to the effective fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ("off" state). When the probe meets telomerase, the hairpin structure changes to rod-like through complementary hybridization with the telomerase-triggered stem elongation product, resulting in a large distance between the Au NP and Cy5 and the recovery of Cy5 fluorescence ("on" state). The molar ratio of 3 : 1 between the reporter (Cy5) and the target related TSP makes the probe show high sensitivity and recovery efficiency of Cy5 in the presence of telomerase extracted from HeLa cells. Given the functional and compact nanostructure, the mechanically stable and noncytotoxic nature of the DNA tetrahedron, this FRET-based probe provides more opportunities for biosensing, molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  7. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  8. Application of restriction display PCR technique in the preparation of cDNA microarray probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Hui Sun; Wen-Li Ma; Bao Zhang; Yi-Fei Peng; Wen-Ling Zheng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a simplified and efficient method for the preparation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) cDNA microarray probes.METHODS: With the technique of restriction display PCR (RD-PCR), restriction enzyme Sau3A I was chosen to digest the full-length HCV cDNAs. The products were classified and re-amplified by RD-PCR. We separated the differential genes by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. Single bands cut out from the polyacrylamide gel were isolated. The third-round PCR was performed using the single bands as PCR template.The RD-PCR fragments were purified and cloned into the pMD18-T vector. The recombinant plasmids were extracted from positive clones, and the target gene fragments were sequenced. The cDNA microarray was prepared by spotting RD-PCR products to the surface of amino-modified glass slides using a robot. We validated the detection of microarray by hybridization and sequence analysis.RESULTS: A total of 24 different cDNA fragments ranging from 200 to 800 bp were isolated and sequenced,which were the specific gene fragments of HCV. These fragments could be further used as probes in microarray preparation. The diagnostic capability of the microarray was evaluated after the washing and scanning steps. The results of hybridization and sequence analysis showed that the specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, reproducibility,and linearity in detecting HCV RNA were satisfactory.CONCLUSION: The RD-PCR technique is of great value in obtaining a large number of size-comparable gene probes, which provides a speedy protocol in generating probes for the preparation of microarrays. Microarray prepared as such could be further optimized and applied in the clinical diagnosis of HCV.

  9. Nucleic Acid-Peptide Complex Phase Controlled by DNA Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieregg, Jeffrey; Lueckheide, Michael; Leon, Lorraine; Marciel, Amanda; Tirrell, Matthew

    When polyanions and polycations are mixed, counterion release drives formation of polymer-rich complexes that can either be solid (precipitates) or liquid (coacervates) depending on the properties of the polyelectrolytes. These complexes are important in many fields, from encapsulation of industrial polymers to membrane-free segregation of biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. Condensation of long double-stranded DNA has been studied for several decades, but comparatively little attention has been paid to the polyelectrolyte behavior of oligonucleotides. We report here studies of DNA oligonucleotides (10 - 88 nt) complexed with polylysine (10 - 100 aa). Unexpectedly, we find that the phase of the resulting complexes is controlled by the hybridization state of the nucleic acid, with double-stranded DNA forming precipitates and single-stranded DNA forming coacervates. Stability increases with polyelectrolyte length and decreases with solution salt concentration, with complexes of the longer double-stranded polymers undergoing precipitate/coacervate/soluble transitions as ionic strength is increased. Mixing coacervates formed by complementary single-stranded oligonucleotides results in precipitate formation, raising the possibility of stimulus-responsive material design.

  10. The Cell Probe Complexity of Dynamic Range Counting

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new technique for proving dynamic cell probe lower bounds. With this technique, we achieve the highest lower bound to date for any explicit problem, namely a lower bound of $t_q=\\Omega((\\lg n/\\lg(wt_u))^2)$. Here $n$ is the number of update operations, $w$ the cell size, $t_q$ the query time and $t_u$ the update time. In the most natural setting of cell size $w=\\Theta(\\lg n)$, this gives a lower bound of $t_q=\\Omega((\\lg n/\\lg \\lg n)^2)$ for any polylogarithmic update time. This bound is almost a quadratic improvement over the highest previous lower bound of $\\Omega(\\lg n)$, due to P\\v{a}tra\\c{s}cu and Demaine [SICOMP'06]. We prove our lower bound for the fundamental problem of weighted orthogonal range counting. In this problem, we are to support insertions of two-dimensional points, each assigned a $\\Theta(\\lg n)$-bit integer weight. A query to this problem is specified by a point $q=(x,y)$, and the goal is to report the sum of the weights assigned to the points dominated by $q$, ...

  11. Photocatalytic probing of DNA sequence by using TiO{sub 2}/dopamine-DNA triads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jianqin [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Garza, Linda de la [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Zhang Ligang; Dimitrijevic, Nada M. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Zuo Xiaobing; Tiede, David M. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rajh, Tijana [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: rajh@anl.gov

    2007-10-15

    A method to control charge transfer reaction in DNA using hybrid nanometer-sized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was developed. In this system extended charge separation reflects the sequence of DNA and was measured using metallic silver deposition or by photocurrent response. Light-induced extended charge separation in these systems was found to be dependent on the DNA-bridge length and sequence. The yield of photocatalytic deposition of silver was studied in systems having GG accepting sites imbedded in AT runs at varying distances from the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle surface. Weak distance dependence of charge separation indicative of a hole hopping through mediating adenine (A) sites was found. The quantum yield of silver deposition in the system having a GG accepting site placed 8.5 A from the nanoparticle surface was found to be {phi} = 0.70 (70%) and {phi} = 0.56 (56%) for (A){sub n} and (AT){sub n/2} bridge, respectively. Hole injection to GG trapping sites as far as 70 A from a nanoparticle surface in the absence of G hopping sites was measured. Introduction of G hopping sites increased the efficiency of hole injection. The efficiency of photocatalytic deposition of metallic silver was found to be sensitive to the presence of a single nucleobase mismatch in the DNA sequence.

  12. Lanthanide complexes as luminogenic probes to measure sulfide levels in industrial samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorson, Megan K. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Ung, Phuc [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Leaver, Franklin M. [Water & Energy Systems Technology, Inc., Kaysville, UT 84037 (United States); Corbin, Teresa S. [Quality Services Laboratory, Tesoro Refining and Marketing, Salt Lake City, UT 84103 (United States); Tuck, Kellie L., E-mail: kellie.tuck@monash.edu [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Graham, Bim, E-mail: bim.graham@monash.edu [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Barrios, Amy M., E-mail: amy.barrios@utah.edu [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States)

    2015-10-08

    A series of lanthanide-based, azide-appended complexes were investigated as hydrogen sulfide-sensitive probes. Europium complex 1 and Tb complex 3 both displayed a sulfide-dependent increase in luminescence, while Tb complex 2 displayed a decrease in luminescence upon exposure to NaHS. The utility of the complexes for monitoring sulfide levels in industrial oil and water samples was investigated. Complex 3 provided a sensitive measure of sulfide levels in petrochemical water samples (detection limit ∼ 250 nM), while complex 1 was capable of monitoring μM levels of sulfide in partially refined crude oil. - Highlights: • Lanthanide–azide based sulfide sensors were synthesized and characterized. • The probes have excitation and emission profiles compatible with sulfide-contaminated samples from the petrochemical industry. • A terbium-based probe was used to measure the sulfide concentration in oil refinery wastewater. • A europium-based probe had compatibility with partially refined crude oil samples.

  13. Probing Complexity using the LCLS and the ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, Nora [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-19

    The goal of our research program is to investigate fundamental interactions between photons and molecular/nano-systems to advance our quantitative understanding of electron correlations, charge transfer and many body phenomena. Our research projects focus on probing, on a femtosecond time-scale, multi-electron interactions and tracing nuclear motion in order to understand, and ultimately control energy flow and charge transfer processes from electromagnetic radiation to matter. The experiments will be carried out with state of the art instrumentation built by the P.I. team with funds from a DoE "Single Investigator and Small Group Research" (SISGR) grant. The research projects carried out the past three years consisted of first experiments using the linac coherent light source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility at the SLAC National Laboratory, as well as the study of correlated processes in select anions using the ALS. A report for the past cycle is described in section II. These studies have paved the way for our renewal application for the next three years. Our research interests for the next three years extend our past and present research by carrying out time-resolved measurements described in section III. They will consist of: a) The study of molecular dynamics that happen on ultrafast time scales, using pump-probe schemes and the study of non-linear physics in the x-ray regime via multi-photon absorption from the LCLS. This will be achieved by measuring and examining both electronic and nuclear dynamics subsequent to the interaction of molecules and nano-systems with LCLS pulses of various wavelength, intensity and pulse duration as described in section III.A. b) The study of molecular dynamics and correlated processes via absorption of vuv-soft x-rays from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide single-photon ionization baseline results for LCLS studies. In addition, we will study the photodetachment of anions

  14. Rapid detection of chromosome 18 copy number in buccal smears using DNA probes and FISH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C.; Nunez, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, WI (United States); Giraldez, R. [ONCOR, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis of trisomy 18 in newborns is often critical to clinical management decisions that must be made in a minimum of time. DNA probes combined with FISH can be used to accurately to determine the copy number of chromosome 18 in interphase cells. We have used the D18Z1 alpha satellite DNA probe to determine signal frequency in normal, previously karyotyped subjects, 12 females and 6 males. We also present one clinical case of trisomy 18, confirmed by karyotype, for comparison to the results obtained from normal subjects. Buccal smears, unlike cytogenetic preparations from peripheral blood, are quite resistant to penetration of probes and detection reagents resulting in higher levels of false monosomy. We have studied 19 individuals and have obtained consistent FISH results, ranging from 64 to 90% disomy. False monosomy rates ranged from 10 to 36%, while false trisomy or tetrasomy was less than 1% in all samples. High rates of false monosomy make this test questionable for detection of low order mosaicism for monosomy, but the extremely low false hyperploidy rate suggests that this is a dependable procedure for detection of trisomy 18, enabling the use of buccal epithelium which can be collected easily from even premature and tiny infants.

  15. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  16. Meat speciation by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis using an α-actin cDNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, K S; Hopwood, A J; Lockley, A K; Bardsley, R G

    1998-09-01

    Classical DNA fingerprinting is based on separation of DNA restriction fragments by electrophoresis and hybridisation to nucleic acid probes containing repetitive nucleotide sequences. The use of such mini- or micro-satellite probes tends to yield patterns specific to an individual rather than to a species, hence their value in forensic analysis but general unsuitability for meat speciation. In the present study, a cDNA probe based on conserved sequences contained in members of the actin multigene family has been evaluated for potential application in meat speciation. Genomic DNA was extracted from muscle and digested with BamHI before electrophoresis and hybridisation to a murine α-actin cDNA probe. Beef, pork, lamb, horse, chicken and fish DNA restriction fragments formed characteristic 'fingerprints' which were reproducible and varied sufficiently to allow discrimination even between closely-related species. However no major differences were seen between individuals of the same breed or between different breeds within a species. When DNA obtained from fresh tissue and also from meat heated at 120 °C was analysed, the gel patterns were essentially the same. An attractive feature of this approach is that it employs a single cross-reacting probe and set of conditions, and gives different patterns with all species so far studied. This simplicity suggests applications in meat speciation or related areas of biology.

  17. A platinum complex that binds non-covalently to DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Mendoza, Oscar; Duarte, Alexandra A; Mann, David J; Vilar, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    Cisplatin and some of its derivatives have been shown to be very successful anticancer agents. Their main mode of action has been proposed to be via covalent binding to DNA. However, one of the limitations of these drugs is their poor activity against some tumours due to intrinsic or acquired resistance. Therefore, there is interest in developing complexes with different binding modes and mode of action. Herein we present a novel platinum(ii)-terpyridine complex (1) which interacts non-covalently with DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin. The interaction of this complex with DNA was studied by UV/Vis spectroscopic titrations, fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assays and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. In addition, computational docking studies were carried out with the aim of establishing the complex's binding mode. These experimental and computational studies showed the complex to have an affinity constant for DNA of ∼10(4) M(-1), a theoretical free energy of binding of -10.83 kcal mol(-1) and selectivity for the minor groove of DNA. Long-term studies indicated that 1 did not covalently bind (or nick) DNA. The cancer cell antiproliferative properties of this platinum(ii) complex were probed in vitro against human and murine cell lines. Encouragingly the platinum(ii) complex displayed selective toxicity for the cancerous (U2OS and SH-SY5Y) and proliferating NIH 3T3 cell lines. Further cell based studies were carried out to establish the mode of action. Cellular uptake studies demonstrated that the complex is able to penetrate the cell membrane and localize to the nucleus, implying that genomic DNA could be a cellular target. Detailed immunoblotting studies in combination with DNA-flow cytometry showed that the platinum(ii) complex induced cell death in a manner consistent with necrosis.

  18. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, DNA/ Protein Binding, DNA Cleavage, Cytotoxicity, Antioxidative and Molecular Docking Studies of Cu(II)Complexes Containing Schiff Base-bpy/Phen Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupama, Berelli; Aruna, Airva; Manga, Vijjulatha; Sivan, Sreekanth; Sagar, Madamsetty Vijay; Chandrashekar, Ravula

    2017-05-01

    Ternary Cu(II) complexes [Cu(II)(L)(bpy)Cl] 1, [Cu(II)(L)(Phen)Cl] 2 [L = 2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-4(2 hydroxy-5-methyl benzylideneamino)-pyrazol-5-one, bpy = 2,2(') bipyridine, phen =1,10 phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, UV-Visible, FT-IR, ESR, Mass, thermogravimetric and SEM EDAX techniques. The complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The interaction of the Cu(II) with cailf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was explored by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The results revealed that the complexes have an affinity constant for DNA in the order of 10(4) M(-1) and mode of interaction is intercalative mode. The DNA cleavage study showed that the complexes cleaved DNA without any external agent. The interaction of Cu(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also studied using absorption and fluorescence techniques. The cytotoxic activity of the Cu(II) complexes was probed in HeLa (human breast adenocarcinoma cell line), B16F10 (Murine melanoma cell line) and HEPA1-6 celllines, complex 1 has good cytotoxic activity which is comparable with the doxarubicin drug, with IC50 values ranging from 3 to 12.6 μM. A further molecular docking technique was employed to understand the binding of the complexes towards the molecular target DNA. Investigation of the antioxidative properties showed that the metal complexes have significant radical scavenging activity potency against DPPH radical.

  19. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics at interfaces: fluorescent DNA probes at the dodecane/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Giuseppe; Vauthey, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Although the interfaces between two isotropic media are of primary importance in many areas of science and technology, their properties are only partially understood. Our strategy to obtain an insight into these properties is to investigate the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of environment-sensitive molecular probes at liquid interfaces using time-resolved surface second harmonic generation, and to compare it with the dynamics of the same molecules in bulk solutions. Additionally, this approach gives rich information on how the chemical reactivity may change when going from the bulk phase to the interface. This is illustrated by an investigation performed with a series of fluorescent DNA probes at the dodecane/water interface without and with the presence of DNA in the aqueous phase. Substantial differences in the conformation of these cyanine dyes (aggregated or not) and in the excited-state dynamics are observed when going from bulk solutions to the interface. Moreover, the presence of double-stranded DNA in the aqueous phase induces some chirality at the interface.

  20. DNA-encapsulated silver nanodots as ratiometric luminescent probes for hypochlorite detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonyoung; Choi, Sungmoon; Yu, Junhua

    2014-03-01

    DNA-encapsulated silver nanodots are noteworthy candidates for bio-imaging probes, thanks to their excellent photophysical properties. The spectral shift of silver nanodot emitters from red to blue shows excellent correlations with the concentration of reactive oxygen species, which makes it possible to develop new types of probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl), given the outstanding stability of the blue in oxidizing environments. HOCl plays a role as a microbicide in immune systems but, on the other hand, is regarded as a disease contributor. Moreover, it is a common ingredient in household cleaners. There are still great demands to detect HOCl fluxes and their physiological pathways. We introduce a new ratiometric luminescence imaging method based on silver nanodots to sensitively detect hypochlorite. The factors that influence the accuracy of the detection are investigated. Its availability has also been demonstrated by detecting the active component in cleaners.

  1. Interaction of novel bis(platinum) complexes with DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, J D; Van Houten, B; Qu, Y; Farrell, N P

    1989-01-01

    Bis(platinum) complexes [[cis-PtCl2(NH3)]2H2N(CH2)nNH2] are a novel series of potential anticancer agents in which two cis-diamine(platinum) groups are linked by an alkyldiamine of variable length. These complexes are potentially tetrafunctional, a unique feature in comparison with known anticancer agents. Studies of DNA interactions of bis(platinum) complexes in comparison with cisplatin demonstrate significant differences. Investigations of interstrand crosslink formation in which crosslink...

  2. Mechanosensing of DNA bending in a single specific protein-DNA complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Shimin; Chen, Hu; Cong, Peiwen; Lin, Jie; Dröge, Peter; Yan, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Many crucial biological processes are regulated by mechanical stimuli. Here, we report new findings that pico-Newton forces can drastically affect the stability of the site-specific DNA binding of a single transcription factor, the E. coli integration host factor (IHF), by stretching a short ~150 nm DNA containing a single IHF binding site. Dynamic binding and unbinding of single IHF were recorded and analyzed for the force-dependent stability of the IHF-DNA complex. Our results demonstrate that the IHF-DNA interaction is fine tuned by force in different salt concentration and temperature over physiological ranges, indicating that, besides other physiological factors, force may play equally important role in transcription regulation. These findings have broad implications with regard to general mechanosensitivity of site-specific DNA bending proteins.

  3. Protein-free parallel triple-stranded DNA complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchyolkina, A. K.; Timofeev, E. N.; Lysov, Yu. P.; Florentiev, V. L.; Jovin, T. M.; Arndt-Jovin, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    A 14 nt DNA sequence 5′-AGAATGTGGCAAAG-3′ from the zinc finger repeat of the human KRAB zinc finger protein gene ZNF91 bearing the intercalator 2-methoxy,6-chloro,9-amino acridine (Acr) attached to the sugar–phosphate backbone in various positions has been shown to form a specific triple helix (triplex) with a 16 bp hairpin (intramolecular) or a two-stranded (intermolecular) duplex having the identical sequence in the same (parallel) orientation. Intramolecular targets with the identical sequence in the antiparallel orientation and a non-specific target sequence were tested as controls. Apparent binding constants for formation of the triplex were determined by quantitating electrophoretic band shifts. Binding of the single-stranded oligonucleotide probe sequence to the target led to an increase in the fluorescence anisotropy of acridine. The parallel orientation of the two identical sequence segments was confirmed by measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the acridine on the 5′-end of the probe strand as donor and BODIPY-Texas Red on the 3′-amino group of either strand of the target duplex as acceptor. There was full protection from OsO4-bipyridine modification of thymines in the probe strand of the triplex, in accordance with the presumed triplex formation, which excluded displacement of the homologous duplex strand by the probe–intercalator conjugate. The implications of these results for the existence of protein-independent parallel triplexes are discussed. PMID:11160932

  4. Chemical shift as a probe of molecular interfaces: NMR studies of DNA binding by the three amino-terminal zinc finger domains from transcription factor IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Mark P.; Wuttke, Deborah S.; Clemens, Karen R.; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar; Tennant, Linda; Reymond, Martine; Chung, John; Wright, Peter E. [Scripps Research Institute, Department of Molecular Biology and Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology (United States)

    1998-07-15

    We report the NMR resonance assignments for a macromolecular protein/DNA complex containing the three amino-terminal zinc fingers (92 amino acid residues) of Xenopus laevis TFIIIA (termed zf1-3) bound to the physiological DNA target (15 base pairs), and for the free DNA. Comparisons are made of the chemical shifts of protein backbone{sup 1} H{sup N}, {sup 15}N,{sup 13} C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13} C{sup {beta}} and DNA base and sugar protons of the free and bound species. Chemical shift changes are analyzed in the context of the structures of the zf1-3/DNA complex to assess the utility of chemical shift change as a probe of molecular interfaces. Chemical shift perturbations that occur upon binding in the zf1-3/DNA complex do not correspond directly to the structural interface, but rather arise from a number of direct and indirect structural and dynamic effects.

  5. Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects for Metal-DNA Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, Eteri

    2008-01-01

    The stoichiometric binding constants of Nickel(II), Cobalt(II), Manganese(II), Silver(I), Zinc(II) ions with DNA, from Spirulina platensis were determined from their binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. It was shown, that the nature of these ions interaction with DNA, from S .platensis is different. For Cobalt(II), Zinc(II) ions were observed cooperative effects and existence of two different types of the binding sites. Nickel(II)_, Silver(I) -DNA complexes shows independent and identical binding sites and Manganese(II)_ negative cooperative interaction. The logarithm of binding constants for Cobalt (II)_, Nickel (II)_, Manganese (II)_, Zinc (II)_, Silver (I) - DNA, from S. platensis in 3 mM Na(I) are 5.11; 5.18; 4.77; 5.05; 5.42; respectively. The linear correlation of logarithm of binding constants (for complexes of metal-DNA from S. platensis) and the covalent index of Pauling are observed.

  6. Simple horizontal magnetic tweezers for micromanipulation of single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Christopher P; Tyson, Christopher; Zischkau, Joseph; Mehl, Patrick; Tuma, Pamela L; Pegg, Ian L; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a simple-to-implement magnetic force transducer that can apply a wide range of piconewton (pN) scale forces on single DNA molecules and DNA-protein complexes in the horizontal plane. The resulting low-noise force-extension data enable very high-resolution detection of changes in the DNA tether's extension: ~0.05 pN in force and DNA in near equilibrium conditions through the wide range of forces by ramping the force from low to high and back again, and observing minimal hysteresis in the molecule's force response. Using a calibration technique based on Stokes' drag law, we have confirmed our force measurements from DNA force-extension experiments obtained using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem applied to transverse fluctuations of the magnetic microsphere. We present data on the force-distance characteristics of a DNA molecule complexed with histones. The results illustrate how the tweezers can be used to study DNA binding proteins at the single molecule level.

  7. DNA-surfactant complexes: self-assembly properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Ma, Chao; Göstl, Robert; Herrmann, Andreas

    2017-08-14

    Over the last few years, DNA-surfactant complexes have gained traction as unique and powerful materials for potential applications ranging from optoelectronics to biomedicine because they self-assemble with outstanding flexibility spanning packing modes from ordered lamellar, hexagonal and cubic structures to disordered isotropic phases. These materials consist of a DNA backbone from which the surfactants protrude as non-covalently bound side chains. Their formation is electrostatically driven and they form bulk films, lyotropic as well as thermotropic liquid crystals and hydrogels. This structural versatility and their easy-to-tune properties render them ideal candidates for assembly in bulk films, for example granting directional conductivity along the DNA backbone, for dye dispersion minimizing fluorescence quenching allowing applications in lasing and nonlinear optics or as electron blocking and hole transporting layers, such as in LEDs or photovoltaic cells, owing to their extraordinary dielectric properties. However, they do not only act as host materials but also function as a chromophore itself. They can be employed within electrochromic DNA-surfactant liquid crystal displays exhibiting remarkable absorptivity in the visible range whose volatility can be controlled by the external temperature. Concomitantly, applications in the biological field based on DNA-surfactant bulk films, liquid crystals and hydrogels are rendered possible by their excellent gene and drug delivery capabilities. Beyond the mere exploitation of their material properties, DNA-surfactant complexes proved outstandingly useful for synthetic chemistry purposes when employed as scaffolds for DNA-templated reactions, nucleic acid modifications or polymerizations. These promising examples are by far not exhaustive but foreshadow their potential applications in yet unexplored fields. Here, we will give an insight into the peculiarities and perspectives of each material and are confident to

  8. The attachment and characterization of DNA probes on gallium arsenide-based semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joonhyuk

    2007-12-01

    Immobilization of nucleic acid molecules on solid surfaces is the core of numerous important technologies in the genomics, disease diagnostics and biosensors applications. The architecture and density of immobilized probe molecules depend on the type of the solid surface on which they are anchored. Even though many different types of surfaces have been studied as substrates for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) attachment, the development of a new type of substrate, which is reproducible, stable, highly controlled and easily transferred to practical applications, is still needed. Recent studies have shown that As terminated GaAs-based semiconductors can be used as substrates for immobilized DNA layers. In this study, I aim to understand the attachment of nucleic acid onto the surfaces of As-terminated GaAs-based semiconductors and focus on improving the "brush-structure", which is essential for high quality of biochip based on a DNA layer. Attachment of 8-base and 100-base thiolated ssDNA layers on arsenic terminated GaAs(001) was achieved and characterized. The covalent bonds between the thiolated oligonucleotides with As atoms on the GaAs surface were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the surface morphology was obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). In addition, I studied the effect of DNA length and the presence of a good solvent, such as water, on the oligonucleotides on a GaAs surface. I also investigated the effects of the thiol-based spacer and electrolyte concentration to improve the brush-like structure of the DNA layer. Finally, irradiation effects and AlGaAs resonators have been studied for the applications of DNA brush layer on GaAs as biosensor during the change of attachment probe DNA and hybridization to target DNA. For the 8-base thiolated ssDNA case, AFM results showed that the layer thickness was about ˜2.2 nm in dry mode and increased in wet mode. Replacement

  9. A rapid, cost-effective method of assembly and purification of synthetic DNA probes >100 bp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Jensen

    Full Text Available Here we introduce a rapid, cost-effective method of generating molecular DNA probes in just under 15 minutes without the need for expensive, time-consuming gel-extraction steps. As an example, we enzymatically concatenated six variable strands (50 bp with a common strand sequence (51 bp in a single pool using Fast-Link DNA ligase to produce 101 bp targets (10 min. Unincorporated species were then filtered out by passing the crude reaction through a size-exclusion column (12 could be achieved with further optimization. Moreover, for large-scale assays, we envision this method to be fully automated with the use of robotics such as the Biomek FX; here, potentially thousands of samples could be pooled, ligated and purified in either a 96, 384 or 1536-well platform in just minutes.

  10. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-05

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  11. Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Technique for Copy Number Analysis on Small Amounts of DNA Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina; Andersen, Paal; Larsen, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique is a sensitive technique for relative quantification of up to 50 different nucleic acid sequences in a single reaction, and the technique is routinely used for copy number analysis in various syndromes and diseases. The aim...... of the study was to exploit the potential of MLPA when the DNA material is limited. The DNA concentration required in standard MLPA analysis is not attainable from dried blood spot samples (DBSS) often used in neonatal screening programs. A novel design of MLPA probes has been developed to permit for MLPA...... analysis on small amounts of DNA. Six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) were used in this study. DNA was extracted from both whole blood and DBSS and subjected to MLPA analysis using normal and modified probes. Results were analyzed using GeneMarker and manual Excel analysis. A total...

  12. Preparation and fluorescent properties of a complex probe based on inorganic QDs and organic dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei Xuening, E-mail: xueningfei@126.co [Department of Material Science and Engineering, TianJin Institute of Urban Construction, No. 26, Jinjing Road, Tianjin 300384 (China) and School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, TianJin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gu Yingchun [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, TianJin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Department of Material Science and Engineering, TianJin Institute of Urban Construction, No. 26, Jinjing Road, Tianjin 300384 (China); Wang Jun; Jia Guozhi; Liu Zhijun [Department of Material Science and Engineering, TianJin Institute of Urban Construction, No. 26, Jinjing Road, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2011-02-15

    A novel complex fluorescent probe based on quantum dots and organic dye (QDs-TO) was designed and prepared by incorporating a benzothiazole derivative into QDs-1-(3-amidepropyl)-4-methylquinoline. The complex probe was characterized by FT-IR and TG/DTA. The emission wavelength of QDs-1-(3-amidepropyl)-4-methylquinoline was found at 475 nm and a new peak corresponding to QDs-TO appeared at 550 nm, indicating that benzothiazole derivative can react with QDs-1-(3-amidepropyl)-4-methylquinoline to afford QDs-TO. Furthermore, the emission wavelength of QDs shifted blue while the characteristic peak of TO shifted red during the reaction. This suggests that the probe may be useful for biological labeling in offering an efficient method to study the interrelation between quantum dots and organic dyes.

