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Sample records for comparative drosophila mutagenesis

  1. [From random mutagenesis to precise genome editing: the development and evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila].

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    Su, Fang; Huang, Zongliang; Guo, Yawen; Jiao, Renjie; Zi, Li; Chen, Jianming; Liu, Jiyong

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, an important model organism for studying life science, has contributed more to the research of genetics, developmental biology and biomedicine with the development of genome editing techniques. Drosophila genome-editing techniques have evolved from random mutagenesis to precise genome editing and from simple mutant construction to diverse genome editing methods since the 20th century. Chemical mutagenesis, using Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), is an important technique to study gene function in forward genetics, however, the precise knockout of Drosophila genes could not be achieved. The gene targeting technology, based on homologous recombination, has accomplished the precise editing of Drosophila genome for the first time, but with low efficiency. The CRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein)-mediated precise genome editing is simple, fast and highly efficient compared with the gene targeting technology in Drosophila. In this review, we focus on Drosophila gene knockout, and summarize the evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila, emphasizing the development and applications of gene targeting, zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR/Cas9 techniques.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms for High Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Wing Mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Wang, Hua; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Ma, Junfeng; Wang, Bingying; Shen, Sile; Fu, Xueqi; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2015-10-08

    Although High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an important physical and chemical tool has been increasingly applied to research of organism, the response mechanisms of organism to HHP have not been elucidated clearly thus far. To identify mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organisms, here, we treated Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) eggs with HHP. Approximately 75% of the surviving flies showed significant morphological abnormalities from the egg to the adult stages compared with control flies (p melanogaster induced by HHP were used to investigate the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organism. Thus 285 differentially expressed genes associated with wing mutations were identified using Affymetrix Drosophila Genome Array 2.0 and verified with RT-PCR. We also compared wing development-related central genes in the mutant flies with control flies using DNA sequencing to show two point mutations in the vestigial (vg) gene. This study revealed the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP-induced mutagenesis in D. melanogaster and provided a new model for the study of evolution on organisms.

  3. Highly Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis of Drosophila with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

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    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for generating and detecting mutations of any gene in Drosophila melanogaster through the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated. We show that injection of RNA into the Drosophila embryo can induce highly efficient mutagenesis of desired target genes in up to 88% of injected flies. These mutations can be transmitted through the germline to make stable lines. Our system provides at least a 10-fold improvement in efficiency over previously published reports, enabling wider application of this technique. We also describe a simple and highly sensitive method of detecting mutations in the target gene by high-resolution melt analysis and discuss how the new technology enables the study of gene function.

  4. An optimized TALEN application for mutagenesis and screening in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Lee, Han B; Sebo, Zachary L; Peng, Ying; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) emerged as powerful tools for locus-specific genome engineering. Due to the ease of TALEN assembly, the key to streamlining TALEN-induced mutagenesis lies in identifying efficient TALEN pairs and optimizing TALEN mRNA injection concentrations to minimize the effort to screen for mutant offspring. Here we present a simple methodology to quantitatively assess bi-allelic TALEN cutting, as well as approaches that permit accurate measures of somatic and germline mutation rates in Drosophila melanogaster. We report that percent lethality from pilot injection of candidate TALEN mRNAs into Lig4 null embryos can be used to effectively gauge bi-allelic TALEN cutting efficiency and occurs in a dose-dependent manner. This timely Lig4-dependent embryonic survival assay also applies to CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting. Moreover, the somatic mutation rate of individual G0 flies can be rapidly quantitated using SURVEYOR nuclease and capillary electrophoresis, and germline transmission rate determined by scoring progeny of G0 outcrosses. Together, these optimized methods provide an effective step-wise guide for routine TALEN-mediated gene editing in the fly.

  5. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

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    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  6. Mutagenesis and homologous recombination in Drosophila cell lines using CRISPR/Cas9

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    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-12-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Drosophila S2 cells to generate targeted genetic mutations in more than 85% of alleles. By targeting a constitutive exon of the AGO1 gene, we demonstrate homozygous mutation in up to 82% of cells, thereby allowing the study of genetic knockouts in a Drosophila cell line for the first time. We have shown that homologous gene targeting is possible at 1–4% efficiency using this system, allowing for the construction of defined insertions and deletions. We demonstrate that a 1 kb homology arm length is optimal for integration by homologous gene targeting, and demonstrate its efficacy by tagging the endogenous AGO1 protein. This technology enables controlled genetic manipulation in Drosophila cell lines, and its simplicity offers the opportunity to study cellular phenotypes genome-wide.

  7. A powerful method combining homologous recombination and site-specific recombination for targeted mutagenesis in Drosophila

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    Gao, Guanjun; McMahon, Conor; Chen, Jie; Rong, Yikang S.

    2008-01-01

    Gene targeting provides a powerful tool for dissecting gene function. However, repeated targeting of a single locus remains a practice mostly limited to unicellular organisms that afford simple targeting methodologies. We developed an efficient method to repeatedly target a single locus in Drosophila. In this method, which we term “site-specific integrase mediated repeated targeting” (SIRT), an attP attachment site for the phage phiC31 integrase is first targeted to the vicinity of the gene o...

  8. Site directed mutagenesis of Drosophila flightin disrupts phosphorylation and impairs flight muscle structure and mechanics.

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    Barton, Byron; Ayer, Gretchen; Maughan, David W; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2007-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin rod binding protein that in Drosophila melanogaster is expressed exclusively in the asynchronous indirect flight muscles (IFM). Hyperphosphorylation of flightin coincides with the completion of myofibril assembly and precedes the emergence of flight competency in young adults. To investigate the role of flightin phosphorylation in vivo we generated three flightin null (fln(0)) Drosophila strains that express a mutant flightin transgene with two (Thr158, Ser 162), three (Ser139, Ser141, Ser145) or all five potential phosphorylation sites mutated to alanines. These amino acid substitutions result in lower than normal levels of flightin accumulation and transgenic strains that are unable to beat their wings. On two dimensional gels of IFM proteins, the transgenic strain with five mutant sites (fln(5STA)) is devoid of all phosphovariants, the transgenic strain with two mutant sites (fln(2TSA)) expresses only the two least acidic of the nine phosphovariants, and the transgenic strain with three mutant sites (fln(3SA)) expresses all nine phosphovariants, as the wild-type strain. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Thr158 and/or Ser162 is necessary for subsequent phosphorylation of other sites. All three transgenic strains show normal, albeit long, IFM sarcomeres in newly eclosed adults. In contrast, sarcomeres in fully mature fln(5STA) and fln(2TSA) adults show extensive breakdown while those in fln(3SA) are not as disordered. The fiber hypercontraction phenotype that characterizes fln(0) is fully evident in fln(5STA) and fln(2TSA) but partially rescued in fln(3SA). Mechanics on skinned fibers from newly eclosed flies show alterations in viscous modulus for fln(5STA) and fln(2TSA) that result in a significant reduction in oscillatory power output. Expression of fln(5STA) and fln(2TSA), but not fln(3SA), in a wild-type (fln(+)/fln(+)) background resulted in a dominant negative effect manifested as flight impairments and hypercontracted IFM

  9. Comparing Different Strategies in Directed Evolution of Enzyme Stereoselectivity: Single- versus Double-Code Saturation Mutagenesis.

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    Sun, Zhoutong; Lonsdale, Richard; Li, Guangyue; Reetz, Manfred T

    2016-10-04

    Saturation mutagenesis at sites lining the binding pockets of enzymes constitutes a viable protein engineering technique for enhancing or inverting stereoselectivity. Statistical analysis shows that oversampling in the screening step (the bottleneck) increases astronomically as the number of residues in the randomization site increases, which is the reason why reduced amino acid alphabets have been employed, in addition to splitting large sites into smaller ones. Limonene epoxide hydrolase (LEH) has previously served as the experimental platform in these methodological efforts, enabling comparisons between single-code saturation mutagenesis (SCSM) and triple-code saturation mutagenesis (TCSM); these employ either only one or three amino acids, respectively, as building blocks. In this study the comparative platform is extended by exploring the efficacy of double-code saturation mutagenesis (DCSM), in which the reduced amino acid alphabet consists of two members, chosen according to the principles of rational design on the basis of structural information. The hydrolytic desymmetrization of cyclohexene oxide is used as the model reaction, with formation of either (R,R)- or (S,S)-cyclohexane-1,2-diol. DCSM proves to be clearly superior to the likewise tested SCSM, affording both R,R- and S,S-selective mutants. These variants are also good catalysts in reactions of further substrates. Docking computations reveal the basis of enantioselectivity.

  10. Targeted mutagenesis of the Sap47 gene of Drosophila: Flies lacking the synapse associated protein of 47 kDa are viable and fertile

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    Huber Saskia

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved proteins preferentially expressed in synaptic terminals of the nervous system are likely to play a significant role in brain function. We have previously identified and molecularly characterized the Sap47 gene which codes for a novel synapse associated protein of 47 kDa in Drosophila. Sequence comparison identifies homologous proteins in numerous species including C. elegans, fish, mouse and human. First hints as to the function of this novel protein family can be obtained by generating mutants for the Sap47 gene in Drosophila. Results Attempts to eliminate the Sap47 gene through targeted mutagenesis by homologous recombination were unsuccessful. However, several mutants were generated by transposon remobilization after an appropriate insertion line had become available from the Drosophila P-element screen of the Bellen/Hoskins/Rubin/Spradling labs. Characterization of various deletions in the Sap47 gene due to imprecise excision of the P-element identified three null mutants and three hypomorphic mutants. Null mutants are viable and fertile and show no gross structural or obvious behavioural deficits. For cell-specific over-expression and "rescue" of the knock-out flies a transgenic line was generated which expresses the most abundant transcript under the control of the yeast enhancer UAS. In addition, knock-down of the Sap47 gene was achieved by generating 31 transgenic lines expressing Sap47 RNAi constructs, again under UAS control. When driven by a ubiquitously expressed yeast transcription factor (GAL4, Sap47 gene suppression in several of these lines is highly efficient resulting in residual SAP47 protein concentrations in heads as low as 6% of wild type levels. Conclusion The conserved synaptic protein SAP47 of Drosophila is not essential for basic synaptic function. The Sap47 gene region may be refractory to targeted mutagenesis by homologous recombination. RNAi using a construct linking genomic DNA to anti

  11. Clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-mediated mutagenesis and phenotype rescue by piggyBac transgenesis in a nonmodel Drosophila species.

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    Tanaka, R; Murakami, H; Ote, M; Yamamoto, D

    2016-08-01

    How behavioural diversity emerged in evolution is an unexplored subject in biology. To tackle this problem, genes and circuits for a behaviour need to be determined in different species for phylogenetic comparisons. The recently developed clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR associated protein9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system made such a challenge possible by providing the means to induce mutations in a gene of interest in any organism. Aiming at elucidating diversification in genetic and neural networks for courtship behaviour, we attempted to generate a genetic tool kit in Drosophila subobscura, a nonmodel species distantly related to the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report the generation of yellow (y) and white mutations with the aid of the CRISPR/Cas9 system, and the rescue of the y mutant phenotype by germline transformation of the newly established y mutant fly line with a y(+) -marked piggyBac vector. This successful mutagenesis and transformation in D. subobscura open up an avenue for comprehensive genetic analyses of higher functions in this and other nonmodel Drosophila species, representing a key step toward systematic comparisons of genes and circuitries underlying behaviour amongst species. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  12. Comparative population genomics of latitudinal variation in Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Machado, Heather E; Bergland, Alan O; O'Brien, Katherine R; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    Examples of clinal variation in phenotypes and genotypes across latitudinal transects have served as important models for understanding how spatially varying selection and demographic forces shape variation within species. Here, we examine the selective and demographic contributions to latitudinal variation through the largest comparative genomic study to date of Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster, with genomic sequence data from 382 individual fruit flies, collected across a spatial transect of 19 degrees latitude and at multiple time points over 2 years. Consistent with phenotypic studies, we find less clinal variation in D. simulans than D. melanogaster, particularly for the autosomes. Moreover, we find that clinally varying loci in D. simulans are less stable over multiple years than comparable clines in D. melanogaster. D. simulans shows a significantly weaker pattern of isolation by distance than D. melanogaster and we find evidence for a stronger contribution of migration to D. simulans population genetic structure. While population bottlenecks and migration can plausibly explain the differences in stability of clinal variation between the two species, we also observe a significant enrichment of shared clinal genes, suggesting that the selective forces associated with climate are acting on the same genes and phenotypes in D. simulans and D. melanogaster. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Context-Dependent Mutagenesis Using Human and Mouse Models

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    Sofya A. Medvedeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substitution rates strongly depend on their nucleotide context. One of the most studied examples is the excess of C > T mutations in the CG context in various groups of organisms, including vertebrates. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying this mutation regularity have provided insights into evolution, mutagenesis, and cancer development. Recently several other hypermutable motifs were identified in the human genome. There is an increased frequency of T > C mutations in the second position of the words ATTG and ATAG and an increased frequency of A > C mutations in the first position of the word ACAA. For a better understanding of evolution, it is of interest whether these mutation regularities are human specific or present in other vertebrates, as their presence might affect the validity of currently used substitution models and molecular clocks. A comprehensive analysis of mutagenesis in 4 bp mutation contexts requires a vast amount of mutation data. Such data may be derived from the comparisons of individual genomes or from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP databases. Using this approach, we performed a systematical comparison of mutation regularities within 2–4 bp contexts in Mus musculus and Homo sapiens and uncovered that even closely related organisms may have notable differences in context-dependent mutation regularities.

  14. Comparative evaluation of the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated bacteria.

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    Petkau, Kristina; Fast, David; Duggal, Aashna; Foley, Edan

    2016-09-15

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model to explore the molecular exchanges that occur between an animal intestine and associated microbes. Previous studies in Drosophila uncovered a sophisticated web of host responses to intestinal bacteria. The outcomes of these responses define critical events in the host, such as the establishment of immune responses, access to nutrients, and the rate of larval development. Despite our steady march towards illuminating the host machinery that responds to bacterial presence in the gut, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the microbial products that influence bacterial association with a fly host. We sequenced and characterized the genomes of three common Drosophila-associated microbes: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Acetobacter pasteurianus For each species, we compared the genomes of Drosophila-associated strains to the genomes of strains isolated from alternative sources. We found that environmental Lactobacillus strains readily associated with adult Drosophila and were similar to fly isolates in terms of genome organization. In contrast, we identified a strain of A. pasteurianus that apparently fails to associate with adult Drosophila due to an inability to grow on fly nutrient food. Comparisons between association competent and incompetent A. pasteurianus strains identified a short list of candidate genes that may contribute to survival on fly medium. Many of the gene products unique to fly-associated strains have established roles in the stabilization of host-microbe interactions. These data add to a growing body of literature that examines the microbial perspective of host-microbe relationships.

  15. A study of the inhibition/promotion effects of sodium-copper chlorophyllin (SCC)-mediated mutagenesis in somatic cells of Drosophila.

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    Pimentel, E; Cruces, M P; Zimmering, S

    2011-05-18

    Sodium-copper chlorophyllin (SCC), a copper-porphyrin complex, has been shown to act as an inhibitor as well as a promoter of DNA-damage induction by a variety of mutagens in several test systems. In order to investigate the basis of this dual effect, experiments were carried out to compare the influence of pretreatment with intact SCC and that of its constituents, the metal-free protoporphyrin (PP-IX) and copper as CuCl(2). The wing-spot test was employed to monitor mutational events in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. Heterozygous mwh+/+flr(3) larvae were treated for 24h with SCC, PP-IX, CuCl(2) or sucrose. Following this treatment, one group of larvae were immediately allowed to feed on instant medium containing 0.5mM N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (ENU) dissolved in phosphate buffer to reach pH 6. The remaining larvae received treatment with ENU with a delay of 1, 2 or 3days (DTD). Results revealed an (a) overall inhibitory effect for 0-DTD and 1-DTD after pretreatment with SCC, (b) only in 0-DTD after PP-IX, and (c) in all DTDs after treatment with CuCl(2). These results provide evidence that the copper ion plays a central role in the antimutagenic effect of SCC, and for a sustained period of time. Pretreatment with SCC and PP-IX produced a promoter effect at 2-DTD and 3-DTD. The results could be explained as an effect of the accumulation of metal-free porphyrin following the dissociation of the copper-porphyrin complex (SCC), the copper-ion reaching proteins to form complexes and participated in anabolic pathways.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and vector mosquito developmental genes.

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    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing projects have presented the opportunity for analysis of developmental genes in three vector mosquito species: Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles gambiae. A comparative genomic analysis of developmental genes in Drosophila melanogaster and these three important vectors of human disease was performed in this investigation. While the study was comprehensive, special emphasis centered on genes that 1 are components of developmental signaling pathways, 2 regulate fundamental developmental processes, 3 are critical for the development of tissues of vector importance, 4 function in developmental processes known to have diverged within insects, and 5 encode microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate developmental transcripts in Drosophila. While most fruit fly developmental genes are conserved in the three vector mosquito species, several genes known to be critical for Drosophila development were not identified in one or more mosquito genomes. In other cases, mosquito lineage-specific gene gains with respect to D. melanogaster were noted. Sequence analyses also revealed that numerous repetitive sequences are a common structural feature of Drosophila and mosquito developmental genes. Finally, analysis of predicted miRNA binding sites in fruit fly and mosquito developmental genes suggests that the repertoire of developmental genes targeted by miRNAs is species-specific. The results of this study provide insight into the evolution of developmental genes and processes in dipterans and other arthropods, serve as a resource for those pursuing analysis of mosquito development, and will promote the design and refinement of functional analysis experiments.

