WorldWideScience

Sample records for complex class i-related

  1. The Effect of Photodynamic Therapy on Tumor Cell Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class I-Related Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Riddell, Jonah; Bangia, Naveen; Gollnick, Sandra O.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is FDA-approved anti-cancer modality for elimination of early disease and palliation in advanced disease. PDT efficacy depends in part on elicitation of a tumor-specific immune response that is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. The cytolytic potential of CTLs and NK cells is mediated by the ability of these cells to recognize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class I-related molecules. The MHC class I-related molecules MICA and MICB are induced by oxidative stress and have been reported to activate NK cells and co-stimulate CD8+ T cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of PDT on tumor cell expression of MHC classes I and II-related molecules in vivo and in vitro. Study Design/Materials and Methods Human colon carcinoma Colo205 cells and murine CT26 tumors were treated with 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophor-bide-a (HPPH)-PDT at various doses. MHC classes I and I-related molecule expression following treatment of Colo205 cells was temporally examined by flow cytometry using antibodies specific for components of MHC class I molecules and by quantitative PCR using specific primers. Expression of MHC class I-related molecules following HPPH-based PDT (HPPH-PDT) of murine tumors was monitored using a chimeric NKG2D receptor. Results In vitro HPPH-PDT significantly induces MICA in Colo205 cells, but had no effect on MHC class I molecule expression. PDT also induced expression of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL) following in vivo HPPH-PDT of a murine tumor. Induction of MICA corresponded to increased NK killing of PDT-treated tumor cells. Conclusions PDT induction of MICA on human tumor cells and increased expression of NKG2DL by murine tumors following PDT may play a role in PDT induction of anti-tumor immunity. This conclusion is supported by our results demonstrating that tumor cells have increased sensitivity to NK cell lysis following

  2. Membrane-bound versus soluble major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A and major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain B differential expression: Mechanisms of tumor eradication versus evasion and current drug development strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A/chain B (MICA/MICB is stress-inducible, highly polymorphic ligands whose expression at the transcript level has been detected in all tissues except the central nervous system. However, their restricted protein expression is due to their regulation at the posttranslational level. Its levels are elevated in virally infected and neoplastically transformed cells. Membrane expression of this NKG2DL marks the aberrant cells for elimination by those immune effector cells that express the cognate NKG2D receptor. Among the evasion strategies developed by tumors, the metalloprotease-dependent shedding of MICA/MICB from tumors (either the free or the exosome form can contribute to the inhibition of cytolysis by the immune effector cells (all NK cells, most NKT cells; γδ CD8+ T cells and αβ CD8+ T cells, as well as some αβ CD4+ T cells. There are micro-RNA clusters that regulate surface expression and shedding. Polymorphic variants can be used as susceptibility/associative markers and can also possibly be used to correlate with tumor survival as well as staging/grading of tumors. Variations in the expression level require quantification of this marker for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Mechanism-based studies would provide a better tumor-specific understanding of their relative roles in the processes of tumor cell elimination versus growth and progression. Last but not least, conventional, interlaboratory validated assays (for, e.g., antibody-based methods should be replaced by robust, reproducible, feasible biophysics-based methods using tumor biopsies. Further, correlative DNA polymorphism-based studies can be done using biological fluids (for, e.g., human saliva that can be sampled by minimally invasive means.

  3. Membrane-bound versus soluble major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A and major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain B differential expression: Mechanisms of tumor eradication versus evasion and current drug development strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, P K

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex Class I-related chain A/chain B (MICA/MICB) is stress-inducible, highly polymorphic ligands whose expression at the transcript level has been detected in all tissues except the central nervous system. However, their restricted protein expression is due to their regulation at the posttranslational level. Its levels are elevated in virally infected and neoplastically transformed cells. Membrane expression of this NKG2DL marks the aberrant cells for elimination by those immune effector cells that express the cognate NKG2D receptor. Among the evasion strategies developed by tumors, the metalloprotease-dependent shedding of MICA/MICB from tumors (either the free or the exosome form) can contribute to the inhibition of cytolysis by the immune effector cells (all NK cells, most NKT cells; γδ CD8+ T cells and αβ CD8+ T cells, as well as some αβ CD4+ T cells). There are micro-RNA clusters that regulate surface expression and shedding. Polymorphic variants can be used as susceptibility/associative markers and can also possibly be used to correlate with tumor survival as well as staging/grading of tumors. Variations in the expression level require quantification of this marker for diagnostic/prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Mechanism-based studies would provide a better tumor-specific understanding of their relative roles in the processes of tumor cell elimination versus growth and progression. Last but not least, conventional, interlaboratory validated assays (for, e.g., antibody-based methods) should be replaced by robust, reproducible, feasible biophysics-based methods using tumor biopsies. Further, correlative DNA polymorphism-based studies can be done using biological fluids (for, e.g., human saliva) that can be sampled by minimally invasive means.

  4. Elevation of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I related chain A protein in malignant and infectious diseases in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xiaoxin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevation of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (sMICA products in serum has been linked to tissue/organ transplantation, autoimmune diseases and some malignant disorders. Cells infected by microbiological pathogens may release sMICA, whereas less is known whether and to what extent serum sMICA levels may change in infectious diseases. Methods The present study determined serum sMICA levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in a southern China population, including patients (n = 1041 suffering from several types of malignant and infectious diseases and healthy controls (n = 141. Results Relative to controls, serum sMICA elevation was significant in patients of hepatic cancer, and was approaching statistical significance in patients with lung, gastric and nasopharyngeal cancers. sMICA elevation was also associated with some bacterial (Enterobacteriaceae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive cocci, viral (hepatitis B and C and the Microspironema pallidum infections. Conclusion Serum sMICA levels may be informative for the diagnosis of some malignant and infectious diseases. The results also indicate that microbiological infections should be considered as a potential confounding clinical condition causing serum sMICA elevation while using this test to evaluate the status of other disorders, such as cancers, host-graft response and autoimmune diseases.

  5. Full-length coding sequences of three major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A alleles, MICA*019, MICA*027 and MICA*045, identified by sequence-based typing in Chinese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y P; Gao, S Q; Tao, H

    2015-10-01

    Full-length coding sequences of three major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A alleles, MICA*019, MICA*027 and MICA*045. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Expression and clinical value of the soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A molecule in the serum of patients with renal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y-K; Jia, C-M; Yuan, G-J; Liu, W; Qiu, Y; Zhu, Q-G

    2015-06-29

    We investigated the expression and clinical value of the soluble major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (sMICA) molecule in the serum of patients with renal tumors. Sixty patients diagnosed with renal tumors were enrolled in the experimental group, whereas 20 healthy volunteers served as the control group. The sMICA levels were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the results were analyzed in combination with data from pathol-ogy examination. The experimental group had a statistically significant higher sMICA level (P < 0.05) than the control group. The sMICA level was higher in patients with malignant tumors than in those with be-nign tumors. We also observed a positive relationship among different tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) pathological stages with more advanced diseases exhibiting higher sMICA levels. As a tumor-associated antigen, MICA has a close relationship with renal tumorigenesis and immune es-cape. Our results indicated that sMICA levels were related to tumor pathol-ogy, TNM stage, and metastasis. Therefore, sMICA might be a potential marker for tumor characteristics, prognosis, and recurrence prediction.

  7. Clinical significance of SNP (rs2596542 in histocompatibility complex class I-related gene A promoter region among hepatitis C virus related hepatocellular carcinoma cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal A. Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I-related gene A (MICA is an antigen induced by stress and performs an integral role in immune responses as an anti-infectious and antitumor agent. This work was designed to investigate whether (SNP rs2596542C/T in MICA promoter region is predictive of liver cirrhosis (LC and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC or not. Forty-seven healthy controls and 94 HCV-infected patients, subdivided into 47 LC and 47 HCC subjects were enrolled in this study. SNP association was studied using real time PCR and soluble serum MICA concentration was measured using ELISA. Results showed that heterozygous genotype rs2596542CT was significantly (P = 0.022 distributed between HCC and LC related CHC patients. The sMICA was significantly higher (P = 0.0001 among HCC and LC. No significant association (P = 0.56 between rs2596542CT genotypes and sMICA levels was observed. Studying SNP rs2596542C/T association with HCC and LC susceptibility revealed that statistical significant differences (P = 0.013, P = 0.027 were only observed between SNP rs2596542C/T and each of HCC and LC, respectively, versus healthy controls, indicating that the rs2596542C/T genetic variation is not a significant contributor to HCC development in LC patients. Moreover, the T allele was considered a risk factor for HCC and LC vulnerability in HCV patients (OR = 1.93 and 2.1, respectively, while the C allele contributes to decreasing HCC risk. Therefore, SNP (rs2596542C/T in MICA promoter region and sMICA levels might be potential useful markers in the assessment of liver disease progression to LC and HCC.

  8. Human leukocyte antigen and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A antibodies after kidney transplantation in Turkish renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhun, Y; Ozdilli, K; Oguz, F; Karahan, G; Onal, E; Turkmen, A; Eldegez, U; Nane, I; Çalişkan, Y; Bakkaloglu, H; Carin, M

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A (MICA) antibody (Ab) production during the first 6 months posttransplantation correlated with long-term graft survival and rejection rate. The study group included 147 first transplantations from either living related (LRDs) or deceased donors (DDs) who were divided into two subgroups: rejection (RG, n = 28) and nonrejection (NRG, n = 119). Serum samples (n = 441) collected from each patient on posttransplant days 30, 90, and 180 were tested for HLA and MICA Ab using the Luminex technique. Among 82 Ab-positive patients (55.8%), 40 had both HLA and MICA, 33 only HLA, and 9 only MICA Ab in the posttransplant period. The rates of HLA class I, class II, or both Ab positivities were greater in the RG than the NRG (P = .011, .037, and .0275, respectively). At 180 days posttransplant, 64.3% of patients in the RG had Ab and 41.2% in the NRG (P = .0349). The data for the LRD (n = 116) group were similar to those for the entire group; whereas there was no significant difference in Ab positivity between RG and NRG patients who received organs from DDs. There was no significant difference with respect to HLA class II and/or MICA Ab positivity between RG and NRG among patients who lacked HLA class I Ab. We confirmed that HLA and MICA Ab may be harmful posttransplant, promoting rejection processes and representing an important cause of graft failure. HLA class II and MICA Ab positivities were only important predictors of graft failure when present together with HLA class I positivity. Patients who developed HLA alone or both HLA and MICA Ab rejected their grafts more frequently than Ab-negative recipients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Augmented serum level of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) protein and reduced NKG2D expression on NK and T cells in patients with cervical cancer and precursor lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arreygue-Garcia, Naela A; Delgado-Rizo, Vidal; Garcia-Iglesias, Trinidad; Hernandez-Flores, Georgina; Toro-Arreola, Susana del; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Toro-Arreola, Alicia del; Cid-Arregui, Angel; Gonzalez-Ramella, Oscar; Jave-Suarez, Luis F; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Troyo-Sanroman, Rogelio; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. NK and cytotoxic T cells play an important role in the elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells through NKG2D activating receptors, which can promote the lysis of target cells by binding to the major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) proteins. Increased serum levels of MICA have been found in patients with epithelial tumors. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of soluble MICA (sMICA) and NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in blood samples from patients with cervical cancer or precursor lesions with those from healthy donors. Peripheral blood with or without heparin was collected to obtain mononuclear cells or sera, respectively. Serum sMICA levels were measured by ELISA and NKG2D-expressing immune cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Also, a correlation analysis was performed to associate sMICA levels with either NKG2D expression or with the stage of the lesion. Significant amounts of sMICA were detected in sera from nearly all patients. We found a decrease in the number of NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in both cervical cancer and lesion groups when compared to healthy donors. Pearson analysis showed a negative correlation between sMICA and NKG2D-expressing T cells; however, we did not find a significant correlation when the analysis was applied to sMICA and NKG2D expression on NK cells. Our results show for the first time that high sMICA levels are found in sera from patients with both cervical cancer and precursor lesions when compared with healthy donors. We also observed a diminution in the number of NKG2D-expressing NK and T cells in the patient samples; however, a significant negative correlation between sMICA and NKG2D expression was only seen in T cells

  10. MHC class I-related chain A and B ligands are differentially expressed in human cervical cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo-Cuellar Alejandro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural killer (NK cells are an important resource of the innate immune system directly involved in the spontaneous recognition and lysis of virus-infected and tumor cells. An exquisite balance of inhibitory and activating receptors tightly controls the NK cell activity. At present, one of the best-characterized activating receptors is NKG2D, which promotes the NK-mediated lysis of target cells by binding to a family of cell surface ligands encoded by the MHC class I chain-related (MIC genes, among others. The goal of this study was to describe the expression pattern of MICA and MICB at the molecular and cellular levels in human cervical cancer cell lines infected or not with human papillomavirus, as well as in a non-tumorigenic keratinocyte cell line. Results Here we show that MICA and MICB exhibit differential expression patterns among HPV-infected (SiHa and HeLa and non-infected cell lines (C33-A, a tumor cell line, and HaCaT, an immortalized keratinocyte cell line. Cell surface expression of MICA was higher than cell surface expression of MICB in the HPV-positive cell lines; in contrast, HPV-negative cells expressed lower levels of MICA. Interestingly, the MICA levels observed in C33-A cells were overcome by significantly higher MICB expression. Also, all cell lines released higher amounts of soluble MICB than of soluble MICA into the cell culture supernatant, although this was most pronounced in C33-A cells. Additionally, Real-Time PCR analysis demonstrated that MICA was strongly upregulated after genotoxic stress. Conclusions This study provides evidence that even when MICA and MICB share a high degree of homology at both genomic and protein levels, differential regulation of their expression and cell surface appearance might be occurring in cervical cancer-derived cells.

  11. Weak equivalence classes of complex vector bundles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van

    LXXVII, č. 1 (2008), s. 23-30 ISSN 0862-9544 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : chern classes * complex Grassmannians weak equivalence Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  12. The bovine class II major histocompatibility complex : serological definition and further characterization of class II haplotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis an analysis of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in cattle is reported, with emphasis on the development of class II serology. First, the production of class II alloantisera, and the serological definition of bovine MHC class II polymorphism is described.

  13. Classes of feedforward neural networks and their circuit complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shawe-Taylor, John S.; Anthony, Martin H.G.; Kern, Walter

    1992-01-01

    This paper aims to place neural networks in the context of boolean circuit complexity. We define appropriate classes of feedforward neural networks with specified fan-in, accuracy of computation and depth and using techniques of communication complexity proceed to show that the classes fit into a

  14. The Complexity of Identifying Large Equivalence Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven; Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    1999-01-01

    We prove that at least 3k−4/k(2k−3)(n/2) – O(k)equivalence tests and no more than 2/k (n/2) + O(n) equivalence tests are needed in the worst case to identify the equivalence classes with at least k members in set of n elements. The upper bound is an improvement by a factor 2 compared to known res...

  15. Cancer cells become susceptible to natural killer cell killing after exposure to histone deacetylase inhibitors due to glycogen synthase kinase-3-dependent expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Søren; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Andresen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    apoptosis or oxidative stress caused by HDAC inhibitor treatment did not affect MICA/B expression, suggesting involvement of a separate signal pathway not directly coupled to induction of cell death. HDAC inhibitor treatment induced glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity and down-regulation of GSK-3......We show that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors lead to functional expression of MHC class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) on cancer cells, making them potent targets for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing through a NK group 2, member D (NKG2D) restricted mechanism. Blocking either...

  16. Instruction sequence based non-uniform complexity classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to non-uniform complexity in which single-pass instruction sequences play a key part, and answer various questions that arise from this approach. We introduce several kinds of non-uniform complexity classes. One kind includes a counterpart of the well-known non-uniform

  17. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  18. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuduk Katarzyna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  19. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Katarzyna; Babik, Wiesław; Bojarska, Katarzyna; Sliwińska, Ewa B; Kindberg, Jonas; Taberlet, Pierre; Swenson, Jon E; Radwan, Jacek

    2012-10-02

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South-north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  20. Global synchronization of a class of delayed complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Yi Zhang; Zhang Lei

    2006-01-01

    Global synchronization of a class of complex networks with time-varying delays is investigated in this paper. Some sufficient conditions are derived. These conditions show that the synchronization of delayed complex networks can be determined by their topologies. In addition, these conditions are simply represented in terms of the networks coupling matrix and are easy to be checked. A typical example of complex networks with chaotic nodes is employed to illustrate the obtained global synchronization results

  1. Liquid class predictor for liquid handling of complex mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seglke, Brent W [San Ramon, CA; Lekin, Timothy P [Livermore, CA

    2008-12-09

    A method of establishing liquid classes of complex mixtures for liquid handling equipment. The mixtures are composed of components and the equipment has equipment parameters. The first step comprises preparing a response curve for the components. The next step comprises using the response curve to prepare a response indicator for the mixtures. The next step comprises deriving a model that relates the components and the mixtures to establish the liquid classes.

  2. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to cytotoxic T cells (CTL). To establish a selection system, and, thereby, enable a library approach to identify the specificities involved (that of the MHC-I for peptides...... and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  3. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell's own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors-tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II-contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity.

  4. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T.; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell’s own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors—tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II—contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity. PMID:28367149

  5. Geometric design method for occlusal outlines of complex class I and class II inlay cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Takada, Yukyo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a geometric design method for the occlusal outlines of complex inlay cavities as a continuation study of a previous design method for simple class I inlay cavity. A method for extending the occlusal outline to the buccal or lingual groove and to three preparation types of the proximal portions of class II inlay cavities -namely, straight line preparation, sweeping curve preparation, and reverse curve preparation- was investigated. To ensure the smoothness of the occlusal outline, a Bézier curve was introduced in the design. A minimal number of control points for the curve was applied to define each preparation type. The design method was experimentally applied to mandibular and maxillary first molars. Smooth outlines of the complex inlay cavities in the molars with tool accessibility throughout the cavities were achievable by using the present method.

  6. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynald eCossard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function.The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabitis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction, whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression.We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals and without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content.We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g. NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8 or GRIM-19 human orthologs in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm.All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression.

  8. Preformed purified peptide/major histocompatibility class I complexes are potent stimulators of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Ortiz-Navarrete, V

    1994-01-01

    A panel of antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted T cell hybridomas has been generated to examine the capacity of peptide/class I complexes to stimulate T cells at the molecular level. Peptide/class I complexes were generated in detergent solution, purified...... be detected by the T cells. Preformed complexes were about 500,000 times more potent than free peptide in terms of T cell stimulation, demonstrating the physiological relevancy of the biochemically generated complexes. Surprisingly, the majority (including the most sensitive of the hybridomas) had lost CD8...... and quantitated. Latex particles were subsequently coated with known amounts of preformed complexes and used to stimulate the T cell hybridomas. Stimulation was specific, i.e. only the appropriate peptide/class I combination were stimulatory, and quite sensitive, i.e. as little as 300 complexes per bead could...

  9. 454 sequencing reveals extreme complexity of the class II Major Histocompatibility Complex in the collared flycatcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Lars

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of their functional significance, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I and II genes have been the subject of continuous interest in the fields of ecology, evolution and conservation. In some vertebrate groups MHC consists of multiple loci with similar alleles; therefore, the multiple loci must be genotyped simultaneously. In such complex systems, understanding of the evolutionary patterns and their causes has been limited due to challenges posed by genotyping. Results Here we used 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize MHC class IIB exon 2 variation in the collared flycatcher, an important organism in evolutionary and immuno-ecological studies. On the basis of over 152,000 sequencing reads we identified 194 putative alleles in 237 individuals. We found an extreme complexity of the MHC class IIB in the collared flycatchers, with our estimates pointing to the presence of at least nine expressed loci and a large, though difficult to estimate precisely, number of pseudogene loci. Many similar alleles occurred in the pseudogenes indicating either a series of recent duplications or extensive concerted evolution. The expressed alleles showed unambiguous signals of historical selection and the occurrence of apparent interlocus exchange of alleles. Placing the collared flycatcher's MHC sequences in the context of passerine diversity revealed transspecific MHC class II evolution within the Muscicapidae family. Conclusions 454 amplicon sequencing is an effective tool for advancing our understanding of the MHC class II structure and evolutionary patterns in Passeriformes. We found a highly dynamic pattern of evolution of MHC class IIB genes with strong signals of selection and pronounced sequence divergence in expressed genes, in contrast to the apparent sequence homogenization in pseudogenes. We show that next generation sequencing offers a universal, affordable method for the characterization and, in perspective

  10. Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-12-19

    The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

  11. Low-dose gemcitabine induces major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B expression and enhances an antitumor innate immune response in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Tomoharu; Miki, Kenji; Kamigaki, Takashi; Makino, Isamu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Ahmed, Ali K; Duncan, Mark D; Harmon, John W; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the effect of gemcitabine (GEM), a key drug for pancreatic cancer treatment, on the expression of cell surface MICA/B in pancreatic cancer cells and resulting cytotoxicity of γδ T cells. We assessed the effect of GEM on the upregulation of cell surface MICA/B expression by flow cytometry, utilizing six pancreatic cancer cell lines. MICA and CD16 expressions from resected pancreatic cancer patient specimens, which received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) with GEM, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. GEM could increase MICA/B expression on cell surface in pancreatic cancer cell lines (in 2 of 6 cell lines). This effect was most effectively at concentration not affecting cell growth of GEM (0.001 μM), because MICA/B negative population was appeared at concentration at cytostatic and cytotoxic effect to cell growth (0.1 and 10 μM). The cytotoxic activity of γδ T cells against PANC-1 was detected and functions through interactions between NKG2D and MICA/B. However, the enhancement of NKG2D-dependent cytotoxicity with increased MICA/B expression, by GEM treatment, was not observed. In addition, soluble MIC molecules were released from pancreatic cancer cell lines in culture supernatant with GEM treatment. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that MICA expression in tumor cells and CD16 positive cells surrounding tumors were significantly higher in the NAC group compared to that of the control group. There was a significant correlation between NAC and MICA expression, as well as NAC and CD16 positive cell expression. The present results indicate that low-dose GEM-induced MICA/B expression enhances innate immune function rather than cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer. In addition, our result suggests that the inhibition of cleavage and release of MIC molecules from the tumor surface could potentially improve NKG2D-dependent cytotoxicity.

  12. Distinguishing PTSD, Complex PTSD, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylène Cloitre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been debate regarding whether Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD is distinct from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD when the latter is comorbid with PTSD. Objective: To determine whether the patterns of symptoms endorsed by women seeking treatment for childhood abuse form classes that are consistent with diagnostic criteria for PTSD, Complex PTSD, and BPD. Method: A latent class analysis (LCA was conducted on an archival dataset of 280 women with histories of childhood abuse assessed for enrollment in a clinical trial for PTSD. Results: The LCA revealed four distinct classes of individuals: a Low Symptom class characterized by low endorsements on all symptoms; a PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD but low endorsement of symptoms that define the Complex PTSD and BPD diagnoses; a Complex PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD and self-organization symptoms that defined the Complex PTSD diagnosis but low on the symptoms of BPD; and a BPD class characterized by symptoms of BPD. Four BPD symptoms were found to greatly increase the odds of being in the BPD compared to the Complex PTSD class: frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, unstable sense of self, unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, and impulsiveness. Conclusions: Findings supported the construct validity of Complex PTSD as distinguishable from BPD. Key symptoms that distinguished between the disorders were identified, which may aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

  13. Distinguishing PTSD, Complex PTSD, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloitre, Marylène; Garvert, Donn W; Weiss, Brandon; Carlson, Eve B; Bryant, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    There has been debate regarding whether Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD) is distinct from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) when the latter is comorbid with PTSD. To determine whether the patterns of symptoms endorsed by women seeking treatment for childhood abuse form classes that are consistent with diagnostic criteria for PTSD, Complex PTSD, and BPD. A latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted on an archival dataset of 280 women with histories of childhood abuse assessed for enrollment in a clinical trial for PTSD. THE LCA REVEALED FOUR DISTINCT CLASSES OF INDIVIDUALS: a Low Symptom class characterized by low endorsements on all symptoms; a PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD but low endorsement of symptoms that define the Complex PTSD and BPD diagnoses; a Complex PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD and self-organization symptoms that defined the Complex PTSD diagnosis but low on the symptoms of BPD; and a BPD class characterized by symptoms of BPD. Four BPD symptoms were found to greatly increase the odds of being in the BPD compared to the Complex PTSD class: frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, unstable sense of self, unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, and impulsiveness. Findings supported the construct validity of Complex PTSD as distinguishable from BPD. Key symptoms that distinguished between the disorders were identified, which may aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

  14. Invariant chain can function as a chaperone protein for class II major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, M S; Miller, J

    1992-01-01

    During biosynthesis, class II major histocompatibility complex molecules are intimately associated with invariant chain (Ii). The Ii-class II association has been shown to block peptide-class II binding and to affect the ultimate conformation of class II expressed on the cell surface. To assess the biochemical basis for the effects of Ii on class II, we have analyzed the biosynthesis of class II in EL4 cells transfected with I-Ad with and without Ii. In these studies, we found that Ii had a p...

  15. Persondata i relation til ting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, Peter

    2011-01-01

    En intelligent verden er under udvikling. En verden, hvor stadig flere ting har indbygget digital teknologi, der indsamler personoplysninger med henblik på at lette borgernes tilværelseog for at realisere samfundsmæssige målsætninger. Atiklen vedrører især anvendelsen af intelligente ting i relat...... relation til måling af energiforbrug m.v. Dette kan medføre en øget anvendelse af persondata, og på denne baggrund sætter artiklen fokus på, hvorledes persondataretten finder anvendelse i denne sammenhæng....

  16. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  17. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and......, more importantly, with a unique "T cell receptor-like" (i. e. peptide-specific, MHC-I-restricted) antibody. Thus, properly assembled and folded peptide-MHC-I complexes can be displayed on filamentous phage. Despite the successful display, interaction with T cells could not be demonstrated....

  18. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I genes in Cetartiodactyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Edward C; Roberts, Ann F C; Staines, Karen A; Ellis, Shirley A

    2003-07-01

    Previous studies of cattle MHC have suggested the presence of at least four classical class I loci. Analysis of haplotypes showed that any combination of one, two or three genes may be expressed, although no gene is expressed consistently. The aim of this study was to examine the evolutionary relationships among these genes and to study their phylogenetic history in Cetartiodactyl species, including cattle and their close relatives. A secondary aim was to determine whether recombination had occurred between any of the genes. MHC class I data sets were generated from published sequences or by polymerase chain reaction from cDNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MHC class I sequences from Cetartiodactyl species closely related to cattle were distributed among the main cattle gene "groups", while those from more distantly related species were either scattered (sheep, deer) or clustered in a species-specific manner (sitatunga, giraffe). A comparison between gene and species trees showed a poor match, indicating that divergence of the MHC sequences had occurred independently from that of the hosts from which they were obtained. We also found two clear instances of interlocus recombination among the cattle MHC sequences. Finally, positive natural selection was documented at positions throughout the alpha 1 and 2 domains, primarily on those amino acids directly involved in peptide binding, although two positions in the alpha 3 domain, a region generally conserved in other species, were also shown to be undergoing adaptive evolution.

  19. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A E; Skov, Svend; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  20. Human Herpesvirus 7 U21 Tetramerizes To Associate with Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Nathan A.; Wang, Qiuhong; Balbo, Andrea; Konrad, Sheryl L.; Buchli, Rico; Hildebrand, William H.; Schuck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The U21 gene product from human herpesvirus 7 binds to and redirects class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to a lysosomal compartment. The molecular mechanism by which U21 reroutes class I MHC molecules to lysosomes is not known. Here, we have reconstituted the interaction between purified soluble U21 and class I MHC molecules, suggesting that U21 does not require additional cellular proteins to interact with class I MHC molecules. Our results demonstrate that U21, itself predicted to contain an MHC class I-like protein fold, interacts tightly with class I MHC molecules as a tetramer, in a 4:2 stoichiometry. These observations have helped to elucidate a refined model describing the mechanism by which U21 escorts class I MHC molecules to the lysosomal compartment. IMPORTANCE In this report, we show that the human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) immunoevasin U21, itself a class I MHC-like protein, binds with high affinity to class I MHC molecules as a tetramer and escorts them to lysosomes, where they are degraded. While many class I MHC-like molecules have been described in detail, this unusual viral class I-like protein functions as a tetramer, associating with class I MHC molecules in a 4:2 ratio, illuminating a functional significance of homooligomerization of a class I MHC-like protein. PMID:24390327

  1. Molecular Basis of Natural Killer Cell Tumor Target Recognition: The NKr/MHC Class I Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hasemann, Charles

    1999-01-01

    .... We have pursued this via the heterologous expression of wild type and mutant NK receptors for the purpose of the determination of the atomic structure of an NK receptor/ class I MHC complex via X-ray crystallography...

  2. Autoantibodies to IgG/HLA class II complexes are associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Arase, Noriko; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Kohyama, Masako; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Saito, Fumiji; Tanimura, Kenji; Matsuoka, Sumiko; Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Toyama-Sorimachi, Noriko; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Hiwa, Ryosuke; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Saito, Takashi; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Katayama, Ichiro; Lanier, Lewis L.; Arase, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Specific HLA class II alleles are strongly associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, how HLA class II regulates susceptibility to RA has remained unclear. Recently, we found a unique function of HLA class II molecules: their ability to aberrantly transport cellular misfolded proteins to the cell surface without processing to peptides. Rheumatoid factor (RF) is an autoantibody that binds to denatured IgG or Fc fragments of IgG and is detected in 70–80% of RA patients but also in patients with other diseases. Here, we report that intact IgG heavy chain (IgGH) is transported to the cell surface by HLA class II via association with the peptide-binding groove and that IgGH/HLA class II complexes are specifically recognized by autoantibodies in RF-positive sera from RA patients. In contrast, autoantibodies in RF-positive sera from non-RA individuals did not bind to IgGH/HLA class II complexes. Of note, a strong correlation between autoantibody binding to IgG complexed with certain HLA-DR alleles and the odds ratio for that allele’s association with RA was observed (r = 0.81; P = 4.6 × 10−5). Our findings suggest that IgGH complexed with certain HLA class II alleles is a target for autoantibodies in RA, which might explain why these HLA class II alleles confer susceptibility to RA. PMID:24567378

  3. Misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are targets for autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwa, Ryosuke; Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule is important for immune system through its function of presentation of peptide antigens. MHC is the gene most strongly associated with susceptibility to many autoimmune diseases. We recently found a novel function of MHC class II molecules to transport cellular misfolded proteins to the cell surface without processing to peptides. Interestingly, misfolded proteins transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules were found to be a specific targets for autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is strongly associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules might be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Characterisation of major histocompatibility complex class I transcripts in an Australian dragon lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, Jessica; Bertozzi, Terry; Moussalli, Adnan; Bradford, Tessa; Gardner, Michael

    2018-07-01

    Characterisation of squamate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes has lagged behind other taxonomic groups. MHC genes encode cell-surface glycoproteins that present self- and pathogen-derived peptides to T cells and play a critical role in pathogen recognition. Here we characterise MHC class I transcripts for an agamid lizard (Ctenophorus decresii) and investigate the evolution of MHC class I in Iguanian lizards. An iterative assembly strategy was used to identify six full-length C. decresii MHC class I transcripts, which were validated as likely to encode classical class I MHC molecules. Evidence for exon shuffling recombination was uncovered for C. decresii transcripts and Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of Iguanian MHC class I sequences revealed a pattern expected under a birth-and-death mode of evolution. This work provides a stepping stone towards further research on the agamid MHC class I region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The genus one Complex Quantum Chern-Simons representation of the Mapping Class Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Marzioni, Simone

    In this paper we compute explicitly, following Witten’s prescription, the quantum representation of the mapping class group in genus one for complex quantum Chern-Simons theory associated to the complex gauge group SL(2, C). We use the k’th order Weil-Gel’fand-Zak transform to exhibit an explicit...

  6. Clusters of Multiple Complex Chronic Conditions: A Latent Class Analysis of Children at End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Lisa C; Mack, Jennifer W; Bruce, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    Children at end of life often experience multiple complex chronic conditions with more than 50% of children reportedly having two or more conditions. These complex chronic conditions are unlikely to occur in an entirely uniform manner in children at end of life. Previous work has not fully accounted for patterns of multiple conditions when evaluating care among these children. The objective of the study was to understand the clusters of complex chronic conditions present among children in the last year of life. Participants were 1423 pediatric decedents from the 2007 to 2008 California Medicaid data. A latent class analysis was used to identify clusters of children with multiple complex chronic conditions (neurological, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, hematologic, metabolic, congenital, cancer). Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between demographic characteristics and class membership. Four latent classes were yielded: medically fragile (31%); neurological (32%); cancer (25%); and cardiovascular (12%). Three classes were characterized by a 100% likelihood of having a complex chronic condition coupled with a low or moderate likelihood of having the other eight conditions. The four classes exhibited unique demographic profiles. This analysis presented a novel way of understanding patterns of multiple complex chronic conditions among children that may inform tailored and targeted end-of-life care for different clusters. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tapasin dependence of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules correlates with their conformational flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstka, Malgorzata Anna; Fritzsche, Susanne; Lenart, Izabela; Hein, Zeynep; Jankevicius, Gytis; Boyle, Louise H; Elliott, Tim; Trowsdale, John; Antoniou, Antony N; Zacharias, Martin; Springer, Sebastian

    2011-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present cell internally derived peptides at the plasma membrane for surveillance by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The surface expression of most class I molecules at least partially depends on the endoplasmic reticulum protein, tapasin, which helps them to bind peptides of the right length and sequence. To determine what makes a class I molecule dependent on support by tapasin, we have conducted in silico molecular dynamics (MD) studies and laboratory experiments to assess the conformational state of tapasin-dependent and -independent class I molecules. We find that in the absence of peptide, the region around the F pocket of the peptide binding groove of the tapasin-dependent molecule HLA-B*44:02 is in a disordered conformational state and that it is converted to a conformationally stable state by tapasin. This novel chaperone function of tapasin has not been described previously. We demonstrate that the disordered state of class I is caused by the presence of two adjacent acidic residues in the bottom of the F pocket of class I, and we suggest that conformational disorder is a common feature of tapasin-dependent class I molecules, making them essentially unable to bind peptides on their own. MD simulations are a useful tool to predict such conformational disorder of class I molecules.

  8. Characterization of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes in miiuy croaker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Xu

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC has a central role in the adaptive immune system by presenting foreign peptide to the T-cell receptor. In order to study the molecular function and genomic characteristic of class II genes in teleost, the full lengths of MHC class IIA and IIB cDNA and genomic sequence were cloned from miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy. As in other teleost, four exons and three introns were identified in miiuy croaker class IIA gene; but the difference is that six exons and five introns were identified in the miiuy croaker class IIB gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of class IIA and class IIB had 26.3-85.7% and 11.0-88.8% identity with those of mammal and teleost, respectively. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that the MHC class IIA and IIB were ubiquitously expressed in ten normal tissues; expression levels of MHC genes were found first upregulated and then downregulated, and finally by a recovery to normal level throughout the pathogenic bacteria infection process. In addition, we report on the underlying mechanism that maintains sequences diversity among many fish species. A series of site-model tests implemented in the CODEML program revealed that positive Darwinian selection is likely the cause of the molecular evolution in the fish MHC class II genes.

  9. Differential transmembrane domain GXXXG motif pairing impacts major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Ann M; Drake, Lisa; Hughes, Kelly T; Sargent, Elizabeth; Hunt, Danielle; Harton, Jonathan A; Drake, James R

    2014-04-25

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules exhibit conformational heterogeneity, which influences their ability to stimulate CD4 T cells and drive immune responses. Previous studies suggest a role for the transmembrane domain of the class II αβ heterodimer in determining molecular structure and function. Our previous studies identified an MHC class II conformer that is marked by the Ia.2 epitope. These Ia.2(+) class II conformers are lipid raft-associated and able to drive both tyrosine kinase signaling and efficient antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Here, we establish that the Ia.2(+) I-A(k) conformer is formed early in the class II biosynthetic pathway and that differential pairing of highly conserved transmembrane domain GXXXG dimerization motifs is responsible for formation of Ia.2(+) versus Ia.2(-) I-A(k) class II conformers and controlling lipid raft partitioning. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the formation of two distinct MHC class II conformers that differ in their inherent ability to signal and drive robust T cell activation, providing new insight into the role of MHC class II in regulating antigen-presenting cell-T cell interactions critical to the initiation and control of multiple aspects of the immune response.

  10. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Science.gov (United States)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  11. Transmembrane Helices Are an Overlooked Source of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Epitopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bianchi, F.; Textor, J.C.; Bogaart, G. van den

    2017-01-01

    About a fourth of the human proteome is anchored by transmembrane helices (TMHs) to lipid membranes. TMHs require multiple hydrophobic residues for spanning membranes, and this shows a striking resemblance with the requirements for peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class I binding predictions as a tool in epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, in silico models of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway have developed significantly. Before, peptide binding could only be reliably modelled for a few major human or mouse histocompatibility molecules; now, high-accuracy predictions are available...

  13. NetMHCcons: a consensus method for the major histocompatibility complex class I predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    A key role in cell-mediated immunity is dedicated to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules that bind peptides for presentation on the cell surface. Several in silico methods capable of predicting peptide binding to MHC class I have been developed. The accuracy of these methods...

  14. Global Phase Synchronization for a Class of Dynamical Complex Networks with Time-Varying Coupling Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XinBin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Global phase synchronization for a class of dynamical complex networks composed of multiinput multioutput pendulum-like systems with time-varying coupling delays is investigated. The problem of the global phase synchronization for the complex networks is equivalent to the problem of the asymptotical stability for the corresponding error dynamical networks. For reducing the conservation, no linearization technique is involved, but by Kronecker product, the problem of the asymptotical stability of the high dimensional error dynamical networks is reduced to the same problem of a class of low dimensional error systems. The delay-dependent criteria guaranteeing global asymptotical stability for the error dynamical complex networks in terms of Liner Matrix Inequalities (LMIs are derived based on free-weighting matrices technique and Lyapunov function. According to the convex characterization, a simple criterion is proposed. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  15. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression in trophoblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jason C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trophoblast cells are unique because they are one of the few mammalian cell types that do not express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II antigens, either constitutively or after exposure to IFN-γ. The absence of MHC class II antigen expression on trophoblast cells has been postulated to be one of the essential mechanisms by which the semi-allogeneic fetus evades immune rejection reactions by the maternal immune system. Consistent with this hypothesis, trophoblast cells from the placentas of women suffering from chronic inflammation of unknown etiology and spontaneous recurrent miscarriages have been reported to aberrantly express MHC class II antigens. The lack of MHC class II antigen expression on trophoblast cells is due to silencing of expression of the class II transactivator (CIITA, a transacting factor that is essential for constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II gene transcription. Transfection of trophoblast cells with CIITA expression vectors activates both MHC class II and class Ia antigen expression, which confers on trophoblast cells both the ability to activate helper T cells, and sensitivity to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Collectively, these studies strongly suggest that stringent silencing of CIITA (and therefore MHC class II gene expression in trophoblast cells is critical for the prevention of immune rejection responses against the fetus by the maternal immune system. The focus of this review is to summarize studies examining the novel mechanisms by which CIITA is silenced in trophoblast cells. The elucidation of the silencing of CIITA in trophoblast cells may shed light on how the semi-allogeneic fetus evades immune rejection by the maternal immune system during pregnancy.

  16. Lipopeptides: a novel antigen repertoire presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Daisuke; Sugita, Masahiko

    2016-10-01

    Post-translationally modified peptides, such as those containing either phosphorylated or O-glycosylated serine/threonine residues, may be presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by MHC class I molecules. Most of these modified peptides are captured in the MHC class I groove in a similar manner to that for unmodified peptides. N-Myristoylated 5-mer lipopeptides have recently been identified as a novel chemical class of MHC class I-presented antigens. The rhesus classical MHC class I allele, Mamu-B*098, was found to be capable of binding N-myristoylated lipopeptides and presenting them to CTLs. A high-resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis of the Mamu-B*098:lipopeptide complex revealed that the myristic group as well as conserved C-terminal serine residue of the lipopeptide ligand functioned as anchors, whereas the short stretch of three amino acid residues located in the middle of the lipopeptides was only exposed externally with the potential to interact directly with specific T-cell receptors. Therefore, the modes of lipopeptide-ligand interactions with MHC class I and with T-cell receptors are novel and fundamentally distinct from that for MHC class I-presented peptides. Another lipopeptide-presenting MHC class I allele has now been identified, leading us to the prediction that MHC class I molecules may be separated on a functional basis into two groups: one presenting long peptides and the other presenting short lipopeptides. Since the N-myristoylation of viral proteins is often linked to pathogenesis, CTLs capable of sensing N-myristoylation may serve to control pathogenic viruses, raising the possibility for the development of a new type of lipopeptide vaccine. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Enumeration of Combinatorial Classes of Single Variable Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    A vector field in the space of degree d monic, centered single variable complex polynomial vector fields has a combinatorial structure which can be fully described by a combinatorial data set consisting of an equivalence relation and a marked subset on the integers mod 2d-2, satisfying certain...... in a valid way. We first enumerate all combinatorial classes with respect to degree d, and then we enumerate the combinatorial classes having a specific dimension q in parameter space. In both cases, a recursion equation and implicit expressions for the algebraic generating functions are calculated...

  18. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  19. Identification of amino acid networks governing catalysis in the closed complex of class I terpene synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrepfer, Patrick; Buettner, Alexander; Goerner, Christian; Hertel, Michael; van Rijn, Jeaphianne; Wallrapp, Frank; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Sieber, Volker; Kourist, Robert; Brück, Thomas

    2016-02-23

    Class I terpene synthases generate the structural core of bioactive terpenoids. Deciphering structure-function relationships in the reactive closed complex and targeted engineering is hampered by highly dynamic carbocation rearrangements during catalysis. Available crystal structures, however, represent the open, catalytically inactive form or harbor nonproductive substrate analogs. Here, we present a catalytically relevant, closed conformation of taxadiene synthase (TXS), the model class I terpene synthase, which simulates the initial catalytic time point. In silico modeling of subsequent catalytic steps allowed unprecedented insights into the dynamic reaction cascades and promiscuity mechanisms of class I terpene synthases. This generally applicable methodology enables the active-site localization of carbocations and demonstrates the presence of an active-site base motif and its dominating role during catalysis. It additionally allowed in silico-designed targeted protein engineering that unlocked the path to alternate monocyclic and bicyclic synthons representing the basis of a myriad of bioactive terpenoids.

  20. Prediction of peptide binding to a major histocompatibility complex class I molecule based on docking simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Binding between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and immunogenic epitopes is one of the most important processes for cell-mediated immunity. Consequently, computational prediction of amino acid sequences of MHC class I binding peptides from a given sequence may lead to important biomedical advances. In this study, an efficient structure-based method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules was developed, in which the binding free energy of the peptide was evaluated by two individual docking simulations. An original penalty function and restriction of degrees of freedom were determined by analysis of 361 published X-ray structures of the complex and were then introduced into the docking simulations. To validate the method, calculations using a 50-amino acid sequence as a prediction target were performed. In 27 calculations, the binding free energy of the known peptide was within the top 5 of 166 peptides generated from the 50-amino acid sequence. Finally, demonstrative calculations using a whole sequence of a protein as a prediction target were performed. These data clearly demonstrate high potential of this method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules.

  1. Characterization of Two Classes of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Arp2/3 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolen, B.; Tomasevic, N; Russell, A; Pierce, D; Jia, Z; McCormick, C; Hartman, J; Sakowicz, R; Pollard, T

    2009-01-01

    Polymerization of actin filaments directed by the actin-related protein (Arp)2/3 complex supports many types of cellular movements. However, questions remain regarding the relative contributions of Arp2/3 complex versus other mechanisms of actin filament nucleation to processes such as path finding by neuronal growth cones; this is because of the lack of simple methods to inhibit Arp2/3 complex reversibly in living cells. Here we describe two classes of small molecules that bind to different sites on the Arp2/3 complex and inhibit its ability to nucleate actin filaments. CK-0944636 binds between Arp2 and Arp3, where it appears to block movement of Arp2 and Arp3 into their active conformation. CK-0993548 inserts into the hydrophobic core of Arp3 and alters its conformation. Both classes of compounds inhibit formation of actin filament comet tails by Listeria and podosomes by monocytes. Two inhibitors with different mechanisms of action provide a powerful approach for studying the Arp2/3 complex in living cells.

  2. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of duck MHC class I molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yong; Gao, Feng; Chen, Weihong; Qi, Jianxun; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    Using a peptide derived from H5N1, a complex of duck MHC class I molecule (DuMHC I) with duck β 2 -microglobulin (Duβ 2 m) was assembled and crystallized. Initial structure analysis indicated that the crystals did not contain the complete DuMHC I complex but instead contained DuMHC I α3-domain and Duβ 2 m subunits. In order to understand the biological properties of the immune systems of waterfowl and to establish a system for structural studies of duck class I major histocompatibility complex (DuMHC I), a complex of DuMHC I with duck β 2 -microglobulin (Duβ 2 m) and the peptide AEIEDLIF (AF8) derived from H5N1 NP residues 251–258 was assembled. The complex was crystallized; the crystals belonged to space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 54.7, b = 72.4, c = 102.2 Å, and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Matthews coefficient calculation and initial structure determination by molecular replacement showed that the crystals did not contain the whole DuMHC I complex, but instead contained the DuMHC I α3 domain and a Duβ2m molecule (DuMHC I α3+β2m). Another complex of DuMHC I with the peptide IDWFDGKE derived from a chicken fusion protein also generated the same results. The stable structure of DuMHC I α3+β2m may reflect some unique characteristics of DuMHC I and pave the way for novel MHC structure-related studies in the future

  3. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Erik D; Simmons, Ryan S; Palmer, Amy L; Hildebrand, William H; Rockey, Daniel D; Dolan, Brian P

    2016-02-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8(+) T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8(+) killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Binding and activation of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient macrophages by staphylococcal exotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beharka, A. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Iandolo, J. J.; Chapes, S. K.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Macrophages from C2D transgenic mice deficient in the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II proteins were used to identify binding sites for superantigens distinct from the MHC class II molecule. Iodinated staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B (SEA and SEB) and exfoliative toxins A and B (ETA and ETB) bound to C2D macrophages in a concentration-dependent and competitive manner. All four toxins increased F-actin concentration within 30 s of their addition to C2D macrophages, indicating that signal transduction occurred in response to toxin in the absence of class II MHC. Furthermore, ETA, ETB, SEA, and, to a lesser extent, SEB induced C2D macrophages to produce interleukin 6. Several molecular species on C2D macrophages with molecular masses of 140, 97, 61, 52, 43, and 37 kDa bound SEA in immunoprecipitation experiments. These data indicate the presence of novel, functionally active toxin binding sites on murine macrophages distinct from MHC class II molecules.

  5. The major histocompatibility complex in Old World camelids and low polymorphism of its class II genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasil, Martin; Mohandesan, Elmira; Fitak, Robert R; Musilova, Petra; Kubickova, Svatava; Burger, Pamela A; Horin, Petr

    2016-03-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is a genomic region containing genes with crucial roles in immune responses. MHC class I and class II genes encode antigen-presenting molecules expressed on the cell surface. To counteract the high variability of pathogens, the MHC evolved into a region of considerable heterogeneity in its organization, number and extent of polymorphism. Studies of MHCs in different model species contribute to our understanding of mechanisms of immunity, diseases and their evolution. Camels are economically important domestic animals and interesting biomodels. Three species of Old World camels have been recognized: the dromedary (Camelus dromedarius), Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and the wild camel (Camelus ferus). Despite their importance, little is known about the MHC genomic region, its organization and diversity in camels. The objectives of this study were to identify, map and characterize the MHC region of Old World camelids, with special attention to genetic variation at selected class MHC II loci. Physical mapping located the MHC region to the chromosome 20 in Camelus dromedarius. Cytogenetic and comparative analyses of whole genome sequences showed that the order of the three major sub-regions is "Centromere - Class II - Class III - Class I". DRA, DRB, DQA and DQB exon 2 sequences encoding the antigen binding site of the corresponding class II antigen presenting molecules showed high degree of sequence similarity and extensive allele sharing across the three species. Unexpectedly low extent of polymorphism with low numbers of alleles and haplotypes was observed in all species, despite different geographic origins of the camels analyzed. The DRA locus was found to be polymorphic, with three alleles shared by all three species. DRA and DQA sequences retrieved from ancient DNA samples of Camelus dromedarius suggested that additional polymorphism might exist. This study provided evidence that camels possess an MHC comparable to

  6. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...... effectively individualizes the immune response of each member of the species. We have recently developed efficient methods to generate recombinant human MHC-I (also known as human leukocyte antigen class I, HLA-I) molecules, accompanying peptide-binding assays and predictors, and HLA tetramers for specific...... CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...