  13. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods to investigate the interaction between 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural and calf thymus DNA using ethidium bromide as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinhua; Chen, Lanlan; Dong, Yingying; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Xiuhua

    2014-04-24

    In this work, the interaction of 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) under simulated physiological conditions (Tris-HCl buffer of pH 7.40), was explored by UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling method, using ethidium bromide (EB) as a fluorescence probe of DNA. The fluorescence quenching mechanism of EB-ctDNA by 5-HMF was confirmed to be a static quenching, which derived from the formation of a new complex. The binding constants of 5-HMF with DNA in the presence of EB were calculated to be 2.17×10(3), 4.24×10(3) and 6.95×10(3) L mol(-1) at 300, 305 and 310 K, respectively. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change ΔH and entropy change ΔS, suggested that both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played a predominant role in the binding of 5-HMF to DNA. According to the UV absorption spectroscopy and melting temperature (Tm) curve results, the binding mode of 5-HMF with DNA was indicative of a non-intercalative binding, which was supposed to be a groove binding. The molecular modeling results showed that 5-HMF could bind into the hydrophobic region of ctDNA and supported the conclusions obtained from the above experiments.

  14. Dissecting the effect of anions on Hg2+ detection using a FRET based DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiy, Mehmet Murat; Zaki, Ahmed; Menhaj, Arsalsan Beg; Samadi, Azadeh; Liu, Juewen

    2012-08-07

    Many biosensors have been developed to detect Hg(2+) using thymine-rich DNA. While sensor response to various cations is often studied to demonstrate selectivity, the effect of anions has been largely overlooked. Anions may compete with DNA for metal binding and thus produce a false negative result. Anions cannot be added alone; the cation part of a salt may cause DNA compaction and other effects, obscuring the role of anions. We find that the sensitivity of a FRET-based Hg(2+) probe is independent of Na(+) concentration. Therefore, by using various sodium salts, any change in sensitivity can be attributed solely to the effect of anions. Halide salts, sulfides, and amines are strong inhibitors; anions containing oxo or hydroxyl groups (e.g. nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, carbonate, acetate, and citrate) do not interfere with Hg(2+) detection even at 100 mM concentration. Mercury hydrolysis and its diffusion into polypropylene containers can also strongly affect the detection results. We conclude that thymine-rich DNA should be useful for Hg(2+) detection in many environmental water samples.

  15. Coiled-coil conformation of a pentamidine-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Tadeo; Pous, Joan; Subirana, Juan A; Campos, J Lourdes

    2010-03-01

    The coiled-coil structure formed by the complex of the DNA duplex d(ATATATATAT)(2) with pentamidine is presented. The duplex was found to have a mixed structure containing Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen base pairs. The drug stabilizes the coiled coil through the formation of cross-links between neighbouring duplexes. The central part of the drug is found in the minor groove as expected, whereas the charged terminal amidine groups protrude and interact with phosphates from neighbouring molecules. The formation of cross-links may be related to the biological effects of pentamidine, which is used as an antiprotozoal agent in trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis and pneumonias associated with AIDS. The DNA sequence that was used is highly abundant in most eukaryotic genomes. However, very few data are available on DNA sequences which only contain A.T base pairs.

  16. Fluorescence anisotropy of DNA/DAPI complex: torsional dynamics and geometry of the complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellona, ML; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence depolarization of synthetic polydeoxynucleotide/4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride complexes has been investigated as a function of dye/polymer coverage. At low coverage, fluorescence depolarization is due to local torsional motions of the DNA segment where the dye resides. At relatively high coverage, fluorescence depolarization is dominated by energy transfer to other dye molecules along the DNA. The extent of the observed depolarization due to torsional motion depe...

  17. LINE-1 repetitive DNA probes for species-specific cloning from Mus spretus and Mus domesticus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikke, B A; Hardies, S C

    1991-12-01

    Mus domesticus and Mus spretus mice are closely related subspecies. For genetic investigations involving hybrid mice, we have developed a set of species-specific oligonucleotide probes based on the detection of LINE-1 sequence differences. LINE-1 is a repetitive DNA family whose many members are interspersed among the genes. In this study, library screening experiments were used to fully characterize the species specificity of four M. domesticus LINE-1 probes and three M. spretus LINE-1 probes. It was found that the nucleotide differences detected by the probes define large, species-specific subfamilies. We show that collaborative use of such probes can be employed to selectively detect thousands of species-specific library clones. Consequently, these probes could be exploited to monitor and access almost any given species-specific region of interest within hybrid genomes.

  18. Genetic effect of A-bomb radiation- Analysis of minisatellite regions detected by DNA fingerprint probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaira, Mieko [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    In author's laboratory, screening of mutation in germ cells of A-bomb survivors is under investigation with use of 8 single-locus minisatellite probes and no increase in mutation rate has been detected hitherto. This paper reported results of screening on the minisatellite region, which consisting of short repeated base sequence, using a DNA fingerprint probe for 33.15 core sequence. Subjects were 50 A-bomb survivor families exposed to mean dose of 1.9 Sv (exposed group) or 0 Gy (control), having 64 or 60 children, respectively. DNA was extracted from their B cells established by EB virus and subjected to agarose-gel electrophoresis followed by southern blotting with some improvements for fingerprinting. On the fingerprints, numbers of the band detected in regions of >3.5 kb were 1080 in children of the exposed group (16.9/child) and 1024 (17.1) in the control group, indicating no detectable effect of exposure on the germ cell mutation rate in the region.(K.H.)

  19. Development of an on-site rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction system and the characterization of suitable DNA polymerases for TaqMan probe technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Naruishi, Nahoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Nagai, Hidenori

    2016-08-01

    On-site quantitative analyses of microorganisms (including viruses) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system are significantly influencing medical and biological research. We have developed a remarkably rapid and portable real-time PCR system that is based on microfluidic approaches. Real-time PCR using TaqMan probes consists of a complex reaction. Therefore, in a rapid real-time PCR, the optimum DNA polymerase must be estimated by using actual real-time PCR conditions. In this study, we compared the performance of three DNA polymerases in actual PCR conditions using our rapid real-time PCR system. Although KAPA2G Fast HS DNA Polymerase has the highest enzymatic activity among them, SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase exhibited better performance to rapidly increase the fluorescence signal in an actual real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. Furthermore, we achieved rapid detection of Escherichia coli in 7 min by using SpeedSTAR HS DNA Polymerase with the same sensitivity as that of a conventional thermal cycler.

  20. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction mechanisms of safranin T with herring sperm DNA using acridine orange as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Wang, Xing-ming; Xu, Dong-ling; Ding, Li-sheng

    2014-03-01

    Under the condition of physiological pH environment (pH = 7.40), the interactions of safranin T (ST) with herring sperm DNA were studied by means of spectral methods using acridine orange (AO) as a fluorescence probe. The spectroscopic characteristics of DNA-AO in the case of ST (along with the increase of concentration) were observed in an aqueous medium. The binding constants for ST stranded DNA and competitive bindings of ST interacting with DNA-AO systems were examined by fluorescence spectra, and the binding mechanism of ST with DNA was researched via viscosity measurements. All the testimony manifested that bonding modes between ST and DNA were evidenced to be intercalative binding and electrostatic binding, and the combining constant of ST with DNA was obtained. The binding of ST to DNA was driven by entropy and enthalpy through the calculated thermodynamic parameters (Δr Hm (Ө), Δr Sm and Δr Gm (Ө)).

  1. Kelvin probe force microscopy of DNA-capped nanoparticles for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung

    2016-07-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a chance to attenuate or augment the SP signal of DCNP without additional enhancement of instrumentation capabilities.Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a robust toolkit for profiling the surface potential (SP) of biomolecular interactions between DNAs and/or proteins at the single molecule level. However, it has often suffered from background noise and low throughput due to instrumental or environmental constraints, which is regarded as limiting KPFM applications for detection of minute changes in the molecular structures such as single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Here, we show KPFM imaging of DNA-capped nanoparticles (DCNP) that enables SNP detection of the BRCA1 gene owing to sterically well-adjusted DNA-DNA interactions that take place within the confined spaces of DCNP. The average SP values of DCNP interacting with BRCA1 SNP were found to be lower than the DCNP reacting with normal (non-mutant) BRCA1 gene. We also demonstrate that SP characteristics of DCNP with different substrates (e.g., Au, Si, SiO2, and Fe) provide us with a

  2. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  3. [Molecular dynamics of immune complex of photoadduct-containing DNA with Fab-Anti-DNA antibody fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberova, N I; Zhmurov, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of structural mechanisms of both the antigen recognition and the interaction of anti-DNA antibodies with DNA will help to understand the role of DNA-containing immune complexes in various pathologies and can provide a basis for new treatment modalities. Moreover, the DNA-antibody complex is an analog of specific intracellular DNA-protein interactions. In this work, we used in silico molecular dynamic simulations of bimolecular complexes of the dsDNA segment containing the Fab fragment of an anti-DNA antibody to obtain the detailed thermodynamic and structural characteristics of dynamic intermolecular interactions. Using computationally modified crystal structure of the Fab-DNA complex (PDB ID: 3VW3), we studied the equilibrium molecular dynamics of the 64M-5 antibody Fab fragment associated with the dsDNA fragment containing the thymine dimer, the product of DNA photodamage. Amino acid residues that constitute paratopes and the complementary nucleotide epitopes for the Fab-DNA construct were identified. Stacking and electrostatic interactions were found to play the main role in mediating the most specific antibody-dsDNA contacts, while hydrogen bonds were less significant. These findings may shed light on the formation and properties of pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus associated with skin photosensitivity and DNA photodamage.

  4. Isolation and characterization of DNA probes from a flow-sorted human chromosome 8 library that detect restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, S.; Starr, T V; Shukin, R J

    1986-01-01

    We have used a recombinant DNA library constructed from flow-sorted human chromosome 8 as a source of single-copy human probes. These probes have been screened for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) by hybridization to Southern transfers of genomic DNA from five unrelated individuals. We have detected six RFLPs distributed among four probes after screening 741 base pairs for restriction site variation. These RFLPs all behave as codominant Mendelian alleles. Two of the probes dete...

  5. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxic activities of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Sreekanth; Vallala, Srujana; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Rodrigues, Daniel Alencar; Raghavendra, Nulgumnalli Manjunathaiah; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel Ru(II) compounds (Ru-1 to Ru-8) bearing R-pdc, 4-Cl-pbinh ligands (where R=4-CF3, 4-F, 4-OH pdc=3-phenyl-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide, pbinh=phenoxybenzylidene isonicotinyl hydrazides) and their in vitro antitumor activity toward the cell lines murine leukemia L1210, human lymphocyte CEM, human epithelial cervical carcinoma HeLa, BEL-7402 and Molt4/C8. Some of the complexes exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines than the standard drug cisplatin. Ruthenium complex Ru-2 displayed potent cytotoxicity with than that of cisplatin. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and protein binding properties of ruthenium complexes with these ligands are reported. Interactions of these ruthenium complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra proved that the interaction of ruthenium complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) resulted in a conformational change of the latter.

  6. Thermodynamic and structural insights into CSL-DNA complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, David R.; Kovall, Rhett A. (UCIN-MED)

    2010-10-28

    The Notch pathway is an intercellular signaling mechanism that plays important roles in cell fates decisions throughout the developing and adult organism. Extracellular complexation of Notch receptors with ligands ultimately results in changes in gene expression, which is regulated by the nuclear effector of the pathway, CSL (C-promoter binding factor 1 (CBF-1), suppressor of hairless (Su(H)), lin-12 and glp-1 (Lag-1)). CSL is a DNA binding protein that is involved in both repression and activation of transcription from genes that are responsive to Notch signaling. One well-characterized Notch target gene is hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES-1), which is regulated by a promoter element consisting of two CSL binding sites oriented in a head-to-head arrangement. Although previous studies have identified in vivo and consensus binding sites for CSL, and crystal structures of these complexes have been determined, to date, a quantitative description of the energetics that underlie CSL-DNA binding is unknown. Here, we provide a thermodynamic and structural analysis of the interaction between CSL and the two individual sites that comprise the HES-1 promoter element. Our comprehensive studies that analyze binding as a function of temperature, salt, and pH reveal moderate, but distinct, differences in the affinities of CSL for the two HES-1 binding sites. Similarly, our structural results indicate that overall CSL binds both DNA sites in a similar manner; however, minor changes are observed in both the conformation of CSL and DNA. Taken together, our results provide a quantitative and biophysical basis for understanding how CSL interacts with DNA sites in vivo.

  7. Uncertainty analysis of point by point sampling complex surfaces using touch probe CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barini, Emanuele; Tosello, Guido; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a study concerning point by point scanning of complex surfaces using tactile CMMs. A four factors-two level full factorial experiment was carried out, involving measurements on a complex surface configuration item comprising a sphere, a cylinder and a cone, combined in a single...... assembly. An investigation on the source and effects of different uncertainty contributors during this complex surface measurement was carried out. The factors involved are machine, probe, and operator, as well as procedure, dependant. The results obtained from the experiments were analysed in terms...

  8. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  9. Novel Phenanthrene-Degrading Bacteria Identified by DNA-Stable Isotope Probing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei Jiang

    Full Text Available Microorganisms responsible for the degradation of phenanthrene in a clean forest soil sample were identified by DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP. The soil was artificially amended with either 12C- or 13C-labeled phenanthrene, and soil DNA was extracted on days 3, 6 and 9. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP results revealed that the fragments of 219- and 241-bp in HaeIII digests were distributed throughout the gradient profile at three different sampling time points, and both fragments were more dominant in the heavy fractions of the samples exposed to the 13C-labeled contaminant. 16S rRNA sequencing of the 13C-enriched fraction suggested that Acidobacterium spp. within the class Acidobacteria, and Collimonas spp. within the class Betaproteobacteria, were directly involved in the uptake and degradation of phenanthrene at different times. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the genus Collimonas has the ability to degrade PAHs. Two PAH-RHDα genes were identified in 13C-labeled DNA. However, isolation of pure cultures indicated that strains of Staphylococcus sp. PHE-3, Pseudomonas sp. PHE-1, and Pseudomonas sp. PHE-2 in the soil had high phenanthrene-degrading ability. This emphasizes the role of a culture-independent method in the functional understanding of microbial communities in situ.

  10. Identification of the autotrophic denitrifying community in nitrate removal reactors by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Cong, Yuan; Gao, Wei; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic denitrification has attracted increasing attention for wastewater with insufficient organic carbon sources. Nevertheless, in situ identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities in reactors remains challenging. Here, a process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification with high nitrate removal efficiency was presented. Two batch reactors were fed organic-free nitrate influent, with H(13)CO3(-) and H(12)CO3(-) as inorganic carbon sources. DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to obtain molecular evidence for autotrophic denitrifying communities. The results showed that the nirS gene was strongly labeled by H(13)CO3(-), demonstrating that the inorganic carbon source was assimilated by autotrophic denitrifiers. High-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis identified Thiobacillus-like bacteria as the most dominant autotrophic denitrifiers. However, 88% of nirS genes cloned from the (13)C-labeled "heavy" DNA fraction showed low similarity with all culturable denitrifiers. These findings provided functional and taxonomical identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities, facilitating application of autotrophic denitrification process for wastewater treatment.

  11. A competition assay for DNA binding using the fluorescent probe ANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ian A; Kneale, G Geoff

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique frequently employed to study protein-nucleic acid interactions. Often, the intrinsic fluorescence emission spectrum of tryptophan residues in a nucleic-acid-binding protein is strongly perturbed upon interaction with a target DNA or RNA. These spectral changes can then be exploited in order to construct binding isotherms and the extract equilibrium association constant together with the stoichiometry of an interaction. However, when a protein contains many tryptophan residues that are not located in the proximity of the nucleic-acid-binding site, changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum may not be apparent or the magnitude too small to be useful. Here, we make use of an extrinsic fluorescence probe, the environmentally sensitive fluorophore 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid (1,8-ANS). Displacement by DNA of 1,8-ANS molecules from the nucleic-acid-binding site of the Type I modification methylase EcoR124I results in red shifting and an intensity decrease of the 1,8-ANS fluorescence emission spectrum. These spectral changes have been used to investigate the interaction of EcoR124I with DNA target recognition sequences.

  12. Measuring complexity, nonextensivity and chaos in the DNA sequence of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlos, G. P.; Karakatsanis, L. P.; Iliopoulos, A. C.; Pavlos, E. G.; Xenakis, M. N.; Clark, Peter; Duke, Jamie; Monos, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze 4 Mb sequences of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), which is a DNA segment on chromosome 6 with high gene density, controlling many immunological functions and associated with many diseases. The analysis is based on modern theoretical and mathematical tools of complexity theory, such as nonlinear time series analysis and Tsallis non-extensive statistics. The results revealed that the DNA complexity and self-organization can be related to fractional dynamical nonlinear processes with low-dimensional deterministic chaotic and non-extensive statistical character, which generate the DNA sequences under the extremization of Tsallis q-entropy principle. While it still remains an open question as to whether the DNA walk is a fractional Brownian motion (FBM), a static anomalous diffusion process or a non-Gaussian dynamical fractional anomalous diffusion process, the results of this study testify for the latter, providing also a possible explanation for the previously observed long-range power law correlations of nucleotides, as well as the long-range correlation properties of coding and non-coding sequences present in DNA sequences.

  13. Lifetime heterogeneity of DNA-bound dppz complexes originates from distinct intercalation geometries determined by complex-complex interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Johanna; Fornander, Louise H; Abrahamsson, Maria; Tuite, Eimer; Nordell, Pär; Lincoln, Per

    2013-01-18

    Despite the extensive interest in structurally explaining the photophysics of DNA-bound [Ru(phen)(2)dppz](2+) and [Ru(bpy)(2)dppz](2+), the origin of the two distinct emission lifetimes of the pure enantiomers when intercalated into DNA has remained elusive. In this report, we have combined a photophysical characterization with a detailed isothermal titration calorimetry study to investigate the binding of the pure Δ and Λ enantiomers of both complexes with [poly(dAdT)](2). We find that a binding model with two different binding geometries, proposed to be symmetric and canted intercalation from the minor groove, as recently reported in high-resolution X-ray structures, is required to appropriately explain the data. By assigning the long emission lifetime to the canted binding geometry, we can simultaneously fit both calorimetric data and the binding-density-dependent changes in the relative abundance of the two emission lifetimes using the same binding model. We find that all complex-complex interactions are slightly unfavorable for Δ-[Ru(bpy)(2)dppz](2+), whereas interactions involving a complex canted away from a neighbor are favorable for the other three complexes. We also conclude that Δ-[Ru(bpy)(2)dppz](2+) preferably binds isolated, Δ-[Ru(phen)(2)dppz](2+) preferably binds as duplets of canted complexes, and that all complexes are reluctant to form longer consecutive sequences than triplets. We propose that this is due to an interplay of repulsive complex-complex and attractive complex-DNA interactions modulated by allosteric DNA conformation changes that are largely affected by the nature of the ancillary ligands.

  14. The DNA gyrase-quinolone complex. ATP hydrolysis and the mechanism of DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    Quinolone binding to the gyrase-DNA complex induces a conformational change that results in the blocking of supercoiling. Under these conditions gyrase is still capable of ATP hydrolysis which now proceeds through an alternative pathway involving two different conformations of the enzyme (Kampranis......, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22606-22614). The kinetics of ATP hydrolysis via this pathway have been studied and found to differ from those of the reaction of the drug-free enzyme. The quinolone-characteristic ATPase rate is DNA-dependent and can be induced in the presence...

  15. DNA intercalation without flipping in the specific ThaI-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firczuk, Malgorzata; Wojciechowski, Marek; Czapinska, Honorata; Bochtler, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The PD-(D/E)XK type II restriction endonuclease ThaI cuts the target sequence CG/CG with blunt ends. Here, we report the 1.3 Å resolution structure of the enzyme in complex with substrate DNA and a sodium or calcium ion taking the place of a catalytic magnesium ion. The structure identifies Glu54, Asp82 and Lys93 as the active site residues. This agrees with earlier bioinformatic predictions and implies that the PD and (D/E)XK motifs in the sequence are incidental. DNA recognition is very unusual: the two Met47 residues of the ThaI dimer intercalate symmetrically into the CG steps of the target sequence. They approach the DNA from the minor groove side and penetrate the base stack entirely. The DNA accommodates the intercalating residues without nucleotide flipping by a doubling of the CG step rise to twice its usual value, which is accompanied by drastic unwinding. Displacement of the Met47 side chains from the base pair midlines toward the downstream CG steps leads to large and compensating tilts of the first and second CG steps. DNA intercalation by ThaI is unlike intercalation by HincII, HinP1I or proteins that bend or repair DNA.

  16. THE CLONING OF HRNT-1 USING A COMBINATION OF cDNA LIBRARY SCREENING WITH BIOTIN-LABELED PROBE AND RAPID AMPLIFICATION OF cDNA ENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To clone the human counterpart of rat ZA73, EST cloned from rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) neoplastic transformed cell model induced by (a-particles radiation by using mRNA differential display. Methods: According to the sequence of rat ZA73, a probe was biotin-labeled to screen human cDNA library, and then the gene sequence was extended by RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). Result: Human gene HRNT-1 (GenBank Accession Number: AF223393) is 4.256 kb in length, with an ORF located in the region between 254 and 3013 bp. 5' UTS (untranslated sequences) is 253 bp, 3' UTS is 1243 bp. Conclusion: The combination of cDNA library screening with biotin-labeled probes and RACE is an effective method to clone full-length cDNA, especially for sequences longer than 2 kb.

  17. DNA-METAFECTENE PRO complexation: a physical chemistry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatorre-Meda, Manuel; González-Pérez, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Julio R

    2010-07-21

    Complexes formed between cationic liposomes and DNA (also known as lipoplexes or genosomes) have proven, for years now, to be a suitable option for gene delivery to cells, transfection, however, some aspects regarding the liposome-DNA interaction mechanism and complex stability remain still unclear. This work aims to improve the understanding of the poorly defined mechanisms and structural conformation associated with the interaction of METAFECTENE PRO (MEP), a commercial liposomal transfection reagent, with poly-anion DNA at mass ratios around the mass ratio recommended for transfection (L/D congruent with 700). A physical chemistry characterization was conducted at a pH of 6.5 and at a temperature of 25 degrees C by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrophoretic mobility (zeta-potential), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Five parameters important for transfection were determined for the lipoplexes: (i) the hydrodynamic radius, R(H), (ii) the stability with time, (iii) the mass ratio of at which both moieties start to interact, (L/D)(i), (iv) the overall charge, and (v) the morphology. Results in ensemble point to a "beads on a string" conformation, with the lipoplex formation occurring well below isoneutrality from (L/D)(i) congruent with 600. The lipoplexes were found to be stable within at least seven days presenting an average R(H) of 135 nm.

  18. From the complex system leadership perspective: DNA leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Basri Gündüz

    2011-01-01

    interdependent interactions of emergent collective action. Enabling leadership serves two functions. First, it creates conditions which stimulate emergent collective action and adaptive leadership. Second, it channels productive responses originating in the emergent collective action back up to managerial leadership for strategic planning and exploitation (Lichtenstein, Uhl-Bien, Marion, Seers, Orton & Schreiber, 2006;Marion & Uhl-Bien, 2001; Uhl-Bien, Mrion & McKelvey, 2007. Complex Leadership differs from traditional models of leadership on key issues. First, Complex Leadership argues that organizations and their leaders are products of interactive dynamics. Second, complex systems are better led by indirect than direct leadership behaviours. Complex Leadership moves away from traditional assumptions regarding hierarchical bureaucracy and top-down leadership control. Complex Leaders need to temper control preferences and instead foster and enable bottom- up behaviours and stimulate systems toward emergent surprises Third, Complex Leadership is not necessarily have a formal position but more properly permeates the complex organization. Complex adaptive agent is used as a term to capture this idea and to distance Complex Leadership from traditional notions of leadership as a formal position of control. Fourth, Complex Leaders can more effectively impact the fitness of the system by enabling distributed intelligence. That is, Complex Leaders foster connectivity among diverse agents and enable effective coupling of structures, ideas, and innovations to ensure they are neither too loose nor too tightly interdependent (Uhl-Bien, Mrion & McKelvey, 2007.DNA leadershipComplexity leadership, by taking the concept of adaptability, learning and innovation into centre, provides a new leadership paradigm for knowledge era. Living organisms, especially multicellular ones, are very complex system and very successful in adapting to changing environment and conditions which indicates the

  19. Detection of beer spoilage bacteria Pectinatus and Megasphaera with acridinium ester labelled DNA probes using a hybridisation protection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradh, A D; Hill, A E; Mitchell, W J

    2014-01-01

    DNA probes specific for rRNA of selected target species were utilised for the detection of beer spoilage bacteria of the genera Pectinatus and Megasphaera using a hybridisation protection assay (HPA). All the probes were modified during synthesis by addition of an amino linker arm at the 5' end or were internally modified by inserting an amine modified thymidine base. Synthesised probes then were labelled with acridinium ester (AE) and purified using reverse phase HPLC. The internally AE labelled probes were able to detect target RNA within the range of 0.016-0.0032pmol. All the designed probes showed high specificity towards target RNA and could detect bacterial contamination within the range of ca. 5×10(2)1×10(3) CFU using the HPA. The developed assay was also compatible with MRS, NBB and SMMP beer enrichment media, routinely used in brewing laboratories.

  20. Recent progress report on DNA B-Z transition modulated by rare earth-amino acid complex and Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG

    2010-01-01

    Rare earth dements have unique physical, magnetic, luminescent and catalytic properties. They have been successfully used as medicine and probes in luminescent resonance energy transfer (LRET) for bioassays, as well as reagents for diagnosis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this progress report, we will focus on recent progress on how rare earth amino complexes bind to DNA and change DNA structure, especially on DNA B-Z transition induced by rare earth amino acid complex and its potential impact on Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  1. Architectures of archaeal GINS complexes, essential DNA replication initiation factors

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    Saito Mihoko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the early stage of eukaryotic DNA replication, the template DNA is unwound by the MCM helicase, which is activated by forming a complex with the Cdc45 and GINS proteins. The eukaryotic GINS forms a heterotetramer, comprising four types of subunits. On the other hand, the archaeal GINS appears to be either a tetramer formed by two types of subunits in a 2:2 ratio (α2β2 or a homotetramer of a single subunit (α4. Due to the low sequence similarity between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS subunits, the atomic structures of the archaeal GINS complexes are attracting interest for comparisons of their subunit architectures and organization. Results We determined the crystal structure of the α2β2 GINS tetramer from Thermococcus kodakaraensis (TkoGINS, comprising Gins51 and Gins23, and compared it with the reported human GINS structures. The backbone structure of each subunit and the tetrameric assembly are similar to those of human GINS. However, the location of the C-terminal small domain of Gins51 is remarkably different between the archaeal and human GINS structures. In addition, TkoGINS exhibits different subunit contacts from those in human GINS, as a consequence of the different relative locations and orientations between the domains. Based on the GINS crystal structures, we built a homology model of the putative homotetrameric GINS from Thermoplasma acidophilum (TacGINS. Importantly, we propose that a long insertion loop allows the differential positioning of the C-terminal domains and, as a consequence, exclusively leads to the formation of an asymmetric homotetramer rather than a symmetrical one. Conclusions The DNA metabolizing proteins from archaea are similar to those from eukaryotes, and the archaeal multi-subunit complexes are occasionally simplified versions of the eukaryotic ones. The overall similarity in the architectures between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS complexes suggests that the GINS function

  2. Potential use of buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of autosomal trisomy or chromosomal sex in newborn infants using DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, C.; Clark, K.; Lazarski, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Wilkerson, C. [Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Meisner, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Buccal smears from 3 women and 1 man were probed with alpha satellite DNA probes for chromosomes 8, 18, X, and Y. Buccal smears were also collected from an adolescent phenotypic female with uterine agenesis, as well as from newborn infants with suspected trisomy 18 and trisomy 21. The clinical cases were confirmed with conventional cytogenetic studies of peripheral lymphocytes. Overall probe efficiency at detecting expected chromosome number in interphase cells was found to be 71% {+-} 6.8%. Higher than expected n-1 signal numbers may be due to karyopyknotic intermediate epithelial cells present in all collected samples. Overall probe efficiency was found to be consistent using alpha satellite and cosmid probes, both of which accurately reflected the modal copy number of the target chromosomes. False trisomy was less than 1%. This study suggests DNA probes can be used in buccal smears for rapid diagnosis of trisomies and chromosomal sex in newborns, but because of high rates of false hydropoploid signals, probed buccal smear specimens may not be accurate at diagnosing mosaicism. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Cyanotryptophans as Novel Fluorescent Probes for Studying Protein Conformational Changes and DNA-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Roy, Basab; Yakovchuk, Petro; Spiering, Michelle M; Alam, Mohammad P; Madathil, Manikandadas M; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-12-29

    Described herein are the syntheses and photophysical characterization of three novel cyanotryptophans, and their efficient incorporation into proteins as fluorescent probes. Photophysical characteristics indicated that each was significantly brighter and red-shifted in fluorescence emission relative to tryptophan. Each analogue was used to activate a suppressor tRNA transcript and was incorporated with good efficiency into two different positions (Trp22 and Trp74) of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR). The Trp analogues could be monitored selectively in the presence of multiple native Trp residues in DHFR. 6-CNTrp (A) formed an efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair with l-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine (HCO, D) at position 17. Further, 6-CNTrp (A) was incorporated into two DNA binding proteins, including the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I and an RNA recognition motif (RRM2) of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNP LL). Using these proteins, we demonstrated the use of FRET involving A as a fluorescence donor and benzo[g]quinazoline-2,4-(1H,3H)-dione 2'-deoxyriboside (Tf) or 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one 2'-deoxyriboside (Cf) as fluorescent acceptors to study the binding interaction of the Klenow fragment with duplex DNA oligomers (labeled with Tf), or the domain-specific association between hnRNP LL and the BCL2 i-motif DNA (labeled with Cf). Thus, the non-natural amino acid could be used as a FRET partner for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. Together, these findings demonstrate the potential utility of 6-CNTrp (A) as a fluorescence donor for the study of protein conformational events.