  17. Comparative site-directed mutagenesis in the catalytic amino acid triad in calicivirus proteases.

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    Oka, Tomoichiro; Murakami, Kosuke; Wakita, Takaji; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2011-02-01

    Calicivirus proteases cleave the viral precursor polyprotein encoded by open reading frame 1 (ORF1) into multiple intermediate and mature proteins. These proteases have conserved histidine (His), glutamic acid (Glu) or aspartic acid (Asp), and cysteine (Cys) residues that are thought to act as a catalytic triad (i.e. general base, acid and nucleophile, respectively). However, is the triad critical for processing the polyprotein? In the present study, we examined these amino acids in viruses representing the four major genera of Caliciviridae: Norwalk virus (NoV), Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), Sapporo virus (SaV) and Feline calicivirus (FCV). Using single amino-acid substitutions, we found that an acidic amino acid (Glu or Asp), as well as the His and Cys in the putative catalytic triad, cannot be replaced by Ala for normal processing activity of the ORF1 polyprotein in vitro. Similarly, normal activity is not retained if the nucleophile Cys is replaced with Ser. These results showed the calicivirus protease is a Cys protease and the catalytic triad formation is important for protease activity. Our study is the first to directly compare the proteases of the four representative calicivirus genera. Interestingly, we found that RHDV and SaV proteases critically need the acidic residues during catalysis, whereas proteolytic cleavage occurs normally at several cleavage sites in the ORF1 polyprotein without a functional acid residue in the NoV and FCV proteases. Thus, the substrate recognition mechanism may be different between the SaV and RHDV proteases and the NoV and FCV proteases. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. ENU mutagenesis reveals that Notchless homolog 1 (Drosophila affects Cdkn1a and several members of the Wnt pathway during murine pre-implantation development

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    Lossie Amy C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our interests lie in determining the genes and genetic pathways that are important for establishing and maintaining maternal-fetal interactions during pregnancy. Mutation analysis targeted to a 34 Mb domain flanked by Trp53 and Wnt3 demonstrates that this region of mouse chromosome 11 contains a large number of essential genes. Two mutant alleles (l11Jus1 and l11Jus4, which fall into the same complementation group, survive through implantation but fail prior to gastrulation. Results Through a positional cloning strategy, we discovered that these homozygous mutant alleles contain non-conservative missense mutations in the Notchless homolog 1 (Drosophila (Nle1 gene. NLE1 is a member of the large WD40-repeat protein family, and is thought to signal via the canonical NOTCH pathway in vertebrates. However, the phenotype of the Nle1 mutant mice is much more severe than single Notch receptor mutations or even in animals in which NOTCH signaling is blocked. To test the hypothesis that NLE1 functions in multiple signaling pathways during pre-implantation development, we examined expression of multiple Notch downstream target genes, as well as select members of the Wnt pathway in wild-type and mutant embryos. We did not detect altered expression of any primary members of the Notch pathway or in Notch downstream target genes. However, our data reveal that Cdkn1a, a NOTCH target, was upregulated in Nle1 mutants, while several members of the Wnt pathway are downregulated. In addition, we found that Nle1 mutant embryos undergo caspase-mediated apoptosis as hatched blastocysts, but not as morulae or blastocysts. Conclusions Taken together, these results uncover potential novel functions for NLE1 in the WNT and CDKN1A pathways during embryonic development in mammals.

  19. Comparative genome sequencing of drosophila pseudoobscura: Chromosomal, gene and cis-element evolution

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    Richards, Stephen; Liu, Yue; Bettencourt, Brian R.; Hradecky, Pavel; Letovsky, Stan; Nielsen, Rasmus; Thornton, Kevin; Todd, Melissa J.; Chen, Rui; Meisel, Richard P.; Couronne, Olivier; Hua, Sujun; Smith, Mark A.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; van Batenburg, Marinus F.; Howells, Sally L.; Scherer, Steven E.; Sodergren, Erica; Matthews, Beverly B.; Crosby, Madeline A.; Schroeder, Andrew J.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Rives, Catherine M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Havlak, Paul; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Gill, Rachel; Hume, Jennifer; Morgan, Margaret B.; Miner, George; Hamilton, Cerissa; Huang, Yanmei; Waldron, Lenee; Verduzco, Daniel; Blankenburg, Kerstin P.; Dubchak, Inna; Noor, Mohamed A.F.; Anderson, Wyatt; White, Kevin P.; Clark, Andrew G.; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Gelbart, William; Weinstock, George M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2004-04-01

    The genome sequence of a second fruit fly, D. pseudoobscura, presents an opportunity for comparative analysis of a primary model organism D. melanogaster. The vast majority of Drosophila genes have remained on the same arm, but within each arm gene order has been extensively reshuffled leading to the identification of approximately 1300 syntenic blocks. A repetitive sequence is found in the D. pseudoobscura genome at many junctions between adjacent syntenic blocks. Analysis of this novel repetitive element family suggests that recombination between offset elements may have given rise to many paracentric inversions, thereby contributing to the shuffling of gene order in the D. pseudoobscura lineage. Based on sequence similarity and synteny, 10,516 putative orthologs have been identified as a core gene set conserved over 35 My since divergence. Genes expressed in the testes had higher amino acid sequence divergence than the genome wide average consistent with the rapid evolution of sex-specific proteins. Cis-regulatory sequences are more conserved than control sequences between the species but the difference is slight, suggesting that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements is flexible. Overall, a picture of repeat mediated chromosomal rearrangement, and high co-adaptation of both male genes and cis-regulatory sequences emerges as important themes of genome divergence between these species of Drosophila.

  20. Protamines and spermatogenesis in Drosophila and Homo sapiens : A comparative analysis.

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    Kanippayoor, Rachelle L; Alpern, Joshua H M; Moehring, Amanda J

    2013-04-01

    The production of mature and motile sperm is a detailed process that utilizes many molecular players to ensure the faithful execution of spermatogenesis. In most species that have been examined, spermatogenesis begins with a single cell that undergoes dramatic transformation, culminating with the hypercompaction of DNA into the sperm head by replacing histones with protamines. Precise execution of the stages of spermatogenesis results in the production of motile sperm. While comparative analyses have been used to identify similarities and differences in spermatogenesis between species, the focus has primarily been on vertebrate spermatogenesis, particularly mammals. To understand the evolutionary basis of spermatogenetic variation, however, a more comprehensive comparison is needed. In this review, we examine spermatogenesis and the final packaging of DNA into the sperm head in the insect Drosophila melanogaster and compare it to spermatogenesis in Homo sapiens.

  1. Comparative functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes.

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    Sabine P Schrimpf

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a popular model system in genetics, not least because a majority of human disease genes are conserved in C. elegans. To generate a comprehensive inventory of its expressed proteome, we performed extensive shotgun proteomics and identified more than half of all predicted C. elegans proteins. This allowed us to confirm and extend genome annotations, characterize the role of operons in C. elegans, and semiquantitatively infer abundance levels for thousands of proteins. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we were able to compare two animal proteomes (C. elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. We found that the abundances of orthologous proteins in metazoans correlate remarkably well, better than protein abundance versus transcript abundance within each organism or transcript abundances across organisms; this suggests that changes in transcript abundance may have been partially offset during evolution by opposing changes in protein abundance.

  2. The 19 genomes of Drosophila: a BAC library resource for genus-wide and genome-scale comparative evolutionary research.

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    Song, Xiang; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Ammiraju, Jetty S S; Luo, Meizhong; He, Ruifeng; Lin, Jinke; Lee, So-Jeong; Sisneros, Nicholas; Watts, Tom; Kudrna, David A; Golser, Wolfgang; Ashley, Elizabeth; Collura, Kristi; Braidotti, Michele; Yu, Yeisoo; Matzkin, Luciano M; McAllister, Bryant F; Markow, Therese Ann; Wing, Rod A

    2011-04-01

    The genus Drosophila has been the subject of intense comparative phylogenomics characterization to provide insights into genome evolution under diverse biological and ecological contexts and to functionally annotate the Drosophila melanogaster genome, a model system for animal and insect genetics. Recent sequencing of 11 additional Drosophila species from various divergence points of the genus is a first step in this direction. However, to fully reap the benefits of this resource, the Drosophila community is faced with two critical needs: i.e., the expansion of genomic resources from a much broader range of phylogenetic diversity and the development of additional resources to aid in finishing the existing draft genomes. To address these needs, we report the first synthesis of a comprehensive set of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) resources for 19 Drosophila species from all three subgenera. Ten libraries were derived from the exact source used to generate 10 of the 12 draft genomes, while the rest were generated from a strategically selected set of species on the basis of salient ecological and life history features and their phylogenetic positions. The majority of the new species have at least one sequenced reference genome for immediate comparative benefit. This 19-BAC library set was rigorously characterized and shown to have large insert sizes (125-168 kb), low nonrecombinant clone content (0.3-5.3%), and deep coverage (9.1-42.9×). Further, we demonstrated the utility of this BAC resource for generating physical maps of targeted loci, refining draft sequence assemblies and identifying potential genomic rearrangements across the phylogeny.

  3. Comparative approaches to the study of physiology: Drosophila as a physiological tool

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    Neckameyer, Wendi S.; Argue, Kathryn J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have detailed the extensive conservation of developmental signaling pathways between the model system, Drosophila melanogaster, and mammalian models, but researchers have also profited from the unique and highly tractable genetic tools available in this system to address critical questions in physiology. In this review, we have described contributions that Drosophila researchers have made to mathematical dynamics of pattern formation, cardiac pathologies, the way in which pai...

  4. Comparative analysis of Pdf-mediated circadian behaviors between Drosophila melanogaster and D. virilis.

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    Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Gyunghee; Park, Jae H

    2009-03-01

    A group of small ventrolateral neurons (s-LN(v)'s) are the principal pacemaker for circadian locomotor rhythmicity of Drosophila melanogaster, and the pigment-dispersing factor (Pdf) neuropeptide plays an essential role as a clock messenger within these neurons. In our comparative studies on Pdf-associated circadian rhythms, we found that daily locomotor activity patterns of D. virilis were significantly different from those of D. melanogaster. Activities of D. virilis adults were mainly restricted to the photophase under light:dark cycles and subsequently became arrhythmic or weakly rhythmic in constant conditions. Such activity patterns resemble those of Pdf(01) mutant of D. melanogaster. Intriguingly, endogenous D. virilis Pdf (DvPdf) expression was not detected in the s-LN(v)-like neurons in the adult brains, implying that the Pdf(01)-like behavioral phenotypes of D. virilis are attributed in part to the lack of DvPdf in the s-LN(v)-like neurons. Heterologous transgenic analysis showed that cis-regulatory elements of the DvPdf transgene are capable of directing their expression in all endogenous Pdf neurons including s-LN(v)'s, as well as in non-Pdf clock neurons (LN(d)'s and fifth s-LN(v)) in a D. melanogaster host. Together these findings suggest a significant difference in the regulatory mechanisms of Pdf transcription between the two species and such a difference is causally associated with species-specific establishment of daily locomotor activity patterns.

  5. Modifier action of the chlorophyllin of the mutagenesis induced by the ethyl-nitroso-urea (ENU) in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster; Accion modificadora de la clorofilina de la mutagenesis inducida por la etil-nitroso-urea (ENU) en celulas germinales de Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales N, I

    2006-07-01

    The cupro-sodium chlorophyllin (CCS) it is a soluble porphyrin in water that it includes in its it structures a copper atom instead of the magnesium that has the chlorophyll. Diverse experiments have demonstrated that it possesses a potent activity, reducing or inhibiting, the DNA damage caused by physical and chemical agents of direct action or insinuation. Most of the knowledge about their anti genotoxic activity has been obtained using somatic cells of different organisms, on the other hand it is known very little of their effect in germinal cells. At the moment in the Drosophila laboratory of the ININ it is investigating the protective action of the CCS in germinal cells, with these studies has been observed that its administration to females that were crossed with males irradiated with 20 Gy of gamma radiation, promotes the induction of lethal dominant in the embryonic and post-embryonic states causing a diminution in the viability egg-adult. With the test of lethal recessive bound to the sex one has evidence that it increases the basal frequency of lethal recessive and it doesn't reduce those induced by radiation. In contrast, with the present investigation when the CCS was administered to males that later on were treated with ethyl-nitroso-urea (ENU) caused a reduction of the lethal frequency in all the monitored cellular states, but only it was significant in the post-meiotic cells. On the contrary, when the CCS was administered to the female ones and then they crossed with males treaties with ENU, it was observed a tendency to increase the lethal ones in all the cellular types. With both protocols the CCS caused a diminution of the sterility. The fact that the CCS has antagonistic activities, it deserves special attention to investigate with different protocols and systems, the conditions in that this pigment can work as a true antimutagenic and/or anti carcinogenic before being able to him to propose as a chemopreventor. (Author)

  6. What use is an infertile sperm? A comparative study of sperm-heteromorphic Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holman, Luke; Freckleton, Robert P; Snook, Rhonda R

    2007-01-01

    Sperm size and number are important determinants of male reproductive success. The genus Drosophila exhibits a remarkable diversity of sperm production strategies, including the production of multiple sperm morphs by individual males, a phenomenon called sperm heteromorphism. Sperm-heteromorphic ......Sperm size and number are important determinants of male reproductive success. The genus Drosophila exhibits a remarkable diversity of sperm production strategies, including the production of multiple sperm morphs by individual males, a phenomenon called sperm heteromorphism. Sperm......-heteromorphic Drosophila species in the obscura group produce large numbers of infertile "parasperm" in addition to fertile eusperm. Parasperm have been hypothesized to perform a number of roles in place of fertilization, predominantly focused on their potential function in postcopulatory sexual selection. However...

  7. Comparative and functional studies of Drosophila species invasion by the gypsy endogenous retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejlumian, Lucine; Pélisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain; Terzian, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. Phylogenetic studies suggest that occasional horizontal transfer events of gypsy occur between Drosophila species. gypsy possesses infective properties associated with the products of the envelope gene that might be at the origin of these interspecies transfers. We report here the existence of DNA sequences putatively encoding full-length Env proteins in the genomes of Drosophila species other than D. melanogaster, suggesting that potentially infective gypsy copies able to spread between sexually isolated species can occur. The ability of gypsy to invade the genome of a new species is conditioned by its capacity to be expressed in the naive genome. The genetic basis for the regulation of gypsy activity in D. melanogaster is now well known, and it has been assigned to an X-linked gene called flamenco. We established an experimental simulation of the invasion of the D. melanogaster genome by gypsy elements derived from other Drosophila species, which demonstrates that these non- D. melanogaster gypsy elements escape the repression exerted by the D. melanogaster flamenco gene.

  8. Differential transcription in defined parts of the insect brain: comparative study utilizing Drosophila melanogaster and Schistocerca gregaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Thomas; Schramm, Guido; Marquardt, Helge; Bussmeyer, Ingo; Franz, Oliver

    2004-10-01

    The brain of all higher organisms has a modular architecture. Processing of various tasks, such as learning, olfaction, or motor control is performed in specialized brain areas, characterized by morphological and molecular peculiarities. To identify those genes that are transcribed in only one region of the insect brain, we chose two different approaches, differential display PCR and DNA array hybridization, with two different insect species, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria and the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. The optic lobes (centers of visual information processing), the midbrain (the region of the brain where almost all "higher" centers are localized), and the thoracic ganglia (regions required to control various peripheral organs) were compared in both types of experiments. Both, the differential display PCR screen of the different parts of the locust brain as well as the DNA array screen of the Drosophila brain revealed almost identical numbers of transcripts exclusively present in either of the three above-mentioned brain areas. Interestingly, the brain areas with the largest number of differential transcripts are the thoracic ganglia and not the midbrain.

  9. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeman, Michael T; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-01-01

    Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Satellite DNA in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Madhav; Warsinger-Pepe, Natalie; Watase, George J; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2017-02-09

    Satellite DNAs are highly repetitive sequences that account for the majority of constitutive heterochromatin in many eukaryotic genomes. It is widely recognized that sequences and locations of satellite DNAs are highly divergent even in closely related species, contributing to the hypothesis that satellite DNA differences may underlie speciation. However, due to its repetitive nature, the mapping of satellite DNAs has been mostly left out of recent genomics analyses, hampering the use of molecular genetics techniques to better understand their role in speciation and evolution. Satellite DNAs are most extensively and comprehensively mapped in Drosophila melanogaster, a species that is also an excellent model system with which to study speciation. Yet the lack of comprehensive knowledge regarding satellite DNA identity and location in its sibling species (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) has prevented the full utilization of D. melanogaster in studying speciation. To overcome this problem, we initiated the mapping of satellite DNAs on the genomes of the D. melanogaster species complex (D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia) using multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. Our study confirms a striking divergence of satellite DNAs in the D. melanogaster species complex, even among the closely related species of the D. simulans clade (D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia), and suggests the presence of unidentified satellite sequences in these species.

  11. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a PCR-based method to mutate specified nucleotides of a sequence within a plasmid vector. This technique allows one to study the relative importance of a particular amino acid for protein structure and function. Typical mutations are designed to disrupt or map protein-protein interactions, mimic or block posttranslational modifications, or to silence enzymatic activity. Alternatively, noncoding changes are often used to generate rescue constructs that are resistant to knockdown via RNAi.