  7. Multiple major histocompatibility complex class I genes in Asian anurans: Ontogeny and phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didinger, Chelsea; Eimes, John A; Lillie, Mette; Waldman, Bruce

    2017-05-01

    Amphibians, as the first terrestrial vertebrates, offer a window into early major histocompatibility complex (MHC) evolution. We characterized the MHC class I of two Korean amphibians, the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans) and the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). We found at least four transcribed MHC class I (MHC I) loci, the highest number confirmed in any anuran to date. Furthermore, we identified MHC I transcripts in terrestrial adults, and possibly in aquatic larvae, of both species. We conducted a phylogenetic analysis based on MHC I sequence data and found that B. gargarizans and H. japonica cluster together in the superfamily Nobleobatrachia. We further identified three supertypes shared by the two species. Our results reveal substantial variation in the number of MHC I loci in anurans and suggest that certain supertypes have particular physiochemical properties that may confer pathogen resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterisation of four major histocompatibility complex class II genes of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Jobbins, Sarah E; Belov, Katherine; Higgins, Damien P

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have an integral role in the adaptive immune response, as they bind and present antigenic peptides to T helper lymphocytes. In this study of koalas, species-specific primers were designed to amplify exon 2 of the MHC class II DA and DB genes, which contain much of the peptide-binding regions of the α and β chains. A total of two DA α1 domain variants and eight DA β1 (DAB), three DB α1 and five DB β1 variants were amplified from 20 koalas from two free-living populations from South East Queensland and the Port Macquarie region in northern New South Wales. We detected greater variation in the β1 than in the α1 domains as well as evidence of positive selection in DAB. The present study provides a springboard to future investigation of the role of MHC in disease susceptibility in koalas.

  9. Transmembrane Helices Are an Overlooked Source of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Frans; Textor, Johannes; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2017-01-01

    About a fourth of the human proteome is anchored by transmembrane helices (TMHs) to lipid membranes. TMHs require multiple hydrophobic residues for spanning membranes, and this shows a striking resemblance with the requirements for peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. It, therefore, comes as no surprise that bioinformatics analysis predicts an over-representation of TMHs among strong MHC class I (MHC-I) binders. Published peptide elution studies confirm that TMHs are indeed presented by MHC-I. This raises the question how membrane proteins are processed for MHC-I (cross-)presentation, with current research focusing on soluble antigens. The presentation of membrane-buried peptides is likely important in health and disease, as TMHs are considerably conserved and their presentation might prevent escape mutations by pathogens. Therefore, it could contribute to the disease correlations described for many human leukocyte antigen haplotypes. PMID:28959259

  10. Structures of the Class D Carbapenemase OXA-24 from Acinetobacter baumannii in Complex with Doripenem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Ortega, Caleb J.; Renck, Nicholas A.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Powers, Rachel A.; Leonard, David A. (Case Western); (Grand Valley)

    2012-02-08

    The emergence of class D {beta}-lactamases with carbapenemase activity presents an enormous challenge to health practitioners, particularly with regard to the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii. Unfortunately, class D {beta}-lactamases with carbapenemase activity are resistant to {beta}-lactamase inhibitors. To better understand the details of the how these enzymes bind and hydrolyze carbapenems, we have determined the structures of two deacylation-deficient variants (K84D and V130D) of the class D carbapenemase OXA-24 with doripenem bound as a covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. Doripenem adopts essentially the same configuration in both OXA-24 variant structures, but varies significantly when compared to the non-carbapenemase class D member OXA-1/doripenem complex. The alcohol of the 6a hydroxyethyl moiety is directed away from the general base carboxy-K84, with implications for activation of the deacylating water. The tunnel formed by the Y112/M223 bridge in the apo form of OXA-24 is largely unchanged by the binding of doripenem. The presence of this bridge, however, causes the distal pyrrolidine/sulfonamide group to bind in a drastically different conformation compared to doripenem bound to OXA-1. The resulting difference in the position of the side-chain bridge sulfur of doripenem is consistent with the hypothesis that the tautomeric state of the pyrroline ring contributes to the different carbapenem hydrolysis rates of OXA-1 and OXA-24. These findings represent a snapshot of a key step in the catalytic mechanism of an important class D enzyme, and might be useful for the design of novel inhibitors.

  11. Ubiquitination regulates MHC class II-peptide complex retention and degradation in dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walseng, Even; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Bosch, Berta; Weih, Karis A.; Matsuki, Yohei; Bakke, Oddmund; Ishido, Satoshi; Roche, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The expression and turnover of MHC class II-peptide complexes (pMHC-II) on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs) is essential for their ability to activate CD4 T cells efficiently. The half-life of surface pMHC-II is significantly greater in activated (mature) DCs than in resting (immature) DCs, but the molecular mechanism leading to this difference remains unknown. We now show that ubiquitination of pMHC-II by the E3 ubiquitin ligase membrane-associated RING-CH 1 (March-I) regulates surface e...

  12. Complex networks for data-driven medicine: the case of Class III dentoskeletal disharmony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scala, A; Auconi, P; Scazzocchio, M; Caldarelli, G; McNamara, JA; Franchi, L

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, the availability of innovative algorithms derived from complexity theory has inspired the development of highly detailed models in various fields, including physics, biology, ecology, economy, and medicine. Due to the availability of novel and ever more sophisticated diagnostic procedures, all biomedical disciplines face the problem of using the increasing amount of information concerning each patient to improve diagnosis and prevention. In particular, in the discipline of orthodontics the current diagnostic approach based on clinical and radiographic data is problematic due to the complexity of craniofacial features and to the numerous interacting co-dependent skeletal and dentoalveolar components. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of computational methods such as network analysis and module detection to extract organizing principles in 70 patients with excessive mandibular skeletal protrusion with underbite, a condition known in orthodontics as Class III malocclusion. Our results could possibly constitute a template framework for organising the increasing amount of medical data available for patients’ diagnosis. (paper)

  13. Structural Properties and Complexity of a New Network Class: Collatz Step Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a biologically inspired model to generate complex networks. In contrast to many other construction procedures for growing networks introduced so far, our method generates networks from one-dimensional symbol sequences that are related to the so called Collatz problem from number theory. The major purpose of the present paper is, first, to derive a symbol sequence from the Collatz problem, we call the step sequence, and investigate its structural properties. Second, we introduce a construction procedure for growing networks that is based on these step sequences. Third, we investigate the structural properties of this new network class including their finite scaling and asymptotic behavior of their complexity, average shortest path lengths and clustering coefficients. Interestingly, in contrast to many other network models including the small-world network from Watts & Strogatz, we find that CS graphs become ‘smaller’ with an increasing size. PMID:23431377

  14. Molecular modeling of class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex in Salmo salar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Constanza; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; Conejeros, Pablo; Arenas, Gloria; Marshall, Sergio; Luque, F. Javier

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of the 3D structure of the binding groove of major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules, which play a central role in the immune response, is crucial to shed light into the details of peptide recognition and polymorphism. This work reports molecular modeling studies aimed at providing 3D models for two class I and two class II MHC alleles from Salmo salar ( Sasa), as the lack of experimental structures of fish MHC molecules represents a serious limitation to understand the specific preferences for peptide binding. The reliability of the structural models built up using bioinformatic tools was explored by means of molecular dynamics simulations of their complexes with representative peptides, and the energetics of the MHC-peptide interaction was determined by combining molecular mechanics interaction energies and implicit continuum solvation calculations. The structural models revealed the occurrence of notable differences in the nature of residues at specific positions in the binding groove not only between human and Sasa MHC proteins, but also between different Sasa alleles. Those differences lead to distinct trends in the structural features that mediate the binding of peptides to both class I and II MHC molecules, which are qualitatively reflected in the relative binding affinities. Overall, the structural models presented here are a valuable starting point to explore the interactions between MHC receptors and pathogen-specific interactions and to design vaccines against viral pathogens.

  15. Conceptual Inadequacy of the Shore and Johnson Axioms for Wide Classes of Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantino Tsallis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is by now well known that the Boltzmann-Gibbs-von Neumann-Shannon logarithmic entropic functional (\\(S_{BG}\\ is inadequate for wide classes of strongly correlated systems: see for instance the 2001 Brukner and Zeilinger's {\\it Conceptual inadequacy of the Shannon information in quantum measurements}, among many other systems exhibiting various forms of complexity. On the other hand, the Shannon and Khinchin axioms uniquely mandate the BG form \\(S_{BG}=-k\\sum_i p_i \\ln p_i\\; the Shore and Johnson axioms follow the same path. Many natural, artificial and social systems have been satisfactorily approached with nonadditive entropies such as the \\(S_q=k \\frac{1-\\sum_i p_i^q}{q-1}\\ one (\\(q \\in {\\cal R}; \\,S_1=S_{BG}\\, basis of nonextensive statistical mechanics. Consistently, the Shannon 1948 and Khinchine 1953 uniqueness theorems have already been generalized in the literature, by Santos 1997 and Abe 2000 respectively, in order to uniquely mandate \\(S_q\\. We argue here that the same remains to be done with the Shore and Johnson 1980 axioms. We arrive to this conclusion by analyzing specific classes of strongly correlated complex systems that await such generalization.

  16. Modulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II-associated peptide repertoire by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ham, M.; van Lith, M.; Lillemeier, B.; Tjin, E.; Grüneberg, U.; Rahman, D.; Pastoors, L.; van Meijgaarden, K.; Roucard, C.; Trowsdale, J.; Ottenhoff, T.; Pappin, D.; Neefjes, J.

    2000-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules is essential for antibody production and T cell activation. For most class II alleles, peptide binding depends on the catalytic action of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DM. HLA-DO is selectively expressed

  17. Overall major histocompatibility complex class I expression is not downregulated in cervix cancer, as detected by immunoelectron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, MA; Roovers, JP; Oorschot, [No Value; Geuze, HJ

    2004-01-01

    Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules in cervix cancer has been proposed as a mechanism for cancer cells to escape immunodetection. By means of light microscopic immunohistochemistry, it has been shown that in 20-70% of cervix cancers MHC class I is

  18. A quantitative assay to measure the interaction between immunogenic peptides and purified class I major histocompatibility complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A C; Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S

    1994-01-01

    A direct and sensitive biochemical assay to measure the interaction in solution between peptides and affinity-purified major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has been generated. Specific binding reflecting the known class I restriction of cytotoxic T cell responses was obtained...

  19. Distribution of class ii major histocompatibility complex antigenexpressing cells in human dental pulp with carious lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Haniastuti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is a bacterial infection which causes destruction of the hard tissues of the tooth. Exposure of the dentin to the oral environment as a result of caries inevitably results in a cellular response in the pulp. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a group of genes that code for cell-surface histocompatibility antigens. Cells expressing class II MHC molecules participate in the initial recognition and the processing of antigenic substances to serve as antigen-presenting cells. Purpose: The aim of the study was to elucidate the alteration in the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in human dental pulp as carious lesions progressed toward the pulp. Methods: Fifteen third molars with caries at the occlusal site at various stages of decay and 5 intact third molars were extracted and used in this study. Before decalcifying with 10% EDTA solution (pH 7.4, all the samples were observed by micro-computed tomography to confirm the lesion condition three-dimensionally. The specimens were then processed for cryosection and immunohistochemistry using an anti-MHC class II monoclonal antibody. Results: Class II MHC antigen-expressing cells were found both in normal and carious specimens. In normal tooth, the class II MHC-immunopositive cells were observed mainly at the periphery of the pulp tissue. In teeth with caries, class II MHC-immunopositive cells were located predominantly subjacent to the carious lesions. As the caries progressed, the number of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells was increased. Conclusion: The depth of carious lesions affects the distribution of class II MHC antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp.Latar belakang: Karies merupakan penyakit infeksi bakteri yang mengakibatkan destruksi jaringan keras gigi. Dentin yang terbuka akibat karies akan menginduksi respon imun seluler pada pulpa. Kompleks histokompatibilitas utama (MHC merupakan sekumpulan gen yang mengkode histokompatibilitas

  20. Autoimmunity and inflammation are independent of class II transactivator type PIV-dependent class II major histocompatibility complex expression in peripheral tissues during collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldburger, Jean-Marc; Palmer, Gaby; Seemayer, Christian; Lamacchia, Celine; Finckh, Axel; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Baeten, Dominique; Reith, Walter; Gabay, Cem

    2011-11-01

    To determine the regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in order to investigate their role as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Expression of class II MHC, class II MHC transactivator (CIITA), and Ciita isoforms PI, PIII, and PIV was examined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry in human synovial tissues, arthritic mouse joints, and human and murine FLS. CIA was induced in mice in which isoform PIV of Ciita was knocked out (PIV(-/-) ), in PIV(-/-) mice transgenic for CIITA in the thymus (K14 CIITA), and in their control littermates. HLA-DRA, total CIITA, and CIITA PIII messenger RNA levels were significantly increased in synovial tissue samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with the levels in tissue from patients with osteoarthritis. Human FLS expressed surface class II MHC via CIITA PIII and PIV, while class II MHC expression in murine FLS was entirely mediated by PIV. Mice with a targeted deletion of CIITA PIV lack CD4+ T cells and were protected against CIA. The expression of CIITA was restored in the thymus of PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice, which had a normal CD4+ T cell repertoire and normal surface levels of class II MHC on professional antigen-presenting cells, but did not induce class II MHC on FLS. Synovial inflammation and immune responses against type II collagen were similar in PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice and control mice with CIA, but bone erosion was significantly reduced in the absence of PIV. Overexpression of class II MHC is tightly correlated with CIITA expression in arthritic synovium and in FLS. Selective targeting of Ciita PIV in peripheral tissues abrogates class II MHC expression by murine FLS but does not protect against inflammation and autoimmune responses in CIA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Zika Virus Escapes NK Cell Detection by Upregulating Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-11-15

    NK cells are innate lymphocytes that participate in many immune processes encompassing cancer, bacterial and fungal infection, autoimmunity, and even pregnancy and that specialize in antiviral defense. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors and kill their targets when activating signals overpower inhibitory signals. The NK cell inhibitory receptors include a uniquely diverse array of proteins named killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), the CD94 family, and the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family. The NK cell inhibitory receptors recognize mostly major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) proteins. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat due to its association with birth defects and its pandemic potential. How Zika virus interacts with the immune system, and especially with NK cells, is unclear. Here we show that Zika virus infection is barely sensed by NK cells, since little or no increase in the expression of activating NK cell ligands was observed following Zika infection. In contrast, we demonstrate that Zika virus infection leads to the upregulation of MHC class I proteins and consequently to the inhibition of NK cell killing. Mechanistically, we show that MHC class I proteins are upregulated via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway and that this upregulation is mediated via beta interferon (IFN-β). Potentially, countering MHC class I upregulation during Zika virus infection could be used as a prophylactic treatment against Zika virus. IMPORTANCE NK cells are innate lymphocytes that recognize and eliminate various pathogens and are known mostly for their role in controlling viral infections. NK cells express inhibitory and activating receptors, and they kill or spare their targets based on the integration of inhibitory and activating signals. Zika virus has recently emerged as a major threat to humans due to its pandemic potential and its association with birth defects. The role of NK cells in Zika virus

  2. Diacylglycerol kinase α regulates tubular recycling endosome biogenesis and major histocompatibility complex class I recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2014-11-14

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) presents intracellular-derived peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and its subcellular itinerary is important in regulating the immune response. While a number of diacylglycerol kinase isoforms have been implicated in clathrin-dependent internalization, MHC I lacks the typical motifs known to mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Here we show that depletion of diacylglycerol kinase α (DGKα), a kinase devoid of a clathrin-dependent adaptor protein complex 2 binding site, caused a delay in MHC I recycling to the plasma membrane without affecting the rate of MHC I internalization. We demonstrate that DGKα knock-down causes accumulation of intracellular and surface MHC I, resulting from decreased degradation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DGKα is required for the generation of phosphatidic acid required for tubular recycling endosome (TRE) biogenesis. Moreover, we show that DGKα forms a complex with the TRE hub protein, MICAL-L1. Given that MICAL-L1 and the F-BAR-containing membrane-tubulating protein Syndapin2 associate selectively with phosphatidic acid, we propose a positive feedback loop in which DGKα generates phosphatidic acid to drive its own recruitment to TRE via its interaction with MICAL-L1. Our data support a novel role for the involvement of DGKα in TRE biogenesis and MHC I recycling. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Plasticity of empty major histocompatibility complex class I molecules determines peptide-selector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Werner, Jörn M; Elliott, Tim

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) proteins provide protection from intracellular pathogens and cancer via each of a cell's MHC I molecules binding and presenting a peptide to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. MHC I genes are highly polymorphic and can have significant diversity, with polymorphisms predominantly localised in the peptide-binding groove where they can change peptide-binding specificity. However, polymorphic residues may also determine other functional properties, such as how dependent MHC I alleles are on the peptide-loading complex for optimal acquisition of peptide cargo. We describe how differences in the peptide-binding properties of two MHC I alleles correlates with altered conformational flexibility in the peptide-empty state. We hypothesise that plasticity is an intrinsic property encoded by the protein sequence, and that co-ordinated movements of the membrane-proximal and membrane-distal domains collectively determines how dependent MHC I are on the peptide-loading complex for efficient assembly with high affinity peptides. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Class-first analysis in a continuum: an approach to the complexities of schools, society, and insurgent science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiviezo, Laura Alicia

    2010-06-01

    This essay addresses Katherine Richardson Bruna's paper: Mexican Immigrant Transnational Social Capital and Class Transformation: Examining the Role of Peer Mediation in Insurgent Science, through five main points . First, I offer a comparison between the traditional analysis of classism in Latin America and Richardson Bruna's call for a class-first analysis in the North American social sciences where there has been a tendency to obviate the specific examination of class relations and class issues. Secondly, I discuss that a class-first analysis solely cannot suffice to depict the complex dimensions in the relations of schools and society. Thus, I suggest a continuum in the class-first analysis. Third, I argue that social constructions surrounding issues of language, ethnicity, and gender necessarily intersect with issues of class and that, in fact, those other constructions offer compatible epistemologies that aid in representing the complexity of social and institutional practices in the capitalist society. Richardson Bruna's analysis of Augusto's interactions with his teacher and peers in the science class provides a fourth point of discussion in this essay. As a final point in my response I discuss Richardson Bruna's idea of making accessible class-first analysis knowledge to educators and especially to science teachers.

  5. Simplified Method for Predicting a Functional Class of Proteins in Transcription Factor Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Marek J.

    2013-07-12

    Background:Initiation of transcription is essential for most of the cellular responses to environmental conditions and for cell and tissue specificity. This process is regulated through numerous proteins, their ligands and mutual interactions, as well as interactions with DNA. The key such regulatory proteins are transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs). TcoFs are important since they modulate the transcription initiation process through interaction with TFs. In eukaryotes, transcription requires that TFs form different protein complexes with various nuclear proteins. To better understand transcription regulation, it is important to know the functional class of proteins interacting with TFs during transcription initiation. Such information is not fully available, since not all proteins that act as TFs or TcoFs are yet annotated as such, due to generally partial functional annotation of proteins. In this study we have developed a method to predict, using only sequence composition of the interacting proteins, the functional class of human TF binding partners to be (i) TF, (ii) TcoF, or (iii) other nuclear protein. This allows for complementing the annotation of the currently known pool of nuclear proteins. Since only the knowledge of protein sequences is required in addition to protein interaction, the method should be easily applicable to many species.Results:Based on experimentally validated interactions between human TFs with different TFs, TcoFs and other nuclear proteins, our two classification systems (implemented as a web-based application) achieve high accuracies in distinguishing TFs and TcoFs from other nuclear proteins, and TFs from TcoFs respectively.Conclusion:As demonstrated, given the fact that two proteins are capable of forming direct physical interactions and using only information about their sequence composition, we have developed a completely new method for predicting a functional class of TF interacting protein partners

  6. Robust H∞ filtering for a class of complex networks with stochastic packet dropouts and time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Lyu, Ming; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Guo, Pengfei; Bo, Yuming

    2014-01-01

    The robust H∞ filtering problem is investigated for a class of complex network systems which has stochastic packet dropouts and time delays, combined with disturbance inputs. The packet dropout phenomenon occurs in a random way and the occurrence probability for each measurement output node is governed by an individual random variable. Besides, the time delay phenomenon is assumed to occur in a nonlinear vector-valued function. We aim to design a filter such that the estimation error converges to zero exponentially in the mean square, while the disturbance rejection attenuation is constrained to a given level by means of the H∞ performance index. By constructing the proper Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, we acquire sufficient conditions to guarantee the stability of the state detection observer for the discrete systems, and the observer gain is also derived by solving linear matrix inequalities. Finally, an illustrative example is provided to show the usefulness and effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  7. Class I major histocompatibility complex anchor substitutions alter the conformation of T cell receptor contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A K; Kuhns, J J; Yan, S; Friedline, R H; Long, B; Tisch, R; Collins, E J

    2001-06-15

    An immunogenic peptide (GP2) derived from HER-2/neu binds to HLA-A2.1 very poorly. Some altered-peptide ligands (APL) of GP2 have increased binding affinity and generate improved cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition of GP2-presenting tumor cells, but most do not. Increases in binding affinity of single-substitution APL are not additive in double-substitution APL. A common first assumption about peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility complex is that each residue binds independently. In addition, immunologists interested in immunotherapy frequently assume that anchor substitutions do not affect T cell receptor contact residues. However, the crystal structures of two GP2 APL show that the central residues change position depending on the identity of the anchor residue(s). Thus, it is clear that subtle changes in the identity of anchor residues may have significant effects on the positions of the T cell receptor contact residues.

  8. Study of class I integron in a Burkholderia cepacia complex strain isolated from blood colture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Furlanis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc consists of several species that cause lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis but are also capable to colonize immunocompromised patients. Once established, the infection is usually difficult to eradicate, as Bcc is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Besides, the acquisition of additional resistance determinants by horizontal gene transfer makes very difficult the therapeutic approach to these infections. Among horizontally acquired DNAs, integrons have been frequently reported in many Gramnegative bacteria that affect human health, but they have not been found frequently in Burkholderia isolates until now. In the present work we report on a Bcc isolate, recovered from the blood of an immunocompromised patient, that carries a 2.3 kb class I integron already described in a Salmonella enterica isolate eight years ago, coding for aacA4, aadA1 and catB2 in its cassette array.

  9. Characterisation of major histocompatibility complex class I genes in Japanese Ranidae frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Igawa, Takeshi; Komaki, Shohei; Satta, Yoko

    2016-11-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key component of adaptive immunity in all jawed vertebrates, and understanding the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped these genes in amphibians, one of the earliest terrestrial tetrapods, is important. We characterised MHC class I variation in three common Japanese Rana species (Rana japonica, Rana ornativentris and Rana tagoi tagoi) and identified a total of 60 variants from 21 individuals. We also found evolutionary signatures of gene duplication, recombination and balancing selection (including trans-species polymorphism), all of which drive increased MHC diversity. A unique feature of MHC class I from these three Ranidae species includes low synonymous differences per site (d S ) within species, which we attribute to a more recent diversification of these sequences or recent gene duplication. The resulting higher d N /d S ratio relative to other anurans studied could be related to stronger selection pressure at peptide binding sites. This is one of the first studies to investigate MHC in Japanese amphibians and permits further exploration of the polygenetic factors associated with resistance to infectious diseases.

  10. Soluble major histocompatibility complex molecules in immune regulation: highlighting class II antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakela, Katerina; Athanassakis, Irene

    2018-03-01

    The involvement of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the development and regulation of immune response has been well defined over the years, starting from maturation, antigenic peptide loading, migration to the cell membrane for recognition by the T-cell receptor and recycling for immune response cessation. During this intracellular trafficking, MHC antigens find a way to be excreted by the cells, because they can be found as soluble MHC class I (sMHC-I) and class II (sMHC-II) molecules in all body fluids. Although secretion mechanisms have not been sufficiently studied, sMHC molecules have been shown to display important immunoregulatory properties. Their levels in the serum have been shown to be altered in a variety of diseases, including viral infections, inflammation, autoimmunities and cancer, etc. while they seem to be involved in a number of physiological reactions, including maintenance of tolerance, reproduction, as well as mate choice vis-à-vis species evolution. The present review aims to present the thus far existing literature on sMHC molecules and point out the importance of these molecules in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Interactions of B-class complex proteins involved in tepal development in Phalaenopsis orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Jeng, Mei-Fen; Wu, Ting-Feng; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2008-05-01

    In our previous studies, we identified four DEFICIENS (DEF)-like genes and one GLOBOSA (GLO)-like gene involved in floral organ development in Phalaenopsis equestris. Revealing the DNA binding properties and protein-protein interactions of these floral homeotic MADS-box protein complexes (PeMADS) in orchids is crucial for the elucidation of the unique orchid floral morphogenesis. In this study, the interactome of B-class PeMADS proteins was assayed by the yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. Furthermore, the DNA binding activities of these proteins were assessed by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). All four DEF-like PeMADS proteins interacted individually with the GLO-like PeMADS6 in Y2H assay, yet with different strengths of interaction. Generally, the PeMADS3/PeMADS4 lineage interacted more strongly with PeMADS6 than the PeMADS2/PeMADS5 lineage did. In addition, independent homodimer formation for both PeMADS4 (DEF-like) and PeMADS6 (GLO-like) was detected. The protein-protein interactions between pairs of PeMADS proteins were further confirmed by using a GST pull-down assay. Furthermore, both the PeMADS4 homodimer and the PeMADS6 homodimer/homomultimer per se were able to bind to the MADS-box protein-binding motif CArG. The heterodimeric complexes PeMADS2-PeMADS6, PeMADS4-PeMADS6 and PeMADS5-PeMADS6 showed CArG binding activity. Taken together, these results suggest that various complexes formed among different combinations of the five B-class PeMADS proteins may increase the complexity of their regulatory functions and thus specify the molecular basis of whorl morphogenesis and combinatorial interactions of floral organ identity genes in orchids.

  12. Multimodal representation contributes to the complex development of science literacy in a college biology class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William Drew

    educators are communicating ideas and concepts to their audience with more than simple text. A focused holistic rubric was designed in this study to score how well students in this class were able to incorporate aspects of multimodality into their writing assignments. Using these scores and factors within the rubric (ex. Number of original modes created) they were correlated with classroom performance scores to determine the strength and direction of the relationship. Classroom observations of lectures and discussion sections along with personal interviews with students and teaching assistants aided the interpretation of the results. The results from the study were surprisingly complex to interpret given the background of literature which suggested a strong relationship between multimodal representations and science learning (Lemke, 2000). There were significant positive correlations between student multimodal representations and quiz scores but not exam scores. This study was also confounded by significant differences between sections at the beginning of the study which may have led to learning effects later. The dissimilarity between the tasks of writing during their homework and working on exams may be the reason for no significant correlations with exams. The power to interpret these results was limited by the number of the participants, the number of modal experiences by the students, and the operationalization of multimodal knowledge through the holistic rubric. These results do show that a relationship does exist between the similar tasks within science writing and quizzes. Students may also gain derived science literacy benefits from modal experiences on distal tasks in exams as well. This study shows that there is still much more research to be known about the interconnectedness of multimodal representational knowledge and use to the development of science literacy.

  13. Detection of autoreactive CD4 T cells using major histocompatibility complex class II dextramers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuszynski Charles

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetramers are useful tools to enumerate the frequencies of antigen-specific T cells. However, unlike CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells - especially self-reactive cells - are challenging to detect with major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II tetramers because of low frequencies and low affinities of their T cell receptors to MHC-peptide complexes. Here, we report the use of fluorescent multimers, designated MHC dextramers that contain a large number of peptide-MHC complexes per reagent. Results The utility of MHC dextramers was evaluated in three autoimmune disease models: 1 proteolipid protein (PLP 139-151-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in SJL/J (H-2s mice; 2 myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG 35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57Bl/6 (H-2b mice; and 3 cardiac myosin heavy chain (Myhc-α 334-352-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis in A/J (H-2a mice. Flow cytometrically, we demonstrate that IAs/PLP 139-151, IAb/MOG 35-55 and IAk/Myhc-α 334-352 dextramers detect the antigen-sensitized cells with specificity, and with a detection sensitivity significantly higher than that achieved with conventional tetramers. Furthermore, we show that binding of dextramers, but not tetramers, is less dependent on the activation status of cells, permitting enumeration of antigen-specific cells ex vivo. Conclusions The data suggest that MHC dextramers are useful tools to track the generation and functionalities of self-reactive CD4 cells in various experimental systems.

  14. Direct evidence for conformational dynamics in major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, Andy; Anderson, Malcolm; Bailey, Alistair; Werner, Jörn M; Skipp, Paul; Elliott, Tim

    2017-12-08

    Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC I) help protect jawed vertebrates by binding and presenting immunogenic peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Peptides are selected from a large diversity present in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, only a limited number of peptides complement the polymorphic MHC specificity determining pockets in a way that leads to high-affinity peptide binding and efficient antigen presentation. MHC I molecules possess an intrinsic ability to discriminate between peptides, which varies in efficiency between allotypes, but the mechanism of selection is unknown. Elucidation of the selection mechanism is likely to benefit future immune-modulatory therapies. Evidence suggests peptide selection involves transient adoption of alternative, presumably higher energy conformations than native peptide-MHC complexes. However, the instability of peptide-receptive MHC molecules has hindered characterization of such conformational plasticity. To investigate the dynamic nature of MHC, we refolded MHC proteins with peptides that can be hydrolyzed by UV light and thus released. We compared the resultant peptide-receptive MHC molecules with non-hydrolyzed peptide-loaded MHC complexes by monitoring the exchange of hydrogen for deuterium in solution. We found differences in hydrogen-deuterium exchange between peptide-loaded and peptide-receptive molecules that were negated by the addition of peptide to peptide-receptive MHC molecules. Peptide hydrolysis caused significant increases in hydrogen-deuterium exchange in sub-regions of the peptide-binding domain and smaller increases elsewhere, including in the α3 domain and the non-covalently associated β 2 -microglobulin molecule, demonstrating long-range dynamic communication. Comparing two MHC allotypes revealed allotype-specific differences in hydrogen-deuterium exchange, consistent with the notion that MHC I plasticity underpins peptide selection. © 2017 by The American Society for

  15. Virus subversion of the MHC class I peptide-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybarger, Lonnie; Wang, Xiaoli; Harris, Michael R; Virgin, Herbert W; Hansen, Ted H

    2003-01-01

    Many viral proteins modulate class I expression, yet, in general, their mechanisms of specific class I recognition are poorly understood. The mK3 protein of gamma(2)-Herpesvirus 68 targets the degradation of nascent class I molecules via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Here, we identify cellular components of the MHC class I assembly machinery, TAP and tapasin, that are required for mK3 function. mK3 failed to regulate class I in TAP- or tapasin-deficient cells, and mK3 interacted with TAP/tapasin, even in the absence of class I. Expression of mK3 resulted in the ubiquitination of TAP/tapasin-associated class I, and mutants of class I incapable of TAP/tapasin interaction were unaffected by mK3. Thus, mK3 subverts TAP/tapasin to specifically target class I molecules for destruction.

  16. Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K3 and K5 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ishido, Satoshi; Wang, Chunyang; Lee, Bok-Soo; Cohen, George B.; Jung, J. U.

    2000-01-01

    The T-cell-mediated immune response plays a central role in the defense against intracellular pathogens. To avoid this immune response, viruses have evolved elaborate mechanisms that target and modulate many different aspects of the host's immune system. A target common to many of these viruses is the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes K3 and K5 zinc finger membrane proteins which remove MHC class I molecules from t...

  17. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hateren, Andrew; Elliott, Timothy; Bailey, Alistair

    2017-01-01

    We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter) are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significan...

  18. Increasing complexity: which drug class to choose for treatment of hypertension in the elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser EA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Edelgard Anna Kaiser,1 Ulrich Lotze,2 Hans Hendrik Schäfer1,31Roche Diagnostics International AG, Rotkreuz, Switzerland; 2Department of Internal Medicine, DRK-Manniske-Krankenhaus Bad Frankenhausen, Bad Frankenhausen, Germany; 3Institute of Anatomy II, University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena, GermanyAbstract: Treatment of hypertension in the elderly is expected to become more complex in the coming decades. Based on the current landscape of clinical trials, guideline recommendations remain inconclusive. The present review discusses the latest evidence derived from studies available in 2013 and investigates optimal blood pressure (BP and preferred treatment substances. Three common archetypes are discussed that hamper the treatment of hypertension in the very elderly. In addition, this paper presents the current recommendations of the NICE 2011, JNC7 2013-update, ESH/ESC 2013, CHEP 2013, JNC8 and ASH/ISH guidelines for elderly patients. Advantages of the six main substance classes, namely diuretics, beta-blockers (BBs, calcium channel blockers (CCBs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, and direct renin inhibitors (DRIs are discussed. Medical and economic implications of drug administration in the very elderly are presented. Avoidance of treatment-related adverse effects has become increasingly relevant. Current substance classes are equally effective, with similar effects on cardiovascular outcomes. Selection of substances should therefore also be based on collateral advantages of drugs that extend beyond BP reduction. The combination of ACEIs and diuretics appears to be favorable in managing systolic/diastolic hypertension. Diuretics are a preferred and cheap combination drug, and the combination with CCBs is recommended for patients with isolated systolic hypertension. ACEIs and CCBs are favorable for patients with dementia, while CCBs and ARBs imply substantial cost

  19. Class 1 integrons and antibiotic resistance of clinical Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex in Poznań, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczura, Ryszard; Przyszlakowska, Beata; Mokracka, Joanna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Sixty-three clinical isolates of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex were analyzed for the presence of integrons and antimicrobial resistance. Class 1 integrons were detected in 40 (63.5 %) isolates. None of them had class 2 or class 3 integrons. The majority of the integrons contained aacC1-orfA-orfB-aadA1 gene cassette array. The presence of integrons was associated with the increased frequency of resistance to 12 of 15 antimicrobials tested, multi-drug resistance phenotype, and the overall resistance ranges of the strains.

  20. Expression, refolding and crystallization of murine MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalova, Tatyana; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Harris, Robert A.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Kärre, Klas; Schneider, Gunter; Achour, Adnane

    2005-01-01

    Mouse MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2m and the LCMV-derived peptide gp33 has been produced and crystallized. Resolution of the structure of this complex combined with the structural comparison with the previously solved crystal structure of H-2Db/mβ2m/gp33 should lead to a better understanding of how the β2m subunit affects the overall conformation of MHC complexes as well as the stability of the presented peptides. β 2 -Microglobulin (β 2 m) is non-covalently linked to the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I heavy chain and interacts with CD8 and Ly49 receptors. Murine MHC class I can bind human β 2 m (hβ 2 m) and such hybrid molecules are often used in structural and functional studies. The replacement of mouse β 2 m (mβ 2 m) by hβ 2 m has important functional consequences for MHC class I complex stability and specificity, but the structural basis for this is unknown. To investigate the impact of species-specific β 2 m subunits on MHC class I conformation, murine MHC class I H-2D b in complex with hβ 2 m and the peptide gp33 derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has been expressed, refolded in vitro and crystallized. Crystals containing two complexes per asymmetric unit and belonging to the space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 68.1, b = 65.2, c = 101.9 Å, β = 102.4°, were obtained

  1. Defective major histocompatibility complex class I expression on lymphoid cells in autoimmunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Y; Nathan, D M; Li, F; Li, X; Faustman, D L

    1993-01-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), a chronic autoimmune disease, have recently been shown to have decreased surface expression of MHC class I antigens. Since IDDM and other autoimmune diseases share a strong genetic association with MHC class II genes, which may in turn be linked to genes that affect MHC class I expression, we studied other autoimmune diseases to determine whether MHC class I expression is abnormal. Fresh PBLs were isolated from patient...

  2. Major histocompatibility complex haplotypes and class II genes in non-Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, A.R. (Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (United States) Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA (United States) American Red Cross Blood Services-Northeast Region, Dedham, MA (United States)); Wagner, R.; Khatri, K.; Notani, G.; Awdeh, Z.; Alper, C.A. (Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA (United States)); Yunis, E.J. (Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA (United States) American Red Cross Blood Services-Northeast Region, Dedham, MA (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that HLA-DR4 was markedly increased among Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), almost entirely as the common Jewish extended haplotype (HLA-B38, SC21, DR4, DQw8) or as the haplotype HLA-B35, SC31, DR4, DQw8, and that HLA-DR4, DQw8 was distributed among patients in a manner consistent with dominant expression of a class II (D-region or D-region-linked) susceptibility gene. In the present study of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) halotypes in 25 non-Jewish PV patients, DR4, DQw8 was found in 12 of the patients and DRw6, DQw5 was found in 15. Only 3 patients had neither. The non-Jewish patients were of more Southern European extraction than our controls. This suggests that there are two major MHC susceptibility alleles in American patients with PV. The more ancient apparently arose on a haplotype in the Jews, HLA-B38(35), SC21(SC31), DR4, DQw8, and spread to other populations largely as D-region segments. The other arose in or near Italy on the haplotype HLA-Bw55, SB45, DRw14, DQw5 amd has also partially fragmented so that many patients carry only DRw14, DQw5. The available data do not permit the specific localization of either the DR4, DQw8-or the DRw14, DQw5-linked susceptibility genes.

  3. Diversity at the major histocompatibility complex Class II in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Mette; Woodward, Rachael E; Sanderson, Claire E; Eldridge, Mark D B; Belov, Katherine

    2012-07-01

    The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is the sole survivor of a previously widely distributed and diverse lineage of ornithorhynchid monotremes. Its dependence on healthy water systems imposes an inherent sensitivity to habitat degradation and climate change. Here, we compare genetic diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II-DZB gene and 3 MHC-associated microsatellite markers with diversity at 6 neutral microsatellite markers in 70 platypuses from across their range, including the mainland of Australia and the isolated populations of Tasmania, King Island, and Kangaroo Island. Overall, high DZB diversity was observed in the platypus, with 57 DZB β1 alleles characterized. Significant positive selection was detected within the DZB peptide-binding region, promoting variation in this domain. Low levels of genetic diversity were detected at all markers in the 2 island populations, King Island (endemic) and Kangaroo Island (introduced), with the King Island platypuses monomorphic at the DZB locus. Loss of MHC diversity on King Island is of concern, as the population may have compromised immunological fitness and reduced ability to resist changing environmental conditions.

  4. The Emerging Role of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarotto, Gabriela Bortolança; Nardo, Giovanni; Trolese, Maria Chiara; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Bendotti, Caterina; Rodrigues de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motoneurons (MNs). The etiology of the disease is still unknown for most patients with sporadic ALS, while in 5-10% of the familial cases, several gene mutations have been linked to the disease. Mutations in the gene encoding Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), reproducing in animal models a pathological scenario similar to that found in ALS patients, have allowed for the identification of mechanisms relevant to the ALS pathogenesis. Among them, neuroinflammation mediated by glial cells and systemic immune activation play a key role in the progression of the disease, through mechanisms that can be either neuroprotective or neurodetrimental depending on the type of cells and the MN compartment involved. In this review, we will examine and discuss the involvement of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) in ALS concerning its function in the adaptive immunity and its role in modulating the neural plasticity in the central and peripheral nervous system. The evidence indicates that the overexpression of MHCI into MNs protect them from astrocytes' toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) and promote the removal of degenerating motor axons accelerating collateral reinnervation of muscles.

  5. Persistent Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection occurs in the absence of functional major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganta, Roman Reddy; Wilkerson, Melinda J.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rokey, Aaron M.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We investigated the impact of two genes that control macrophage and T-cell function on murine resistance to E. chaffeensis. Congenic pairs of wild-type and toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4)- or major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-deficient mice were used for these studies. Wild-type mice cleared the infection within 2 weeks, and the response included macrophage activation and the synthesis of E. chaffeensis-specific Th1-type immunoglobulin G response. The absence of a functional tlr4 gene depressed nitric oxide and interleukin 6 secretion by macrophages and resulted in short-term persistent infections for > or =30 days. In the absence of MHC-II alleles, E. chaffeensis infections persisted throughout the entire 3-month evaluation period. Together, these data suggest that macrophage activation and cell-mediated immunity, orchestrated by CD4(+) T cells, are critical for conferring resistance to E. chaffeensis.

  6. Identification of 32 major histocompatibility complex class I alleles in African green monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Li, A; Li, L; Yan, X; Fa, Y; Zeng, L; Fan, J; Liu, B; Sun, Z

    2014-09-01

    The African green monkey may be an ideal replacement for the rhesus monkey in biomedical research, but relatively little is known about the genetic background of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In analysis of 12 African green monkeys, 13 Chae-A and 19 Chae-B alleles were identified. Among these alleles, 12 Chae-A and 9 Chae-B were new lineages. The full amino acid length deduced for Chae-A genes is 365 amino acids, but for Chae-B genes, the lengths are 365, 362, 361, and 359 amino acids, respectively. There were 1-3 Chae-A alleles and 2-5 Chae-B alleles in each animal. In African green monkeys, rhesus monkeys, and cynomolgus monkeys, the MHC-A and MHC-B alleles display trans-species polymorphism, rather than being clustered in a species-specific fashion. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  8. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide-MHC...... complexes have been less well characterized. We have used a complete set of singly substituted analogs of a mouse MHC class I, Kk-restricted peptide, influenza hemagglutinin (Ha)255-262, to address the binding specificity of this MHC molecule. Using the same peptide-MHC complexes we determined the fine...... each other showing that peptide residues 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were exposed on the MHC surface and recognized by the T cells. Thus, the majority, and perhaps all, of the side chains of the non-primary anchor residues may be available for T-cell recognition, and contribute to the stringent specificity of T...

  9. T cell receptor recognition of a 'super-bulged' major histocompatibility complex class I-bound peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tynan, Fleur E; Burrows, Scott R; Buckle, Ashley M; Clements, Craig S; Borg, Natalie A; Miles, John J; Beddoe, Travis; Whisstock, James C; Wilce, Matthew C; Silins, Sharon L; Burrows, Jacqueline M; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Purcell, Anthony W; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie [Queensland; (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2010-07-20

    Unusually long major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted epitopes are important in immunity, but their 'bulged' conformation represents a potential obstacle to {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-MHC class I docking. To elucidate how such recognition is achieved while still preserving MHC restriction, we have determined here the structure of a TCR in complex with HLA-B*3508 presenting a peptide 13 amino acids in length. This complex was atypical of TCR-peptide-MHC class I interactions, being dominated at the interface by peptide-mediated interactions. The TCR assumed two distinct orientations, swiveling on top of the centrally bulged, rigid peptide such that only limited contacts were made with MHC class I. Although the TCR-peptide recognition resembled an antibody-antigen interaction, the TCR-MHC class I contacts defined a minimal 'generic footprint' of MHC-restriction. Thus our findings simultaneously demonstrate the considerable adaptability of the TCR and the 'shape' of MHC restriction.

  10. Expression of hepatitis C virus proteins does not interfere with major histocompatibility complex class I processing and presentation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradpour, D; Grabscheid, B; Kammer, A R; Schmidtke, G; Groettrup, M; Blum, H E; Cerny, A

    2001-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection takes a chronic course in the majority of patients. The mechanisms underlying the evasion of the host immune response and viral persistence are poorly understood. In this context, we investigated interactions of HCV proteins with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I processing and presentation pathways using cell lines that allow the tetracycline-regulated expression of viral structural and nonstructural proteins. These well-characterized inducible cell lines were found to efficiently process and present endogenously synthesized HCV proteins via MHC class I. Functional MHC class I cell-surface expression and intracellular proteasome activity were not affected by the expression of HCV proteins. These results suggest that viral evasion of the host immune response does not involve interactions of HCV with MHC class I processing and presentation. Other mechanisms, such as interference with the interferon system, may be operative in HCV infection, leading to viral persistence.

  11. Delayed Identity Matching to Complex Samples: Teaching Students with Mental Retardation Spelling and the Prerequisites for Equivalence Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromer, Robert; Mackay, Harry A.

    1993-01-01

    Two students with moderate to severe mental retardation learned delayed matching to sample in which some of the trials involved complex sample stimuli, each consisting of a picture and a printed word. Matching to either the preceding picture or printed word sample was reinforced. Evidence for the formation of equivalence classes was observed.…

  12. Disentangling women's responses on complex dietary intake patterns from an Indian cross-sectional survey : a latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padmadas, SS; Dias, JG; Willekens, FJ

    Objective To investigate the degree of individual heterogeneity related to complex dietary behaviour and to further examine the associations of different dietary compositions with selected characteristics. Design Latent class analysis was applied to data from the recent cross-sectional National

  13. Disentangling women's responses on complex dietary intake patterns from an Indian cross-sectional survey: a latent class analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padmadas, S.; Dias, J.; Willekens, F.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the degree of individual heterogeneity related to complex dietary behaviour and to further examine the associations of different dietary compositions with selected characteristics. Design Latent class analysis was applied to data from the recent cross-sectional National

  14. Proteolysis of the heavy chain of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens contain a light chain, beta 2-microglobulin, non-covalently associated to the transmembrane heavy alpha-chain carrying the allotypic determinants. Since the C1q complement component is known to associate with beta 2-microglobulin, and we...

  15. Health status transitions in community-living elderly with complex care needs: a latent class approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béland François

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For older persons with complex care needs, accounting for the variability and interdependency in how health dimensions manifest themselves is necessary to understand the dynamic of health status. Our objective is to test the hypothesis that a latent classification can capture this heterogeneity in a population of frail elderly persons living in the community. Based on a person-centered approach, the classification corresponds to substantively meaningful groups of individuals who present with a comparable constellation of health problems. Methods Using data collected for the SIPA project, a system of integrated care for frail older people (n = 1164, we performed latent class analyses to identify homogenous categories of health status (i.e. health profiles based on 17 indicators of prevalent health problems (chronic conditions; depression; cognition; functional and sensory limitations; instrumental, mobility and personal care disability Then, we conducted latent transition analyses to study change in profile membership over 2 consecutive periods of 12 and 10 months, respectively. We modeled competing risks for mortality and lost to follow-up as absorbing states to avoid attrition biases. Results We identified four health profiles that distinguish the physical and cognitive dimensions of health and capture severity along the disability dimension. The profiles are stable over time and robust to mortality and lost to follow-up attrition. The differentiated and gender-specific patterns of transition probabilities demonstrate the profiles' sensitivity to change in health status and unmasked the differential relationship of physical and cognitive domains with progression in disability. Conclusion Our approach may prove useful at organization and policy levels where many issues call for classification of individuals into pragmatically meaningful groups. In dealing with attrition biases, our analytical strategy could provide critical

  16. CD9 Regulates Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Trafficking in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Martínez Del Hoyo, Gloria; González-Granado, José María; Ramírez-Huesca, Marta; Zorita, Virginia; Rubinstein, Eric; Boucheix, Claude; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2017-08-01

    Antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) stimulates naive CD4 + T cells, triggering T cell activation and the adaptive arm of the immune response. Newly synthesized major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules accumulate at MHC-II-enriched endosomal compartments and are transported to the plasma membrane of DCs after binding to antigenic peptides to enable antigen presentation. In DCs, MHC-II molecules are included in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). However, the role of tetraspanin CD9 in these processes remains largely undefined. Here, we show that CD9 regulates the T cell-stimulatory capacity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), without affecting antigen presentation by fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L)-dependent BMDCs. CD9 knockout (KO) GM-CSF-dependent BMDCs, which resemble monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs), induce lower levels of T cell activation than wild-type DCs, and this effect is related to a reduction in MHC-II surface expression in CD9-deficient MoDCs. Importantly, MHC-II targeting to the plasma membrane is largely impaired in immature CD9 KO MoDCs, in which MHC-II remains arrested in acidic intracellular compartments enriched in LAMP-1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1), and MHC-II internalization is also blocked. Moreover, CD9 participates in MHC-II trafficking in mature MoDCs, regulating its endocytosis and recycling. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspanin CD9 specifically regulates antigenic presentation in MoDCs through the regulation of MHC-II intracellular trafficking. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related A (MICA) Molecules: Relevance in Solid Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Ajay Kumar; Mehra, Narinder K.