  4. Nutrient amendments in soil DNA stable isotope probing experiments reduce the observed methanotroph diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Singer, Andrew C; Thompson, Ian P; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-02-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) can be used to analyze the active bacterial populations involved in a process by incorporating 13C-labeled substrate into cellular components such as DNA. Relatively long incubation times are often used with laboratory microcosms in order to incorporate sufficient 13C into the DNA of the target organisms. Addition of nutrients can be used to accelerate the processes. However, unnatural concentrations of nutrients may artificially change bacterial diversity and activity. In this study, methanotroph activity and diversity in soil was examined during the consumption of 13CH4 with three DNA-SIP experiments, using microcosms with natural field soil water conditions, the addition of water, and the addition of mineral salts solution. Methanotroph population diversity was studied by targeting 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. Clone library analyses, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and pmoA microarray hybridization analyses were carried out. Most methanotroph diversity (type I and type II methanotrophs) was observed in non-amended SIP microcosms. Although this treatment probably best reflected the in situ environmental conditions, one major disadvantage of this incubation was that the incorporation of 13CH4 was slow and some cross-feeding of 13C occurred, thereby leading to labeling of nonmethanotroph microorganisms. Conversely, microcosms supplemented with mineral salts medium exhibited rapid consumption of 13CH4, resulting in the labeling of a less diverse population of only type I methanotrophs. DNA-SIP incubations using water-amended microcosms yielded faster incorporation of 13C into active methanotrophs while avoiding the cross-feeding of 13C.

  5. Predicting Electrophoretic Mobility of Protein-Ligand Complexes for Ligands from DNA-Encoded Libraries of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Hale, Robert L; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Chiu, Cynthia H; Shaginian, Alex; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-05-17

    Selection of target-binding ligands from DNA-encoded libraries of small molecules (DELSMs) is a rapidly developing approach in drug-lead discovery. Methods of kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) may facilitate highly efficient homogeneous selection of ligands from DELSMs. However, KCE methods require accurate prediction of electrophoretic mobilities of protein-ligand complexes. Such prediction, in turn, requires a theory that would be applicable to DNA tags of different structures used in different DELSMs. Here we present such a theory. It utilizes a model of a globular protein connected, through a single point (small molecule), to a linear DNA tag containing a combination of alternating double-stranded and single-stranded DNA (dsDNA and ssDNA) regions of varying lengths. The theory links the unknown electrophoretic mobility of protein-DNA complex with experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities of the protein and DNA. Mobility prediction was initially tested by using a protein interacting with 18 ligands of various combinations of dsDNA and ssDNA regions, which mimicked different DELSMs. For all studied ligands, deviation of the predicted mobility from the experimentally determined value was within 11%. Finally, the prediction was tested for two proteins and two ligands with a DNA tag identical to those of DELSM manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Deviation between the predicted and experimentally determined mobilities did not exceed 5%. These results confirm the accuracy and robustness of our model, which makes KCE methods one step closer to their practical use in selection of drug leads, and diagnostic probes from DELSMs.

  6. The Preparation of Magnetic Silica Nanospheres and Incorporation of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-DNA Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Youngjin; Kim, Jongsung

    2016-03-01

    Silica nanospheres containing magnetic particles were prepared, and CdSe/ZnS QDs functionalized with carboxyl group were incorporated into the silica nanospheres by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The silica nanospheres were prepared by a co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric solutions followed by the sol-gel reaction of TEOS (tetraethoxysilane) and APTES (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane) using base catalyst. The size of magnetic silica nanospheres was confirmed by Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Thiol group modified single stranded oligonucleotides were immobilized on the surface of QDs and fluorescence quenching by intercalation dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization with target oligonucleotide was observed. The fluorescence from QDs could be quenched by intercalating dye (TOTO-3) after hybridization of target DNA to probe DNA. This shows that the magnetic silica-QD-DNA probe can be used to detect specific DNA.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the grasshopper Sinipta dalmani: application of long-PCR to the development of a homologous probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensel, S M; Vilardi, J C; Remis, M I

    2005-12-01

    RFLP analysis of mtDNA in natural populations is a valuable tool for phylogeographic and population genetic studies. The amplification of long DNA fragments using universal primers may contribute to the development of novel homologous probes in species for which no previous genomic information is available. Here we report how we obtained the complete mtDNA genome of Sinipta dalmani (Orthoptera) in 2 fragments (7 and 9 kb) using primers of conserved regions. The specificity of the PCR reactions was ultimately confirmed by several lines of evidence. These fragments were used as a probe for a mtDNA RFLP study in S. dalmani that analyzed the pattern of haplotype distribution and nucleotide diversity within and among chromosomally differentiated natural populations. Our results suggest that the restriction in gene flow detected at the molecular level may explain the chromosome differentiation detected previously and the maintenance of chromosome polymorphism in some areas of S. dalmani geographic distribution.

  8. Complex structural dynamics of nanocatalysts revealed in Operando conditions by correlated imaging and spectroscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Zakharov, D; Zhao, S; Tappero, R; Jung, U; Elsen, A; Baumann, Ph; Nuzzo, R G; Stach, E A; Frenkel, A I

    2015-06-29

    Understanding how heterogeneous catalysts change size, shape and structure during chemical reactions is limited by the paucity of methods for studying catalytic ensembles in working state, that is, in operando conditions. Here by a correlated use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy in operando conditions, we quantitatively describe the complex structural dynamics of supported Pt catalysts exhibited during an exemplary catalytic reaction-ethylene hydrogenation. This work exploits a microfabricated catalytic reactor compatible with both probes. The results demonstrate dynamic transformations of the ensemble of Pt clusters that spans a broad size range throughout changing reaction conditions. This method is generalizable to quantitative operando studies of complex systems using a wide variety of X-ray and electron-based experimental probes.

  9. Complex structural dynamics of nanocatalysts revealed in Operando conditions by correlated imaging and spectroscopy probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zakharov, D.; Zhao, S.; Tappero, R.; Jung, U.; Elsen, A.; Baumann, Ph.; Nuzzo, R. G.; Stach, E. A.; Frenkel, A. I.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how heterogeneous catalysts change size, shape and structure during chemical reactions is limited by the paucity of methods for studying catalytic ensembles in working state, that is, in operando conditions. Here by a correlated use of synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy in operando conditions, we quantitatively describe the complex structural dynamics of supported Pt catalysts exhibited during an exemplary catalytic reaction--ethylene hydrogenation. This work exploits a microfabricated catalytic reactor compatible with both probes. The results demonstrate dynamic transformations of the ensemble of Pt clusters that spans a broad size range throughout changing reaction conditions. This method is generalizable to quantitative operando studies of complex systems using a wide variety of X-ray and electron-based experimental probes.

  10. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, Enas Mohammed Hassan

    2014-07-21

    has been also confirmed from the DFT calculations. Finally, interaction experiments of uranyl-quercetin complex with DNA have been performed to assess an alternative uranyl-trapping and photoreduction system. The data show that consecutive addition of quercetin and uranyl destabilizes DNA. However, a preformed uranyl quercetin complex has very little effect on DNA structure. On the other hand, quercetin and uranyl appear to bind to DNA as a preformed complex in the loop portion of hairpin DNA. Therefore, also HP DNA is expected to be a suitable but less effective trapping system for the uranyl quercetin complex and its potential photoproducts.

  11. Evaluation of a colorimetric Babesia bigemina-DNA probe within an epidemiological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Ramos

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological survey was conducted in south east Mexico, in an effort to establish the serological reactivity and carrier status to Babesia bigemina of an indigenous cattle population. The prevalance was obtained through the Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Test (IFAT, using an in vitro culture-derived B. bigemina antigen. A specific, digoxigenin-coupled, ~6kb B. bigemina-DNA probe (BBDP, was used to indicate the presence of the parasite. Serum samples from 925 animals of all ages, were obtained within the three regions (I, II, III of the state of Yucatan and tested by IFAT. In addition, whole blood samples draw from 136 of the same animals of region II were analyzed using the BBDP. Positive IFAT (IFAT+ reactions were observed in 531 sera for a 57% overall prevalence. Regional values were: I = 157 + (56%, II = 266 + (68% and III = 108 + (42%. Only 32 (23% of the blood samples tested with BBDP showed distinctive hybridization signal, in contrast with 100 (73% IFAT + animals. The responses distribution for IFAT vs. BBDP was: +/+ 23, +/- 77, -/+ 9 and -/- 27 respectively. It was found that the analytical sinsitivity of BBDP appears to be low for its utilization is widespread epidemiological surveys. It was considered, however, that the colorimetric probe mifht to be useful to safely detect transmission prone carriers, since it is able to detect parasitemias as low as 0.001%.

  12. DNA–DNA kissing complexes as a new tool for the assembly of DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Anna; Kobbe, Daniela; Focke, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Kissing-loop annealing of nucleic acids occurs in nature in several viruses and in prokaryotic replication, among other circumstances. Nucleobases of two nucleic acid strands (loops) interact with each other, although the two strands cannot wrap around each other completely because of the adjacent double-stranded regions (stems). In this study, we exploited DNA kissing-loop interaction for nanotechnological application. We functionalized the vertices of DNA tetrahedrons with DNA stem-loop sequences. The complementary loop sequence design allowed the hybridization of different tetrahedrons via kissing-loop interaction, which might be further exploited for nanotechnology applications like cargo transport and logical elements. Importantly, we were able to manipulate the stability of those kissing-loop complexes based on the choice and concentration of cations, the temperature and the number of complementary loops per tetrahedron either at the same or at different vertices. Moreover, variations in loop sequences allowed the characterization of necessary sequences within the loop as well as additional stability control of the kissing complexes. Therefore, the properties of the presented nanostructures make them an important tool for DNA nanotechnology. PMID:26773051

  13. The FACT Complex Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus DNA Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Shelby; Larue, Ross C; Abraham, Carly M; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Skopp, Amelie; Winkler, Duane; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Beemon, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    All retroviruses need to integrate a DNA copy of their genome into the host chromatin. Cellular proteins regulating and targeting lentiviral and gammaretroviral integration in infected cells have been discovered, but the factors that mediate alpharetroviral avian leukosis virus (ALV) integration are unknown. In this study, we have identified the FACT protein complex, which consists of SSRP1 and Spt16, as a principal cellular binding partner of ALV integrase (IN). Biochemical experiments with purified recombinant proteins show that SSRP1 and Spt16 are able to individually bind ALV IN, but only the FACT complex effectively stimulates ALV integration activity in vitro Likewise, in infected cells, the FACT complex promotes ALV integration activity, with proviral integration frequency varying directly with cellular expression levels of the FACT complex. An increase in 2-long-terminal-repeat (2-LTR) circles in the depleted FACT complex cell line indicates that this complex regulates the ALV life cycle at the level of integration. This regulation is shown to be specific to ALV, as disruption of the FACT complex did not inhibit either lentiviral or gammaretroviral integration in infected cells.IMPORTANCE The majority of human gene therapy approaches utilize HIV-1- or murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors, which preferentially integrate near genes and regulatory regions; thus, insertional mutagenesis is a substantial risk. In contrast, ALV integrates more randomly throughout the genome, which decreases the risks of deleterious integration. Understanding how ALV integration is regulated could facilitate the development of ALV-based vectors for use in human gene therapy. Here we show that the FACT complex directly binds and regulates ALV integration efficiency in vitro and in infected cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  15. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation. PMID:28212312

  16. Detection of hepatitis B virus DNA by real-time PCR using TaqMan-MGB probe technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Rong Zhao; Yu-Jie Bai; Qing-Hua Zhang; Yan Wan; Ding Li; Xiao-Jun Yan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop a real-time PCR for detecting hepatitis B virus-(HBV) DNA based on TaqMan technology using a new MGB probe.METHODS: Plasmid containing the sequence of X gene (1414-1744 nt) was constructed as HBV-DNA standard for quantitative analysis. A TaqMan-MGB probe between primers for amplification was designed to detect PCR products. The interested sequence contained in the plasmid and in clinical specimens was quantitatively measured.RESULTS: The detection limit of the assay for HBV DNA was 1 genome equivalent per reaction. A linear standard curve was obtained between 100 and 109 DNA copies/reaction (r>0.990). None of the negative control samples showed false-positive reactions in duplicate. HBV DNA was detected in 100% (50/50) of HBV patients with HbeAg, and in 72.0% (36/50) with HBsAg, HBeAb and HBcAb. The coefficient of variation for both intra- and inter-experimental variability demonstrated high reproducibility and accuracy.CONCLUSION: Real-time PCR based on TaqMan-MGB probe technology is an excellent method for detection of HBV DNA.

  17. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  18. Intravital imaging of fluorescent markers and FRET probes by DNA tattooing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer David M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in fluorescence microscopy and mouse transgenesis have made it possible to image molecular events in living animals. However, the generation of transgenic mice is a lengthy process and intravital imaging requires specialized knowledge and equipment. Here, we report a rapid and undemanding intravital imaging method using generally available equipment. Results By DNA tattooing we transfect keratinocytes of living mice with DNA encoding fluorescent biosensors. Subsequently, the behavior of individual cells expressing these biosensors can be visualized within hours and using conventional microscopy equipment. Using this "instant transgenic" model in combination with a corrected coordinate system, we followed the in vivo behavior of individual cells expressing either FRET- or location-based biosensors for several days. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by assessment of in vivo caspase-3 activation upon induction of apoptosis. Conclusion This "instant skin transgenic" model can be used to follow the in vivo behavior of individual cells expressing either FRET- or location-based probes for several days after tattooing and provides a rapid and inexpensive method for intravital imaging in murine skin.

  19. Detection of complex hemoglobinopathies: recommendations on screening and DNA testing

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    E. Baysal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The following recommendations should be taken into account during the evaluation and elucidation of the complex hemoglobinopathies: a in complex hemoglobinopathies performing DNA studies on all family members might be essential; b complex gene-gene interactions offer major diagnostic challenges both at the technical and clinical level; c hematological & DNA analyses must be run in parallel. Some cases may be straight forward but others may require indepth DNA work-up; d co-inheritance of a-thalassemia offers added challenge as it may affect phenotype significantly; e sickle cell anemia (SS, co-inherited with a-thal, can be a phenocopy of Sβ0-thal. The HbA2 increase can be mistaken for Sβ-thal. DNA Sequencing is imperative; f only a selected number of normal MCV, MCH, borderline HbA2 cases must be referred for DNA analysis. However, in certain cases, following hematological and family evaluation, the β and d genes may need to be sequenced; g DNA Sequencing will increasingly become the method of choice for screening and DNA mutation analysis. However, new methods like MLPA-which analyzes gene dosage- must be used more commonly to rule out deletion mutants to avoid false negative sequencing results; h these recommendations should be reviewed every 2-3 years reflecting new methods, new findings and new findings from ethnic groups. 诊断和说明复杂血红蛋白病时,建议考虑以下几点: a)针对复杂的血红蛋白病,有必要对所有家庭成员开展DNA研究;b 复杂的基因-基因交互作用可能使诊断在技术和临床层面上颇受挑战;c 血液和DNA分析须同时进行。 有些病例简单,但另外一些病例可能需要开展深层次的DNA检查;d 由于α型地中海贫血可能严重影响表型,α型地中海贫血的共同继承特征更具挑战;e 共同继承α型地中海贫血的镰状细胞贫血(SS),可以作为Sβ0型地中海贫血的显型。 HbA2增

  20. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TYPHA LATIFOLIA (TYPHACEAE) AND THE IMPACT OF POLLUTANTS EXAMINED WITH TANDEM-REPETITIVE DNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic diversity at variable-number-tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci was examined in the common cattail, Typha latifolia (Typhaceae), using three synthetic DNA probes composed of tandemly repeated "core" sequences (GACA, GATA, and GCAC). The principal objectives of this investigation w...

  1. Specific detection of neuronal cell bodies: in situ hybridization with a biotin-labelled neurofilament cDNA probe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Liesi; J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); P. Vilja; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); L. Rechardt

    1986-01-01

    textabstractWe have used a biotinylated, 300-nucleotide cDNA probe which encodes the 68,000 MW neurofilament protein to detect neurofilament-specific mRNA in situ. The neurofilament message specifically demonstrates the neuronal cell bodies, in contrast to the usual antibody staining which detects t

  2. Multiplexed microRNA detection using lanthanide-labeled DNA probes and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Shah, Pratik; Cho, Seok Keun

    2014-01-01

    . The narrow size range of miRNAs (20-24 nucleotides) combined with the chemical properties of conventional reporter tags has hampered the development of multiplexed miRNA assays. In this study, we have used lanthanide-labeled DNA probes for the detection of miRNAs on membranes using laser ablation inductively...

  3. A liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry method to measure ¹³C-isotope enrichment for DNA stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair, Julie; Lépine, François; Villemur, Richard

    2012-03-01

    DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) is a cultivation-independent technique that makes it possible to associate metabolic function and taxonomic identity in a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic environments. In DNA-SIP, DNA is labeled via the assimilation of a labeled growth substrate that is subsequently used to identify microorganisms involved in assimilation of the substrate. However, the labeling time has to be sufficient to obtain labeled DNA but not so long such that cross-feeding of ¹³C-labeled metabolites from the primary consumers to nontarget species can occur. Confirmation that the DNA is isotopically labeled in DNA-SIP assays can be achieved using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In this study, we describe the development of a method using liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) to measure the ¹³C enrichment of thymine incorporated into DNA in Escherichia coli cultures fed with [¹³C]acetate. The method involved the hydrolysis of DNA extracted from the cultures that released the nucleotides, followed by the separation of the thymine by HPLC on a reverse-phase C₈ column in isocratic elution mode and the detection and quantification of ¹³C-labeled thymine by QMS. To mimic a DNA-SIP assay, a DNA mixture was made using ¹³C-labeled E. coli DNA with DNA extracted from five bacterial species. The HPLC-MS method was able to measure the correct proportion of ¹³C-DNA in the mix. This method can then be used as an alternative to the use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry in DNA-SIP assays.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Satellite DNA in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Madhav; Warsinger-Pepe, Natalie; Watase, George J; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2017-02-09

    Satellite DNAs are highly repetitive sequences that account for the majority of constitutive heterochromatin in many eukaryotic genomes. It is widely recognized that sequences and locations of satellite DNAs are highly divergent even in closely related species, contributing to the hypothesis that satellite DNA differences may underlie speciation. However, due to its repetitive nature, the mapping of satellite DNAs has been mostly left out of recent genomics analyses, hampering the use of molecular genetics techniques to better understand their role in speciation and evolution. Satellite DNAs are most extensively and comprehensively mapped in Drosophila melanogaster, a species that is also an excellent model system with which to study speciation. Yet the lack of comprehensive knowledge regarding satellite DNA identity and location in its sibling species (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) has prevented the full utilization of D. melanogaster in studying speciation. To overcome this problem, we initiated the mapping of satellite DNAs on the genomes of the D. melanogaster species complex (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) using multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our study confirms a striking divergence of satellite DNAs in the D. melanogaster species complex, even among the closely related species of the D. simulans clade (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia), and suggests the presence of unidentified satellite sequences in these species.

  5. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    As we all live in a special water planet Earth, the significance of water to life has been universally recognized. The reason why water is so important to life has intrigued many researchers. This dissertation will focus on the ultrafast dynamics of protein surface water and protein-DNA interfacial water which have direct importance to the protein structure and function. Using tryptophan as an intrinsic fluorescence probe, combined with site-directed mutagenesis and ultrafast fluorescence up-conversion spectroscopy, we can achieve single residue spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. We can also precisely determine the local hydration water dynamics by monitoring the Stokes shift of tryptophan one at a time. Previously, the protein surface hydration has been extensively studied by our group. In this thesis, we will provide more details on the methods we are using to extract the hydration dynamics, and also validate our methods from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. To further interrogate the interfacial water hydration dynamics relative to the protein surface hydration, we studied two DNA polymerases: DNA Polymerase IV (Dpo4) and DNA Polymerase Beta (Pol beta). Both proteins show typical surface hydration pattern with three distinct time components including: (i) the ultrafast sub-picosecond component reflects the bulk type water motion; (ii) a few picoseconds component shows the inner water relaxation mainly corresponding to the local libration and reorientation; (iii) the tens to hundred picoseconds component represents the water-protein coupled motion involving the whole water network reorganization. Dpo4, a loosely DNA binding protein, exhibits very flexible interfacial water which resembles its surface water yet with a significantly reduced ultrafast component. Such dynamic interfacial water not only maintains interfacial flexibility, but also contributes to the low fidelity of the protein. In contrast to the Dpo4, pol beta

  6. Structure of an 'open' clamp type II topoisomerase-DNA complex provides a mechanism for DNA capture and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Veselkov, Dennis A; Crevel, Isabelle M-T; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases regulate DNA supercoiling and chromosome segregation. They act as ATP-operated clamps that capture a DNA duplex and pass it through a transient DNA break in a second DNA segment via the sequential opening and closure of ATPase-, G-DNA- and C-gates. Here, we present the first 'open clamp' structures of a 3-gate topoisomerase II-DNA complex, the seminal complex engaged in DNA recognition and capture. A high-resolution structure was solved for a (full-length ParE-ParC55)2 dimer of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV bound to two DNA molecules: a closed DNA gate in a B-A-B form double-helical conformation and a second B-form duplex associated with closed C-gate helices at a novel site neighbouring the catalytically important β-pinwheel DNA-binding domain. The protein N gate is present in an 'arms-wide-open' state with the undimerized N-terminal ParE ATPase domains connected to TOPRIM domains via a flexible joint and folded back allowing ready access both for gate and transported DNA segments and cleavage-stabilizing antibacterial drugs. The structure shows the molecular conformations of all three gates at 3.7 Å, the highest resolution achieved for the full complex to date, and illuminates the mechanism of DNA capture and transport by a type II topoisomerase.

  7. A Novel Cobalt(Ⅲ) Mixed-polypyridyl Complex: Synthesis,Characterization and DNA Binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,Hui-Li(陈绘丽); YANG,Pin(杨频)

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex[Co(phen)2HPIP]Cl3[phen=phenanethroline,HPIP=2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanethroline]has been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis,UV,IR and 1H NMR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complex with calf thymus DNA(CT DNA)has been studied using absorption and emission spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques and cyclic voltammetry. The compound shows absorption hypochromicity, fluorescence enhancement and DNA melting temperature increment when binding to CT DNA. CV measurement shows a shift in reduction potential and a change in peak current with addition of DNA.These results prove that the compound inserts into DNA base pairs. The shift of peak potential indicates the ion interaction mode between the complex and DNA. The binding constant of the compound to DNA is 4.37×104. The complex also seems to be an efficient photocleavage reagent.

  8. Polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of DNA-DAPI complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Gammon, Seth; Hazlett, Theodore; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2004-11-01

    We discuss the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the measurement of relatively slow rotations of large macromolecules in solution or attached to other macromolecular structures. We present simulations and experimental results to illustrate the range of rotational correlation times and diffusion times that the technique can analyze. In particular, we examine various methods to analyze the polarization fluctuation data. We have found that by first constructing the polarization function and then calculating the autocorrelation function, we can obtain the rotational motion of the molecule with very little interference from the lateral diffusion of the macromolecule, as long as the rotational diffusion is significantly faster than the lateral diffusion. Surprisingly, for common fluorophores the autocorrelation of the polarization function is relatively unaffected by the photon statistics. In our instrument, two-photon excitation is used to define a small volume of illumination where a few molecules are present at any instant of time. The measurements of long DNA molecules labeled with the fluorescent probe DAPI show local rotational motions of the polymers in addition to translation motions of the entire polymer. For smaller molecules such as EGFP, the viscosity of the solution must be increased to bring the relaxation due to rotational motion into the measurable range. Overall, our results show that polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can be used to detect fast and slow rotational motion in the time scale from microsecond to second, a range that cannot be easily reached by conventional fluorescence anisotropy decay methods.

  9. Experimental mapping of DNA duplex shape enabled by global lineshape analyses of a nucleotide-independent nitroxide probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Tham, Kenneth W; Qin, Peter Z

    2014-10-01

    Sequence-dependent variation in structure and dynamics of a DNA duplex, collectively referred to as 'DNA shape', critically impacts interactions between DNA and proteins. Here, a method based on the technique of site-directed spin labeling was developed to experimentally map shapes of two DNA duplexes that contain response elements of the p53 tumor suppressor. An R5a nitroxide spin label, which was covalently attached at a specific phosphate group, was scanned consecutively through the DNA duplex. X-band continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to monitor rotational motions of R5a, which report on DNA structure and dynamics at the labeling site. An approach based on Pearson's coefficient analysis was developed to collectively examine the degree of similarity among the ensemble of R5a spectra. The resulting Pearson's coefficients were used to generate maps representing variation of R5a mobility along the DNA duplex. The R5a mobility maps were found to correlate with maps of certain DNA helical parameters, and were capable of revealing similarity and deviation in the shape of the two closely related DNA duplexes. Collectively, the R5a probe and the Pearson's coefficient-based lineshape analysis scheme yielded a generalizable method for examining sequence-dependent DNA shapes.

  10. Using XFELs for Probing of Complex Interaction Dynamics of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Thomas; Huang, Lingen; Metzkes, Josefine; Schramm, Ulrich; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advancethe understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena may become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. We demonstrate the potentials of XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions using exemplary the small angle X-ray scattering technique, focusing on general considerations for XFEL probing.

  11. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  12. Simulation of 125I induced DNA strand breaks in a CAP-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Friedland, W; Jacob, P; Paretzke, H G; Panyutin, I; Neumann, R D

    2002-01-01

    The E. coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP)-DNA complex with 125I located at the position of the H5 atom of the cytosine near the centre was incorporated into the PARTRAC track structure code. DNA strand breaks due to irradiation were calculated by track structure and radical attack simulations; strand breaks due to neutralisation of the highly charged 125Te ion were derived from a semi-empirical distribution. According to the calculations, the neutralisation effect dominates the strand breakage frequency at 2 bases away from the 125I decay site on both strands. The first breakage distribution counted from a 32P labelled end on the strand with 125I agreed well with experimental data, but on the opposite strand, the calculated distribution is more concentrated around the decay site and its yield is about 20% larger than the measured data.

  13. Surface modification of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels with DNA capture-probes for potential use in microfluidic DNA analysis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakov, Dmitriy A.; Thredgold, Leigh D.; Lenehan, Claire E.; Andersson, Gunther A.; Kobus, Hilton; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2011-12-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is an elastomeric material used for microfluidic devices and is especially suited to medical and forensic applications. This is due to its relatively low cost, ease of fabrication, excellent optical transmission characteristics and its ability to support electroosmotic flow, required during electrophoretic separations. These aspects combined with its large range of surface modification chemistries, make PDMS an attractive substrate in microfluidic devices for, in particular, DNA separation. Here, we report the successful wet chemical surface modification of PDMS microchannels using a simple three step method to produce an isothiocyanate-terminated surface. Initially, PDMS was oxygen plasma treated to produce a silanol-terminated surface, this was then reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with subsequent reaction of the now amine-terminated surface with p-phenylenediisothiocyanate. Water contact angle measurements both before and after modification showed a reduction in hydrophobicity from 101o for native PDMS to 94o for the isothiocyante-terminated PDMS. The isothiocyanate-terminated surface was then coupled with an amineterminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide capture probe via a thiourea linkage. Confirmation of capture probe attachment was observed using fluorescent microscopy after hybridization of the capture probes with fluorescently labeled complimentary ssDNA oligonucleotides.