  13. Use of mutagenesis, genetic mapping and next generation transcriptomics to investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Kalajdzic

    Full Text Available Insecticide resistance is a worldwide problem with major impact on agriculture and human health. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms is crucial for the management of the phenomenon; however, this information often comes late with respect to the implementation of efficient counter-measures, particularly in the case of metabolism-based resistance mechanisms. We employed a genome-wide insertional mutagenesis screen to Drosophila melanogaster, using a Minos-based construct, and retrieved a line (MiT[w(-]3R2 resistant to the neonicotinoid insecticide Imidacloprid. Biochemical and bioassay data indicated that resistance was due to increased P450 detoxification. Deep sequencing transcriptomic analysis revealed substantial over- and under-representation of 357 transcripts in the resistant line, including statistically significant changes in mixed function oxidases, peptidases and cuticular proteins. Three P450 genes (Cyp4p2, Cyp6a2 and Cyp6g1 located on the 2R chromosome, are highly up-regulated in mutant flies compared to susceptible Drosophila. One of them (Cyp6g1 has been already described as a major factor for Imidacloprid resistance, which validated the approach. Elevated expression of the Cyp4p2 was not previously documented in Drosophila lines resistant to neonicotinoids. In silico analysis using the Drosophila reference genome failed to detect transcription binding factors or microRNAs associated with the over-expressed Cyp genes. The resistant line did not contain a Minos insertion in its chromosomes, suggesting a hit-and-run event, i.e. an insertion of the transposable element, followed by an excision which caused the mutation. Genetic mapping placed the resistance locus to the right arm of the second chromosome, within a ∼1 Mb region, where the highly up-regulated Cyp6g1 gene is located. The nature of the unknown mutation that causes resistance is discussed on the basis of these results.

  14. Using comparative genomics to develop a molecular diagnosis for the identification of an emerging pest Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophilia suzukii (Spotted Wing Drosophila) has recently become a serious invasive pest of fruit crops in the U.S., Canada, and Europe, leading to substantial economic losses. D. suzukii oviposits directly into ripe or ripening fruits making it a direct pest; in contrast, other Drosophilids utili...

  15. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power

  16. Classical mutagenesis in higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.

    2002-01-01

    For a long time, mutagenesis research in plants focused on crop improvement and, especially for crop plants, opimised protocols were developed with barley being one of the favourite species. However, the interest in mutagenesis has shifted to basic plant research in the last 20 years, when the power

  17. Using comparative genomic hybridization to survey genomic sequence divergence across species: a proof-of-concept from Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulathinal Rob J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide analysis of sequence divergence among species offers profound insights into the evolutionary processes that shape lineages. When full-genome sequencing is not feasible for a broad comparative study, we propose the use of array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH in order to identify orthologous genes with high sequence divergence. Here we discuss experimental design, statistical power, success rate, sources of variation and potential confounding factors. We used a spotted PCR product microarray platform from Drosophila melanogaster to assess sequence divergence on a gene-by-gene basis in three fully sequenced heterologous species (D. sechellia, D. simulans, and D. yakuba. Because complete genome assemblies are available for these species this study presents a powerful test for the use of aCGH as a tool to measure sequence divergence. Results We found a consistent and linear relationship between hybridization ratio and sequence divergence of the sample to the platform species. At higher levels of sequence divergence (D. melanogaster ~84% of features had significantly less hybridization to the array in the heterologous species than the platform species, and thus could be identified as "diverged". At lower levels of divergence (≥ 97% identity, only 13% of genes were identified as diverged. While ~40% of the variation in hybridization ratio can be accounted for by variation in sequence identity of the heterologous sample relative to D. melanogaster, other individual characteristics of the DNA sequences, such as GC content, also contribute to variation in hybridization ratio, as does technical variation. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that aCGH can accurately be used as a proxy to estimate genome-wide divergence, thus providing an efficient way to evaluate how evolutionary processes and genomic architecture can shape species diversity in non-model systems. Given the increased number of species for which

  18. Antimicrobials, stress and mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are ancient and ubiquitous immune effectors that multicellular organisms use to kill and police microbes whereas antibiotics are mostly employed by microorganisms. As antimicrobial peptides (AMPs mostly target the cell wall, a microbial 'Achilles heel', it has been proposed that bacterial resistance evolution is very unlikely and hence AMPs are ancient 'weapons' of multicellular organisms. Here we provide a new hypothesis to explain the widespread distribution of AMPs amongst multicellular organism. Studying five antimicrobial peptides from vertebrates and insects, we show, using a classic Luria-Delbrück fluctuation assay, that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs do not increase bacterial mutation rates. Moreover, using rtPCR and disc diffusion assays we find that AMPs do not elicit SOS or rpoS bacterial stress pathways. This is in contrast to the main classes of antibiotics that elevate mutagenesis via eliciting the SOS and rpoS pathways. The notion of the 'Achilles heel' has been challenged by experimental selection for AMP-resistance, but our findings offer a new perspective on the evolutionary success of AMPs. Employing AMPs seems advantageous for multicellular organisms, as it does not fuel the adaptation of bacteria to their immune defenses. This has important consequences for our understanding of host-microbe interactions, the evolution of innate immune defenses, and also sheds new light on antimicrobial resistance evolution and the use of AMPs as drugs.

  19. Germ cell mutagenesis in lambdalacZ transgenic mice treated with ethylnitrosourea : comparison with specific-locus test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Baan, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Germ cell mutagenesis was studied in male λlacZ transgenic mice in such a way that the data can be compared with literature data for germ cell mutagenesis obtained with the specific-locus test. This comparison is of interest for validation of the transgenic mouse model. We studied mutagenesis induce

  20. Dynamics of cell polarity in tissue morphogenesis: a comparative view from Drosophila and Ciona [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Veeman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissues in developing embryos exhibit complex and dynamic rearrangements that shape forming organs, limbs, and body axes. Directed migration, mediolateral intercalation, lumen formation, and other rearrangements influence the topology and topography of developing tissues. These collective cell behaviors are distinct phenomena but all involve the fine-grained control of cell polarity. Here we review recent findings in the dynamics of polarized cell behavior in both the Drosophila ovarian border cells and the Ciona notochord. These studies reveal the remarkable reorganization of cell polarity during organ formation and underscore conserved mechanisms of developmental cell polarity including the Par/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC and planar cell polarity pathways. These two very different model systems demonstrate important commonalities but also key differences in how cell polarity is controlled in tissue morphogenesis. Together, these systems raise important, broader questions on how the developmental control of cell polarity contributes to morphogenesis of diverse tissues across the metazoa.

  1. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  2. Interchromosomal duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y chromosome imply a distinct evolutionary origin of the sex chromosomes compared to Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M; Bonomi, Angelica; Siciliano, Paolo; Scolari, Francesca; Franz, Gerald; Jessup, Andrew; Malacrida, Anna R; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2011-03-07

    Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data reinforce the idea that the sex chromosomes of the Tephritidae may have distinct evolutionary

  3. Interchromosomal duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y chromosome imply a distinct evolutionary origin of the sex chromosomes compared to Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gabrieli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data

  4. Promoter analysis by saturation mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baliga Nitin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression and regulation are mediated by DNA sequences, in most instances, directly upstream to the coding sequences by recruiting transcription factors, regulators, and a RNA polymerase in a spatially defined fashion. Few nucleotides within a promoter make contact with the bound proteins. The minimal set of nucleotides that can recruit a protein factor is called a cis-acting element. This article addresses a powerful mutagenesis strategy that can be employed to define cis-acting elements at a molecular level. Technical details including primer design, saturation mutagenesis, construction of promoter libraries, phenotypic analysis, data analysis, and interpretation are discussed.

  5. Comparative study of the strategies evolved by two parasitoids of the genus Asobara to avoid the immune response of the host, Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Sébastien J M; Eslin, Patrice; Giordanengo, Philippe; Doury, Géraldine

    2003-04-01

    Asobara tabida and Asobara citri are two braconid endoparasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We studied and compared the strategies evolved by these two species to avoid the immune reaction of their host. A. tabida has no negative impact on host cellular defenses and its eggs avoid encapsulation by adhering to host tissues. At the opposite, we found that A. citri, whose eggs are devoid of adhesive properties, affects the host encapsulation abilities, hemolymph phenoloxidase activity and concentrations of circulating hemocytes. Some of these effects could directly rely on a severe disruption of the hematopoietic organ anterior lobes observed in parasitized larvae. This is the first report of the immune suppressive abilities of a parasitoid from the Asobara genus. Results are presented and discussed with respect to the strategies of virulence evolved by other parasitoids to counteract the D. melanogaster immune system.

  6. Characterizing the developmental transcriptome of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) through comparative genomic analysis with Drosophila melanogaster utilizing modENCODE datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Scott M; Calla, Bernarda; Hall, Brian; Hou, Shaobin; Manoukis, Nicholas C

    2014-10-28

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important pest of fruit and vegetable crops throughout Asia, and is considered a high risk pest for establishment in the mainland United States. It is a member of the family Tephritidae, which are the most agriculturally important family of flies, and can be considered an out-group to well-studied members of the family Drosophilidae. Despite their importance as pests and their relatedness to Drosophila, little information is present on B. dorsalis transcripts and proteins. The objective of this paper is to comprehensively characterize the transcripts present throughout the life history of B. dorsalis and functionally annotate and analyse these transcripts relative to the presence, expression, and function of orthologous sequences present in Drosophila melanogaster. We present a detailed transcriptome assembly of B. dorsalis from egg through adult stages containing 20,666 transcripts across 10,799 unigene components. Utilizing data available through Flybase and the modENCODE project, we compared expression patterns of these transcripts to putative orthologs in D. melanogaster in terms of timing, abundance, and function. In addition, temporal expression patterns in B. dorsalis were characterized between stages, to establish the constitutive or stage-specific expression patterns of particular transcripts. A fully annotated transcriptome assembly is made available through NCBI, in addition to corresponding expression data. Through characterizing the transcriptome of B. dorsalis through its life history and comparing the transcriptome of B. dorsalis to the model organism D. melanogaster, a database has been developed that can be used as the foundation to functional genomic research in Bactrocera flies and help identify orthologous genes between B. dorsalis and D. melanogaster. This data provides the foundation for future functional genomic research that will focus on improving our understanding of the physiology and

  7. Optogenetic mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Kentaro; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can modify and damage DNA. Here we report an optogenetic mutagenesis approach that is free of toxic chemicals and easy to perform by taking advantage of a genetically encoded ROS generator. This method relies on the potency of ROS generation by His-mSOG, the mini singlet oxygen generator, miniSOG, fused to a histone. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing His-mSOG in the germline behave and reproduce normally, without photoinduction. Following exposure to blue light, the His-mSOG animals produce progeny with a wide range of heritable phenotypes. We show that optogenetic mutagenesis by His-mSOG induces a broad spectrum of mutations including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), chromosomal deletions, as well as integration of extrachromosomal transgenes, which complements those derived from traditional chemical or radiation mutagenesis. The optogenetic mutagenesis expands the toolbox for forward genetic screening and also provides direct evidence that nuclear ROS can induce heritable and specific genetic mutations. PMID:26632265

  8. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, October 1, 1988--June 1, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-12-31

    The primary goal of this study is to achieve a more thorough understanding of the mechanisms employed by higher organisms to repair DNA damage induced by both ionizing and nonionizing radiation. These studies are also contributing to an improved understanding of the processes of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in higher eukaryotes. The studies employ Drosophila as a model organism for investigating repair functions that are common to all higher eukaryotes. Drosophila was chosen in the early phases of this study primarily because of the ease with which one can isolate and characterize repair-deficient mutants in a metazoan organism. The laboratory has gone on to investigate the metabolic defects of such mutants while others have performed complementary genetic and cytogenetic studies which relate DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and chromosome stability. The repair studies have exploited the capacity to introduce mutant Drosophila cells into tissue culture and thereby compare repair defects directly with those of homologous human disorders. Researchers are currently employing recombinant DNA technology to investigate the mechanisms of the DNA repair pathways defined by those mutants.

  9. Comparative gene expression analysis of Dtg, a novel target gene of Dpp signaling pathway in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodar, Christian; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Travisany, Dante; Chacon, Carlos; Pino, Michael; Maass, Alejandro; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2014-02-10

    In the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo, Dpp, a secreted molecule that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors, activates a set of downstream genes to subdivide the dorsal region into amnioserosa and dorsal epidermis. Here, we examined the expression pattern and transcriptional regulation of Dtg, a new target gene of Dpp signaling pathway that is required for proper amnioserosa differentiation. We showed that the expression of Dtg was controlled by Dpp and characterized a 524-bp enhancer that mediated expression in the dorsal midline, as well as, in the differentiated amnioserosa in transgenic reporter embryos. This enhancer contained a highly conserved region of 48-bp in which bioinformatic predictions and in vitro assays identified three Mad binding motifs. Mutational analysis revealed that these three motifs were necessary for proper expression of a reporter gene in transgenic embryos, suggesting that short and highly conserved genomic sequences may be indicative of functional regulatory regions in D. melanogaster genes. Dtg orthologs were not detected in basal lineages of Dipterans, which unlike D. melanogaster develop two extra-embryonic membranes, amnion and serosa, nevertheless Dtg orthologs were identified in the transcriptome of Musca domestica, in which dorsal ectoderm patterning leads to the formation of a single extra-embryonic membrane. These results suggest that Dtg was recruited as a new component of the network that controls dorsal ectoderm patterning in the lineage leading to higher Cyclorrhaphan flies, such as D. melanogaster and M. domestica. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative thoracic anatomy of the wild type and wingless (wg(1)cn(1)) mutant of Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Benjamin; Schneeberg, Katharina; Beutel, Rolf Georg

    2016-11-01

    Genetically modified organisms are crucial for our understanding of gene regulatory networks, physiological processes and ontogeny. With modern molecular genetic techniques allowing the rapid generation of different Drosophila melanogaster mutants, efficient in-depth morphological investigations become an important issue. Anatomical studies can elucidate the role of certain genes in developmental processes and point out which parts of gene regulatory networks are involved in evolutionary changes of morphological structures. The wingless mutation wg(1) of D. melanogaster was discovered more than 40 years ago. While early studies addressed the external phenotype of these mutants, the documentation of the internal organization was largely restricted to the prominent indirect flight muscles. We used SEM micrographs, histological serial sections, μ-computed tomography, CLSM and 3D reconstructions to study and document the thoracic skeletomuscular system of the wild type and mutant. A recently introduced nomenclature for the musculature of neopteran insects was applied to facilitate comparisons with closely or more distantly related taxa. The mutation is phenotypically mainly characterized by the absence of one or both wings and halteres. The wing is partly or entirely replaced by duplications of mesonotal structures, whereas the haltere and its associated muscles are completely absent on body sides showing the reduction. Both the direct and indirect mesothoracic flight muscles are affected by loss and reorientation of bundles or fibers. Our observations lead to the conclusion that the wingless mutation causes a homeotic transformation in the imaginal discs of wings and halteres with a direct effect on the development of skeletal structures and an indirect effect on the associated muscular system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective population size of natural populations of Drosophila buzzatii, with a comparative evaluation of nine methods of estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J S F

    2011-11-01

    Allozyme and microsatellite data from numerous populations of Drosophila buzzatii have been used (i) to determine to what degree N(e) varies among generations within populations, and among populations, and (ii) to evaluate the congruence of four temporal and five single-sample estimators of N(e) . Effective size of different populations varied over two orders of magnitude, most populations are not temporally stable in genetic composition, and N(e) showed large variation over generations in some populations. Short-term N(e) estimates from the temporal methods were highly correlated, but the smallest estimates were the most precise for all four methods, and the most consistent across methods. Except for one population, N(e) estimates were lower when assuming gene flow than when assuming populations that were closed. However, attempts to jointly estimate N(e) and immigration rate were of little value because the source of migrants was unknown. Correlations among the estimates from the single-sample methods generally were not significant although, as for the temporal methods, estimates were most consistent when they were small. These single-sample estimates of current N(e) are generally smaller than the short-term temporal estimates. Nevertheless, population genetic variation is not being depleted, presumably because of past or ongoing migration. A clearer picture of current and short-term effective population sizes will only follow with better knowledge of migration rates between populations. Different methods are not necessarily estimating the same N(e) , they are subject to different bias, and the biology, demography and history of the population(s) may affect different estimators differently.

  12. Comparative analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans gene expression experiments in the European Soyuz flights to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, L. J.; Szewczyk, N. J.; Benguría, A.; Herranz, R.; Laván, D.; Medina, F. J.; Gasset, G.; van Loon, J.; Conley, C. A.; Marco, R.

    The European Soyuz missions have been one of the main routes for conducting scientific experiments onboard the International Space Station, which is currently in the construction phase. A relatively large number of life and physical sciences experiments as well as technology demonstrations have been carried out during these missions. Included among these experiments are the Gene experiment during the Spanish "Cervantes" Soyuz mission and the ICE-1st experiment during the Dutch "Delta" mission. In both experiments, full genome microarray analyses were carried out on RNA extracted from whole animals recovered from the flight. These experiments indicated relatively large scale changes in gene expression levels in response to spaceflight for two popular model systems, Drosophila melanogaster (Gene) and Caenorabditis elegans (ICE-1st). Here we report a comparative analysis of results from these two experiments. Finding orthologous genes between the fruit fly and the nematode was far from straightforward, reducing the number of genes that we could compare to roughly 20% of the full comparative genome. Within this sub-set of the data (2286 genes), only six genes were found to display identical changes between species (decreased) while 1809 genes displayed no change in either species. Future experiments using ground simulation techniques will allow producing a better, more comprehensive picture of the putative set of genes affected in multicellular organisms by changes in gravity and getting a deeper understanding of how animals respond and adapt to spaceflight.

  13. Comparative analysis of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans gene expression experiments in the European Soyuz flights to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, L.J.; Szewczyk, N.J.; Benguría, A.; Herranz, R.; Laván, D.; Medina, F.J.; Gasset, G.; Loon, J. van; Conley, C.A.; Marco, R.