    2017-01-01

    An ever growing number of reports on graft rejection and/or failure even with good HLA matches have highlighted an important role of non-HLA antigens in influencing allograft immunity. The list of non-HLA antigens that have been implicated in graft rejection in different types of organ transplantation has already grown long. Of these, the Major Histocompatibility Complex class I chain-related molecule A (MICA) is one of the most polymorphic and extensively studied non-HLA antigenic targets especially in the kidney transplantation. Humoral response to MICA antigens has repeatedly been associated with lower graft survival and an increased risk of acute and chronic rejection following kidney and liver transplantation with few studies showing conflicting results. Although there are clear indications of MICA antibodies being associated with adverse graft outcome, a definitive consensus on this relationship has not been arrived yet. Furthermore, only a few studies have dealt with the impact of MICA donor-specific antibodies as compared to those that are not donor specific on graft outcome. In addition to the membrane bound form, a soluble isoform of MICA (sMICA), which has the potential to engage the natural killer cell-activating receptor NKG2D resulting in endocytosis and degradation of receptor–ligand interaction complex leading to suppression of NKG2D-mediated host innate immunity, has been a subject of intense discussion. Most studies on sMICA have been directed toward understanding their influence on tumor growth, with limited literature focusing its role in transplant biology. Furthermore, a unique dimorphism (methionine to valine) at position 129 in the α2 domain categorizes MICA alleles into strong (MICA-129 met) and weak (MICA-129 val) binders of NKG2D receptor depending on whether they have methionine or valine at this position. Although the implications of MICA 129 dimorphism have been highlighted in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, its role in

  18. Economies of Racism: Grounding Education Policy Research in the Complex Dialectic of Race, Class, and Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anthony L.; De Lissovoy, Noah

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to interrogate the current theoretical discourse in education concerning issues of race and class. The authors maintain that in recent years educational theory and critical policy discourse have unintentionally become splintered in such a way that race and class theories are employed separately, without much analysis of…

  19. Multimodal Representation Contributes to the Complex Development of Science Literacy in a College Biology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William Drew

    2011-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the science literacy of college genetics students who were given a modified curriculum to address specific teaching and learning problems from a previous class. This study arose out of an interest by the professor and researcher to determine how well students in the class Human Genetics in the 21st Century…

  20. The 1.4 Å Crystal Structure of the Class D [beta]-Lactamase OXA-1 Complexed with Doripenem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Karpen, Mary E.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Leonard, David A.; Powers, Rachel A.; (Grand Valley); (Case Western U.-Med)

    2010-01-12

    The clinical efficacy of carbapenem antibiotics depends on their resistance to the hydrolytic action of {beta}-lactamase enzymes. The structure of the class D {beta}-lactamase OXA-1 as an acyl complex with the carbapenem doripenem was determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike most class A and class C carbapenem complexes, the acyl carbonyl oxygen in the OXA-1-doripenem complex is bound in the oxyanion hole. Interestingly, no water molecules were observed in the vicinity of the acyl linkage, providing an explanation for why carbapenems inhibit OXA-1. The side chain amine of K70 remains fully carboxylated in the acyl structure, and the resulting carbamate group forms a hydrogen bond to the alcohol of the 6{alpha}-hydroxyethyl moiety of doripenem. The carboxylate attached to the {beta}-lactam ring of doripenem is stabilized by a salt bridge to K212 and a hydrogen bond with T213, in lieu of the interaction with an arginine side chain found in most other {beta}-lactamase-{beta}-lactam complexes (e.g., R244 in the class A member TEM-1). This novel set of interactions with the carboxylate results in a major shift of the carbapenem's pyrroline ring compared to the structure of the same ring in meropenem bound to OXA-13. Additionally, bond angles of the pyrroline ring suggest that after acylation, doripenem adopts the {Delta}{sup 1} tautomer. These findings provide important insights into the role that carbapenems may have in the inactivation process of class D {beta}-lactamases.

  1. Forming a complex with MHC class I molecules interferes with mouse CD1d functional expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renukaradhya J Gourapura

    Full Text Available CD1d molecules are structurally similar to MHC class I, but present lipid antigens as opposed to peptides. Here, we show that MHC class I molecules physically associate with (and regulate the functional expression of mouse CD1d on the surface of cells. Low pH (3.0 acid stripping of MHC class I molecules resulted in increased surface expression of murine CD1d on antigen presenting cells as well as augmented CD1d-mediated antigen presentation to NKT cells. Consistent with the above results, TAP1-/- mice were found to have a higher percentage of type I NKT cells as compared to wild type mice. Moreover, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from TAP1-/- mice showed increased antigen presentation by CD1d compared to wild type mice. Together, these results suggest that MHC class I molecules can regulate NKT cell function, in part, by masking CD1d.

  2. Structure and Function of Cross-class Complexes of G Protein-coupled Secretin and Angiotensin 1a Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Augustine, Mary Lou; Lee, Leo T O; Chow, Billy K C; Miller, Laurence J

    2016-08-12

    Complexes of secretin (SecR) and angiotensin 1a (Atr1a) receptors have been proposed to be functionally important in osmoregulation, providing an explanation for overlapping and interdependent functions of hormones that bind and activate different classes of GPCRs. However, the nature of these cross-class complexes has not been well characterized and their signaling properties have not been systematically explored. We now use competitive inhibition of receptor bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence complementation to establish the dominant functionally important state as a symmetrical homodimeric form of SecR decorated by monomeric Atr1a, interacting through lipid-exposed faces of Atr1a TM1 and TM4. Conditions increasing prevalence of this complex exhibited negative allosteric modulatory impact on secretin-stimulated cAMP responses at SecR. In contrast, activating Atr1a with full agonist in such a complex exhibited a positive allosteric modulatory impact on the same signaling event. This modulation was functionally biased, with secretin-stimulated calcium responses unaffected, whereas angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses through the complex were reduced or absent. Further supporting this interpretation, Atr1a with mutations of lipid-exposed faces of TM1 and TM4 that did not affect its ability to bind or signal, could be expressed in the same cell as SecR, yet not exhibit either the negative or positive allosteric impact on cAMP observed with the inactive or activated states of wild type Atr1a on function, and not interfere with angiotensin-stimulated calcium responses like complexes with Atr1a. This may provide a more selective means of exploring the physiologic functional impact of this cross-class receptor complex without interfering with the function of either component receptor. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Human class I major histocompatibility complex alleles determine central nervous system injury versus repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Papke-Norton, Louisa M; David, Chella; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-11-17

    We investigated the role of human HLA class I molecules in persistent central nervous system (CNS) injury versus repair following virus infection of the CNS. Human class I A11 + and B27 + transgenic human beta-2 microglobulin positive (Hβ2m + ) mice of the H-2 b background were generated on a combined class I-deficient (mouse beta-2 microglobulin deficient, β2m 0 ) and class II-deficient (mouse Aβ 0 ) phenotype. Intracranial infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in susceptible SJL mice results in acute encephalitis with prominent injury in the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Following infection with TMEV, a picornavirus, the Aβ 0 .β2m 0 mice lacking active immune responses died within 18 to 21 days post-infection. These mice showed severe encephalomyelitis due to rapid replication of the viral genome. In contrast, transgenic Hβ2m mice with insertion of a single human class I MHC gene in the absence of human or mouse class II survived the acute infection. Both A11 + and B27 + mice significantly controlled virus RNA expression by 45 days and did not develop late-onset spinal cord demyelination. By 45 days post-infection (DPI), B27 + transgenic mice showed almost complete repair of the virus-induced brain injury, but A11 + mice conversely showed persistent severe hippocampal and cortical injury. The findings support the hypothesis that the expression of a single human class I MHC molecule, independent of persistent virus infection, influences the extent of sub frequent chronic neuronal injury or repair in the absence of a class II MHC immune response.

  4. Human cytomegalovirus-infected cells have unstable assembly of major histocompatibility complex class I complexes and are resistant to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, A P; Ducroq, D H; Lehner, P J; Borysiewicz, L K

    1994-01-01

    Viruses which cause persistence in the naturally infected host are predicted to have evolved immune evasion mechanisms. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients yet persists without clinical manifestations in seropositive individuals who have normal immune function. We report that HCMV infection in vitro impairs major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) assembly accompanied by resistance to killing by cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphoc...

  5. Deglucosylation of N-linked glycans is an important step in the dissociation of calreticulin–class I–TAP complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Van Leeuwen, Jeroen E. M.; Kearse, Kelly P.

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that newly synthesized major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins interact with calnexin, a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum protein specific for certain glycoproteins bearing monoglucosylated glycans. Here, we studied the association of newly synthesized class I proteins with calreticulin, a soluble calnexin-related ER protein, in murine T cells. We found that, unlike calnexin–class I interactions, calreticulin assembly wi...

  6. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djidjik Réda

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26. Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  7. Clinical, immunological and genetic features in eleven Algerian patients with major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djidjik, Réda; Messaoudani, Nesrine; Tahiat, Azzedine; Meddour, Yanis; Chaib, Samia; Atek, Aziz; Khiari, Mohammed Elmokhtar; Benhalla, Nafissa Keltoum; Smati, Leila; Bensenouci, Abdelatif; Baghriche, Mourad; Ghaffor, Mohammed

    2012-08-03

    Presenting processed antigens to CD4+ lymphocytes during the immune response involves major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. MHC class II genes transcription is regulated by four transcription factors: CIITA, RFXANK, RFX5 and RFXAP. Defects in these factors result in major histocompatibility complex class II expression deficiency, a primary combined immunodeficiency frequent in North Africa. Autosomal recessive mutations in the RFXANK gene have been reported as being the principal defect found in North African patients with this disorder. In this paper, we describe clinical, immunological and genetic features of 11 unrelated Algerian patients whose monocytes display a total absence of MHC class II molecules. They shared mainly the same clinical picture which included protracted diarrhoea and respiratory tract recurrent infections. Genetic analysis revealed that 9 of the 11 patients had the same RFXANK founder mutation, a 26 bp deletion (named I5E6-25_I5E6+1, also known as 752delG26). Immunological and genetic findings in our series may facilitate genetic counselling implementation for Algerian consanguineous families. Further studies need to be conducted to determine 752delG26 heterozygous mutation frequency in Algerian population.

  8. Expression of hepatitis C virus proteins does not interfere with major histocompatibility complex class I processing and presentation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Moradpour, Darius; Grabscheid, Benno; Kammer, Andreas R.; Schmidtke, Gunter; Gröttrup, Marcus; Blum, Hubert E.; Cerny, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection takes a chronic course in the majority of patients. The mechanisms underlying the evasion of the host immune response and viral persistence are poorly understood. In this context, we investigated interactions of HCV proteins with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I processing and presentation pathways using cell lines that allow the tetracycline-regulated expression of viral structural and nonstructural proteins. These well-characterized inducible ...

  9. T cell responses affected by aminopeptidase N (CD13)-mediated trimming of major histocompatibility complex class II-bound peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, S L; Pedersen, L O; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    the exopeptidase Aminopeptidase N (APN, CD13) as one of the enzymes involved in the observed cell-surface antigen processing. The NH2-terminal end of the longer peptide could, even while bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, be digested by APN with dramatic consequences for T cell......Endocytosed protein antigens are believed to be fragmented in what appears to be a balance between proteolysis and MHC-mediated epitope protection, and the resulting peptide-MHC complexes are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cells (APC) and presented to T cells. The events...

  10. Two putative subunits of a peptide pump encoded in the human major histocompatability complex class 2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahram, S.; Arnold, D.; Bresnahan, M.; Strominger, J.L.; Spies, T.

    1991-01-01

    The class 2 region of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) may encode several genes controlling the processing of endogenous antigen and the presentation of peptide epitopes by MHC class 1 molecules to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. A previously described peptide supply factor (PSF1) is a member of the multidrug-resistance family of transporters and may pump cytosolic peptides into the membrane-bound compartment where class 1 molecules assemble. A second transporter gene, PSF2, was identified 10 kilobases (kb) from PSF1, near the class 2 DOB gene. The complete sequences of PSF1 and PSF2 were determined from cDNA clones. The translation products are closely related in sequence and predicted secondary structure. Both contain a highly conserved ATP-binding fold and share 25% homology in a hydrophobic domain with a tentative number of eight membrane-spanning segments. Based on the principle dimeric organization of these two domains in other transporters, PSF1 and PSF2 may function as complementary subunits, independently as homodimers, or both. Taken together with previous genetic evidence, the coregulation of PSF1 and PSF2 by γ interferon and the to-some-degree coordinate transcription of these genes suggest a common role in peptide-loading of class 1 molecules, although a distinct function of PSF2 cannot be ruled out

  11. 'You were not born here, so you are classless, you are free!' Social class and cultural complex in analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Emilija

    2016-09-01

    The unconscious impact of differences in culture and social class is discussed from the perspective of an analyst practising in London whose 'foreign accent' prevents patients from placing her within the social stratifications by which they feel confined. Because she is seen by them as an analyst from both 'inside' and 'outside' the British psycho-social fabric and cultural complex, this opens a space in the transference that enables fuller exploration of the impact of the British social class system on patients' experience of themselves and their world. The paper considers this impact as a trans-generational trauma of living in a society of sharp socio-economic divisions based on material property. This is illustrated with the example of a patient who, at the point of moving towards the career to which he aspired, was unable to separate a sense of personal identity from the social class he so desperately wanted to leave behind and walk the long avenue of individuation. The dearth of literature on the subject of class is considered, and the paper concludes that not enough attention is given to class identification in training. © 2016, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  12. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex class I, and class II DRB loci of captive and wild Indian leopards (Panthera pardus fusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Drashti R; Mitra, Siuli; Bhadouriya, Snehalata; Rao, Tirupathi; Kunteepuram, Vaishnavi; Gaur, Ajay

    2017-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in vertebrate animals, is a multi-genic protein complex that encodes various receptors. During a disease, MHC interacts with the antigen and triggers a cascade of adaptive immune responses to overcome a disease outbreak. The MHC is very important region from immunological point of view, but it is poorly characterized among Indian leopards. During this investigation, we examined genetic diversity for MHC class I (MHC-I) and MHC class II-DRB (MHC-II) among wild and captive Indian leopards. This study estimated a pool of 9 and 17 alleles for MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. The wild group of individuals showed higher nucleotide diversity and amino acid polymorphism compared to the captive group. A phylogenetic comparison with other felids revealed a clustering in MHC-I and interspersed presence in MHC-II sequences. A test for selection also revealed a deviation from neutrality at MHC-II DRB loci and higher non-synonymous substitution rate (dN) among the individuals from wild group. Further, the wild individuals showed higher dN for both MHC I and II genes compared to the group that was bred under captive conditions. These findings suggest the role of micro-evolutionary forces, such as pathogen-mediated selection, to cause MHC variations among the two groups of Indian leopards, because the two groups have been bred in two different environments for a substantial period of time. Since, MHC diversity is often linked with the quality of immunological health; the results obtained from this study fill the gap of knowledge on disease predisposition among wild and captive Indian leopards.

  13. Complex MHC Class I Gene Transcription Profiles and Their Functional Impact in Orangutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Natasja G; Heijmans, Corrine M C; van der Wiel, Marit K H; Blokhuis, Jeroen H; Mulder, Arend; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Claas, Frans H J; Parham, Peter; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2016-01-01

    MHC haplotypes of humans and the African great ape species have one copy of the MHC-A, -B, and -C genes. In contrast, MHC haplotypes of orangutans, the Asian great ape species, exhibit variation in the number of gene copies. An in-depth analysis of the MHC class I gene repertoire in the two

  14. Skeletal muscle major histocompatibility complex class I and II expression differences in adult and juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki; Sallum, Adriana Maluf Elias; Silva, Clovis Artur; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2012-08-01

    To analyze major histocompatibility complex expression in the muscle fibers of juvenile and adult dermatomyositis. In total, 28 untreated adult dermatomyositis patients, 28 juvenile dermatomyositis patients (Bohan and Peter's criteria) and a control group consisting of four dystrophic and five Pompe's disease patients were analyzed. Routine histological and immunohistochemical (major histocompatibility complex I and II, StreptoABComplex/HRP, Dakopatts) analyses were performed on serial frozen muscle sections. Inflammatory cells, fiber damage, perifascicular atrophy and increased connective tissue were analyzed relative to the expression of major histocompatibility complexes I and II, which were assessed as negatively or positively stained fibers in 10 fields (200X). The mean ages at disease onset were 42.0±15.9 and 7.3±3.4 years in adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, respectively, and the symptom durations before muscle biopsy were similar in both groups. No significant differences were observed regarding gender, ethnicity and frequency of organ involvement, except for higher creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels in adult dermatomyositis (pmajor histocompatibility complex I (96.4% vs. 50.0%, pmajor histocompatibility complex II expression (14.3% vs. 53.6%, p=0.004) was observed in juvenile dermatomyositis. Fiber damage (p=0.006) and increased connective tissue (pmajor histocompatibility complex I was an important finding for the diagnosis of both groups, particularly for juvenile dermatomyositis, whereas there was lower levels of expression of major histocompatibility complex II than major histocompatibility complex I. This finding was particularly apparent in juvenile dermatomyositis.

  15. Complex MHC class I gene transcription profiles and their functional impact in orangutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natasja G.; Heijmans, Corrine M.C.; van der Wiel, Marit K.H.; Blokhuis, Jeroen H.; Mulder, Arend; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Doxiadis, Gaby G.M.; Claas, Frans H.J.; Parham, Peter; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    MHC haplotypes of humans and the African great ape species have one copy of the MHC-A, -B, and -C genes. In contrast, MHC haplotypes of orangutans, the Asian great ape species, exhibit variation in the number of gene copies. An in-depth analysis of the MHC class I gene repertoire in the two orangutan species, Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus, is presented here. This analysis involved Sanger and next-generation sequencing methodologies, revealing diverse and complicated transcription profiles for orangutan MHC-A, -B, and -C. Thirty-five previously unreported MHC class I alleles are described. The data demonstrate that each orangutan MHC haplotype has one copy of the MHC-A gene, and that the MHC-B region has been subject to duplication, giving rise to at least three MHC-B genes. The MHC-B*03 and -B*08 lineages of alleles each account for a separate MHC-B gene. All MHC-B*08 allotypes have the C1-epitope motif recognized by KIR. At least one other MHC-B gene is present, pointing to MHC-B alleles that are not B*03 or B*08. The MHC-C gene is present only on some haplotypes, and each MHC-C allotype has the C1-epitope. The transcription profiles demonstrate that MHC-A alleles are highly transcribed, whereas MHC-C alleles, when present, are transcribed at very low levels. The MHC-B alleles are transcribed to a variable extent and over a wide range. For those orangutan MHC class I allotypes that are detected by human monoclonal anti-HLA class I antibodies, the level of cell-surface expression of proteins correlates with the level of transcription of the allele. PMID:26685209

  16. Using intein catalysis to probe the origin of major histocompatibility complex class I-presented peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán-Arribas, Diego J.; Stern, Lawrence J.; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    All vertebrate nucleated cells generate peptides from their expressed gene products and then display them at the cell surface bound to MHC class I molecules. This allows CD8+ T cells to detect and eliminate abnormal cells that are synthesizing foreign proteins, e.g., from viruses or mutations. To permit the immune system to more uniformly monitor a cell's proteins, regardless of their half-life or location, it has been thought that the products of rapid degradation of the mistakes of protein synthesis (defective ribosomal products, DRiPs) preferentially contribute to the class I-presented peptides. However, using intein catalysis to generate peptide sequences exclusively by posttranslational splicing of mature proteins, we show here that presented peptides can be generated from fully folded and functional proteins. Remarkably, the presentation of peptides from two model mature proteins is just as efficient as from newly synthesized proteins subject to errors in translation or folding. These results indicate that for the constructs we have analyzed, DRiPs are not a more efficient source of class I peptides for antigen presentation than the turnover of mature functional proteins. Accordingly, our data suggest that one of the major ways the immune system evaluates the health of cells is by monitoring the breakdown products of the proteome. PMID:23027972

  17. Expression of rat class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alloantigens and hepatocytes and hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.M.; Desai, P.A.; Chakraborty, S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered expression of Class I MHC alloantigens has been reported for murine tumors, and may be associated with the tumorigenic phenotype of tumor cells. To characterize MHC Class I alloantigen expression on a chemically-induced transplantable rat hepatoma cell line, 17X, derived from a (WF x F344) F 1 rat, polyvalent anti-F344 and anti-WF rat alloantisera were first used to immunoprecipitate the rat RT1.A Class I MHC alloantigens expressed on primary (WF x F344) F 1 hepatocyptes in short-term monolayer cultures. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE of immunoprecipitates from 35 S-methionine-labeled (WF x F344) F 1 hepatocytes clearly resolved the RT1.A/sup u/ (WF) and RT1.A/sup LvI/ (F344) parental alloantigens. Identical radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation failed to detect either parental alloantigen on the 17X hepatoma cells. However, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses demonstrated the presence of parental alloantigens on the 17X cells. Immunization of F344 rats but not of WF rats with 17X cells resulted in antibodies cytotoxic for normal (WF X F344) F 1 spleen cells in the presence of complement. These findings indicate that a combination of detection techniques will be necessary to characterize altered alloantigen expression on rat hepatoma cells

  18. Characterization of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2017-12-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been identified as an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group. The species is a promising animal model for HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine studies due to susceptibility to HIV-1. However, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genetics in northern pig-tailed macaques remains poorly understood. We have previously studied the MHC class I genes in northern pig-tailed macaques and identified 39 novel alleles. Here, we describe the MHC class II alleles in all six classical loci (DPA, DPB, DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB) from northern pig-tailed macaques using a sequence-based typing method for the first time. A total of 60 MHC-II alleles were identified of which 27 were shared by other macaque species. Additionally, northern pig-tailed macaques expressed a single DRA and multiple DRB genes similar to the expression in humans and other macaque species. Polymorphism and positive selection were detected, and phylogenetic analysis suggested the presence of a common ancestor in human and northern pig-tailed macaque MHC class II allelic lineages at the DQA, DQB, and DRB loci. The characterization of full-length MHC class II alleles in this study significantly improves understanding of the immunogenetics of northern pig-tailed macaques and provides the groundwork for future animal model studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteolysis of the heavy chain of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens by complement component C1s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1990-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigens contain a light chain, beta 2-microglobulin, non-covalently associated to the transmembrane heavy alpha-chain carrying the allotypic determinants. Since the C1q complement component is known to associate with beta 2-microglobulin, and we...... weights of the fragments are in agreement with the cleavage located in the area between the disulphide loops of the alpha 2-and alpha 3-domains of the heavy chain. In addition human C1s complement is able to cleave H-2 antigens from mouse in a similar fashion but not rat MHC class I antigen or mouse MHC...... class II antigen (I-Ad). Mouse MHC class I antigen-specific determinants could also be detected in supernatant from mouse spleen cells incubated with C1r and C1s. These results indicate the presence in the body fluids of a non-membrane-bound soluble form of the alpha 1-and alpha 2-domains which...

  20. Characterization and 454 pyrosequencing of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I genes in the great tit reveal complexity in a passerine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepil Irem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The critical role of Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc genes in disease resistance and their highly polymorphic nature make them exceptional candidates for studies investigating genetic effects on survival, mate choice and conservation. Species that harbor many Mhc loci and high allelic diversity are particularly intriguing as they are potentially under strong selection and studies of such species provide valuable information as to the mechanisms maintaining Mhc diversity. However comprehensive genotyping of complex multilocus systems has been a major challenge to date with the result that little is known about the consequences of this complexity in terms of fitness effects and disease resistance. Results In this study, we genotyped the Mhc class I exon 3 of the great tit (Parus major from two nest-box breeding populations near Oxford, UK that have been monitored for decades. Characterization of Mhc class I exon 3 was adopted and bidirectional sequencing was carried using the 454 sequencing platform. Full analysis of sequences through a stepwise variant validation procedure allowed reliable typing of more than 800 great tits based on 214,357 reads; from duplicates we estimated the repeatability of typing as 0.94. A total of 862 alleles were detected, and the presence of at least 16 functional loci was shown - the highest number characterized in a wild bird species. Finally, the functional alleles were grouped into 17 supertypes based on their antigen binding affinities. Conclusions We found extreme complexity at the Mhc class I of the great tit both in terms of allelic diversity and gene number. The presence of many functional loci was shown, together with a pseudogene family and putatively non-functional alleles; there was clear evidence that functional alleles were under strong balancing selection. This study is the first step towards an in-depth analysis of this gene complex in this species, which will help

  1. A potential neural substrate for processing functional classes of complex acoustic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle George

    Full Text Available Categorization is essential to all cognitive processes, but identifying the neural substrates underlying categorization processes is a real challenge. Among animals that have been shown to be able of categorization, songbirds are particularly interesting because they provide researchers with clear examples of categories of acoustic signals allowing different levels of recognition, and they possess a system of specialized brain structures found only in birds that learn to sing: the song system. Moreover, an avian brain nucleus that is analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex (the caudo-medial nidopallium, or NCM has recently emerged as a plausible site for sensory representation of birdsong, and appears as a well positioned brain region for categorization of songs. Hence, we tested responses in this non-primary, associative area to clear and distinct classes of songs with different functions and social values, and for a possible correspondence between these responses and the functional aspects of songs, in a highly social songbird species: the European starling. Our results clearly show differential neuronal responses to the ethologically defined classes of songs, both in the number of neurons responding, and in the response magnitude of these neurons. Most importantly, these differential responses corresponded to the functional classes of songs, with increasing activation from non-specific to species-specific and from species-specific to individual-specific sounds. These data therefore suggest a potential neural substrate for sorting natural communication signals into categories, and for individual vocal recognition of same-species members. Given the many parallels that exist between birdsong and speech, these results may contribute to a better understanding of the neural bases of speech.

  2. Primes of the form x2+ny2 Fermat, class field theory, and complex multiplication

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, David A

    2014-01-01

    An exciting approach to the history and mathematics of number theory ". . . the author's style is totally lucid and very easy to read . . .the result is indeed a wonderful story." -Mathematical ReviewsWritten in a unique and accessible style for readers of varied mathematical backgrounds, the Second Edition of Primes of the Form p = x2+ ny2 details the history behind how Pierre de Fermat's work ultimately gave birth to quadratic reciprocity and the genus theory of quadratic forms. The book also illustrates how results of Euler and Gauss can be fully understood only in the context of class fi

  3. Regulation of MHC Class II-Peptide Complex Expression by Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Jin eCho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MHC class II (MHC-II molecules are present on antigen presenting cells (APCs and these molecules function by binding antigenic peptides and presenting these peptides to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. APCs continuously generate and degrade MHC-II molecules, and ubiquitination of MHC-II has recently been shown to be a key regulator of MHC-II expression in dendritic cells (DCs. In this mini-review we will examine the mechanism by which the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I regulates MHC-II expression on APCs and will discuss the functional consequences of altering MHC-II ubiquitination.

  4. Insights into the activation mechanism of class I HDAC complexes by inositol phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Peter J.; Millard, Christopher J.; Riley, Andrew M.; Robertson, Naomi S.; Wright, Lyndsey C.; Godage, Himali Y.; Cowley, Shaun M.; Jamieson, Andrew G.; Potter, Barry V. L.; Schwabe, John W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1, 2 and 3 form the catalytic subunit of several large transcriptional repression complexes. Unexpectedly, the enzymatic activity of HDACs in these complexes has been shown to be regulated by inositol phosphates, which bind in a pocket sandwiched between the HDAC and co-repressor proteins. However, the actual mechanism of activation remains poorly understood. Here we have elucidated the stereochemical requirements for binding and activation by inositol phosphates, demonstrating that activation requires three adjacent phosphate groups and that other positions on the inositol ring can tolerate bulky substituents. We also demonstrate that there is allosteric communication between the inositol-binding site and the active site. The crystal structure of the HDAC1:MTA1 complex bound to a novel peptide-based inhibitor and to inositol hexaphosphate suggests a molecular basis of substrate recognition, and an entropically driven allosteric mechanism of activation. PMID:27109927

  5. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A.J.; Bailey, E.; Woodward, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a 32 P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family

  6. Triptycene based organometallic complexes: a new class of acceptor synthons for supramolecular ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Mondal, Snehasish; Bhowmick, Sourav; Ma, Jianqiu; Tan, Hongwei; Neogi, Subhadip; Das, Neeladri

    2014-09-21

    Preparation and characterization of two new triptycene based polytopic Pt(II) organometallic complexes are being reported. These complexes have three trans-bromobis(trialkylphosphine)platinum(II) units directly attached to the central triptycene unit. These organoplatinum complexes were converted to the corresponding nitrate salts for subsequent use in self-assembly reactions. Characterization of these organometallic triptycene complexes by multinuclear NMR, FTIR, mass spectrometry and elemental analyses is described. The molecular structure of one of the organoplatinum triptycene tripods was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The potential utility of these organometallic tritopic acceptors as building blocks in the construction of metallasupramolecular cages containing the triptycene motif is explored. Additionally, for the first time, 3,3'-bipyridine has been used as a flexible donor tecton for self-assembly of discrete and finite metallacages using triptycene based tritopic organometallic acceptor units. Triptycene motif containing supramolecules were characterized by multinuclear NMR (including (1)H DOSY), mass spectrometry and elemental analyses. Geometry of each supramolecular framework was optimized by employing the PM6 semiempirical molecular orbital method to predict its shape and size.

  7. Second class minors: molecular identification of the autosomal H46 histocompatibility locus as a peptide presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, Hiroeki; Shastri, Nilabh

    2003-02-03

    CD4 T cells regulate immune responses that cause chronic graft rejection and graft versus host disease but their target antigens remain virtually unknown. We developed a new method to identify CD4 T cell-stimulating antigens. LacZ-inducible CD4 T cells were used as a probe to detect their cognate peptide/MHC II ligand generated in dendritic cells fed with Escherichia coli expressing a library of target cell genes. The murine H46 locus on chromosome 7 was thus found to encode the interleukin 4-induced IL4i1 gene. The IL4i1 precursor contains the HAFVEAIPELQGHV peptide which is presented by A(b) major histocompatibility complex class II molecule via an endogenous pathway in professional antigen presenting cells. Both allelic peptides bind A(b) and a single alanine to methionine substitution at p2 defines nonself. These results reveal novel features of H loci that regulate CD4 T cell responses as well as provide a general strategy for identifying elusive antigens that elicit CD4 T cell responses to tumors or self-tissues in autoimmunity.

  8. PLT: a new class of low-complexity optimal transform coders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoong, See-May; Lin, Yuan-Pei

    1999-10-01

    Transform coding and differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) are two of the most important techniques for signal compression. The Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) is the optimal unitary transform that maximizes the coding gain. For DPCM coder, the optimal linear predictor maximizes its coding gain. In this paper, we will provide a connection between KLT and DPCM. A new class of nonunitary transform called Prediction-based Lower triangular Transform (PLT) is introduced. We will show that PLT is a special case of vector prediction, when the predictor is a lower triangular matrix. PLT has the same coding gain as KLT but its design and computational cost is much lower. In addition, it has many other desired features that make it a good choice for signal compression.

  9. Capital dissipation minimization for a class of complex irreversible resource exchange processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shaojun; Chen, Lingen

    2017-05-01

    A model of a class of irreversible resource exchange processes (REPes) between a firm and a producer with commodity flow leakage from the producer to a competitive market is established in this paper. The REPes are assumed to obey the linear commodity transfer law (LCTL). Optimal price paths for capital dissipation minimization (CDM) (it can measure economic process irreversibility) are obtained. The averaged optimal control theory is used. The optimal REP strategy is also compared with other strategies, such as constant-firm-price operation and constant-commodity-flow operation, and effects of the amount of commodity transferred and the commodity flow leakage on the optimal REP strategy are also analyzed. The commodity prices of both the producer and the firm for the CDM of the REPes with commodity flow leakage change with the time exponentially.

  10. Efficient assembly of recombinant major histocompatibility complex class I molecules with preformed disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Hansen, N J

    2001-01-01

    The expression of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) crucially depends upon the binding of appropriate peptides. MHC-I from natural sources are therefore always preoccupied with peptides complicating their purification and analysis. Here, we present an efficient solution to this problem....... Recombinant MHC-I heavy chains were produced in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified under denaturing conditions. In contrast to common practice, the molecules were not reduced during the purification. The oxidized MHC-I heavy chain isoforms were highly active with respect to peptide binding....... This suggests that de novo folding of denatured MHC-I molecules proceed efficiently if directed by preformed disulfide bond(s). Importantly, these molecules express serological epitopes and stain specific T cells; and they bind peptides specifically. Several denatured MHC-I heavy chains were analyzed and shown...

  11. Major Histocompatibility Complex class IIb polymorphism influences gut microbiota composition and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Daniel I; Snowberg, Lisa K; Caporaso, J Gregory; Lauber, Chris; Knight, Rob; Stutz, William E

    2014-10-01

    Animals harbour diverse communities of symbiotic bacteria, which differ dramatically among host individuals. This heterogeneity poses an immunological challenge: distinguishing between mutualistic and pathogenic members of diverse and host-specific microbial communities. We propose that Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC) genotypes contribute to recognition and regulation of gut microbes, and thus, MHC polymorphism contributes to microbial variation among hosts. Here, we show that MHC IIb polymorphism is associated with among-individual variation in gut microbiota within a single wild vertebrate population of a small fish, the threespine stickleback. We sampled stickleback from Cedar Lake, on Vancouver Island, and used next-generation sequencing to genotype the sticklebacks' gut microbiota (16S sequencing) and their MHC class IIb exon 2 sequences. The presence of certain MHC motifs was associated with altered relative abundance (increase or decrease) of some microbial Families. The effect sizes are modest and entail a minority of microbial taxa, but these results represent the first indication that MHC genotype may affect gut microbiota composition in natural populations (MHC-microbe associations have also been found in a few studies of lab mice). Surprisingly, these MHC effects were frequently sex-dependent. Finally, hosts with more diverse MHC motifs had less diverse gut microbiota. One implication is that MHC might influence the efficacy of therapeutic strategies to treat dysbiosis-associated disease, including the outcome of microbial transplants between healthy and diseased patients. We also speculate that macroparasite-driven selection on MHC has the potential to indirectly alter the host gut microbiota, and vice versa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Clinical, Immunological, and Molecular Findings in Five Patients with Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Deficiency from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnavi Aluri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive form of primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID characterized by the deficiency of MHC class II molecules. This deficiency affects the cellular and humoral immune response by impairing the development of CD4+ T helper (Th cells and Th cell-dependent antibody production by B cells. Affected children typically present with severe respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy available for treating these patients. This is the first report from India wherein we describe the clinical, immunological, and molecular findings in five patients with MHC class II deficiency. Our patients presented with recurrent lower respiratory tract infection as the most common clinical presentation within their first year of life and had a complete absence of human leukocyte antigen-antigen D-related (HLA-DR expression on B cells and monocytes. Molecular characterization revealed novel mutations in RFAXP, RFX5, and CIITA genes. Despite genetic heterogeneity, these patients were clinically indistinguishable. Two patients underwent HSCT but had a poor survival outcome. Detectable level of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs were measured in our patients, highlighting that this form of PID may be missed by TREC-based newborn screening program for severe combined immunodeficiency.

  13. Association of early onset myasthenia gravis in Newfoundland dogs with the canine major histocompatibility complex class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Zena; Vernau, Karen; Safra, Noa; Shelton, G Diane; King, Jason; Owen, Joseph; Weich, Kalie; Bannasch, Danika

    2017-05-01

    Acquired Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder whose development in humans has been associated with the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) or Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA). There is a form of early onset MG (EOMG) in Newfoundland dogs that mimics the clinical presentation in humans and appears to have familial inheritance. Genotyping of three classical Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA) class II genes, DLA-DRB1, DLA-DQA1 and DLA-DQB1, in 16 Newfoundlands with EOMG and 46 unaffected Newfoundlands, identified DLA-DQB1 *00301 (p-value = 0.0051 OR: 7.41) as a risk locus for the development of EOMG in this breed. In order to further investigate the extent of the association to the entire MHC region, 208 additional SNPs were genotyped in two phases. Both a risk locus for EOMG to the DLA class I (chr12: 458483-506460) and a protective locus for EOMG susceptibility that extends outside of the DLA class I (chr12: 89701-475348) were identified. Four additional dog breeds with an elevated risk for the development of MG were SNP genotyped, but no shared or significant associations were found. MHC involvement in canine MG disease manifestation overlaps with loci identified in human studies and highlights the value of dogs as a model for genetic studies of naturally occurring diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Male mate choice relies on major histocompatibility complex class I in a sex-role-reversed pipefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, O; Sundin, J; Berglund, A; Rosenqvist, G; Wegner, K M

    2014-05-01

    Mate choice for compatible genes is often based on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Although MHC-based mate choice is commonly observed in female choice, male mate choice remains elusive. In particular, if males have intense paternal care and are thus the choosing sex, male choice for females with dissimilar MHC can be expected. Here, we investigated whether male mate choice relies on MHC class I genes in the sex-role reversed pipefish Syngnathus typhle. In a mate choice experiment, we determined the relative importance of visual and olfactory cues by manipulating visibility and olfaction. We found that pipefish males chose females that maximize sequence-based amino acid distance between MHC class I genotypes in the offspring when olfactory cues were present. Under visual cues, large females were chosen, but in the absence of visual cues, the choice pattern was reversed. The use of sex-role reversed species thus revealed that sexual selection can lead to the evolution of male mate choice for MHC class I genes. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  15. Unconventional Peptide Presentation by Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Allele HLA-A*02:01: BREAKING CONFINEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remesh, Soumya G; Andreatta, Massimo; Ying, Ge; Kaever, Thomas; Nielsen, Morten; McMurtrey, Curtis; Hildebrand, William; Peters, Bjoern; Zajonc, Dirk M

    2017-03-31

    Peptide antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins initiates CD8 + T cell-mediated immunity against pathogens and cancers. MHC I molecules typically bind peptides with 9 amino acids in length with both ends tucked inside the major A and F binding pockets. It has been known for a while that longer peptides can also bind by either bulging out of the groove in the middle of the peptide or by binding in a zigzag fashion inside the groove. In a recent study, we identified an alternative binding conformation of naturally occurring peptides from Toxoplasma gondii bound by HLA-A*02:01. These peptides were extended at the C terminus (PΩ) and contained charged amino acids not more than 3 residues after the anchor amino acid at PΩ, which enabled them to open the F pocket and expose their C-terminal extension into the solvent. Here, we show that the mechanism of F pocket opening is dictated by the charge of the first charged amino acid found within the extension. Although positively charged amino acids result in the Tyr-84 swing, amino acids that are negatively charged induce a not previously described Lys-146 lift. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the peptides with alternative binding modes have properties that fit very poorly to the conventional MHC class I pathway and suggest they are presented via alternative means, potentially including cross-presentation via the MHC class II pathway. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Domain structures and molecular evolution of class I and class II major histocompatibility gene complex (MHC) products deduced from amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Koji

    1984-12-01

    Domain structures of class I and class II MHC products were analyzed from a viewpoint of amino acid and nucleotide sequence homologies. Alignment statistics revealed that class I (transplantation) antigen H chains consist of four mutually homologous domains, and that class II (HLA-DR) antigen β and α chains are both composed of three mutually homologous ones. The N-terminal three and two domains of class I and class II (both β and α) gene products, respectively, all of which being ˜90 residues long, were concluded to be homologous to β2-microglobulin (β2M). The membraneembedded C-terminal shorter domains of these MHC products were also found to be homologous to one another and to the third domain of class I H chains. Class I H chains were found to be more closely related to class II α chains than to class II β chains. Based on these findings, an exon duplication history from a common ancestral gene encoding a β2M-like primodial protein of one-domain-length up to the contemporary MHC products was proposed.

  17. T-cell activation. VI. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibodies in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Röpke, C; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1993-01-01

    Murine T splenocytes stimulated in primary allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) were incubated with soluble anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies induced inhibition in the cytotoxicity of the responding population and this inhibition...

  18. Class II malocclusion with complex problems treated with a novel combination of lingual orthodontic appliances and lingual arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    This case report describes a novel method of combining lingual appliances and lingual arches to control horizontal problems. The patient, who was 25 years of age at her first visit to our hospital with a chief complaint of crooked anterior teeth, was diagnosed with skeletal Class II and Angle Class II malocclusion with anterior deep bite, lateral open bite, premolar crossbite, and severe crowding in both arches. She was treated with premolar extractions and temporary anchorage devices. Conventionally, it is ideal to use labial brackets simultaneously with appliances, such as a lingual arch, a quad-helix, or a rapid expansion appliance, in patients with complex problems requiring horizontal, anteroposterior, and vertical control; however, this patient strongly requested orthodontic treatment with lingual appliances. A limitation of lingual appliances is that they cannot be used with other conventional appliances. In this report, we present the successful orthodontic treatment of a complex problem using modified lingual appliances that enabled combined use of a conventional lingual arch. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. FREQUENCY OF DETACHED CARDIAC DRUGS PRESCRIBING IN PATIENTS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES QRS COMPLEX DURATION ON THE PERMANENT PACING BACKGROUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Shanina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of beta-blockers, amiodarone, antiplatelet agents (acetylsalicylic acid, anticoagulants (warfarin, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics and angiotensin II receptor antagonists prescribing was determined in 114 patients (56 – women, 58 – men with permanent pacemakers in VVI/VVIR (40 patients, DDD/DDDR (26 patient, cardiac resynchronization therapy (14 patients and separate group was made up of 34 patients with sinus sick syndrome in DDD/DDDR pacing mode in 3 QRS complex duration classes: 1 – under 119 ms (normal, 2 – 120-149 ms (elongate and more than 150 ms (significantly elongate. The patients’ average age was 69 ± 7 years. The results showed that the same groups of drugs are being prescribed as in patients with pacemakers as in patients without them. More frequent prescribing of beta-blockers was associated with prevention of the development of possible device-induced arrhythmias and chronic heart failure. More rare appointment acetylsalicylic acid and statins was associated with the lack of attention to therapeutic support. Frequency of prescribing most of used drugs in patients with implanted pacemaker increases with QRS complex duration class.

  20. Determinant capture as a possible mechanism of protection afforded by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules in autoimmune disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    How peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II complexes are naturally generated is still unknown, but accumulating evidence suggests that unfolding proteins or long peptides can become bound to class II molecules at the dominant determinant before proteolytic cleavage. We have compared the immunogenicity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) in nonobese diabetic (NOD), (NOD x BALB/c)F1, and E(d) alpha transgenic NOD mice. We find that a response to the subdominant ANOD- restricted determinant disappears upon introduction of an E(d) molecule, and is restored when scission of HEL separates this determinant from its adjoining, competitively dominant, E(d)-restricted determinant. This suggests that the E(d) molecule binds and protects its dominant determinant on a long peptide while captured neighboring determinants are lost during proteolysis. These results provide clear evidence for "determinant capture" as a mechanism of determinant selection during antigen processing and a possible explanation for MHC- protective effects in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:8228814

  1. Alternative Ii-independent antigen-processing pathway in leukemic blasts involves TAP-dependent peptide loading of HLA class II complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Luijn, M.M.; Chamuleau, M.E.D.; Ressing, M.E.; Wiertz, E.J.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S.; Souwer, Y.; Zevenbergen, A.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; van de Loosdrecht, A.A.; Ham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    During HLA class II synthesis in antigen-presenting cells, the invariant chain (Ii) not only stabilizes HLA class II complexes in the endoplasmic reticulum, but also mediates their transport to specialized lysosomal antigen-loading compartments termed MIICs. This study explores an alternative HLA

  2. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class 1 proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-class...

  3. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidick, Christina; El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E.; Stenmark, Harald; Platta, Harald W.

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept

  4. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidick, Christina [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany); El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E. [Biomedical Research, Human Brain Proteomics II, Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS, Dortmund 44139 (Germany); Stenmark, Harald [Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, Oslo 0310 (Norway); Platta, Harald W., E-mail: harald.platta@rub.de [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany)

    2014-12-23

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept.

  5. Staphylococcus-mediated T-cell activation and spontaneous natural killer cell activity in the absence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapes, S. K.; Hoynowski, S. M.; Woods, K. M.; Armstrong, J. W.; Beharka, A. A.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    We used major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-deficient transgenic mice to show that in vitro natural killer cell cytotoxicity and T-cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins (superantigens) are not dependent upon the presence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. T cells can be activated by exotoxins in the presence of exogenously added interleukin 1 or 2 or in the presence of specific antibody without exogenously added cytokines.

  6. Binding stability of peptides on major histocompatibility complex class I proteins: role of entropy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ahmet; Erman, Burak

    2018-03-01

    Prediction of peptide binding on specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) has long been studied with successful results. We herein describe the effects of entropy and dynamics by investigating the binding stabilities of 10 nanopeptides on various HLA Class I alleles using a theoretical model based on molecular dynamics simulations. The fluctuational entropies of the peptides are estimated over a temperature range of 310-460 K. The estimated entropies correlate well with experimental binding affinities of the peptides: peptides that have higher binding affinities have lower entropies compared to non-binders, which have significantly larger entropies. The computation of the entropies is based on a simple model that requires short molecular dynamics trajectories and allows for approximate but rapid determination. The paper draws attention to the long neglected dynamic aspects of peptide binding, and provides a fast computation scheme that allows for rapid scanning of large numbers of peptides on selected HLA antigens, which may be useful in defining the right peptides for personal immunotherapy.

  7. Human cytomegalovirus-infected cells have unstable assembly of major histocompatibility complex class I complexes and are resistant to lysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, A P; Ducroq, D H; Lehner, P J; Borysiewicz, L K

    1994-05-01

    Viruses which cause persistence in the naturally infected host are predicted to have evolved immune evasion mechanisms. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients yet persists without clinical manifestations in seropositive individuals who have normal immune function. We report that HCMV infection in vitro impairs major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) assembly accompanied by resistance to killing by cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes. Pulse-chase metabolic labelling experiments show that MHC-I complexes continue to be assembled by both uninfected and HCMV-infected cells. However, MHC-I molecules are unstable in HCMV-infected cells and are rapidly broken down. Endoglycosidase H treatment of immunoprecipitates indicates that the breakdown of MHC-I complexes in HCMV-infected cells occurs primarily in a pre-Golgi compartment. Interference with normal MHC-I assembly and expression, if relevant in vivo, may have implications for the restriction of the diversity of the CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte repertoire directed against HCMV antigens and may be an important mechanism of viral persistence.

  8. Effects of pH and polysaccharides on peptide binding to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, C.V.; Roof, R.W.; Allen, P.M.; Unanue, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of immunogenic peptides to class II major histocompatibility molecules was examined at various pH values. The authors studied binding of peptides containing residues 52-61 from hen egg lysozyme (HEL) to I-A k on fixed peritoneal macrophages or to solubilized affinity-purified I-A k . Optimum binding occurred at pH 5.5-6.0 with accelerated kinetics relative to pH 7.4; equilibrium binding was also higher at pH 5.5-6.0 than at 7.4. Similar enhancement at pH 5-6 was observed for the binding of hemoglobin-(64-76) to I-E k and of ribonuclease-(41-61) to I-A k . In contrast, the binding of HEL-(35-45) to I-A k was minimally enhanced at acid pH. Dissociation of cell-associated or purified peptide-I-A k complexes was minimal between pH 5.5 and 7.4, with increased dissociation only at or below pH 4.0 [HEL-(46-61)] or pH 5.0 [HEL-(34-45)]. Thus, optimum peptide binding occurs at pH values similar to the endosomal environment, where the complexes appear to be formed during antigen processing. In addition, they examined the effect of a number of polysaccharides on the binding of peptide to I-A k . Polysaccharides do not appear to bind to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules, which explains the T-cell independence of polysaccharide antigens

  9. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  10. Edmonston Measles Virus Prevents Increased Cell Surface Expression of Peptide-Loaded Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Proteins in Human Peripheral Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yilla, Mamadi; Hickman, Carole; McGrew, Marcia; Meade, Elizabeth; Bellini, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induces expression of the gene products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), whereas IFN-α/β can interfere with or suppress class II protein expression. In separate studies, measles virus (MV) was reported to induce IFN-α/β and to up-regulate MHC class II proteins. In an attempt to resolve this paradox, we examined the surface expression of MHC class I and class II proteins in MV-infected peripheral monocytes in the presence and absence of IFN-α/β. Infection...

  11. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, S N; Miyasaka, T; Polat, M; Kikuya, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mingala, C N; Villanueva, M A; Salces, A J; Onuma, M; Aida, Y

    2014-12-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle.