  14. DNA interaction studies of a platinum (II) complex containing an antiviral drug, ribavirin: the effect of metal on DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mirzaei kalar, Zeinab; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2012-10-01

    The water-soluble Pt (II) complex, [PtCl (DMSO)(N(4)N(7)-ribavirin)]· H(2)O (ribavirin is an antiviral drug) has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interactions of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism and viscosimetry. The complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode. The calculated binding constant, K(b), was 7.2×10(5) M(-1). In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH0) changes of the reaction between the Pt (II) complex with CT-DNA showed hydrophobic interaction. In addition, CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of CT-DNA. All these results prove that the complex interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative mode of binding. In comparison with the previous study of the DNA interaction with ribavirin, these results show that platinum complex has greater affinity to CT-DNA.

  15. Sequential picosecond isomerizations in a photochromic ruthenium sulfoxide complex triggered by pump-repump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Albert W; Jin, Yuhuan; Engle, James T; Ziegler, Christopher J; Rack, Jeffrey J

    2013-02-18

    The complex [Ru(bpy)(2)(bpSO)](PF(6))(2), where bpy is 2,2'-bipydine and bpSO is 1,2-bis(phenylsulfinyl)ethane, exhibits three distinct isomers which are accessible upon metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) irradiation. This complex and its parent, [Ru(bpy)(2)(bpte)](PF(6))(2), where bpte is 1,2-bis(phenylthio)ethane, have been synthesized and characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, NMR, X-ray crystallography, and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A novel method of 2-color Pump-Repump-Probe spectroscopy has been employed to investigate all three isomers of the bis-sulfoxide complex. This method allows for observation of the isomerization dynamics of sequential isomerizations of each sulfoxide from MLCT irradiation of the S,S-bonded complex to ultimately form the O,O-bonded metastable complex. One-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) (COSY, NOESY, and TOCSY) (1)H NMR data show the thioether and ground state S,S-bonded sulfoxide complexes to be rigorously C(2) symmetric and are consistent with the crystal structures. Transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the S,S to S,O isomerization occurs with an observed time constant of 56.8 (±7.4) ps. The S,O to O,O isomerization time constant was found to be 59 (±4) ps by pump-repump-probe spectroscopy. The composite S,S- to O,O-isomer quantum yield is 0.42.

  16. Replication of adenovirus DNA-protein complex with purified proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, J E; Enomoto, T.; Hurwitz, J

    1981-01-01

    A protein fraction isolated from the cytosol of adenovirus-infected HeLa cells, which contained DNA polymerase alpha, catalyzed adenoviral DNA replication in the presence of adenovirus DNA binding protein, eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta, ATP, all four dNTPs, and MgCl2. DNA replication started at either end of exogenously added adenoviral DNA and was totally dependent on the presence of terminal 55,000-dalton proteins on the DNA template. The replicaton of adenovirus DNA in the system was sens...

  17. New Concepts of Fluorescent Probes for Specific Detection of DNA Sequences: Bis-Modified Oligonucleotides in Excimer and Exciplex Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbaj A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of single base mismatches in DNA is important for diagnostics, treatment of genetic diseases, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Highly sensitive, specific assays are needed to investigate genetic samples from patients. The use of a simple fluorescent nucleoside analogue in detection of DNA sequence and point mutations by hybridisation in solution is described in this study. The 5’-bispyrene and 3’-naphthalene oligonucleotide probes form an exciplex on hybridisation to target in water and the 5’-bispyrene oligonucleotide alone is an adequate probe to determine concentration of target present. It was also indicated that this system has a potential to identify mismatches and insertions. The aim of this work was to investigate experimental structures and conditions that permit strong exciplex emission for nucleic acid detectors, and show how such exciplexes can register the presence of mismatches as required in SNP analysis. This study revealed that the hybridisation of 5'-bispyrenyl fluorophore to a DNA target results in formation of a fluorescent probe with high signal intensity change and specificity for detecting a complementary target in a homogeneous system. Detection of SNP mutations using this split-probe system is a highly specific, simple, and accessible method to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmacogenomic studies. Thus, it is possible for the system to act as SNP detectors and it shows promise for future applications in genetic testing.

  18. DNA-based stable isotope probing coupled with cultivation methods implicates Methylophaga in hydrocarbon degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eMishamandani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the oxidation and ultimate removal of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. Those with an almost exclusive ability to utilize hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source have been found confined to just a few genera. Here we used stable isotope probing (SIP, a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in coastal North Carolina sea water (Beaufort Inlet, USA with uniformly labeled [13C]n-hexadecane. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from n-hexadecane enrichments were identified to belong to the genus Alcanivorax, with ≤98% sequence identity to the closest type strain – thus representing a putative novel phylogenetic taxon within this genus. Unexpectedly, we also identified 13C-enriched sequences in heavy DNA fractions that were affiliated to the genus Methylophaga. This is a contentious group since, though some of its members have been proposed to degrade hydrocarbons, substantive evidence has not previously confirmed this. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Alcanivorax and Methylophaga to determine their abundance in incubations amended with unlabeled n-hexadecane. Both showed substantial increases in gene copy number during the experiments. Subsequently, we isolated a strain representing the SIP-identified Methylophaga sequences (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and used it to show, for the first time, direct evidence of hydrocarbon degradation by a cultured Methylophaga sp. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the marine environment.

  19. Probing diversity in freshwater fishes from Mexico and Guatemala with DNA barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Moreno, M; Ivanova, N V; Elías-Gutiérrez, M; Contreras-Balderas, S; Hebert, P D N

    2009-02-01

    The freshwater fish fauna of Mexico and Guatemala is exceptionally diverse with >600 species, many endemic. In this study, patterns of sequence divergence were analysed in representatives of this fauna using cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) DNA barcodes for 61 species in 36 genera. The average divergence among conspecific individuals was 0.45%, while congeneric taxa showed 5.1% divergence. Three species of Poblana, each occupying a different crater lake in the arid regions of Central Mexico, have had a controversial taxonomic history but are usually regarded as endemics to a single lake. They possess identical COI barcodes, suggesting a very recent history of isolation. Representatives of the Cichlidae, a complex and poorly understood family, were well discriminated by barcodes. Many species of Characidae seem to be young, with low divergence values (clusters were apparent in the Bramocharax-Astyanax complex. The symbranchid, Opisthernon aenigmaticum, has been regarded as a single species ranging from Guatemala to Mexico, but it includes two deeply divergent barcode lineages, one a possible new endemic species. Aside from these special cases, the results confirm that DNA barcodes will be highly effective in discriminating freshwater fishes from Central America and that a comprehensive analysis will provide new important insights for understanding diversity of this fauna.

  20. Binding and interaction of di- and tri-substituted organometallic triptycene palladium complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rina; Bhowmick, Sourav; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2014-10-01

    Two triptycene-based ligands with pendant bromophenyl units have been prepared. These triptycene derivatives have been used as synthons for the synthesis of di and tri nuclear palladium complexes. The organic molecules and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been fully characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The mode of binding and effect of the complexes on pUC19 plasmid, calf thymus DNA and oligomer duplex DNA have been investigated by a host of analytical methods. The complexes brought about unwinding of supercoiled plasmid and the unwinding angle was found to be related to the binding affinity of the complexes with DNA, where both these parameters were guided by the structure of the complexes. Concentration-dependent inhibition of endonuclease activity of SspI and BamHI by the complexes indicates preference for G/C sequence for binding to DNA. However, neither the complexes did not introduce any cleavage at abasic site in oligomer duplex DNA, nor they created linear form of the plasmid upon co-incubation with the DNA samples. The interactions of the complexes with DNA were found to be strongly guided by the structure of the complexes, where intercalation as well as groove binding was observed, without inflicting any damage to the DNA. The mode of interaction of the complexes with DNA was further confirmed by isothermal calorimetry.

  1. Probing and quantifying DNA-protein interactions with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Jonathan; Schachermeyer, Samantha; Duan, Yaokai; Jimenez, Luis A; Zhong, Wenwan

    2014-09-05

    Tools capable of measuring binding affinities as well as amenable to downstream sequencing analysis are needed for study of DNA-protein interaction, particularly in discovery of new DNA sequences with affinity to diverse targets. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) is an open-channel separation technique that eliminates interference from column packing to the non-covalently bound complex and could potentially be applied for study of macromolecular interaction. The recovery and elution behaviors of the poly(dA)n strand and aptamers in AF4 were investigated. Good recovery of ssDNAs was achieved by judicious selection of the channel membrane with consideration of the membrane pore diameter and the radius of gyration (Rg) of the ssDNA, which was obtained with the aid of a Molecular Dynamics tool. The Rg values were also used to assess the folding situation of aptamers based on their migration times in AF4. The interactions between two ssDNA aptamers and their respective protein components were investigated. Using AF4, near-baseline resolution between the free and protein-bound aptamer fractions could be obtained. With this information, dissociation constants of ∼16nM and ∼57nM were obtained for an IgE aptamer and a streptavidin aptamer, respectively. In addition, free and protein-bound IgE aptamer was extracted from the AF4 eluate and amplified, illustrating the potential of AF4 in screening ssDNAs with high affinity to targets. Our results demonstrate that AF4 is an effective tool holding several advantages over the existing techniques and should be useful for study of diverse macromolecular interaction systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of AffiProbe HPV test kit for detection of human papillomavirus DNA in genital scrapes.

    OpenAIRE

    Ranki, M; Leinonen, A W; Jalava, T. (Tiina); Nieminen, P.; Soares, V R; Paavonen, J; Kallio, A

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical and vaginal scrapes was analyzed by the AffiProbe HPV test kit (Orion Corp., Orion Pharmaceutica, Helsinki, Finland), which is a 1-day solution hybridization test for HPV type 6/11, 16, or 18. The AffiProbe test was compared with a commercially available dot blot test (ViraPap and ViraType tests; Life Technologies Inc., Gaithersburg, Md.). The study group consisted of 178 patients seen in a gynecological outpatient clinic. Altogether,...

  3. Cultivation-independent detection of autotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria by DNA stable-isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Graham M; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Spain, Jim C

    2011-07-01

    Knallgas bacteria are a physiologically defined group that is primarily studied using cultivation-dependent techniques. Given that current cultivation techniques fail to grow most bacteria, cultivation-independent techniques that selectively detect and identify knallgas bacteria will improve our ability to study their diversity and distribution. We used stable-isotope probing (SIP) to identify knallgas bacteria in rhizosphere soil of legumes and in a microbial mat from Obsidian Pool in Yellowstone National Park. When samples were incubated in the dark, incorporation of (13)CO(2) was H(2) dependent. SIP enabled the detection of knallgas bacteria that were not detected by cultivation, and the majority of bacteria identified in the rhizosphere soils were betaproteobacteria predominantly related to genera previously known to oxidize hydrogen. Bacteria in soil grew on hydrogen at concentrations as low as 100 ppm. A hydB homolog encoding a putative high-affinity NiFe hydrogenase was amplified from (13)C-labeled DNA from both vetch and clover rhizosphere soil. The results indicate that knallgas bacteria can be detected by SIP and populations that respond to different H(2) concentrations can be distinguished. The methods described here should be applicable to a variety of ecosystems and will enable the discovery of additional knallgas bacteria that are resistant to cultivation.

  4. Unravelling the Complexities of the Earth's Radiation Belts: Findings from the Van Allen Probes mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Barry; Fox, Nicola; Kessel, Ramona; Sibeck, David; Kanekal, Shri

    2014-05-01

    Within the first year of Van Allen Probe operations, team members made a series of highly publicized decisive discoveries concerning the structure and evolution of the Earth's radiation belts, the processes that energize particles there, and the locations where they operate. Nevertheless, much more extensive and less publicized findings from the Van Allen Probes suggest that Earth's radiation belts regions remain a highly complex and puzzling place. Although the relation between magnetic storm and radiation belt enhancements and loss has been emphasized, dynamics during non-storm periods has occasionally been shown to be dramatic. While emphasis has been placed on new findings regarding local non-adiabatic energization mechanisms, adiabatic mechanisms have also been shown to be important. Furthermore, the interplay between, and relative importance of, these and other energization processes remain uncertain. The role of seed populations has been highlighted, with some studies pointing to localized mechanisms and others pointing to the role of substorms in transporting and injecting such populations. Here we review some of the less publicized findings and future objectives of the Van Allen Probes mission to get a broader and in-depth view of present understanding of Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary studies of the DNA-binding domain Za from ADAR1 complexed to left-handed DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, T; Shafer, K; Lowenhaupt, K; Hanlon, E; Herbert, A; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    The proteolytically defined Z-DNA binding domain Za of human adenosine deaminase type 1 (hADAR1) has been crystallized in complex with the DNA oligomer d(TCGCGCG). The crystals were obtained from a solution containing ammonium sulfate as precipitating agent and belong to the tetragonal space group P4212. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The unit-cell dimensions are a = b = 85.9, c = 71.3 A. A Raman spectrum of the complex indicates that the DNA in the complex adopts the left-handed Z conformation.

  6. Isolation and Quantitation of Topoisomerase Complexes Accumulated on Escherichia coli Chromosomal DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA. PMID:22869559

  7. Isolation and quantitation of topoisomerase complexes accumulated on Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA.

  8. Multiple DNA Extractions Coupled with Stable-Isotope Probing of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Contaminated Soil▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Maiysha D.; Singleton, David R.; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the 13C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-13C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from 13C-enriched DNA and were designated “anthracene group 1.” Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP. PMID:21398486

  9. Multiple DNA extractions coupled with stable-isotope probing of anthracene-degrading bacteria in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Maiysha D; Singleton, David R; Sun, Wei; Aitken, Michael D

    2011-05-01

    In many of the DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) studies published to date in which soil communities were investigated, a single DNA extraction was performed on the soil sample, usually using a commercial DNA extraction kit, prior to recovering the (13)C-labeled (heavy) DNA by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Recent evidence suggests, however, that a single extraction of a soil sample may not lead to representative recovery of DNA from all of the organisms in the sample. To determine whether multiple DNA extractions would affect the DNA yield, the eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number, or the identification of anthracene-degrading bacteria, we performed seven successive DNA extractions on the same aliquot of contaminated soil either untreated or enriched with [U-(13)C]anthracene. Multiple extractions were necessary to maximize the DNA yield and 16S rRNA gene copy number from both untreated and anthracene-enriched soil samples. Sequences within the order Sphingomonadales, but unrelated to any previously described genus, dominated the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from (13)C-enriched DNA and were designated "anthracene group 1." Sequences clustering with Variovorax spp., which were also highly represented, and sequences related to the genus Pigmentiphaga were newly associated with anthracene degradation. The bacterial groups collectively identified across all seven extracts were all recovered in the first extract, although quantitative PCR analysis of SIP-identified groups revealed quantitative differences in extraction patterns. These results suggest that performing multiple DNA extractions on soil samples improves the extractable DNA yield and the number of quantifiable eubacterial 16S rRNA gene copies but have little qualitative effect on the identification of the bacterial groups associated with the degradation of a given carbon source by SIP.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and DNA interaction studies of complexes of lanthanide nitrates with tris{2-[(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)imino]ethyl}amine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Yuan, Wen-bing; Zhang, Qi; Yan, Lan; Yang, Ru-dong

    2008-10-01

    A new tripodal, hydroxyl-rich ligand, tris{2-[(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)imino]ethyl}amine (L), and its complexes with lanthanide nitrates were synthesized. These complexes which are stable in air with the general formula of [LnL(NO 3) 2]NO 3·H 2O (Ln = La, Sm, Eu, Gd, Y) were characterized by molar conductivity, elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermal analysis. The NO 3- groups coordinated to lanthanide mono-dentately, and the coordination number in these complexes may be 8. The interaction of complexes with DNA were investigated by ultraviolet and fluorescent spectra, which showed that the binding mode of complexes with DNA was intercalation, and the binding affinity with DNA were La(III) complex > Sm(III) complex > Eu(III) complex > Gd(III) complex > Y(III) complex. Based on these results, it can be shown that the La(III)complex is promising candidate for therapeutic reagents and DNA probes.

  11. DNA structure, binding mechanism and biology functions of polypyridyl complexes in biomedicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is considerable research interest and vigorous debate about the DNA binding of polypyridyl complexes including the electron transfer involving DNA. In this review, based on the fluorescence quenching experiments, it was proposed that DNA might serve as a conductor. From the time-interval CD spectra, the different binding rates of D- and L-enantiomer to calf thymus DNA were observed. The factors influencing the DNA-binding of polypyridyl complexes, and the potential bio-functions of the complexes are also discussed.

  12. Photoinduced intercalation and coordination of a dirhodium complex to DNA: dual DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Alycia M; Burya, Scott J; Gallucci, Judith C; Turro, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Two new complexes, cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (LL)(CH3 CN)2 ](2+) , where LL=bpy (2, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) and dppz (3, dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), were prepared from the reaction of cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (CH3 CN)6 ](2+) (1) with the corresponding bidentate ligand. The bpy and dppz ligands chelate to the same rhodium atom and are positioned trans to the amidato N atoms, as determined by the single crystal X-ray structure of 2. Irradiation of 2 and 3 with visible light in water results in the exchange of one CH3 CNeq ligand for an H2 O molecule with quantum yields, Φ400 , of 0.040 and 0.044, respectively (λirr =400 nm). The identities of the photoproducts of 2 and 3 were determined to be cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (L)(H2 O)(CH3 CN)](2+) , where L is bpy (4) and dppz (5), respectively. Mobility shift assays show that 4 crosslinks double-stranded DNA, and ESI-MS experiments indicate that both 4 and 5 form covalent adducts with single-stranded DNA. In addition, relative viscosity and 2D NMR experiments show that the dppz ligand of 5 also intercalates into DNA upon irradiation, making 3 a dual-binding agent that both intercalates and covalently binds to DNA upon the absorption of visible light.

  13. Probing the resonance of Dirac particle by the application of complex momentum representation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Niu; Guo, Jian-You; Niu, Zhong-Ming; Liang, Haozhao

    2016-01-01

    Resonance plays critical roles in the formation of many physical phenomena, and several methods have been developed for the exploration of resonance. In this work, we propose a new scheme for resonance by solving the Dirac equation in complex momentum representation, in which the resonant states are exposed clearly in complex momentum plane and the resonance parameters can be determined precisely without imposing unphysical parameters. Combining with the relativistic mean-field theory, this method is applied to probe the resonances in $^{120}$Sn with the energies, widths, and wavefunctions being obtained. Comparing with other methods, this method is not only very effective for narrow resonances, but also can be reliably applied to broad resonances.

  14. Characterization of Plasmid DNA Location within Chitosan/PLGA/pDNA Nanoparticle Complexes Designed for Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hali Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide- (PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles are becoming an increasingly common choice for the delivery of nucleic acids to cells for various genetic manipulation techniques. These particles are biocompatible, with tunable size and surface properties, possessing an overall positive charge that promotes complex formation with negatively charged nucleic acids. This study examines properties of the PLGA-chitosan nanoparticle/plasmid DNA complex after formation. Specifically, the study aims to determine the optimal ratio of plasmid DNA:nanoparticles for nucleic acid delivery purposes and to elucidate the location of the pDNA within these complexes. Such characterization will be necessary for the adoption of these formulations in a clinical setting. The ability of PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles to form complexes with pDNA was evaluated by using the fluorescent intercalating due OliGreen to label free plasmid DNA. By monitoring the fluorescence at different plasmid: nanoparticle ratios, the ideal plasmid:nanoparticle ration for complete complexation of plasmid was determined to be 1:50. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and gel digest studies suggested that even at these optimal complexation ratios, a portion of the plasmid DNA was located on the outer complex surface. This knowledge will facilitate future investigations into the functionality of the system in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Probing the topological properties of complex networks modeling short written texts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego R Amancio

    Full Text Available In recent years, graph theory has been widely employed to probe several language properties. More specifically, the so-called word adjacency model has been proven useful for tackling several practical problems, especially those relying on textual stylistic analysis. The most common approach to treat texts as networks has simply considered either large pieces of texts or entire books. This approach has certainly worked well-many informative discoveries have been made this way-but it raises an uncomfortable question: could there be important topological patterns in small pieces of texts? To address this problem, the topological properties of subtexts sampled from entire books was probed. Statistical analyses performed on a dataset comprising 50 novels revealed that most of the traditional topological measurements are stable for short subtexts. When the performance of the authorship recognition task was analyzed, it was found that a proper sampling yields a discriminability similar to the one found with full texts. Surprisingly, the support vector machine classification based on the characterization of short texts outperformed the one performed with entire books. These findings suggest that a local topological analysis of large documents might improve its global characterization. Most importantly, it was verified, as a proof of principle, that short texts can be analyzed with the methods and concepts of complex networks. As a consequence, the techniques described here can be extended in a straightforward fashion to analyze texts as time-varying complex networks.

  16. Probing the topological properties of complex networks modeling short written texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amancio, Diego R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, graph theory has been widely employed to probe several language properties. More specifically, the so-called word adjacency model has been proven useful for tackling several practical problems, especially those relying on textual stylistic analysis. The most common approach to treat texts as networks has simply considered either large pieces of texts or entire books. This approach has certainly worked well-many informative discoveries have been made this way-but it raises an uncomfortable question: could there be important topological patterns in small pieces of texts? To address this problem, the topological properties of subtexts sampled from entire books was probed. Statistical analyses performed on a dataset comprising 50 novels revealed that most of the traditional topological measurements are stable for short subtexts. When the performance of the authorship recognition task was analyzed, it was found that a proper sampling yields a discriminability similar to the one found with full texts. Surprisingly, the support vector machine classification based on the characterization of short texts outperformed the one performed with entire books. These findings suggest that a local topological analysis of large documents might improve its global characterization. Most importantly, it was verified, as a proof of principle, that short texts can be analyzed with the methods and concepts of complex networks. As a consequence, the techniques described here can be extended in a straightforward fashion to analyze texts as time-varying complex networks.

  17. Analytical methods to determine the comparative DNA binding studies of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Rajasekaran, Marichamy; Rajagopal, Gurusamy; Athappan, Periakaruppan

    2012-11-01

    DNA interaction studies of two mononuclear [1:1(1); 1:2(2)] copper(II) complexes of curcumin have been studied. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been explored by physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption spectral titrations of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 3 nm with the DNA binding affinity of K(b), 5.21×10(4)M(-1) that are higher than that obtained for 2 (red-shift, 2 nm; K(b), 1.73×10(4)M(-1)) reveal that the binding occurs in grooves as a result of the interaction is via exterior phosphates. The CD spectra of these Cu(II) complexes show a red shift of 3-10nm in the positive band with increase in intensities. This spectral change of induced CD due to the hydrophobic interaction of copper complexes with DNA is the characteristic of B to A conformational change. The EB displacement assay also reveals the same trend as observed in UV-Vis spectral titration. The addition of complexes 1 and 2 to the DNA bound ethidium bromide (EB) solutions causes an obvious reduction in emission intensities indicating that these complexes competitively bind to DNA with EB. The positive shift of both the E(pc) and E(0)' accompanied by reduction of peak currents in differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), upon adding different concentrations of DNA to the metal complexes, are obviously in favor of strong binding to DNA. The super coiled plasmid pUC18 DNA cleavage ability of Cu(II) complexes in the presence of reducing agent reveals the single strand DNA cleavage (ssDNA) is observed. The hydroxyl radical (HO()) and the singlet oxygen are believed to be the reactive species responsible for the cleavage.

  18. Supersandwich cytosensor for selective and ultrasensitive detection of cancer cells using aptamer-DNA concatamer-quantum dots probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongying; Xu, Shouming; He, Zhimei; Deng, Anping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2013-03-19

    In this work, a signal amplification supersandwich strategy was developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of cancer cells using aptamer-DNA concatamer-quantum dots (QDs) probes. First of all, electrode materials denoted as MWCNTs@PDA@AuNPs were fabricated by multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and polydopamine (PDA) using a layer-by-layer technique. Then, the prepared bases as matrices were applied to bind concanavalin A (Con A), resulting in high stability, bioactivity, and capability for cell capture. Meanwhile, aptamer-DNA concatamer-QDs were designed via DNA hybridization followed by covalent assembling, which incorporated the specific recognition of the aptamer with the signal amplification of the DNA concatamer and QDs. With aptamer-DNA concatamer-QDs as recognizing probes, the model cancer cells (CCRF-CEM cells) were detected using a MWCNTs@PDA@AuNPs modified electrode with trapped Con A by means of fluorescence and electrochemical methods. The proposed supersandwich cytosensor showed high sensitivity with the detection limit of 50 cells mL(-1). More importantly, it could distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which indicated the promising applications of our method in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancers.

  19. Method to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification using an ionically labeled probe and measuring impedance change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Belgrader, Phillip; Fuller, Christopher D.

    2007-01-02

    Impedance measurements are used to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification. A pair of spaced electrodes are located on a surface of a microfluidic channel and an AC or DC voltage is applied across the electrodes to produce an electric field. An ionically labeled probe will attach to a complementary DNA segment, and a polymerase enzyme will release the ionic label. This causes the conductivity of the solution in the area of the electrode to change. This change in conductivity is measured as a change in the impedance been the two electrodes.

  20. Interfacing click chemistry with automated oligonucleotide synthesis for the preparation of fluorescent DNA probes containing internal xanthene and cyanine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-14

    Double-labeled oligonucleotide probes containing fluorophores interacting by energy-transfer mechanisms are essential for modern bioanalysis, molecular diagnostics, and in vivo imaging techniques. Although bright xanthene and cyanine dyes are gaining increased prominence within these fields, little attention has thus far been paid to probes containing these dyes internally attached, a fact which is mainly due to the quite challenging synthesis of such oligonucleotide probes. Herein, by using 2'-O-propargyl uridine phosphoramidite and a series of xanthenes and cyanine azide derivatives, we have for the first time performed solid-phase copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click labeling during the automated phosphoramidite oligonucleotide synthesis followed by postsynthetic click reactions in solution. We demonstrate that our novel strategy is rapid and efficient for the preparation of novel oligonucleotide probes containing internally positioned xanthene and cyanine dye pairs and thus represents a significant step forward for the preparation of advanced fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the novel xanthene and cyanine labeled probes display unusual and very promising photophysical properties resulting from energy-transfer interactions between the fluorophores controlled by nucleic acid assembly. Potential benefits of using these novel fluorescent probes within, for example, molecular diagnostics and fluorescence microscopy include: Considerable Stokes shifts (40-110 nm), quenched fluorescence of single-stranded probes accompanied by up to 7.7-fold light-up effect of emission upon target DNA/RNA binding, remarkable sensitivity to single-nucleotide mismatches, generally high fluorescence brightness values (FB up to 26), and hence low limit of target detection values (LOD down to <5 nM).

  1. Self-assembly of lamellar lipid-DNA complexes simulated by explicit solvent counterion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lianghui; Cao, Jun; Fang, Weihai

    2010-06-03

    The dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit solvent and counterions are used to mimic the self-assembly of lamellar cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA)complexes. We found that the formation of the complexes is associated with the releasing of 70% DNA counterions and 90% lipid counterions. The trapped DNA and CL charges together with their counterions inside the complex still keep the interior neutral, which stabilized the structure. Simulations in constant pressure ensemble following the self-assembly show that the DNA interaxial spacing as a function of the inversed CL concentrations 1/phi(c) is linear at low phi(c) and nonlinear at high phi(c). The attraction between the DNA and the CLs as well as the repulsion between the DNA strands impose stretching stress on the membrane so that the averaged area per lipid is dependent on the CL concentration, which in turn determines the behavior of the DNA spacing.

  2. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity.

  3. Use of a multi-thermal washer for DNA microarrays simplifies probe design and gives robust genotyping assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J.; Poulsen, Lena; Petronis, S.

    2008-01-01

    DNA microarrays are generally operated at a single condition, which severely limits the freedom of designing probes for allele-specific hybridization assays. Here, we demonstrate a fluidic device for multi-stringency posthybridization washing of microarrays on microscope slides. This device...... is called a multi-thermal array washer (MTAW), and it has eight individually controlled heating zones, each of which corresponds to the location of a subarray on a slide. Allele-specific oligonucleotide probes for nine mutations in the beta-globin gene were spotted in eight identical subarrays at positions...... corresponding to the temperature zones of the MTAW. After hybridization with amplified patient material, the slides were mounted in the MTAW, and each subarray was exposed to different temperatures ranging from 22 to 40 degrees C. When processed in the MTAW, probes selected without considering melting...