    2007-01-01

    The European Soyuz missions have been one of the main routes for conducting scientific experiments onboard the International Space Station, which is currently in the construction phase. A relatively large number of life and physical sciences experiments as well as technology demonstrations have been carried out during these missions. Included among these experiments are the Gene experiment during the Spanish “Cervantes” Soyuz mission and the ICE-1st experiment during the Dutch “Delta” mission. In both experiments, full genome microarray analyses were carried out on RNA extracted from whole animals recovered from the flight. These experiments indicated relatively large scale changes in gene expression levels in response to spaceflight for two popular model systems, Drosophila melanogaster (Gene) and Caenorabditis elegans (ICE-1st). Here we report a comparative analysis of results from these two experiments. Finding orthologous genes between the fruit fly and the nematode was far from straightforward, reducing the number of genes that we could compare to roughly 20% of the full comparative genome. Within this sub-set of the data (2286 genes), only six genes were found to display identical changes between species (decreased) while 1809 genes displayed no change in either species. Future experiments using ground simulation techniques will allow producing a better, more comprehensive picture of the putative set of genes affected in multicellular organisms by changes in gravity and getting a deeper understanding of how animals respond and adapt to spaceflight. PMID:18084631

  14. Genetic aspects of targeted insertion mutagenesis in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, U; Schäfer, B

    2004-05-01

    Targeted insertion mutagenesis is a main molecular tool of yeast science initially applied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method was extended to fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and to "non-conventional" yeast species, which show specific properties of special interest to both basic and applied research. Consequently, the behaviour of such non-Saccharomyces yeasts is reviewed against the background of the knowledge of targeted insertion mutagenesis in S. cerevisiae. Data of homologous integration efficiencies obtained with circular, ends-in or ends-out vectors in several yeasts are compared. We follow details of targeted insertion mutagenesis in order to recognize possible rate-limiting steps. The route of the vector to the target and possible mechanisms of its integration into chromosomal genes are considered. Specific features of some yeast species are discussed. In addition, similar approaches based on homologous recombination that have been established for the mitochondrial genome of S. cerevisiae are described.

  15. A simple mutagenesis using natural competence in Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2013-09-01

    We report the discovery of natural competence in Tannerella forsythia and its application to targeted chromosomal mutagenesis. Keeping T. forsythia in a biofilm throughout the procedure allowed efficient DNA uptake and allelic replacement. This simple method is cost-effective and reproducible compared with the conventional protocols using broth culture and electroporation.

  16. In vitro models of mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, B S; Larson, K; Sagher, D; Rabkin, S; Shenkar, R; Sahm, J

    1985-01-01

    The bypass of lesions in DNA with insertion of nucleotides opposite damaged bases has been studied as a model for mutagenesis in an in vitro system. Lesions introduced by dimethyl sulfate at adenines and by ultraviolet light at pyrimidine dimers act as termination sites on both double- and single-stranded DNA templates. Base selection opposite noninformational lesions is, in part, a property of the polymerases: different polymerases have different selectivities although all polymerases tested seem to prefer purines. The ability to insert "incorrect" bases is determined in part by the sequence 5' to the lesion on the template strand. The hypothesis that damaged purines tend to result in transversions can be applied to published data on activation of the c-ras oncogene.

  17. The use of TALENs for nonhomologous end joining mutagenesis in silkworm and fruitfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Yoko; Tamura, Toshiki; Sajwan, Suresh; Kobayashi, Isao; Zurovec, Michal

    2014-08-15

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are custom-made enzymes designed to cut double-stranded DNA at desired locations. The DNA breaks are repaired either by error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway or via homologous recombination requiring homologous DNA as a template for the repair. TALENs are used for site-specific mutagenesis in an extended range of organisms including insects. We will describe here a simple TALEN-based mutagenesis protocol suitable for the generation of germline mutations in Bombyx mori and Drosophila melanogaster. The protocol includes assembly of specific TAL modules, in vitro synthesis of TALEN RNAs, egg microinjection and mutation detection using PCR analysis. Our procedure allows a high frequency induction of NHEJ mutations, which often allows the reception of homozygous mutants already in the G1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Scoring function to predict solubility mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deutsch Christopher

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutagenesis is commonly used to engineer proteins with desirable properties not present in the wild type (WT protein, such as increased or decreased stability, reactivity, or solubility. Experimentalists often have to choose a small subset of mutations from a large number of candidates to obtain the desired change, and computational techniques are invaluable to make the choices. While several such methods have been proposed to predict stability and reactivity mutagenesis, solubility has not received much attention. Results We use concepts from computational geometry to define a three body scoring function that predicts the change in protein solubility due to mutations. The scoring function captures both sequence and structure information. By exploring the literature, we have assembled a substantial database of 137 single- and multiple-point solubility mutations. Our database is the largest such collection with structural information known so far. We optimize the scoring function using linear programming (LP methods to derive its weights based on training. Starting with default values of 1, we find weights in the range [0,2] so that predictions of increase or decrease in solubility are optimized. We compare the LP method to the standard machine learning techniques of support vector machines (SVM and the Lasso. Using statistics for leave-one-out (LOO, 10-fold, and 3-fold cross validations (CV for training and prediction, we demonstrate that the LP method performs the best overall. For the LOOCV, the LP method has an overall accuracy of 81%. Availability Executables of programs, tables of weights, and datasets of mutants are available from the following web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/OptSolMut.html.

  19. History of environmental and molecular mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, George R

    2004-01-01

    Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, the journal of the Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS), marks its 25th anniversary in 2004. The journal, originally called Environmental Mutagenesis, was established in 1979 with Seymour Abrahamson as its first editor. The development of the journal is closely linked to the evolution of the fields of mutation research and genetic toxicology. This perspective traces the founding of the journal and discusses its editorial history, growth, content, style, administration, and relationship to the EMS.

  20. Microgravity effects on Drosophila melanogaster development and aging: comparative analysis of the results of the Fly experiment in the Biokosmos 9 biosatellite flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, R; González-Jurado, J; Calleja, M; Garesse, R; Maroto, M; Ramírez, E; Holgado, M C; de Juan, E; Miquel, J

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of the exposure of Drosophila melanogaster to microgravity conditions during a 15-day biosatellite flight, Biokosmos 9, in a joint ESA-URSS project. The experimental containers were loaded before launch with a set of Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R larvae so that imagoes were due to emerge half-way through the flight. A large number of normally developed larvae were recovered from the space-flown containers. These larvae were able to develop into normal adults confirming earlier results that Drosophila melanogaster of a wild-type constitution can develop normally in the absence of gravity. However, microgravity exposure clearly enhances the number of growing embryos laid by the flies and possibly slows down the developmental pace of the microgravity-exposed animals. Due to some problems in the experimental set-up, this slowing down needs to be verified in future experiments. No live adult that had been exposed to microgravity was recovered from the experiment, so that no life span studies could be carried out, but adult males emerged from the recovered embyros showed a slight shortening in life span and a lower performance in other experimental tests of aging. This agrees with the results of previous experiments performed by our groups.

  1. [Stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2014-04-01

    The adaptive mutations exist widely in the evolution of cells, such as antibiotic resistance mutations of pathogenic bacteria, adaptive evolution of industrial strains, and cancerization of human somatic cells. However, how these adaptive mutations are generated is still controversial. Based on the mutational analysis models under the nonlethal selection conditions, stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis is proposed as a new evolutionary viewpoint. The hypothetic pathway of stress-induced mutagenesis involves several intracellular physiological responses, including DNA damages caused by accumulation of intracellular toxic chemicals, limitation of DNA MMR (mismatch repair) activity, upregulation of general stress response and activation of SOS response. These responses directly affect the accuracy of DNA replication from a high-fidelity manner to an error-prone one. The state changes of cell physiology significantly increase intracellular mutation rate and recombination activity. In addition, gene transcription under stress condition increases the instability of genome in response to DNA damage, resulting in transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize these two molecular mechanisms of stress-induced mutagenesis and transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis to help better understand the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis.

  2. DNA MUTAGENESIS IN PANAX GINSENG CELL CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiselev K.V.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, it is well documented that plant tissue culture induces a number of mutations and chromosome rearrangements termed “somaclonal variations”. However, little is known about the nature and the molecular mechanisms of the tissue culture-induced mutagenesis and the effects of long-term subculturing on the rate and specific features of the mutagenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare DNA mutagenesis in different genes of Panax ginseng callus cultures of different age. It has previously been shown that the nucleotide sequences of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes rolC locus and the selective marker nptII developed mutations during long-term cultivation of transgenic cell cultures of P. ginseng. In the present work, we analyzed nucleotide sequences of selected plant gene families in a 2-year-old and 20-year-old P. ginseng 1c cell culture and in leaves of cultivated P. ginseng plants. We analysed sequence variability between the Actin genes, which are a family of house-keeping genes; the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and dammarenediol synthase (DDS genes, which actively participate in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides; and the somatic embryogenesis receptor kinase (SERK genes, which control plant development. The frequency of point mutations in the Actin, PAL, DDS, and SERK genes in the 2-year-old callus culture was markedly higher than that in cultivated plants but lower than that in the 20-year-old callus culture of P. ginseng. Most of the mutations in the 2- and 20-year-old P. ginseng calli were A↔G and T↔C transitions. The number of nonsynonymous mutations was higher in the 2- and 20-year-old callus cultures than the number of nonsynonymous mutations in the cultivated plants of P. ginseng. Interestingly, the total number of N→G or N→C substitutions in the analyzed genes was 1.6 times higher than the total number of N→A or N→T substitutions. Using methylation-sensitive DNA fragmentation

  3. DNA repair and mutagenesis of singlestranded bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubleday, O.P.; Brandenburger, A.; Wagner, R. Jr.; Radman, M. (Brussels Univ. (Belgium)); Godson, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    Virtually all radiation-induced mutagenesis is believed to result from an error-prone repair activity (SOS repair) and to involve mutations occurring both at the site of radiation-induced lesions (targeted mutations) and in undamaged DNA (untargeted mutations). To examine the relative contributions of targeted and untargeted mutations to ..gamma.. and ultraviolet (UV) radiation mutagenesis we have determined the DNA sequences of 174 M13 revertant phages isolated from stocks of irradiated or unirradiated amber mutants grown in irradiated or unirradiated host bacteria. We have detected no obvious specificity of mutagenesis and find no evidence of a predominance of targeted mutations associated with either UV- or ..gamma..-irradiation of the phages or with the induction of the host SOS repair system. In particular, pyrimidine dimers do not appear to be the principal sites of UV-induced bare substitution mutagenesis, suggesting that such UV-induced mutagenesis may be untargeted or occur at sites of lesions other than pyrimidine dimers.

  4. Lipid metabolism in Drosophila: development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Liu; Xun Huang

    2013-01-01

    Proteins,nucleic acids,and lipids are three major components of the cell.Despite a few basic metabolic pathways,we know very little about lipids,compared with the explosion of knowledge about proteins and nucleic acids.How many different forms of lipids are there? What are the in vivo functions of individual lipid? How does lipid metabolism contribute to normal development and human health? Many of these questions remain unanswered.For over a century,the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a model organism to study basic biological questions.In recent years,increasing evidences proved that Drosophila models are highly valuable for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis researches.Some recent progresses of lipid metabolic regulation during Drosophila development and in Drosophila models of human diseases will be discussed in this review.

  5. Comparative analysis of chromatin binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and other polycomb group repressors at a Drosophila Hox gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L; Ketel, Carrie S; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets.

  6. 从随机突变到精确编辑:果蝇基因组编辑技术的发展及演化%From random mutagenesis to precise genome editing: the development and evolution of genome editing techniques in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏方; 黄宗靓; 郭雅文; 焦仁杰; 李孜; 陈建明; 刘继勇

    2016-01-01

    黑腹果蝇(Drosophila melanogaster)是研究生命科学的重要模式动物,基因组编辑技术的发展有助于人们更好地利用果蝇来进行遗传学、发育生物学、生物医学等领域的研究.从20世纪开始,果蝇基因组编辑技术经历了从随机突变到精确敲除、从单纯的基因突变体制作到多样化的基因组精确编辑的过程.甲基磺酸乙酯(Ethyl methanesulfonate,EMS)化学诱变是利用正向遗传学研究基因功能的重要手段,但是无法实现果蝇基因的精确敲除.基于同源重组建立的基因打靶技术首次实现对果蝇基因组任意位点的精确编辑,但效率较低.CRISPR/Cas9(Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein)系统介导的果蝇基因组精确编辑相对于基因打靶技术具有简单、快速、高效的特点.本文以果蝇基因敲除为主线,系统阐述了果蝇基因组编辑技术的演化,着重论述了基因打靶、ZFN(Zinc-finger nucleases)、TALEN(Transcription activator-like effector nucleases)及CRISPR/Cas9技术的发展和应用.

  7. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  8. Novel Random Mutagenesis Method for Directed Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hong; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhao, Hong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful strategy for gene mutagenesis, and has been used for protein engineering both in scientific research and in the biotechnology industry. The routine method for directed evolution was developed by Stemmer in 1994 (Stemmer, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91, 10747-10751, 1994; Stemmer, Nature 370, 389-391, 1994). Since then, various methods have been introduced, each of which has advantages and limitations depending upon the targeted genes and procedure. In this chapter, a novel alternative directed evolution method which combines mutagenesis PCR with dITP and fragmentation by endonuclease V is described. The kanamycin resistance gene is used as a reporter gene to verify the novel method for directed evolution. This method for directed evolution has been demonstrated to be efficient, reproducible, and easy to manipulate in practice.

  9. Whole-Genome Profiling of a Novel Mutagenesis Technique Using Proofreading-Deficient DNA Polymerase δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh Shiwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel mutagenesis technique using error-prone DNA polymerase δ (polδ, the disparity mutagenesis model of evolution, has been successfully employed to generate novel microorganism strains with desired traits. However, little else is known about the spectra of mutagenic effects caused by disparity mutagenesis. We evaluated and compared the performance of the polδMKII mutator, which expresses the proofreading-deficient and low-fidelity polδ, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid strain with that of the commonly used chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS. This mutator strain possesses exogenous mutant polδ supplied from a plasmid, tthereby leaving the genomic one intact. We measured the mutation rate achieved by each mutagen and performed high-throughput next generation sequencing to analyze the genome-wide mutation spectra produced by the 2 mutagenesis methods. The mutation frequency of the mutator was approximately 7 times higher than that of EMS. Our analysis confirmed the strong G/C to A/T transition bias of EMS, whereas we found that the mutator mainly produces transversions, giving rise to more diverse amino acid substitution patterns. Our present study demonstrated that the polδMKII mutator is a useful and efficient method for rapid strain improvement based on in vivo mutagenesis.

  10. The effects of folate intake on DNA and single-carbon pathway metabolism in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster compared to mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatch, Sydella A; Stabler, Sally P; Harrison, Jon F

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms of vitamin function in non-mammals are poorly understood, despite being essential for development. Folate and cobalamin are B-vitamin cofactors with overlapping roles in transferring various single-carbon units. In mammals, one or both is needed for nucleotide synthesis, DNA methylation, amino acid conversions and other reactions. However, there has been little investigation of the response to folate or cobalamin in insects. Here, we manipulated folate intake and potentially cobalamin levels in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster with chemically-defined diets, an antibiotic to reduce bacterially-derived vitamins, and the folate-interfering pharmaceutical methotrexate, to see if single-carbon metabolites and DNA synthesis rates would be affected. We found that similar to mammals with low folate intake, fruit fly larvae had significantly slower growth and DNA synthesis rates. But changes to single carbon-metabolites did not mirror that of mammals with abnormal folate or given MTX. Five of the nine metabolites measured were not significantly affected (methionine, serine, glycine, methylglycine, and dimethylglycine) and three (cystathionine, methylgycine, and methylmalonic acid) were only decreased in larvae consuming methotrexate. Metabolites expected to be elevated if flies used cobalamin from microbial symbionts were not affected by dietary sulfaquinoxaline. Our data support the role of folate in nucleotide synthesis in D. melanogaster and that microbial symbionts provide functioning folates. We could not confirm how folate intake affects single carbon pathway metabolites, nor whether Drososphila use microbially-derived cobalamin. Further work should explore which cofactors are used in fruit flies in these important and potentially novel pathways.

  11. Adult Neurogenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Fernández-Hernández; Christa Rhiner; Eduardo Moreno

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been linked to several cognitive functions and neurological disorders. Description of adult neurogenesis in a model organism like Drosophila could facilitate the genetic study of normal and abnormal neurogenesis in the adult brain. So far, formation of new neurons has not been detected in adult fly brains and hence has been thought to be absent in Drosophila. Here, we used an improved lineage-labeling method to show that, surprisingly, adult neurogenesis occurs in the m...

  12. Comparison of human and Drosophila atlastin GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuyun; Hu, Xiaoyu; Bian, Xin; Liu, Xinqi; Hu, Junjie

    2015-02-01

    Formation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network requires homotypic membrane fusion, which involves a class of atlastin (ATL) GTPases. Purified Drosophila ATL is capable of mediating vesicle fusion in vitro, but such activity has not been reported for any other ATLs. Here, we determined the preliminary crystal structure of the cytosolic segment of Drosophila ATL in a GDP-bound state. The structure reveals a GTPase domain dimer with the subsequent three-helix bundles associating with their own GTPase domains and pointing in opposite directions. This conformation is similar to that of human ATL1, to which GDP and high concentrations of inorganic phosphate, but not GDP only, were included. Drosophila ATL restored ER morphology defects in mammalian cells lacking ATLs, and measurements of nucleotide-dependent dimerization and GTPase activity were comparable for Drosophila ATL and human ATL1. However, purified and reconstituted human ATL1 exhibited no in vitro fusion activity. When the cytosolic segment of human ATL1 was connected to the transmembrane (TM) region and C-terminal tail (CT) of Drosophila ATL, the chimera still exhibited no fusion activity, though its GTPase activity was normal. These results suggest that GDP-bound ATLs may adopt multiple conformations and the in vitro fusion activity of ATL cannot be achieved by a simple collection of functional domains.