  12. Cyclometalated N-heterocyclic carbene iridium(iii) complexes with naphthalimide chromophores: a novel class of phosphorescent heteroleptic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoë, Pierre-Henri; Chan, Jonny; Groué, Antoine; Gontard, Geoffrey; Jutand, Anny; Rager, Marie-Noelle; Armaroli, Nicola; Monti, Filippo; Barbieri, Andrea; Amouri, Hani

    2018-03-06

    A series of cyclometalated N-heterocyclic carbene complexes of the general formula [Ir(C^N) 2 (C^C:)] has been prepared. Two sets of compounds were designed, those where (C^C:) represents a bidentate naphthalimide-substituted imidazolylidene ligand and (C^N) = ppy (3a), F2ppy (4a), bzq (5a) and those where (C^C:) represents a naphthalimide-substituted benzimidazolylidene ligand and (C^N) = ppy (3b), F2ppy (4b), bzq (5b). The naphthalimide-imidazole and naphthalimide-benzimidazole ligands 1a,b and the related imidazolium and benzimidazolium salts 2a,b were also prepared and fully characterized. The N-heterocyclic carbene Ir(iii) complexes have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and elemental analysis. Moreover, the molecular structures of one imidazolium salt and four Ir(iii) complexes were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structures provide us with valuable information, most notably the orientation of the naphthalimide chromophore with respect to the N-heterocyclic carbene moiety. All compounds are luminescent at room temperature and in a frozen solvent at 77 K, exhibiting a broad emission band that extends beyond 700 nm. The presence of the naphthalimide moiety changes the character of the lowest excited state from 3 MLCT to 3 LC, as corroborated by DFT and TD-DFT calculations. Remarkably, replacing imidazole with a benzimidazole unit improves the quantum yields of these compounds by decreasing the k nr values which is an important feature for optimized emission performance. These studies provide valuable insights about a novel class of N-heterocyclic carbene-based luminescent complexes containing organic chromophores and affording metal complexes emitting across the red-NIR range.

  13. Complexes of technetium-99m with tetrapeptides, a new class of 99mTc-labelled agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanbilloen, Hubert P.; Bormans, Guy M.; Roo, Michel J. de; Verbruggen, Alfons M.

    1995-01-01

    Tetrapeptides are a class of N4-tetraligands that can efficiently bind 99m Tc. In fact, tetrapeptides can be considered as derivatives of mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) in which the mercaptoacetyl moiety is replaced by a more stable and easier to handle aminoacyl group. Direct labelling of tetrapeptides with 99m Tc in alkaline medium (pH ≥ 11) in the presence of stannous ions gave a high yield (>95%) of one or two (probably isomeric) radiochemical species. Exchange labelling at different pH values in the presence of stannous tartrate resulted in lower yields of the same 99m Tc-labelled products as those formed during direct labelling. In addition, other radiochemical species were formed of which one was characterized as an oxotechnetium-complex with the cyclisized tetrapeptide. Tetrapeptides with a chiral centre in the first amino acid yield upon labelling with 99m Tc two radiochemical species, probably the two diastereomers with an oxotechnetium core respectively syn and anti with respect to the substituent on the amino acid. Only one diastereomer was observed when the chiral carbon atom is located in the second or third amino acid. Electrophoresis indicated that these new 99m Tc-labelled complexes are neutral in acidic medium and negatively charged in neutral and alkaline conditions. This correlates with a complex in which an oxotechnetium(V) group is bound to the ligand through three deprotonated nitrogen atoms of the amide functions and the free electron pair of the amine nitrogen atom. Biodistribution in mice showed for all studied 99m Tc-labelled tetrapeptides a rapid clearance from the blood mainly by the renal system. The presence of a methyl substituent in the tetrapeptide increased the urinary excretion. 99m Tc-labelledl -glycylalanylglycylglycine showed in mice a urinary excretion comparable to that of 99m Tc-MAG3. Further rise of lipophilicity by introduction of a dimethyl, isopropyl or isobutyryl group leads to increased hepatobiliary handling. It

  14. HIV controllers exhibit enhanced frequencies of major histocompatibility complex class II tetramer+ Gag-specific CD4+ T cells in chronic clade C HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos

    2017-01-01

    = 0.02). These data identify an association between HIV-specific CD4+ T cell targeting of immunodominant Gag epitopes and immune control, particularly the contribution of a single class II MHC-peptide complex to the immune response against HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, these results highlight...... complex (MHC) class II tetramers have emerged as a powerful tool for interrogating antigen-specific CD4+ T cells without relying on effector functions. Here, we defined the MHC class II alleles for immunodominant Gag CD4+ T cell epitopes in clade C virus infection, constructed MHC class II tetramers......, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4+ T cells in HIV controllers than progressors (P...

  15. Message survival and decision dynamics in a class of reactive complex systems subject to external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Lucatero, C.; Schaum, A.; Alarcon Ramos, L.; Bernal-Jaquez, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the dynamics of decisions in complex networks subject to external fields are studied within a Markov process framework using nonlinear dynamical systems theory. A mathematical discrete-time model is derived using a set of basic assumptions regarding the convincement mechanisms associated with two competing opinions. The model is analyzed with respect to the multiplicity of critical points and the stability of extinction states. Sufficient conditions for extinction are derived in terms of the convincement probabilities and the maximum eigenvalues of the associated connectivity matrices. The influences of exogenous (e.g., mass media-based) effects on decision behavior are analyzed qualitatively. The current analysis predicts: (i) the presence of fixed-point multiplicity (with a maximum number of four different fixed points), multi-stability, and sensitivity with respect to the process parameters; and (ii) the bounded but significant impact of exogenous perturbations on the decision behavior. These predictions were verified using a set of numerical simulations based on a scale-free network topology.

  16. The outermost N-terminal region of tapasin facilitates folding of major histocompatibility complex class I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav Andreas; Geironson, Linda; Darabi, Anna

    2009-01-01

    ). Using a biochemical peptide-MHC-I-binding assay, recombinant Tpn(1-87) was found to specifically facilitate peptide-dependent folding of HLA-A*0201. Furthermore, we used Tpn(1-87) to generate a monoclonal antibody, alphaTpn(1-87)/80, specific for natural human Tpn and capable of cellular staining of ER......Tapasin (Tpn) is an ER chaperone that is uniquely dedicated to MHC-I biosynthesis. It binds MHC-I molecules, integrates them into peptide-loading complexes, and exerts quality control of the bound peptides; only when an "optimal peptide" is bound will the MHC-I be released and exported to the cell...... surface for presentation to T cells. The exact mechanisms of Tpn quality control and the criteria for being an optimal peptide are still unknown. Here, we have generated a recombinant fragment of human Tpn, Tpn(1-87) (representing the 87 N-terminal and ER-luminal amino acids of the mature Tpn protein...

  17. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class IIβ alleles of New World ranid frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Low major histocompatibility complex class II DQA diversity in the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Xiang-Dong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is one of the most endangered animals due to habitat fragmentation and loss. Although the captive breeding program for this species is now nearly two decades old, researches on the genetic background of such captive populations, especially on adaptive molecular polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC, are still limited. In this study, we characterized adaptive variation of the giant panda's MHC DQA gene by PCR amplification of its antigen-recognizing region (i.e. the exon 2 and subsequent single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP and sequence analyses. Results The results revealed a low level of DQA exon 2 diversity in this rare animal, presenting 6 alleles from 61 giant panda individuals. The observed polymorphism was restricted to 9 amino acid substitutions, all of which occurred at and adjacent to positions forming the functionally important antigen-binding sites. All the samples were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. A significantly higher rate of non-synonymous than synonymous substitutions at the antigen-binding sites indicated positive selection for diversity in the locus. Conclusion The DQA allelic diversity of giant pandas was low relative to other vertebrates. Nonetheless, the pandas exhibited more alleles in DQA than those in DRB, suggesting the alpha chain genes would play a leading role when coping with certain pathogens and thus should be included in conservation genetic investigation. The microsatellite and MHC loci might predict long-term persistence potential and short-term survival ability, respectively. Consequently, it is recommended to utilize multiple suites of microsatellite markers and multiple MHC loci to detect overall genetic variation in order to design unbiased conservation strategies.

  19. Polymorphism in a second ABC transproter gene located within the class II region of the human major histocompatibility complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powis, S.H.; Mockridge, I.; Kelly, A.; Glynne, R.; Beck, S.; Trowsdale, J. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund Labs., London (United Kingdom)); Kerr, L.A. (Guy' s Campus, London (United Kingdom)); Gileadi, U. (Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1992-02-15

    Recent studies have identified genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that may play a role in presentation of antigenic peptides to T cells. The authors have previously described RING4, a gene within the human MHC class II region that has sequence homology with members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter superfamily. They now report the nucleotide sequence of RING11, a second ABC transporter gene located approximately 7 kilobases telomeric to RING4. RING11 is {gamma}-interferon inducible, a property shared with other genes involved in antigen presentation. Comparison between the amino acid sequences of RING11 and RING4 reveals strong homology. They propose that they form a heterodimer that transports peptides from the cytoplasm into the endoplasmic reticulum. They have identified two RING11 alleles, which differ in length of their derived protein sequence by 17 amino acids. The more common of these alleles is present in a Caucasoid population at a frequency of 79%.

  20. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Elliott, Tim

    2017-01-01

    We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter) are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significant sequence diversity. Thus, in most species, there are many different MHC I allotypes expressed, each with different peptide-binding specificity, which can have a dramatic effect on disease outcome. Although MHC allotypes vary in their primary sequence, they share common tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we review the evidence that, despite this commonality, polymorphic amino acid differences between allotypes alter the ability of MHC I molecules to change shape (that is, their conformational plasticity). We discuss how the peptide loading co-factor tapasin might modify this plasticity to augment peptide loading. Lastly, we consider recent findings concerning the functions of the non-classical MHC I molecule HLA-E as well as the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR (transporter associated with antigen presentation binding protein-related), which has been shown to act as a second quality-control stage in MHC I antigen presentation.

  1. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Elliott, Tim

    2017-01-01

    We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter) are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significant sequence diversity. Thus, in most species, there are many different MHC I allotypes expressed, each with different peptide-binding specificity, which can have a dramatic effect on disease outcome. Although MHC allotypes vary in their primary sequence, they share common tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we review the evidence that, despite this commonality, polymorphic amino acid differences between allotypes alter the ability of MHC I molecules to change shape (that is, their conformational plasticity). We discuss how the peptide loading co-factor tapasin might modify this plasticity to augment peptide loading. Lastly, we consider recent findings concerning the functions of the non-classical MHC I molecule HLA-E as well as the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR (transporter associated with antigen presentation binding protein-related), which has been shown to act as a second quality-control stage in MHC I antigen presentation. PMID:28299193

  2. Are Complex Magnetic Field Structures Responsible for the Confined X-class Flares in Super Active Region 12192?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Chen, Huadong, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-08-10

    From 2014 October 19 to 27, six X-class flares occurred in super active region (AR) 12192. They were all confined flares and were not followed by coronal mass ejections. To examine the structures of the four flares close to the solar disk center from October 22 to 26, we firstly employ composite triple-time images in each flare process to display the stratified structure of these flare loops. The loop structures of each flare in both the lower (171 Å) and higher (131 Å) temperature channels are complex, e.g., the flare loops rooting at flare ribbons are sheared or twisted (enwound) together, and the complex structures were not destroyed during the flares. For the first flare, although the flare loop system appears as a spindle shape, we can estimate its structures from observations, with lengths ranging from 130 to 300 Mm, heights from 65 to 150 Mm, widths at the middle part of the spindle from 40 to 100 Mm, and shear angles from 16° to 90°. Moreover, the flare ribbons display irregular movements, such as the left ribbon fragments of the flare on October 22 sweeping a small region repeatedly, and both ribbons of the flare on October 26 moved along the same direction instead of separating from each other. These irregular movements also imply that the corresponding flare loops are complex, e.g., several sets of flare loops are twisted together. Although previous studies have suggested that the background magnetic fields prevent confined flares from erupting,based on these observations, we suggest that complex flare loop structures may be responsible for these confined flares.

  3. Adaptor Protein Complexes AP-1 and AP-3 Are Required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for Rerouting of Class I MHC Molecules to the Lysosomal Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpler, Lisa A.; Glosson, Nicole L.; Downs, Deanna; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Hudson, Amy W.

    2014-01-01

    The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s) is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes. PMID:24901711

  4. Nonlinear Decoupling Control With ANFIS-Based Unmodeled Dynamics Compensation for a Class of Complex Industrial Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajun; Chai, Tianyou; Wang, Hong; Wang, Dianhui; Chen, Xinkai

    2017-04-24

    Complex industrial processes are multivariable and generally exhibit strong coupling among their control loops with heavy nonlinear nature. These make it very difficult to obtain an accurate model. As a result, the conventional and data-driven control methods are difficult to apply. Using a twin-tank level control system as an example, a novel multivariable decoupling control algorithm with adaptive neural-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS)-based unmodeled dynamics (UD) compensation is proposed in this paper for a class of complex industrial processes. At first, a nonlinear multivariable decoupling controller with UD compensation is introduced. Different from the existing methods, the decomposition estimation algorithm using ANFIS is employed to estimate the UD, and the desired estimating and decoupling control effects are achieved. Second, the proposed method does not require the complicated switching mechanism which has been commonly used in the literature. This significantly simplifies the obtained decoupling algorithm and its realization. Third, based on some new lemmas and theorems, the conditions on the stability and convergence of the closed-loop system are analyzed to show the uniform boundedness of all the variables. This is then followed by the summary on experimental tests on a heavily coupled nonlinear twin-tank system that demonstrates the effectiveness and the practicability of the proposed method.

  5. The role of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A antibodies in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yizhou; Stastny, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) antigens are expressed on the endothelium, they are polymorphic and have been shown to be recognized by antibodies produced by transplant recipients. Methods for detection of these antibodies have become available. In the 15th International Histocompatibility Workshop, a study for MICA antibody testing and of MICA genotyping was organized. Antibodies against MICA antigens have been determined either using cells transfected with MICA alleles or recombinant MICA antigens. MICA epitopes were characterized by empirical study of human sera and by correlation with MICA polymorphic amino acids. Sera were absorbed with cells transfected with MICA alleles and site-directed mutagenesis was employed to analyze complex sera. A number of clinical studies have shown associations of antibodies against MICA with decreased survival of kidney transplants and in one investigation with acute rejection in recipients of heart allografts. In addition to the HLA antigens, which elicit a strong immune response against allografted organs, the MICA antigens may be recognized as foreign and induce the production of MICA-specific antibodies. Antibodies against MICA have been associated with a decrease in the survival of organ allografts. The results suggest the MICA antigens are transplantation antigens that can induce an immune response associated with graft failure.

  6. Analysis of Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Gene Transcription in Human Tumors Caused by Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Steven F; Zhang, Ali; Ghasemi, Farhad; Barrett, John W; Nichols, Anthony C; Mymryk, Joe S

    2017-09-10

    Oncoproteins from high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) downregulate the transcription of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I) antigen presentation apparatus in tissue culture model systems. This could allow infected or transformed cells to evade the adaptive immune response. Using data from over 800 human cervical and head & neck tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we determined the impact of HPV status on the mRNA expression of all six MHC-I heavy chain genes, and the β2 microglobulin light chain. Unexpectedly, these genes were all expressed at high levels in HPV positive (HPV+) cancers compared with normal control tissues. Indeed, many of these genes were expressed at significantly enhanced levels in HPV+ tumors. Similarly, the transcript levels of several other components of the MHC-I peptide-loading complex were also high in HPV+ cancers. The coordinated expression of high mRNA levels of the MHC-I antigen presentation apparatus could be a consequence of the higher intratumoral levels of interferon γ in HPV+ carcinomas, which correlate with signatures of increased infiltration by T- and NK-cells. These data, which were obtained from both cervical and oral tumors in large human cohorts, indicates that HPV oncoproteins do not efficiently suppress the transcription of the antigen presentation apparatus in human tumors.

  7. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng,L.; Cho, S.; Malchiodi, E.; Kerzic, M.; Dam, J.; Mariuzza, R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined with mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally.

  8. Differential expression of guinea pig class II major histocompatibility complex antigens on vascular endothelial cells in vitro and in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, C E; Baker, D; Butter, C; Willoughby, D A; Turk, J L

    1989-04-15

    Previous studies have shown that vascular endothelial cells do not normally express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II antigens either in vivo or in vitro. In this investigation it was found that endothelial in the central nervous system (CNS) of normal guinea pigs constitutively express MHC Class II antigens recognized by the monoclonal antibodies HLA-DR, 27E7, and MSgp8. This phenotype is retained when these CNS-derived endothelial cells are propagated in tissue culture. Furthermore, examination of CNS tissue taken from animals in the acute phase of chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis shows that additional epitopes of the MHC Class II antigen, detected by the monoclonal antibodies CI.13.1 and 22C4, are present during the diseased state. This study not only demonstrates constitutive expression of certain MHC Class II determinants by guinea pig endothelial cells, but also shows that other Class II determinants can be differentially expressed in certain disease states.

  9. Derandomizing complexity classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2001-01-01

    Consider a randomized algorithm, such as the Rabin primality test of Rabin, 1976. This algorithm is given as input an integer n, and as auxiliary input, a sequence of coin tosses, i.e., a vector of unbiased independent random bits. The test gives as output either "n is a prime" or "n is not a pri...

  10. Trogocytosis of peptide–MHC class II complexes from dendritic cells confers antigen-presenting ability on basophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kensuke; Shiozawa, Nozomu; Nagao, Toshihisa; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Th2 immunity plays important roles in both protective and allergic responses. Nevertheless, the nature of antigen-presenting cells responsible for Th2 cell differentiation remains ill-defined compared with the nature of the cells responsible for Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation. Basophils have attracted attention as a producer of Th2-inducing cytokine IL-4, whereas their MHC class II (MHC-II) expression and function as antigen-presenting cells are matters of considerable controversy. Here we revisited the MHC-II expression on basophils and explored its functional relevance in Th2 cell differentiation. Basophils generated in vitro from bone marrow cells in culture with IL-3 plus GM-CSF displayed MHC-II on the cell surface, whereas those generated in culture with IL-3 alone did not. Of note, these MHC-II–expressing basophils showed little or no transcription of the corresponding MHC-II gene. The GM-CSF addition to culture expanded dendritic cells (DCs) other than basophils. Coculture of basophils and DCs revealed that basophils acquired peptide–MHC-II complexes from DCs via cell contact-dependent trogocytosis. The acquired complexes, together with CD86, enabled basophils to stimulate peptide-specific T cells, leading to their proliferation and IL-4 production, indicating that basophils can function as antigen-presenting cells for Th2 cell differentiation. Transfer of MHC-II from DCs to basophils was also detected in draining lymph nodes of mice with atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation. Thus, the present study defined the mechanism by which basophils display MHC-II on the cell surface and appears to reconcile some discrepancies observed in previous studies. PMID:28096423

  11. Trogocytosis of peptide-MHC class II complexes from dendritic cells confers antigen-presenting ability on basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kensuke; Shiozawa, Nozomu; Nagao, Toshihisa; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2017-01-31

    Th2 immunity plays important roles in both protective and allergic responses. Nevertheless, the nature of antigen-presenting cells responsible for Th2 cell differentiation remains ill-defined compared with the nature of the cells responsible for Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation. Basophils have attracted attention as a producer of Th2-inducing cytokine IL-4, whereas their MHC class II (MHC-II) expression and function as antigen-presenting cells are matters of considerable controversy. Here we revisited the MHC-II expression on basophils and explored its functional relevance in Th2 cell differentiation. Basophils generated in vitro from bone marrow cells in culture with IL-3 plus GM-CSF displayed MHC-II on the cell surface, whereas those generated in culture with IL-3 alone did not. Of note, these MHC-II-expressing basophils showed little or no transcription of the corresponding MHC-II gene. The GM-CSF addition to culture expanded dendritic cells (DCs) other than basophils. Coculture of basophils and DCs revealed that basophils acquired peptide-MHC-II complexes from DCs via cell contact-dependent trogocytosis. The acquired complexes, together with CD86, enabled basophils to stimulate peptide-specific T cells, leading to their proliferation and IL-4 production, indicating that basophils can function as antigen-presenting cells for Th2 cell differentiation. Transfer of MHC-II from DCs to basophils was also detected in draining lymph nodes of mice with atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation. Thus, the present study defined the mechanism by which basophils display MHC-II on the cell surface and appears to reconcile some discrepancies observed in previous studies.

  12. HLA-F complex without peptide binds to MHC class I protein in the open conformer form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Jodie P; Burian, Aura; Lee, Ni; Geraghty, Daniel E

    2010-06-01

    HLA-F has low levels of polymorphism in humans and is highly conserved among primates, suggesting a conserved function in the immune response. In this study, we probed the structure of HLA-F on the surface of B lymphoblastoid cell lines and activated lymphocytes by direct measurement of peptide binding to native HLA-F. Our findings suggested that HLA-F is expressed independently of bound peptide, at least in regard to peptide complexity profiles similar to those of either HLA-E or classical MHC class I (MHC-I). As a further probe of native HLA-F structure, we used a number of complementary approaches to explore the interactions of HLA-F with other molecules, at the cell surface, intracellularly, and in direct physical biochemical measurements. This analysis demonstrated that HLA-F surface expression was coincident with MHC-I H chain (HC) expression and was downregulated upon perturbation of MHC-I HC structure. It was further possible to directly demonstrate that MHC-I would interact with HLA-F only when in the form of an open conformer free of peptide and not as a trimeric complex. This interaction was directly observed by coimmunoprecipitation and by surface plasmon resonance and indirectly on the surface of cells through coincident tetramer and MHC-I HC colocalization. These data suggest that HLA-F is expressed independently of peptide and that a physical interaction specific to MHC-I HC plays a role in the function of MHC-I HC expression in activated lymphocytes.

  13. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weicai Chen

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae, which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  14. Deacylation Mechanism and Kinetics of Acyl-Enzyme Complex of Class C β-Lactamase and Cephalothin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ravi; Nair, Nisanth N

    2016-03-17

    Understanding the molecular details of antibiotic resistance by the bacterial enzymes β-lactamases is vital for the development of novel antibiotics and inhibitors. In this spirit, the detailed mechanism of deacylation of the acyl-enzyme complex formed by cephalothin and class C β-lactamase is investigated here using hybrid quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical molecular dynamics methods. The roles of various active-site residues and substrate in the deacylation reaction are elucidated. We identify the base that activates the hydrolyzing water molecule and the residue that protonates the catalytic serine (Ser64). Conformational changes in the active sites and proton transfers that potentiate the efficiency of the deacylation reaction are presented. We have also characterized the oxyanion holes and other H-bonding interactions that stabilize the reaction intermediates. Together with the kinetic and mechanistic details of the acylation reaction, we analyze the complete mechanism and the overall kinetics of the drug hydrolysis. Finally, the apparent rate-determining step in the drug hydrolysis is scrutinized.

  15. Association Between Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Zhu, Quan; Chen, Chunjing; Fu, Xiaoling; Li, Yu; Liu, Limin; Luo, Qizhi; Wang, Fuyan; Wang, Yong

    2017-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene (MIC) polymorphisms have been associated with many autoimmune diseases. To explore the correlation between MIC polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we compared the sequence of the MIC gene in Han Chinese patients with SLE from Hainan Island, China, with healthy individuals. In this study, the MIC polymorphisms in 296 subjects (159 patients with SLE and 137 healthy volunteers) of Han ethnicity from Hainan Island were characterized. A chi-square test was performed to evaluate the differences in the allelic frequency of the MIC genes between patients with SLE and the control subjects. The genotyping results indicated that the frequencies of the MICA*010, MICB*014, and MICB*002 alleles were significantly higher in the control subjects than the patients with SLE. Additionally, the results also indicated that the frequency of the MICB*009N in the SLE group was significantly increased compared to that in the matched control subjects. The results of this study suggested that the MICB*009N allele might be a risk factor for SLE, whereas the MICB*014, MICA*010 and MICB*002 alleles were associated with reduced incidence of SLE in the study population. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The expression of major histocompatibility complex class I in endometrial epithelial cells from dairy cow under a simulating hypoxic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haichong; Jiang, Kangfeng; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Gan; Shaukat, Aftab; Deng, Ganzhen

    2018-01-25

    During the first trimester of pregnancy in dairy cows, the fetus is mainly recognized by the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) in the maternal immune system. Before the embryo begins to implant in the maternal uterus, it requires a long time to remodel and develop vessels in the placenta. During this stage, the embryos are exposed to a hypoxic environment. However, the expression of bovine MHC-I has not been determined in hypoxic bovine endometrial epithelial cells (bEECs). Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a marker for hypoxic conditions in cells. In the present study, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ) to establish a hypoxic cell model and then determined the expression of the classical gene BoLA-A and the non-classical gene MICB. qRT-PCR and western blot assays were applied to determine the expression of HIF-1α. qRT-PCR was performed to detect the levels of BoLA-A and MICB mRNAs. The results showed that HIF-1α expression was increased in the hypoxic cell model. The expression of BoLA-A was increased, but MICB levels were decreased in bEECs. Our study provides a basis for exploring the cattle intrauterine environment during pregnancy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Constraints within major histocompatibility complex class I restricted peptides: Presentation and consequences for T-cell recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodossis, Alex; Guillonneau, Carole; Welland, Andrew; Ely, Lauren K.; Clements, Craig S.; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Webb, Andrew I.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Mulder, Roger J.; Dunstone, Michelle A.; Doherty, Peter C.; McCluskey, James; Purcell, Anthony W.; Turner, Stephen J.; Rossjohn, Jamie (Ian Wark Lab.); (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2010-03-24

    Residues within processed protein fragments bound to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) glycoproteins have been considered to function as a series of 'independent pegs' that either anchor the peptide (p) to the MHC-I and/or interact with the spectrum of {alpha}{beta}-T-cell receptors (TCRs) specific for the pMHC-I epitope in question. Mining of the extensive pMHC-I structural database established that many self- and viral peptides show extensive and direct interresidue interactions, an unexpected finding that has led us to the idea of 'constrained' peptides. Mutational analysis of two constrained peptides (the HLA B44 restricted self-peptide (B44DP{alpha}-EEFGRAFSF)) and an H2-D{sup b} restricted influenza peptide (D{sup b}PA, SSLENFRAYV) demonstrated that the conformation of the prominently exposed arginine in both peptides was governed by interactions with MHC-I-orientated flanking residues from the peptide itself. Using reverse genetics in a murine influenza model, we revealed that mutation of an MHC-I-orientated residue (SSLENFRAYV {yields} SSLENARAYV) within the constrained PA peptide resulted in a diminished cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and the recruitment of a limited pMHC-I specific TCR repertoire. Interactions between individual peptide positions can thus impose fine control on the conformation of pMHC-I epitopes, whereas the perturbation of such constraints can lead to a previously unappreciated mechanism of viral escape.

  18. Cross-linking staphylococcal enterotoxin A bound to major histocompatibility complex class I is required for TNF-alpha secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. D.; Chapes, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of how superantigens function to activate cells has been linked to their ability to bind and cross-link the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecule. Cells that lack the MHCII molecule also respond to superantigens, however, with much less efficiency. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to confirm that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) could bind the MHCI molecule and to test the hypothesis that cross-linking SEA bound to MHCII-deficient macrophages would induce a more robust cytokine response than without cross-linking. We used a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an immunprecipitation assay to directly demonstrate that MHCI molecules bind SEA. Directly cross-linking MHCI using monoclonal antibodies or cross-linking bound SEA with an anti-SEA antibody or biotinylated SEA with avidin increased TNF-alpha and IL-6 secretion by MHCII(-/-) macrophages. The induction of a vigorous macrophage cytokine response by SEA/anti-SEA cross-linking of MHCI offers a mechanism to explain how MHCI could play an important role in superantigen-mediated pathogenesis. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Structural and Biochemical Analyses of Swine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Complexes and Prediction of the Epitope Map of Important Influenza A Virus Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuhua; Wu, Yanan; Wang, Song; Wang, Zhenbao; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yanjie; Liang, Ruiying; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhang, Nianzhi; Xia, Chun

    2016-08-01

    The lack of a peptide-swine leukocyte antigen class I (pSLA I) complex structure presents difficulties for the study of swine cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity and molecule vaccine development to eliminate important swine viral diseases, such as influenza A virus (IAV). Here, after cloning and comparing 28 SLA I allelic genes from Chinese Heishan pigs, pSLA-3*hs0202 was crystalized and solved. SLA-3*hs0202 binding with sβ2m and a KMNTQFTAV (hemagglutinin [HA]-KMN9) peptide from the 2009 pandemic swine H1N1 strain clearly displayed two distinct conformations with HA-KMN9 peptides in the structures, which are believed to be beneficial to stimulate a broad spectrum of CTL immune responses. Notably, we found that different HA-KMN9 conformations are caused, not only by the flexibility of the side chains of residues in the peptide-binding groove (PBG), but also by the skewing of α1 and α2 helixes forming the PBG. In addition, alanine scanning and circular-dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the B, D, and F pockets play critical biochemical roles in determining the peptide-binding motif of SLA-3*hs0202. Based on biochemical parameters and comparisons to similar pockets in other known major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) structures, the fundamental motif for SLA-3*hs0202 was determined to be X-(M/A/R)-(N/Q/R/F)-X-X-X-X-X-(V/I) by refolding in vitro and multiple mutant peptides. Finally, 28 SLA-3*hs0202-restricted epitope candidates were identified from important IAV strains, and two of them have been found in humans as HLA-A*0201-specific IAV epitopes. Structural and biochemical illumination of pSLA-3*hs0202 can benefit vaccine development to control IAV in swine. We crystalized and solved the first SLA-3 structure, SLA-3*hs0202, and found that it could present the same IAV peptide with two distinct conformations. Unlike previous findings showing that variable peptide conformations are caused only by the flexibility of the side chains in the groove

  20. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III genetics in two Amerindian tribes from southern Brazil: the Kaingang and the Guarani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weg-Remers, S; Brenden, M; Schwarz, E; Witzel, K; Schneider, P M; Guerra, L K; Rehfeldt, I R; Lima, M T; Hartmann, D; Petzl-Erler, M L; de Messias, I J; Mauff, G

    1997-10-01

    Population genetic studies of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region, comprising C2, BF and C4 phenotypes, and molecular genetic data are rarely available for populations other than Caucasoids. We have investigated three Amerindian populations from Southern Brazil: 131 Kaingang from Ivaí (KIV), 111 Kaingang (KRC) and 100 Guarani (GRC) from Rio das Cobras. Extended MHC haplotypes were derived after standard C2, BF, C4 phenotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with TaqI, together with HLA data published previously by segregation analysis. C2 and BF frequencies corresponded to other Amerindian populations. C4B*Q0 frequency was high in the GRC (0.429) but low in the Kaingang. Unusual C4 alleles were found, viz. C4A*58, A*55 and C4B*22 (presumably non-Amerindian) and aberrant C4A*3 of Amerindian origin occurring with a frequency of 0.223 in the GRC. C4A*3 bands of homo- and heterozygous individuals carrying this variant were Rodgers 1 positive and Chido 1,3 positive, showed a C4A specific lysis type and a C4A like alpha-chain. Polymerase chain reaction studies and sequencing showed that this is based on a C4A*3 duplication with a regular C4A*3 and a partially converted C4A*0304 carrying the C4B specific epitopes Ch 6 and Ch 1,3. Associations of class III haplotypes with particular RFLP patterns were similar to those reported for Caucasoids. The previously described association between combined C4A and CYP21P deletions and the 6.4 kb TaqI fragment was not seen in these Amerindians. This fragment occurred within a regular two locus gene structure in the Kaingang, representing a "short" gene at C4 locus I. C4 and CYP21 duplications were frequently observed. The distribution of extended MHC haplotypes provides evidence for a close relationship between the KIV and KRC and a larger genetic distance between the two Kaingang groups and the GRC.

  1. Major histocompatibility complex class I peptide presentation after Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection assessed via stable isotope tagging of the B27-presented peptide repertoire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringrose, Jeffrey H.; Meiring, Hugo D.; Speijer, Dave; Feltkamp, Theodorus E. W.; van Els, Cecile A. C. M.; de Jong, Ad P. J. M.; Dankert, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) induced by infection with several gram-negative bacteria is strongly associated with expression of the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B27. It is thought that due to the intracellular lifestyle of ReA-inducing bacteria, bacterial fragments can be

  2. Implementing a Case-Based E-Learning Environment in a Lecture-Oriented Anaesthesiology Class: Do Learning Styles Matter in Complex Problem Solving over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ikseon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, Jeongwan

    2009-01-01

    This study explores how students' learning styles influence their learning while solving complex problems when a case-based e-learning environment is implemented in a conventional lecture-oriented classroom. Seventy students from an anaesthesiology class at a dental school participated in this study over a 3-week period. Five learning-outcome…

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of Tc-99m-Labelled Monoclonal Antibody 1D09C3 for Molecular Imaging of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Protein Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; de Vries, E. F. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Signore, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    It is known that major histocompatibility complex class II protein HLA-DR is highly expressed in B-cell lymphomas and in a variety of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, a radiolabelled fully humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) can provide useful prognostic and diagnostic

  4. Novel full-length major histocompatibility complex class I allele discovery and haplotype definition in pig-tailed macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Matthew R; Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Graham, Michael E; Gieger, Samantha M; O'Connor, David H

    2017-11-13

    Pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina, Mane) are important models for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) studies. Their infectability with minimally modified HIV makes them a uniquely valuable animal model to mimic human infection with HIV and progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, variation in the pig-tailed macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and the impact of individual transcripts on the pathogenesis of HIV and other infectious diseases is understudied compared to that of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. In this study, we used Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time circular consensus sequencing to describe full-length MHC class I (MHC-I) transcripts for 194 pig-tailed macaques from three breeding centers. We then used the full-length sequences to infer Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes containing groups of MHC-I transcripts that co-segregate due to physical linkage. In total, we characterized full-length open reading frames (ORFs) for 313 Mane-A, Mane-B, and Mane-I sequences that defined 86 Mane-A and 106 Mane-B MHC-I haplotypes. Pacific Biosciences technology allows us to resolve these Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes to the level of synonymous allelic variants. The newly defined haplotypes and transcript sequences containing full-length ORFs provide an important resource for infectious disease researchers as certain MHC haplotypes have been shown to provide exceptional control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication and prevention of AIDS-like disease in nonhuman primates. The increased allelic resolution provided by Pacific Biosciences sequencing also benefits transplant research by allowing researchers to more specifically match haplotypes between donors and recipients to the level of nonsynonymous allelic variation, thus reducing the risk of graft-versus-host disease.

  5. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  6. Inflammatory bowel diseases influence major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) and II compartments in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, F; Sina, C; Hundorfean, G; Pagel, R; Lehnert, H; Fellermann, K; Büning, J

    2013-05-01

    Antigen presentation by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is crucial for intestinal homeostasis. Disturbances of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)- and II-related presentation pathways in IEC appear to be involved in an altered activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in inflammatory bowel disease. However, a comprehensive analysis of MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC of the small and large bowel in the healthy state as opposed to inflammatory bowel diseases is lacking. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular expression of MHC I and II in the endocytic pathway of IEC throughout all parts of the intestinal tract, and to identify differences between the healthy state and inflammatory bowel diseases. Biopsies were taken by endoscopy from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon in healthy individuals (n = 20). In Crohn's disease (CD), biopsies were obtained from the ileum and colon and within the colon from ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (n = 15). Analysis of IEC was performed by immunoelectron microscopy. MHC I and II were identified in early endosomes and multi-vesicular, multi-lamellar, electrondense and vacuolar late endosomes. Both molecules were enriched in multi-vesicular bodies. No differences were found between the distinct parts of the gut axis. In CD and UC the expression of MHC I and II showed a shift from multi-vesicular bodies towards the basolateral membranes. Within the multi-vesicular bodies, MHC I and II moved from internal vesicles to the limiting membranes upon inflammation in CD and UC. MHC I- and II-enriched compartments in IEC were identical in all parts of the small and large bowel. CD and UC appear to modulate the MHC I- and II-related presentation pathways of exogenous antigens in IEC. © 2012 British Society for Immunology.

  7. Expression, refolding and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of equine MHC class I molecule complexed with an EIAV-Env CTL epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shugang; Qi, Jianxun; Liu, Jun; Chen, Rong; Pan, Xiaocheng; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Feng; Xia, Chun

    2011-01-01

    The equine MHC class I molecule was crystallized in complex with β 2 -microglobulin and a CTL epitope and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution. In order to clarify the structure and the peptide-presentation characteristics of the equine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule, a complex of equine MHC class I molecule (ELA-A1 haplotype, 7-6 allele) with mouse β 2 -microglobulin and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope Env-RW12 (RVEDVTNTAEYW) derived from equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) envelope protein (residues 195–206) was refolded and crystallized. The crystal, which belonged to space group P2 1 , diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and had unit-cell parameters a = 82.5, b = 71.4, c = 99.8 Å, β = 102.9°. The crystal structure contained two molecules in the asymmetric unit. These results should help to determine the first equine MHC class I molecule structure presenting an EIAV CTL epitope

  8. Structure and expression of major histocompatibility complex-binding protein 2, a 275-kDa zinc finger protein that binds to an enhancer of major histocompatibility complex class I genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, L.J. van 't; Lutz, P.M.; Isselbacher, K.J.; Bernards, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding a transcription factor that binds to the enhancer of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes. MHC-binding protein 2 (MBP-2) is a 275-kDa protein, containing two sets of widely separated zinc fingers and a stretch of highly acidic amino acids, a

  9. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II and Programmed Death Ligand 1 Expression Predict Outcome After Programmed Death 1 Blockade in Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Margaretha G M; Redd, Robert A; Cader, Fathima Zumla; Pak, Christine J; Abdelrahman, Sara; Ouyang, Jing; Sasse, Stephanie; Younes, Anas; Fanale, Michelle; Santoro, Armando; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Timmerman, John; Collins, Graham P; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Cohen, Jonathon B; De Boer, Jan Paul; Kuruvilla, John; Savage, Kerry J; Trneny, Marek; Ansell, Stephen; Kato, Kazunobu; Farsaci, Benedetto; Sumbul, Anne; Armand, Philippe; Neuberg, Donna S; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Ligon, Azra H; Rodig, Scott J; Shipp, Margaret A

    2018-02-02

    Purpose Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells evade antitumor immunity by multiple means, including gains of 9p24.1/ CD274(PD-L1)/ PDCD1LG2(PD-L2) and perturbed antigen presentation. Programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor blockade is active in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) despite reported deficiencies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression on HRS cells. Herein, we assess bases of sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL who were treated with nivolumab (anti-PD-1) in the CheckMate 205 trial. Methods HRS cells from archival tumor biopsies were evaluated for 9p24.1 alterations by fluorescence in situ hybridization and for expression of PD ligand 1 (PD-L1) and the antigen presentation pathway components-β2-microglobulin, MHC class I, and MHC class II-by immunohistochemistry. These parameters were correlated with clinical responses and progression-free survival (PFS) after PD-1 blockade. Results Patients with higher-level 9p24.1 copy gain and increased PD-L1 expression on HRS cells had superior PFS. HRS cell expression of β2-microglobulin/MHC class I was not predictive for complete remission or PFS after nivolumab therapy. In contrast, HRS cell expression of MHC class II was predictive for complete remission. In patients with a > 12-month interval between myeloablative autologous stem-cell transplantation and nivolumab therapy, HRS cell expression of MHC class II was associated with prolonged PFS. Conclusion Genetically driven PD-L1 expression and MHC class II positivity on HRS cells are potential predictors of favorable outcome after PD-1 blockade. In cHL, clinical responses to nivolumab were not dependent on HRS cell expression of MHC class I.

  10. New insights into the structure of the MHC class I peptide-loading complex and mechanisms of TAP inhibition by viral immune evasion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praest, Patrique; Liaci, A Manuel; Förster, Friedrich; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2018-03-29

    Several hundred million years of co-evolution of vertebrates and invading pathogens have shaped the adaptive immune system to fight back the unwanted invaders through highly sophisticated defense mechanisms. Herpesviruses manage to dodge this immune response by hampering one of the central hinges of human adaptive immunity, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway. One of the bottlenecks of this pathway is the loading of pathogen-derived peptides onto MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This task is accomplished by the MHC class I peptide-loading complex (PLC), of which the transporter associated with antigen-processing (TAP) is a central component. In this review, we summarize recent structural and functional insights into the molecular architecture of the PLC, how TAP accomplishes the transport of peptides across the ER membrane, and how herpes- and poxviruses inhibit TAP-mediated peptide translocation and subsequent antigen presentation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T

    1993-01-01

    respectively, as well as three transfectant clones reconstituted with the appropriate TcR/CD3 cDNA. For activation, the cells were exposed to anti-TcR/CD3, anti-CD2 and anti-major histocompatibility complex (anti-MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies (mAb) respectively. Cellular activation by these mAb leading...... to an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of TcR/CD3...

  12. Correlation between expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and that of antigen presenting machineries in carcinoma cell lines of the pancreas, biliary tract and colon

    OpenAIRE

    Imanishi, Tatsuya; Kamigaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Tetsu; Hayashi, Shun; Yasuda, Takashi; Kawasaki, Kentaro; Takase, Shiro; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Kuroda, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    To elicit a tumor immune response, tumor antigens represented by majorhistocompatibility (MHC) class I complex on the cell surface is indispensable. Someinvestigators demonstrated that many cancer cells reduce expression ofβ2-microglobulin, a transporter of antigen presenting (TAP) or low molecular protein(LMP), due to the deletion mutant or point mutation. We investigated gene expressionlevels of antigen presenting machineries in 13 cell lines of the pancreas, biliary tractand colon cancer b...

  13. Crystal structure of the human CD4 N-terminal two-domain fragment complexed to a class II MHC molecule.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.-H.; Meijers, R.; Xiong, Y.; Liu, J.-H.; Sakihama, T.; Zhang, R.-G.; Joachimiak, A.; Reinherz, E. L.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School

    2001-09-11

    The structural basis of the interaction between the CD4 coreceptor and a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is described. The crystal structure of a complex containing the human CD4 N-terminal two-domain fragment and the murine I-A{sup k }class II MHC molecule with associated peptide (pMHCII) shows that only the 'top corner' of the CD4 molecule directly contacts pMHCII. The CD4 Phe-43 side chain extends into a hydrophobic concavity formed by MHC residues from both {alpha}2 and {beta}2 domains. A ternary model of the CD4-pMHCII-T-cell receptor (TCR) reveals that the complex appears V-shaped with the membrane-proximal pMHCII at the apex. This configuration excludes a direct TCR-CD4 interaction and suggests how TCR and CD4 signaling is coordinated around the antigenic pMHCII complex. Human CD4 binds to HIV gp120 in a manner strikingly similar to the way in which CD4 interacts with pMHCII. Additional contacts between gp120 and CD4 give the CD4-gp120 complex a greater affinity. Thus, ligation of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 occludes the pMHCII-binding site on CD4, contributing to immunodeficiency.

  14. Pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC Class I complex stability, a correlate of T cell immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of Ags to CTL, and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally...

  15. Class-First Analysis in a Continuum: An Approach to the Complexities of Schools, Society, and Insurgent Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiviezo, Laura Alicia

    2010-01-01

    This essay addresses Katherine Richardson Bruna's paper: "Mexican Immigrant Transnational Social Capital and Class Transformation: Examining the Role of Peer Mediation in Insurgent Science", through five main points. First, I offer a comparison between the traditional analysis of classism in Latin America and Richardson Bruna's call for…

  16. Analysis of associations between major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis of dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, N. E.; Østergård, H.

    1995-01-01

    The associations between BoLA class I haplotypes and subclinical mastitis were investigated using information on 333 cows from three different breeds and crossbreeds from 14 dairy herds in Denmark. Somatic cell count and bacteriological status were used as markers for subclinical mastitis. Associ...

  17. Antibodies against a class II HLA-peptide complex raised by active immunization of mice with antigen mimicking peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam-Tuxen, R; Riise, Erik Skjold

    2009-01-01

    , have been found in the peripheral blood of MS patients. These autoreactive T cells are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MS. In this article, antibodies against the HLA complex DR2b (DRA1*0101/DRB1*1501) in complex with the MBP-derived peptide MBP(85-99) have been generated by immunization...

  18. HIV Controllers Exhibit Enhanced Frequencies of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Tetramer+Gag-Specific CD4+T Cells in Chronic Clade C HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Faatima; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Porichis, Filippos; Mewalal, Nikoshia; Pretorius, Karyn; Ismail, Nasreen; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Carrington, Mary; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Ndhlovu, Zaza M

    2017-04-01

    Immune control of viral infections is heavily dependent on helper CD4 + T cell function. However, the understanding of the contribution of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses to immune protection against HIV-1, particularly in clade C infection, remains incomplete. Recently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramers have emerged as a powerful tool for interrogating antigen-specific CD4 + T cells without relying on effector functions. Here, we defined the MHC class II alleles for immunodominant Gag CD4 + T cell epitopes in clade C virus infection, constructed MHC class II tetramers, and then used these to define the magnitude, function, and relation to the viral load of HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in a cohort of untreated HIV clade C-infected persons. We observed significantly higher frequencies of MHC class II tetramer-positive CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers than progressors ( P = 0.0001), and these expanded Gag-specific CD4 + T cells in HIV controllers showed higher levels of expression of the cytolytic proteins granzymes A and B. Importantly, targeting of the immunodominant Gag41 peptide in the context of HLA class II DRB1*1101 was associated with HIV control ( r = -0.5, P = 0.02). These data identify an association between HIV-specific CD4 + T cell targeting of immunodominant Gag epitopes and immune control, particularly the contribution of a single class II MHC-peptide complex to the immune response against HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, these results highlight the advantage of the use of class II tetramers in evaluating HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses in natural infections. IMPORTANCE Increasing evidence suggests that virus-specific CD4 + T cells contribute to the immune-mediated control of clade B HIV-1 infection, yet there remains a relative paucity of data regarding the role of HIV-specific CD4 + T cells in shaping adaptive immune responses in individuals infected with clade C, which is responsible for the majority of HIV

  19. Migration-related health inequalities: showing the complex interactions between gender, social class and place of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmusi, Davide; Borrell, Carme; Benach, Joan

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we briefly review theories and findings on migration and health from the health equity perspective, and then analyse migration-related health inequalities taking into account gender, social class and migration characteristics in the adult population aged 25-64 living in Catalonia, Spain. On the basis of the characterisation of migration types derived from the review, we distinguished between immigrants from other regions of Spain and those from other countries, and within each group, those from richer or poorer areas; foreign immigrants from low-income countries were also distinguished according to duration of residence. Further stratification by sex and social class was applied. Groups were compared in relation to self-assessed health in two cross-sectional population-based surveys, and in relation to indicators of socio-economic conditions (individual income, an index of material and financial assets, and an index of employment precariousness) in one survey. Social class and gender inequalities were evident in both health and socio-economic conditions, and within both the native and immigrant subgroups. Migration-related health inequalities affected both internal and international immigrants, but were mainly limited to those from poor areas, were generally consistent with their socio-economic deprivation, and apparently more pronounced in manual social classes and especially for women. Foreign immigrants from poor countries had the poorest socio-economic situation but relatively better health (especially men with shorter length of residence). Our findings on immigrants from Spain highlight the transitory nature of the 'healthy immigrant effect', and that action on inequality in socio-economic determinants affecting migrant groups should not be deferred. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression and hemagglutinin subtype influence the infectivity of type A influenza virus for respiratory dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M; Zhou, Haixia; Albrecht, Randy A; Dodd, Haley A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Braciale, Thomas J

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in antiviral immunity, functioning both as innate effector cells in early phases of the immune response and subsequently as antigen-presenting cells that activate the adaptive immune response. In the murine respiratory tract, there are several respiratory dendritic cell (RDC) subsets, including CD103(+) DC, CD11b(hi) DC, monocyte/macrophage DC, and plasmacytoid DC. However, little is known about the interaction between these tissue-resident RDC and viruses that are encountered during natural infection in the respiratory tract. Here, we show both in vitro and in vivo that the susceptibility of murine RDC to infection with type A influenza virus varies with the level of MHC class II expression by RDC and with the virus strain. Both CD103(+) and CD11b(hi) RDC, which express the highest basal level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, are highly susceptible to infection by type A influenza virus. However, efficient infection is restricted to type A influenza virus strains of the H2N2 subtype. Furthermore, enhanced infectivity by viruses of the H2N2 subtype is linked to expression of the I-E MHC class II locus product. These results suggest a potential novel role for MHC class II molecules in influenza virus infection and pathogenesis in the respiratory tract.