  4. Clinical utility of a DNA probe to 17p11.2 in screening of patients with a peripheral neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blancato, J.; Precht, K.; Meck, J. [Georgetown Univ., Hospital, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We assessed the usefulness of in situ hybridization with a DNA probe to the area of chromosome 17 at p11.2 as a diagnostic tool for screening for Charcot Marte Tooth 1A (CMT 1A). In situ hybridization with a probe to 17p11.2 was performed on fixed lymphocytes from the following groups of individuals: (1) normal controls; (2) patients evoking a strong clinical suspicion of CMT 1A; and (3) 3 families with an apparent autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy of unknown diagnoses. Group 2 patients had evidence of demyelination as defined by nerve conduction of less that 50% of the normal mean or terminal latency greater than 50% of the normal mean in conduction studies. Analysis of interphase cells hybridized with a cosmid DNA probe to 17p11.2 requires inclusion of a normal control with each trial and masked observer. Due to the size of the target DNA and the nature of the centromeric heterochromatin, the scoring of this probe is more subjective than centromere probes. For example, if the two 17 chromosomes are decondensed as in interphase, two tandem signals may be visualized as one. Results from duplication positive patients demonstrate a large proportion of cells with two closely aligned, but separate, signals with an additional single signal. Normal results demonstrate a majority of cells with two separate signals representing both normal homologues. None of the 3 families with questionable diagnosis revealed a duplication at the region, reinforcing our belief that a clinical diagnosis is the most discriminating tool available for diagnosis of CMT 1A. We concur with Boylan that molecular analysis for CMT 1A is useful for establishing a diagnosis of CMT 1A, but is not a primary differential diagnostic test. The yield in screening patients without physiologic evidence of demyelination is likely to be low. We further find that the use of in situ hybridization is a simple method of performing the duplication analysis.

  5. Bacteria capable of degrading anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene as revealed by DNA based stable-isotope probing in a forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mengke [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jiang, Longfei [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhang, Dayi [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Luo, Chunling, E-mail: clluo@gig.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yu, Zhiqiang [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yin, Hua [College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Gan [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Investigate PAHs degraders in forest carbon-rich soils via DNA-SIP. • Rhodanobacter is identified to metabolite anthracene for the first time. • The first fluoranthene degrader belongs to Acidobacteria. • Different functions of PAHs degraders in forest soils from contaminated soils. - Abstract: Information on microorganisms possessing the ability to metabolize different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex environments helps in understanding PAHs behavior in natural environment and developing bioremediation strategies. In the present study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied to investigate degraders of PAHs in a forest soil with the addition of individually {sup 13}C-labeled phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene. Three distinct phylotypes were identified as the active phenanthrene-, anthracene- and fluoranthene-degrading bacteria. The putative phenanthrene degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Sphingomona. For anthracene, bacteria of the genus Rhodanobacter were the putative degraders, and in the microcosm amended with fluoranthene, the putative degraders were identified as belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria. Our results from DNA-SIP are the first to directly link Rhodanobacter- and Acidobacteria-related bacteria with anthracene and fluoranthene degradation, respectively. The results also illustrate the specificity and diversity of three- and four-ring PAHs degraders in forest soil, contributes to our understanding on natural PAHs biodegradation processes, and also proves the feasibility and practicality of DNA-based SIP for linking functions with identity especially uncultured microorganisms in complex microbial biota.

  6. Developing a qPCR method to quantify AhR-PCP-DNA complex for detection of environmental trace-level PCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Pang, Xiaoqian; Chaisuwan, Nuanapa

    2011-07-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), a widely-used aseptic or biocide, is known as an environmental toxicant involved in endocrine disruption even at a trace level. In order to reliably and efficiently quantify environmental trace-quantity PCP, this study developed a novel PCP detection method using the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR). DNA probe with AhR binding sites was synthesized by PCR before added into AhR-PCP complex. After AhR-PCP-DNA complex was digested with exonuclease, copy number of DNA probe was determined using fluorescence qPCR. To calculate PCP concentration in samples, a standard curve (PCP concentration versus Ct value) was constructed and the detection range was 10(-13) to 10(-9) M. PCP detection limit was 0.0089 ppt for the AhR-PCP-DNA complex assay and 8.8780 ppm for high performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating that the method developed in this study is more sensitive. These results suggest that AhR-PCP-DNA complex method may be successfully applicable in detection and quantification of environmental trace-level PCP.

  7. Mutagenesis and ultraviolet inactivation of transforming DNA of ``Haemophilus influenzae`` complexed with a ``Bacillus subtilis`` protein that alter DNA conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, Jane K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Setlow, Barbara C.; Setlow, Peter [Connecticut Univ., Farmington, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The wild-type ``Bacillus subtilis`` spore protein, SspC{sup wt}, binds to DNA ``in vitro`` and ``in vivo`` and changes the conformation of DNA from B to A. Synthesis of the cloned SspC{sup wt} gene in ``Escherichia coli`` also causes large increases in mutation frequency. Binding of SspC{sup wt} to transforming DNA from ``Haemophilus influenzae`` made the DNA resistant to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The mutant protein, SspC{sup ala}, which does not bind DNA, did not change the UV resistance. The UV sensitivity of the DNA/SspC{sup wt} complex was not increased when the recipients of the DNA were defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers. These data indicate that the ``H. influenzae`` excision mechanism does not operate on the spore photoproduct formed by UV irradiation of the complex. Selection for the streptomycin- or erythromycin-resistance markers on the transforming DNA evidenced significant mutations at loci closely linked to these, but not at other loci. SspC{sup wt} apparently entered the cell attached to the transforming DNA, and caused mutations in adjacent loci. The amount of such mutations decreased when the transforming DNA was UV irradiated, because UV unlinks linked markers. (author). 22 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs.

  8. Serum amyloid P component-DNA complexes are decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus. inverse association with anti-dsDNA antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Anne; Nielsen, Ellen Holm; Svehag, Sven Erik;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study serum levels of serum amyloid P component (SAP) and SAP-DNA complexes in a population-based cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: The study population comprised 82 unselected patients of predominantly Scandinavian ancestry with SLE according......-DNA-negative patients tended to have lower leukocyte counts and complement C3 levels, and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C3d levels versus SAP-DNA-positive patients. There was an inverse association between the occurrence of anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies and SAP-DNA complexes. Co......-occurrence of SAP-DNA complexes and anti-dsDNA antibodies was demonstrated in only one SLE patient, implying that 81/82 patients were discordant for the presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies and SAP-DNA complexes. CONCLUSION: The decreased level of SAP-DNA complexes in SLE patients and the inverse relationship between...

  9. Probing the Relationship between Anti-Pneumocystis carinii Activity and DNA Binding of Bisamidines by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Żołek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Pneumocystis carinii activity of 13 synthetic pentamidine analogs was analyzed. The experimental differences in melting points of DNA dodecamer 5'-(CGCGAATTCGCG2-3' complexes (ΔTm, and in the biological activity measured using ATP bioluminescence assay (IC50 together with the theoretical free energy of DNA-ligand binding estimated by the proposed computational protocol, showed that the experimental activity of the tested pentamidines appeared to be due to the binding to the DNA minor groove with extended AT sequences. The effect of heteroatoms in the aliphatic linker, and the sulfonamide or methoxy substituents on the compound inducing changes in the interactions with the DNA minor groove was examined and was correlated with biological activity. In computational analysis, the explicit solvent approximation with the discrete water molecules was taken into account, and the role of water molecules in the DNA-ligand complexes was defined.

  10. Partial Purification of a Megadalton DNA Replication Complex by Free Flow Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caroline M.; Miao, Yunan; Lingeman, Robert G.; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a gentle and rapid method to purify the intact multiprotein DNA replication complex using free flow electrophoresis (FFE). In particular, we applied FFE to purify the human cell DNA synthesome, which is a multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out all phases of the DNA replication process in vitro using a plasmid containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin of DNA replication and the viral large tumor antigen (T-antigen) protein. The isolated native DNA synthesome can be of use in studying the mechanism by which mammalian DNA replication is carried-out and how anti-cancer drugs disrupt the DNA replication or repair process. Partially purified extracts from HeLa cells were fractionated in a native, liquid based separation by FFE. Dot blot analysis showed co-elution of many proteins identified as part of the DNA synthesome, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ), DNA polymerase ɛ (Pol ɛ), replication protein A (RPA) and replication factor C (RFC). Previously identified DNA synthesome proteins co-eluted with T-antigen dependent and SV40 origin-specific DNA polymerase activity at the same FFE fractions. Native gels show a multiprotein PCNA containing complex migrating with an apparent relative mobility in the megadalton range. When PCNA containing bands were excised from the native gel, mass spectrometric sequencing analysis identified 23 known DNA synthesome associated proteins or protein subunits. PMID:28036377

  11. Target-induced reconfiguration of DNA probes for recycling amplification and signal-on electrochemical detection of hereditary tyrosinemia type I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Cuiyun; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2015-09-01

    By coupling target DNA-induced reconfiguration of the dsDNA probes with enzyme-assisted target recycling amplification, we describe the development of a signal-on electrochemical sensing approach for sensitive detection of hereditary tyrosinemia type I gene. The dsDNA probes are self-assembled on the sensing electrode, and the addition of the target DNA reconfigures and switches the dsDNA probes into active substrates for exonuclease III, which catalytically digests the probes and leads to cyclic reuse of the target DNA. The target DNA recycling and the removal of one of the ssDNA from the dsDNA probes by exonuclease III result in the formation of many hairpin structures on the sensor surface, which brings the electroactive methylene blue labels into proximity with the electrode and produces a significantly amplified current response for sensitive detection of the target gene down to 0.24 pM. This method is also selective to discriminate single-base mismatch and can be employed to detect the target gene in human serum samples. With the demonstration for the detection of the target gene, we expect the developed method to be a universal sensitive sensing platform for the detection of different nucleic acid sequences.

  12. Probing DNA-stabilized fluorescent silver nanocluster spectral heterogeneity by time-correlated single photon counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carro, Miguel; Paolucci, Valentina; Hooley, Emma Nicole

    2016-01-01

    DNA-stabilized silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) are promising fluorophores whose photophysical properties and synthesis procedures have received increased attention in the literature. However, depending on the preparation conditions and the DNA sequence, the DNA-AgNC samples can host a range of di...

  13. A comparative cytogenetic study of Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) using DNA-binding fluorochromes and FISH with 45S rDNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhman, Vladimir E; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Govind, Shubha; Muravenko, Olga V

    2016-06-01

    Karyotypes of Leptopilina boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979) (n = 9), L. heterotoma (Thomson, 1862) (n = 10), L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 (n = 10) and Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896) (n = 9) (Hymenoptera, Figitidae) were studied using DNA-binding ligands with different base specificity [propidium iodide (PI), chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)], and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a 45S rDNA probe. Fluorochrome staining was similar between the different fluorochromes, except for a single CMA3- and PI-positive and DAPI-negative band per haploid karyotype of each species. FISH with 45S rDNA probe detected a single rDNA site in place of the bright CMA3-positive band, thus identifying the nucleolus organizing region (NOR). Chromosomal locations of NORs were similar for both L. heterotoma and L. victoriae, but strongly differed in L. boulardi as well as in G. xanthopoda. Phylogenetic aspects of NOR localization in all studied species are briefly discussed.

  14. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  15. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haiying [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044300 (China); Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Wang, Jinyi [College of Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Chengxiao, E-mail: cxzhang@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10{sup 2} to 3.0 × 10{sup 4} cells mL{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL{sup −1}. The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  16. Continuous probing of cold complex molecules with infrared frequency comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaun, Ben; Changala, P. Bryan; Patterson, David; Bjork, Bryce J.; Heckl, Oliver H.; Doyle, John M.; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    For more than half a century, high-resolution infrared spectroscopy has played a crucial role in probing molecular structure and dynamics. Such studies have so far been largely restricted to relatively small and simple systems, because at room temperature even molecules of modest size already occupy many millions of rotational/vibrational states, yielding highly congested spectra that are difficult to assign. Targeting more complex molecules requires methods that can record broadband infrared spectra (that is, spanning multiple vibrational bands) with both high resolution and high sensitivity. However, infrared spectroscopic techniques have hitherto been limited either by narrow bandwidth and long acquisition time, or by low sensitivity and resolution. Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) combines the inherent broad bandwidth and high resolution of an optical frequency comb with the high detection sensitivity provided by a high-finesse enhancement cavity, but it still suffers from spectral congestion. Here we show that this problem can be overcome by using buffer gas cooling to produce continuous, cold samples of molecules that are then subjected to CE-DFCS. This integration allows us to acquire a rotationally resolved direct absorption spectrum in the C-H stretching region of nitromethane, a model system that challenges our understanding of large-amplitude vibrational motion. We have also used this technique on several large organic molecules that are of fundamental spectroscopic and astrochemical relevance, including naphthalene, adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. These findings establish the value of our approach for studying much larger and more complex molecules than have been probed so far, enabling complex molecules and their kinetics to be studied with orders-of-magnitude improvements in efficiency, spectral resolution and specificity.

  17. On docking, scoring and assessing protein-DNA complexes in a rigid-body framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Parisien

    Full Text Available We consider the identification of interacting protein-nucleic acid partners using the rigid body docking method FTdock, which is systematic and exhaustive in the exploration of docking conformations. The accuracy of rigid body docking methods is tested using known protein-DNA complexes for which the docked and undocked structures are both available. Additional tests with large decoy sets probe the efficacy of two published statistically derived scoring functions that contain a huge number of parameters. In contrast, we demonstrate that state-of-the-art machine learning techniques can enormously reduce the number of parameters required, thereby identifying the relevant docking features using a miniscule fraction of the number of parameters in the prior works. The present machine learning study considers a 300 dimensional vector (dependent on only 15 parameters, termed the Chemical Context Profile (CCP, where each dimension reflects a specific type of protein amino acid-nucleic acid base interaction. The CCP is designed to capture the chemical complementarities of the interface and is well suited for machine learning techniques. Our objective function is the Chemical Context Discrepancy (CCD, which is defined as the angle between the native system's CCP vector and the decoy's vector and which serves as a substitute for the more commonly used root mean squared deviation (RMSD. We demonstrate that the CCP provides a useful scoring function when certain dimensions are properly weighted. Finally, we explore how the amino acids on a protein's surface can help guide DNA binding, first through long-range interactions, followed by direct contacts, according to specific preferences for either the major or minor grooves of the DNA.

  18. Insight into F plasmid DNA segregation revealed by structures of SopB and SopB–DNA complexes

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Accurate DNA segregation is essential for genome transmission. Segregation of the prototypical F plasmid requires the centromere-binding protein SopB, the NTPase SopA and the sopC centromere. SopB displays an intriguing range of DNA-binding properties essential for partition; it binds sopC to form a partition complex, which recruits SopA, and it also coats DNA to prevent non-specific SopA–DNA interactions, which inhibits SopA polymerization. To understand the myriad functions of SopB, we dete...

  19. Rapid quantification of hepatitis B virus DNA by real-time PCR using efficient TaqMan probe and extraction of virus DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Qin Lu; Jin-Xiang Han; Peng Qi; Wei Xu; Yan-Hui Zu; Bo Zhu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To rapidly quantify hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA by real-time PCR using efficient TaqMan probe and extraction methods of virus DNA.METHODS: Three standards were prepared by cloning PCR products which targeted S, C and X region of HBV genome into pGEM-T vector respectively. A pair of primers and matched TaqMan probe were selected by comparing the copy number and the Ct values of HBV serum samples derived from the three different standard curves using certain serum DNA. Then the efficiency of six HBV DNA extraction methods including guanidinium isothiocyanate, proteinase K, NaI, NaOH lysis, alkaline lysis and simple boiling was analyzed in sample A, B and C by real-time PCR. Meanwhile, 8 clinical HBV serum samples were quantified.RESULTS: The copy number of the same HBV serum sample originated from the standard curve of S, C and Xregions was 5.7 x 104/mL, 6.3 x 102/mL and 1.6 x 103/mL respectively. The relative Ct value was 26.6, 31.8 and 29.5 respectively. Therefore, primers and matched probe from S region were chosen for further optimization of six extraction methods. The copy number of HBV serum samples A, B and C was 3.49 x 109/mL, 2.08 x 106/mL and 4.40 x 107/mL respectively, the relative Ct value was 19.9, 30 and 26.2 in the method of NaOH lysis,which was the efficientest among six methods. Simple boiling showed a slightly lower efficiency than NaOH lysis. Guanidinium isothiocyanate, proteinase K and NaI displayed that the copy number of HBV serum sample A,B and C was around 105/mL, meanwhile the Ct value was about 30. Alkaline failed to quantify the copy number of three HBV serum samples. Standard deviation (SD) and coefficient variation (CV) were very low in all 8 clinical HBV serum samples, showing that quantification of HBV DNA in triplicate was reliable and accurate.CONCLUSION: Real-time PCR based on optimized primers and TaqMan probe from S region in combination with NaOH lysis is a simple, rapid and accurate method for quantification of HBV serum DNA.

  20. Chemistry specificity of DNA-polycation complex salt response: a simulation study of DNA, polylysine and polyethyleneimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Hanne S; Härkönen, Marc; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2015-02-21

    In this work, the chemistry specific stability determining factors of DNA-polycation complexes are examined by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. To this end, we conduct a systematic variation of polycation line charge through polyethyleneimine (PEI) protonation and polycation chemistry via comparison with poly-l-lysine (PLL). Our simulations show that increasing line charge of the polycation alone does not lead to more salt tolerant complexes. Instead, the effective charge compensation by the polycation correlates with the increased stability of the complex against additional salt. The salt stability of PEI-DNA complexes also links to the proton sponge property of weak polycations, commonly assumed to be behind the effectivity of PEI as a gene delivery vector. Examination of the complexes reveals the mechanism behind this behaviour; more Cl(-) ions are attracted by the protonated complexes but, in contrast to the common depiction of the proton sponge behaviour, the ion influx does not cause swelling of the complex structure itself. However, PEI protonation leads to release of PEI while DNA remains tightly bound to the complex. Jointly, these findings shed light on the stability determining factors of DNA-polycation complexes, raise charge distribution as an important stability determining contributor, and indicate that the effectivity of PEI in gene delivery is likely to result from the freed PEI facilitating gene transfection.

  1. Spectrofluorimetric quantification of bilirubin using yttrium-norfloxacin complex as a fluorescence probe in serum samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamruzzaman, Mohammad; Alam, Al-Mahmnur [Department of Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hak Lee, Sang, E-mail: shlee@knu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ho Kim, Young, E-mail: youngkim@knu.ac.kr [Research Institute of Advanced Energy Technology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyu-Man [School of Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hyub Oh, Sang [Center for Gas Analysis, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    A simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was developed to determine trace amounts of bilirubin (BR) using yttrium (Y{sup 3+})-norfloxacin (NFLX) complex as a fluorescence (FL) probe. NFLX can form a stable binary complex with Y{sup 3+} and markedly enhances the weak FL signal of the NFLX. The FL intensity of the Y{sup 3+}-NFLX complex decreased significantly in the presence of BR in a buffer solution at pH=7.2. Under optimal conditions, the FL intensity decreased according to the BR concentration and showed a good linear relationship in the range of 0.03-2.3 {mu}g mL{sup -1} of BR with a correlation coefficient of 0.9988. The limit of detection for the determination of BR was 2.8 ng mL{sup -1} with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.55% for five replicate determination of 0.05 {mu}g mL{sup -1} BR. The presented method offers higher sensitivity with simple instrumentation and was applied successfully in detecting BR at low concentrations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak FL signal of NFLX was enhanced at 419 nm by forming binary complex with Y{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The FL intensity of Y{sup 3+}-NFLX complex was quenched markedly in the presence of ATP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFLX can transfer energy to Y{sup 3+} and BR and form the Y{sup 3+}-NFLX-ATP ternary complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced FL intensity of the system was correlated with the concentration of BR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method is applied to determine BR at low concentration (2.8 ng mL{sup -1}) in serum.

  2. Detection of mRNA of the cyclin D1 breast cancer marker by a novel duplex-DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Meirav; Yavin, Eylon; Kafri, Pinhas; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Fischer, Bilha

    2013-06-27

    Previously, we have described 5-((4-methoxy-phenyl)-trans-vinyl)-2'-deoxy-uridine, 6, as a fluorescent uridine analogue exhibiting a 3000-fold higher quantum yield (Φ 0.12) and maximum emission (478 nm) which is 170 nm red-shifted as compared to uridine. Here, we utilized 6 for preparation of labeled oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) probes based on MS2 and cyclin D1 (a known breast cancer mRNA marker) sequences. Cyclin D1-derived labeled-ssODN showed a 9.5-fold decrease of quantum yield upon duplex formation. On the basis of this finding, we developed the ds-NIF (nucleoside with intrinsic fluorescence)-probe methodology for detection of cyclin D1 mRNA, by which the fluorescent probe is released upon recognition of target mRNA by the relatively dark NIF-duplex-probe. Indeed, we successfully detected, a ss-deoxynucleic acid (DNA) variant of cyclin D1 mRNA using a dark NIF-labeled duplex-probe, and monitoring the recognition process by fluorescence spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, we successfully detected cyclin D1 mRNA in RNA extracted from cancerous human cells, using ds-NIF methodology.

  3. Development of Fluorescent Protein Probes Specific for Parallel DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Dung Thanh; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-01-01

    We have developed fluorescent protein probes specific for parallel G-quadruplexes by attaching cyan fluorescent protein to the G-quadruplex-binding motif of the RNA helicase RHAU. Fluorescent probes containing RHAU peptide fragments of different lengths were constructed, and their binding to G-quadruplexes was characterized. The selective recognition and discrimination of G-quadruplex topologies by the fluorescent protein probes was easily detected by the naked eye or by conventional gel imaging.

  4. The architecture of ArgR-DNA complexes at the genome-scale in> Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Yoo-Bok; Kang, Taek Jin;

    2015-01-01

    DNA-binding motifs that are recognized by transcription factors (TFs) have been well studied; however, challenges remain in determining the in vivo architecture of TF-DNA complexes on a genome-scale. Here, we determined the in vivo architecture of Escherichia coli arginine repressor (ArgR)-DNA co...

  5. Potential-modulated DNA cleavage by (N-salicylideneglycinato)copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou-Sheng; Wang, Yan-Ling; Liu, Yun-Chun; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of aqua (N-salicylideneglycinato)copper(II) (Cu(salgly)2+) complex with calf thymus DNA has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Potential-modulated DNA cleavage in the presence of Cu(salgly)2+ complex was performed at a gold electrode in a thin layer cell. DNA can be efficiently cleaved by electrochemically reducing Cu(salgly)2+ complex to Cu(salgly)+ complex at -0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). When the solution was aerated with a small flow of O2 during electrolysis, the extent of DNA cleavage was dramatically enhanced, and hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibited DNA cleavage. These results suggested that O2 and hydroxyl radical were involved in potential-modulated DNA cleavage reaction. The percentage of DNA cleavage was enhanced as the working potential was shifted to more negative values and the electrolysis time was increased. It was also dependent on the ratio of Cu(salgly)2+ complex to DNA concentration. The cleaved DNA fragments were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The experimental results indicated that the method for potential-modulated DNA cleavage by Cu(salgly)2+ complex was simple and efficient.

  6. Synthesis of trimethoprim metal complexes: Spectral, electrochemical, thermal, DNA-binding and surface morphology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirezen, Nihat; Tarınç, Derya; Polat, Duygu; Ceşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Complexes of trimethoprim (TMP), with Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Fe(III) have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic techniques involving UV-vis, IR, mass and (1)H NMR. CHN elemental analysis, electrochemical and thermal behavior of complexes have also been investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that these compounds can bind to CT DNA. The binding constants of the complexes with CT DNA have also been calculated. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA have shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA by both the intercalative and the electrostatic binding mode. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against two different fungi has been evaluated and compared with the reference drug TMP. Almost all types of complexes show excellent activity against all type of bacteria and fungi. The morphology of the CT DNA, TMP, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with CT DNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at CT DNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism.

  7. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network.

  8. Amino acid detection using fluoroquinolone–Cu{sup 2+} complex as a switch-on fluorescent probe by competitive complexation without derivatization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farokhcheh, Alireza; Alizadeh, Naader, E-mail: alizaden@modares.ac.ir

    2014-01-15

    In this work, we describe the use of fluoroquinolone–Cu{sup 2+} complex as a competitive switch-on fluorescence probe for amino acid determination without derivatization. The fluorescence intensity of this probe, which has been reduced due to effective quenching by Cu{sup 2+} ion, increases drastically by an addition of amino acid (glycine, phenylalanine, sarcosine, aspargine, alanine, proline, arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine, leucine and isoleucine). The overall stability constants of Cu{sup 2+} ion complexes with amino acids were determined by fluorometric titration of fluoroquinolone-Cu{sup 2+} complex with the amino acid solution. Furthermore, the probe shows high calibration sensitivity toward aspartic acid. The fluorescence signal depends linearly on the amino acid concentration within the range of concentration from 1.2×10{sup −7} to 1.1×10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for aspartic acid. The detection limit was found 2.7×10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} with the relative standard deviation (RSD%) about 2.1% (five replicate). -- Highlights: • Amino acids are detected by using fluoroquinolone–Cu{sup 2+} complex as fluorescent probe. • Amino acids were detected based on a competitive complexation reaction. • Probe has been able to recognize amino acids through switch-on fluorescence behavior. • Ultra-trace level of aspartic and glutamic acid is determined without derivatization.

  9. Impedimetric genosensor for detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV1) DNA using viral probe on methylene blue doped silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Chaitali; Ingle, Aviraj; Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Pn, Anoop Krishna; Pundir, C S; Narang, Jagriti

    2017-05-01

    An impedimetric genosensor was fabricated for detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 in serum, based on hybridization of the probe with complementary target cDNA from sample. To achieve it, probe DNA complementary to HCVgene was immobilized on the surface of methylene blue (MB) doped silica nanoparticles MB@SiNPs) modified fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode. The synthesized MB@SiNPs was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. This modified electrode (ssDNA/MB@SiNPs/FTO) served both as a signal amplification platform (due to silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) as well as an electrochemical indicator (due to methylene blue (MB)) for the detection of the HCV DNA in patient serum sample. The genosensor was optimized and evaluated. The sensor showed a dynamic linear range 100-10(6) copies/mL, with a detection limit of 90 copies/mL. The sensor was applied for detection of HCV in sera of hepatitis patient and could be renewed. The half life of the sensor was 4 weeks. The MB@SiNPs/FTO electrode could be used for preparation of other gensensors also. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Micron-sized surface enhanced Raman scattering reporter/fluorescence probe encoded colloidal microspheres for sensitive DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Lijun; Li, Ruimin; Dong, Xu; Wang, Fang; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun

    2017-02-15

    A new type of optical probes, featuring surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence spectra dual-mode encoding, has been reported in this article. Based on the uniform micrometer-sized melamine resin/Ag nanoparticles (MRM/Ag-NPs) composite microspheres, the SERS reporters and fluorescent probes were successfully fixed onto the different layers of the MEM/Ag-NPs microspheres, which supported the sensitive DNA detecton. The two spectroscopic methods commonly considered to be contradictive to each other, yet the optical signals were separable in the experiments. The dual-encoding strategy and single microsphere detecton method put the number of available independent codes to be rough the multiple of those available in the two optical detection channels, which increases far more rapidly than the summation of the two channels. As a proof of cencept, the utility of this dual spectrum mode SERS-fluoresecence encoded microsphere (SFEM) was demonstrated in a specific DNA detection using complimentary ssDNA functionalized magnetic beads as the DNA capturing and separation agents. Excellent encoding results were demonstrated from the decoding of the SERS and fluorescence signals of the SFEM. The method appears to be general in scope and we expect that the SERS-fluoresecence encoded microspheres system is applicable to multiplex bioassays of a variety of biomolecules.