  13. Natural selection drives Drosophila immune system evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenke, Todd A; Begun, David J

    2003-08-01

    Evidence from disparate sources suggests that natural selection may often play a role in the evolution of host immune system proteins. However, there have been few attempts to make general population genetic inferences on the basis of analysis of several immune-system-related genes from a single species. Here we present DNA polymorphism and divergence data from 34 genes thought to function in the innate immune system of Drosophila simulans and compare these data to those from 28 nonimmunity genes sequenced from the same lines. Several statistics, including average K(A)/K(S) ratio, average silent heterozygosity, and average haplotype diversity, significantly differ between the immunity and nonimmunity genes, suggesting an important role for directional selection in immune system protein evolution. In contrast to data from mammalian immunoglobulins and other proteins, we find no strong evidence for the selective maintenance of protein diversity in Drosophila immune system proteins. This may be a consequence of Drosophila's generalized innate immune response.

  14. Long-distance effects of insertional mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Singhal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most common systems of genetic engineering of mammalian cells are associated with insertional mutagenesis of the modified cells. Insertional mutagenesis is also a popular approach to generate random alterations for gene discovery projects. A better understanding of the interaction of the structural elements within an insertional mutagen and the ability of such elements to influence host genes at various distances away from the insertion site is a matter of considerable practical importance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that, in the context of a lentiviral construct, a transcript, which is initiated at an internal CMV promoter/enhancer region and incorporates a splice donor site, is able to extend past a collinear viral LTR and trap exons of host genes, while the polyadenylation signal, which is naturally present in the LTR, is spliced out. Unexpectedly, when a vector, which utilizes this phenomenon, was used to produce mutants with elevated activity of NF-κB, we found mutants, which owed their phenotype to the effect of the insert on a gene located tens or even hundreds of kilobases away from the insertion site. This effect did not result from a CMV-driven transcript, but was sensitive to functional suppression of the insert. Interestingly, despite the long-distance effect, expression of loci most closely positioned to the insert appeared unaffected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We concluded that a polyadenylation signal in a retroviral LTR, when occurring within an intron, is an inefficient barrier against the formation of a hybrid transcript, and that a vector containing a strong enhancer may selectively affect the function of genes far away from its insertion site. These phenomena have to be considered when experimental or therapeutic transduction is performed. In particular, the long-distance effects of insertional mutagenesis bring into question the relevance of the lists of disease-associated retroviral integration

  15. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  16. Comparative mutagenesis of plant flavonoids in microbial systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardigree, A.A.; Epler, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The plant flavonoids quercetin (3,5,7,3',4'-pentahydroxyflavone), morin (3,5,7,2'4'-pentahydroxyflavone), kaempferol (3,5,7,4'tetrahydroxyflavone), chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), myricetin (3,5,7,3',4',5'-hexahydroxyflavone), myricitrin (myricetin-3-rhamnoside), hesperetin (3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavanone), quercitrin (quercetin-3-L-rhamnoside), rutin (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside or quercetin-3-rutinoside), and hesperidin (hesperetin-7-rutinoside) have been assayed for mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsomal activation system. Quercetin, morin, kaempferol, fisetin, myricetin, quercitrin and rutin were mutagenic in the histidine reversion system with the frameshift strain TA98. The flavonols quercetin and myricetin are mutagenic without metabolic activation, although more effective when a rat liver microsomal preparation (S-9) is included; all others require metabolic activation. Flavonoids are common constituents of higher plants, with extensive medical uses. In addition to pure compounds, we have examined crude extracts of tobacco (snuff) and extracts from commonly available nutritional supplements containing rutin. Mutagenic activity can be detected and is correlated with the flavonoid content.

  17. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  18. An efficient TALEN mutagenesis system in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunling; Shan, Qiwei; Gao, Caixia

    2014-08-15

    Targeted gene mutagenesis is a powerful tool for elucidating gene function and facilitating genetic improvement in rice. TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases), consisting of a custom TALE DNA binding domain fused to a nonspecific FokI cleavage domain, are one of the most efficient genome engineering methods developed to date. The technology of TALENs allows DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to be introduced into predetermined chromosomal loci. DSBs trigger DNA repair mechanisms and can result in loss of gene function by error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), or they can be exploited to modify gene function or activity by precise homologous recombination (HR). In this paper, we describe a detailed protocol for constructing TALEN expression vectors, assessing nuclease activities in vivo using rice protoplast-based assays, generating and introducing TALEN DNAs into embryogenic calluses of rice and identifying TALEN-generated mutations at targeted genomic sites. Using these methods, T0 rice plants resulting from TALEN mutagenesis can be produced within 4-5 months.

  19. Status of research on Drosophila ananassae at global level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. N. Singh; J. P. Yadav

    2015-12-01

    Drosophila, a dipteran insect, has been found to be the best biological model for different kinds of studies. D. melanogaster was first described by Meigen in 1830, is most extensively studied species of the genus Drosophila and a number of investigations employing this species have been documented in areas such as genetics, behaviour, evolution, development, molecular biology, ecology, population biology, etc. Besides D. melanogaster, a number of other species of the genus Drosophila have also been used for different kinds of investigations. Among these, D. ananassae, a cosmopolitan and domestic species endowed with several unusual genetic features, is noteworthy. Described for the first time from Indonesia (Doleschall 1858), this species is commonly distributed in India. Extensive research work on D. ananassae has been done by numerous researchers pertaining to cytology, genetics, mutagenesis, gene mapping, crossing-over in both sexes, population and evolutionary genetics, behaviour genetics, ecological genetics, sexual isolation, fluctuating asymmetry, trade-offs etc. Genome of D. ananassae has also been sequenced. The status of research on D. ananassae at global level is briefly described in this review. Bibliography on this species from different countries worldwide reveals that maximum contribution is from India.

  20. Radiosensitivity Parameters For Lethal Mutagenesis In Caenorhabditis Elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Wilson, J.W.; Katz, R.

    1994-01-01

    For the first time track structure theory has been applied to radiobiological effects in a living organism. Data for lethal mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, obtained after irradiation with nine different types of ions of atomic number 1-57 and gamma rays have yielded radiosensitivity parameters (E{sub 0}, sigma{sub 0}, Kappa, m = 68 Gy, 2.5 x 10(exp {minus}9) cm (exp 2), 750, 2) comparable with those found for the transformation of C3HT10 1/2 cells (180 Gy, 1.15 x 10(exp {minus}10) cm(exp 2), 750, 2) but remote from those (E{sub 0} and sigma{sub 0} = approx. 2 Gy, approx. 5 x 10(exp {minus}7) cm(exp 2)) for mammalian cell survival.

  1. Characterization of maltase clusters in the genus Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriško, Marek; Janeček, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    To reveal evolutionary history of maltase gene family in the genus Drosophila, we undertook a bioinformatics study of maltase genes from available genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Molecular evolution of a closely related glycoside hydrolase, the α-amylase, in Drosophila has been extensively studied for a long time. The α-amylases were even used as a model of evolution of multigene families. On the other hand, maltase, i.e., the α-glucosidase, got only scarce attention. In this study, we, therefore, investigated spatial organization of the maltase genes in Drosophila genomes, compared the amino acid sequences of the encoded enzymes and analyzed the intron/exon composition of orthologous genes. We found that the Drosophila maltases are more numerous than previously thought (ten instead of three genes) and are localized in two clusters on two chromosomes (2L and 2R). To elucidate the approximate time line of evolution of the clusters, we estimated the order and dated duplication of all the 10 genes. Both clusters are the result of ancient series of subsequent duplication events, which took place from 352 to 61 million years ago, i.e., well before speciation to extant Drosophila species. Also observed was a remarkable intron/exon composition diversity of particular maltase genes of these clusters, probably a result of independent intron loss after duplication of intron-rich gene ancestor, which emerged well before speciation in a common ancestor of all extant Drosophila species.

  2. Efficient multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from genomic template

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fengtao Luo; Xiaolan Du; Tujun Weng; Xuan Wen; Junlan Huang; Lin Chen

    2012-12-01

    In this article, the traditional multi-site-directed mutagenesis method based on overlap extension PCR was improved specifically for complicated templates, such as genomic sequence or complementary DNA. This method was effectively applied for multi-site-directed mutagenesis directly from mouse genomic DNA, as well as for combination, deletion or insertion of DNA fragments.

  3. Predicting oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis failures in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassman, Christopher D; Tam, Phillip Y; Lathrop, Richard H; Weiss, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    Protein engineering uses oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to modify DNA sequences through a two-step process of hybridization and enzymatic synthesis. Inefficient reactions confound attempts to introduce mutations, especially for the construction of vast combinatorial protein libraries. This paper applied computational approaches to the problem of inefficient mutagenesis. Several results implicated oligonucleotide annealing to non-target sites, termed 'cross-hybridization', as a significant contributor to mutagenesis reaction failures. Test oligonucleotides demonstrated control over reaction outcomes. A novel cross-hybridization score, quickly computable for any plasmid and oligonucleotide mixture, directly correlated with yields of deleterious mutagenesis side products. Cross-hybridization was confirmed conclusively by partial incorporation of an oligonucleotide at a predicted cross-hybridization site, and by modification of putative template secondary structure to control cross-hybridization. Even in low concentrations, cross-hybridizing species in mixtures poisoned reactions. These results provide a basis for improved mutagenesis efficiencies and increased diversities of cognate protein libraries.

  4. Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis in Stressed Bacillus subtilis Cells Operates by Mfd-Dependent Mutagenic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marroquín, Martha; Martin, Holly A; Pepper, Amber; Girard, Mary E; Kidman, Amanda A; Vallin, Carmen; Yasbin, Ronald E; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario; Robleto, Eduardo A

    2016-07-05

    In replication-limited cells of Bacillus subtilis, Mfd is mutagenic at highly transcribed regions, even in the absence of bulky DNA lesions. However, the mechanism leading to increased mutagenesis through Mfd remains currently unknown. Here, we report that Mfd may promote mutagenesis in nutritionally stressed B. subtilis cells by coordinating error-prone repair events mediated by UvrA, MutY and PolI. Using a point-mutated gene conferring leucine auxotrophy as a genetic marker, it was found that the absence of UvrA reduced the Leu⁺ revertants and that a second mutation in mfd reduced mutagenesis further. Moreover, the mfd and polA mutants presented low but similar reversion frequencies compared to the parental strain. These results suggest that Mfd promotes mutagenic events that required the participation of NER pathway and PolI. Remarkably, this Mfd-dependent mutagenic pathway was found to be epistatic onto MutY; however, whereas the MutY-dependent Leu⁺ reversions required Mfd, a direct interaction between these proteins was not apparent. In summary, our results support the concept that Mfd promotes mutagenesis in starved B. subtilis cells by coordinating both known and previously unknown Mfd-associated repair pathways. These mutagenic processes bias the production of genetic diversity towards highly transcribed regions in the genome.

  5. BMAA neurotoxicity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianchong; Escala, Wilfredo; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon; Bradley, Walter G; Zhai, R Grace

    2009-01-01

    We report the establishment of an in vivo model using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the toxic effects of L-BMAA. We found that dietary intake of BMAA reduced the lifespan as well as the neurological functions of flies. Furthermore, we have developed an HPLC method to reliably detect both free and protein-bound BMAA in fly tissue extracts.

  6. Cancer in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Héctor; Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer genomics has greatly increased our understanding of the complexity of the genetic and epigenetic changes found in human tumors. Understanding the functional relationships among these elements calls for the use of flexible genetic models. We discuss the use of Drosophila models to study...

  7. Loss of the bloom syndrome helicase increases DNA ligase 4-independent genome rearrangements and tumorigenesis in aging Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ana Maria; Salomon, Robert N; Witsell, Alice; Liepkalns, Justine; Calder, R Brent; Lee, Moonsook; Lundell, Martha; Vijg, Jan; McVey, Mitch

    2011-12-19

    The BLM DNA helicase plays a vital role in maintaining genome stability. Mutations in BLM cause Bloom syndrome, a rare disorder associated with cancer predisposition and premature aging. Humans and mice with blm mutations have increased frequencies of spontaneous mutagenesis, but the molecular basis of this increase is not well understood. In addition, the effect of aging on spontaneous mutagenesis in blm mutants has not been characterized. To address this, we used a lacZ reporter system in wild-type and several mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster to analyze mechanisms of mutagenesis throughout their lifespan. Our data show that Drosophila lacking BLM have an elevated frequency of spontaneous genome rearrangements that increases with age. Although in normal flies most genome rearrangements occur through DNA ligase 4-dependent classical end joining, most rearrangements that accumulate during aging in blm mutants do not require DNA ligase 4, suggesting the influence of an alternative end-joining mechanism. Adult blm mutants also display reduced lifespan and ligase 4-independent enhanced tumorigenesis in mitotically active tissues. These results suggest that Drosophila BLM suppresses error-prone alternative end-joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks that can result in genome instability and tumor formation during aging. In addition, since loss of BLM significantly affects lifespan and tumorigenesis, the data provide a link between error-prone end joining, genome rearrangements, and tumor formation in a model metazoan.

  8. Identification of Novel Regulators of atonal Expression in the Developing Drosophila Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melicharek, David; Shah, Arpit; DiStefano, Ginnene; Gangemi, Andrew J.; Orapallo, Andrew; Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia D.; Marenda, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Atonal is a Drosophila proneural protein required for the proper formation of the R8 photoreceptor cell, the founding photoreceptor cell in the developing retina. Proper expression and refinement of the Atonal protein is essential for the proper formation of the Drosophila adult eye. In vertebrates, expression of transcription factors orthologous to Drosophila Atonal (MATH5/Atoh7, XATH5, and ATH5) and their progressive restriction are also involved in specifying the retinal ganglion cell, the founding neural cell type in the mammalian retina. Thus, identifying factors that are involved in regulating the expression of Atonal during development are important to fully understand how retinal neurogenesis is accomplished. We have performed a chemical mutagenesis screen for autosomal dominant enhancers of a loss-of-function atonal eye phenotype. We report here the identification of five genes required for proper Atonal expression, three of which are novel regulators of Atonal expression in the Drosophila retina. We characterize the role of the daughterless, kismet, and roughened eye genes on atonal transcriptional regulation in the developing retina and show that each gene regulates atonal transcription differently within the context of retinal development. Our results provide additional insights into the regulation of Atonal expression in the developing Drosophila retina. PMID:18832354

  9. The BDGP gene disruption project: Single transposon insertions associated with 40 percent of Drosophila genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellen, Hugo J.; Levis, Robert W.; Liao, Guochun; He, Yuchun; Carlson, Joseph W.; Tsang, Garson; Evans-Holm, Martha; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Schulze, Karen L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2004-01-13

    The Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project (BDGP) strives to disrupt each Drosophila gene by the insertion of a single transposable element. As part of this effort, transposons in more than 30,000 fly strains were localized and analyzed relative to predicted Drosophila gene structures. Approximately 6,300 lines that maximize genomic coverage were selected to be sent to the Bloomington Stock Center for public distribution, bringing the size of the BDGP gene disruption collection to 7,140 lines. It now includes individual lines predicted to disrupt 5,362 of the 13,666 currently annotated Drosophila genes (39 percent). Other lines contain an insertion at least 2 kb from others in the collection and likely mutate additional incompletely annotated or uncharacterized genes and chromosomal regulatory elements. The remaining strains contain insertions likely to disrupt alternative gene promoters or to allow gene mis-expression. The expanded BDGP gene disruption collection provides a public resource that will facilitate the application of Drosophila genetics to diverse biological problems. Finally, the project reveals new insight into how transposons interact with a eukaryotic genome and helps define optimal strategies for using insertional mutagenesis as a genomic tool.

  10. Mechanisms of uv mutagenesis in yeast and E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, C.; Christensen, R.; Christensen, J.R.; O' Brien, T.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments investigating ultraviolet light mutagenesis in either bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or E. coli have led to the following conclusions. First, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers cause most mutations in both organisms; pyrimidine adducts, such as PyC, can account at best for only a small proportion. 86 percent of forward mutations induced at the E. coli lacI locus can be abolished by photoreactivation under conditions which do not alter the level of recA induction. About 75 percent of the forward mutations induced at the CAN1 locus of yeast could be removed by photoreactivation, a value that lies within the range observed previously for the reversion of CYC1 alleles (60 percent - 97 percent). Second, about 10 percent of the lacI forward mutations are untargeted, a smaller fraction than found previously for cycl-91 reversion in yeast. It is not yet clear whether the two species are really different in this respect, of whether the cycl-91 reversion site is a typical of the yeast genome at large. Third, analysis of reversion frequencies of 20 mutant alleles suggests that about 10 to 25 percent of all replication errors produced by mutagenic mechanisms in uv-irradiated yeast involve additions or deletions of base-pairs, indicating that error-prone repair does not just produce substitutions. Last, the REV1 locus in yeast is concerned with the induction of frameshift mutations at some, but not all, genetic sites, just as found previously for substitution mutations. The function of the REV3 gene is more widely, though not universally, required while the function of the RAD6 gene, like that of the recA locus in E. coli, appears to be necessary for all kinds of uv mutagenesis. E coli genes comparable to REV1 and REV3 have not yet been described; conversely, there does not yet appear to be a yeast equivalent of umuC.