  1. Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Hemagglutinin Subtype Influence the Infectivity of Type A Influenza Virus for Respiratory Dendritic Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M.; Zhou, Haixia; Albrecht, Randy A.; Dodd, Haley A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in antiviral immunity, functioning both as innate effector cells in early phases of the immune response and subsequently as antigen-presenting cells that activate the adaptive immune response. In the murine respiratory tract, there are several respiratory dendritic cell (RDC) subsets, including CD103+ DC, CD11bhi DC, monocyte/macrophage DC, and plasmacytoid DC. However, little is known about the interaction between these tissue-resident RDC and viruses that are encountered during natural infection in the respiratory tract. Here, we show both in vitro and in vivo that the susceptibility of murine RDC to infection with type A influenza virus varies with the level of MHC class II expression by RDC and with the virus strain. Both CD103+ and CD11bhi RDC, which express the highest basal level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, are highly susceptible to infection by type A influenza virus. However, efficient infection is restricted to type A influenza virus strains of the H2N2 subtype. Furthermore, enhanced infectivity by viruses of the H2N2 subtype is linked to expression of the I-E MHC class II locus product. These results suggest a potential novel role for MHC class II molecules in influenza virus infection and pathogenesis in the respiratory tract. PMID:21917972

  2. Three-coordinate gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: a new class of strongly luminescent derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Renso; López-de-Luzuriaga, José M; Laguna, Antonio; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2014-01-07

    A selected group of cationic three-coordinate Au(I)-NHC complexes of the form [Au(NHC)(dppbz)]OTf have been prepared from a commercially available bidentate phosphine. All complexes have been fully characterised by NMR and mass spectroscopy. The [Au(NHC)](+) fragment shows a pronounced tendency to form linear complexes which is confirmed by the molecular structure of [Au(IPr)(dppbz)]OTf in the solid state. The complexes are brightly luminescent and present very high quantum yield values in the solid state. The assignments of the electronic transitions involved in the emissions are of a phosphorescent nature and it is proposed that the origin of the emissions is derived from the ligand (dppbz) to metal-ligand (Au-NHC) charge-transfer (LML'CT) transition.

  3. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T

    1993-01-01

    We have studied activation-induced changes in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, and clonal abortion of the human leukaemic T-cell line Jurkat and three T-cell receptor (TcR)/CD3 receptor negative clones deficient for the TcR alpha, TcR beta and CD3 gamma chains...... to an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of TcR/CD3...... expression. The present observation suggest the existence of different secondary messenger systems operating in Jurkat cells following activation via the TcR/CD3, CD2 and the MHC class I pathways, respectively....

  4. Localization of MHC class II/human cartilage glycoprotein-39 complexes in synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients using complex-specific monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Peter G. A.; Baeten, Dominique; Rovers, Eric; Veys, Eric M.; Rijnders, Antonius W. M.; Meijerink, Jan; de Keyser, Filip; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) was identified as a candidate autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To further investigate the relevance of this Ag in RA, we have generated a set of five mAbs to a combination epitope of complexes of HC gp-39(263-275) and the RA-associated DR alpha beta

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class II DOA sequences from three Antarctic seal species verify stabilizing selection on the DO locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, D J; Stewart, B S; Lehman, N

    2002-12-01

    To provide additional support for the sequence conservation and hence the regulatory role of the MHC class II DOA locus, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of exon 2 and exon 3, along with the intervening intron, of the Ross seal, and sequences from the exon 2 region from the Weddell and leopard seals. These are the first reports of the sequences of this locus from a carnivore species. The results demonstrate strong conservation among mammals for the exon sequence and produce a gene genealogy that is consistent in topology with a species tree.

  6. Antibodies to major histocompatibility complex class II antigens directly prime neutrophils and cause acute lung injury in a two-event in vivo rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelher, Marguerite R.; Banerjee, Anirban; Gamboni, Fabia; Anderson, Cameron; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a significant cause of mortality, especially after transfusions containing antibodies to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens. We hypothesize that a first event induces both 1) polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) to express MHC class II antigens, and 2) activation of the pulmonary endothelium, leading to PMN sequestration, so that the infusion of specific MHC class II antibodies to these antigens causes PMN-mediated acute lung injury (ALI). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Rats were treated with saline (NS), endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), or cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ], macrophage colony-stimulating factor [MCSF], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNFα]); the PMNs were isolated; and the surface expression of the MHC class II antigen OX6 and priming by OX6 antibodies were measured by flow cytometry or priming assays. RESULTS A two-event model of ALI was completed with NS, LPS, or IFNγ/MCSF/TNFα (first events) and the infusion of OX6 (second event). Compared with NS incubation, rats treated with either LPS or IFNγ/MCSF/TNFα exhibited OX6 PMN surface expression, OX6 antibodies primed the formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine (fMLF)-activated respiratory burst, and PMN sequestration was increased. OX6 antibody infusion into LPS-incubated or IFNγ/MCSF/TNFα-incubated rats elicited ALI, the OX6 antibody was present on the PMNs, and PMN depletion abrogated ALI. CONCLUSION Proinflammatory first events induce PMN MHC class II surface expression, activation of the pulmonary endothelium, and PMN sequestration such that the infusion of cognate antibodies precipitates TRALI. PMID:27667662

  7. Predicting the properties of a new class of host-guest complexes: C60 fullerene and CB[9] cucurbituril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fileti, Eudes; Colherinhas, Guilherme; Malaspina, Thaciana

    2014-11-07

    DFT, semi-empirical and classical molecular dynamics methods were used to describe the structure and stability of the inclusion complex formed by the fullerene C60 and the cucurbituril CB[9]. Our results indicate a high structural compatibility between the two monomers, which is evident from the potential energy curve for the inclusion process of the C60 into the CB[9] cavity. The interaction between the two monomers is mainly of the van der Waals type and leads to a highly stable complex. Thermal contributions and environmental interaction are taken into account by the free energy of binding of -224 kJ mol(-1), indicating that even in aqueous medium the complex remains very stable.

  8. Biochemical identification of the bovine blood group M' antigen as a major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønberg, L S; Larsen, B; Koch, C

    1995-01-01

    Absorption and elution experiments showed that it was impossible to separate antibodies against blood group factor M' from antibodies against bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA) A16 in an antiserum showing haemolytic activity against M' as well as lymphocytotoxic activity against BoLA-A16....... To elucidate the structural relationship between BoLA-A16 and blood group antigen M', immunoprecipitation experiments on red and white cell lysates isolated from M'-A16 positive and negative cattle were carried out. These results showed that M(r) 44,000 and M(r) 12000 polypeptides can be precipitated from both...... difference in the pI of the immunoprecipitable components of red and white cells was observed. All together, this indicates that either the blood group antigen M' is the BoLA-A16 class I antigen or M' and BoLA-A16 are two different class I polypeptides with the same relative mass, sharing identical epitopes...

  9. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  10. On generalized de Rham-Hodge complexes, the related characteristic Chern classes and some applications to integrable multi-dimensional differential systems on Riemannian manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolubov, Nikolai N. Jr.; Prykarpatsky, Anatoliy K.

    2006-12-01

    The differential-geometric aspects of generalized de Rham-Hodge complexes naturally related with integrable multi-dimensional differential systems of M. Gromov type, as well as the geometric structure of Chern characteristic classes are studied. Special differential invariants of the Chern type are constructed, their importance for the integrability of multi-dimensional nonlinear differential systems on Riemannian manifolds is discussed. An example of the three-dimensional Davey-Stewartson type nonlinear strongly integrable differential system is considered, its Cartan type connection mapping and related Chern type differential invariants are analyzed. (author)

  11. Giant panda genomic data provide insight into the birth-and-death process of mammalian major histocompatibility complex class II genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Hong Wan

    Full Text Available To gain an understanding of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of the giant panda major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, we determined a 636,503-bp nucleotide sequence spanning the MHC class II region. Analysis revealed that the MHC class II region from this rare species contained 26 loci (17 predicted to be expressed, of which 10 are classical class II genes (1 DRA, 2 DRB, 2 DQA, 3 DQB, 1 DYB, 1 DPA, and 2 DPB and 4 are non-classical class II genes (1 DOA, 1 DOB, 1 DMA, and 1 DMB. The presence of DYB, a gene specific to ruminants, prompted a comparison of the giant panda class II sequence with those of humans, cats, dogs, cattle, pigs, and mice. The results indicated that birth and death events within the DQ and DRB-DY regions led to major lineage differences, with absence of these regions in the cat and in humans and mice respectively. The phylogenetic trees constructed using all expressed alpha and beta genes from marsupials and placental mammals showed that: (1 because marsupials carry loci corresponding to DR, DP, DO and DM genes, those subregions most likely developed before the divergence of marsupials and placental mammals, approximately 150 million years ago (MYA; (2 conversely, the DQ and DY regions must have evolved later, but before the radiation of placental mammals (100 MYA. As a result, the typical genomic structure of MHC class II genes for the giant panda is similar to that of the other placental mammals and corresponds to BTNL2 approximately DR1 approximately DQ approximately DR2 approximately DY approximately DO_box approximately DP approximately COL11A2. Over the past 100 million years, there has been birth and death of mammalian DR, DQ, DY, and DP genes, an evolutionary process that has brought about the current species-specific genomic structure of the MHC class II region. Furthermore, facing certain similar pathogens, mammals have adopted intra-subregion (DR and DQ and inter-subregion (between DQ and DP

  12. Expressions of the S-matrix for a large class of potentials over the complex k-plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanellopoulos, E.J.; Kanellopoulos, Th.V.

    1977-01-01

    Expressions of the S-matrix which are suitable for analytical continuation over the complex k-plane for potentials fulfilling conditions ∫ 0 sup(infinity) r.mod(V(r)) dr 0 sup(infinity) r 2 .mod(V(r)) dr < infinity are derived. (Auth.)

  13. Assembly factors as a new class of disease genes for mitochondrial complex I deficiency: cause, pathology and treatment options.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouws, J.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Vogel, R.O.

    2012-01-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most frequent cause of oxidative phosphorylation disorders. The disease features a large diversity of clinical symptoms often leading to progressive encephalomyopathies with a fatal outcome. There is currently no cure, and although disease-causing mutations have been

  14. Reproducible association with type 1 diabetes in the extended class I region of the major histocompatibility complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viken, M.K.; Blomhoff, A.; Olsson, M.

    2009-01-01

    The high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles cannot explain the entire type 1 diabetes (T1D) association observed within the extended major histocompatibility complex. We have earlier identified an association with D6S2223, located 2.3 Mb telomeric of HLA-A, on the DRB1...

  15. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria

    2006-01-01

    immune responses by catalyzing the peptide loading of human class II MHC molecules HLA-DR. Here we show now that they achieve this by interacting with a defined binding site of the HLA-DR peptide receptor. Screening of a compound library revealed a set of adamantane derivatives that strongly accelerated...... the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule. Apparently......-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental factors could induce...

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 function and its pathogenic role in regulating innate and adaptive immunity in cancer and major histocompatibility complex class I-associated autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruci, D; Romania, P; D'Alicandro, V; Locatelli, F

    2014-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present antigenic peptides on the cell surface to alert natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells for the presence of abnormal intracellular events, such as virus infection or malignant transformation. The generation of antigenic peptides is a multistep process that ends with the trimming of N-terminal extensions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of ERAP1 in reprogramming the immunogenicity of tumor cells in order to elicit innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses, and in conferring susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in predisposed individuals. In this review, we will provide an overview of the current knowledge about the role of ERAP1 in MHC class I antigen processing and how its manipulation may constitute a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy and treatment of MHC class I-associated autoimmune diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of two approaches to genotyping major histocompatibility complex class I in a passerine—CE-SSCP and 454 pyrosequencing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Promerová, Marta; Babik, W.; Bryja, Josef; Albrecht, Tomáš; Stuglik, M.; Radwan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2012), s. 285-292 ISSN 1755-098X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930608; GA ČR GA206/06/0851; GA ČR GAP505/10/1871 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : avian * Carpodacus erythrinus * major histocompatibility complex * next-generation sequencing * scarlet rosefinch Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 7.432, year: 2012

  18. Lack of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Upregulation and Restrictive Infection by JC Virus Hamper Detection of Neurons by T Lymphocytes in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Christian; Batson, Stephanie; Koralnik, Igor J

    2015-08-01

    The human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects glial cells in immunosuppressed individuals, leading to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Polyomavirus JC can also infect neurons in patients with JCV granule cell neuronopathy and JCV encephalopathy. CD8-positive T cells play a crucial role in viral containment and outcome in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, but whether CD8-positive T cells can also recognize JCV-infected neurons is unclear. We used immunohistochemistry to determine the prevalence of T cells in neuron-rich areas of archival brain samples from 77 patients with JCV CNS infections and 94 control subjects. Neurons predominantly sustained a restrictive infection with expression of JCV regulatory protein T antigen (T Ag), whereas glial cells were productively infected and expressed both T Ag and the capsid protein VP1. T cells were more prevalent near JCV-infected cells with intact nuclei expressing both T Ag and VP1 compared with those expressing either protein alone. CD8-positive T cells also colocalized more with JCV-infected glial cells than with JCV-infected neurons. Major histocompatibility complex class I expression was upregulated in JCV-infected areas but could only be detected in rare neurons interspersed with infected glial cells. These results suggest that isolated neurons harboring restrictive JCV infection do not upregulate major histocompatibility complex class I and thus may escape recognition by CD8-positive T cells.

  19. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class 1) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (114 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs...

  20. Engineering chimeric human and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers for the production of T-cell receptor (TCR) mimic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Demin; Bentley, Carol; Yates, Jenna; Salimi, Maryam; Greig, Jenny; Wiblin, Sarah; Hassanali, Tasneem; Banham, Alison H

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting cell surface or secreted antigens are among the most effective classes of novel immunotherapies. However, the majority of human proteins and established cancer biomarkers are intracellular. Peptides derived from these intracellular proteins are presented on the cell surface by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and can be targeted by a novel class of T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm) antibodies that recognise similar epitopes to T-cell receptors. Humoural immune responses to MHC-I tetramers rarely generate TCRm antibodies and many antibodies recognise the α3 domain of MHC-I and β2 microglobulin (β2m) that are not directly involved in presenting the target peptide. Here we describe the production of functional chimeric human-murine HLA-A2-H2Dd tetramers and modifications that increase their bacterial expression and refolding efficiency. These chimeric tetramers were successfully used to generate TCRm antibodies against two epitopes derived from wild type tumour suppressor p53 (RMPEAAPPV and GLAPPQHLIRV) that have been used in vaccination studies. Immunisation with chimeric tetramers yielded no antibodies recognising the human α3 domain and β2m and generated TCRm antibodies capable of specifically recognising the target peptide/MHC-I complex in fully human tetramers and on the cell surface of peptide pulsed T2 cells. Chimeric tetramers represent novel immunogens for TCRm antibody production and may also improve the yield of tetramers for groups using these reagents to monitor CD8 T-cell immune responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mouse models of immunotherapy.

  1. Pathway of detergent-mediated and peptide ligand-mediated refolding of heterodimeric class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, J; Döring, K; Malotka, J; Jähnig, F; Dornmair, K

    1997-09-15

    We investigated the mechanism of refolding and reassembly of recombinant alpha and beta chains of the class II major histocompatibility molecules (MHC-II) HLA-DRB5*0101. Both chains were expressed in the cytosol of Escherichia coli, purified in urea and SDS, and reassembled to functional heterodimers by replacement of SDS by mild detergents, incubation in a redox-shuffling buffer and finally by oxidation and removal of detergent. Refolding was mediated by mild detergents and by peptide ligands. Early stages of structure formation were characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (FAD) spectroscopies. We found that formation of secondary structure was detectable after replacement of SDS by mild detergents. At that stage the alpha and beta chains were still monomeric, the buffer was strongly reducing, and the folding intermediates did not yet interact with peptide ligands. Formation of folding intermediates capable of interacting with peptide ligands was detected after adjusting the redox potential with oxidized glutathione and incubation in mild detergents. We conclude that at that stage a tertiary structure close to the native structure is formed at least locally. The nature and concentration of detergent critically determined the refolding efficiency. We compared detergents with different carbohydrate headgroups, and with aliphatic chains ranging from C6 to C14 in length. For each of the detergents we observed a narrow concentration range for mediating refolding. Surprisingly, detergents with long aliphatic chains had to be used at higher concentrations than short-chain detergents, indicating that increasing the solubility of folding intermediates is not the only function of detergents during a refolding reaction. We discuss structure formation and interactions of detergents with stable folding intermediates. Understanding such interactions will help to develop rational strategies for refolding hydrophobic or

  2. First report of major histocompatibility complex class II loci from the Amazon pink river dolphin (genus Inia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Agüero, M; Flores-Ramírez, S; Ruiz-García, M

    2006-07-31

    We report the first major histocompatibility complex (MHC) DQB1 sequences for the two species of pink river dolphins (Inia geoffrensis and Inia boliviensis) inhabiting the Amazon and Orinoco River basins. These sequences were found to be polymorphic within the Inia genus and showed shared homology with cetacean DQB-1 sequences, especially, those of the Monodontidae and Phocoenidae. On the other hand, these sequences were shown to be divergent from those described for other riverine dolphin species, such as Lipotes vexillifer, the Chinese river dolphin. Two main conclusions can be drawn from our results: 1) the Mhc DQB1 sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than other nuclear sequences in cetaceans, and 2) differential positive selective pressures acting on these genes cause concomitant divergent evolutionary histories that derive phylogenetic reconstructions that could be inconsistent with widely accepted intertaxa evolutionary relationships elucidated with other molecular markers subjected to a neutral dynamics.

  3. The duplicated B-class heterodimer model: whorl-specific effects and complex genetic interactions in Petunia hybrida flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, Michiel; Zethof, Jan; Royaert, Stefan; Weterings, Koen; Gerats, Tom

    2004-03-01

    In both Antirrhinum (Antirrhinum majus) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the floral B-function, which specifies petal and stamen development, is embedded in a heterodimer consisting of one DEFICIENS (DEF)/APETALA3 (AP3)-like and one GLOBOSA (GLO)/PISTILLATA (PI)-like MADS box protein. Here, we demonstrate that gene duplications in both the DEF/AP3 and GLO/PI lineages in Petunia hybrida (petunia) have led to a functional diversification of their respective members, which is reflected by partner specificity and whorl-specific functions among these proteins. Previously, it has been shown that mutations in PhDEF (formerly known as GREEN PETALS) only affect petal development. We have isolated insertion alleles for PhGLO1 (FLORAL BINDING PROTEIN1) and PhGLO2 (PETUNIA MADS BOX GENE2) and demonstrate unique and redundant properties of PhDEF, PhGLO1, and PhGLO2. Besides a full homeotic conversion of petals to sepals and of stamens to carpels as observed in phglo1 phglo2 and phdef phglo2 flowers, we found that gene dosage effects for several mutant combinations cause qualitative and quantitative changes in whorl 2 and 3 meristem fate, and we show that the PHDEF/PHGLO1 heterodimer controls the fusion of the stamen filaments with the petal tube. Nevertheless, when the activity of PhDEF, PhGLO1, and PhGLO2 are considered jointly, they basically appear to function as DEF/GLO does in Antirrhinum and to a lesser extent as AP3/PI in Arabidopsis. By contrast, our data suggest that the function of the fourth B-class MADS box member, the paleoAP3-type PETUNIA HYBRIDA TM6 (PhTM6) gene, differs significantly from the known euAP3-type DEF/AP3-like proteins; PhTM6 is mainly expressed in the developing stamens and ovary of wild-type flowers, whereas its expression level is upregulated in whorls 1 and 2 of an A-function floral mutant; PhTM6 is most likely not involved in petal development. The latter is consistent with the hypothesis that the evolutionary origin of the higher eudicot

  4. The murine cytomegalovirus immune evasion protein m4/gp34 forms biochemically distinct complexes with class I MHC at the cell surface and in a pre-Golgi compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, D G; Koszinowski, U H; Hill, A B

    2001-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the murine CMV (MCMV) gene m4 is an immune evasion gene that protects MCMV-infected targets from some virus-specific CTL clones. m4 encodes m4/gp34, a 34-kDa glycoprotein that binds to major histocompatibility complex class I in the endoplasmic reticulum and forms a detergent-stable complex that is exported to the surface of the cell. To investigate how m4/gp34 promotes CTL evasion, we analyzed the assembly and export of m4/gp34-K(b) complexes. We found that 50-70% of K(b) exported over the course of MCMV infection was m4/gp34 associated. Because these complexes are present at the cell surface, it is possible that m4 mediates CTL evasion by interfering with contact between class I and receptors on the T cell. In addition, we found that K(b) retained by the MCMV immune evasion gene m152 formed a novel type of complex with Endo H-sensitive m4/gp34; these complexes are distinguished from the exported complexes by being stable in 1% digitonin and unstable in 1% Nonidet P-40. Because this association occurs in a pre-Golgi compartment, m4/gp34 might also interfere with Ag presentation by affecting some aspect of class I assembly, such as peptide loading. Although m4/gp34 requires beta(2)-microglobulin to bind class I, there was no significant binding of m4/gp34 to beta(2)-microglobulin in the absence of class I H chain, demonstrating that m4/gp34 forms Nonidet P-40-stable complexes specifically with folded conformations of class I. We conclude that m4/gp34 promotes immune evasion by a novel mechanism involving altered assembly and/or T cell recognition of class I molecules.

  5. Enterobacter cloacae Complex Isolates Harboring blaNMC-A or blaIMI-Type Class A Carbapenemase Genes on Novel Chromosomal Integrative Elements and Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David A; Mataseje, Laura F; Davidson, Ross; Delport, Johannes A; Fuller, Jeff; Hoang, Linda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Levett, Paul N; Roscoe, Diane L; Willey, Barbara M; Mulvey, Michael R

    2017-05-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates submitted to a reference laboratory from 2010 to 2015 were screened by PCR for seven common carbapenemase gene groups, namely, KPC, NDM, OXA-48, VIM, IMP, GES, and NMC-A/IMI. Nineteen of the submitted isolates (1.7%) were found to harbor Ambler class A bla NMC-A or bla IMI -type carbapenemases. All 19 isolates were resistant to at least one carbapenem but susceptible to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, and ciprofloxacin. Most isolates (17/19) gave positive results with the Carba-NP test for phenotypic carbapenemase detection. Isolates were genetically diverse by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis macrorestriction analysis, multilocus sequence typing, and hsp60 gene analysis. The genes were found in various Enterobacter cloacae complex species; however, bla NMC-A was highly associated with Enterobacter ludwigii Whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis revealed that all NMC-A ( n = 10), IMI-1 ( n = 5), and IMI-9 ( n = 2) producers harbored the carbapenemase gene on EludIMEX-1-like integrative mobile elements (EcloIMEXs) located in the identical chromosomal locus. Two novel genes, bla IMI-5 and bla IMI-6 , were harbored on different IncFII-type plasmids. Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates harboring bla NMC-A/IMI -type carbapenemases are relatively rare in Canada. Though mostly found integrated into the chromosome, some variants are located on plasmids that may enhance their mobility potential. © Crown copyright 2017.

  6. The Development of Bispecific Hexavalent Antibodies as a Novel Class of DOCK-AND-LOCKTM (DNLTM Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The DOCK-AND-LOCKTM (DNLTM method provides a modular approach to develop multivalent, multifunctional complexes of defined structures, of which bispecific hexavalent antibodies (bsHexAbs are prominent examples with potential applications in targeted therapy for malignant, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. Currently, bsHexAbs are constructed by derivatizing a divalent IgG, at the carboxyl termini of either the heavy chain (the CH3-format or the light chain (the Ck-format, to contain two stabilized dimers of Fab having a different specificity from the IgG. In this review, we briefly outline the features of the DNLTM method and describe key aspects of bsHexAbs examined with diverse preclinical studies, which include binding affinity to target cells, induction of signaling pathways, effector functions, serum stability, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity in human tumor xenograft models. Our findings favor the selection of the CK- over the CH3-format for further exploration of bsHexAbs in clinical trials.

  7. Letermovir and inhibitors of the terminase complex: a promising new class of investigational antiviral drugs against human cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melendez DP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dante P Melendez,1,2 Raymund R Razonable1,2 1Division of Infectious Diseases, 2William J von Liebig Center for Transplantation and Clinical Regeneration, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Infection with cytomegalovirus is prevalent in immunosuppressed patients. In solid organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, cytomegalovirus infection is associated with high morbidity and preventable mortality. Prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus with currently approved antiviral drugs is often associated with side effects that sometimes preclude their use. Moreover, cytomegalovirus has developed mutations that confer resistance to standard antiviral drugs. During the last decade, there have been calls to develop novel antiviral drugs that could provide better options for prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus. Letermovir (AIC246 is a highly specific antiviral drug that is currently undergoing clinical development for the management of cytomegalovirus infection. It acts by inhibiting the viral terminase complex. Letermovir is highly potent in vitro and in vivo against cytomegalovirus. Because of a distinct mechanism of action, it does not exhibit cross-resistance with other antiviral drugs. It is predicted to be active against strains that are resistant to ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir. To date, early-phase clinical trials suggest a very low incidence of adverse effects. Herein, we present a comprehensive review on letermovir, from its postulated novel mechanism of action to the results of most recent clinical studies. Keywords: cytomegalovirus, letermovir, AIC246, terminase, antivirals, transplantation 

  8. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of major histocompatibility complex class I, IIA and IIB genes of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Wen, Jiu-fu; Liu, Hong; Wang, Wei-min; Gao, Ze-xia

    2014-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the immune response of vertebrates. In this study, we isolated MHC class IIA and IIB genes from blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) by rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). In order to study the function of the MHC genes in M. amblycephala, tissue distribution and immune response of the MHC genes to bacterial challenge were analyzed. All the characteristic features of MHC class II chain structure could be identified in the deduced amino sequences of MHC IIA and IIB, including the leader peptide, α1/β1 and α2/β2 domains, connecting peptide and transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions, as well as conserved cysteines and N-glycosylation site. The deduced amino acid sequence of the MHC IIA and IIB molecules shared from 48% to 88% and from 65% to 77% similarity with those of other teleosts, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that MHC I and II genes were ubiquitously expressed in ten tissues, with high level in immune related tissues, including kidney, intestine, gill and spleen. Challenge of M. amblycephala with the extracellular pathogen, Aeromonas hydrophila, resulted in a significant increase in the expression of MHC I, MHC IIA and IIB mRNA within 72 h after infection in gill, kidney, intestine and liver, followed by a recovery to normal level after 120 h. The changes of expression levels for MHC IIA and IIB in most tissues were significantly higher than that of MHC I in the corresponding tissues at most time points (P<0.05). These results demonstrated the MHC genes played an important role in response to bacterial infection in M. amblycephala; however, MHC class I and II genes showed different functional activity, which need be further investigated in teleost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-classical major histocompatibility complex class makes a crucial contribution to reproduction in the dairy cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lei; Peng, Xiuli; Zhang, Shen; Deng, Ganzhen; Wu, Yue; He, Mingyue; Li, Beibei; Li, Chengye; Zhang, Kechun

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of classical and non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on the reproduction in the dairy cow. Nine pairs of MHC-I genes were chosen according to their homology and possible function, and their transcription levels in maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from all three trimesters and transcription levels in fetal tissues were compared to evaluate their contributions to cattle reproduction. The results showed that three non-classical genes were variably expressed in PBMCs of pregnant cows. MICB was downregulated in the first and second trimesters (P0.05). BoLA-NC1* was upregulated in the first and last trimesters (P0.05). BoLA-NC3* was upregulated in all trimesters (P<0.001). On the other hand, MICB was upregulated in fetal ear tissues (P<0.001), and BoLA-NC1* was almost silent in both fetal placenta and ear tissues (P<0.001); however, BoLA-NC3* was upregulated in both the fetal placenta and ear tissues (P<0.001). These results suggested that non-classical gene BoLA-NC1* increased maternal immunity against the fetus, which was inhibited by BoLA-NC3*. BoLA-NC3* also inhibited fetal autoimmunity. Apoptosis of the fetal placenta could reduce itself expressing MICB, and upregulated expression of MICB in ear tissues was favorable for the fetus to escape autoimmunity. On the other hand, downregulated expression of MICB in the fetal placenta allows for placental decoherence from the maternal placentome, which was beneficial to fetus delivery. Although classical genes were expressed differentially, their effects were restricted because of heavy chain deficiency.

  10. Activation of Stat-3 is involved in the induction of apoptosis after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on human Jurkat T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Nielsen, M; Bregenholt, S

    1998-01-01

    Activation of Janus tyrosine kinases (Jak) and Signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) after ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was explored in Jurkat T cells. Cross-linking of MHC-I mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of Tyk2, but not Jak1, Jak2, and Jak3......-probe derived from the interferon-gamma activated site (GAS) in the c-fos promoter, a common DNA sequence for Stat protein binding. An association between hSIE and Stat-3 after MHC-I ligation was directly demonstrated by precipitating Stat-3 from nuclear extracts with biotinylated hSIE probe and avidin......-coupled agarose. To investigate the function of the activated Stat-3, Jurkat T cells were transiently transfected with a Stat-3 isoform lacking the transactivating domain. This dominant-negative acting Stat-3 isoform significantly inhibited apoptosis induced by ligation of MHC-I. In conclusion, our data suggest...

  11. Ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I) prevents apoptosis induced by Fas or SAPK/JNK activation in T-lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberth, K; Claesson, M H

    2001-01-01

    Early apoptosis in Jurkat T-lymphoma cells was induced by agonistic anti-Fas Ab or by anisomycin which activates the stress kinases SAPK/JNK. Apoptosis was inhibited by ligation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (MHC-I). MHC-I ligation induced upregulation of the anti......-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsim). MHC-I ligation also prevented downregulation of Bcl-2 and destabilization of Deltapsim induced by anti-Fas Ab treatment or anisomycin exposure. Studies on three different Jurkat cell mutants deficient for src p56(lck), ZAP......-70 kinase, or TCR/CD3 gamma-chain showed that the cells undergo apoptosis after Fas ligation. Anisomycin exposure induced apoptosis in the src p56(lck)-deficient cell line but not in the two other mutant cell lines. Simultaneous cross-linking of MHC-I and Fas ligation inhibited apoptosis in the ZAP...

  12. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Synchronization Control of a Class of Complex Dynamical Networks With General Input Distribution Matrices and Actuator Faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fault-tolerant synchronization control of a class of complex dynamical networks (CDNs) with actuator faults and unknown coupling weights. The considered input distribution matrix is assumed to be an arbitrary matrix, instead of a unit one. Within this framework, an adaptive fault-tolerant controller is designed to achieve synchronization for the CDN. Moreover, a convex combination technique and an important graph theory result are developed, such that the rigorous convergence analysis of synchronization errors can be conducted. In particular, it is shown that the proposed fault-tolerant synchronization control approach is valid for the CDN with both time-invariant and time-varying coupling weights. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to validate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  13. Recent advances in Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I antigen presentation: Plastic MHC molecules and TAPBPR-mediated quality control [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy van Hateren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We have known since the late 1980s that the function of classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules is to bind peptides and display them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. Recognition by these sentinels of the immune system can lead to the destruction of the presenting cell, thus protecting the host from pathogens and cancer. Classical MHC class I molecules (MHC I hereafter are co-dominantly expressed, polygenic, and exceptionally polymorphic and have significant sequence diversity. Thus, in most species, there are many different MHC I allotypes expressed, each with different peptide-binding specificity, which can have a dramatic effect on disease outcome. Although MHC allotypes vary in their primary sequence, they share common tertiary and quaternary structures. Here, we review the evidence that, despite this commonality, polymorphic amino acid differences between allotypes alter the ability of MHC I molecules to change shape (that is, their conformational plasticity. We discuss how the peptide loading co-factor tapasin might modify this plasticity to augment peptide loading. Lastly, we consider recent findings concerning the functions of the non-classical MHC I molecule HLA-E as well as the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR (transporter associated with antigen presentation binding protein-related, which has been shown to act as a second quality-control stage in MHC I antigen presentation.

  14. Association of a specific major histocompatibility complex class IIβ single nucleotide polymorphism with resistance to lactococcosis in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, S; Prearo, M; Bertuzzi, S A; Scanzio, T; Peletto, S; Favaro, L; Modesto, P; Maniaci, M G; Ru, G; Desiato, R; Acutis, P L

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci encode glycoproteins that bind to foreign peptides and initiate immune responses through their interaction with T cells. MHC class II molecules are heterodimers consisting of α and β chains encoded by extremely variable genes; variation in exon 2 is responsible for the majority of observed polymorphisms, mostly concentrated in the codons specifying the peptide-binding region. Lactococcus garvieae is the causative agent of lactococcosis, a warm-water bacterial infection pathogenic for cultured freshwater and marine fish. It causes considerable economic losses, limiting the profitability and development of fish industries in general and the intensive production of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), in particular. The disease is currently controlled with vaccines and antibiotics; however, vaccines have short-term efficacy, and increasing concerns regarding antibiotic residues have called for alternative strategies. To explore the involvement of the MHC class II β-1 domain as a candidate gene for resistance to lactococcosis, we exposed 400 rainbow trout to naturally contaminated water. One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and one haplotype were associated with resistance (P trout resistant to lactococcosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Rare-earth- and uranium-mesoionic carbenes. A new class of f-block carbene complex derived from an N-heterocyclic olefin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, John A.; Gregson, Matthew; Chilton, Nicholas F.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L. [School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-11

    Neutral mesoionic carbenes (MICs) have emerged as an important class of carbene, however they are found in the free form or ligated to only a few d-block ions. Unprecedented f-block MIC complexes [M(N''){sub 3}{CN(Me)C(Me)N(Me)CH}] (M=U, Y, La, Nd; N''=N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) are reported. These complexes were prepared by a formal 1,4-proton migration reaction when the metal triamides [M(N''){sub 3}] were treated with the N-heterocyclic olefin H{sub 2}C=C(NMeCH){sub 2}, which constitutes a new, general way to prepare MIC complexes. Quantum chemical calculations on the 5f{sup 3} uranium(III) complex suggest the presence of a U=C donor-acceptor bond, composed of a MIC→U σ-component and a U(5f)→MIC(2p) π-back-bond, but for the d{sup 0}f{sup 0} Y and La and 4f{sup 3} Nd congeners only MIC→M σ-bonding is found. Considering the generally negligible π-acidity of MICs, this is surprising and highlights that greater consideration should possibly be given to recognizing MICs as potential π-acid ligands when coordinated to strongly reducing metals. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  16. Structural Definition of Duck Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules That Might Explain Efficient Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Immunity to Influenza A Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanan; Wang, Junya; Fan, Shuhua; Chen, Rong; Liu, Yanjie; Zhang, Jianhua; Yuan, Hongyu; Liang, Ruiying; Zhang, Nianzhi; Xia, Chun

    2017-07-15

    A single dominantly expressed allele of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) may be responsible for the duck's high tolerance to highly pathogenic influenza A virus (HP-IAV) compared to the chicken's lower tolerance. In this study, the crystal structures of duck MHC I ( Anpl -UAA*01) and duck β2-microglobulin (β2m) with two peptides from the H5N1 strains were determined. Two remarkable features were found to distinguish the Anpl -UAA*01 complex from other known MHC I structures. A disulfide bond formed by Cys 95 and Cys 112 and connecting the β5 and β6 sheets at the bottom of peptide binding groove (PBG) in Anpl -UAA*01 complex, which can enhance IAV peptide binding, was identified. Moreover, the interface area between duck MHC I and β2m was found to be larger than in other species. In addition, the two IAV peptides that display distinctive conformations in the PBG, B, and F pockets act as the primary anchor sites. Thirty-one IAV peptides were used to verify the peptide binding motif of Anpl -UAA*01, and the results confirmed that the peptide binding motif is similar to that of HLA-A*0201. Based on this motif, approximately 600 peptides from the IAV strains were partially verified as the candidate epitope peptides for Anpl -UAA*01, which is a far greater number than those for chicken BF2*2101 and BF2*0401 molecules. Extensive IAV peptide binding should allow for ducks with this Anpl -UAA*01 haplotype to resist IAV infection. IMPORTANCE Ducks are natural reservoirs of influenza A virus (IAV) and are more resistant to the IAV than chickens. Both ducks and chickens express only one dominant MHC I locus providing resistance to the virus. To investigate how MHC I provides IAV resistance, crystal structures of the dominantly expressed duck MHC class I (p Anpl -UAA*01) with two IAV peptides were determined. A disulfide bond was identified in the peptide binding groove that can facilitate Anpl -UAA*01 binding to IAV peptides. Anpl -UAA*01 has a much wider

  17. Complex tibial fractures are associated with lower social classes and predict early exit from employment and worse patient-reported QOL: a prospective observational study of 46 complex tibial fractures treated with a ring fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsoe, Rasmus; Larsen, Peter; Petruskevicius, Juozas; Kold, Søren

    2018-04-01

    The long-term outcomes following complex fractures of the tibia are reported to carry a risk of knee pain, malalignment, articular injury and post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The main objective of this study was to account for the patient-reported quality of life (QOL) 12 months after ring fixator removal in patients with a complex tibial fracture. Secondary objectives included a review of the socio-economic characteristics of the patient group and the rate of return to work in the study period. A prospective follow-up study was conducted of 60 patients with complex fractures of the tibia treated with ring external fixation. Patient-reported outcomes, radiological outcomes and socio-economic status including employment status of the patients were obtained 12 months after frame removal. Forty-six patients completed the assessment 12 months after frame removal (77%). The mean age of the patient at the time of fracture was 54.6 years (range 31-86). There were 19 males and 27 females. At 12 months after frame removal, the mean EQ5D-5L index was 0.66 (CI 0.60-0.72). The mean EQ5D-5L VAS was 69 (CI 61-76). When this was compared to the established reference population from Denmark, the study population showed a significantly worse EQ5D-5L index. The majority of patients (87%) were in the lower social classes suggesting a higher degree of social deprivation in the study population. Twenty-seven per cent of patients who were employed prior to injury had returned to employment at approximately 19 months following fracture. The onset of post-traumatic osteoarthritis was present in the knee joint in 29% of patients following a proximal intra-articular fracture, whereas osteoarthritis was present at the ankle joint in 35% of patients following a distal intra-articular fracture 12 months after frame removal. This study indicates that at 12 months after frame removal there are poorer patient-reported QOL as when compared to reference populations. Furthermore, this study

  18. Structural requirements for recognition of major histocompatibility complex class II by membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) protein E3 ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P

    2012-08-17

    MARCH E3 ligases play a key role in controlling MHC class II surface expression by regulated ubiquitination of a lysine residue in the β-chain. Little is known concerning how these enzymes target their specific substrates. Here we show that recognition of HLA-DR by MARCH proteins is complex. Several features associated with the transmembrane domain and bordering regions influence the overall efficiency of receptor internalization. A cluster of residues at the interface of the lipid bilayer and the cytosol plays the most important role in MARCH8 recognition of HLA-DRβ. Variation in this sequence also determines specificity of MARCH9 for HLA-DQ. Residues located in helical face four of HLA-DRβ together with a charged residue at the boundary with the stalk region also contribute significantly to recognition. Truncation analysis suggested that a dileucine-like motif in the DRβ cytoplasmic tail influences the efficiency of co-localization of HLA-DR with MARCH8. The DRβ-encoded acceptor lysine functioned optimally when placed in its natural location relative to the bilayer. In the DRα/DRβ dimer most other amino acids in the cytoplasmic tail could be substituted for alanine with minimal influence on function. Our data support a model whereby multiple features of HLA-DR are involved in substrate recognition by MARCH8. The single most important region is located at the interface between the transmembrane domain and the cytosol. Variation in sequence in this location between different class II isotypes controls efficiency of recognition by different MARCH E3 ligases.

  19. "Racializing" Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt-Echeverria, Beth; Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to explore how racial and class oppressions intersect, the authors use their autobiographical narratives to depict cultural and experiential continuity and discontinuity in growing up white working class versus Chicano working class. They specifically focus on "racializing class" due to the ways class is often used as a copout by…

  20. Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Cancer Using a Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Restricted T-Cell Receptor Targeting the Cancer Germline Antigen MAGE-A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Parker, Linda L; Lu, Tangying; Zheng, Zhili; Toomey, Mary Ann; White, Donald E; Yao, Xin; Li, Yong F; Robbins, Paul F; Feldman, Steven A; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Goff, Stephanie L; Sherry, Richard M; Kammula, Udai S; Yang, James C; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2017-10-10

    Purpose Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells is being explored as a treatment for patients with metastatic cancer. Most current strategies use genes that encode major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors to genetically modify CD8 + T cells or bulk T cells for treatment. Here, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of an adoptive CD4 + T-cell therapy using an MHC class II-restricted, HLA-DPB1*0401-restricted TCR that recognized the cancer germline antigen, MAGE-A3 (melanoma-associated antigen-A3). Patients and Methods Patients received a lymphodepleting preparative regimen, followed by adoptive transfer of purified CD4 + T cells, retrovirally transduced with MAGE-A3 TCR plus systemic high-dose IL-2. A cell dose escalation was conducted, starting at 10 7 total cells and escalating at half-log increments to approximately 10 11 cells. Nine patients were treated at the highest dose level (0.78 to 1.23 × 10 11 cells). Results Seventeen patients were treated. During the cell dose-escalation phase, an objective complete response was observed in a patient with metastatic cervical cancer who received 2.7 × 10 9 cells (ongoing at ≥ 29 months). Among nine patients who were treated at the highest dose level, objective partial responses were observed in a patient with esophageal cancer (duration, 4 months), a patient with urothelial cancer (ongoing at ≥ 19 months), and a patient with osteosarcoma (duration, 4 months). Most patients experienced transient fevers and the expected hematologic toxicities from lymphodepletion pretreatment. Two patients experienced transient grade 3 and 4 transaminase elevations. There were no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion These results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of administering autologous CD4 + T cells that are genetically engineered to express an MHC class II-restricted antitumor TCR that targets MAGE-A3. This clinical trial extends the reach of TCR

  1. The human major histocompatibility complex class II HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 genes are separated by a CTCF-binding enhancer-blocking element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Parimal; Gomez, Jorge A; Boss, Jeremy M

    2006-07-07

    The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) region encodes a cluster of polymorphic heterodimeric glycoproteins HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP that functions in antigen presentation. Separated by approximately 44 kb of DNA, the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 encode MHC-II proteins that function in separate MHC-II heterodimers and are diametrically transcribed. A region of high acetylation located in the intergenic sequences between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 was discovered and termed XL9. The peak of acetylation coincided with sequences that bound the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitations and in vitro DNA binding studies. XL9 was also found to be associated with the nuclear matrix. The activity of the XL9 region was examined and found to be a potent enhancer-blocking element. These results suggest that the XL9 region may have evolved to separate the transcriptional units of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes.

  2. Regulation of major histocompatibility complex class II antigens on human alveolar macrophages by granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the presence of glucocorticoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, J J; Fernandez, M H; Sousa, A R; Lane, S J; Lee, T H; Hawrylowicz, C M

    1999-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) present antigen poorly to CD4+ T cells and respond weakly to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) for up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and costimulatory molecule expression. In atopic asthma, however, AM exhibit enhanced antigen-presenting cell (APC) activity. Since granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is increased in the airways of asthmatic patients, we have investigated its role in modulating the APC function of AM. The effects of glucocorticoids were also studied since earlier studies showed optimal induction of MHC antigens on monocytes by GM-CSF in their presence. GM-CSF in the presence, but not the absence, of dexamethasone enhanced the expression of HLA-DR, -DP and -DQ antigens by AM. However AM and monocytes differed in the optimal concentration of steroid required to mediate this effect (10−10 m and 10−7 m, respectively). Induction of MHC antigens was glucocorticoid specific and independent of IFN-γ. These studies suggest the existence of an IFN-γ-independent pathway of macrophage activation, which may be important in regulating APC function within the lung. PMID:10469240

  3. The effects of historical fragmentation on major histocompatibility complex class II β and microsatellite variation in the Aegean island reptile,Podarcis erhardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonastaso, Trent; Lighten, Jackie; van Oosterhout, Cock; Jones, Kenneth L; Foufopoulos, Johannes; Anthony, Nicola M

    2017-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a key role in disease resistance and is the most polymorphic gene region in vertebrates. Although habitat fragmentation is predicted to lead to a loss in MHC variation through drift, the impact of other evolutionary forces may counter this effect. Here we assess the impact of selection, drift, migration, and recombination on MHC class II and microsatellite variability in 14 island populations of the Aegean wall lizard Podarcis erhardii . Lizards were sampled from islands within the Cyclades (Greece) formed by rising sea levels as the last glacial maximum approximately 20,000 before present. Bathymetric data were used to determine the area and age of each island, allowing us to infer the corresponding magnitude and timing of genetic bottlenecks associated with island formation. Both MHC and microsatellite variation were positively associated with island area, supporting the hypothesis that drift governs neutral and adaptive variation in this system. However, MHC but not microsatellite variability declined significantly with island age. This discrepancy is likely due to the fact that microsatellites attain mutation-drift equilibrium more rapidly than MHC. Although we detected signals of balancing selection, recombination and migration, the effects of these evolutionary processes appeared negligible relative to drift. This study demonstrates how land bridge islands can provide novel insights into the impact of historical fragmentation on genetic diversity as well as help disentangle the effects of different evolutionary forces on neutral and adaptive diversity.

  4. Transcription of non-classic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in the bovine placenta throughout gestation and after Brucella abortus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Larissa Sarmento; da Silva Mol, Juliana Pinto; de Macedo, Auricélio Alves; Silva, Ana Patrícia Carvalho; Dos Santos Ribeiro, Diego Luiz; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Carvalho Neta, Alcina Vieira

    2015-10-15

    Transcription of non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) was assessed in the bovine placenta throughout gestation. Additionally, the effect of Brucella abortus infection on expression of non-classical MHC-I was also evaluated using a chorioallantoic membrane explant model of infection. The non-classical MHC-I genes MICB and NC3 had higher levels of transcription in the intercotyledonary region when compared to the placentome, which had higher levels of transcription at the second trimester of gestation. NC1 and classical MHC-I had very low levels of transcription throughout gestation. Trophoblastic cells of B. abortus-infected chorioallantoic membrane explants had an increase in transcription of non-classical MHC-I at 4h post infection. Therefore, this study provides an analysis of non-classical MHC-I transcription at different stages of gestation and different placental tissues, and during B. abortus infection. These findings provide additional knowledge on immune regulation in placental tissues, a known immune-privileged site. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    of dependent classes and a machine-checked type soundness proof in Isabelle/HOL [29], the first of this kind for a language with virtual classes and path-dependent types. [29] T.Nipkow, L.C. Poulson, and M. Wenzel. Isabelle/HOL -- A Proof Assistant for Higher-Order Logic, volume 2283 of LNCS, Springer, 2002......Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...