  11. Systems-based approaches to probing metabolic variation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma K Lofthouse

    Full Text Available The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes bovine and human strains of the tuberculosis bacillus, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain. M. bovis has evolved from a M. tuberculosis-like ancestor and is the ancestor of the BCG vaccine. The pathogens demonstrate distinct differences in virulence, host range and metabolism, but the role of metabolic differences in pathogenicity is poorly understood. Systems biology approaches have been used to investigate the metabolism of M. tuberculosis, but not to probe differences between tuberculosis strains. In this study genome scale metabolic networks of M. bovis and M. bovis BCG were constructed and interrogated, along with a M. tuberculosis network, to predict substrate utilisation, gene essentiality and growth rates. The models correctly predicted 87-88% of high-throughput phenotype data, 75-76% of gene essentiality data and in silico-predicted growth rates matched measured rates. However, analysis of the metabolic networks identified discrepancies between in silico predictions and in vitro data, highlighting areas of incomplete metabolic knowledge. Additional experimental studies carried out to probe these inconsistencies revealed novel insights into the metabolism of these strains. For instance, that the reduction in metabolic capability observed in bovine tuberculosis strains, as compared to M. tuberculosis, is not reflected by current genetic or enzymatic knowledge. Hence, the in silico networks not only successfully simulate many aspects of the growth and physiology of these mycobacteria, but also provide an invaluable tool for future metabolic studies.

  12. The Model Analysis of a Complex Tuning Fork Probe and Its Application in Bimodal Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new electromechanical coupling model was built to quantitatively analyze the tuning fork probes, especially the complex ones. A special feature of a novel, soft tuning fork probe, that the second eigenfrequency of the probe was insensitive to the effective force gradient, was found and used in a homemade bimodal atomic force microscopy to measure power dissipation quantitatively. By transforming the mechanical parameters to the electrical parameters, a monotonous and concise method without using phase to calculate the power dissipation was proposed.

  13. Mystery of DNA repair: the role of the MRN complex and ATM kinase in DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czornak, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H

    2008-01-01

    Genomes are subject to a number of exogenous or endogenous DNA-damaging agents that cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). These critical DNA lesions can result in cell death or a wide variety of genetic alterations, including deletions, translocations, loss of heterozygosity, chromosome loss, or chromosome fusions, which enhance genome instability and can trigger carcinogenesis. The cells have developed an efficient mechanism to cope with DNA damages by evolving the DNA repair machinery. There are 2 major DSB repair mechanisms: nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). One element of the repair machinery is the MRN complex, consisting of MRE11, RAD50 and NBN (previously described as NBS1), which is involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, and signaling to the cell cycle checkpoints. A number of kinases, like ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated), ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad-3-related), and DNA PKcs (DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit), phosphorylate various protein targets in order to repair the damage. If the damage cannot be repaired, they direct the cell to apoptosis. The MRN complex as well as repair kinases are also involved in telomere maintenance and genome stability. The dysfunction of particular elements involved in the repair mechanisms leads to genome instability disorders, like ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), A-T-like disorder (ATLD) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS). The mutated genes responsible for these disorders code for proteins that play key roles in the process of DNA repair. Here we present a detailed review of current knowledge on the MRN complex, kinases engaged in DNA repair, and genome instability disorders.

  14. Immune cell activation from multivalent interactions with liquid-crystalline polycation-DNA complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Frasca, Loredana; Dobnikar, Jure; Frenkel, Daan; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Microbial DNA can trigger type I interferon (IFN) production in plasmacytoid cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). TLR9 in pDCs do not normally respond to self-DNA, but in certain autoimmune diseases self-DNA can complex with the polycationic antimicrobial peptide LL37 into condensed structures which allow DNA to access endosomal compartments and stimulate TLR9 in pDCs. We use x-ray studies and cell measurements of IFN secretion by pDCs to show that a broad range of polycation-DNA complexes stimulate pDCs and elucidate the criterion for high IFN production. Furthermore, we show via experiments and computer simulations that the distinguishing factor for why certain complexes activate pDCs while others do not is the self-assembled structure of the liquid-crystalline polycation-DNA complex.

  15. A combined approach of DNA probe and RFLP for family and species identification of larval stages of commercially important aquatic species: A study on the surfclam Spisula solidissima

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    This paper deals briefly with a technique developed for the identification of the early stages of veligers of surfclam Spisula solidissima from the larval stages of other common bivalve species using a combination of DNA probe and restriction...

  16. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA

  17. Recharging cationic DNA complexes with highly charged polyanions for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Wong, S C; Subbotin, V; Budker, V G; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Wolff, J A

    2003-02-01

    The intravenous delivery of plasmid DNA complexed with either cationic lipids (CL) or polyethyleneimine (PEI) enables high levels of foreign gene expression in lung. However, these cationic DNA complexes cause substantial toxicity. The present study found that the inclusion of polyacrylic acid (pAA) with DNA/polycation and DNA/CL complexes prevented the serum inhibition of the transfection complexes in cultured cells. The mechanism mediating this increase seems to involve both particle size enlargement due to flocculation and electrostatic shielding from opsonizing serum proteins. The use of pAA also increased the levels of lung expression in mice in vivo substantially above the levels achieved with just binary complexes of DNA and linear PEI (lPEI) or CL and reduced their toxicity. Also, the use of a "chaser" injection of pAA 30 min after injection of the ternary DNA/lPEI/pAA complexes further aided this effort to reduce toxicity while not affecting foreign gene expression. By optimizing the amount of pAA, lPEI, and DNA within the ternary complexes and using the "chaser" injection, substantial levels of lung expression were obtained while avoiding adverse effects in lung or liver. These developments will aid the use of cationic DNA complexes in animals and for eventual human gene therapy.

  18. Corrigendum: Structural diversity of target-specific homopyrimidine peptide nucleic acid-dsDNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, T.; Hansen, G.I.; Nielsen, P.E.

    2007-01-01

    This corrects the article "Structural diversity of target-specific homopyrimidine peptide nucleic acid-dsDNA complexes" in volume 34 on page 5790.......This corrects the article "Structural diversity of target-specific homopyrimidine peptide nucleic acid-dsDNA complexes" in volume 34 on page 5790....

  19. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA damag

  20. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2014-12-25

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  1. Polymorphism of DNA-anionic liposome complexes reveals hierarchy of ion-mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hongjun; Harries, Daniel; Wong, Gerard C L

    2005-08-09

    Self-assembled DNA delivery systems based on anionic lipids (ALs) complexed with DNA mediated by divalent cations have been recently introduced as an alternative to cationic lipid-DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity. We investigate AL-DNA complexes induced by different cations by using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering and confocal microscopy to show how different ion-mediated interactions are expressed in the self-assembled structures and phase behavior of AL-DNA complexes. The governing interactions in AL-DNA systems are complex: divalent ions can mediate strong attractions between different combinations of the components (such as DNA-DNA and membrane-membrane). Moreover, divalent cations can coordinate non-electrostatically with lipids and modify the resultant membrane structure. We find that at low membrane charge densities AL-DNA complexes organize into a lamellar structure of alternating DNA and membrane layers crosslinked by ions. At high membrane charge densities, a new phase with no analog in cationic lipid-DNA systems is observed: DNA is expelled from the complex, and a lamellar stack of membranes and intercalated ions is formed. For a subset of the ionic species, high ion concentrations generate an inverted hexagonal phase comprised of DNA strands wrapped by ion-coated lipid tubes. A simple theoretical model that takes into account the electrostatic and membrane elastic contributions to the free energy shows that this transition is consistent with an ion-induced change in the membrane spontaneous curvature, c0. Moreover, the crossover between the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases occurs at a critical c0 that agrees well with experimental values.

  2. Transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping probed by high-resolution, single-molecule imaging in live E. coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Zach; Weng, Xiaoli; Lagda, Arvin Cesar; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The "genetic switch" of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences O(R) and O(L) (separated by 2.3 kb), mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034), play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms.

  3. Transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping probed by high-resolution, single-molecule imaging in live E. coli cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Hensel

    Full Text Available DNA looping mediated by transcription factors plays critical roles in prokaryotic gene regulation. The "genetic switch" of bacteriophage λ determines whether a prophage stays incorporated in the E. coli chromosome or enters the lytic cycle of phage propagation and cell lysis. Past studies have shown that long-range DNA interactions between the operator sequences O(R and O(L (separated by 2.3 kb, mediated by the λ repressor CI (accession number P03034, play key roles in regulating the λ switch. In vitro, it was demonstrated that DNA segments harboring the operator sequences formed loops in the presence of CI, but CI-mediated DNA looping has not been directly visualized in vivo, hindering a deep understanding of the corresponding dynamics in realistic cellular environments. We report a high-resolution, single-molecule imaging method to probe CI-mediated DNA looping in live E. coli cells. We labeled two DNA loci with differently colored fluorescent fusion proteins and tracked their separations in real time with ∼40 nm accuracy, enabling the first direct analysis of transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in live cells. Combining looping measurements with measurements of CI expression levels in different operator mutants, we show quantitatively that DNA looping activates transcription and enhances repression. Further, we estimated the upper bound of the rate of conformational change from the unlooped to the looped state, and discuss how chromosome compaction may impact looping kinetics. Our results provide insights into transcription-factor-mediated DNA looping in a variety of operator and CI mutant backgrounds in vivo, and our methodology can be applied to a broad range of questions regarding chromosome conformations in prokaryotes and higher organisms.

  4. Kinetic adsorption profile and conformation evolution at the DNA-gold nanoparticle interface probed by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Ding, XiaoFan; He, Miao; Wang, Jing; Lou, Xinhui

    2014-10-21

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA-gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA-AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  5. Isolation and Quantitation of Topoisomerase Complexes Accumulated on Escherichia coli Chromosomal DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from th...

  6. DNA Origami with Complex Curvatures in Three-Dimensional Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongran; Pal, Suchetan; Nangreave, Jeanette; Deng, Zhengtao; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-04-14

    We present a strategy to design and construct self-assembling DNA nanostructures that define intricate curved surfaces in three-dimensional (3D) space using the DNA origami folding technique. Double-helical DNA is bent to follow the rounded contours of the target object, and potential strand crossovers are subsequently identified. Concentric rings of DNA are used to generate in-plane curvature, constrained to 2D by rationally designed geometries and crossover networks. Out-of-plane curvature is introduced by adjusting the particular position and pattern of crossovers between adjacent DNA double helices, whose conformation often deviates from the natural, B-form twist density. A series of DNA nanostructures with high curvature—such as 2D arrangements of concentric rings and 3D spherical shells, ellipsoidal shells, and a nanoflask—were assembled.

  7. DNA-membrane complex damages in mammalian cells after gamma irradiation and chemical agent action and role of the complex in DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, A.S.; Kiseleva, V.I.; Synzynys, B.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1982-06-22

    The sedimentation behavior of the DNA-membrane complex (DMC) from Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after gamma irradiation and carminomycin (CM) treatment was studied. The DNA and membrane containing material released by alkaline lysis from EAT cells had an anomalous sedimentation relative to denatured DNA. The DMC sediments with a great sedimentation constant (255 S). Both the chemical and physical agents induced DNA single-strand breaks and damage of the DMC. It was shown that 0.01 g/ml CM did not affect the incorporation of exogenic thymidine into DNA but the DMC was completely disrupted by this CM dose. There was no correlation between postirradiation repair kinetics of the DMC and the kinetics of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of ETA cells.

  8. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of DNA and DNA-drug complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, A K

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the brominated oligonucleotide d(ACGTACG(5-BrU)) sub 2 was solved using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) technique. The space group was P4 sub 3 2 sub 1 2, with unit cell a=b=43.60A, c=26.27A. This structure was an A-DNA, isomorphous with many other previously solved octomers. Single crystal X-ray diffraction data were collected from crystals of the intercalation complexes N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl] acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA), d(CGTACG) sub 2 and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl] 9-aminoacridine-4-carboxamide (9- aminoDACA) and some of their derivatives. An attempt was made to solve the structure of the DACA derivative N-[2-(dimethylamino)butyl]-acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA4) by molecular replacement, using the crystal structure of the daunomycin d(CGTACG) sub 2 complex as a search model. Attempts were made to position the molecule in the unit cell based on an SIR map, knowledge of the symmetry and unit cell dimensions. The structure of the 9-amino-5-bromo DACA - d(CGT(5-BrU)CG) su...

  9. Structural Biology of DNA Repair: Spatial Organisation of the Multicomponent Complexes of Nonhomologous End Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ plays a major role in double-strand break DNA repair, which involves a series of steps mediated by multiprotein complexes. A ring-shaped Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer forms first at broken DNA ends, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs binds to mediate synapsis and nucleases process DNA overhangs. DNA ligase IV (LigIV is recruited as a complex with XRCC4 for ligation, with XLF/Cernunnos, playing a role in enhancing activity of LigIV. We describe how a combination of methods—X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering—can give insights into the transient multicomponent complexes that mediate NHEJ. We first consider the organisation of DNA-PKcs/Ku70/Ku80/DNA complex (DNA-PK and then discuss emerging evidence concerning LigIV/XRCC4/XLF/DNA and higher-order complexes. We conclude by discussing roles of multiprotein systems in maintaining high signal-to-noise and the value of structural studies in developing new therapies in oncology and elsewhere.

  10. A DNA fingerprint probe from Mycosphaerella graminicola identifies an active transposable element

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodwin, S.B.; Cavaletto, J.R.; Waalwijk, C.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2001-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting has been used extensively to characterize populations of Mycosphaerella graminicola, the Septoria tritici blotch pathogen of wheat. The highly polymorphic DNA fingerprints of Mycosphaerella graminicola were assumed to reflect the action of transposable elements. However, there was

  11. Mode of formation and structural features of DNA-cationic liposome complexes used for transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Ghirlando, R; Guttman, S B; Minsky, A

    1993-07-20

    Complexes formed between cationic liposomes and nucleic acids represent a highly efficient vehicle for delivery of DNA and RNA molecules into a large variety of eukaryotic cells. By using fluorescence, gel electrophoresis, and metal-shadowing electron microscopy techniques, the factors that affect the, yet unclear, interactions between DNA and cationic liposomes as well as the structural features of the resulting complexes have been elucidated. A model is suggested according to which cationic liposomes bind initially to DNA molecules to form clusters of aggregated vesicles along the nucleic acids. At a critical liposome density, two processes occur, namely, DNA-induced membrane fusion, indicated by lipid mixing studies, and liposome-induced DNA collapse, pointed out by the marked cooperativity of the encapsulation processes, by their modulations by DNA-condensing agents, and also by their conspicuous independence upon DNA length. The DNA collapse leads to the formation of condensed structures which can be completely encapsulated within the fused lipid bilayers in a fast, highly cooperative process since their exposed surface is substantially smaller than that of extended DNA molecules. The formation of the transfecting DNA-liposome complexes in which the nucleic acids are fully encapsulated within a positively-charged lipid bilayer is proposed, consequently, to be dominated by mutual effects exerted by the DNA and the cationic liposomes, leading to interrelated lipid fusion and DNA collapse.

  12. Single-molecule approaches to probe the structure, kinetics, and thermodynamics of nucleoprotein complexes that regulate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David D

    2010-06-18

    Single-molecule experimentation has contributed significantly to our understanding of the mechanics of nucleoprotein complexes that regulate epigenetic switches. In this minireview, we will discuss the application of the tethered-particle motion technique, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy to (i) directly visualize and thermodynamically characterize DNA loops induced by the lac, gal, and lambda repressors and (ii) understand the mechanistic role of DNA-supercoiling and DNA-bending cofactors in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.

  13. DNA Probe for Identification of the Take-All Fungus, Gaeumannomyces graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, J M

    1989-02-01

    A 4.3-kilobase mitochondrial DNA fragment was cloned from Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, the causative agent of take-all disease of wheat. Although this DNA fragment hybridized with all three varieties of G. graminis, it showed little homology with DNA from other fungi and thus should be useful for identification of Gaeumannomyces sp. recovered from infected plants.

  14. DNA Probe for Identification of the Take-All Fungus, Gaeumannomyces graminis

    OpenAIRE

    Henson, Joan M.

    1989-01-01

    A 4.3-kilobase mitochondrial DNA fragment was cloned from Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, the causative agent of take-all disease of wheat. Although this DNA fragment hybridized with all three varieties of G. graminis, it showed little homology with DNA from other fungi and thus should be useful for identification of Gaeumannomyces sp. recovered from infected plants.

  15. DNA as a molecular local thermal probe for the analysis of magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jorge T; Moros, María; Del Pino, Pablo; Rivera, Sara; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M

    2013-10-25

    Too hot to handle: The surroundings of magnetic nanoparticles can be heated by applying a magnetic field. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles were functionalized with single-stranded DNA molecules and further hybridized with DNA modified with different fluorophores. By correlating the denaturation profiles of the DNA with the local temperature, temperature gradients for the vicinity of the excited nanoparticles were determined.

  16. DNA Probe for Identification of the Take-All Fungus, Gaeumannomyces graminis

    OpenAIRE

    Henson, Joan M.

    1989-01-01

    A 4.3-kilobase mitochondrial DNA fragment was cloned from Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, the causative agent of take-all disease of wheat. Although this DNA fragment hybridized with all three varieties of G. graminis, it showed little homology with DNA from other fungi and thus should be useful for identification of Gaeumannomyces sp. recovered from infected plants.

  17. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-04

    Fluorescent probes for detecting the physical properties of cellular structures have become valuable tools in life sciences. The fluorescence lifetime of molecular rotors can be used to report on variations in local molecular packing or viscosity. We used a nucleoside linked to a meso-substituted BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor (dC(bdp)) to sense changes in DNA microenvironment both in vitro and in living cells. DNA incorporating dC(bdp) can respond to interactions with DNA-binding proteins and lipids by changes in the fluorescence lifetimes in the range 0.5-2.2 ns. We can directly visualize changes in the local environment of exogenous DNA during transfection of living cells. Relatively long fluorescence lifetimes and extensive contrast for detecting changes in the microenvironment together with good photostability and versatility for DNA synthesis make this probe suitable for analysis of DNA-associated processes, cellular structures, and also DNA-based nanomaterials.

  18. The role of a microscopic colloidally stabilized phase in solubilizing oligoamine-condensed DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Wolff, Jon A; Budker, Vladimir G

    2003-02-01

    DNA complexes of spermine and spermidine become resolubilized at very high concentrations of the oligoamine. It has been postulated that high oligoamine concentrations shift the DNA from the globule back to the coil phase. The present study indicates that DNA resolubilization at high concentrations of spermine and spermidine is explained by formation of small particles of condensed DNA that cannot be precipitated by centrifugation. The fact that DNA stays condensed during resolubilization was confirmed using a relatively new condensation assay and three independent microscopic techniques. A considerable portion of DNA was found to be in particles with diameter <100 nm. Formation of such small particles is likely to be caused by colloidal forces. The ability to form small, condensed DNA particles in solutions that contain high concentrations of oligocation should aid in the design of synthetic DNA vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy and in the handling of DNA for diagnostic studies.

  19. Mesencephalic complex I deficiency does not correlate with parkinsonism in mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palin, Eino J H; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2013-08-01

    Genetic evidence from recessively inherited Parkinson's disease has indicated a clear causative role for mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. This role has long been discussed based on findings that toxic inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I caused parkinsonism and that tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease show complex I deficiency. Disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance are a common cause of inherited neurodegenerative disorders, and lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions or depletion and respiratory chain defect, including complex I deficiency. However, parkinsonism associates typically with defects of catalytic domain of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Surprisingly, however, not all mutations affecting DNA polymerase gamma manifest as parkinsonism, but, for example, spacer region mutations lead to spinocerebellar ataxia and/or severe epilepsy. Furthermore, defective Twinkle helicase, a close functional companion of DNA polymerase gamma in mitochondrial DNA replication, results in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, epilepsy or adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy, but not typically parkinsonism. Here we sought for clues for this specificity in the neurological manifestations of mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders by studying mesencephalic neuropathology of patients with DNA polymerase gamma or Twinkle defects, with or without parkinsonism. We show here that all patients with mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders had neuronopathy in substantia nigra, most severe in DNA polymerase gamma-associated parkinsonism. The oculomotor nucleus was also affected, but less severely. In substantia nigra, all patients had a considerable decrease of respiratory chain complex I, but other respiratory chain enzymes were not affected. Complex I deficiency did not correlate with parkinsonism, age, affected gene or inheritance. We conclude that the cell number in substantia nigra correlated well with parkinsonism in DNA polymerase gamma

  20. Real-time electrochemical LAMP: a rational comparative study of different DNA intercalating and non-intercalating redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexandra; Bouffier, Laurent; Grant, Kathryn B; Limoges, Benoît; Marchal, Damien

    2016-06-20

    We present a comparative study of ten redox-active probes for use in real-time electrochemical loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). Our main objectives were to establish the criteria that need to be fulfilled for minimizing some of the current limitations of the technique and to provide future guidelines in the search for ideal redox reporters. To ensure a reliable comparative study, each redox probe was tested under similar conditions using the same LAMP reaction and the same entirely automatized custom-made real-time electrochemical device (designed for electrochemically monitoring in real-time and in parallel up to 48 LAMP samples). Electrochemical melt curve analyses were recorded immediately at the end of each LAMP reaction. Our results show that there are a number of intercalating and non-intercalating redox compounds suitable for real-time electrochemical LAMP and that the best candidates are those able to intercalate strongly into ds-DNA but not too much to avoid inhibition of the LAMP reaction. The strongest intercalating redox probes were finally shown to provide higher LAMP sensitivity, speed, greater signal amplitude, and cleaner-cut DNA melting curves than the non-intercalating molecules.

  1. Application of DNA fingerprinting with digoxigenated oligonucleotide probe (CAC)5 to analysis of the genetic variation within Taenia taeniaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, M; Ueda, H; Hayashi, M; Oku, Y; Kurosawa, T; Kamiya, M

    1995-04-01

    DNA from T. taeniaeformis digested with the restriction endonuclease was hybridized with digoxigenated oligonucleotide probe (CAC)5. Metacestode and adult showed same clear multibanding patterns, which were characteristic of multilocus DNA fingerprinting. The fingerprinting patterns were quite different from those of the rodent hosts. Genetic variations in 4 laboratory-reared isolates of T. taeniaeformis, including 3 isolates which have been reported to be indistinguishable by infectivity, morphology and protein composition of metacestode, were investigated using this technique. Each of the 4 isolates exhibited isolate-specific fingerprinting patterns and were easily distinguished from one another, thus it was considered that (CAC)5 was a highly resolvable and informative probe for cestodes. However, it was also indicated that (CAC)5 was so sensitive that applying fingerprinting with (CAC)5 to taxonomical or phylogenetic analysis was limited where habitat of the host was restricted to the small area. In comparison to fingerprinting with 32P-labeled (CAC)5, fingerprinting with digoxigenated (CAC)5 represented more and sharper bands. It was considered that a digoxigenated probe was more useful for genetic analysis of cestodes.

  2. Isoquinoline-based lanthanide complexes: bright NIR optical probes and efficient MRI agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillé, Fabien; Bonnet, Célia S; Buron, Frédéric; Villette, Sandrine; Helm, Lothar; Petoud, Stéphane; Suzenet, Franck; Tóth, Eva

    2012-02-20

    In the objective of developing ligands that simultaneously satisfy the requirements for MRI contrast agents and near-infrared emitting optical probes that are suitable for imaging, three isoquinoline-based polyaminocarboxylate ligands, L1, L2 and L3, have been synthesized and the corresponding Gd(3+), Nd(3+) and Yb(3+) complexes investigated. The specific challenge of the present work was to create NIR emitting agents which (i) have excitation wavelengths compatible with biological applications and (ii) are able to emit a sufficient number of photons to ensure sensitive NIR detection for microscopic imaging. Here we report the first observation of a NIR signal arising from a Ln(3+) complex in aqueous solution in a microscopy setup. The lanthanide complexes have high thermodynamic stability (log K(LnL) =17.7-18.7) and good selectivity for lanthanide ions versus the endogenous cations Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Ca(2+) thus preventing transmetalation. A variable temperature and pressure (17)O NMR study combined with nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion measurements yielded the microscopic parameters characterizing water exchange and rotation. Bishydration of the lanthanide cation in the complexes, an important advantage to obtain high relaxivity for the Gd(3+) chelates, has been demonstrated by (17)O chemical shifts for the Gd(3+) complexes and by luminescence lifetime measurements for the Yb(3+) analogues. The water exchange on the three Gd(3+) complexes is considerably faster (k(ex)(298) = (13.9-15.4) × 10(6) s(-1)) than on commercial Gd(3+)-based contrast agents and proceeds via a dissociative mechanism, as evidenced by the large positive activation volumes for GdL1 and GdL2 (+10.3 ± 0.9 and +10.6 ± 0.9 cm(3) mol(-1), respectively). The relaxivity of GdL1 is doubled at 40 MHz and 298 K in fetal bovine serum (r(1) = 16.1 vs 8.5 mM(-1) s(-1) in HEPES buffer), due to hydrophobic interactions between the chelate and serum proteins. The isoquinoline core allows for the

  3. Enantiospecific kinking of DNA by a partially intercalating metal complex

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Opposite enantiomers of [Ru(phenanthroline) 3] 2+ affect the persistence length of DNA differently, a long speculated effect of helix kinking. Our molecular dynamics simulations confirm a substantial change of duplex secondary structure produced by wedge-intercalation of one but not the other enantiomer. This effect is exploited by several classes of DNA operative proteins. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  4. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence of interlipidic ion-pairing in anion-induced DNA release from cationic amphiphile-DNA complexes. Mechanistic implications in transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, S; Mandal, S S

    1998-05-26

    Complex formation of DNA with a number of cationic amphiphiles has been examined using fluorescence, gel electrophoresis, and chemical nuclease digestion. Here we have addressed the status of both DNA and lipid upon complexation with each other. DNA upon binding with cationic amphiphiles changes its structure in such a way that it loses the ability to intercalate and becomes resistant to nuclease digestion. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements due to 1, 6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) doped in cationic liposomes demonstrated that upon complexation with DNA, the resulting complexes still retain lamellar organizations with modest enhancement in thermal stabilities. The lipid-DNA complexation is most effective only when the complexation was carried out at or around the phase transition temperatures of the cationic lipid employed in the complexation with DNA. The release of DNA from cationic lipid-DNA complexes could be induced by several anionic additives. Determination of fluorescence anisotropies (due to DPH) as a function of temperature clearly demonstrates that the addition of equivalent amounts of anionic amphiphile into cationic lipid-DNA complexes leads to the ion-pairing of the amphiphiles, the melting profiles of which are virtually the same as those obtained in the absence of DNA. In this process DNA gets released from its complexes with cationic lipids and regains its natural intercalation ability, movement, and staining ability on agarose gel and also the sensitivities toward nuclease digestion. This clearly suggests that combination of ion-pairing and hydrophobic interactions between cationic and anionic amphiphiles is stronger than the electrostatic forces involved in the cationic lipid-DNA complexation. It is further revealed that the DNA release by anions is most efficient from the cationic lipid-DNA complexes at or around the Tm of the cationic lipid used in DNA complexation. This explains why more effective DNA delivery is achieved with cationic lipids

  6. Hydrophobic contribution to the free energy of complexation of aromatic ligands with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evstigneev M. P.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic component of complexation energy of double-stranded DNA with biologically active aromatic compounds was calculated using two semi-empirical methods – correlations of hydrophobic energy with changes of a heat capacity (DCp and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA. These surface areas were calculated for free ligands and DNA oligomers, unwound DNA duplexes and DNA-ligand complexes. The changes of polar and non-polar SASAs of molecules upon binding ligands to DNA were found. The hydrophobic contribution at both complexation stages were calculated. It was shown that the calculation of hydrophobic energy by SASA method is more correct than (DCp method for DNA-binding ligands.

  7. Dot-Blot Hybridization for Detection of Five Cucurbit Viruses by Digoxigenin-Labelled cDNA Probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Juan; GU Qin-sheng; LIN Shi-ming; PENG Bin; LIU Li-feng; TIAN Yan-ping; LI Li

    2007-01-01

    Dot-blot hybridization was applied in this paper to detect five viruses infecting cucurbitaceous crops,Zuccini yellow mosaic virus(ZYMV),Watermelon mosaic virus(WMV),Cucumber mosaic virus(CMV),Papaya ringspot virus watermelon strain(PRSV-W)and Squash mosaic virus(SqMV),as a good alternative assay in seed health test and epidemiological and transgenic research.Digoxigenin-labelled cDNA probes of the five viruses were synthesized by PCR with the specific primers and applied in dot-blot hybridization to detect five viruses in crude extraction of the infected leaves.And three SqMV probes of different lengths(0.55,1.6,and 2.7 kb,respectively)were designed to investigate the effect of hybridization.The results showed that the sensitivity for detecting the crude extraction of infected leaves by ZYMV,WMV,CMV,PRSV-W,and SqMV was down to 1:160,1:160,1:320,1:160,and 1:320,respectively.Three SqMV probes of different length showed no differences on the sensitivity and specificity.The digoxigenin-labelled probes prepared by PCR could be used for accurate and rapid identification of 5 viruses infecting cucurbitaceous crops with good stabilities,sensitivities,specificity,and reproducibilities.