  11. Structure-based design of combinatorial mutagenesis libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deeptak; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The development of protein variants with improved properties (thermostability, binding affinity, catalytic activity, etc.) has greatly benefited from the application of high-throughput screens evaluating large, diverse combinatorial libraries. At the same time, since only a very limited portion of sequence space can be experimentally constructed and tested, an attractive possibility is to use computational protein design to focus libraries on a productive portion of the space. We present a general-purpose method, called "Structure-based Optimization of Combinatorial Mutagenesis" (SOCoM), which can optimize arbitrarily large combinatorial mutagenesis libraries directly based on structural energies of their constituents. SOCoM chooses both positions and substitutions, employing a combinatorial optimization framework based on library-averaged energy potentials in order to avoid explicitly modeling every variant in every possible library. In case study applications to green fluorescent protein, β-lactamase, and lipase A, SOCoM optimizes relatively small, focused libraries whose variants achieve energies comparable to or better than previous library design efforts, as well as larger libraries (previously not designable by structure-based methods) whose variants cover greater diversity while still maintaining substantially better energies than would be achieved by representative random library approaches. By allowing the creation of large-scale combinatorial libraries based on structural calculations, SOCoM promises to increase the scope of applicability of computational protein design and improve the hit rate of discovering beneficial variants. While designs presented here focus on variant stability (predicted by total energy), SOCoM can readily incorporate other structure-based assessments, such as the energy gap between alternative conformational or bound states.

  12. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  13. RNA mutagenesis yields highly diverse mRNA libraries for in vitro protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobric Nada

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In protein drug development, in vitro molecular optimization or protein maturation can be used to modify protein properties. One basic approach to protein maturation is the introduction of random DNA mutations into the target gene sequence to produce a library of variants that can be screened for the preferred protein properties. Unfortunately, the capability of this approach has been restricted by deficiencies in the methods currently available for random DNA mutagenesis and library generation. Current DNA based methodologies generally suffer from nucleotide substitution bias that preferentially mutate particular base pairs or show significant bias with respect to transitions or transversions. In this report, we describe a novel RNA-based random mutagenesis strategy that utilizes Qβ replicase to manufacture complex mRNA libraries with a mutational spectrum that is close to the ideal. Results We show that Qβ replicase generates all possible base substitutions with an equivalent preference for mutating A/T or G/C bases and with no significant bias for transitions over transversions. To demonstrate the high diversity that can be sampled from a Qβ replicase-generated mRNA library, the approach was used to evolve the binding affinity of a single domain VNAR shark antibody fragment (12Y-2 against malarial apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 via ribosome display. The binding constant (KD of 12Y-2 was increased by 22-fold following two consecutive but discrete rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The mutagenesis method was also used to alter the substrate specificity of β-lactamase which does not significantly hydrolyse the antibiotic cefotaxime. Two cycles of RNA mutagenesis and selection on increasing concentrations of cefotaxime resulted in mutants with a minimum 10,000-fold increase in resistance, an outcome achieved faster and with fewer overall mutations than in comparable studies using other mutagenesis strategies

  14. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo.

  15. Genomics of Ecological Adaptation in Cactophilic Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Yolanda; Rius, Núria; Delprat, Alejandra; Williford, Anna; Muyas, Francesc; Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Ràmia, Miquel; Egea, Raquel; Negre, Barbara; Mir, Gisela; Camps, Jordi; Moncunill, Valentí; Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J.; Cabrero, Josefa; de Lima, Leonardo G.; Dias, Guilherme B.; Ruiz, Jeronimo C.; Kapusta, Aurélie; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G.; Torrents, David; Camacho, Juan P.; Kuhn, Gustavo C.S.; Feschotte, Cédric; Clark, Andrew G.; Betrán, Esther; Barbadilla, Antonio; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Cactophilic Drosophila species provide a valuable model to study gene–environment interactions and ecological adaptation. Drosophila buzzatii and Drosophila mojavensis are two cactophilic species that belong to the repleta group, but have very different geographical distributions and primary host plants. To investigate the genomic basis of ecological adaptation, we sequenced the genome and developmental transcriptome of D. buzzatii and compared its gene content with that of D. mojavensis and two other noncactophilic Drosophila species in the same subgenus. The newly sequenced D. buzzatii genome (161.5 Mb) comprises 826 scaffolds (>3 kb) and contains 13,657 annotated protein-coding genes. Using RNA sequencing data of five life-stages we found expression of 15,026 genes, 80% protein-coding genes, and 20% noncoding RNA genes. In total, we detected 1,294 genes putatively under positive selection. Interestingly, among genes under positive selection in the D. mojavensis lineage, there is an excess of genes involved in metabolism of heterocyclic compounds that are abundant in Stenocereus cacti and toxic to nonresident Drosophila species. We found 117 orphan genes in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage. In addition, gene duplication analysis identified lineage-specific expanded families with functional annotations associated with proteolysis, zinc ion binding, chitin binding, sensory perception, ethanol tolerance, immunity, physiology, and reproduction. In summary, we identified genetic signatures of adaptation in the shared D. buzzatii–D. mojavensis lineage, and in the two separate D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis lineages. Many of the novel lineage-specific genomic features are promising candidates for explaining the adaptation of these species to their distinct ecological niches. PMID:25552534

  16. Drosophila by the dozen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celniker, Susan E.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2007-07-13

    This year's conference on Drosophila research illustratedwell the current focus of Drosophila genomics on the comprehensiveidentification of functional elements in the genome sequence, includingmRNA transcripts arising from multiple alternative start sites and splicesites, a multiplicity of noncoding transcripts and small RNAs,identification of binding sites for transcription factors, sequenceconservation in related species and sequence variation within species.Resources and technologies for genetics and functional genomics aresteadily being improved, including the building of collections oftransposon insertion mutants and hairpin constructs for RNA interference(RNAi). The conference also highlighted progress in the use of genomicinformation by many laboratories to study diverse aspects of biology andmodels of human disease. Here we will review a few highlights of especialinterest to readers of Genome Biology.

  17. Cell-mediated mutagenesis by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1978-01-01

    The cell-mediated mutation system, with the proper choice of metabolizing cells, can be used to detect the mutagenic activities of different classes of chemical carcinogens. When fibroblastic cells were used as the metabolizing cells, a correlation between the in vivo carcinogenic activity and the in vitro mutagenic activity of 11 aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons was observed. When primary liver cells were used as the metabolizing cells, three known liver carcinogens were demonstrated to be mutagenic by the cell-mediated assay, while two non-carcinogenic analogues were not mutagenic. These results from the cell-mediated system suggest that the reactive intermediates of the carcinogens are stable enough to be transferred from the metabolizing cells to the V79 cells. The cell-mediated mutagenesis system is a simple in vitro assay which may simulate the in vivo situation. It was concluded that this approach could be extended to the co-cultivation of cells from other organs or tissues with mutable mammalian cells.

  18. Symposium on molecular and cellular mechanisms of mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings contain abstracts only of the 21 papers presented at the Sympsoium. The papers dealt with molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cellular responses to chemical and physical mutagenic agents. (ERB)

  19. The Roles of UmuD in Regulating Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaylene N. Ollivierre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available All organisms are subject to DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. DNA damage that is not fully repaired can lead to mutations. Mutagenesis is now understood to be an active process, in part facilitated by lower-fidelity DNA polymerases that replicate DNA in an error-prone manner. Y-family DNA polymerases, found throughout all domains of life, are characterized by their lower fidelity on undamaged DNA and their specialized ability to copy damaged DNA. Two E. coli Y-family DNA polymerases are responsible for copying damaged DNA as well as for mutagenesis. These DNA polymerases interact with different forms of UmuD, a dynamic protein that regulates mutagenesis. The UmuD gene products, regulated by the SOS response, exist in two principal forms: UmuD2, which prevents mutagenesis, and UmuD2′, which facilitates UV-induced mutagenesis. This paper focuses on the multiple conformations of the UmuD gene products and how their protein interactions regulate mutagenesis.

  20. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igboin, Christina O.; Griffen, Ann L.; Leys, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed. PMID:22368770

  1. The Drosophila melanogaster host model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina O. Igboin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious and sometimes fatal outcomes of bacterial infectious diseases are the net result of the interactions between the pathogen and the host, and the genetically tractable fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has emerged as a valuable tool for modeling the pathogen–host interactions of a wide variety of bacteria. These studies have revealed that there is a remarkable conservation of bacterial pathogenesis and host defence mechanisms between higher host organisms and Drosophila. This review presents an in-depth discussion of the Drosophila immune response, the Drosophila killing model, and the use of the model to examine bacterial–host interactions. The recent introduction of the Drosophila model into the oral microbiology field is discussed, specifically the use of the model to examine Porphyromonas gingivalis–host interactions, and finally the potential uses of this powerful model system to further elucidate oral bacterial-host interactions are addressed.

  2. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  3. Augmenting CRISPR applications in Drosophila with tRNA-flanked sgRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Fillip; Bullock, Simon L

    2016-10-01

    We present tRNA-based vectors for producing multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) from a single RNA polymerase II or III transcript in Drosophila. The system, which is based on liberation of sgRNAs by processing flanking tRNAs, permits highly efficient multiplexing of Cas9-based mutagenesis. We also demonstrate that the tRNA-sgRNA system markedly increases the efficacy of conditional gene disruption by Cas9 and can promote editing by the recently discovered RNA-guided endonuclease Cpf1.

  4. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens. [Rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro.

  5. Amino acid substitutions in random mutagenesis libraries: lessons from analyzing 3000 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Frauenkron-Machedjou, Victorine Josiane; Kardashliev, Tsvetan; Ruff, Anna Joëlle; Zhu, Leilei; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-03

    The quality of amino acid substitution patterns in random mutagenesis libraries is decisive for the success in directed evolution campaigns. In this manuscript, we provide a detailed analysis of the amino acid substitutions by analyzing 3000 mutations of three random mutagenesis libraries (1000 mutations each; epPCR with a low-mutation and a high-mutation frequency and SeSaM-Tv P/P) employing lipase A from Bacillus subtilis (bsla). A comparison of the obtained numbers of beneficial variants in the mentioned three random mutagenesis libraries with a site saturation mutagenesis (SSM) (covering the natural diversity at each amino acid position of BSLA) concludes the diversity analysis. Seventy-six percent of the SeSaM-Tv P/P-generated substitutions yield chemically different amino acid substitutions compared to 64% (epPCR-low) and 69% (epPCR-high). Unique substitutions from one amino acid to others are termed distinct amino acid substitutions. In the SeSaM-Tv P/P library, 35% of all theoretical distinct amino acid substitutions were found in the 1000 mutation library compared to 25% (epPCR-low) and 26% (epPCR-high). Thirty-six percent of distinct amino acid substitutions found in SeSaM-Tv P/P were unobtainable by epPCR-low. Comparison with the SSM library showed that epPCR-low covers 15%, epPCR-high 18%, and SeSaM-Tv P/P 21% of obtainable beneficial amino acid positions. In essence, this study provides first insights on the quality of epPCR and SeSaM-Tv P/P libraries in terms of amino acid substitutions, their chemical differences, and the number of obtainable beneficial amino acid positions.

  6. An ENU-mutagenesis screen in the mouse: identification of novel developmental gene functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien Wansleeben

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutagenesis screens in the mouse have been proven useful for the identification of novel gene functions and generation of interesting mutant alleles. Here we describe a phenotype-based screen for recessive mutations affecting embryonic development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were mutagenized with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU and following incrossing the offspring, embryos were analyzed at embryonic day 10.5. Mutant phenotypes that arose in our screen include cardiac and nuchal edema, neural tube defects, situs inversus of the heart, posterior truncation and the absence of limbs and lungs. We isolated amongst others novel mutant alleles for Dll1, Ptprb, Plexin-B2, Fgf10, Wnt3a, Ncx1, Scrib(Scrib, Scribbled homolog [Drosophila] and Sec24b. We found both nonsense alleles leading to severe protein truncations and mutants with single-amino acid substitutions that are informative at a molecular level. Novel findings include an ectopic neural tube in our Dll1 mutant and lung defects in the planar cell polarity mutants for Sec24b and Scrib. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using a forward genetics approach, we have generated a number of novel mutant alleles that are linked to disturbed morphogenesis during development.

  7. Overproduction of Clavulanic Acid by UV Mutagenesis of Streptomyces clavuligerus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Darkhal, Parisa; Hojati, Zohreh; Abedi, Daryoush; Hamedi, Javad; Pourhosein, Meraj

    2010-01-01

    Clavulanic acid is produced industrially by fermentation of Streptomyces clavuligerus and researches have increased its production by strain improvement, recombinant DNA technology, and media composition and growth condition optimization. The main objective of this study was to increase the level of clavulanic acid production from Streptomyces clavuligerus (DSM 738), using UV irradiation. After incubation, the spores and aerial mycelia were scraped off the agar plate by a sterile loop. After passing through a cotton wool, the serially diluted spore suspension was spread on GYM- agar containing caffeine. The plates were irradiated with UV light, wrapped in aluminum foil and incubated. The colonies were sub-cultured again to express the mutations. An aliquot of the spore suspension prepared from the resulted culture was poured in GYM agar plates and incubated. The plates were overlaid with nutrient-agar containing penicillin G and Klebsiela pneumoniae, and incubated. The inhibition zone diameter was measured and compared with the wild type colony. Repeating this procedure, the overproducer mutants were selected. Concentration of clavulanic acid was determined by HPLC analysis. It was concluded that secondary metabolites, mainly antibiotics containing clavulanic acid, were produced about 6–7 days after the growth, and concentration of clavulanic acid was increased up to two-folds after UV mutagenesis. PMID:24363725

  8. Exploring Autophagy in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Lőrincz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a catabolic process in eukaryotic cells promoting bulk or selective degradation of cellular components within lysosomes. In recent decades, several model systems were utilized to dissect the molecular machinery of autophagy and to identify the impact of this cellular “self-eating” process on various physiological and pathological processes. Here we briefly discuss the advantages and limitations of using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a popular model in cell and developmental biology, to apprehend the main pathway of autophagy in a complete animal.

  9. Specification of the somatic musculature in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobi, Krista C; Schulman, Victoria K; Baylies, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    The somatic muscle system formed during Drosophila embryogenesis is required for larvae to hatch, feed, and crawl. This system is replaced in the pupa by a new adult muscle set, responsible for activities such as feeding, walking, and flight. Both the larval and adult muscle systems are comprised of distinct muscle fibers to serve these specific motor functions. In this way, the Drosophila musculature is a valuable model for patterning within a single tissue: while all muscle cells share properties such as the contractile apparatus, properties such as size, position, and number of nuclei are unique for a particular muscle. In the embryo, diversification of muscle fibers relies first on signaling cascades that pattern the mesoderm. Subsequently, the combinatorial expression of specific transcription factors leads muscle fibers to adopt particular sizes, shapes, and orientations. Adult muscle precursors (AMPs), set aside during embryonic development, proliferate during the larval phases and seed the formation of the abdominal, leg, and flight muscles in the adult fly. Adult muscle fibers may either be formed de novo from the fusion of the AMPs, or are created by the binding of AMPs to an existing larval muscle. While less is known about adult muscle specification compared to the larva, expression of specific transcription factors is also important for its diversification. Increasingly, the mechanisms required for the diversification of fly muscle have found parallels in vertebrate systems and mark Drosophila as a robust model system to examine questions about how diverse cell types are generated within an organism.

  10. 2012 MUTAGENESIS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 19-23, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demple, Bruce

    2012-08-23

    The delicate balance among cellular pathways that control mutagenic changes in DNA will be the focus of the 2012 Mutagenesis Gordon Research Conference. Mutagenesis is essential for evolution, while genetic stability maintains cellular functions in all organisms from microbes to metazoans. Different systems handle DNA lesions at various times of the cell cycle and in different places within the nucleus, and inappropriate actions can lead to mutations. While mutation in humans is closely linked to disease, notably cancers, mutational systems can also be beneficial. The conference will highlight topics of beneficial mutagenesis, including full establishment of the immune system, cell survival mechanisms, and evolution and adaptation in microbial systems. Equal prominence will be given to detrimental mutation processes, especially those involved in driving cancer, neurological diseases, premature aging, and other threats to human health. Provisional session titles include Branching Pathways in Mutagenesis; Oxidative Stress and Endogenous DNA Damage; DNA Maintenance Pathways; Recombination, Good and Bad; Problematic DNA Structures; Localized Mutagenesis; Hypermutation in the Microbial World; and Mutation and Disease.

  11. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  12. Improvement of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase enantioselectivity by using mutagenesis targeted to the substrate binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, F; Cambon, E; Dossat-Létisse, V; André, I; Croux, C; Nicaud, J M; Marty, A

    2009-07-06

    Lip2p lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica was shown to be an efficient catalyst for the resolution of 2-bromo-arylacetic acid esters, an important class of chemical intermediates in the pharmaceutical industry. Enantioselectivity of this lipase was improved by site-directed mutagenesis targeted to the substrate binding site. To guide mutagenesis experiments, the three-dimensional model of this lipase was built by homology modelling techniques by using the structures of lipases from Rhizomucor miehei and Thermomyces lanuginosa as templates. On the basis of this structural model, five amino acid residues (T88, V94, D97, V232, V285) that form the hydrophobic substrate binding site of the lipase were selected for site-directed mutagenesis. Position 232 was identified as crucial for the discrimination between enantiomers. Variant V232A displayed an enantioselectivity enhanced by one order of magnitude, whereas variant V232L exhibited a selectivity inversion. To further explore the diversity, position 232 was systematically replaced by the 19 possible amino acids. Screening of this library led to the identification of the V232S variant, which has a tremendously increased E value compared to the parental enzyme for the resolution of 2-bromo-phenylacetic acid ethyl ester (58-fold) and 2-bromo-o-tolylacetic acid ethyl ester (16-fold). In addition to the gain in enantioselectivity, a remarkable increase in velocity was observed (eightfold increase) for both substrates.