  6. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression by Disrupting Enhanceosome Assembly through Binding with the Regulatory Factor X Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakker, Suhani; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Gupta, Namrata; Challa, Shanthan; Cai, Qiliang; Verma, Subhash C

    2015-05-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules play a central role in adaptive antiviral immunity by presenting viral peptides to CD4(+) T cells. Due to their key role in adaptive immunity, many viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have evolved multiple strategies to inhibit the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. The expression of MHC-II, which is controlled mainly at the level of transcription, is strictly dependent upon the binding of the class II transactivator (CIITA) to the highly conserved promoters of all MHC-II genes. The recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters requires its direct interactions with a preassembled MHC-II enhanceosome consisting of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) complex and regulatory factor X (RFX) complex proteins. Here, we show that KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II enhanceosome by binding to the components of the RFX complex. Our data show that LANA is capable of binding to all three components of the RFX complex, RFX-associated protein (RFXAP), RFX5, and RFX-associated ankyrin-containing protein (RFXANK), in vivo but binds more strongly with the RFXAP component in in vitro binding assays. Levels of MHC-II proteins were significantly reduced in KSHV-infected as well as LANA-expressing B cells. Additionally, the expression of LANA in a luciferase promoter reporter assay showed reduced HLA-DRA promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that LANA binds to the MHC-II promoter along with RFX proteins and that the overexpression of LANA disrupts the association of CIITA with the MHC-II promoter. These assays led to the conclusion that the interaction of LANA with RFX proteins interferes with the recruitment of CIITA to MHC-II promoters, resulting in an inhibition of MHC-II gene expression. Thus, the data presented here identify a novel

  7. Crystal structures of three classes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in complex with aldo-keto reductase 1C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack U Flanagan

    Full Text Available Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3 catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of carbonyl groups in a number of important steroid and prostanoid molecules. The enzyme is also over-expressed in prostate and breast cancer and its expression is correlated with the aggressiveness of the disease. The steroid products of AKR1C3 catalysis are important in proliferative signalling of hormone-responsive cells, while the prostanoid products promote prostaglandin-dependent proliferative pathways. In these ways, AKR1C3 contributes to tumour development and maintenance, and suggest that inhibition of AKR1C3 activity is an attractive target for the development of new anti-cancer therapies. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are one well-known class of compounds that inhibits AKR1C3, yet crystal structures have only been determined for this enzyme with flufenamic acid, indomethacin, and closely related analogues bound. While the flufenamic acid and indomethacin structures have been used to design novel inhibitors, they provide only limited coverage of the NSAIDs that inhibit AKR1C3 and that may be used for the development of new AKR1C3 targeted drugs. To understand how other NSAIDs bind to AKR1C3, we have determined ten crystal structures of AKR1C3 complexes that cover three different classes of NSAID, N-phenylanthranilic acids (meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, arylpropionic acids (flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen, and indomethacin analogues (indomethacin, sulindac, zomepirac. The N-phenylanthranilic and arylpropionic acids bind to common sites including the enzyme catalytic centre and a constitutive active site pocket, with the arylpropionic acids probing the constitutive pocket more effectively. By contrast, indomethacin and the indomethacin analogues sulindac and zomepirac, display three distinctly different binding modes that explain their relative inhibition of the AKR1C family members. This new data from ten crystal structures greatly broadens

  8. Genetic drift vs. natural selection in a long-term small isolated population: major histocompatibility complex class II variation in the Gulf of California endemic porpoise (Phocoena sinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Esquer-Garrigos, Yareli; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Vazquez-Juarez, Ricardo; Castro-Prieto, Aines; Flores-Ramirez, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    Although many studies confirm long-term small isolated populations (e.g. island endemics) commonly sustain low neutral genetic variation as a result of genetic drift, it is less clear how selection on adaptive or detrimental genes interplay with random forces. We investigated sequence variation at two major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II loci on a porpoise endemic to the upper Gulf of California, México (Phocoena sinus, or vaquita). Its unique declining population is estimated around 500 individuals. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis revealed one putative functional allele fixed at the locus DQB (n = 25). At the DRB locus, we found two presumed functional alleles (n = 29), differing by a single nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution that could increase the stability at the dimer interface of alphabeta-heterodimers on heterozygous individuals. Identical trans-specific DQB1 and DRB1 alleles were identified between P. sinus and its closest relative, the Burmeister's porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis). Comparison with studies on four island endemic mammals suggests fixation of one allele, due to genetic drift, commonly occurs at the DQA or DQB loci (effectively neutral). Similarly, deleterious alleles of small effect are also effectively neutral and can become fixed; a high frequency of anatomical malformations on vaquita gave empirical support to this prediction. In contrast, retention of low but functional polymorphism at the DRB locus was consistent with higher selection intensity. These observations indicated natural selection could maintain (and likely also purge) some crucial alleles even in the face of strong and prolonged genetic drift and inbreeding, suggesting long-term small populations should display low inbreeding depression. Low levels of Mhc variation warn about a high susceptibility to novel pathogens and diseases in vaquita.

  9. Transcriptome analyses of immune tissues from three Japanese frogs (genus Rana ) reveals their utility in characterizing major histocompatibility complex class II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Quintin; Igawa, Takeshi; Minei, Ryuhei; Kosch, Tiffany A; Satta, Yoko

    2017-12-28

    In Japan and East Asia, endemic frogs appear to be tolerant or not susceptible to chytridiomycosis, a deadly amphibian disease caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytridium dendrobatidis (Bd). Japanese frogs may have evolved mechanisms of immune resistance to pathogens such as Bd. This study characterizes immune genes expressed in various tissues of healthy Japanese Rana frogs. We generated transcriptome data sets of skin, spleen and blood from three adult Japanese Ranidae frogs (Japanese brown frog Rana japonica, the montane brown frog Rana ornativentris, and Tago's brown frog Rana tagoi tagoi) as well as whole body of R. japonica and R. ornativentris tadpoles. From this, we identified tissue- and stage-specific differentially expressed genes; in particular, the spleen was most enriched for immune-related genes. A specific immune gene, major histocompatibility complex class IIB (MHC-IIB), was further characterized due to its role in pathogen recognition. We identified a total of 33 MHC-IIB variants from the three focal species (n = 7 individuals each), which displayed evolutionary signatures related to increased MHC variation, including balancing selection. Our supertyping analyses of MHC-IIB variants from Japanese frogs and previously studied frog species identified potential physiochemical properties of MHC-II that may be important for recognizing and binding chytrid-related antigens. This is one of the first studies to generate transcriptomic resources for Japanese frogs, and contributes to further understanding the immunogenetic factors associated with resistance to infectious diseases in amphibians such as chytridiomycosis. Notably, MHC-IIB supertyping analyses identified unique functional properties of specific MHC-IIB alleles that may partially contribute to Bd resistance, and such properties provide a springboard for future experimental validation.

  10. Brucella abortus Inhibits Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression and Antigen Processing through Interleukin-6 Secretion via Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrionuevo, Paula; Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Zwerdling, Astrid; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Samartino, Clara García; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2008-01-01

    The strategies that allow Brucella abortus to survive inside macrophages for prolonged periods and to avoid the immunological surveillance of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes are poorly understood. We report here that infection of THP-1 cells with B. abortus inhibited expression of MHC-II molecules and antigen (Ag) processing. Heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) also induced both these phenomena, indicating the independence of bacterial viability and involvement of a structural component of the bacterium. Accordingly, outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, inhibited both MHC-II expression and Ag processing to the same extent as HKBA. Moreover, a synthetic lipohexapeptide that mimics the structure of the protein lipid moiety also inhibited MHC-II expression, indicating that any Brucella lipoprotein could down-modulate MHC-II expression and Ag processing. Inhibition of MHC-II expression and Ag processing by either HKBA or lipidated Omp19 (L-Omp19) depended on Toll-like receptor 2 and was mediated by interleukin-6. HKBA or L-Omp19 also inhibited MHC-II expression and Ag processing of human monocytes. In addition, exposure to the synthetic lipohexapeptide inhibited Ag-specific T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Brucella-infected patients. Together, these results indicate that there is a mechanism by which B. abortus may prevent recognition by T cells to evade host immunity and establish a chronic infection. PMID:17984211

  11. Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 2 in the Inflammatory Response and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Downregulation in Brucella abortus-Infected Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C.; Hielpos, M. Soledad; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Barrionuevo, Paula; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Oliveira, Sergio C.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) seem to constitute the main cellular target of inhaled brucellae. Here, we show that Brucella abortus invades and replicates in murine AM without inducing cytotoxicity. B. abortus infection induced a statistically significant increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), CXCL1 or keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-12 in AM from C57BL/6 mice and BALB/c mice, but these responses were generally weaker and/or delayed compared to those elicited in peritoneal macrophages. Studies using knockout mice for TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9 revealed that TNF-α and KC responses were mediated by TLR2 recognition. Brucella infection reduced in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules induced by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in AM. The same phenomenon was induced by incubation with heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) or the lipidated form of the 19-kDa outer membrane protein of Brucella (L-Omp19), and it was shown to be mediated by TLR2 recognition. In contrast, no significant downregulation of MHC-II was induced by either unlipidated Omp19 or Brucella LPS. In a functional assay, treatment of AM with either L-Omp19 or HKBA reduced the MHC-II-restricted presentation of OVA peptides to specific T cells. One week after intratracheal infection, viable B. abortus was detected in AM from both wild-type and TLR2 KO mice, but CFU counts were higher in the latter. These results suggest that B. abortus survives in AM after inhalatory infection in spite of a certain degree of immune control exerted by the TLR2-mediated inflammatory response. Both the modest nature of the latter and the modulation of MHC-II expression by the bacterium may contribute to such survival. PMID:24478078

  12. Astroglioma conditioned medium increases synaptic elimination and correlates with major histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I) upregulation in PC12Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Rodrigo Fabrizzio; Zanon, Renata Gacielle; Castro, Mateus Vidigal de; Souza, Henrique Marques de; Bajgelman, Marcio Chaim; Verinaud, Liana; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues de

    2016-11-10

    Astrocytes are multifunctional glial cells that actively participate in synaptic plasticity in health and disease. Little is known about molecular interactions between neurons and glial cells that result in synaptic stability or elimination. In this sense, the main histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I) has been shown to play a role in the synaptic plasticity process during development and after lesion of the CNS. MHC I levels in neurons appear to be influenced by astrocyte secreted molecules, which may generate endoplasmic reticulum stress. In vitro studies are of relevance since cell contact can be avoided by the use of astrocyte conditioned medium, allowing investigation of soluble factors isolated from cell direct interaction. Thus, we investigated synaptic preservation by synaptophysin and MHC I immunolabeling in PC12 neuron-like cells exposed to NG97 astroglioma conditioned medium (CM). For that, PC12 cells were cultured and differentiated into neuron-like profile with nerve growth factor. MHC I was induced with interferon beta treatment (IFN), and the effects were compared to PC12 exposure to NG97 CM. Overall, the results show that NG97 CM increases, more than IFN alone, the expression of MHC I, negatively influencing synaptic stability. This indicates that glial soluble factors influence synapse elimination, compatible to in vivo synaptic stripping process, in a cell contact independent fashion. In turn, our results indicate that deleterious effects of astroglioma are not only restricted to rapid growth ratio of the tumor, but also correlated with secretion of stress-related molecules that directly affect neuronal networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The porcine Major Histocompatibility Complex and related paralogous regions: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaiman Marcel

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The physical alignment of the entire region of the pig major histocompatibility complex (MHC has been almost completed. In swine, the MHC is called the SLA (swine leukocyte antigen and most of its class I region has been sequenced. Over one hundred genes have been characterised, including the classical class I and class I-related genes, as well as the class II gene families. These results in swine provide new evidence for the striking conservation during the evolution of a general MHC framework, and are consistent with the location of the class I genes on segments referred to as permissive places within the MHC class I region. Recent results confirm the involvement of the SLA region in numerous quantitative traits.

  14. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  15. Interference with major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted antigen presentation in the brain by herpes simplex virus type 1: a possible mechanism of evasion of the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, G A; Lo, D; Bloom, F E

    1993-03-01

    Host survival of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection depends on the establishment of latent infections in both peripheral and central nervous systems. Strains of HSV-1 that are successful in escaping the immune response produce a lethal infection. We now report a possible mechanism of immune response evasion used by HSV-1. After intraocular inoculation of mice, HSV-1 strain F established a latent infection in the brain, whereas strain KOS did not. The immune response to HSV-1 infection (strains KOS and F) in the brain was characterized by induction of major histocompatibility complex class II expression and recruitment of CD4+ and CD8+ cells to highly restricted sites of intracerebral viral infection. Major histocompatibility complex class II antigen expression was primarily intracellular in strain KOS infection centers and at the cell surface in strain F infection centers. We propose that major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted viral-antigen presentation to T cells is interrupted during strain KOS infections, thereby allowing KOS infection to evade T-cell-mediated events that would normally protect the host from a lethal infection. Immunocompromised mice (athymic or irradiate mice) could not survive strain F infections; however, latent F infections were established in irradiated mice reconstituted with naive lymph node and spleen cells. These data suggest that class II-restricted presentation of viral antigens is required for the control of HSV-1 infections in the nervous system.

  16. Early detection of dominant Env-specific and subdominant Gag-specific CD8+ lymphocytes in equine infectious anemia virus-infected horses using major histocompatibility complex class I/peptide tetrameric complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H; Sharif, Amin; Ellis, Shirley A; Littke, Matt H; Leib, Steven R; McGuire, Travis C

    2005-08-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Measurement of equine CTL responses has relied on chromium-release assays, which do not allow accurate quantitation. Recently, the equine MHC class I molecule 7-6, associated with the ELA-A1 haplotype, was shown to present both the Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 EIAV CTL epitopes. In this study, 7-6/Gag-GW12 and 7-6/Env-RW12 MHC class I/peptide tetrameric complexes were constructed and used to analyze Gag-GW12- and Env-RW12-specific CTL responses in two EIAV-infected horses (A2164 and A2171). Gag-GW12 and Env-RW12 tetramer-positive CD8+ cells were identified in nonstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as early as 14 days post-EIAV inoculation, and frequencies of tetramer-positive cells ranged from 0.4% to 6.7% of nonstimulated peripheral blood CD8+ cells during the 127-day study period. Although both horses terminated the initial viremic peak, only horse A2171 effectively controlled viral load. Neutralizing antibody was present during the initial control of viral load in both horses, but the ability to maintain control correlated with Gag-GW12-specific CD8+ cells in A2171. Despite Env-RW12 dominance, Env-RW12 escape viral variants were identified in both horses and there was no correlation between Env-RW12-specific CD8+ cells and control of viral load. Although Gag-GW12 CTL escape did not occur, a Gag-GW12 epitope variant arose in A2164 that was recognized less efficiently than the original epitope. These data indicate that tetramers are useful for identification and quantitation of CTL responses in horses, and suggest that the observed control of EIAV replication and clinical disease was associated with sustained CTL recognition of Gag-specific epitopes.

  17. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Sammenfatning af de mest væsentlige pointer fra hovedrapporten: Dokumentation og evaluering af Coding Class......Sammenfatning af de mest væsentlige pointer fra hovedrapporten: Dokumentation og evaluering af Coding Class...

  18. Development of a rapid in vitro protein refolding assay which discriminates between peptide-bound and peptide-free forms of recombinant porcine major histocompatibility class I complex (SLA-I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Kristensen, B.; Ladekjaer-Mikkelsen, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The extracellular domains of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I, major histocompatibility complex protein class 1) were cloned and sequenced for two haplotypes (114 and H7) which do not share any alleles based on serological typing, and which are the most important in Danish farmed pigs....... The extracellular domain of SLA-I was connected to porcine beta2 microglobulin by glycine-rich linkers. The engineered sin.-le-chain proteins, consisting of fused SLA-I and beta2 microglobulin, were overexpressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. Also, variants were made of the single-chain proteins...

  19. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II alleles which confer susceptibility or protection in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobe, Heidi; Ahn, Chul; Arnett, Frank; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-class I) and II (HLA-class II) alleles associated with morphea (localized scleroderma) in the Morphea in Adults and Children (MAC) cohort by a nested case–control association study. Methods Morphea patients were included from MAC cohort and matched controls from the NIH/NIAMS Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository and Division of Rheumatology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. HLA- Class II genotyping and SSCP typing was performed of HLA-A, -B, -C alleles. Associations between HLA-Class I and II alleles and morphea as well as its subphenotypes were determined. Results There were 211 cases available for HLA-class I typing with 726 matched controls and 158 cases available for HLA Class-II typing with 1108 matched controls. The strongest associations were found with DRB1*04:04 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–4.0 P=0.002) and HLA-B*37 conferred the highest OR among Class I alleles (3.3, 95% CI 1.6–6.9, P= 0.0016). Comparison with risk alleles in systemic sclerosis determined using the same methods and control population revealed one common allele (DRB*04:04). Conclusion Results of the present study demonstrate specific HLA Class I and II alleles are associated with morphea and likely generalized and linear subtypes. The associated morphea alleles are different than in scleroderma, implicating morphea is also immunogenetically distinct. Risk alleles in morphea are also associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune conditions. Population based studies indicate patients with RA have increased risk of morphea, implicating a common susceptibility allele. PMID:25223600

  20. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasar, Parveen; Wilhelm, Amanda; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Teng, Lihong; Shi, Bi; Davis, William C; Suarez, Carlos E; New, Daniel D; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-classical MHC-I isoforms, we expressed the MHC proteins in murine P815 and human K562 (MHC-I deficient) cells. Following antibiotic selection, stably transfected cell lines were stained with H1A or W6/32 antibodies to detect expression of the MHC-I proteins by flow cytometry. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00501 and BoLA-NC3*00101) were expressed on the cell surface in both cell lines. Surprisingly, the BoLA-NC4*00201 protein was expressed on the cell membrane of human K562 but not mouse P815 cells. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00401, which lacks a transmembrane domain, and BoLA-NC2*00102) did not exhibit cell surface expression. Nevertheless, Western blot analyses demonstrated expression of the MHC-I heavy chain in all transfected cell lines. Ammonium-sulfate precipitation of proteins from culture supernatants showed that BoLA-NC1*00401 was secreted and that all surface expressed proteins where shed from the cell membrane by the transfected cells. Interestingly, the surface expressed MHC-I proteins were present in culture supernatants at a much higher concentration than BoLA-NC1*00401. This comprehensive study shows that bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins BoLA-NC1*00501, BoLA-NC3*00101, and BoLA-NC4*00201 are expressed as surface isoforms with the latter reaching the cell membrane only in K562 cells. Furthermore, it demonstrated that BoLA-NC1*00401 is a secreted isoform and that significant quantities of membrane associated MHC-I proteins can be shed from the cell membrane. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Recognition of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class Ib Molecule H2-Q10 by the Natural Killer Cell Receptor Ly49C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Berry, Richard; Sosnin, Natasha; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Deuss, Felix A; Balaji, Gautham R; LaGruta, Nicole L; Mirams, Michiko; Trapani, Joseph A; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G; Andrews, Daniel M

    2016-09-02

    Murine natural killer (NK) cells are regulated by the interaction of Ly49 receptors with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I). Although the ligands for inhibitory Ly49 were considered to be restricted to classical MHC (MHC-Ia), we have shown that the non-classical MHC molecule (MHC-Ib) H2-M3 was a ligand for the inhibitory Ly49A. Here we establish that another MHC-Ib, H2-Q10, is a bona fide ligand for the inhibitory Ly49C receptor. H2-Q10 bound to Ly49C with a marginally lower affinity (∼5 μm) than that observed between Ly49C and MHC-Ia (H-2K(b)/H-2D(d), both ∼1 μm), and this recognition could be prevented by cis interactions with H-2K in situ To understand the molecular details underpinning Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition, we determined the crystal structures of H2-Q10 and Ly49C bound H2-Q10. Unliganded H2-Q10 adopted a classical MHC-I fold and possessed a peptide-binding groove that exhibited features similar to those found in MHC-Ia, explaining the diverse peptide binding repertoire of H2-Q10. Ly49C bound to H2-Q10 underneath the peptide binding platform to a region that encompassed residues from the α1, α2, and α3 domains, as well as the associated β2-microglobulin subunit. This docking mode was conserved with that previously observed for Ly49C·H-2K(b) Indeed, structure-guided mutation of Ly49C indicated that Ly49C·H2-Q10 and Ly49C·H-2K(b) possess similar energetic footprints focused around residues located within the Ly49C β4-stand and L5 loop, which contact the underside of the peptide-binding platform floor. Our data provide a structural basis for Ly49·MHC-Ib recognition and demonstrate that MHC-Ib represent an extended family of ligands for Ly49 molecules. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression is normal on peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, W; Gladstone, P; Engardt, S; Greenbaum, C; Palmer, J P

    1996-01-01

    Recent work from one laboratory has shown, in both nonobese diabetic mice and humans, an association between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and quantitative difference in MHC class I molecule expression. This reported decrease in MHC class I molecule expression is very controversial in the nonobese diabetic mouse model of IDDM, but to our knowledge, it has not been evaluated by another group in human IDDM. To evaluate this question, we studied 30 patients with IDDM and 30 age- and...

  3. Effects of irradiation on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen and adhesion costimulation molecules ICAM-1 in human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santin, Alessandro D.; Hermonat, Paul L.; Hiserodt, John C.; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Woodliff, Jeff; Theus, John W.; Barclay, David; Pecorelli, Sergio; Parham, Groesbeck P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We initiated studies to analyze the effects of high doses of gamma irradiation on the surface antigen expression of MHC Class I, Class II, and ICAM-1 on human cervical carcinoma cell lines. Methods and Materials: The expression of surface antigens (MHC Class I, Class II, and ICAM-1) was evaluated by FACS analysis on two cervical cell lines at different time points, following their exposure to high doses of gamma irradiation (i.e., 25.00, 50.00, and 100.00 Gy). Results: The CaSki and SiHa cervical cancer cells we analyzed in this study expressed variable levels of MHC Class I and ICAM-1 antigens, while Class II surface antigens were not detectable. Whereas irradiation doses of 25.00 Gy were not sufficient to totally block cell replication in both cell lines, exposure to 50.00 or 100.00 Gy was able to completely inhibit cell replication. Range doses from 25.00 to 100.00 Gy significantly and consistently increased the expression of all surface antigens present on the cells prior to irradiation but were unable to induce neoexpression of antigens previously not expressed by these cells (i.e., MHC Class II). Importantly, such upregulation was shown to be dose dependent, with higher radiation doses associated with increased antigen expression. Moreover, when the kinetic of this upregulation was studied after 2 and 6 days after irradiation, it was shown to be persistent and lasted until all the cells died. Conclusions: These findings may partially explain the increased immunogenicity of tumor cells following irradiation and may suggest enhanced immune recognition in tumor tissue in patients receiving radiation therapy

  4. New Class of Half-Sandwich Ruthenium(II) Arene Complexes Bearing the Water-Soluble CAP Ligand as an in Vitro Anticancer Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Antonella; Oberhauser, Werner; Riedel, Tina; Peruzzini, Maurizio; Dyson, Paul J; Gonsalvi, Luca

    2017-05-15

    Ruthenium(II) arene complexes of 1,4,7-triaza-9-phosphatricyclo[5.3.2.1]tridecane (CAP) were obtained. Cytotoxicity studies against cancer cell lines reveal higher activity than the corresponding PTA analogues and, in comparison to the effects on noncancerous cells, the complexes are endowed with a reasonable degree of cancer cell selectivity.

  5. Half-Sandwich Iridium(III) and Ruthenium(II) Complexes Containing P^P-Chelating Ligands: A New Class of Potent Anticancer Agents with Unusual Redox Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, JuanJuan; Tian, Meng; Tian, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Shumiao; Yan, Chao; Shao, Changfang; Liu, Zhe

    2018-02-19

    A series of half-sandwich Ir III pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and Ru II arene complexes containing P^P-chelating ligands of the type [(Cp x /arene)M(P^P)Cl]PF 6 , where M = Ir, Cp x is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*), or 1-biphenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethyl cyclopentadienyl (Cp xbiPh ); M = Ru, arene is 3-phenylpropan-1-ol (bz-PA), 4-phenylbutan-1-ol (bz-BA), or p-cymene (p-cym), and P^P is 2,20-bis(diphenylphosphino)-1,10-binaphthyl (BINAP), have been synthesized and fully characterized, three of them by X-ray crystallography, and their potential as anticancer agents explored. All five complexes showed potent anticancer activity toward HeLa and A549 cancer cells. The introduction of a biphenyl substituent on the Cp* ring for the iridium complexes has no effect on the antiproliferative potency. Ruthenium complex [(η 6 -p-cym)Ru(P^P)Cl]PF 6 (5) displayed the highest potency, about 15 and 7.5 times more active than the clinically used cisplatin against A549 and HeLa cells, respectively. No binding to 9-MeA and 9-EtG nucleobases was observed. Although these types of complexes interact with ctDNA, DNA appears not to be the major target. Compared to iridium complex [(η 5 -Cp*)Ir(P^P)Cl]PF 6 (1), ruthenium complex (5) showed stronger ability to interfere with coenzyme NAD + /NADH couple through transfer hydrogenation reactions and to induce ROS in cells, which is consistent with their anticancer activities. The redox properties of the complexes 1, 5, and ligand BINAP were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Complexes 1 and 5 arrest cell cycles at the S phase, Sub-G 1 phase and G 1 phase, respectively, and cause cell apoptosis toward A549 cells.

  6. Effects of a novel magnetic orthopedic appliance (MOA-III) on the dentofacial complex in mild to moderate skeletal class III children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Feng, Jing; Hu, Zheng; Chen, Rongjing; Shen, Gang

    2015-10-14

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes of skeletal and dental structures in mild to moderate skeletal Class III children following the use of a new magnetic orthopedic appliance (MOA-III). A total of 36 patients (14 boys and 22 girls, mean age 9 years and 5 months) who presented with a mild to moderate skeletal Class III jaw discrepancy were treated with MOA-III. Another group of 20 untreated patients (9 boys and 11 girls, mean age 9 years and 2 months) with the same level of deformity served as the control group. The average treatment time was 6.6 months. Radiographs were taken at the same time intervals for both groups. A paired t test was used to determine the significant differences before and after treatment, and a two-sample t test was used to analyze the differences between the treatment and control groups. The anterior crossbite in all subjects was corrected after MOA-III therapy. The maxillomandibular relationship showed favorable changes (ANB, Wits, overjet increased significantly, P  0.05). Significant upper incisor proclination and lower incisor retroclination were observed (UI-NA increased, P III appliance compared to the untreated group. The MOA-III was effective for the early treatment of a mild to moderate Class III malocclusion in children.

  7. Word classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found...... in grammatical descriptions of some 50 languages, which together constitute a representative sample of the world’s languages (Hengeveld et al. 2004: 529). It appears that there are both quantitative and qualitative differences between word class systems of individual languages. Whereas some languages employ...... a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective...

  8. Coding Class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine; Hansbøl, Mikala

    Denne rapport rummer evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet1. Coding Class projektet blev igangsat i skoleåret 2016/2017 af IT-Branchen i samarbejde med en række medlemsvirksomheder, Københavns kommune, Vejle Kommune, Styrelsen for IT- og Læring (STIL) og den frivillige forening......, design tænkning og design-pædagogik, Stine Ejsing-Duun fra Forskningslab: It og Læringsdesign (ILD-LAB) ved Institut for kommunikation og psykologi, Aalborg Universitet i København. Vi har fulgt og gennemført evaluering og dokumentation af Coding Class projektet i perioden november 2016 til maj 2017....... Coding Class projektet er et pilotprojekt, hvor en række skoler i København og Vejle kommuner har igangsat undervisningsaktiviteter med fokus på kodning og programmering i skolen. Evalueringen og dokumentationen af projektet omfatter kvalitative nedslag i udvalgte undervisningsinterventioner i efteråret...

  9. Molecular dynamics-assisted pharmacophore modeling of caspase-3-isatin sulfonamide complex: Recognizing essential intermolecular contacts and features of sulfonamide inhibitor class for caspase-3 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Patel, Chirag N; Jha, Prakash C; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2017-12-01

    The identification of isatin sulfonamide as a potent small molecule inhibitor of caspase-3 had fuelled the synthesis and characterization of the numerous sulfonamide class of inhibitors to optimize for potency. Recent works that relied on the ligand-based approaches have successfully shown the regions of optimizations for sulfonamide scaffold. We present here molecular dynamics-based pharmacophore modeling of caspase-3-isatin sulfonamide crystal structure, to elucidate the essential non-covalent contacts and its associated pharmacophore features necessary to ensure caspase-3 optimal binding. We performed 20ns long dynamics of this crystal structure to extract global conformation states and converted into structure-based pharmacophore hypotheses which were rigorously validated using an exclusive focussed library of experimental actives and inactives of sulfonamide class by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) statistic. Eighteen structure-based pharmacophore hypotheses with better sensitivity and specificity measures (>0.6) were chosen which collectively showed the role of pocket residues viz. Cys163 (S 1 sub-site; required for covalent and H bonding with Michael acceptor of inhibitors), His121 (S 1 ; π stack with bicyclic isatin moiety), Gly122 (S 1 ; H bond with carbonyl oxygen) and Tyr204 (S 2 ; π stack with phenyl group of the isatin sulfonamide molecule) as stringent binding entities for enabling caspase-3 optimal binding. The introduction of spatial pharmacophore site points obtained from dynamics-based pharmacophore models in a virtual screening strategy will be helpful to screen and optimize molecules belonging to sulfonamide class of caspase-3 inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cellular expression or binding of desLys58-beta2 microglobulin is not dependent on the presence of the tri-molecular MHC class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Corlin, D B; Heegaard, N H H

    2008-01-01

    -exposure to dbeta2m. Binding of 332-01 antibody could not be displaced by addition of high concentrations of native beta2m. In conclusion, our data indicate that dbeta2m - in contrast to native beta2m - binds to a hitherto unknown cell surface receptor independent of classical MHC class I molecules. As beta2m has...... previously been shown to display biological activities such as the induction of both growth promotion and apoptosis, C1 complement activity, shown to mediate cleavage of beta2m, could be involved in these processes....

  11. Genetic fixity in the human major histocompatibility complex and block size diversity in the class I region including HLA-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Viviana; Larsen, Charles E; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S; Fox, Edward A; Romero, Tatiana; Clavijo, Olga P; Fici, Dolores A; Husain, Zaheed; Almeciga, Ingrid; Alford, Dennis R; Awdeh, Zuheir L; Zuñiga, Joaquin; El-Dahdah, Lama; Alper, Chester A; Yunis, Edmond J

    2007-04-12

    The definition of human MHC class I haplotypes through association of HLA-A, HLA-Cw and HLA-B has been used to analyze ethnicity, population migrations and disease association. Here, we present HLA-E allele haplotype association and population linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis within the ~1.3 Mb bounded by HLA-B/Cw and HLA-A to increase the resolution of identified class I haplotypes. Through local breakdown of LD, we inferred ancestral recombination points both upstream and downstream of HLA-E contributing to alternative block structures within previously identified haplotypes. Through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of the MHC region, we also confirmed the essential genetic fixity, previously inferred by MHC allele analysis, of three conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs), and we demonstrated that commercially-available SNP analysis can be used in the MHC to help define CEHs and CEH fragments. We conclude that to generate high-resolution maps for relating MHC haplotypes to disease susceptibility, both SNP and MHC allele analysis must be conducted as complementary techniques.

  12. Human major histocompatibility complex class I antigens: residues 61-83 of the HLA-B7 heavy chain specify an alloreactive site.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, L E; Ketler, T A; Houghten, R A; Schulz, G; Chersi, A; Reisfeld, R A

    1985-01-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide (sequence in text) homologous to residues 61-83 of the HLA-B7 heavy chain, induced antibodies that specifically recognized the HLA heavy chain-beta 2-microglobulin complex and the free heavy chain of the HLA-B7 antigen. These antibodies specifically immunoprecipitated the HLA-B7 beta 2-microglobulin complex solubilized from human lymphoblastoid cells by nonionic detergents and reacted with free HLA-B7 heavy chains in blots on nitrocellulose. These observations...

  13. Detecting Site-Specific Physicochemical Selective Pressures: Applications to the Class I HLA of the Human Major Histocompatibility Complex and the SRK of the Plant Sporophytic Self-Incompatibility System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Wong, Wendy Shuk Wan; Yogeeswaran, Krithika

    2005-01-01

    plants (Brassicaceae), whose structure is unknown. Through likelihood ratio tests we demonstrate that at some sites, the positively selected MHC and SRK proteins are under physicochemical selective pressures to alter polarity, volume, polarity and/or volume, and charge to various extents. An empirical......:transversion biases. Here, we apply this method to two positively selected receptors involved in ligand-recognition: the class I alleles of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of known structure and the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) of the sporophytic self-incompatibility system (SSI) in cruciferous...

  14. Structure of a SARS coronavirus-derived peptide bound to the human major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-B*1501

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav; Kristensen, Ole; Kastrup, Jette S

    2008-01-01

    , the crystal structure of HLA-B*1501 in complex with a SARS coronavirus-derived nonapeptide (VQQESSFVM) has been determined at high resolution (1.87 A). The peptide is deeply anchored in the B and F pockets, but with the Glu4 residue pointing away from the floor in the peptide-binding groove, making...

  15. Peptide binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex class I resolved into an array of apparently independent subspecificities: quantitation by peptide libraries and improved prediction of binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    Considerable interest has focused on understanding how major histocompatibility complex (MHC) specificity is generated and characterizing the specificity of MHC molecules with the ultimate goal being to predict peptide binding. We have used a strategy where all possible peptides of a particular...

  16. In vitro evaluation of the cyto-genotoxic potential of Ruthenium(II) SCAR complexes: a promising class of antituberculosis agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grandis, Rone Aparecido; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; da Silva, Monize Martins; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a top infectious disease killer worldwide, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Increasing incidences of multiple drug-resistance (MDR) strains are emerging as one of the major public health threats. However, the drugs in use are still incapable of controlling the appalling upsurge of MDR. In recent years a marked number of research groups have devoted their attention toward the development of specific and cost-effective antimicrobial agents against targeted MDR-Tuberculosis. In previous studies, ruthenium(II) complexes (SCAR) have shown a promising activity against MDR-Tuberculosis although few studies have indeed considered ruthenium toxicity. Therefore, within the preclinical requirements, we have sought to determine the cyto-genotoxicity of three SCAR complexes in this present study. The treatment with the SCARs induced a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability in CHO-K1 and HepG2 cells. Based on the clonogenic survival, SCAR 5 was found to be more cytotoxic while SCAR 6 exhibited selectivity action on tumor cells. Although SCAR 4 and 5 did not indicate any mutagenic activity as evidenced by the Ames and Cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assays, the complex SCAR 6 was found to engender a frameshift mutation detected by Salmonella typhimurium in the presence of S9. Similarly, we observed a chromosomal damage in HepG2 cells with significant increases of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. These data indicate that SCAR 4 and 5 complexes did not show genotoxicity in our models while SCAR 6 was considered mutagenic. This study presented a comprehensive genotoxic evaluation of SCAR complexes were shown to be genotoxic in vitro. All in all, further studies are required to fully elucidate how the properties can affect human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gender, social class, and women's employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Kathleen L; Oh, Eunsil

    2017-12-01

    People in low-power positions, whether due to gender or class, tend to exhibit other-oriented rather than self-oriented behavior. Women's experiences at work and at home are shaped by social class, heightening identification with gender for relatively upper class women and identification with class for relatively lower class women, potentially mitigating, or even reversing, class-based differences documented in past research. Gender-class differences are reflected in women's employment beliefs and behaviors. Research integrating social class with gendered experiences in homes and workplaces deepens our understanding of the complex interplay between sources of power and status in society. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Social Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    , and the Vaiśyas, the fourth underprivileged class, the Śūdras, and, at the bottom of the society, the lowest so-called ‘untouchable’ castes. It also discusses the understanding of human differences that lies at the center of the system and the possible economic and political motivations of the Brahmin authors......The notions of class (varṇa) and caste (jāti) run through the dharmaśāstra literature (i.e. Hindu Law Books) on all levels. They regulate marriage, economic transactions, work, punishment, penance, entitlement to rituals, identity markers like the sacred thread, and social interaction in general....... Although this social structure was ideal in nature and not equally confirmed in other genres of ancient and medieval literature, it has nevertheless had an immense impact on Indian society. The chapter presents an overview of the system with its three privileged classes, the Brahmins, the Kṣatriyas...

  19. Social Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    The notions of class (varṇa) and caste (jāti) run through the dharmaśāstra literature (i.e. Hindu Law Books) on all levels. They regulate marriage, economic transactions, work, punishment, penance, entitlement to rituals, identity markers like the sacred thread, and social interaction in general....... Although this social structure was ideal in nature and not equally confirmed in other genres of ancient and medieval literature, it has nevertheless had an immense impact on Indian society. The chapter presents an overview of the system with its three privileged classes, the Brahmins, the Kṣatriyas......, and the Vaiśyas, the fourth underprivileged class, the Śūdras, and, at the bottom of the society, the lowest so-called ‘untouchable’ castes. It also discusses the understanding of human differences that lies at the center of the system and the possible economic and political motivations of the Brahmin authors...

  20. Native IgG2a(b) is barely antigenic to major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted T cells owing to inefficient internalization by professional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnes, K; Hannestad, K

    2000-04-01

    Peptide epitopes derived from immunoglobulin variable regions represent tumour-specific antigens on B-cell neoplasms and can be recognized by syngeneic, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted T cells. Immunoglobulin peptide/MHC class II complexes may also be involved in autoimmunity and CD4+ T-cell-mediated B-cell regulation. Thus, the IgG2a(b) H-chain allopeptide gamma2a(b) 435-451 presented on I-Ad mimics the epitope implicated in herpes simplex virus-induced autoimmune stromal keratitis and is the target of T helper 1 (Th1) clones that suppress IgG2a(b) production in vivo. We here report that spleen and thymus cells constitutively present the autologous gamma2a(b) epitope to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma as a function of the animal housing conditions (specific pathogen-free or not) and the serum levels of IgG2a(b). Constitutive presentation in the spleen was predominantly performed by dendritic cells. Whereas spleen cells poorly presented native IgG2a(b) to a gamma2a(b) 435-451/I-A(d) reactive T-cell hybridoma, IgG2a(b) in the form of immune complexes were presented > 200-fold more efficiently owing to internalization via low-affinity FcgammaR on macrophages. The antigenicity could also be improved by homotypic aggregation and by targeting IgG2a(b) to complement receptors on the A20 B-cell lymphoma. Mice without detectable IgG2a(b)-containing immune complexes typically exhibited minimal constitutive presentation. Nevertheless, native IgG2a(b) can sensitize antigen-presenting cells in vivo, as mice that were devoid of immune complexes and carried an IgG2a(b)-producing tumour did present constitutively, even at physiological IgG2a(b) serum levels. Whereas the amounts of IgG released from most B-cell lymphomas may be too low to allow spontaneous priming of tumour-specific MHC class II-restricted T cells, administration of tumour immunoglobulin in aggregated form might improve the efficacy of idiotype vaccination.

  1. In vivo test of the vertical phase separation hypothesis: the display of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules on membranes of B cells from mice fed high-fat diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Boyle, Sarah; Hua, Jing; Li, Zhiping; Edidin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The membrane vertical phase separation hypothesis predicts that a decrease in plasma membrane acyl chain order will increase major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I surface expression. The hypothesis is based on modification of plasma membrane acyl chain order in cell culture and has not been tested in vivo. In the present study, we isolated splenic B cells from C57/BL6 mice fed either a normal diet or high-fat diets enriched in SFA or MUFA and assayed for changes in plasma membrane acyl chain order and MHC class I surface expression. Plasma membranes of B cells from MUFA-fed mice had significantly decreased acyl chain order and increased headgroup order. The decrease in acyl chain order correlated with a significant increase in the acyl chain unsaturation of B cells from the MUFA-fed mice. MHC class I surface levels on B cells were not affected by the MUFA-rich diet. This study suggests that the membrane vertical phase separation hypothesis may have limited application in a physiologically relevant setting. PMID:19283887

  2. Human major histocompatibility complex class I antigens: residues 61-83 of the HLA-B7 heavy chain specify an alloreactive site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L E; Ketler, T A; Houghten, R A; Schulz, G; Chersi, A; Reisfeld, R A

    1985-01-01

    A chemically synthesized peptide (sequence in text) homologous to residues 61-83 of the HLA-B7 heavy chain, induced antibodies that specifically recognized the HLA heavy chain-beta 2-microglobulin complex and the free heavy chain of the HLA-B7 antigen. These antibodies specifically immunoprecipitated the HLA-B7 beta 2-microglobulin complex solubilized from human lymphoblastoid cells by nonionic detergents and reacted with free HLA-B7 heavy chains in blots on nitrocellulose. These observations suggest that the antigenic conformation of this region of the HLA-B7 molecule is independent of the presence of beta 2-microglobulin and that amino acid residues 61-83 mimic an alloreactive site expressed by the HLA-B7 antigen.

  3. A new class of sulfido/oxo(dithiolene)-molybdenum(IV) complexes derived from sulfido/oxo-bis(tetrasulfido)molybdenum(IV) anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Suyama, Koichiro; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Isao; Hirota, Shun; Itoh, Shinobu

    2008-11-03

    Mono(dithiolene)sulfidomolybdenum(IV) complexes, [MoS(S4)(bdt)](2-) (2) and [MoS(S4)(bdtCl2)](2-) (3) (1,2-benzenedithiolate = bdt, 3,6-dichloro-1,2-benzenedithiolate = bdtCl2), were prepared by the substitution reaction of a tetrasulfido ligand in known [MoS(S4)2](2-) (1) with the corresponding dithiol. Complexes 2 and 3 were irreversibly oxidized to give bis(mu-sulfido) dimolybdenum(V) species, {[MoS(bdt)]2(mu-S)2}(2-) (4) and {[MoS(bdtCl2)]2(mu-S)2}(2-) (5), in aerobic acetonitrile. Mono(dithiolene)oxomolybdenum(IV) complexes, [MoO(S4)(bdt)](2-) (7) and [MoO(S4)(bdtCl2)](2-) (8), that are oxo derivatives of 2 and 3 were also synthesized from a known [MoO(S4)2](2-) (6) of an oxo derivative of 1 and the corresponding dithiol. Further, the electrophilic addition of dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate to 7 gave [MoO(bdt)(S2C2(COOMe)2)](2-) (9), and ligand substitution of the tetrasulfido group of 7 with bdt and bdtCl2 yielded [MoO(bdt)2](2-) ( 10) and [MoO(bdt)(bdtCl2)](2-) (11), respectively. New sulfido/oxo molybdenum complexes were characterized by (1)H NMR, IR, ESI-MS, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopies; cyclic voltammetry; and elemental analysis, and crystal structures of 2, 3, 5, 7, and 8 were determined by X-ray analysis.

  4. Birthing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management options. Breastfeeding basics. Caring for baby at home. Birthing classes are not just for new parents, though. ... midwife. Postpartum care. Caring for your baby at home, including baby first aid. Lamaze One of the most popular birthing techniques in the U.S., Lamaze has been around ...

  5. Class Trash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students calculate the amount and types of trash thrown out by their class at school to investigate how much trash is generated, where it goes, and speculate about alternatives. Students need to be familiar with the concepts of weight, volume, and numbers. (MCO)

  6. The Missing Link in Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion: the BDLF3 Gene Induces Ubiquitination and Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Laura L.; Williams, Luke R.; White, Claire; Forrest, Calum; Rowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to spread and persist in human populations relies on a balance between host immune responses and EBV immune evasion. CD8+ cells specific for EBV late lytic cycle antigens show poor recognition of target cells compared to immediate early and early antigen-specific CD8+ cells. This phenomenon is due in part to the early EBV protein BILF1, whose immunosuppressive activity increases with lytic cycle progression. However, published data suggest the existence of a hitherto unidentified immune evasion protein further enhancing protection against late EBV antigen-specific CD8+ cells. We have now identified the late lytic BDLF3 gene as the missing link accounting for efficient evasion during the late lytic cycle. Interestingly, BDLF3 also contributes to evasion of CD4+ cell responses to EBV. We report that BDLF3 downregulates expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in the absence of any effect upon other surface molecules screened, including CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD71 (transferrin receptor). BDLF3 both enhanced internalization of surface MHC molecules and reduced the rate of their appearance at the cell surface. The reduced expression of surface MHC molecules correlated with functional protection against CD8+ and CD4+ T cell recognition. The molecular mechanism was identified as BDLF3-induced ubiquitination of MHC molecules and their subsequent downregulation in a proteasome-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Immune evasion is a necessary feature of viruses that establish lifelong persistent infections in the face of strong immune responses. EBV is an important human pathogen whose immune evasion mechanisms are only partly understood. Of the EBV immune evasion mechanisms identified to date, none could explain why CD8+ T cell responses to late lytic cycle genes are so infrequent and, when present, recognize lytically infected target cells so poorly relative to CD8+ T cells specific for

  7. The Missing Link in Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion: the BDLF3 Gene Induces Ubiquitination and Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Laura L; Williams, Luke R; White, Claire; Forrest, Calum; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to spread and persist in human populations relies on a balance between host immune responses and EBV immune evasion. CD8(+) cells specific for EBV late lytic cycle antigens show poor recognition of target cells compared to immediate early and early antigen-specific CD8(+) cells. This phenomenon is due in part to the early EBV protein BILF1, whose immunosuppressive activity increases with lytic cycle progression. However, published data suggest the existence of a hitherto unidentified immune evasion protein further enhancing protection against late EBV antigen-specific CD8(+) cells. We have now identified the late lytic BDLF3 gene as the missing link accounting for efficient evasion during the late lytic cycle. Interestingly, BDLF3 also contributes to evasion of CD4(+) cell responses to EBV. We report that BDLF3 downregulates expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in the absence of any effect upon other surface molecules screened, including CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD71 (transferrin receptor). BDLF3 both enhanced internalization of surface MHC molecules and reduced the rate of their appearance at the cell surface. The reduced expression of surface MHC molecules correlated with functional protection against CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell recognition. The molecular mechanism was identified as BDLF3-induced ubiquitination of MHC molecules and their subsequent downregulation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Immune evasion is a necessary feature of viruses that establish lifelong persistent infections in the face of strong immune responses. EBV is an important human pathogen whose immune evasion mechanisms are only partly understood. Of the EBV immune evasion mechanisms identified to date, none could explain why CD8(+) T cell responses to late lytic cycle genes are so infrequent and, when present, recognize lytically infected target cells so poorly relative to CD8(+) T cells specific for

  8. Class size versus class composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sam

    Raising schooling quality in low-income countries is a pressing challenge. Substantial research has considered the impact of cutting class sizes on skills acquisition. Considerably less attention has been given to the extent to which peer effects, which refer to class composition, also may affect...... outcomes. This study uses new microdata from East Africa, incorporating test score data for over 250,000 children, to compare the likely efficacy of these two types of interventions. Endogeneity bias is addressed via fixed effects and instrumental variables techniques. Although these may not fully mitigate...

  9. Nitric oxide and KLF4 protein epigenetically modify class II transactivator to repress major histocompatibility complex II expression during Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, Devram Sampat; Holla, Sahana; Sinha, Akhauri Yash; Alagesan, Senthil Kumar; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2013-07-12

    Pathogenic mycobacteria employ several immune evasion strategies such as inhibition of class II transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II expression, to survive and persist in host macrophages. However, precise roles for specific signaling components executing down-regulation of CIITA/MHC-II have not been adequately addressed. Here, we demonstrate that Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-mediated TLR2 signaling-induced iNOS/NO expression is obligatory for the suppression of IFN-γ-induced CIITA/MHC-II functions. Significantly, NOTCH/PKC/MAPK-triggered signaling cross-talk was found critical for iNOS/NO production. NO responsive recruitment of a bifunctional transcription factor, KLF4, to the promoter of CIITA during M. bovis BCG infection of macrophages was essential to orchestrate the epigenetic modifications mediated by histone methyltransferase EZH2 or miR-150 and thus calibrate CIITA/MHC-II expression. NO-dependent KLF4 regulated the processing and presentation of ovalbumin by infected macrophages to reactive T cells. Altogether, our study delineates a novel role for iNOS/NO/KLF4 in dictating the mycobacterial capacity to inhibit CIITA/MHC-II-mediated antigen presentation by infected macrophages and thereby elude immune surveillance.

  10. Combined use of phospholipid complexes and self-emulsifying microemulsions for improving the oral absorption of a BCS class IV compound, baicalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyi Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a formulation to improve the oral absorption of baicalin (BA by combining a phospholipid complex (PC and self-emulsifying microemulsion drug delivery system (SMEDDS, termed BA–PC–SMEDDS. BA–PC was prepared by a solvent evaporation method and evaluated by complexation percentage (CP. The physicochemical properties of BA–PC were determined. The synergistic effect of PC and SMEDDS on permeation of BA was studied in vitro with Caco-2 cells and in situ with a single pass intestinal perfusion model. The improved bioavailability of BA in BA–PC–SMEDDS was confirmed in an in vivo rat model. The CP of BA–PC reached 100% when the molar ratio of drug to phospholipid (PP was ≥1:1. The solubility of BA–PC increased in both water and octanol, and the log Po/w of BA–PC was increased significantly. BA–PC–SMEDDS could be dispersed more evenly in water, compared to BA and BA–PC. Both the Caco-2 cell uptake and single-pass intestinal perfusion models illustrated that transport of BA in BA–PC was lower than that of free BA, while improved significantly in BA–PC–SMEDDS. The relative bioavailability of BA–PC(1:2–SMEDDS was 220.37%. The combination system of PC and SMEDDS had a synergistic effect on improving the oral absorption of BA.

  11. Association of Local Intrapulmonary Production of Antibodies Specific to Donor Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I With the Progression of Chronic Rejection of Lung Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ei; Motoyama, Hideki; Sato, Masaaki; Aoyama, Akihiro; Menju, Toshi; Shikuma, Kei; Sowa, Terumasa; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Saito, Masao; Takahagi, Akihiro; Tanaka, Satona; Takahashi, Mamoru; Ohata, Keiji; Kondo, Takeshi; Hijiya, Kyoko; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection may lead to chronic lung allograft dysfunction, but antibody-mediated rejection may develop in the absence of detectable donor-specific antibody (DSA) in recipient serum. This study investigated whether humoral immune responses develop not only systemically but locally within rejected lung allografts, resulting in local production of DSA. Lewis rats received orthotopic left lung transplantation from Lewis (syngeneic control) or Brown-Norway (major histocompatibility complex-mismatched allogeneic) donor rats. Rats that underwent allogeneic lung transplantation were subsequently administered cyclosporine until day 14 (short immunosuppression) or day 35 (long immunosuppression). The lung grafts and spleens of recipient animals were tissue cultured for 4 days, and the titer of antibody against donor major histocompatibility complex molecules was assayed by flow cytometry. Explanted lung grafts were also evaluated pathologically. By day 98, DSA titers in supernatants of lung graft (P = 0.0074) and spleen (P = 0.0167) cultures, but not serum, from the short immunosuppression group were significantly higher than titers in syngeneic controls. Cultures and sera from the long immunosuppression group showed no production of DSA. Microscopically, the lung grafts from the short immunosuppression group showed severe bronchiole obliteration and parenchymal fibrosis, along with lymphoid aggregates containing T and B cells, accompanying plasma cells. These findings suggestive of local humoral immune response were not observed by days 28 and 63. DSA can be locally produced in chronically rejected lung allografts, along with intragraft immunocompetent cells. Clinical testing of DSA in serum samples alone may underestimate lung allograft dysfunction.