  8. The architecture of the human Rad54-DNA complex provides evidence for protein translocation along DNA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Ristic (Dejan); C. Wyman (Claire); C. Paulusma (Coen); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractProper maintenance and duplication of the genome require accurate recombination between homologous DNA molecules. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 protein mediates pairing between homologous DNA molecules. This reaction is assisted by the Rad54 protein. To gai

  9. Mechanism of cleaving DNA through hydrolysis of a novel complex of Mg containing dien ligand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of metal complexes were designed and synthesized and a novel binuclear magnesium complex has been selected, namely [Mg2(dien)Cl(OH2)2]Cl2·H2O (dien=diethylene-triamine), which can cleave the plasmid pBR322 DNA effectively in close to physiological condition without adding any external materials.Through biological and chemical methods, especially the comparative experiments, we find the interaction between the complex and DNA belongs to hydrolytic mechanism.

  10. Resting state fMRI entropy probes complexity of brain activity in adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokunbi, Moses O; Fung, Wilson; Sawlani, Vijay; Choppin, Sabine; Linden, David E J; Thome, Johannes

    2013-12-30

    In patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), quantitative neuroimaging techniques have revealed abnormalities in various brain regions, including the frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, and occipital cortex. Nonlinear signal processing techniques such as sample entropy have been used to probe the regularity of brain magnetoencephalography signals in patients with ADHD. In the present study, we extend this technique to analyse the complex output patterns of the 4 dimensional resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in adult patients with ADHD. After adjusting for the effect of age, we found whole brain entropy differences (P=0.002) between groups and negative correlation (r=-0.45) between symptom scores and mean whole brain entropy values, indicating lower complexity in patients. In the regional analysis, patients showed reduced entropy in frontal and occipital regions bilaterally and a significant negative correlation between the symptom scores and the entropy maps at a family-wise error corrected cluster level of Pentropy is a useful tool in revealing abnormalities in the brain dynamics of patients with psychiatric disorders.

  11. A highly sensitive fluorescence probe for metallothioneins based on tiron-copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xilin; Xue, Jinhua; Liao, Lifu; Huang, Mingyang; Zhou, Bin; He, Bo

    2015-06-15

    The fabrication of tiron-copper complex as a novel fluorescence probe for the sensitive directly detection of metallothioneins at nanomolar levels was demonstrated. In Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer (pH 7.50), the interaction of bis(tiron)copper(II) complex cation [Cu(tiron)2](2+) and metallothioneins enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the system. The fluorescence enhancement at 347 nm was proportional to the concentration of metallothioneins. The mechanism was studied and discussed in terms of the fluorescence spectra. Under the optimal experimental conditions, at 347 nm, there was a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of the metallothioneins in the range of 8.80 × 10(-9)-7.70 × 10(-7)mol L(-1), with a correlation coefficient of r=0.995 and detection limit 2.60 × 10(-9)mol L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 0.77% (n=11), and the average recovery 94.4%. The method proposed was successfully reliable, selective and sensitive in determining of trace metallothioneins in fish visceral organ samples with the results in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC.

  12. Bacteria capable of degrading anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene as revealed by DNA based stable-isotope probing in a forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mengke; Jiang, Longfei; Zhang, Dayi; Luo, Chunling; Wang, Yan; Yu, Zhiqiang; Yin, Hua; Zhang, Gan

    2016-05-05

    Information on microorganisms possessing the ability to metabolize different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex environments helps in understanding PAHs behavior in natural environment and developing bioremediation strategies. In the present study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied to investigate degraders of PAHs in a forest soil with the addition of individually (13)C-labeled phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene. Three distinct phylotypes were identified as the active phenanthrene-, anthracene- and fluoranthene-degrading bacteria. The putative phenanthrene degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Sphingomona. For anthracene, bacteria of the genus Rhodanobacter were the putative degraders, and in the microcosm amended with fluoranthene, the putative degraders were identified as belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria. Our results from DNA-SIP are the first to directly link Rhodanobacter- and Acidobacteria-related bacteria with anthracene and fluoranthene degradation, respectively. The results also illustrate the specificity and diversity of three- and four-ring PAHs degraders in forest soil, contributes to our understanding on natural PAHs biodegradation processes, and also proves the feasibility and practicality of DNA-based SIP for linking functions with identity especially uncultured microorganisms in complex microbial biota.

  13. Studies on the Interaction between Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite Complex and Genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacali Necefoglu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite ([Zn (H206] (p-HO-C6H4COO22H20 complex which wassynthesized and characterized by instrumental methods and the DNA samples which hadbeen isolated from cattle were allowed to interact at 37 oC for different time periods. Theinteraction of genomic DNA with this complex has been followed by agarose gelelectrophoresis at 50 V for 2 h. When DNA samples were allowed to interact with this metalcomplex, it was found that band intensities changed with the concentrations of the complex.In the result of interaction between this complex and genomic DNA samples, it wasdetermined that the intensities of bands were changed at the different concentrations of thecomplex. The brightness of the bands was increased and mobility of the bands wasdecreased, indicating the occurrence of increased covalent binding of the metal complexwith DNA. In this study it was concluded that the damage effect of ascorbate was reducedby Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite.

  14. Multilevel deconstruction of the In vivo behavior of looped DNA-protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Saiz

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA complexes with loops play a fundamental role in a wide variety of cellular processes, ranging from the regulation of DNA transcription to telomere maintenance. As ubiquitous as they are, their precise in vivo properties and their integration into the cellular function still remain largely unexplored. Here, we present a multilevel approach that efficiently connects in both directions molecular properties with cell physiology and use it to characterize the molecular properties of the looped DNA-lac repressor complex while functioning in vivo. The properties we uncover include the presence of two representative conformations of the complex, the stabilization of one conformation by DNA architectural proteins, and precise values of the underlying twisting elastic constants and bending free energies. Incorporation of all this molecular information into gene-regulation models reveals an unprecedented versatility of looped DNA-protein complexes at shaping the properties of gene expression.

  15. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Woo; Xu, Guozhou; Persky, Nicole S.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Rudge, Derek G.; Buzovetsky, Olga; Elledge, Stephen J.; Pavletich, Nikola P. (Harvard-Med); (Cornell); (MSKCC)

    2011-08-29

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  16. Structure of the FANCI-FANCD2 Complex: Insights into the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W Joo; G Xu; n Persky; A Smogorzewska; D Rudge; O Buzovetsky; S Elledge; N Pavletich

    2011-12-31

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by defects in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Central to this pathway is the Fanconi anemia I-Fanconi anemia D2 (FANCI-FANCD2) (ID) complex, which is activated by DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and monoubiquitination. The 3.4 angstrom crystal structure of the {approx}300 kilodalton ID complex reveals that monoubiquitination and regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the I-D interface, suggesting that they occur on monomeric proteins or an opened-up complex and that they may serve to stabilize I-D heterodimerization. The 7.8 angstrom electron-density map of FANCI-DNA crystals and in vitro data show that each protein has binding sites for both single- and double-stranded DNA, suggesting that the ID complex recognizes DNA structures that result from the encounter of replication forks with an ICL.

  17. Binding of copper(II) polypyridyl complexes to DNA and consequences for DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Leising, Miriam; Meetsma, Auke; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between salmon testes DNA (st-DNA) and a series of Cu-II polypyridyl complexes, i.e. [Cu(dmbpy)(NO3)(2)] (1) (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), [Cu(bpy)(NO3)(2)] (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), [Cu(phen)(NO3)(2)] (3) (phen = phenanthroline), [Cu(terpy)(NO3)(2)]center dot H2O (4) (

  18. Thermodynamic and structural study of pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde/DNA interactions by molecular spectroscopy: Probing intercalation and binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grueso, E. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Seville, C/Profesor Garcia Gonzalez s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain); Prado-Gotor, R., E-mail: pradogotor@us.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Seville, C/Profesor Garcia Gonzalez s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2010-08-03

    Graphical abstract: The exocyclic carbonyl compound pyren-1-carboxyaldehyde, (1-PyCHO), binds to the ctDNA in an intercalative mode. Two possible angular orientations for intercalation into base-pairs are possible. Induced circular dichroism measurements indicate that the intercalation orientation of 1-PyCHO into DNA could be heterogeneous, that is, multiple binding orientations of the pyren-1-carboxyaldehyde must be involved. - Abstract: The binding of pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde (1-PyCHO) with ctDNA was investigated through absorption, intrinsic and induced circular dichroism, viscosity measurements and steady-state fluorescence. The binding and the number of monomer units of the polymer involved in the binding of one dye molecule (site size) have been quantified. The results indicated that the 1-PyCHO molecule binds to the ctDNA in an intercalative mode. The spectroscopic evidence of this intercalation process is also corroborated by the effect of urea, iodide-induced fluorescence quenching of pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde and competitive binding using a fluorescent intercalator, SYBR Green I (SG). The induced circular dichroism (ICD) spectra of pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde complexed with ctDNA show that pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde intercalates into ctDNA and that the intercalation orientation of pyrene to the DNA base-pairs long axis is heterogeneous. On the other hand, the intrinsic circular dichroism (CD) spectra show a stabilization of the right-handed B form of ctDNA, due to the intercalation process.

  19. Probing platinum azido complexes by 14N and 15N NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Nicola J; Gierth, Peter; Sadler, Peter J

    2011-10-17

    Metal azido complexes are of general interest due to their high energetic properties, and platinum azido complexes in particular because of their potential as photoactivatable anticancer prodrugs. However, azido ligands are difficult to probe by NMR spectroscopy due to the quadrupolar nature of (14)N and the lack of scalar (1)H coupling to enhance the sensitivity of the less abundant (15)N by using polarisation transfer. In this work, we report (14)N and (15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of cis,trans,cis-[Pt(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(NH(3))] (1) and trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(X)(Y)], where X=Y=NH(3) (2); X=NH(3), Y=py (3) (py=pyridine); X=Y=py (4); and selected Pt(II) precursors. These studies provide the first (15)N NMR data for azido groups in coordination complexes. We discuss one- and three-bond J((15)N,(195)Pt) couplings for azido and am(m)ine ligands. The (14)N(α) (coordinated azido nitrogen) signal in the Pt(IV) azido complexes is extremely broad (W(1/2)≈2124 Hz for 4) in comparison to other metal azido complexes, attributable to a highly asymmetrical electric field gradient at the (14)N(α) atom. Through the use of anti-ringing pulse sequences, the (14)N NMR spectra, which show resolution of the broad (14)N(α) peak, were obtained rapidly (e.g., 1.5 h for 10 mM 4). The linewidths of the (14)N(α) signals correlate with the viscosity of the solvent. For (15) N-enriched samples, it is possible to detect azido (15)N resonances directly, which will allow photoreactions to be followed by 1D (15)N NMR spectroscopy. The T(1) relaxation times for 3 and 4 were in the range 5.7-120 s for (15)N, and 0.9-11.3 ms for (14)N. Analysis of the (1)J((15)N,(195)Pt) coupling constants suggests that an azido ligand has a moderately strong trans influence in octahedral Pt(IV) complexes, within the series 2-picIV)-NH(3) bond to a greater extent than an axial OH(-) ligand. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Binding of copper(II) polypyridyl complexes to DNA and consequences for DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Leising, Miriam; Meetsma, Auke; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-02-28

    The interaction between salmon testes DNA (st-DNA) and a series of Cu(II) polypyridyl complexes, i.e. [Cu(dmbpy)(NO3)2] (1) (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), [Cu(bpy)(NO3)2] (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), [Cu(phen)(NO3)2] (3) (phen = phenanthroline), [Cu(terpy)(NO3)2]·H2O (4) (terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), [Cu(dpq)(NO3)2] (5) (dpq = dipyrido-[3,2-d:2',3'-f]-quinoxaline) and [Cu(dppz)(NO3)2] (6) (dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was studied by UV/Vis absorption, Circular Dichroism, Linear Dichroism, EPR, Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies and viscometry. These complexes catalyse enantioselective C-C bond forming reactions in water with DNA as the source of chirality. Complex 1 crystallizes as an inorganic polymer with nitrate ligands bridging the copper ions, which adopt essentially a distorted square pyramidal structure with a fifth bridging nitrate ligand at the axial position. Raman spectroscopy indicates that in solution the nitrate ligands in 1, 2, 3 and 4 are displaced by solvent (H2O). For complex 1, multiple supramolecular species are observed in the presence of st-DNA in contrast to the other complexes, which appear to interact relatively uniformly as a single species predominantly, when st-DNA is present. Overall the data suggest that complexes 1 and 2 engage primarily through groove binding with st-DNA while 5 and 6 undergo intercalation. For complexes 3 and 4 the data indicates that both groove binding and intercalation takes place, albeit primarily intercalation. Although it is tempting to conclude that the groove binders give highest ee and rate acceleration, it is proposed that the flexibility and dynamics in binding of Cu(II) complexes to DNA are key parameters that determine the outcome of the reaction. These findings provide insight into the complex supramolecular structure of these DNA-based catalysts.

  1. Carbon-13 (13C) labeling of Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells and spores: suitability for DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) of spores in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Fedenko, Jeffrey; Schuerger, Andrew C

    2009-07-01

    To test the suitability of DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) for characterizing bacterial spore populations in soils, the properties of Bacillus subtilis cells and spores intensely labeled with [(13)C]glucose were characterized. Spore germination, vegetative growth rates, and sporulation efficiency were indistinguishable on glucose versus [(13)C]glucose, as were spore wet heat and UV resistance. Unlabeled and (13)C-labeled spores contained 1.0989 and 74.336 at.% (13)C, and exhibited wet densities of 1.356 and 1.365 g/ml, respectively. Chromosomal DNAs containing (12)C versus (13)C were readily separated by their different buoyant densities in cesium chloride/ethidium bromide gradients.

  2. Isolation and characterization of species-specific DNA probes from Taenia solium and Taenia saginata and their use in an egg detection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, A; Vallejo, V; Mossie, K G; Ortiz, D; Agabian, N; Flisser, A

    1995-05-01

    Cysticercosis results from ingestion of the eggs of the tapeworm Taenia solium. Reduction of the incidence of human and swine cysticercosis requires identification and treatment of individuals who carry the adult tapeworm. T. solium and Taenia saginata eggs cannot be differentiated on the basis of morphology; thus, in order to improve existing methods for the diagnosis of taeniasis, we have developed highly sensitive, species-specific DNA probes which differentiate T. solium and T. saginata. Recombinant clones containing repetitive DNA sequences which hybridize specifically with genomic DNAs from either species were isolated and characterized. T. solium-specific DNA sequences contained complete and truncated forms of a tandemly repeated 158-bp DNA sequence. An unrelated T. saginata DNA sequence was also characterized and shown to encode a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene. T. solium- and T. saginata-specific DNA probes did not hybridize in dot blot assays either with genomic DNA from the platyhelminths Taenia hydatigena, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia taeniaeformis, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistosoma mansoni or with genomic DNA from other eukaryotes, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, Cryptosporidium parvum, Entamoeba histolytica, Trypanosoma gambiense, Trypanosoma brucei, and Giardia lamblia, Caenorhabditis elegans, and human DNA. By using these T. solium and T. saginata DNA probes, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific dot blot assay for the detection of T. solium eggs was developed.

  3. B to Z-Dna Transition Probed by the Feoli's Formalism for a Kirchhoff Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Morteza

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we are going to use the techniques of quantum field theory to describe the free energy of DNA structures. The exact solutions of the general equilibrium shape equations for DNA structures in a Kirchhoff model by using the Feoli's formalism [A. Feoli, V. V. Nesterenko and G. Scarpetta, Nucl. Phys. B705, 577 (2005)] are investigated. The free energy of the B- to Z-DNA transition is also calculated in this formalism.

  4. A DNA minor groove electronegative potential genome map based on photo-chemical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Hansen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA of the genome contains both sequence information directly relating to the protein and RNA coding as well as functional and structural information relating to protein recognition. Only recently is the importance of DNA shape in this recognition process being fully appreciated...... resolution of any genome, and it is illustrated how such detailed studies of this sequence dependent, inherent property of the DNA may reflect on genome organization, gene expression and chromosomal condensation....

  5. Tracking heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon cycling by magnetotactic bacteria in freshwater sediments using DNA stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürşat Coşkun, Ömer; Roud, Sophie; He, Kuang; Petersen, Nikolai; Gilder, Stuart; Orsi, William D.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are diverse, widespread, motile prokaryotes which biomineralize nanosize magnetic minerals, either magnetite or gregite, under highly conserved genetic control and have magnetotaxis to align their position in aquatic environment according to Earth's magnetic field. They play important roles on some geobiological cycle of important minerals such as iron, sulphur, nitrogen and carbon. Yet, to date, their importance in carbon cycle and carbon source in their natural environment have not been previously studied. In this study, we focused on freshwater benthic carbon cycling of MTB and total bacteria using DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) technique coupled with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Pond sediments from Unterlippach (Germany) were amended with 13C-labelled sodium bicarbonate and 13C-labelled organic matter, and incubated in the dark over a two week time period. Applying separate qPCR assays specific for total bacteria and MTB, respectively, allowed us to estimate the contribution of MTB to total heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon cycling via DNA-SIP. After one week, there was a slight degree of autotrophic activity which increased markedly after two weeks. Comparing total DNA to the qPCR data revealed that changes in the buoyant density of DNA was due mainly to autotrophic bacterial production. DNA-SIP also identified heterotrophic utilization of 13C-labelled organic matter by MTB after 1 week. The qPCR data also allowed us to estimate uptake rates based on the incubation times for heterotrophic and autotrophic MTB. High-throughput DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that most of the MTB involved in carbon cycling were related to the Magnetococcus genus. This study sheds light on the carbon sources for MTB in a natural environment and helps unravel their ecological role in the carbon cycle.

  6. Effects of ionizing radiations on DNA-protein complexes; Effets des radiations ionisantes sur des complexes ADN-proteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, N

    2005-11-15

    The radio-induced destruction of DNA-protein complexes may have serious consequences for systems implicated in important cellular functions. The first system which has been studied is the lactose operon system, that regulates gene expression in Escherichia coli. First of all, the repressor-operator complex is destroyed after irradiation of the complex or of the protein alone. The damaging of the domain of repressor binding to DNA (headpiece) has been demonstrated and studied from the point of view of peptide chain integrity, conformation and amino acids damages. Secondly, dysfunctions of the in vitro induction of an irradiated repressor-unirradiated DNA complex have been observed. These perturbations, due to a decrease of the number of inducer binding sites, are correlated to the damaging of tryptophan residues. Moreover, the inducer protects the repressor when they are irradiated together, both by acting as a scavenger in the bulk, and by the masking of its binding site on the protein. The second studied system is formed by Fpg (for Formamido pyrimidine glycosylase), a DNA repair protein and a DNA with an oxidative lesion. The results show that irradiation disturbs the repair both by decreasing its efficiency of DNA lesion recognition and binding, and by altering its enzymatic activity. (author)

  7. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA nucleoba......Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in nanolithography, atmospheric chemistry, and DNA radiation damage. Previously, the cleavage of specific chemical bonds triggered by LEEs has been demonstrated in a variety of small organic molecules such as halogenated benzenes and DNA...

  8. Evaluation of the Tissue Culture Standard and Correlation with DNA probes and ELISA for the Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    reactivity between Chlamydiazyme and Acinetobacter strains. N. Engl. J. Med. 314:922-923. 120. Schachter, J. 1978. Chlamydial infections (first of three...COVEREDL.. TAIW2r)M’ , PtN)Yl COcNIQLTlcIOtU \\JIT OI ’.JP O9606 5 A9J MS THESIS ELIcA F-ot -Tjlt OiiTiio J oi Co- LA ’) OHA T fk v O 4A T S 6...Tissue Culture Standard, and Correlation with DNA Probes and ELISA for the Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment

  9. Synthesis of dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex and interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingquan; Yuan, Juan; Zeng, Jinhua; He, Xiangzhu; Li, Daguang

    2012-11-01

    Dihydromyricetin has many physiological functions and its metal complex could have better effects. DNA is very important in biological body, but little attention has been devoted to the relationship between dihydromyricetin-metal complex and the DNA. In this paper, dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex has been prepared and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TG-DTA Analysis). The interaction of dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex with DNA was investigated using UV-vis spectra, fluorescence measurements and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex can intercalate into the stacked base pairs of DNA with binding constant Kb = 5.64 × 104 M and compete with the strong intercalator ethidium bromide for the intercalative binding sites with Stern-Volmer quenching constant, Ksq = 1.16.

  10. Zn(2+)-cyclen-based complex enable a selective detection of single-stranded thymine-rich DNA in aqueous buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zece; Wang, Sheng; Wei, Danqing; Yang, Chuluo

    2016-11-15

    It is a big challenge to develop fluorescent probes for selective detection of DNA with specific sequences in aqueous buffers. We report a new tetraphenylethene-based Zn(2+)-cyclen complex (TPECyZn), and a chemo-sensing ensemble of the Zn complex with phenol red. TPECyZn showed significant fluorescence enhancement upon binding to thymine-rich DNA in HEPES buffers. But its selectivity was not high enough to eliminate the interference from some random DNA. By constructing the chemo-sensing ensemble of TPECyZn with phenol red, the background fluorescence was eliminated due to the energy transfer from TPECyZn to phenol red. Moreover, this chemo-sensing ensemble revealed high selectivity in detecting thymine-rich single-stranded DNA over other DNA in aqueous buffer. It can detect poly deoxythymidylic acid sequence as short as 2 nt. This detection in aqueous media makes this probe feasible in real application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of PCR-amplified genetically modified organisms (GMOs) DNA by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in anion-exchange chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stefano; Lesignoli, Francesca; Germini, Andrea; Faccini, Andrea; Sforza, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2007-04-04

    PCR products obtained by selective amplification of transgenic DNA derived from food samples containing Roundup Ready soybean or Bt-176 maize have been analyzed by anion-exchange HPLC. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), oligonucleotide analogues known to bind to complementary single-stranded DNA with high affinity and specificity, have been used as specific probes in order to assess the identity of the peaks observed. Two different protocols were adopted in order to obtain single-stranded DNA: amplification with an excess of one primer or digestion of one DNA strand. The single-stranded DNA was mixed with the PNA probe, and the presence of a specific sequence was revealed through detection of the corresponding PNA:DNA peak with significantly different retention time. Advantages and limits of this approach are discussed. The method was tested with reference materials and subsequently applied to commercial samples.

  12. Gene Transfer into the Lung by Nanoparticle Dextran-Spermine/Plasmid DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahril Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cationic polymer, dextran-spermine (D-SPM, has been found to mediate gene expression in a wide variety of cell lines and in vivo through systemic delivery. Here, we extended the observations by determining the optimal conditions for gene expression of D-SPM/plasmid DNA (D-SPM/pDNA in cell lines and in the lungs of BALB/c mice via instillation delivery. In vitro studies showed that D-SPM could partially protect pDNA from degradation by nuclease and exhibited optimal gene transfer efficiency at D-SPM to pDNA weight-mixing ratio of 12. In the lungs of mice, the levels of gene expression generated by D-SPM/pDNA are highly dependent on the weight-mixing ratio of D-SPM to pDNA, amount of pDNA in the complex, and the assay time postdelivery. Readministration of the complex at day 1 following the first dosing showed no significant effect on the retention and duration of gene expression. The study also showed that there was a clear trend of increasing size of the complexes as the amount of pDNA was increased, where the sizes of the D-SPM/pDNA complexes were within the nanometer range.

  13. A deadly organometallic luminescent probe: anticancer activity of a ReI bisquinoline complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanovic, Igor; Can, Suzan; Alborzinia, Hamed; Kitanovic, Ana; Pierroz, Vanessa; Leonidova, Anna; Pinto, Antonio; Spingler, Bernhard; Ferrari, Stefano; Molteni, Roberto; Steffen, Andreas; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Wölfl, Stefan; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-02-24

    The photophysical properties of [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br (L-N3 =2-azido-N,N-bis[(quinolin-2-yl)methyl]ethanamine), which could not be localized in cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy, have been revisited in order to evaluate its use as a luminescent probe in a biological environment. The Re(I) complex displays concentration-dependent residual fluorescence besides the expected phosphorescence, and the nature of the emitting excited states have been evaluated by DFT and time-dependent (TD) DFT methods. The results show that fluorescence occurs from a (1) LC/MLCT state, whereas phosphorescence mainly stems from a (3) LC state, in contrast to previous assignments. We found that our luminescent probe, [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br, exhibits an interesting cytotoxic activity in the low micromolar range in various cancer cell lines. Several biochemical assays were performed to unveil the cytotoxic mechanism of the organometallic Re(I) bisquinoline complex. [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br was found to be stable in human plasma indicating that [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br itself and not a decomposition product is responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Addition of [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br to MCF-7 breast cancer cells grown on a biosensor chip micro-bioreactor immediately led to reduced cellular respiration and increased glycolysis, indicating a large shift in cellular metabolism and inhibition of mitochondrial activity. Further analysis of respiration of isolated mitochondria clearly showed that mitochondrial respiratory activity was a direct target of [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br and involved two modes of action, namely increased respiration at lower concentrations, potentially through increased proton transport through the inner mitochondrial membrane, and efficient blocking of respiration at higher concentrations. Thus, we believe that the direct targeting of mitochondria in cells by [Re(CO)3 (L-N3)]Br is responsible for the anticancer activity.

  14. The NF90/NF45 complex participates in DNA break repair via nonhomologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Hoque, Mainul; Lewis-Antes, Anita; Azzam, Edouard I; Lagunoff, David; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear factor 90 (NF90), an RNA-binding protein implicated in the regulation of gene expression, exists as a heterodimeric complex with NF45. We previously reported that depletion of the NF90/NF45 complex results in a multinucleated phenotype. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that binucleated cells arise by incomplete abscission of progeny cells followed by fusion. Multinucleate cells arose through aberrant division of binucleated cells and displayed abnormal metaphase plates and anaphase chromatin bridges suggestive of DNA repair defects. NF90 and NF45 are known to interact with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), which is involved in telomere maintenance and DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We hypothesized that NF90 modulates the activity of DNA-PK. In an in vitro NHEJ assay system, DNA end joining was reduced by NF90/NF45 immunodepletion or by RNA digestion to an extent similar to that for catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs immunodepletion. In vivo, NF90/NF45-depleted cells displayed increased γ-histone 2A.X foci, indicative of an accumulation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation consistent with decreased DSB repair. Further, NF90/NF45 knockdown reduced end-joining activity in vivo. These results identify the NF90/NF45 complex as a regulator of DNA damage repair mediated by DNA-PK and suggest that structured RNA may modulate this process.

  15. Interaction of Bis-Zn(II) salphen complex with calf thymus-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yussof, Aida Mastura Binti Mohd; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2014-09-01

    Metal salphen family has been extensively studied over the past few years and has been reported to be good DNA stabilizers due to its high binding affinity. Binding studies of metal complex with DNA are useful for understanding the interaction mechanism and to provide an insight about the application and design of a novel effective drug target to DNA. In this study, a bis-zinc (II) salphen metal complex derived from 4-methyl-2,6-diformylphenol and 1,2-diaminobenzene (H2L) via condensation reactions has been synthesised. The zinc(II) macrocyclic complex is characterised using standard spectroscopic and structural techniques such as 1H NMR spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The binding interaction between the synthesised metal complex with calf thymus-DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by preliminary UV/Vis DNA study. From the preliminary UV/Vis DNA study, it shows that Bis-Zn(II) salphen complex has interaction with ct-DNA.