  13. A mouse chromosome 4 balancer ENU-mutagenesis screen isolates eleven lethal lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskowitz Ivan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ENU-mutagenesis is a powerful technique to identify genes regulating mammalian development. To functionally annotate the distal region of mouse chromosome 4, we performed an ENU-mutagenesis screen using a balancer chromosome targeted to this region of the genome. Results We isolated 11 lethal lines that map to the region of chromosome 4 between D4Mit117 and D4Mit281. These lines form 10 complementation groups. The majority of lines die during embryonic development between E5.5 and E12.5 and display defects in gastrulation, cardiac development, and craniofacial development. One line displayed postnatal lethality and neurological defects, including ataxia and seizures. Conclusion These eleven mutants allow us to query gene function within the distal region of mouse chromosome 4 and demonstrate that new mouse models of mammalian developmental defects can easily and quickly be generated and mapped with the use of ENU-mutagenesis in combination with balancer chromosomes. The low number of mutations isolated in this screen compared with other balancer chromosome screens indicates that the functions of genes in different regions of the genome vary widely.

  14. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haralalka, Shruti [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Abmayr, Susan M., E-mail: sma@stowers.org [Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 66160 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  15. SUMOylation in Drosophila Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J. Courey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO, an ~90 amino acid ubiquitin-like protein, is highly conserved throughout the eukaryotic domain. Like ubiquitin, SUMO is covalently attached to lysine side chains in a large number of target proteins. In contrast to ubiquitin, SUMO does not have a direct role in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, like ubiquitin, SUMO does modulate protein function in a variety of other ways. This includes effects on protein conformation, subcellular localization, and protein–protein interactions. Significant insight into the in vivo role of SUMOylation has been provided by studies in Drosophila that combine genetic manipulation, proteomic, and biochemical analysis. Such studies have revealed that the SUMO conjugation pathway regulates a wide variety of critical cellular and developmental processes, including chromatin/chromosome function, eggshell patterning, embryonic pattern formation, metamorphosis, larval and pupal development, neurogenesis, development of the innate immune system, and apoptosis. This review discusses our current understanding of the diverse roles for SUMO in Drosophila development.

  16. Sterol requirements in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida de Carvalho, Maria Joao

    2009-01-01

    Sterol is an abundant component of eukaryotic cell membranes and is thought to influence membrane properties such as permeability, fluidity and microdomain formation. Drosophila is an excellent model system in which to study functional requirements for membrane sterol because, although it does not synthesize sterol, it nevertheless requires sterols to complete development. Moreover, Drosophila normally incorporates sterols into cell membranes. Thus, dietary sterol depletion can be used to ...

  17. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Risheng; Li, Manman; Deng, Shengsong; Hu, Huajia; Wang, Huai; Li, Fenghe

    2012-04-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  18. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  19. Mutagenesis of Trichoderma Viride by Ultraviolet and Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚日生; 李曼曼; 邓胜松; 胡华佳; 王淮; 李凤和

    2012-01-01

    Considering the importance of a microbial strain capable of increased cellulase production, a mutant strain UP4 of Trichoderma viride was developed by ultraviolet (UV) and plasma mutation. The mutant produced a 21.0 IU/mL FPase which was 98.1% higher than that of the parent strain Trichoderma viride ZY-1. In addition, the effect of ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis was not merely simple superimposition of single ultraviolet mutation and single plasma mutation. Meanwhile, there appeared a capsule around some of the spores after the ultraviolet and plasma treatment, namely, the spore surface of the strain became fuzzy after ultraviolet or ultraviolet and plasma mutagenesis.

  20. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  1. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. Copyright © 2017 Schwartz and Cavalli.

  2. RNA editing in Drosophila melanogaster: new targets and functionalconsequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2006-09-05

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine in primary mRNA transcripts. These re-coding events affect coding potential, splice-sites, and stability of mature mRNAs. ADAR is an essential gene and studies in mouse, C. elegans, and Drosophila suggest its primary function is to modify adult behavior by altering signaling components in the nervous system. By comparing the sequence of isogenic cDNAs to genomic DNA, we have identified and experimentally verified 27 new targets of Drosophila ADAR. Our analyses lead us to identify new classes of genes whose transcripts are targets of ADAR including components of the actin cytoskeleton, and genes involved in ion homeostasis and signal transduction. Our results indicate that editing in Drosophila increases the diversity of the proteome, and does so in a manner that has direct functional consequences on protein function.

  3. Three-Dimensional Genome Organization and Function in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Yuri B.; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the metazoan genome is used during development and cell differentiation is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. Early studies in Drosophila suggested that three-dimensional (3D) chromosome organization plays important regulatory roles in this process and recent technological advances started to reveal connections at the molecular level. Here we will consider general features of the architectural organization of the Drosophila genome, providing historical perspective and insights from recent work. We will compare the linear and spatial segmentation of the fly genome and focus on the two key regulators of genome architecture: insulator components and Polycomb group proteins. With its unique set of genetic tools and a compact, well annotated genome, Drosophila is poised to remain a model system of choice for rapid progress in understanding principles of genome organization and to serve as a proving ground for development of 3D genome-engineering techniques. PMID:28049701

  4. Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew G; Eisen, Michael B; Smith, Douglas R; Bergman, Casey M; Oliver, Brian; Markow, Therese A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kellis, Manolis; Gelbart, William; Iyer, Venky N; Pollard, Daniel A; Sackton, Timothy B; Larracuente, Amanda M; Singh, Nadia D; Abad, Jose P; Abt, Dawn N; Adryan, Boris; Aguade, Montserrat; Akashi, Hiroshi; Anderson, Wyatt W; Aquadro, Charles F; Ardell, David H; Arguello, Roman; Artieri, Carlo G; Barbash, Daniel A; Barker, Daniel; Barsanti, Paolo; Batterham, Phil; Batzoglou, Serafim; Begun, Dave; Bhutkar, Arjun; Blanco, Enrico; Bosak, Stephanie A; Bradley, Robert K; Brand, Adrianne D; Brent, Michael R; Brooks, Angela N; Brown, Randall H; Butlin, Roger K; Caggese, Corrado; Calvi, Brian R; Bernardo de Carvalho, A; Caspi, Anat; Castrezana, Sergio; Celniker, Susan E; Chang, Jean L; Chapple, Charles; Chatterji, Sourav; Chinwalla, Asif; Civetta, Alberto; Clifton, Sandra W; Comeron, Josep M; Costello, James C; Coyne, Jerry A; Daub, Jennifer; David, Robert G; Delcher, Arthur L; Delehaunty, Kim; Do, Chuong B; Ebling, Heather; Edwards, Kevin; Eickbush, Thomas; Evans, Jay D; Filipski, Alan; Findeiss, Sven; Freyhult, Eva; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Garcia, Ana C L; Gardiner, Anastasia; Garfield, David A; Garvin, Barry E; Gibson, Greg; Gilbert, Don; Gnerre, Sante; Godfrey, Jennifer; Good, Robert; Gotea, Valer; Gravely, Brenton; Greenberg, Anthony J; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Gross, Samuel; Guigo, Roderic; Gustafson, Erik A; Haerty, Wilfried; Hahn, Matthew W; Halligan, Daniel L; Halpern, Aaron L; Halter, Gillian M; Han, Mira V; Heger, Andreas; Hillier, LaDeana; Hinrichs, Angie S; Holmes, Ian; Hoskins, Roger A; Hubisz, Melissa J; Hultmark, Dan; Huntley, Melanie A; Jaffe, David B; Jagadeeshan, Santosh; Jeck, William R; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Corbin D; Jordan, William C; Karpen, Gary H; Kataoka, Eiko; Keightley, Peter D; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kirkness, Ewen F; Koerich, Leonardo B; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kudrna, Dave; Kulathinal, Rob J; Kumar, Sudhir; Kwok, Roberta; Lander, Eric; Langley, Charles H; Lapoint, Richard; Lazzaro, Brian P; Lee, So-Jeong; Levesque, Lisa; Li, Ruiqiang; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lin, Michael F; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Llopart, Ana; Long, Manyuan; Low, Lloyd; Lozovsky, Elena; Lu, Jian; Luo, Meizhong; Machado, Carlos A; Makalowski, Wojciech; Marzo, Mar; Matsuda, Muneo; Matzkin, Luciano; McAllister, Bryant; McBride, Carolyn S; McKernan, Brendan; McKernan, Kevin; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Minx, Patrick; Mollenhauer, Michael U; Montooth, Kristi; Mount, Stephen M; Mu, Xu; Myers, Eugene; Negre, Barbara; Newfeld, Stuart; Nielsen, Rasmus; Noor, Mohamed A F; O'Grady, Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Papaceit, Montserrat; Parisi, Matthew J; Parisi, Michael; Parts, Leopold; Pedersen, Jakob S; Pesole, Graziano; Phillippy, Adam M; Ponting, Chris P; Pop, Mihai; Porcelli, Damiano; Powell, Jeffrey R; Prohaska, Sonja; Pruitt, Kim; Puig, Marta; Quesneville, Hadi; Ram, Kristipati Ravi; Rand, David; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Reed, Laura K; Reenan, Robert; Reily, Amy; Remington, Karin A; Rieger, Tania T; Ritchie, Michael G; Robin, Charles; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Rohde, Claudia; Rozas, Julio; Rubenfield, Marc J; Ruiz, Alfredo; Russo, Susan; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Saranga, David J; Sato, Hajime; Schaeffer, Stephen W; Schatz, Michael C; Schlenke, Todd; Schwartz, Russell; Segarra, Carmen; Singh, Rama S; Sirot, Laura; Sirota, Marina; Sisneros, Nicholas B; Smith, Chris D; Smith, Temple F; Spieth, John; Stage, Deborah E; Stark, Alexander; Stephan, Wolfgang; Strausberg, Robert L; Strempel, Sebastian; Sturgill, David; Sutton, Granger; Sutton, Granger G; Tao, Wei; Teichmann, Sarah; Tobari, Yoshiko N; Tomimura, Yoshihiko; Tsolas, Jason M; Valente, Vera L S; Venter, Eli; Venter, J Craig; Vicario, Saverio; Vieira, Filipe G; Vilella, Albert J; Villasante, Alfredo; Walenz, Brian; Wang, Jun; Wasserman, Marvin; Watts, Thomas; Wilson, Derek; Wilson, Richard K; Wing, Rod A; Wolfner, Mariana F; Wong, Alex; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wu, Chung-I; Wu, Gabriel; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yang, Hsiao-Pei; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Yorke, James A; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Zhang, Peili; Zhang, Yu; Zimin, Aleksey V; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abdouelleil, Amr; Abdulkadir, Jamal; Abebe, Adal; Abera, Brikti; Abreu, Justin; Acer, St Christophe; Aftuck, Lynne; Alexander, Allen; An, Peter; Anderson, Erica; Anderson, Scott; Arachi, Harindra; Azer, Marc; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Bourzgui, Imane; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Channer, Sheridon; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chuda, Lisa; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Costello, Maura; D'Aco, Katie; Daza, Riza; De Haan, Georgius; DeGray, Stuart; DeMaso, Christina; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Erin; Doricent, Missole; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dupes, Alan; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Fisher, Sheila; Foley, Chelsea D; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gadbois, Loryn; Gearin, Gary; Gearin, Christina R; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Grewal, Sharleen; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Henson, Charlotte; Hollinger, Andrew; Honan, Tracey; Huard, Monika D; Hughes, Leanne; Hurhula, Brian; Husby, M Erii; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kashin, Seva; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kisner, Peter; Lance, Krista; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Lennon, Niall; Letendre, Frances; LeVine, Rosie; Lipovsky, Alex; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Shangtao; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lubonja, Rakela; Lui, Annie; MacDonald, Pen; Magnisalis, Vasilia; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McCusker, William; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Meneus, Louis; Mihai, Oana; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Montmayeur, Anna; Mulrain, Leonidas; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Negash, Tamrat; Nguyen, Thu; Nguyen, Nga; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Choe; Norbu, Nyima; Novod, Nathaniel; O'Neill, Barry; Osman, Sahal; Markiewicz, Eva; Oyono, Otero L; Patti, Christopher; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rege, Filip; Reyes, Rebecca; Rise, Cecil; Rogov, Peter; Ross, Keenan; Ryan, Elizabeth; Settipalli, Sampath; Shea, Terry; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Lu; Shih, Diana; Sparrow, Todd; Spaulding, Jessica; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Strader, Christopher; Tesfaye, Senait; Thomson, Talene; Thoulutsang, Yama; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zembek, Lisa; Zhong, Danni; Zimmer, Andrew; Zwirko, Zac; Jaffe, David B; Alvarez, Pablo; Brockman, Will; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, CheeWhye; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kleber, Michael; Mauceli, Evan; MacCallum, Iain

    2007-11-08

    Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.

  5. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2009-03-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, and mammals, demonstrating the evolutionary dynamics of the ribosomal gene regulatory network. We also report a motif present in similar numbers of RPGs among Drosophila species which does not appear to be conserved at the individual RPG gene level. A module-wise stabilizing selection theory is proposed to explain this observation. Overall, our results provide significant insight into the fast-evolving nature of transcriptional regulation in the RPG module.

  6. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity.

  7. The role of Rdl in resistance to phenylpyrazoles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnant, Emily J; Morton, Craig J; Daborn, Phillip J; Lumb, Christopher; Yang, Ying Ting; Ng, Hooi Ling; Parker, Michael W; Batterham, Philip

    2014-11-01

    Extensive use of older generation insecticides may result in pre-existing cross-resistance to new chemical classes acting at the same target site. Phenylpyrazole insecticides block inhibitory neurotransmission in insects via their action on ligand-gated chloride channels (LGCCs). Phenylpyrazoles are broad-spectrum insecticides widely used in agriculture and domestic pest control. So far, all identified cases of target site resistance to phenylpyrazoles are based on mutations in the Rdl (Resistance to dieldrin) LGCC subunit, the major target site for cyclodiene insecticides. We examined the role that mutations in Rdl have on phenylpyrazole resistance in Drosophila melanogaster, exploring naturally occurring variation, and generating predicted resistance mutations by mutagenesis. Natural variation at the Rdl locus in inbred strains of D. melanogaster included gene duplication, and a line containing two Rdl mutations found in a highly resistant line of Drosophila simulans. These mutations had a moderate impact on survival following exposure to two phenylpyrazoles, fipronil and pyriprole. Homology modelling suggested that the Rdl chloride channel pore contains key residues for binding fipronil and pyriprole. Mutagenesis of these sites and assessment of resistance in vivo in transgenic lines showed that amino acid identity at the Ala(301) site influenced resistance levels, with glycine showing greater survival than serine replacement. We confirm that point mutations at the Rdl 301 site provide moderate resistance to phenylpyrazoles in D. melanogaster. We also emphasize the beneficial aspects of testing predicted mutations in a whole organism to validate a candidate gene approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Drosophila chem mutations disrupt epithelial polarity in Drosophila embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Zamudio-Arroyo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila embryogenesis has proven to be an extremely powerful system for developmental gene discovery and characterization. We isolated five new EMS-induced alleles that do not complement the l(3R5G83 lethal line isolated in the Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus screens. We have named this locus chem. Lethality of the new alleles as homozygous zygotic mutants is not completely penetrant, and they have an extended phenocritical period. Like the original allele, a fraction of mutant embryos die with cuticular defects, notably head involution and dorsal closure defects. Embryonic defects are much more extreme in germline clones, where the majority of mutant embryos die during embryogenesis and do not form cuticle, implying a strong chem maternal contribution. chem mutations genetically interact with mutations in cytoskeletal genes (arm and with mutations in the epithelial polarity genes coracle, crumbs, and yurt. chem mutants dorsal open defects are similar to those present in yurt mutants, and, likewise, they have epithelial polarity defects. chem1 and chem3 mutations suppress yurt3, and chem3 mutants suppress crumbs1 mutations. In contrast, chem1 and coracle2 mutations enhance each other. Compared to controls, in chem mutants in embryonic lateral epithelia Crumbs expression is mislocalized and reduced, Coracle is increased and mislocalized basally at embryonic stages 13–14, then reduced at stage 16. Arm expression has a similar pattern but levels are reduced.

  9. Optogenetics in Drosophila Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemensperger, Thomas; Kittel, Robert J; Fiala, André

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable one to target specific neurons with light-sensitive proteins, e.g., ion channels, ion pumps, or enzymes, and to manipulate their physiological state through illumination. Such artificial interference with selected elements of complex neuronal circuits can help to determine causal relationships between neuronal activity and the effect on the functioning of neuronal circuits controlling animal behavior. The advantages of optogenetics can best be exploited in genetically tractable animals whose nervous systems are, on the one hand, small enough in terms of cell numbers and to a certain degree stereotypically organized, such that distinct and identifiable neurons can be targeted reproducibly. On the other hand, the neuronal circuitry and the behavioral repertoire should be complex enough to enable one to address interesting questions. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model organism in this regard. However, the application of optogenetic tools to depolarize or hyperpolarize neurons through light-induced ionic currents has been difficult in adult flies. Only recently, several variants of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) have been introduced that provide sufficient light sensitivity, expression, and stability to depolarize central brain neurons efficiently in adult Drosophila. Here, we focus on the version currently providing highest photostimulation efficiency, ChR2-XXL. We exemplify the use of this optogenetic tool by applying it to a widely used aversive olfactory learning paradigm. Optogenetic activation of a population of dopamine-releasing neurons mimics the reinforcing properties of a punitive electric shock typically used as an unconditioned stimulus. In temporal coincidence with an odor stimulus this artificially induced neuronal activity causes learning of the odor signal, thereby creating a light-induced memory.