  12. Escape in One of Two Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Epitopes Bound by a High-Frequency Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecule, Mamu-A*02: a Paradigm for Virus Evolution and Persistence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Thorsten U.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O'Connor, David H.; Rehrauer, William; Dodds, Elizabeth J.; Hickman, Heather; Hildebrand, William; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Hughes, Austin; Horton, Helen; Vielhuber, Kathy; Rudersdorf, Richard; de Souza, Ivna P.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Allen, Todd M.; Wilson, Nancy; Watkins, David I.

    2002-01-01

    It is now accepted that an effective vaccine against AIDS must include effective cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaque is the best available animal model for AIDS, but analysis of macaque CTL responses has hitherto focused mainly on epitopes bound by a single major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule, Mamu-A*01. The availability of Mamu-A*01-positive macaques for vaccine studies is therefore severely limited. Furthermore, it is becoming clear that different CTL responses are able to control immunodeficiency virus replication with varying success, making it a priority to identify and analyze CTL responses restricted by common MHC class I molecules other than Mamu-A*01. Here we describe two novel epitopes derived from SIV, one from Gag (Gag71-79 GY9), and one from the Nef protein (Nef159-167 YY9). Both epitopes are bound by the common macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A*02. The sequences of these two eptiopes are consistent with the molecule's peptide-binding motif, which we have defined by elution of natural ligands from Mamu-A*02. Strikingly, we found evidence for the selection of escape variant viruses by CTL specific for Nef159-167 YY9 in 6 of 6 Mamu-A*02-positive animals. In contrast, viral sequences encoding the Gag71-79 GY9 epitope remained intact in each animal. This situation is reminiscent of Mamu-A*01-restricted CTL that recognize Tat28-35 SL8, which reproducibly selects for escape variants during acute infection, and Gag181-189 CM9, which does not. Differential selection by CTL may therefore be a paradigm of immunodeficiency virus infection. PMID:12388723

  13. The Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase Class III Complex Containing TcVps15 and TcVps34 Participates in Autophagy in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoijet, Alejandra C; Sternlieb, Tamara; Alonso, Guillermo D

    2017-05-01

    Autophagy is a degradative process by which eukaryotic cells digest their own components to provide aminoacids that may function as energy source under nutritional stress conditions. There is experimental evidence for autophagy in parasitic protists belonging to the family Trypanosomatidae. However, few proteins implicated in this process have been characterized so far in these parasites. Moreover, it has been shown that autophagy is involved in Trypanosoma cruzi differentiation and thus might have a role in pathogenicity. Here, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of TcVps15. In addition, we demonstrate that TcVps15 interact with the PI3K TcVps34 and that both proteins associate with cellular membranes. Under nutritional stress conditions, TcVps15 and TcVps34 modify their subcellular distribution showing a partial co-localization in autophagosomes with TcAtg8.1 and using an active site TcVps15-mutated version (TcVps15-K219D-HA) we demonstrated that this relocalization depends on the TcVps15 catalytic activity. Overexpression of TcVps15-HA and TcVps15-K219D-HA also leads to increased accumulation of monodansylcadaverine (MDC) in autophagic vacuoles under nutritional stress conditions compared to wild-type cells. In addition, the MDC-specific activity shows to be significantly higher in TcVps15-HA overexpressing cells when compared with TcVps15-K219D-HA. Our results reveal for the first time a role of TcVps15 as a key regulator of TcVps34 enzymatic activity and implicate the TcVps15-Vps34 complex in autophagy in T. cruzi, exposing a new key pathway to explore novel chemotherapeutic targets. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  14. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Revisiting Parametric Types and Virtual Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Bach; Ernst, Erik

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptually oriented updated view on the relationship between parametric types and virtual classes. The traditional view is that parametric types excel at structurally oriented composition and decomposition, and virtual classes excel at specifying mutually recursive families...... of classes whose relationships are preserved in derived families. Conversely, while class families can be specified using a large number of F-bounded type parameters, this approach is complex and fragile; and it is difficult to use traditional virtual classes to specify object composition in a structural......, it shows how a novel kind of dynamic type check can detect compatibility among entire families of classes....

  16. License class design: complexity and algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Kroon (Leo); A.W.J. Kolen

    1992-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper a generalization of the Fixed Job Scheduling Problem (FSP) is considered, which appears in the aircraft maintenance process at an airport. A number of jobs have to be carried out, where the main attributes of a job are a fixed start time, a fixed finish time and an aircraft

  17. Transfer of IgG in the female genital tract by MHC class I-related neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) confers protective immunity to vaginal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    IgG is a major immunoglobulin subclass in mucosal secretions of human female genital tract, where it predominates over the IgA isotype. Despite the abundance of IgG, surprisingly little is known about whether and how IgG enters the lumen of the genital tract and the exact role of local IgG may play ...

  18. Distribution of the multidrug efflux pump genes, adeABC, adeDE and adeIJK, and class 1 integron genes in multiple-antimicrobial-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Ling, Bao-Dong; Li, Xian-Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Of 112 non-repetitive clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii-Acinetobacter calcoaceticus complex, 80% were resistant to a variety of structurally unrelated antimicrobials although all isolates were susceptible to minocycline and polymyxin. Resistance to carbapenems occurred in 8% of the isolates. The presence of adeSR-adeABC, adeDE and adeIJK drug efflux system genes and class 1 integron genes (integrase gene int1) was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in relation to the susceptibility of the isolates to 20 antimicrobials. The majority of isolates (75%) with high levels of multidrug resistance were positive for adeSR-adeABC and adeIJK as well as int1 and thus belong to A. baumannii (i.e. genomospecies 2). Positive adeE was only observed in adeSR-adeABC/adeIJK/int1-negative isolates (8%; likely belonging to Acinetobacter genomospecies 3) that were relatively susceptible to several agents, and adeE expression was undetectable. The results reveal a possible association between adeABC/adeIJK and int1 in multidrug-resistant isolates of A. baumannii. In addition, differential distribution of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) genes can likely be used as indicators for differentiating Acinetobacter species.

  19. Associations of MICB with cervical cancer in north-eastern Thais: identification of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene B motifs influencing natural killer cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumnainsong, A; Jearanaikoon, P; Khahmahpahte, S; Wongsena, W; Romphruk, A V; Chumworathayi, B; Vaeteewoottacharn, K; Ponglikitmongkol, M; Romphruk, A; Leelayuwat, C

    2008-01-01

    The expression of MICB, a member of the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene B family, is induced in response to cellular stress. It is one of the ligands to the NKG2D receptor. MICB is polymorphic, but the distribution of MICB polymorphism in north-eastern Thais and their potential associations with cancer have not yet been elucidated. In this study, polymerase chain reaction–sequence-specific primers were developed to identify 15 MICB alleles and one group of alleles. We performed MICB typing in 100 healthy north-eastern Thai females (NETF) and 99 cervical cancer patients to evaluate the association of MICB polymorphisms and the risk of developing cervical cancer. Eight and nine alleles were detected in the NETF and cervical cancer respectively. MICB*00502 was associated negatively with a corrected P-value of 0·0009, suggesting the existence of a protective allele in cervical cancer. Amino acid substitutions carried by this allele were investigated for their potential involvement in natural killer (NK) cell activation. Although lysine at amino acid position 80 (Lys80) and aspartic acid at position 136 (Asp136) were associated negatively with cervical cancer, only MICB carrying Asp136 could induce NK cell killing more efficiently than MICB-Lys80 when the NK cells were blocked by anti-NKG2D. This result suggested that aspartic acid at position 136 may affect NKG2D binding, leading to different degrees of immune cell activation. PMID:18505429

  20. Resistance of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class B (MHC-B) to Nef-Mediated Downregulation Relative to that of MHC-A Is Conserved among Primate Lentiviruses and Influences Antiviral T Cell Responses in HIV-1-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwimanzi, Francis; Toyoda, Mako; Mahiti, Macdonald; Mann, Jaclyn K; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David; Brockman, Mark A; Goulder, Philip; Kirchhoff, Frank; Brumme, Zabrina L; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Ueno, Takamasa

    2018-01-01

    Patient-derived HIV-1 subtype B Nef clones downregulate HLA-A more efficiently than HLA-B. However, it remains unknown whether this property is common to Nef proteins across primate lentiviruses and how antiviral immune responses may be affected. We examined 263 Nef clones from diverse primate lentiviruses including different pandemic HIV-1 group M subtypes for their ability to downregulate major histocompatibility complex class A (MHC-A) and MHC-B from the cell surface. Though lentiviral Nef proteins differed markedly in their absolute MHC-A and MHC-B downregulation abilities, all lentiviral Nef lineages downregulated MHC-A, on average, 11 to 32% more efficiently than MHC-B. Nef genotype/phenotype analyses in a cohort of HIV-1 subtype C-infected patients ( n = 168), together with site-directed mutagenesis, revealed Nef position 9 as a subtype-specific determinant of differential HLA-A versus HLA-B downregulation activity. Nef clones harboring nonconsensus variants at codon 9 downregulated HLA-B (though not HLA-A) significantly better than those harboring the consensus sequence at this site, resulting in reduced recognition of infected target cells by HIV-1-specific CD8 + effector cells in vitro Among persons expressing protective HLA class I alleles, carriage of Nef codon 9 variants was also associated with reduced ex vivo HIV-specific T cell responses. Our results demonstrate that Nef's inferior ability to downregulate MHC-B compared to that of MHC-A is conserved across primate lentiviruses and suggest that this property influences antiviral cellular immune responses. IMPORTANCE Primate lentiviruses encode the Nef protein that plays an essential role in establishing persistent infection in their respective host species. Nef interacts with the cytoplasmic region of MHC-A and MHC-B molecules and downregulates them from the infected cell surface to escape recognition by host cellular immunity. Using a panel of Nef alleles isolated from diverse primate lentiviruses

  1. Sensorisk analyse i relation til markedsorientret produktudvikling af fødevarer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Anne C.; Juhl, Hans Jørn; Kristensen, Kai

    1995-01-01

    and not as a substitute for a market analysis. Furthermore there is a risk that some products are rejected too early if the products are only tested in a blind test. Factors such as packaging, brand, price and information on the product's nutritional value may influence consumer pref If the mentioned factors influence...... as follows: "From a scientific/technical point of view there is a need for complete knowledge of the sensory qualities of a product and for a wider understanding of the ultimate consumer in relation to prod acceptance, product optimisation and product satisfaction." This wide formulation of the aim thus...... includes both production, research and marketing perspectives. In other words it is necessary to know which sensory qualities are required by the consumer and how to manufacture a product with these qualities. It sounds simple but covers a complex set of problems. On the product side the sensory qualities...

  2. The Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Transactivator CIITA Inhibits the Persistent Activation of NF-κB by the Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax-1 Oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Abdallah, Rawan; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2016-01-20

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax-1, a key protein in HTLV-1-induced T cell transformation, deregulates diverse cell signaling pathways. Among them, the NF-κB pathway is constitutively activated by Tax-1, which binds to NF-κB proteins and activates the IκB kinase (IKK). Upon phosphorylation-dependent IκB degradation, NF-κB migrates into the nucleus, mediating Tax-1-stimulated gene expression. We show that the transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II genes CIITA (class II transactivator), endogenously or ectopically expressed in different cells, inhibits the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax-1 and map the region that mediates this effect. CIITA affects the subcellular localization of Tax-1, which is mostly retained in the cytoplasm, and this correlates with impaired migration of RelA into the nucleus. Cytoplasmic and nuclear mutant forms of CIITA reveal that CIITA exploits different strategies to suppress Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation in both subcellular compartments. CIITA interacts with Tax-1 without preventing Tax-1 binding to both IKKγ and RelA. Nevertheless, CIITA affects Tax-1-induced IKK activity, causing retention of the inactive p50/RelA/IκB complex in the cytoplasm. Nuclear CIITA associates with Tax-1/RelA in nuclear bodies, blocking Tax-1-dependent activation of NF-κB-responsive genes. Thus, CIITA inhibits cytoplasmic and nuclear steps of Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation. These results, together with our previous finding that CIITA acts as a restriction factor inhibiting Tax-1-promoted HTLV-1 gene expression and replication, indicate that CIITA is a versatile molecule that might also counteract Tax-1 transforming activity. Unveiling the molecular basis of CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-1 functions may be important in defining new strategies to control HTLV-1 spreading and oncogenic potential. HTLV-1 is the causative agent of human adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL). The viral

  3. RxClass

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The RxClass Browser is a web application for exploring and navigating through the class hierarchies to find the RxNorm drug members associated with each class....

  4. IFN-τ Mediated Control of Bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression and Function via the Regulation of bta-miR-148b/152 in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haichong Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IFN-τ, a type I interferon produced by the trophoblasts of ruminants, has various important immune functions, including effects on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I (MHC-I. A previous study has reported that IFN-τ promotes the expression of MHC-I molecules on endometrial cells. However, the immunological mechanisms by which IFN-τ regulates MHC-I molecules remain unknown. Here, we investigated which microRNA (miRNAs may be involved in the regulation of MHC-I molecule expression and function in bovine endometrial epithelial cells (bEECs. By using TargetScan 6.2 and http://www.microRNA.org, two miRNAs were suggested to target the 3′UTR of the bovine MHC-I heavy chain: bta-miR-148b and bta-miR-152. Dual luciferase reporter and miRNA mimic/inhibitor assays suggested that bta-miR-148b/152 were negatively correlated with bovine MHC-I heavy chain genes. The function of the MHC-I heavy chain was then investigated using qRT-PCR, ELISA, western blotting, immunofluorescence, and RNA interference assays in primary bEECs and an endometrial epithelial cell line (BEND. The results demonstrated that bta-miR-148b/152 could promote TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses by targeting the bovine MHC-I heavy chain, and the MHC-I molecule negatively regulated TLR4-induced inflammatory reactions may through the Fps-SHP-2 pathway. Our discovery offers novel insight into negative regulation of the TLR4 pathway and elucidates the mechanism by which bovine MHC-I molecules control congenital inflammatory reactions.

  5. Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-W; Peng, Z-G; Xian, W-H; Cui, X-Q; Sun, H-B; Li, E-G; Geng, L-N; Zhao, P; Tian, J

    2013-11-01

    Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A (MICA) antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation. De novo presence of HLA and MICA antibodies after renal transplantation is associated with poor graft survival. Proteinuria after transplantation is also considered a risk factor for premature graft loss. In this study, we investigated the association of de novo HLA and MICA antibodies on proteinuria after renal transplantation and the association of proteinuria and de novo antibodies with graft survival. We enrolled 275 patients without preexisting HLA and MICA antibodies followed for >5 years after renal transplantation. All donor organs were from living-related donors or from an organ donation program. HLA and MICA antibodies were detected by the Luminex method. Patients with proteinuria (>150 mg/d) underwent intermittent 24-hour proteinuria examination. The frequencies of de novo HLA and MICA antibody 5 years after transplantation were 25.8% and 12%, respectively. In total, 26.5% of patients had proteinuria at the 5-year follow-up. De novo HLA antibody was associated with increased proteinuria after transplantation (relative risk, 3.12). HLA antibody and proteinuria were both associated with poor 5-year graft survival (P = .027 and P = .006, respectively). De novo HLA and MICA antibodies and proteinuria after renal transplantation are all associated with poor graft survival. De novo HLA antibody is independent risk factor for posttransplant proteinuria, and proteinuria affects the association of de novo antibodies with decreased graft survival after transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. IFN-α augments natural killer-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of HIV-1-infected autologous CD4+ T cells regardless of major histocompatibility complex class 1 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomescu, Costin; Tebas, Pablo; Montaner, Luis J

    2017-03-13

    We have previously shown that IFN-α stimulation augments direct natural killer (NK) cell lysis of autologous CD4 primary T cells infected with certain HIV-1 isolates based upon major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC-1) downregulation capacity. Here, we investigated if antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) could trigger lysis of HIV-1 isolates that were resistant to direct NK lysis and if IFN-α prestimulation of NK cells could further enhance ADCC. Using broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against gp120 (VRC01 or PGV04) or plasma from HIV-1-infected patients (ART-suppressed or elite controller) to trigger ADCC, we measured NK cell chromium release cytotoxicity against HIV-1-infected autologous CD4 primary T cells and NK cell CD107a degranulation against gp120-coated CD4 T cells. Total or NK-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used as effectors in the presence or absence of IFN-α prestimulation. Plasma from HIV-1-infected patients and monoclonal antibodies against gp120 could trigger NK-dependent ADCC lysis of viral isolates that were resistant to direct NK cell lysis following IFN-α stimulation. In contrast, viral isolates that exhibited potent MHC-I downregulation capacity could be lysed by NK cells through either IFN-α stimulated direct cytotoxicity or through ADCC. When utilized in combination, IFN-α prestimulation significantly augmented ADCC lysis of HIV-1-infected target cells and increased NK cell CD107a degranulation against gp120-coated ADCC targets (P cytotoxicity depending on MHC downregulation status.

  7. Changes in Expressions of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I, Paired-Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor B, and Cluster of Differentiation 3ζ in Motor Cortical Representations of the Brachial Plexus After Avulsion in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI), paired-immunoglobulin-like receptor B (PirB), and cluster of differentiation 3ζ (CD3ζ) negatively regulate neuronal plasticity in developing and adult brains. The aim of this study was to evaluate expressive changes of these factors in motor cortical representations of the brachial plexus (MCRBP) after total brachial plexus root avulsion (tBPRA). A total of 45 rats were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups for evaluating mRNA and protein expression levels of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ: 7 days, 3 months, and control. In the 7-day and 3-month groups, expressions were examined at 7 days and 3 months, respectively, after left tBPRA. In the control group, the brachial plexus was uninjured. Three rats from each group were used for examining expressions of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ proteins by immunofluorescence labeling, 6 rats for quantification of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ mRNAs by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the remaining 6 animals for quantification of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ proteins by Western blotting. In the original MCRBP, mRNA and protein expression levels of MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ were down-regulated 7 days postinjury compared with control (P  0.05). Recovery of protein expressions were initiated from near the border region of the original MCRBP. MHCI, PirB, and CD3ζ may participate in motor cortical reorganization after tBPRA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. IFN-τ Mediated Control of Bovine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression and Functionviathe Regulation of bta-miR-148b/152 in Bovine Endometrial Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haichong; Jiang, Kangfeng; Guo, Shuai; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Gan; Qiu, Changwei; Deng, Ganzhen

    2018-01-01

    IFN-τ, a type I interferon produced by the trophoblasts of ruminants, has various important immune functions, including effects on the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I). A previous study has reported that IFN-τ promotes the expression of MHC-I molecules on endometrial cells. However, the immunological mechanisms by which IFN-τ regulates MHC-I molecules remain unknown. Here, we investigated which microRNA (miRNAs) may be involved in the regulation of MHC-I molecule expression and function in bovine endometrial epithelial cells (bEECs). By using TargetScan 6.2 and http://www.microRNA.org, two miRNAs were suggested to target the 3'UTR of the bovine MHC-I heavy chain: bta-miR-148b and bta-miR-152. Dual luciferase reporter and miRNA mimic/inhibitor assays suggested that bta-miR-148b/152 were negatively correlated with bovine MHC-I heavy chain genes. The function of the MHC-I heavy chain was then investigated using qRT-PCR, ELISA, western blotting, immunofluorescence, and RNA interference assays in primary bEECs and an endometrial epithelial cell line (BEND). The results demonstrated that bta-miR-148b/152 could promote TLR4-triggered inflammatory responses by targeting the bovine MHC-I heavy chain, and the MHC-I molecule negatively regulated TLR4-induced inflammatory reactions may through the Fps-SHP-2 pathway. Our discovery offers novel insight into negative regulation of the TLR4 pathway and elucidates the mechanism by which bovine MHC-I molecules control congenital inflammatory reactions.

  9. Present Yourself! By MHC Class I and MHC Class II Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Kenneth L.; Reits, Eric; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, it took some 40 years to arrive at a coherent picture of how MHC class I and MHC class II molecules really work. This is a story of proteases and MHC-like chaperones that support the MHC class I and II molecules in presenting peptides to the immune system. We now understand that the MHC system shapes both the repertoire of presented peptides and the subsequent T cell responses, with important implications ranging from transplant rejection to tumor immunotherapies. Here we present an illustrated review on the ins and outs of MHC class I and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:27614798

  10. NLRC5: a newly discovered MHC class I transactivator (CITA)

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator), is a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression as well as of some of the genes involved in MHC class II antigen presentation. It has recently been discovered that another member of the NLR protein family, NLRC5, transcriptionally activates MHC class I genes, and thus acts as “CITA” (MHC class I transactivator)...

  11. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  12. Complex/Symplectic Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Kachru, Shamit; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC; Tomasiello, Alessandro; /Stanford U., ITP

    2005-10-28

    We construct a class of symplectic non-Kaehler and complex non-Kaehler string theory vacua, extending and providing evidence for an earlier suggestion by Polchinski and Strominger. The class admits a mirror pairing by construction. Comparing hints from a variety of sources, including ten-dimensional supergravity and KK reduction on SU(3)-structure manifolds, suggests a picture in which string theory extends Reid's fantasy to connect classes of both complex non-Kaehler and symplectic non-Kaehler manifolds.

  13. PRCR Classes and Activities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — This data is specific to Parks and Recreation classes, workshops, and activities within the course catalog. It contains an entry for upcoming classes.*This data set...

  14. Class 1 Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A "Class 1" area is a geographic area recognized by the EPA as being of the highest environmental quality and requiring maximum protection. Class I areas are areas...

  15. Spectrum of Class Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiangtao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some spectral properties of class operators for , , , and . It is shown that if is a class operator, then the Riesz idempotent of with respect to each nonzero isolated point spectrum is selfadjoint and . Afterwards, we prove that every class operator has SVEP and property , and Weyl's theorem holds for when .

  16. A Virtual Class Calculus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik; Ostermann, Klaus; Cook, William Randall

    2006-01-01

    model for virtual classes has been a long-standing open question. This paper presents a virtual class calculus, vc, that captures the essence of virtual classes in these full-fledged programming languages. The key contributions of the paper are a formalization of the dynamic and static semantics of vc...

  17. The epitope recognized by pan-HLA class I-reactive monoclonal antibody W6/32 and its relationship to unusual stability of the HLA-B27/beta2-microglobulin complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tran, T. M.; Ivanyi, P.; Hilgert, Ivan; Brdička, Tomáš; Pla, M.; Breur, B.; Flieger, Miroslav; Ivašková, E.; Hořejší, Václav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2001), s. 440-446 ISSN 0093-7711 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI5314; GA MZd IZ3647; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : HLA class I * epitope * W6/32 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.268, year: 2001

  18. Loosely coupled class families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2001-01-01

    are expressed using virtual classes seem to be very tightly coupled internally. While clients have achieved the freedom to dynamically use one or the other family, it seems that any given family contains a xed set of classes and we will need to create an entire family of its own just in order to replace one...... of the members with another class. This paper shows how to express class families in such a manner that the classes in these families can be used in many dierent combinations, still enabling family polymorphism and ensuring type safety....

  19. Class, Culture and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2013-01-01

    Even though contemporary discussions of class have moved forward towards recognizing a multidimensional concept of class, empirical analyses tend to focus on cultural practices in a rather narrow sense, that is, as practices of cultural consumption or practices of education. As a result......, discussions within political sociology have not yet utilized the merits of a multidimensional conception of class. In light of this, the article suggests a comprehensive Bourdieusian framework for class analysis, integrating culture as both a structural phenomenon co-constitutive of class and as symbolic...

  20. Second Class Minors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, Hiroeki; Shastri, Nilabh

    2003-01-01

    CD4 T cells regulate immune responses that cause chronic graft rejection and graft versus host disease but their target antigens remain virtually unknown. We developed a new method to identify CD4 T cell–stimulating antigens. LacZ-inducible CD4 T cells were used as a probe to detect their cognate peptide/MHC II ligand generated in dendritic cells fed with Escherichia coli expressing a library of target cell genes. The murine H46 locus on chromosome 7 was thus found to encode the interleukin 4–induced IL4i1 gene. The IL4i1 precursor contains the HAFVEAIPELQGHV peptide which is presented by Ab major histocompatibility complex class II molecule via an endogenous pathway in professional antigen presenting cells. Both allelic peptides bind Ab and a single alanine to methionine substitution at p2 defines nonself. These results reveal novel features of H loci that regulate CD4 T cell responses as well as provide a general strategy for identifying elusive antigens that elicit CD4 T cell responses to tumors or self-tissues in autoimmunity. PMID:12566421

  1. The highest affinity DNA element bound by Pbx complexes in t(1;19) leukemic cells fails to mediate cooperative DNA-binding or cooperative transactivation by E2a-Pbx1 and class I Hox proteins - evidence for selective targetting of E2a-Pbx1 to a subset of Pbx-recognition elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoepfler, P S; Kamps, M P

    1997-05-29

    Oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 contains the N-terminal transactivation domains of E2a and the majority of the homeodomain protein, Pbx1. Using recombinant proteins, both Pbx1 and E2a-Pbx1 heterodimerize with Hox proteins on bipartite elements, Pbx1 binding a 5' TGAT core and Class I Hox proteins binding adjacent 3' TAAT, TTAT, or TGAT cores. In contrast to these in vitro results, nuclear extracts from E2a-Pbx1-transformed cells assemble an abundant Pbx-containing complex on TGATTGAT that excludes E2a-Pbx1, suggesting that an uncharacterized in vivo partner discriminates between E2a-Pbx1 and Pbx proteins, distinguishing it from Hox proteins. Here, we describe the DNA-binding properties of this complex, and identify TGATTGAC (PCE; Pbx Consensus Element) as its optimal recognition motif. In vitro, the PCE fails to bind heterodimers of Class I Hox proteins plus either Pbx1 or E2a-Pbx1. Likewise, in vivo, the PCE fails to mediate cooperative transactivation by E2a-Pbx1 plus Class I Hox proteins. Thus, the PCE binds a Pbx dimer partner that behaves unlike Class I Hox proteins. Competition analysis indicates that the Pbx-containing complex that binds the PCE also binds the TGATTGAT Pbx-Hox element and binds promoter elements required for tissue-specific expression of a number of cellular genes. Thus, different Pbx partners dictate targetting of Pbx heterodimers to related DNA motifs that differ in the sequence of their 3' half-sites, and E2a-Pbx1 heterodimerizes with only a subset of Pbx partners, restricting its potential DNA targets.

  2. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W.; Whittingham, Linda A.; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O.

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  3. Social power and social class: conceptualization, consequences, and current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Derek D; Galinsky, Adam D

    2017-12-01

    This article offers a primer on social power and social class with respect to their theoretical importance, conceptual distinction, and empirical relationship. We introduce and define the constructs of social power, social class, and one's psychological sense of power. We next explore the complex relationship between social power and social class. Because social class can produce a sense of power within an individual, studies on social power can inform theory and research on social class. We conclude with a discussion of the current challenges and future opportunities for the study of social power and social class. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  5. Data Selection for Within-Class Covariance Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    used in this study consisted of an i- vector generator followed by within- class covariance normalization (WCCN) and cosine scoring. The decision to...desire to avoid the complexity of coupling effects when using both within- class and across- class matrices. In addition, our studies and those of others... absence of sufficient diversity in the training data and is considerably worse than using no within- class compensation at all. Figure 2

  6. Class network routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan [Princeton, NJ; Blumrich, Matthias A [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong [Croton On Hudson, NY; Coteus, Paul W [Yorktown Heights, NY; Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D [Mount Kisco, NY; Takken, Todd E [Mount Kisco, NY; Vranas, Pavlos M [Bedford Hills, NY

    2009-09-08

    Class network routing is implemented in a network such as a computer network comprising a plurality of parallel compute processors at nodes thereof. Class network routing allows a compute processor to broadcast a message to a range (one or more) of other compute processors in the computer network, such as processors in a column or a row. Normally this type of operation requires a separate message to be sent to each processor. With class network routing pursuant to the invention, a single message is sufficient, which generally reduces the total number of messages in the network as well as the latency to do a broadcast. Class network routing is also applied to dense matrix inversion algorithms on distributed memory parallel supercomputers with hardware class function (multicast) capability. This is achieved by exploiting the fact that the communication patterns of dense matrix inversion can be served by hardware class functions, which results in faster execution times.

  7. Culture and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuri

    2017-12-01

    A large body of research in Western cultures has demonstrated the psychological and health effects of social class. This review outlines a cultural psychological approach to social stratification by comparing psychological and health manifestations of social class across Western and East Asian cultures. These comparisons suggest that cultural meaning systems shape how people make meaning and respond to material/structural conditions associated with social class, thereby leading to culturally divergent manifestations of social class. Specifically, unlike their counterparts in Western cultures, individuals of high social class in East Asian cultures tend to show high conformity and other-orientated psychological attributes. In addition, cultures differ in how social class impacts health (i.e. on which bases, through which pathways, and to what extent). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Semantic Analysis of Virtual Classes and Nested Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1999-01-01

    Virtual classes and nested classes are distinguishing features of BETA. Nested classes originated from Simula, but until recently they have not been part of main stream object- oriented languages. C++ has a restricted form of nested classes and they were included in Java 1.1. Virtual classes...... classes and parameterized classes have been made. Although virtual classes and nested classes have been used in BETA for more than a decade, their implementation has not been published. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of virtual classes and nested classes by presenting...

  9. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-04-15

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157-165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157–165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing. PMID:26903513

  11. The Question of Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Paul C.

    2007-01-01

    For too long, educators' approach to understanding the relationships between poverty, class and education has been framed by studying the behaviors and cultures of poor students and their families. If only people--in the middle and upper-middle classes--can understand "their" culture, why "those people" do not value education, why "those parents"…

  12. The Conversation Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  13. Teaching Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablante, Courtney B.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Discussing socioeconomic status in college classes can be challenging. Both teachers and students feel uncomfortable, yet social class matters more than ever. This is especially true, given increased income inequality in the United States and indications that higher education does not reduce this inequality as much as many people hope. Resources…

  14. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  15. On the classification of complex vector bundles of stable rank

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , the tuples of cohomology classes on a compact, complex manifold, corresponding to the Chern classes of a complex vector bundle of stable rank. This classification becomes more effective on generalized flag manifolds, where the Lie ...

  16. MOLECULAR GENETICS OF THE SWINE MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX, THE SLA COMPLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex is one of the most gene-dense regions in the swine genome. It consists of three major gene clusters, the SLA class I, class III and class II regions, that span ~1.1, 0.7 and 0.5 Mb, respectively, making the swi...

  17. 47 CFR 73.25 - Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.25 Clear channels; Class A, Class B and Class D stations. The frequencies in the following tabulations are designated as clear channels...

  18. MHC class II expression in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yayi; Rozeboom, Leslie; Rivard, Christopher J; Ellison, Kim; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Yu, Hui; Zhou, Caicun; Hirsch, Fred R

    2017-10-01

    Immunotherapy is an exciting development in lung cancer research. In this study we described major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II protein expression in lung cancer cell lines and patient tissues. We studied MHC Class II (DP, DQ, DR) (CR3/43, Abcam) protein expression in 55 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, 42 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and 278 lung cancer patient tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Seven (12.7%) NSCLC cell lines were positive for MHC Class II. No SCLC cell lines were found to be MHC Class II positive. We assessed 139 lung cancer samples available in the Hirsch Lab for MHC Class II. There was no positive MHC Class II staining on SCLC tumor cells. MHC Class II expression on TILs in SCLC was significantly lower than that on TILs in NSCLC (P<0.001). MHC Class II was also assessed in an additional 139 NSCLC tumor tissues from Medical University of Gdansk, Poland. Patients with positive staining of MHC Class II on TILs had longer regression-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those whose TILs were MHC Class II negative (2.980 years, 95% CI 1.628-4.332 vs. 1.050 years, 95% CI 0.556-1.554, P=0.028) (3.230 years, 95% CI 2.617-3.843 vs. 1.390 years, 95% CI 0.629-2.151, P=0.014). MHC Class II was expressed both in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. However, MHC Class II was not detected in SCLC cell lines or tissue tumor cells. MHC Class II expression was lower on SCLC TILs than on NSCLC TILs. Loss of expression of MHC Class II on SCLC tumor cells and reduced expression on SCLC TILs may be a means of escaping anti-cancer immunity. Higher MHC Class II expression on TILs was correlated with better prognosis in patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Delivery of a MalE CD4+-T-Cell Epitope into the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation Pathway by Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase ral NPKSupply

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loucká, Jiřina; Schlecht, G.; Vojtová, Jana; Leclerc, C.; Šebo, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2002), s. 1002-1005 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/01/0934; GA AV ČR IAA5020907; GA MŠk ME 167 Grant - others:QLK2-CT(US) 00556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : delivery * epitope * complex Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.039, year: 2002

  20. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  1. TV News Analysis Project Motivates Broadcast Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the use of content analysis by a journalism class in studying television news. Indicates that the method is flexible, generates familiarity with quantitative approaches to the analysis of broadcast journalism, can result in increased awareness of the complexity of the broadcast news medium, and increases student motivation. (TJ)

  2. On a Class of Real Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelas de Oliveira, E.; Rosa, M. A. F.; Vaz, J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    We present a calculation involving a wide class of real integrals by means of integration in the complex plane. Some particular cases where Euler numbers and Bell polynomials appear are discussed and a generalisation of some previous results is also provided. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  3. Venture Class Launch Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Provide an introduction to the Launch Services Program, and specifically the strategic initiative that drove the Venture Class Launch Services contracts. Provide information from the VCLS request for proposals, as well as the Agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative.

  4. Nordic Walking Classes

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2015-01-01

    Four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Spring Course 2015: 05.05/12.05/19.05/26.05 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Nordic%20Walking/NewForm.aspx? Hope to see you among us! fitness.club@cern.ch

  5. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory foll...... follows that integral transform with kernels which are products of a Bessel and a Hankel function or which is of a certain general hypergeometric type have inverse transforms of the same structure....

  6. MHC class I and II deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Suheir; Etzioni, Amos

    2014-08-01

    Deficiencies of MHC complex class I or II are rare primary immunodeficiencies, both of which are inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. MHC class II deficiency is a prototype of a disease of gene regulation. Defects in transacting regulatory factors required for expression of MHC class II genes, rather than the genes themselves, are responsible for the disease phenotype. The affected genes are known to encode 4 distinct regulatory factors controlling transcription of MHC class II genes. These transacting factors are the class II transactivator and 3 subunits of regulatory factor X (RFX): RFX containing ankyrin repeats (RFXANK), the fifth member of the RFX family (RFX5), and RFX-associated protein (RFXAP). Mutations in one of each define 4 distinct complementation groups termed A, B, C, and D, respectively. MHC class I deficiency is extremely rare and has been reported in less than 30 patients worldwide. Here we review the clinical, genetic, and molecular features that characterize these primary immunodeficiencies and discuss therapy options. Beyond the description of MHC class I and II deficiencies, their discovery has fascinated scientists and clinicians because of their ability to reveal the molecular basis of MCH regulation. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells prime in vivo alloreactive T cells for interleukin-4-dependent rejection of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-disparate cardiac allograft

    OpenAIRE

    Buonocore, Sofia; Flamand, Véronique; Goldman, Michel; Braun, Michel Y

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC) at the immature state express low levels of major histocompatibility complex and costimulatory molecules and are poor stimulators of primary T-cell response in vitro. Injection of immature bone marrow-derived DC, however, was shown to prime in vivo alloreactive CD4 T lymphocytes toward type 2 cytokine-producing cells in the absence of CD8 T-cell activation. METHODS: We undertook the present study to determine whether Th2-immunization by immature DC could lead ...

  8. Provability, complexity, grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Beklemishev, Lev; Vereshchagin, Nikolai

    1999-01-01

    The book contains English translations of three outstanding dissertations in mathematical logic and complexity theory. L. Beklemishev proves that all provability logics must belong to one of the four previously known classes. The dissertation of M. Pentus proves the Chomsky conjecture about the equivalence of two approaches to formal languages: the Chomsky hierarchy and the Lambek calculus. The dissertation of N. Vereshchagin describes a general framework for criteria of reversability in complexity theory.

  9. Social-Class Identity and English Learning: Studies of Chinese Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    This article first looks at the complex conceptualization of Chinese learners' social-class identities with respect to a shifting Chinese class stratification. It then examines the link between social class and second-language learning in the Chinese context by reviewing several studies on Chinese learners' social-class backgrounds and their…

  10. Present Yourself! By MHC Class I and MHC Class II Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Rock, Kenneth L.; Reits, Eric; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, it took some 40 years to arrive at a coherent picture of how MHC class I and MHC class II molecules really work. This is a story of proteases and MHC-like chaperones that support the MHC class I and II molecules in presenting peptides to the immune system. We now understand that the MHC system shapes both the repertoire of presented peptides and the subsequent T cell responses, with important implications ranging from tr...

  11. Class and Politics in Denmark: Are Both Old and New Politics Structured by Class?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer; Prieur, Annick; Rosenlund, Lennart

    2010-01-01

    background, although in complex ways, which can only be discovered with a multidimensional conception of what class is. This conception may be found in Pierre Bourdieu's analytical approach, which we here apply in an analysis of survey data from a Danish city, Aalborg. Data from a survey of political...... the constructed space of attitudes to a set of indicators based on a two-dimensional conception of social class. On the basis of this analysis the article concludes that the political landscape appears as highly structured by the two principles of social differentiation from Bourdieu’s class model: volume...

  12. Safety class methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, E.B.; Low, J.M.; Lux, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria (GDC), requires that DOE facilities be evaluated with respect to ''safety class items.'' Although the GDC defines safety class items, it does not provide a methodology for selecting safety class items. The methodology described in this paper was developed to assure that Safety Class Items at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are selected in a consistent and technically defensible manner. Safety class items are those in the highest of four categories determined to be of special importance to nuclear safety and, merit appropriately higher-quality design, fabrication, and industrial test standards and codes. The identification of safety class items is approached using a cascading strategy that begins at the 'safety function' level (i.e., a cooling function, ventilation function, etc.) and proceeds down to the system, component, or structure level. Thus, the items that are required to support a safety function are SCls. The basic steps in this procedure apply to the determination of SCls for both new project activities, and for operating facilities. The GDC lists six characteristics of SCls to be considered as a starting point for safety item classification. They are as follows: 1. Those items whose failure would produce exposure consequences that would exceed the guidelines in Section 1300-1.4, ''Guidance on Limiting Exposure of the Public,'' at the site boundary or nearest point of public access 2. Those items required to maintain operating parameters within the safety limits specified in the Operational Safety Requirements during normal operations and anticipated operational occurrences. 3. Those items required for nuclear criticality safety. 4. Those items required to monitor the release of radioactive material to the environment during and after a Design Basis Accident. Those items required to achieve, and maintain the facility in a safe shutdown condition 6. Those items that control Safety Class Item listed above

  13. Proteasomes: a complex story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    Protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is important for regulation of metabolism, progression through the division cycle, in cell signalling pathways, and in mammals also for generation of antigen fragments for presentation on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Most cell protein...

  14. Smoothed Complexity Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bläser, Markus; Manthey, Bodo

    Smoothed analysis is a new way of analyzing algorithms introduced by Spielman and Teng. Classical methods like worst-case or average-case analysis have accompanying complexity classes, such as P and Avg-P, respectively. Whereas worst-case or average-case analysis give us a means to talk about the

  15. Translation in ESL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Imola Katalin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of translation in foreign language classes cannot be dealt with unless we attempt to make an overview of what translation meant for language teaching in different periods of language pedagogy. From the translation-oriented grammar-translation method through the complete ban on translation and mother tongue during the times of the audio-lingual approaches, we have come today to reconsider the role and status of translation in ESL classes. This article attempts to advocate for translation as a useful ESL class activity, which can completely fulfil the requirements of communicativeness. We also attempt to identify some activities and games, which rely on translation in some books published in the 1990s and the 2000s.

  16. Synthesis of a new class of carbon-bonded anionic sigma complexes with 1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-5-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-4-olate moiety as insensitive high energy density materials -- implications from impact sensitivity and thermal testings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulandaiya, Rajamani; Doraisamyraja, Kalaivani

    2015-01-01

    Poly nitro aromatic compounds are high energy density materials. Carbon-bonded anionic sigma complexes derived from them have remarkable thermal stability. At present there is a strong requirement for thermally stable insensitive high energy density materials (IHEDMs) in the energetic field which necessitates the present investigation. Three new carbon-bonded anionic sigma complexes were synthesized from 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 1,3-dimethylpyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid) and bases such as triethanolamine, pyridine and N,N-diethylaniline, characterized by UV-VIS, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and elemental analysis data. Their molecular structures were further ascertained through single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. TGA/DTA testings were undertaken at four different heating rates (5, 10, 20 and 40 K/min) and energy of activation was determined employing Ozawa and Kissinger plots. The reported carbon-bonded anionic sigma complexes were prepared through single pot synthesis in good yield with high purity. These complexes are molecular salts comprise of cation and anion moieties. Because of the salt-like nature, they are highly stable upto 300°C and decompose in two stages on further heating. They are stable towards impact of 2 kg mass hammer upto height limit (160 cm) of the instrument. The delocalization of the negative charge and various hydrogen bonds noticed in their crystals are the added factors of their thermal stability. The new insensitive high energy density materials of the present findings may receive attention in the field of energetics in future. Graphical AbstractA new class of carbon-bonded anionic sigma complexes as insensitive high energy density materials.

  17. Towards a New Way of Healing: Experienced Counsellors' Perceived Influences of Ch'i-Related Experiences on Counselling Practice in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Chin-Ping

    2018-01-01

    This narrative study explored how the experienced counsellors utilised the idea and practice of "ch'i" during counselling sessions. The data were co-constructed between the researcher and 12 senior counsellors with substantial "ch'i"-related experiences using a semi-structured in-depth interview method and were analysed…

  18. Talking Class in Tehroon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Rasmus Christian; Rezakhani, Khodadad

    2016-01-01

    Persian, like any other language, is laced with references to class, both blatant and subtle. With idioms and metaphors, Iranians can identify and situate others, and thus themselves, within hierarchies of social status and privilege, both real and imagined. Some class-related terms can be traced...... back to medieval times, whereas others are of modern vintage, the linguistic legacy of television shows, pop songs, social media memes or street vernacular. Every day, it seems, an infectious set of phrases appears that make yesterday’s seem embarrassingly antiquated....

  19. MIDDLE CLASS MOVEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. K. Sravana Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The middle class is placed between labour and capital. It neither directly awns the means of production that pumps out the surplus generated by wage labour power, nor does it, by its own labour, produce the surplus which has use and exchange value. Broadly speaking, this class consists of the petty bourgeoisie and the white-collar workers. The former are either self-employed or involved in the distribution of commodities and the latter are non-manual office workers, supervisors and profession...

  20. Class Actions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the relatively new Danish Act on Class Action (Danish: gruppesøgsmål) which was suggested by The Permanent Council on Civil procedure (Retsplejerådet) of which the article's author is a member. The operability of the new provisions is illustrated through some wellknown Danish...... cases: Hafnia case (investment prospectus), and Danish Eternit (roof elements) where the existence of Danish provisions on class actions might have made a difference, and the article also deals with the delicate questions of opt-in and opt-out....

  1. Language, Social Class and Education: Listening to Adolescents' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sarah; Clegg, Judy; Stackhouse, Joy

    2013-01-01

    Young people's perceptions may offer an insight into the complex associations between language, education and social class. However, little research has asked young people what they think of their own talking. Forty-two British adolescents aged between 14 and 15 years were interviewed: 21 attended a school in a working class area; 21 attended…

  2. Class II correction prior to orthodontics with the carriere distalizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Class II correction is a challenge in orthodontics with many existing devices being complex, too compliance-driven, or too prone to breakage. The Carriere Distalizer allows for straightforward Class II correction prior to orthodontics (fixed or clear aligners) at a time when no other mechanics interfere, and compliance is at its best.

  3. Enhanced Prevalence of Plasmatic Soluble MHC Class I Chain-Related Molecule in Vascular Pregnancy Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Haumonte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I related chain (MIC is a stress-inducible protein modulating the function of immune natural killer (NK cells, a major leukocyte subset involved in proper trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether upregulation of soluble MIC (sMIC may reflect immune disorders associated to vascular pregnancy diseases (VPD. sMIC was more frequently detected in the plasma of women with a diagnostic of VPD (32% than in normal term-matched pregnancies (1.6%, P<0.0001, with highest prevalence in intrauterine fetal death (IUDF, 44% and vascular intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, 39%. sMIC levels were higher in preeclampsia (PE than in IUFD (P<0.01 and vascular IUGR (P<0.05. sMIC detection was associated with bilateral early diastolic uterine notches (P=0.037, thrombocytopenia (P=0.03, and high proteinuria (P=0.03 in PE and with the vascular etiology of IUGR (P=0.0038. Incubation of sMIC-positive PE plasma resulted in downregulation of NKG2D expression and NK cell-mediated IFN-γ production in vitro. Our work thus suggests that detection of sMIC molecule in maternal plasma may constitute a hallmark of altered maternal immune functions that contributes to vascular disorders that complicate pregnancy, notably by impairing NK-cell mediated production of IFN-γ, an essential cytokine favoring vascular modeling.

  4. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General ... Author Affiliations. Rajat Tandon1. Department of Mathematics, University of Hyderabad, Central University P.O., Hyderabad 500 046, India ...

  5. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 6. The Class Number Problem - Binary Quadratic Forms. Rajat Tandon. General Article Volume 3 Issue ... Author Affiliations. Rajat Tandon1. Department of Mathematics, University of Hyderabad, Central University P.O. Hyderabad 500 046. India ...

  6. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 28-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Class Number Problem. 2. An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon received his PhD from Yale. University, USA. After an initial period as a visiting post-doctoral fellow at. TIFR, he joined the faculty of the North. Eastern Hill University, where he taught for a few years. For about two decades now, he ...

  8. Reference class forecasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    Underbudgettering og budgetoverskridelser forekommer i et flertal af større bygge- og anlægsprojekter. Problemet skyldes optimisme og/eller strategisk misinformation i budgetteringsprocessen. Reference class forecasting (RCF) er en prognosemetode, som er udviklet for at reducere eller eliminere...

  9. Working Together in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pateşan Marioara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The scores obtained by the military students are very important as a lot of opportunities depend on them: the choice of the branch, selection for different in and off-campus activities, the appointment to the workplace and so on. A qualifier, regardless of its form of effective expression, can make a difference in a given context of issuing a value judgment, in relation to the student's performance assessment. In our research we tried to find out what motives students, what determines them to get actively involved in the tasks they are given and the ways we can improve their participation in classes and assignments. In order to have an educated generation we need to have not only well prepared teachers but ones that are open-minded, flexible and in pace with the methodological novelties that can improve the teaching learning process in class. Along the years we have noticed that in classes where students constituted a cohesive group with an increasing degree of interaction between members, the results were better than in a group that did not appreciate team-work. In this article we want to highlight the fact that a teacher can bring to class the appropriate methods and procedures can contribute decisively to the strengthening of the group cohesion and high scores.

  10. EPA Web Training Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheduled webinars can help you better manage EPA web content. Class topics include Drupal basics, creating different types of pages in the WebCMS such as document pages and forms, using Google Analytics, and best practices for metadata and accessibility.

  11. Class in disguise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Prieur, Annick

    . The paper picks out two sets of discourses from this city: on the one hand a newspapers discourses about the city’s brand and on the other interviews with female inhabitants about experiences and visions of social differences and divides. The analysis reveals indirect and euphemized forms of class divisions...