  16. Effective DNA binding and cleaving tendencies of malonic acid coupled transition metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Utthra, Ponnukalai Ponya; Kumaravel, Ganesan; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-11-01

    Eight transition metal complexes were designed to achieve maximum biological efficacy. They were characterized by elemental analysis and various other spectroscopic techniques. The monomeric complexes were found to espouse octahedral geometry and non-electrolytic nature. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, cyclic voltammetry, and viscometric techniques revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, the complexes were found to exhibit greater binding strength than that of the free ligands. A strong hypochromism and a slight red shift were exhibited by complex 5 among the other complexes. The intrinsic binding constant values of all the complexes compared to cisplatin reveal that they are excellent metallonucleases than that of cisplatin. The complexes were also shown to reveal displacement of the ethidium bromide, a strong intercalator using fluorescence titrations. Gel electrophoresis was used to divulge the competence of the complexes in cleaving the supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA. From the results, it is concluded that the complexes, especially 5, are excellent chemical nucleases in the presence of H2O2. Furthermore, the in vitro antimicrobial screening of the complexes exposes that these complexes are excellent antimicrobial agents. Overall the effect of coligands is evident from the results of all the investigations.

  17. Probing the Conformational Landscape of DNA Polymerases Using Diffusion-Based Single-Molecule FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohlbein, J.; Kapanidis, A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring conformational changes in DNA polymerases using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) has provided new tools for studying fidelity-related mechanisms that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before DNA synthesis. In addition to the previously known open

  18. Influence of salt bridge interactions on the gas-phase stability of DNA/peptide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sandra; Woods, Amina; Delvolvé, Alice; Tabet, Jean Claude

    2008-12-01

    Negative ion mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to study DNA duplexes-peptide interaction. In the present study, we show that peptides that contain two adjacent basic residues interact noncovalently with DNA single strand or duplex. Fragmentation of the complexes between peptides containing basic residues and DNA were studied under collisions and showed unexpected dissociation pathways, as previously reported for peptide-peptide interactions. The binary complexes are dissociated either along fragmentation of the covalent bonds of the peptide backbone and/or along the single DNA strand backbone cleavage without disruption of noncovalent interaction, which demonstrates the strong binding of peptide to the DNA strand. Sequential MS/MS and MSn were further performed on ternary complexes formed between duplexes and peptides to investigate the nature of interaction. The CID spectra showed as major pathway the disruption of the noncovalent interactions and the formation of binary complexes and single-strand ions, directed by the nucleic acid gas-phase acidity. Indeed, a preferential formation of complexes with thymidine containing single strands is observed. An alternative pathway is also detected, in which complexes are dissociated along the covalent bond of the peptide and/or DNA according to the basicity. Our experimental data suggest the presence of strong salt bridge interactions between DNA and peptides containing basic residues.

  19. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Żurek-Biesiada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015 [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  20. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Best, Gerrit; Mohana, Giriram K; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Roignant, Jean-Yves; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  1. Mass spectrometric proteomics reveals that nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhifeng; Luo, Qun; Yang, Liping; Bing, Tao; Li, Xianchan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Kui; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Fuyi

    2014-02-26

    An MS-based proteomic strategy combined with chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles as affinity probes was developed and validated by successful identification and quantification of HMGB1, which is well characterized to interact selectively with 1,2-cross-linked DNA by cisplatin, from whole cell lysates. The subsequent application of this method to identify proteins responding to 1,3-cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex, trans-PtTz (Tz = thiazole), revealed that the human nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to the damaged DNA, implying that PC4 may play a role in cellular response to DNA damage by trans-PtTz.

  2. Spectroscopic probe of the competitive binding of ethidium bromide and neomycin to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Medini Kanta; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    1995-03-01

    The three spectroscopic changes of ethidium bromide (EB) on its binding to DNA, namely red-shift of the νmax, enhancement of fluorescence and induced dichroism are utilized to study the competitive binding of neomycin (NMC) and EB to DNA. Reversion of νmax, decrease in fluorescence and reduction of dichroism of DNA-EB on addition of NMC shows that the binding of NMC and EB to DNA is competitive in nature, over a limited concentration of the polymer. The binding constant of EB-DNA falls from 4.00 × 10 6 to 2.27 × 10 4 1 mol -1 in the presence of added NMC.

  3. LZ Complexity Distance of DNA Sequences and Its Application in Phylogenetic Tree Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Li; Yi-Bing Li; Hong-Bo He

    2005-01-01

    DNA sequences can be treated as finite-length symbol strings over a four-letter alphabet (A, C, T, G). As a universal and computable complexity measure, LZ complexity is valid to describe the complexity of DNA sequences. In this study, a concept of conditional LZ complexity between two sequences is proposed according to the principle of LZ complexity measure. An LZ complexity distance metric between two nonnull sequences is defined by utilizing conditional LZ complexity.Based on LZ complexity distance, a phylogenetic tree of 26 species of placental mammals (Eutheria) with three outgroup species was reconstructed from their complete mitochondrial genomes. On the debate that which two of the three main groups of placental mammals, namely Primates, Ferungulates, and Rodents, are more closely related, the phylogenetic tree reconstructed based on LZ complexity distance supports the suggestion that Primates and Ferungulates are more closely related.

  4. Recombinational DNA repair is regulated by compartmentalization of DNA lesions at the nuclear pore complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Géli, Vincent; Lisby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    and colleagues shows that also physiological threats to genome integrity such as DNA secondary structure-forming triplet repeat sequences relocalize to the NPC during DNA replication. Mutants that fail to reposition the triplet repeat locus to the NPC cause repeat instability. Here, we review the types of DNA...... lesions that relocalize to the NPC, the putative mechanisms of relocalization, and the types of recombinational repair that are stimulated by the NPC, and present a model for NPC-facilitated repair....

  5. Study on the Binding Mode of a Co(Ⅱ) Complex with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qing-Hua; YANG Pin

    2005-01-01

    The mode of binding of CoLCl2, here L=bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine, with calf thymus DNA has been investigated by fluorescence measurements, equilibrium dialysis, viscosity experiments and gel electrophoresis. The complex was found to bind but weakly to DNA, with binding constant of 1.96× 104 L/mol determind at 20 ℃ in a solution containing 5 mmol/L Tris-HCl (pH 7.1) and 50 mmol/L NaCl. Polyelectrolyte theory was applied to analyse these values. Viscosity experiments show that binding did not alter the relative viscosity of DNA with any complexes to an appreciable extent. Electrophoresis test displayed that the compound could not cleave the DNA.These results show that the complex is essentially electrostatically bound to DNA.

  6. DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, apoptosis and photocleavage studies of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Deepika; C Shobha Devi; Y Praveen Kumar; K Laxma Reddy; P Venkat Reddy; D Anil Kumar; Surya S Singh; S Satyanarayana

    2016-07-01

    Two Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2bppp](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(phen)27-Br-dppz](ClO4)2 (2) [phen=1,10 phenanthroline, 7-Br-dppz=7-fluorodipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, bppp=11-bromo-pyrido[2',3':5,6]pyrazino[2,3-f] [1,10]phenanthroline] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ES-MS, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and IR. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes examined against a panel of cancer cell lines (HeLa, Du145 and A549) by MTT method, both complexes show prominent anticancer activity against various cancer cells. Live cell imaging study and flow cytometric analysis demonstrate that both the complexes 1 and 2 could cross the cell membrane accumulating in the nucleus. Further, flow cytometry experiments showed that the cytotoxic Ru(II) complexes 1 and 2 induced apoptosis of HeLa tumor cell lines. Photo induced DNA cleavage studies have been performed and results indicate that both the complexes efficiently photo cleave pBR322 DNA. The binding properties of two complexes toward CT-DNA were investigated by various optical methods and viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggested that both Ru(II) complexes can intercalate into DNA base pairs. The complexes were docked into DNA-base pairs using the GOLD docking program.

  7. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  8. Mechanistic Studies with DNA Polymerases Reveal Complex Outcomes following Bypass of DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Eoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a chemically reactive molecule that is subject to many different covalent modifications from sources that are both endogenous and exogenous in origin. The inherent instability of DNA is a major obstacle to genomic maintenance and contributes in varying degrees to cellular dysfunction and disease in multi-cellular organisms. Investigations into the chemical and biological aspects of DNA damage have identified multi-tiered and overlapping cellular systems that have evolved as a means of stabilizing the genome. One of these pathways supports DNA replication events by in a sense adopting the mantra that one must “make the best of a bad situation” and tolerating covalent modification to DNA through less accurate copying of the damaged region. Part of this so-called DNA damage tolerance pathway involves the recruitment of specialized DNA polymerases to sites of stalled or collapsed replication forks. These enzymes have unique structural and functional attributes that often allow bypass of adducted template DNA and successful completion of genomic replication. What follows is a selective description of the salient structural features and bypass properties of specialized DNA polymerases with an emphasis on Y-family members.

  9. RAD50 and NBS1 form a stable complex functional in DNA binding and tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eddy; Sanchez, Humberto; Kinoshita, Eri; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2009-04-01

    The RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 protein complex (RMN) plays an essential role during the early steps of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. Previous data suggest that one important role for RMN in DSB repair is to provide a link between DNA ends. The striking architecture of the complex, a globular domain from which two extended coiled coils protrude, is essential for this function. Due to its DNA-binding activity, ability to form dimers and interact with both RAD50 and NBS1, MRE11 is considered to be crucial for formation and function of RMN. Here, we show the successful expression and purification of a stable complex containing only RAD50 and NBS1 (RN). The characteristic architecture of the complex was not affected by absence of MRE11. Although MRE11 is a DNA-binding protein it was not required for DNA binding per se or DNA-tethering activity of the complex. The stoichiometry of NBS1 in RMN and RN complexes was estimated by SFM-based volume analysis. These data show that in vitro, R, M and N form a variety of stable complexes with variable subunit composition and stoichiometry, which may be physiologically relevant in different aspects of RMN function.

  10. Photoluminescence Probing of Complex H2O Adsorption on InGaN/GaN Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Konrad; Helwig, Andreas; Müller, Gerhard; Hille, Pascal; Teubert, Jörg; Eickhoff, Martin

    2017-02-08

    We demonstrate that the complex adsorption behavior of H2O on InGaN/GaN nanowire arrays is directly revealed by their ambient-dependent photoluminescence properties. Under low-humidity, ambient-temperature, and low-excitation-light conditions, H2O adsorbates cause a quenching of the photoluminescence. In contrast, for high humidity levels, elevated temperature, and high excitation intensity, H2O adsorbates act as efficient photoluminescence enhancers. We show that this behavior, which can only be detected due to the low operation temperature of the InGaN/GaN nanowires, can be explained on the basis of single H2O adsorbates forming surface recombination centers and multiple H2O adsorbates forming surface passivation layers. Reversible creation of such passivation layers is induced by the photoelectrochemical splitting of adsorbed water molecules and by the interaction of reactive H3O(+) and OH(-) ions with photoactivated InGaN surfaces. Due to electronic coupling of adsorbing molecules with photoactivated surfaces, InGaN/GaN nanowires act as sensitive nanooptical probes for the analysis of photoelectrochemical surface processes.

  11. Study on Cyclometalated Palladium-azo Complexes as Colorimetric Probes for Hazardous Gas in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU,Chun-Wei; LI,Shun-Hua; ZHENG,Hong; XU,Jin-Gou

    2007-01-01

    A synthesized cyclometalated palladium-azo complex was explored as a multifunctional probe for visual detection of SO2, H2S and NH3 in water. In acidic aqueous environment, the sensing solution underwent a sharp color change from poor violet to deep blue when titrated with Na2SO3 standard solution. But the color changed from poor violet to bright yellow when titrated with Na2S standard solution. In basic environment, the sensing solution rapidly changed to magenta when titrated by NH4Cl-NH3 standard buffer solution at high concentration. However, the color of sensing solution changed to blue when titrated by NH4Cl-NH3 standard buffer solution at low concentration although the pH was kept constant during the titration. Different species of these hazardous gases at environmentally relevant concentration levels were differentiated by independent optical signal outputs, and the interference from other inorganic ions commonly existing in water was very small.

  12. Particles as probes for complex plasmas in front of biased surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Basner, R; Loffhagen, D; Schubert, G; Fehske, H; Kersten, H

    2008-01-01

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purposes. Local electric fields can be determined from the behaviour of particles in the plasma, e.g. particles may serve as electrostatic probes. Since in many cases of applications in plasma technology it is of great interest to describe the electric field conditions in front of floating or biased surfaces, the confinement and behaviour of test particles is studied in front of floating walls inserted into a plasma as well as in front of additionally biased surfaces. For the latter case, the behaviour of particles in front of an adaptive electrode, which allows for an efficient confinement and manipulation of the grains, has been experimentally studied in dependence on the discharge parameters and on different bias conditions of the electrode. The effect of the partially biased surface (dc, rf) on the charged micro-particles has been inves...

  13. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  14. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Maribel [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Centro de Quimica; Betancourt, Adelmo [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela). Facultad Experimental de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica; Hernandez, Clara [Universidad de Carabobo Sede Aragua, Maracay (Venezuela). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Marchan, Edgar [Universidad de Oriente, Cumana (Venezuela). Inst. de Investigaciones en Biomedicina y Ciencias Aplicadas. Nucleo de Sucre

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl{sub 2}(phen)] and [PdCl{sub 2}(phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 {mu}mol L{sup -1} in 48 h. (author)

  15. Stacking interaction in metal complexes with compositions of DNA and heteroaromatic N-bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The current development in the intramolecular aromatic-ring stacking i nteractions in the complexes with compositions of DNA and heteroaromatic N-bases has been reviewed to a great extent, especially the significant contributions i n several important systems about ternary mixed-ligand complexes, including nucl eotide-metal ion-po- lyaromatic amine, amino acid-metal ion-polyaromatic amine, nucleotide-metal ion-pyridine-like aromatic amine, nucleotide-metal ion-amino ac id, nucleotide-metal ion-nucleic acid base, nucleic acid base-metal ion, and the important factors affecting the intramolecular aromatic-ring stacking interacti ons in the complexes. Based on the study of stacking interaction in the complexe s, the mechanism of interaction between DNA molecules and complexes of heteroaro matic N-bases has been established, which is crucial for the design and synthesi s of the complexes acting as molecular devices of DNA.

  16. Probabilistic expert systems for handling artifacts in complex DNA mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, R G; Lauritzen, S L; Mortera, J

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a coherent probabilistic framework for taking account of allelic dropout, stutter bands and silent alleles when interpreting STR DNA profiles from a mixture sample using peak size information arising from a PCR analysis. This information can be exploited for evaluating the evidential strength for a hypothesis that DNA from a particular person is present in the mixture. It extends an earlier Bayesian network approach that ignored such artifacts. We illustrate the use of the extended network on a published casework example.

  17. Interaction of the Ku heterodimer with the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex and its regulation by DNA-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Silvia; Woodbine, Lisa; Andreoli, Lucia; Jeggo, Penny A; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major mechanism for repairing DNA double-stranded (ds) breaks in mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the interaction between two key components of the NHEJ machinery, the Ku heterodimer and the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Our results demonstrate that Ku interacts with DNA ligase IV via its tandem BRCT domain and that this interaction is enhanced in the presence of Xrcc4 and dsDNA. Moreover, residues 644-748 of DNA ligase IV encompassing the first BRCT motif are necessary for binding. We show that Ku needs to be in its heterodimeric form to bind DNA ligase IV and that the C-terminal tail of Ku80, which mediates binding to DNA-PKcs, is dispensable for DNA ligase IV recognition. Although the interaction between Ku and DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 occurs in the absence of DNA-PKcs, the presence of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK kinase enhances complex formation. Previous studies have shown that DNA-PK kinase activity causes disassembly of DNA-PKcs from Ku at the DNA end. Here, we show that DNA-PK kinase activity also results in disassembly of the Ku/DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Collectively, our findings provide novel information on the protein-protein interactions that regulate NHEJ in cells.

  18. Mechanism of intramolecular charge transfer in DNA helix as probed by the use of the fluorescent 2-aminopurine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Huijuan; WANG Peng; WANG Xuefei; FENG Juan; XU Sichuan; AI Xicheng; ZHANG Xingkang; ZHANG Jianping

    2004-01-01

    As a structural analogue of adenine, 2-aminopurine (2Ap) is often used as a fluorescent probe to study the intramolecular charge transfer reaction in DNA. We have designed and synthesized a series of model DNA helix with the variation in the distance between the 2Ap probe and the GGG sequence, and have investigated, by means of picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, the effect of the length of the bridge (consisting of a number of transfer dynamics. The fluorescence dynamics of 2Ap exhibited three exponential decay components, the one with a time constant of a few hundred picoseconds is assigned to the intramolecular charge transfer from GGG to 2Ap. Within 2.4 nm of the donor-acceptor separation,the rate of charge transfer decreased exponentially upon increasing the separation, from which the decay factor ,β is determined to be 1.3 nm-1. Beyond 2.4 nm, however, the rate started to increase, this abnormal behavior of charge transfer is interpreted in terms of the match of electronic energies between the I-bridge and the donor/acceptor couple.

  19. DNA flexibility on short length scales probed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Alexey K; Maaloum, Mounir

    2014-02-14

    Unusually high bending flexibility has been recently reported for DNA on short length scales. We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) in solution to obtain a direct estimate of DNA bending statistics for scales down to one helical turn. It appears that DNA behaves as a Gaussian chain and is well described by the wormlike chain model at length scales beyond 3 helical turns (10.5 nm). Below this threshold, the AFM data exhibit growing noise because of experimental limitations. This noise may hide small deviations from the Gaussian behavior, but they can hardly be significant.

  20. Electrochemical DNA Biosensor Based on a Tetrahedral Nanostructure Probe for the Detection of Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shibiao; Zhao, Rongtao; Zhu, Jiangong; Lu, Xiao; Li, Yang; Qiu, Shaofu; Jia, Leili; Jiao, Xiong; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Hao, RongZhang; Song, HongBin

    2015-04-29

    A DNA tetrahedral nanostructure-based electrochemical biosensor was developed to detect avian influenza A (H7N9) virus through recognizing a fragment of the hemagglutinin gene sequence. The DNA tetrahedral probe was immobilized onto a gold electrode surface based on self-assembly between three thiolated nucleotide sequences and a longer nucleotide sequence containing complementary DNA to hybridize with the target single-stranded (ss)DNA. The captured target sequence was hybridized with a biotinylated-ssDNA oligonucleotide as a detection probe, and then avidin-horseradish peroxidase was introduced to produce an amperometric signal through the interaction with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine substrate. The target ssDNA was obtained by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the cDNA template, reversely transcribed from the viral lysate of influenza A (H7N9) virus in throat swabs. The results showed that this electrochemical biosensor could specifically recognize the target DNA fragment of influenza A (H7N9) virus from other types of influenza viruses, such as influenza A (H1N1) and (H3N2) viruses, and even from single-base mismatches of oligonucleotides. Its detection limit could reach a magnitude of 100 fM for target nucleotide sequences. Moreover, the cycle number of the asymmetric PCR could be reduced below three with the electrochemical biosensor still distinguishing the target sequence from the negative control. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the detection of target DNA from clinical samples using a tetrahedral DNA probe functionalized electrochemical biosensor. It displays that the DNA tetrahedra has a great potential application as a probe of the electrochemical biosensor to detect avian influenza A (H7N9) virus and other pathogens at the gene level, which will potentially aid the prevention and control of the disease caused by such pathogens.

  1. DNA interactions of cobalt(III) mixed-polypyridyl complexes containing asymmetric ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Li; Chao, Hui; Li, Hong; Hong, Xian-Lan; Liu, Yun-Jun; Tan, Li-Feng; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2004-06-01

    Three novel asymmetric ligands, 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-5,6-diphenyl-as-triazine (pdtb), 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]acenaphthylene (pdta) and 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]phenanthroline (pdtp) and their cobalt(III) complexes have been synthesized and characterized. Binding of the three complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by spectroscopic methods, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry, and electrophoresis measurements. The experimental results indicate that the size and shape of the intercalated ligand have a marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes to CT-DNA. Complexes 2 and 3 have also been found to promote cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA from the supercoiled form I to the open circular form II upon irradiation.

  2. Studies on the Interaction of Dinitratobis(phen) Cadmium Complex with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN,Cai-Xia; WU,Yan-Bo; WEI,Yi-Bin; YANG,Pin; ZHU,Miao-Li

    2007-01-01

    DNA-binding properties of the dinitratobis(phen) cadmium complex [Cd(phen)2(NO3)2] (where phen =1,10-phenanthroline) have been investigated with absorption titration, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, molecular modeling and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results indictate DNA-binding mode of the complex to be weak groove binding rather than partial intercalative interaction expected of the extended planar aromatic phen ring. In addition, the DNA cleavage study was carried out by gel electrophoresis experiment. The results showed that the complex both hardly cleaves pBR322 DNA in the absence and present ascorbate. So it is suggested that the formation of cadmium complex can decrease cadmium toxicity to some extents.

  3. RAD50 and NBS1 form a stable complex functional in DNA binding and tethering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Linden (Eddy); H. Sanchez (Humberto); E. Kinoshita (Eri); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 protein complex (RMN) plays an essential role during the early steps of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. Previous data suggest that one important role for RMN in DSB repair is to provide a link between DNA ends. The striking architect

  4. DNA-surfactant complexes : preparation, self-assembly properties and applications in synthesis and bioelectronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The powerful ionic self-assembly behavior of DNA-surfactant complexes make it a unique material for various applications from optoelectronics to biomedicine. Three types of DNA-surfactant assemblies, including bulk films, lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) and hydrogels have been investigated extensive

  5. The structure of a DnaA/HobA complex from Helicobacter pylori provides insight into regulation of DNA replication in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Natrajan, Ganesh; Noirot-Gros, Marie Francoise; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Kapp, Ulrike; Terradot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA replication requires DnaA, an AAA+ ATPase that initiates replication at a specific chromosome region, oriC, and is regulated by species-specific regulators that directly bind DnaA. HobA is a DnaA binding protein, recently identified as an essential regulator of DNA replication in Helicobacter pylori. We report the crystal structure of HobA in complex with domains I and II of DnaA (DnaAI–II) from H. pylori, the first structure of DnaA bound to one of its regulators. Biochemical c...

  6. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-07-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains.

  7. A complexity measure for symbolic sequences and applications to DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Majtey, A P; Lamberti, P W; Majtey, Ana P.; Roman-Roldan, Ramon; Lamberti, Pedro W.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a complexity measure for symbolic sequences. Starting from a segmentation procedure of the sequence, we define its complexity as the entropy of the distribution of lengths of the domains of relatively uniform composition in which the sequence is decomposed. We show that this quantity verifies the properties usually required for a ``good'' complexity measure. In particular it satisfies the one hump property, is super-additive and has the important property of being dependent of the level of detail in which the sequence is analyzed. Finally we apply it to the evaluation of the complexity profile of some genetic sequences.

  8. Role of the external NH2 linker on the conformation of surface immobilized single strand DNA probes and their SERS detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lijie; Langlet, Michel; Stambouli, Valerie

    2017-03-01

    The conformation and topological properties of DNA single strand probe molecules attached on solid surfaces are important, notably for the performances of devices such as biosensors. Commonly, the DNA probes are tethered to the surface using external linkers such as NH2. In this study, the role and influence of this amino-linker on the immobilization way and conformation of DNA probes on Ag nanoparticle surface is emphasized using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). We compare the SERS spectra and their reproducibility in the case of two groups of DNA polybase probes which are polyA, polyC, polyT, and polyG. In the first group, the polybases exhibit an external NH2 functional linker while in the second group the polybases are NH2-free. The results show that the reproducibility of SERS spectra is enhanced in the case of the first group. It leads us to propose two models of polybase conformation on Ag surface according to the presence or the absence of the external NH2 linker. In the presence of the NH2 external linker, the latter would act as a major anchoring point. As a result, the polybases are much ordered with a less random orientation than in the case of NH2-free polybases. Consequently, in view of further in situ hybridization for biosensing applications, it is strongly recommended to use NH2 linker functionalized DNA probes.

  9. Methods for the identification of mutations in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene using DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.L.C.; Dilella, A.G.

    1990-10-23

    This patent describes a method of detecting a mutation in a phenylalanine hydroxylase gene of human genomic DNA. Also described is an automated method of detecting PKU affected, PKU helerozgotes and normals in fetal to adult human samples.

  10. Probing the Absorption and Emission Transition Dipole Moment of DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooley, Emma Nicole; Carro Temboury, Miguel R.; Vosch, Tom André Jos

    2017-01-01

    Using single molecule polarization measurements, we investigate the excitation and emission polarization characteristics of DNA stabilized silver nanoclusters (C24-AgNCs). Although small changes in the polarization generally accompany changes to the emission spectrum, the emission and excitation ...

  11. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xurui Zhang

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  12. DNA as a Model for Probing Polymer Entanglements: Circular Polymers and Non-Classical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Regan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded DNA offers a robust platform for investigating fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of entangled polymer solutions. The exceptional monodispersity and multiple naturally occurring topologies of DNA, as well as a wide range of tunable lengths and concentrations that encompass the entanglement regime, enable direct testing of molecular-level entanglement theories and corresponding scaling laws. DNA is also amenable to a wide range of techniques from passive to nonlinear measurements and from single-molecule to bulk macroscopic experiments. Over the past two decades, researchers have developed methods to directly visualize and manipulate single entangled DNA molecules in steady-state and stressed conditions using fluorescence microscopy, particle tracking and optical tweezers. Developments in microfluidics, microrheology and bulk rheology have also enabled characterization of the viscoelastic response of entangled DNA from molecular levels to macroscopic scales and over timescales that span from linear to nonlinear regimes. Experiments using DNA have uniquely elucidated the debated entanglement properties of circular polymers and blends of linear and circular polymers. Experiments have also revealed important lengthscale and timescale dependent entanglement dynamics not predicted by classical tube models, both validating and refuting new proposed extensions and alternatives to tube theory and motivating further theoretical work to describe the rich dynamics exhibited in entangled polymer systems.

  13. DNA mechanics as a tool to probe helicase and translocase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionnet, Timothée; Dawid, Alexandre; Bigot, Sarah; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A; Heslot, François; Allemand, Jean-François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Helicases and translocases are proteins that use the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move along or pump nucleic acid substrates. Single molecule manipulation has proved to be a powerful tool to investigate the mechanochemistry of these motors. Here we first describe the basic mechanical properties of DNA unraveled by single molecule manipulation techniques. Then we demonstrate how the knowledge of these properties has been used to design single molecule assays to address the enzymatic mechanisms of different translocases. We report on four single molecule manipulation systems addressing the mechanism of different helicases using specifically designed DNA substrates: UvrD enzyme activity detection on a stretched nicked DNA molecule, HCV NS3 helicase unwinding of a RNA hairpin under tension, the observation of RecBCD helicase/nuclease forward and backward motion, and T7 gp4 helicase mediated opening of a synthetic DNA replication fork. We then discuss experiments on two dsDNA translocases: the RuvAB motor studied on its natural substrate, the Holliday junction, and the chromosome-segregation motor FtsK, showing its unusual coupling to DNA supercoiling.

  14. DNA Interaction Studies of a New Platinum(II) Complex Containing Different Aromatic Dinitrogen Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mohammadi, Somaye; Alizadeh, Robabeh

    2011-01-01

    A new mononuclear Pt(II) complex, [Pt(DMP)(DIP)]Cl(2).H(2)O, in which DMP is 4,4-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridine and DIP is 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantroline, has been synthesized and characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism, viscosimetry and cyclic voltametry (CV). UV-VIS spectrum showed 4 nm bathochromic shift of the absorption band at 280 nm along with significant hypochromicity for the absorption band of the complex. The intrnisic binding constant (K(b) = 2 × 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with intercalators and suggests this binding mode. The viscosity measurements showed that the complex-DNA interaction can be hydrophobic and confirm intercalation. Moreover, the complex induced detectable changes in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA. The fluorescence studies revealed that the probable quenching mechanism of fluorescence of the complex by CT-DNA is static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH > 0 and ΔS > 0) showed that main interaction with hydrogenic forces occurred that is intercalation mode. Also, CV results confirm this mode because, with increasing the CT-DNA concentration, shift to higher potential was observed.

  15. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and cleavage activity of a new copper(Ⅱ) complex of bispyridylpyrrolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Rui; HU Xiao-hui; YI Xiao-yi; ZHANG Shou-chun

    2015-01-01

    A copper-bispyridylpyrrolide complex [Cu(PDPH)Cl] (PDPH = 2,5-bis(2′-pyridyl)pyrrole) was synthesized and characterized. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space groupPccn,a = 0.9016(3) nm,b = 1.0931(4) nm,c = 2.5319(8) nm, andV = 2.4951(15) nm3. The copper center is situated in a square planar geometry. The interaction of the copper(Ⅱ) complexwith calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by electronic absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectra. It is proposed that the complex binds to CT-DNA through groove binding mode. Nuclease activity of the