  12. Adeus à classe trabalhadora?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Eley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available No início da década de 1980, a política centrada em classes da tradição socialista estava em crise, e comentadores importantes adotaram tons apocalípticos. No final da década, a esquerda permanecia profundamente dividida entre os advogados da mudança e os defensores da fé. Em meados dos anos 1990, os primeiros tinham, de modo geral, ganhado a batalha. O artigo busca apresentar essa mudança contemporânea não como a 'morte da classe', mas como o desa­parecimento de um tipo particular de ­sociedade de classes, marcado pelo ­processo de formação da classe trabalhadora entre os anos 1880 e 1940 e pelo alinhamento político daí resultante, atingindo seu apogeu na construção social-democrata do acordo do pós-guerra. Quando mudanças de longo prazo na economia se combinaram com o ataque ao keynesianismo na política de recessão a partir de meados da década de 1970, a unidade da classe trabalhadora deixou de estar disponível da forma antiga e bastante utilizada, como o terreno natural da política de esquerda. Enquanto uma coletividade dominante da classe trabalhadora entrou em declínio, outra se corporificou de modo lento e desigual para tomar o lugar daquela. Mas a unidade operacional dessa nova agregação da classe trabalhadora ainda está, em grande parte, em formação. Para recuperar a eficácia política da tradição socialista, alguma nova visão de agência política coletiva será necessária, uma visão imaginativamente ajustada às condições emergentes da produção e acumulação capitalista no início do século XXI.

  13. On the complexity of labeled oriented trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We define a notion of complexity for labeled oriented trees (LOTs) related to the bridge number in knot theory and prove that LOTs of complexity 2 are aspherical. We also present a class of LOTs of higher complexity which is aspherical, give an upper bound for the complexity of labeled oriented intervals and study ...

  14. Complex multiplication of abelian surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streng, Theodorus Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    The theory of complex multiplication makes it possible to construct certain class fields and abelian varieties. The main theme of this thesis is making these constructions explicit for the case where the abelian varieties have dimension 2. Chapter I is an introduction to complex

  15. Complexity control in statistical learning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    further, may be corrupted by noise. In this situation, it is important to control the complexity of the class of models from which we are to choose our model. In this paper, we first give a simplified overview of the principal features of learning theory. Then we describe how the method of regularization is used to control complexity.

  16. Improved prediction of MHC class I and class II epitopes using a novel Gibbs sampling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Worning, Peder

    2004-01-01

    to the MHC class II complex HLA-DR4(B1*0401). Prior identification of information-rich (anchor) positions in the binding motif is shown to improve the predictive performance of the Gibbs sampler. Similarly, a consensus solution obtained from an ensemble average over suboptimal solutions is shown......Prediction of which peptides will bind a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) constitutes an important step in identifying potential T-cell epitopes suitable as vaccine candidates. MHC class II binding peptides have a broad length distribution complicating such predictions. Thus......, identifying the correct alignment is a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. In this context, we wish to describe a novel Gibbs motif sampler method ideally suited for recognizing such weak sequence motifs. The method is based on the Gibbs sampling method, and it incorporates...

  17. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  18. La flotta di Classe

    OpenAIRE

    Gnoli, Tommaso

    2003-01-01

    Testo di una conferenza tenuta a Ravenna il 17 gennaio 2003. La flotta imperiale romana di Classe è presentata nel suo contesto storico e istituzionale. Inquadramento della condizione dei classiarii nell'ambito più generale dell'esercito romano. Ipotesi e problemi sullo sviluppo dell'area ravennate in età imperiale in rapporto all'installazione di questa grande unità militare.

  19. [Social classes and poverty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benach, Joan; Amable, Marcelo

    2004-05-01

    Social classes and poverty are two key social determinants fundamental to understand how disease and health inequalities are produced. During the 90's in Spain there has been a notable oscillation in the inequality and poverty levels, with an increase in the middle of the decade when new forms of social exclusion, high levels of unemployment and great difficulties in accessing the labour market, especially for those workers with less resources, emerged. Today society is still characterized by a clear social stratification and the existence of social classes with a predominance of high levels of unemployment and precarious jobs, and where poverty is an endemic social problem much worse than the EU average. To diminish health inequalities and to improve the quality of life will depend very much on the reduction of the poverty levels and the improvement of equal opportunities and quality of employment. To increase understanding of how social class and poverty affect public health, there is a need to improve the quality of both information and research, and furthermore planners and political decision makers must take into account those determinants when undertaking disease prevention and health promotion.

  20. Swine Leukocyte Antigen Class II Is a Xenoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladowski, Joseph M; Reyes, Luz M; Martens, Gregory R; Butler, James R; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Eckhoff, Devin E; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A Joseph

    2018-02-01

    Over 130 000 patients in the United States alone need a lifesaving organ transplant. Genetically modified porcine organs could resolve the donor organ shortage, but human xenoreactive antibodies destroy pig cells and are the major barrier to clinical application of xenotransplantation. The objective of this study was to determine whether waitlisted patients possess preformed antibodies to swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II, homologs of the class II HLA. Sera from people currently awaiting solid organ transplant were tested for IgG binding to class II SLA proteins when expressed on mammalian cells. Pig fibroblasts were made positive by transfection with the class II transactivator. As a second expression system, transgenes encoding the alpha and beta chains of class II SLA were transfected into human embryonic kidney cells. Human sera containing IgG specific for class II HLA molecules exhibited greater binding to class II SLA positive cells than to SLA negative cells. Sera lacking antibodies against class II HLA showed no change in binding regardless of the presence of class II SLA. These antibodies could recognize either SLA-DR or SLA-DQ complexes. Class II SLA proteins may behave as xenoantigens for people with humoral immunity toward class II HLA molecules.

  1. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    consecuencia, con la recuperación funcional. Por consiguiente, estos nuevos aspectos sobre la función del MHC I en el SNC orientan nuevas investigaciones con miras a entender el papel del MHC I en las enfermedades neurológicas y a desarrollar nuevas estrategias terapéuticas.It has been recently demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I expressed in the central nervous system (CNS does not only function as a molecule of the immune system, but also plays a role in the synaptic plasticity. The expression of MHC I influences the intensity and selectivity of elimination of synapses apposed to neurons that were subjected to lesion, besides influencing the reactivity of neighboring glial cells. MHC I expression and the degree of synaptic rearrangement and glial response after injury correlate with differences in the regenerative potential and functional recovery of isogenic mice strains. In this way, the new aspects regarding MHC I functions in the CNS may guide further studies aiming at searching the involvement of MCH I in neurologic disorders, as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  2. Complexity explained

    CERN Document Server

    Erdi, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why complex systems research is important in understanding the structure, function and dynamics of complex natural and social phenomena. Readers will learn the basic concepts and methods of complex system research.

  3. The major histocompatibility complex in the chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillemot, F; Kaufman, J F; Skjoedt, K

    1989-01-01

    The chicken B complex is the first non-mammalian MHC characterized at the molecular level. It differs from the human HLA and murine H-2 complexes in the small size of the class I (B-F) and class II (B-L) genes and their close proximity. This proximity accounts for the absence of recombination......-induced tumors associated with some B complex haplotypes. Udgivelsesdato: 1989-Sep...

  4. Class Action and Class Settlement in a European Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses the options for introducing common European rules on class action lawsuits with an opt-out-model in individual cases. An analysis is made of how the risks of misuse of class actions can be prevented. The article considers the Dutch rules on class settlements (the WCAM procedure...

  5. Class impressions : Higher social class elicits lower prosociality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doesum, Niels J.; Tybur, Joshua M.; Van Lange, Paul A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Social class predicts numerous important life outcomes and social orientations. To date, literature has mainly examined how an individual's own class shapes interactions with others. But how prosocially do people treat others they perceive as coming from lower, middle, or higher social classes?

  6. Design and use of conditional MHC class I ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, Mireille; Coccoris, Miriam; Bins, Adriaan; Rodenko, Boris; Gomez, Raquel; Nieuwkoop, Nella J.; van de Kasteele, Willeke; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Ovaa, Huib; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2006-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules associate with a variety of peptide ligands during biosynthesis and present these ligands on the cell surface for recognition by cytotoxic T cells. We have designed conditional MHC ligands that form stable complexes with MHC molecules but

  7. Class field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Artin, Emil

    2009-01-01

    This classic book, originally published in 1968, is based on notes of a year-long seminar the authors ran at Princeton University. The primary goal of the book was to give a rather complete presentation of algebraic aspects of global class field theory, and the authors accomplished this goal spectacularly: for more than 40 years since its first publication, the book has served as an ultimate source for many generations of mathematicians. In this revised edition, two mathematical additions complementing the exposition in the original text are made. The new edition also contains several new foot

  8. An "expanded" class perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steur, Luisa Johanna

    2014-01-01

    -back of Adivasis against their age-old colonization or the work of ‘external’ agitators. Capitalist restructuring and ‘globalization’ was generally seen as simply the latest chapter in the suffering of these Adivasis. Little focused attention was paid to the recent class trajectory of their lives under changing......Following the police raid on the ‘Muthanga’ land occupation by Adivasi (‘indigenous’) activists in Kerala, India, in February 2003, intense public debate erupted about the fate of Adivasis in this ‘model’ development state. Most commentators saw the land occupation either as the fight...

  9. ESPA Class Redefined

    OpenAIRE

    Sanford, Gregory; Williams, Andy; Maly, Joseph R.; Berenberg, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    ESPA is established launch infrastructure for small satellites on Atlas V, Falcon 9, and Delta IV. Satellites mount to ESPA in a cantilever mount with defined limits on spacecraft mass and center of gravity (CG). ESPA auxiliary payload (APL) capability was established by test in 2002 as 181 kg with CG at 51 cm (400 lb at 20 in). This mass/CG combination is a defining characteristic of the small satellite standard “ESPA class.” Increased APL capability for ESPA has been validated with Delta...

  10. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  11. Class I Cytokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinocher, Helena

    , the minimal determinants for specificity between membrane spanning helices were investigated with small artificial low complexity peptides, prior found to activate the EPOR in cells. The placement of single methyl group in the so called transmembrane aptamers (traptamers) determined the stabilizing effect...... characteristics of membrane spanning helices, was designed and hGHR TMD and hEPOR TMD produced in sufficient amounts for spectroscopic investigations. The isolated hGHR TMD was revealed to associate in dimeric complexes in detergent micelles and first presumptions about the dimer interface could be made. Further...... the traptamers on the hEPOR TMD dimeric complex in detergent micelles. To gain a better understanding of hGHR regulation a point mutation in the hGHR intracellular domain (ICD), which has recently been linked to lung cancer, was characterized. The mutation was found to decrease binding of suppressor of cytokine...

  12. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  13. On the computational complexity of (maximum) shift class scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Kroon (Leo); A.W.J. Kolen

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we consider a generalization of the Fixed Job Scheduling Problem (FSP) which appears in a natural way in the aircraft maintenance process at an airport. A number of jobs has to be carried out, where the main attributes of a job are: a fixed start time, a fixed finish time

  14. On the computational complexity of (maximum) class scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Kroon (Leo); A.W.J. Kolen

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we consider several generalizations of the Fixed Job Scheduling Problem (FSP) which appear in a natural way in the aircraft maintenance process at an airport: A number of jobs have to be carried out, where the main attributes of a job are: a fixed start time, a fixed finish

  15. Extremely high major histocompatibility complex class IIb gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Identifying the processes that maintain genetic diversity within and among populations is a central goal of mod- ern evolutionary genetics. So far, the studies on genetic diversity have mainly focussed on neutral DNA markers, such as mtDNA and microsatellites (Xu et al. 2010). While these markers are very informative in ...

  16. Extremely high major histocompatibility complex class IIb gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    genetic information for conservation and management strate- gies for this endangered population. Materials and methods. Samples and DNA extraction. A total of 21 individuals were sampled (table 1). Sample collection, transportation and storage are same as previously described (Wu et al. 2002). DNA extraction followed ...

  17. Teachers, Social Class and Underachievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Mairead; Gazeley, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Addressing the "the social class attainment gap" in education has become a government priority in England. Despite multiple initiatives, however, little has effectively addressed the underachievement of working-class pupils within the classroom. In order to develop clearer understandings of working-class underachievement at this level,…

  18. Understanding Class in Contemporary Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrits, Gitte Sommer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that claims about the death of class and the coming of the classless society are premature. Such claims are seldom genuinely empirical, and the theoretical argument often refers to a simple and therefore easily dismissible concept of class. By rejecting the concept of class...

  19. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadia M. Al-Hummayani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  20. Network class superposition analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A B Pearson

    Full Text Available Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30 for the yeast cell cycle process, considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  1. On the Complexity of Numerical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltersen, Peter Bro; Kjeldgaard-Pedersen, Johan; Burgisser, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We study two quite different approaches to understanding the complexity of fundamental problems in numerical analysis. We show that both hinge on the question of understanding the complexity of the following problem, which we call PosSLP: Given a division-free straight-line program producing...... of classical complexity classes) being PSPACE....

  2. Type Families with Class, Type Classes with Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano, Alejandro; Hage, Jurriaan; Bahr, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Type classes and type families are key ingredients in Haskell programming. Type classes were introduced to deal with ad-hoc polymorphism, although with the introduction of functional dependencies, their use expanded to type-level programming. Type families also allow encoding type-level functions......, now as rewrite rules. This paper looks at the interplay of type classes and type families, and how to deal with shortcomings in both of them. Furthermore, we show how to use families to simulate classes at the type level. However, type families alone are not enough for simulating a central feature...

  3. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...... of parameter spaces into structurally stable domains, and a description of the bifurcations. For this reason, the talk will focus on these questions for complex polynomial vector fields.......The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...

  4. Complex Narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.; Buckland, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the opening chapter, "Complex Narratives," Jan Simons brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. He presents an overview of the different concepts - forking path narratives, mind-game films,

  5. phenanthroline complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHRANIL DE

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... complex in a unique binding motif and provide additional stability to the compound in the solid state. This iron(II) complex is able to catalyze the cleavage of aromatic C-C linkage of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (Gentisic acid,. GA) in oxygen environment. The iron(II) complex in the presence of two equivalent ...

  6. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  7. Complexity in language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alexander; Lappin, Shalom

    2013-01-01

    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems-in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about the learner. Second, we claim that the real problem for language learning is the computational complexity of constructing a hypothesis from input data. Studying this problem allows for a more direct approach to the object of study--the language acquisition device-rather than the learnable class of languages, which is epiphenomenal and possibly hard to characterize. The learnability results informed by complexity studies are much more insightful. They strongly suggest that target grammars need to be objective, in the sense that the primitive elements of these grammars are based on objectively definable properties of the language itself. These considerations support the view that language acquisition proceeds primarily through data-driven learning of some form. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  8. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  9. Holomorphic Q classes

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The space Q p consists of all holomorphic functions f on the unit disk for which the L^2 area integrals of its derivative against the p-th power of the Green function of the unit disk are uniformly bounded in the variable that survives the integration. It turns out that Q 1 coincides with BMOA, while, for p>1, Q p are just the Bloch space. For p/in (0,1) the Q p furnish an increasing sequence of spaces, each invariant under conformal mappings of the unit disk onto itself, which interpolate between the Dirichlet space and BMOA. This monograph covers a number of important aspects in complex, functional and harmonic analysis. The primary focus is Q p, p/in (0,1), and their equivalent characterizations. Based on the up-to-date results obtained by experts in their respective fields, each of the eight chapters unfolds from the basics to the more complex. The exposition here is rapid-paced and efficient, with proofs and examples.

  10. Reconciling Virtual Classes with Genericity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    2006-01-01

    is functional abstraction, yielding more precise knowledge about the outcome; the prime ex- ample is type parameterized classes. This paper argues that they should be clearly separated to work optimally. We have applied this design philosophy to a lan- guage based on an extension mechanism, namely virtual...... classes. As a result, a kind of type parameters have been introduced, but they are simple and only used where they excel. Conversely, final definitions of virtual classes have been re- moved from the language, thus making virtual classes more flexible. The result- ing language presents a clearer and more...

  11. Childbirth and parenting preparation in antenatal classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barimani, M; Forslund Frykedal, K; Rosander, M; Berlin, A

    2018-02-01

    to describe topics (1) presented by midwives' during antenatal classes and the amount of time spent on these topics and (2) raised and discussed by first-time parents and the amount of time spent on these topics. qualitative; data were gathered using video or tape recordings and analysed using a three-pronged content analysis approach, i.e., conventional, summative, and directed analyses. 3 antenatal courses in 2 antenatal units in a large Swedish city; 3 midwives; and 34 course participants. class content focused on childbirth preparation (67% of the entire antenatal course) and on parenting preparation (33%). Childbirth preparation facilitated parents' understanding of the childbirth process, birthing milieu, the partner's role, what could go wrong during delivery, and pain relief advantages and disadvantages. Parenting preparation enabled parents to (i) plan for those first moments with the newborn; (ii) care for/physically handle the infant; (iii) manage breastfeeding; (iv) manage the period at home immediately after childbirth; and (v) maintain their relationship. During the classes, parents expressed concerns about what could happened to newborns. Parents' questions to midwives and discussion topics among parents were evenly distributed between childbirth preparation (52%) and parenting preparation (48%). childbirth preparation and pain relief consumed 67% of course time. Parents particularly reflected on child issues, relationship, sex, and anxiety. Female and male participants actively listened to the midwives, appeared receptive to complex issues, and needed more time to ask questions. Parents appreciated the classes yet needed to more information for managing various post-childbirth situations. while midwifery services vary among hospitals, regions, and countries, midwives might equalise content focus, offer classes in the second trimester, provide more time for parents to talk to each other, allow time in the course plan for parents to bring up new

  12. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers.

  13. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B.; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A.; Lizee, Gregory A.; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as “NLRC5” [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers. PMID:27162338

  14. Are Ghanaian Diaspora Middle Class? Linking Middle Class to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What constitutes the Ghanaian middle class? How do they organise themselves politically? Are they truly the vanguard of political stability in Ghana? If so, how have they accomplished this? These are some of the questions the article will provide answers to. Keywords: Diaspora, Middle Class, Political Participation ...

  15. Class Matters in the Interview Setting? Positionality, Situatedness and Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Jody; Ingram, Nicola; Abrahams, Jessie; Beedell, Phoebe

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that despite methodological and analytical advancements in the field of social class research, these developments have not led to a wholehearted discussion about class positionality and situatedness in relation to interviewer-participant dynamics. Despite--or perhaps due to--this methodological gap, there remains an…

  16. Subaltern Classes, Class Struggles and Hegemony : a Gramscian Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Simionatto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article sought to revive the concept of subaltern classes and their relation with other categories, particularly the State, civil society and hegemony in the thinking of Antonio Gramsci, as a support for contemporary class struggles. It also analyzes the relations between subaltern classes, common sense and ideology, as well as the forms of “overcoming” conceptualized by Gramsci, through the culture and philosophy of praxis. The paper revives the discussion of the subaltern classes, based on the original Gramscian formulation in the realm of Marxism, through the dialectic interaction between structure and superstructure, economy and politics. In addition to the conceptual revival, it indicates some elements that can support the discussion of the forms of subalternity found in contemporary reality and the possibilities for strengthening the struggles of these class layers, above all in moments of strong demobilization of popular participation.

  17. Periodicity of a class of nonlinear fuzzy systems with delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jiali; Yi Zhang; Zhang Lei

    2009-01-01

    The well known Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) model gives an effective method to combine some simple local systems with their linguistic description to represent complex nonlinear dynamic systems. By using the T-S method, a class of local nonlinear systems having nice dynamic properties can be employed to represent some global complex nonlinear systems. This paper proposes to study the periodicity of a class of global nonlinear fuzzy systems with delays by using T-S method. Conditions for guaranteeing periodicity are derived. Examples are employed to illustrate the theory.

  18. Smoothed analysis of complex conic condition numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Buergisser, Peter; Cucker, Felipe; Lotz, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Smoothed analysis of complexity bounds and condition numbers has been done, so far, on a case by case basis. In this paper we consider a reasonably large class of condition numbers for problems over the complex numbers and we obtain smoothed analysis estimates for elements in this class depending only on geometric invariants of the corresponding sets of ill-posed inputs. These estimates are for a version of smoothed analysis proposed in this paper which, to the best of our knowledge, appears ...

  19. Race and Class on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Angel B.

    2016-01-01

    Colleges and universities have a significant role to play in shaping the future of race and class relations in America. As exhibited in this year's presidential election, race and class continue to divide. Black Lives Matter movements, campus protests, and police shootings are just a few examples of the proliferation of intolerance, and higher…

  20. Social Class and the Extracurriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Will

    2012-01-01

    Social class is a powerful and often unrecognized influence on student participation in the extracurriculum. Spontaneous student-created extracurricular experiences depend on students affiliating and interacting with each other; student social class is a powerful influence on student affiliations. Students tend to exercise consciousness of kind-…

  1. Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassler, Sharon; Miller, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning cohabitation literature, research has failed to examine social class variation in processes of forming and advancing such unions. Drawing upon in-depth interviews with 122 working- and middle-class cohabitors, we examine the duration between dating and moving in together, reasons for cohabiting, and subsequent plans.…

  2. 75 FR 17297 - Account Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 190 RIN 3038-AC94 Account Class AGENCY: Commodity... ``Commission'') is amending its regulations (the ``Regulations'') \\1\\ to create a sixth and separate ``account... Commission can be found at 17 CFR Chapter 1. \\2\\ In general, the concept of ``account class'' governs the...

  3. Class 1 railroad statistics, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    U.S. Class I Railroads are line haul freight railroads with 2008 operating revenue in excess of $401.4 million. Two Canadian railroads, CN and Canadian Pacific, have enough revenue that they would be U.S. Class I railroads if they were U.S. companies...

  4. A Touch of...Class!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netten, Joan W., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    A collection of ideas for class activities in elementary and secondary language classes includes a vocabulary review exercise and games of memory, counting, vocabulary, flashcard tic-tac-toe, dice, trashcans, questioning, and spelling. Some are designed specifically for French. (MSE)

  5. Propagating Class and Method Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Erik

    1999-01-01

    number of implicit combinations. For example, it is possible to specify separate aspects of a family of classes, and then combine several aspects into a full-fledged class family. The combination expressions would explicitly combine whole-family aspects, and by propagation implicitly combine the aspects...

  6. ADULT EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CLASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONDON, JACK; AND OTHERS

    IDENTIFICATION OF SOME OF THE VARIABLES THAT ENCOURAGE OR DISCOURAGE PARTICIPATION IN ADULT EDUCATION AMONG MIDDLE-CLASS AND WORKING-CLASS MEN WAS THE BASIS FOR THIS STUDY. A COMMUNITY SURVEY WAS USED TO LOCATE A SAMPLE OF PARTICIPANTS AND NONPARTICIPANTS, AS WELL AS TO PROVIDE DESCRIPTIVE DATA ABOUT THE RATES OF PARTICIPATION. A MATCHED SAMPLE…

  7. Complexity control in statistical learning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider the problem of determining a model for a given system on the basis of experimental data. The amount of data available is limited and, further, may be corrupted by noise. In this situation, it is important to control the complexity of the class of models from which we are to choose our model. In this paper, we first ...

  8. The Relationship between Class I and Class II Methanol Masers

    OpenAIRE

    Ellingsen, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The Australia Telescope National Facility Mopra millimetre telescope has been used to search for 95.1-GHz class I methanol masers towards sixty-two 6.6-GHz class II methanol masers. A total of twenty-six 95.1-GHz masers were detected, eighteen of these being new discoveries. Combining the results of this search with observations reported in the literature, a near complete sample of sixty-six 6.6-GHz class II methanol masers has been searched in the 95.1-GHz transition, with detections towards...

  9. Tapasin-related protein TAPBPR is an additional component of the MHC class I presentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Louise H; Hermann, Clemens; Boname, Jessica M

    2013-01-01

    Tapasin is an integral component of the peptide-loading complex (PLC) important for efficient peptide loading onto MHC class I molecules. We investigated the function of the tapasin-related protein, TAPBPR. Like tapasin, TAPBPR is widely expressed, IFN-γ-inducible, and binds to MHC class I coupled...... with β2-microglobulin in the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to tapasin, TAPBPR does not bind ERp57 or calreticulin and is not an integral component of the PLC. β2-microglobulin is essential for the association between TAPBPR and MHC class I. However, the association between TAPBPR and MHC class I...... occurs in the absence of a functional PLC, suggesting peptide is not required. Expression of TAPBPR decreases the rate of MHC class I maturation through the secretory pathway and prolongs the association of MHC class I on the PLC. The TAPBPR:MHC class I complex trafficks through the Golgi apparatus...

  10. X-Windows Socket Widget Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Matthew R.

    2006-01-01

    The X-Windows Socket Widget Class ("Class" is used here in the object-oriented-programming sense of the word) was devised to simplify the task of implementing network connections for graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer programs. UNIX Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) socket programming libraries require many method calls to configure, operate, and destroy sockets. Most X Windows GUI programs use widget sets or toolkits to facilitate management of complex objects. The widget standards facilitate construction of toolkits and application programs. The X-Windows Socket Widget Class encapsulates UNIX TCP/IP socket-management tasks within the framework of an X Windows widget. Using the widget framework, X Windows GUI programs can treat one or more network socket instances in the same manner as that of other graphical widgets, making it easier to program sockets. Wrapping ISP socket programming libraries inside a widget framework enables a programmer to treat a network interface as though it were a GUI.

  11. Oxicams, a Class of NSAIDs and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu; Rouzer, Carol A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2017-01-01

    Oxicams are a class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) structurally related to the enolic acid class of 4-hydroxy-1,2-benzothiazine carboxamides. They are used clinically to treat both acute and chronic inflammation by inhibiting the activity of the two cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms, cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Oxicams are structurally distinct from all other NSAIDs, exhibiting a novel binding pose in the COX channel. The 4-hydroxyl group on the thiazine ring partners with Ser-530 via hydrogen bonding while two coordinated water molecules mediate a polar interaction between the oxicam and COX. The rotation of Leu-531 in the complex opens a new pocket, which is not utilized for binding other NSAIDs to the enzyme. This structure provides the basis for understanding documented structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the oxicam class. In addition, from the oxicam template, a series of potent microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) inhibitors represents a new direction for drug development. Here, we review the major route of oxicam synthesis and SAR for COX inhibition, as well as recent advances in oxicam-mediated mPGES-1 inhibition. PMID:25537198

  12. Complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  13. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives,

  14. Complexity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    A complex system consists of many interacting parts, generates new collective behavior through self organization, and adaptively evolves through time. Many theories have been developed to study complex systems, including chaos, fractals, cellular automata, self organization, stochastic processes, turbulence, and genetic algorithms.

  15. Homogeneous products of conjugacy classes

    OpenAIRE

    Adan-Bante, Edith

    2006-01-01

    Let $G$ be a finite group and $a\\in G$. Let $a^G=\\{g^{-1}ag\\mid g\\in G\\}$ be the conjugacy class of $a$ in $G$. Assume that $a^G$ and $b^G$ are conjugacy classes of $G$ with the property that ${\\bf C}_G(a)={\\bf C}_G(b)$. Then $a^G b^G$ is a conjugacy class if and only if $[a,G]=[b,G]=[ab,G]$ and $[ab,G]$ is a normal subgroup of $G$.

  16. Three Classes of Orthomodular Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greechie, Richard J.; Legan, Bruce J.

    2006-02-01

    Let mathcal{OML} denote the class of all orthomodular lattices and mathcal{C} denote the class of those that are commutator-finite. Also, let mathcal{C}1 denote the class of orthomodular lattices that satisfy the block extension property, mathcal{C}2 those that satisfy the weak block extension property, and mathcal{C}3 those that are locally finite. We show that the following strict containments hold: mathcal{C} subset mathcal{C}1 subset mathcal{C}2 subset mathcal{C}3 subset mathcal{OML}.

  17. Patterns of victimization, suicide attempt, and posttraumatic stress disorder in Greenlandic adolescents: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsberg, Sidsel; Armour, Cherie; Elklit, Ask

    2014-09-01

    The current study had two main aims. The first was to identify groups of adolescents based on their similarity of responding across a number of victimizing and potentially traumatic events (PTEs). In doing so, we employed the statistical technique of Latent Class Analysis (LCA). The second aim was to assess the relationship between our resultant classes and the covariates of gender, suicide attempt, and PTSD. Two hundred and sixty-nine Greenlandic school students, aged 12-18 (M = 15.4, SD = 1.84) were assessed for their level of exposure to PTEs. In addition, adolescents were assessed for the psychological impact of these events. A LCA was performed on seven binary indicators representing PTEs. Logistic regression was subsequently implemented to ascertain the relationships between latent classes and covariates. Three distinct classes were uncovered: a violence, neglect, and bullying class (class 1), a wide-ranging multiple PTE class (class 2), and a normative/baseline class (class 3). Notably, classes 1 and 2 were largely separated by the presence or absence of sexual PTEs. Individuals who reported having previously attempted suicide were almost six times more likely to be members of class 1 (OR = 5.97) and almost four times more likely to be members of class 2 (OR = 3.87) compared to the baseline class (class 3). Individuals who met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD were five times as likely to be members of class 1 and class 2 (OR = 5.09) compared to the baseline class. No significant associations were found between classes and gender. The results underline the complexity of the interplay between multiple victimization experiences, traumatization, and suicide attempts.

  18. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...... vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  19. 76 FR 53048 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class D and Class E airspace at Casper, Natrona County International...

  20. 76 FR 64233 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... published in the Federal Register of August 25, 2011 that amends Class D and Class E airspace, and...

  1. 77 FR 9839 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class D and Class E airspace at Bozeman, Gallatin Field Airport...

  2. A class-chest for deriving transport protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strayer, W.T.

    1996-10-01

    Development of new transport protocols or protocol algorithms suffers from the complexity of the environment in which they are intended to run. Modeling techniques attempt to avoid this by simulating the environment. Another approach to promoting rapid prototyping of protocols and protocol algorithms is to provide a pre-built infrastructure that is common to transport protocols, so that the focus is placed on the protocol-specific aspects. The Meta-Transport Library is a library of C++ base classes that implement or abstract out the mundane functions of a protocol, new protocol implementations are derived from base classes. The result is a fully viable user- level transport protocol implementation, with emphasis on modularity. The collection of base classes form a ``class-chest`` of tools .from which protocols can be developed and studied with as little change to a normal UNIX environment as possible.

  3. Theoretical and computational foundations of management class simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denie Gerold

    1978-01-01

    Investigations on complicated, complex, and not well-ordered systems are possible only with the aid of mathematical methods and electronic data processing. Simulation as a method of operations research is particularly suitable for this purpose. Theoretical and computational foundations of management class simulation must be integrated into the planning systems of...

  4. Legitimacy and Social Class in Catalan Language Education for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frekko, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult students of Catalan are worthy of study because they reveal complexities underlying taken-for-granted assumptions about Catalan speakers and Castilian speakers. Far from fitting into neat bundles aligning language of origin, social class, and national orientation, the students in this study exemplify the breakdown of boundaries traditionally…

  5. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb...

  6. A Poisson type formula for Hardy classes on Heisenberg's group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopushansky O.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Hardy type class of complex functions with infinite many variables defined on the Schrodinger irreducible unitary orbit of reduced Heisenberg group, generated by the Gauss density, is investigated. A Poisson integral type formula for their analytic extensions on an open ball is established. Taylor coefficients for analytic extensions are described by the associatedsymmetric Fock space.

  7. Impact of Class Time on Student Learning. Briefing Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Stacey; Molina, Concepcion; Beckwith, Shirley; Williams, Haidee

    2011-01-01

    The impact of class time lengths on student achievement is a complex issue with multiple extraneous factors and without definitive answers. A major theme across many of the studies reviewed is that the amount of instructional time is not so important as how that time is spent. Key points include: (1) The commonly held conception that students in…

  8. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DQA, -DQB, -DPA, and -DPB in 20 Danish patients with alopecia areata (AA) and in healthy Danes. The frequency in AA of the DQB1*0301 and DQw7 associated DQB Bgl/II 4.2 kb frag...

  9. Complexity in Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cristopher David

    The study of chaos has shown us that deterministic systems can have a kind of unpredictability, based on a limited knowledge of their initial conditions; after a finite time, the motion appears essentially random. This observation has inspired a general interest in the subject of unpredictability, and more generally, complexity; how can we characterize how "complex" a dynamical system is?. In this thesis, we attempt to answer this question with a paradigm of complexity that comes from computer science, we extract sets of symbol sequences, or languages, from a dynamical system using standard methods of symbolic dynamics; we then ask what kinds of grammars or automata are needed a generate these languages. This places them in the Chomsky heirarchy, which in turn tells us something about how subtle and complex the dynamical system's behavior is. This gives us insight into the question of unpredictability, since these automata can also be thought of as computers attempting to predict the system. In the culmination of the thesis, we find a class of smooth, two-dimensional maps which are equivalent to the highest class in the Chomsky heirarchy, the turning machine; they are capable of universal computation. Therefore, these systems possess a kind of unpredictability qualitatively different from the usual "chaos": even if the initial conditions are known exactly, questions about the system's long-term dynamics are undecidable. No algorithm exists to answer them. Although this kind of unpredictability has been discussed in the context of distributed, many-degree-of -freedom systems (for instance, cellular automata) we believe this is the first example of such phenomena in a smooth, finite-degree-of-freedom system.

  10. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  11. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dutch...... and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing....

  12. Less than a Class Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kristin Redington

    2012-01-01

    The iPad holds amazing potential for classroom use. Just a few--or even only one--is enough to get results. Having a class set promotes traditional, whole-class instruction, but fewer iPads facilitate individualized and tailored instruction. In this article, the author discusses the potential of the iPad and suggests ways to put the iPad to use in…

  13. pH dependence of MHC class I-restricted peptide presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    The function of MHC class I molecules is to bind and present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. Here, we report that class I-restricted peptide presentation is strongly pH dependent. The presentation of some peptides was enhanced at acidic pH, whereas the presentation of others was inhibited....... Biochemical peptide-MHC class I binding assays demonstrated that peptide-MHC class I complexes are more stable at neutral pH than at acidic pH. We suggest that acid-dependent peptide dissociation can generate empty class I molecules and that the resulting binding potential can be exploited by a subset...

  14. Molecular mechanisms of viral immune evasion proteins to inhibit MHC class I antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang

    2009-01-01

    Viral products inhibit MHC class I antigen processing and presentation via three major pathways: inhibition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression on cells, blockade of peptide trafficking and loading on MHC class I molecules, and inhibition of peptide generation in host cells. Viral products also interfere with IFN-gamma -mediated JAK/STAT signal transduction in cells. These results imply that viral proteins probably inhibit the function of IFN-gamma in MHC class I antigen presentation via inactivation of JAK/STAT signal transduction in host cells. Mechanisms of viral products to inhibit IFN-gamma -mediated MHC class I antigen presentation were summarized in this literature review.

  15. Diversity of MHC class I alleles in Spheniscus humboldti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Eri; Tanaka, Masafumi; Naruse, Taeko K; Tsuda, Tomi T; Tsuda, Michio; Murata, Koichi; Kimura, Akinori

    2017-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex locus (MHC) is a gene region related to immune response and exhibits a remarkably great diversity. We deduced that polymorphisms in MHC genes would help to solve several issues on penguins, including classification, phylogenetic relationship, and conservation. This study aimed to elucidate the structure and diversity of the so far unknown MHC class I gene in a penguin species. The structure of an MHC class I gene from the Humboldt penguin (Spheniscus humboldti) was determined by using an inverse PCR method. We designed PCR primers to directly determine nucleotide sequences of PCR products from the MHC class I gene and to obtain recombinant clones for investigating the diversity of the MHC class I gene in Humboldt penguins. A total of 24 MHC class I allele sequences were obtained from 40 individuals. Polymorphisms were mainly found in exons 2 and 3, as expected from the nature of MHC class I genes in vertebrate species including birds and mammals. Phylogenetic analyses of MHC class I alleles have revealed that the Humboldt penguin is closely related to the Red Knot (Calidris canutus) belonging to Charadriiformes.

  16. Impact of telecommunication technologies on the middle class formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khusnullova, A.; Absalyamova, S.; Sakhapov, R.; Mukhametgalieva, Ch

    2017-12-01

    The article is devoted to the study of the impact of the information economy on the formation of the middle class. The paper identifies factors contributing to the increase in the share of the middle class in the transition to the information economy. The positive synergetic influence of telecommunication technologies on the formation of the middle class is considered through a possibility of using virtual spaces for labor and educational activities, a possibility of obtaining high returns in the form of dividends on intellectual capital, a qualitative change in the structure of needs, an access to new types of information services, etc. Authors develop a complex model of research of the middle class in the information economy, differing from those available using an expanded list of criteria. In addition to such widely used criteria as income level, level of education and self-identification, the criterion "degree of involvement in the information society" was introduced. The study substantiates that the transition to the information economy made an access to information and communication technologies one of the most significant criteria for social differentiation of society. On the basis of the model, an econometric estimate of the middle class has been carried out, which makes it possible to reveal the share of the middle class in modern society, dynamics of its development, as well as multicollinearity between spending on education, the Gini coefficient, access to information and telecommunication technologies and the size of the middle class.

  17. Mechanism of activation of SGK3 by growth factors via the Class 1 and Class 3 PI3Ks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nazma; Macartney, Thomas; Hornberger, Annika; Anderson, Karen E; Tovell, Hannah; Prescott, Alan R; Alessi, Dario R

    2018-01-02

    Derailment of the PI3K-AGC protein kinase signalling network contributes to many human diseases including cancer. Recent work has revealed that the poorly studied AGC kinase family member, SGK3, promotes resistance to cancer therapies that target the Class 1 PI3K pathway, by substituting for loss of Akt kinase activity. SGK3 is recruited and activated at endosomes, by virtue of its phox homology domain binding to PtdIns(3)P. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous SGK3 is rapidly activated by growth factors such as IGF1, through pathways involving both Class 1 and Class 3 PI3Ks. We provide evidence that IGF1 enhances endosomal PtdIns(3)P levels via a pathway involving the UV-RAG complex of hVPS34 Class 3 PI3K. Our data point towards IGF1-induced activation of Class 1 PI3K stimulating SGK3 through enhanced production of PtdIns(3)P resulting from the dephosphorylation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P 3 Our findings are also consistent with activation of Class 1 PI3K promoting mTORC2 phosphorylation of SGK3 and with oncogenic Ras-activating SGK3 solely through the Class 1 PI3K pathway. Our results highlight the versatility of upstream pathways that activate SGK3 and help explain how SGK3 substitutes for Akt following inhibition of Class 1 PI3K/Akt pathways. They also illustrate robustness of SGK3 activity that can remain active and counteract physiological conditions or stresses where either Class 1 or Class 3 PI3K pathways are inhibited. © 2018 The Author(s).

  18. Complex Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Kleefeld

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to some generalized correspondence principle the classical limit of a non-Hermitian quantum theory describing quantum degrees of freedom is expected to be the well known classical mechanics of classical degrees of freedom in the complex phase space, i.e., some phase space spanned by complex-valued space and momentum coordinates. As special relativity was developed by Einstein merely for real-valued space-time and four-momentum, we will try to understand how special relativity and covariance can be extended to complex-valued space-time and four-momentum. Our considerations will lead us not only to some unconventional derivation of Lorentz transformations for complex-valued velocities, but also to the non-Hermitian Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, which are to lay the foundations of a non-Hermitian quantum theory.

  19. Communication Complexity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaikumar Radhakrishnan

    Alice and Bob are randomized agents. They exchange messages in order to compute a function f(x, y). We allow a small probability of error. Goal: minimize the total number of bits transmitted. Jaikumar Radhakrishnan. Communication Complexity ...

  20. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide...

  1. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  2. Luminescent Lanthanoid Calixarene Complexes and Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Massi, Massimiliano; Ogden, Mark I.

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to provide an overview of recent examples of lanthanoid-calixarene complexes incorporated into light-emitting materials. Background information on the antenna effect and early work on lanthanoid complexes on calixarenes is provided to set the context. Classes of materials discussed include polymers, nanoparticles, and metal clusters.

  3. Luminescent Lanthanoid Calixarene Complexes and Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Massimiliano; Ogden, Mark I

    2017-11-28

    This review aims to provide an overview of recent examples of lanthanoid-calixarene complexes incorporated into light-emitting materials. Background information on the antenna effect and early work on lanthanoid complexes on calixarenes is provided to set the context. Classes of materials discussed include polymers, nanoparticles, and metal clusters.

  4. Luminescent Lanthanoid Calixarene Complexes and Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Massi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to provide an overview of recent examples of lanthanoid-calixarene complexes incorporated into light-emitting materials. Background information on the antenna effect and early work on lanthanoid complexes on calixarenes is provided to set the context. Classes of materials discussed include polymers, nanoparticles, and metal clusters.

  5. In between matters, interfaces in complex oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zalk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complex oxides are emerging as a versatile class of materials, exhibiting a wide variety of properties. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the properties of complex-oxide interfaces can differ considerably from those of the bulk. This opens up the possibility of tuning and

  6. In Between Matters : Interfaces in Complex Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zalk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Complex oxides are emerging as a versatile class of materials, exhibiting a wide variety of properties. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the properties of complex-oxide interfaces can differ considerably from those of the bulk. This opens up the possibility of tuning and

  7. Mixture model analysis of complex samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M; ter Hofstede, F; Steenkamp, JBEM

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the effects of a complex sampling design on the estimation of mixture models. An approximate or pseudo likelihood approach is proposed to obtain consistent estimates of class-specific parameters when the sample arises from such a complex design. The effects of ignoring the sample

  8. The theory of social classes Maurice Halbwachs

    OpenAIRE

    L. V. Kozlova

    2014-01-01

    The article considers the basic thesis of Maurice Halbwachs’s theory of social classes outlined in the “Social classes and morphology” (1942): the concept of class is revealed as the object of collective representation, the main characteristics of classes, the criteria for its selection and conditions for classes formation are analyzed.

  9. Longitudinal analysis of latent classes of psychopathology and patterns of class migration in survivors of severe injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David; Nickerson, Angela; Alkemade, Nathan; Bryant, Richard A; Creamer, Mark; Silove, Derrick; McFarlane, Alexander C; Van Hooff, Miranda; Fletcher, Susan L; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2015-09-01

    classes indicate a complex pattern of psychopathology expression over time. The findings have considerable implications for tailoring multifocused interventions to class type, as well as flexible stepped care models, and for the potential development and delivery of transdiagnostic interventions targeting underlying mechanisms. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I) no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I) en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I) in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Graciele Zanon; Amanda Emirandetti; Gustavo Ferreira Simões; Camila Marques Freria; Sheila Cristina Victório; Luciana Politti Cartarozzi; Roberta Barbizan; Alexandre Leite Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Foi demonstrado recentemente que o complexo de histocompatibilidade principal de classe I (MHC I), expresso no sistema nervoso central (SNC), não funciona somente como molécula com papel imunológico, mas também como parte de um mecanismo envolvido na plasticidade sináptica. A expressão de MHC I interfere na intensidade e seletividade da retração de sinapses em contato com neurônios que sofreram lesão e também influencia a reatividade das células gliais próximas a esses neurônios. A intensidad...

  11. Cpf1 Is a Single RNA-Guided Endonuclease of a Class 2 CRISPR-Cas System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zetsche, Bernd; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Slaymaker, Ian M.; Makarova, Kira S.; Essletzbichler, Patrick; Volz, Sara E.; Joung, Julia; Oost, van der John; Regev, Aviv; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The microbial adaptive immune system CRISPR mediates defense against foreign genetic elements through two classes of RNA-guided nuclease effectors. Class 1 effectors utilize multi-protein complexes, whereas class 2 effectors rely on single-component effector proteins such as the well-characterized

  12. Effect of technology on student class performance and class absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesodia, Sanjay; Molnar, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of instructional technology availability on the performance of students enrolled in a medical physiology course at a podiatric medical school. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to predict student overall test performance based on instructional technology, Medical College Admission Test score, undergraduate grade point average, and class absence. The availability of instructional technology was associated with a small decline in mean test performance and a small increase in class absence. Class absence had a negative effect on test performance only when the technology was available. Total Medical College Admission Test score and grade point average were positively correlated with performance. Instructional technology did not enhance absentee student course performance and, indeed, hurt it. Its use as a means of providing access to additional lecture material needs to be reevaluated.

  13. The interaction between beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) and purified class-I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S; Olsen, A C

    1994-01-01

    The function of MHC class-I molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To understand the molecular details of the assembly (and disassembly) of peptide-beta 2m-class-I complexes a biochemical peptide-class-I binding assay has...... been generated recently and this paper reports on a similar assay for the interaction between beta 2m and class I. As a model system human beta 2m binding to mouse class I was used. The assay is strictly biochemical using purified reagents which interact in solution and complex formation is determined...

  14. Recipients with In Utero Induction of Tolerance Upregulated MHC Class I in the Engrafted Donor Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Chang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The alterations in MHC class I expression play a crucial step in immune evasion of cancer or virus-infected cells. This study aimed to examine whether tolerized grafts modified MHC class I expression. FVB/N mice were rendered tolerant of C57BL/6 alloantigens by in utero transplantation of C57BL/6 marrows. Postnatally, engrafted donor skins and leukocytes were examined for their MHC expression by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Engrafted donor skins upregulated their MHC class I related gene transcripts after short-term (1~2 weeks or long-term (>1 month engraftment. This biological phenomenon was simultaneously associated with upregulation of TAP1 gene transcripts, suggesting an important role of TAP1 in the regulation of MHC class I pathway. The surface MHC class I molecules of H-2Kb in engrafted donor leukocytes consistently showed overexpression. Conclusively, the induction of allograft tolerance involved biological modifications of donor transplants. The overexpression of MHC class I within engrafted transplants of tolerant mice might be used as the tolerance biomarkers for identifying a state of graft tolerance.

  15. Cellular misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules are possible targets for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Noriko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-11-01

    The major function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is the presentation of peptide antigens to helper T cells. However, when misfolded proteins are associated with MHC class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum, they are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without processing to peptides. Of note, misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules are specifically recognized by autoantibodies produced in patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and antiphospholipid syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins complexed with MHC class II molecules is associated with the susceptibility to autoimmune diseases conferred by each MHC class II allele. Therefore, misfolded proteins rescued from degradation by MHC class II molecules may be recognized as 'neo-self' antigens by the immune system and be involved in the pathogenicity of autoimmune diseases. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Imagining class : A study into material social class position, subjective identification, and voting behavior across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Hooge, L.; Achterberg, P.H.J.; Reeskens, T.

    2018-01-01

    The traditional approach to class voting has largely ignored the question whether material class positions coincide with subjective class identification. Following Sosnaud et al. (2013), this study evaluates party preferences when Europeans’ material and subjective social class do not coincide.

  17. Hidden Connectivity in Networks with Vulnerable Classes of Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian M. Krause

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In many complex systems representable as networks, nodes can be separated into different classes. Often these classes can be linked to a mutually shared vulnerability. Shared vulnerabilities may be due to a shared eavesdropper or correlated failures. In this paper, we show the impact of shared vulnerabilities on robust connectivity and how the heterogeneity of node classes can be exploited to maintain functionality by utilizing multiple paths. Percolation is the field of statistical physics that is generally used to analyze connectivity in complex networks, but in its existing forms, it cannot treat the heterogeneity of multiple vulnerable classes. To analyze the connectivity under these constraints, we describe each class as a color and develop a “color-avoiding” percolation. We present an analytic theory for random networks and a numerical algorithm for all networks, with which we can determine which nodes are color-avoiding connected and whether the maximal set percolates in the system. We find that the interaction of topology and color distribution implies a rich critical behavior, with critical values and critical exponents depending both on the topology and on the color distribution. Applying our physics-based theory to the Internet, we show how color-avoiding percolation can be used as the basis for new topologically aware secure communication protocols. Beyond applications to cybersecurity, our framework reveals a new layer of hidden structure in a wide range of natural and technological systems.

  18. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  19. Complex Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Elias M

    2009-01-01

    With this second volume, we enter the intriguing world of complex analysis. From the first theorems on, the elegance and sweep of the results is evident. The starting point is the simple idea of extending a function initially given for real values of the argument to one that is defined when the argument is complex. From there, one proceeds to the main properties of holomorphic functions, whose proofs are generally short and quite illuminating: the Cauchy theorems, residues, analytic continuation, the argument principle.With this background, the reader is ready to learn a wealth of additional m

  20. Complex manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Morrow, James

    2006-01-01

    This book, a revision and organization of lectures given by Kodaira at Stanford University in 1965-66, is an excellent, well-written introduction to the study of abstract complex (analytic) manifolds-a subject that began in the late 1940's and early 1950's. It is largely self-contained, except for some standard results about elliptic partial differential equations, for which complete references are given. -D. C. Spencer, MathSciNet The book under review is the faithful reprint of the original edition of one of the most influential textbooks in modern complex analysis and geometry. The classic