  10. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-01-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and [gamma]-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by [gamma]-rays, [alpha]-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than [gamma]-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate [gamma]-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed.

  11. Radiation mutagenesis from molecular and genetic points of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Park, M.S.; Okinaka, R.T.; Jaberaboansari, A.

    1993-02-01

    An important biological effect of ionizing radiation on living organisms is mutation induction. Mutation is also a primary event in the etiology of cancer. The chain events, from induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation to processing of these damages by the cellular repair/replication machinery, that lead to mutation are not well understood. The development of quantitative methods for measuring mutation-induction, such as the HPRT system, in cultured mammalian cells has provided an estimate of the mutagenic effects of x- and {gamma}-rays as wen as of high LET radiation in both rodent and human cells. A major conclusion from these mutagenesis data is that high LET radiation induces mutations more efficiently than g-rays. Molecular analysis of mutations induced by sparsely ionizing radiation have detected major structural alterations at the gene level. Our molecular results based on analysis of human HPRT deficient mutants induced by {gamma}-rays, {alpha}-particles and high energy charged particles indicate that higher LET radiation induce more total and large deletion mutations than {gamma}-rays. Utilizing molecular techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Direct DNA sequencing, mutational spectra induced by ionizing radiation have been compared in different cell systems. Attempts have also been made to determine the mutagenic potential and the nature of mutation induced by low dose rate {gamma}-rays. Defective repair, in the form of either a diminished capability for repair or inaccurate repair, can lead to increased risk of heritable mutations from radiation exposure. Therefore, the effects of DNA repair deficiency on the mutation induction in mammalian cells is reviewed.

  12. Construction of a high-efficiency multi-site-directed mutagenesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Construction of a high-efficiency multi-site-directed mutagenesis. ... applied to hexapeptide gene synthesis and recombinant enterokinase gene ... This method was beneficial to prepare high-quality multibase mutagenesis and also implied ...

  13. What Can a Micronucleus Teach? Learning about Environmental Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Ana R.; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The micronucleus test is widely employed in environmental health research. It can also be an excellent tool for learning important concepts in environmental health. In this article we present an inquiry-based laboratory exercise where students explore several theoretical and practical aspects of environmental mutagenesis employing the micronucleus…

  14. Coupled mutagenesis screens and genetic mapping in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, John F; Frieda, Matthew R; McAdow, Anthony R; Gross, Jason P; Clayton, Chad M; Heyen, Candy K; Johnson, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Forward genetic analysis is one of the principal advantages of the zebrafish model system. However, managing zebrafish mutant lines derived from mutagenesis screens and mapping the corresponding mutations and integrating them into the larger collection of mutations remain arduous tasks. To simplify and focus these endeavors, we developed an approach that facilitates the rapid mapping of new zebrafish mutations as they are generated through mutagenesis screens. We selected a minimal panel of 149 simple sequence length polymorphism markers for a first-pass genome scan in crosses involving C32 and SJD inbred lines. We also conducted a small chemical mutagenesis screen that identified several new mutations affecting zebrafish embryonic melanocyte development. Using our first-pass marker panel in bulked-segregant analysis, we were able to identify the genetic map positions of these mutations as they were isolated in our screen. Rapid mapping of the mutations facilitated stock management, helped direct allelism tests, and should accelerate identification of the affected genes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of coupling mutagenesis screens with genetic mapping. PMID:12663538

  15. OneClick: A Program for Designing Focused Mutagenesis Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Warburton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OneClick is a user-friendly web-based program, developed specifically for quick-and-easy design of focused mutagenesis experiments (e.g., site-directed mutagenesis and saturation mutagenesis. Written in Perl and developed into a web application using CGI programming, OneClick offers a step-by-step experimental design, from mutagenic primer design to analysis of a mutant library. Upon input of a DNA sequence encoding the protein of interest, OneClick designs the mutagenic primers according to user input, e.g., amino acid position to mutate, type of amino acid substitutions (e.g., substitution to a group of amino acids with similar chemical property and type of mutagenic primers. OneClick has incorporated an extensive range of commercially available plasmids and DNA polymerases suitable for focused mutagenesis. Therefore, OneClick also provides information on PCR mixture preparation, thermal cycling condition, expected size of PCR product and agar plate to use during bacterial transformation. Importantly, OneClick also carries out a statistical analysis of the resultant mutant library, information of which is important for selection/screening. OneClick is a unique and invaluable tool in the field of protein engineering, allowing for systematic construction of a mutant library or a protein variant and simplifying molecular biology work. The program will be constantly updated to reflect the rapid development in the fields of molecular biology and protein engineering.

  16. Targeted mutagenesis using CRISPR/Cas in inbred potatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted mutagenesis using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) has been well established in several important crop species, but is in need of improvement in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). For over a century, potatoes have been bred as autotetraploids (2n = 4x = 48), relying on F1 selections and clona...

  17. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  18. The metabolic profile of long-lived Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Pedersen, Simon Metz; Nielsen, Niels Christian

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the age-related changes in the metabolic profile of male Drosophila melanogaster and compared the metabolic profile of flies selected for increased longevity to that of control flies of equal age. We found clear differences in metabolite composition between selection regimes...

  19. MtDNA mutagenesis impairs elimination of mitochondria during erythroid maturation leading to enhanced erythrocyte destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlqvist, K.J.; Leoncini, S.; Pecorelli, A.; Wortmann, S.B.; Ahola, S.; Forsstrom, S.; Guerranti, R.; Felice, C. De; Smeitink, J.; Ciccoli, L.; Hamalainen, R.H.; Suomalainen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic progenitor cells show special sensitivity to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis, which suggests that increased mtDNA mutagenesis could underlie anemias. Here we show that elevated mtDNA mutagenesis in mice with a proof-reading deficient mtDNA polymerase (PolG) leads to incomplete m

  20. Ohgata, the Single Drosophila Ortholog of Human Cereblon, Regulates Insulin Signaling-dependent Organismic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Satoru; Sawamura, Naoya; Voelzmann, André; Broemer, Meike; Asahi, Toru; Hoch, Michael

    2016-11-25

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that is highly conserved in animals and plants. CRBN proteins have been implicated in various biological processes such as development, metabolism, learning, and memory formation, and their impairment has been linked to autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability and cancer. Furthermore, human CRBN was identified as the primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Data on functional analysis of CRBN family members in vivo, however, are still scarce. Here we identify Ohgata (OHGT), the Drosophila ortholog of CRBN, as a regulator of insulin signaling-mediated growth. Using ohgt mutants that we generated by targeted mutagenesis, we show that its loss results in increased body weight and organ size without changes of the body proportions. We demonstrate that ohgt knockdown in the fat body, an organ analogous to mammalian liver and adipose tissue, phenocopies the growth phenotypes. We further show that overgrowth is due to an elevation of insulin signaling in ohgt mutants and to the down-regulation of inhibitory cofactors of circulating Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs), named acid-labile subunit and imaginal morphogenesis protein-late 2. The two inhibitory proteins were previously shown to be components of a heterotrimeric complex with growth-promoting DILP2 and DILP5. Our study reveals OHGT as a novel regulator of insulin-dependent organismic growth in Drosophila.

  1. Compensatory evolution of a precursor messenger RNA secondary structure in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the evolutionary maintenance of a hairpin structure possibly involved in intron processing had been found in intron 1 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) in diverse Drosophila species. In this study, the putative hairpin structure was evaluated systematically in Drosophila melanogaster by elimination of either side of the stem using site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these mutations and the compensatory double mutant on intron splicing efficiency and ADH protein production were assayed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider L2 cells and germ-line transformed adult flies. Mutations that disrupt the putative hairpin structure right upstream of the intron branch point were found to cause a significant reduction in both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. In contrast, the compensatory double mutant that restores the putative hairpin structure was indistinguishable from the WT in both splicing efficiency and ADH level. It was also observed by mutational analysis that a more stable secondary structure (with a longer stem) in this intron decreases both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. Implications for RNA secondary structure and intron evolution are discussed. PMID:12972637

  2. Drosophila models of Alzheimer's disease: advances, limits, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouleau, Sylvina; Tricoire, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) are the two key players involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are associated with amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles respectively, two key hallmarks of the disease. Besides vertebrate models, Drosophila models have been widely used to understand the complex events leading to AD in relation to aging. Drosophila benefits from the low redundancy of the genome which greatly simplifies the analysis of single gene disruption, sophisticated molecular genetic tools, and reduced cost compared to mammals. The aim of this review is to describe the recent advances in modeling AD using fly and to emphasize some limits of these models. Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed some key aspects of the normal function of Appl and Tau, the fly homologues of AβPP and MAPT that may be disrupted during AD. Drosophila models have also been useful to uncover or validate several pathological pathways or susceptibility genes, and have been readily implemented in drug screening pipelines. We discuss some limitations of the current models that may arise from differences in structure of Appl and Tau compared to their human counterparts or from missing AβPP or MAPT protein interactors in flies. The advent of new genome modification technologies should allow the development of more realistic fly models and to better understand the relationship between AD and aging, taking advantage of the fly's short lifespan.

  3. Drosophila models for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marcos; Cagan, Ross L

    2006-02-01

    Drosophila is a model system for cancer research. Investigation with fruit flies has facilitated a number of important recent discoveries in the field: the hippo signaling pathway, which coordinates cell proliferation and death to achieve normal tissue size; 'social' behaviors of cells, including cell competition and apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation, that help ensure normal tissue size; and a growing understanding of how oncogenes and tumor suppressors cooperate to achieve tumor growth and metastasis in situ. In the future, Drosophila models can be extended beyond basic research in the search for human therapeutics.

  4. Structural evidence for the rare tautomer hypothesis of spontaneous mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weina; Hellinga, Homme W.; Beese, Lorena S. (Duke)

    2012-05-10

    Even though high-fidelity polymerases copy DNA with remarkable accuracy, some base-pair mismatches are incorporated at low frequency, leading to spontaneous mutagenesis. Using high-resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis of a DNA polymerase that catalyzes replication in crystals, we observe that a C {center_dot} A mismatch can mimic the shape of cognate base pairs at the site of incorporation. This shape mimicry enables the mismatch to evade the error detection mechanisms of the polymerase, which would normally either prevent mismatch incorporation or promote its nucleolytic excision. Movement of a single proton on one of the mismatched bases alters the hydrogen-bonding pattern such that a base pair forms with an overall shape that is virtually indistinguishable from a canonical, Watson-Crick base pair in double-stranded DNA. These observations provide structural evidence for the rare tautomer hypothesis of spontaneous mutagenesis, a long-standing concept that has been difficult to demonstrate directly.

  5. Selection acts on DNA secondary structures to decrease transcriptional mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Hoede

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA is more subject to mutation than double stranded. During transcription, DNA is transiently single stranded and therefore subject to higher mutagenesis. However, if local intra-strand secondary structures are formed, some bases will be paired and therefore less sensitive to mutation than unpaired bases. Using complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli, we show that local intra-strand secondary structures can, as a consequence, be used to define an index of transcription-driven mutability. At gene level, we show that natural selection has favoured a reduced transcription-driven mutagenesis via the higher than expected frequency of occurrence of intra-strand secondary structures. Such selection is stronger in highly expressed genes and suggests a sequence-dependent way to control mutation rates and a novel form of selection affecting the evolution of synonymous mutations.

  6. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ishida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs, and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9, hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9.

  7. Insertional mutagenesis of an industrial strain of Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarre, C; Schirawski, J; van der Zwet, A; Fitzgerald, G F; van Sinderen, D

    2001-06-12

    Random mutagenesis of an industrial strain of Streptococcus thermophilus was achieved through an adapted version of a two-plasmid system. The mutagenesis strategy is based on random integration of derivatives of the non-replicative (Rep(-)) plasmid pORI19 by means of homologous recombination following a temperature shift that eliminates replication of the temperature-sensitive (Rep(ts)) helper plasmid pVE6007. In this way mutants were generated which were affected in bacteriophage sensitivity or sucrose metabolism. Homologues were identified of a protein related to folate metabolism from a bacteriophage-resistant mutant and of two subunits of an oligopeptide transport system from a mutant deficient in sucrose utilisation.

  8. Targeted mutagenesis in sea urchin embryos using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Sayaka; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered nucleases such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has been reported in various animals. We previously described ZFN-mediated targeted mutagenesis and insertion of reporter genes in sea urchin embryos. In this study, we demonstrate that TALENs can induce mutagenesis at specific genomic loci of sea urchin embryos. Injection of TALEN mRNAs targeting the HpEts transcription factor into fertilized eggs resulted in the impairment of skeletogenesis. Sequence analyses of the mutations showed that deletions and/or insertions occurred at the HpEts target site in the TALEN mRNAs-injected embryos. The results suggest that targeted gene disruption using TALENs is feasible in sea urchin embryos.

  9. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-07-25

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Modeling nucleotide excision repair and its impact on UV-induced mutagenesis during SOS-response in bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, Aleksandr N; Krasavin, Evgeny A; Parkhomenko, Aleksandr Yu; Vasilyeva, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    A model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli bacteria has been developed taking into account the whole sequence of molecular events starting from initial photo-damage and finishing with the fixation of point mutations. The wild-type phenotype bacterial cells are compared with UV-sensitive repair-deficient mutant cells. Attention is mainly paid to excision repair system functioning as regards induced mutagenesis.

  11. Virtual mutagenesis of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 involved in glioblastoma multiforme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ming-dong; SHI Yan-fang; WANG Hong; WANG Jia-liang; MA Wen-bin; WANG Ren-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Background Site A132Arg mutations potentially impair the affinity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) for its substrate isocitrate (ICT),consequently reducing the production of α-ketoglutarate and leading to tumor growth through the induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway.However,given that the roles of other active sites in IDH1 substrate binding remain unclear,we aimed to investigate IDH1 mutation pattern and its influence on enzyme function.Methods Fifteen IDH1 catalytic active site candidates were selected for in silico mutagenesis and protein homology modeling.Binding free energy of the IDH1/ICT complexes with single-site mutations was compared with that of the wild type.The affinity of 10 IDH1 catalytic active sites for the ICT substrate was further calculated.Results The IDH1 active site included seven residues from chain A (A77Thr,A94Ser,A100Arg,A132Arg,A1O9Arg,A275Asp,and A279Asp) and three residues from chain B (B214Thr,B212Lys,and B252Asp) that constituted the substrate ICT-binding site.These residues were located within 0.5 nm of ICT,indicating a potential interaction with the substrate.IDH1 changes of binding free energy (△E) suggested that the A132Arg residue from chain A contributes three hydrogen bonds to the ICT α-carboxyl and β-carboxyl groups,while the other nine residues involved in ICT binding form only one or two hydrogen bonds.Amino acid substitutes at A132Arg,A109Arg,and B212Lys sites,had the greatest effect on enzyme affinity for its substrate.Conclusions Mutations at sites A132Arg,A109Arg,and B212Lys reduced IDH1 affinity for ICT,indicating these active sites may play a central role in substrate binding.Mutations at sites A77Thr,A94Ser,and A275Asp increased the affinity of IDH1 for ICT,which may enhance IDN1 catalytic activity.Mutant IDH1 proteins with higher catalytic activity than the wild-type IDH1 could potentially be used as a novel gene therapy for glioblastoma multiforme.

  12. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  13. Mutagenesis breeding of high echinocandin B producing strain and further titer improvement with culture medium optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shu-Ping; Zhong, Wei; Xia, Chao-Jie; Gu, Ya-Nan; Niu, Kun; Zheng, Yu-Guo; Shen, Yin-Chu

    2015-10-01

    A combination of microbial strain improvement and statistical optimization is investigated to maximize echinocandin B (ECB) production from Aspergillus nidulans ZJB-0817. A classical sequential mutagenesis was studied first by using physical (ultraviolet irradiation at 254 nm) and chemical mutagens (lithium chloride and sodium nitrite). Mutant strain ULN-59 exhibited 2.1-fold increase in ECB production to 1583.1 ± 40.9 mg/L when compared with the parent strain (750.8 ± 32.0 mg/L). This is the first report where mutagenesis is applied in Aspergillus to improve ECB production. Further, fractional factorial design and central composite design were adopted to optimize the culture medium for increasing ECB production by the mutant ULN-59. Results indicated that four culture media including peptone, K2HPO4, mannitol and L-ornithine had significant effects on ECB production. The optimized medium provided another 1.4-fold increase in final ECB concentration to 2285.6 ± 35.6 mg/L compared to the original medium. The results of this study indicated the combined application of a classical mutation and medium optimization can improve effectively ECB production from A. nidulans and could be a promising tool to improve other secondary metabolites production by fungal strains.

  14. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Mutagenesis Using Recombineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Narayanan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones has been demonstrated to facilitate physiologically relevant levels compared to viral and nonviral cDNA vectors. BACs are large enough to transfer intact genes in their native chromosomal setting together with flanking regulatory elements to provide all the signals for correct spatiotemporal gene expression. Until recently, the use of BACs for functional studies has been limited because their large size has inherently presented a major obstacle for introducing modifications using conventional genetic engineering strategies. The development of in vivo homologous recombination strategies based on recombineering in E. coli has helped resolve this problem by enabling facile engineering of high molecular weight BAC DNA without dependence on suitably placed restriction enzymes or cloning steps. These techniques have considerably expanded the possibilities for studying functional genetics using BACs in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Molecular characterization of chemical mutagenesis induced diversity in elite maize germplasm

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    Christov Nikolai K.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three classical breeding Iowa Super Stiff Stalk (SSS inbred lines B37, B73 and B84, one Lancaster inbred Oh43 and mutant lines obtained by chemical mutagenesis followed by mutation breeding as follows: two of B37 and four of Oh43 were selected for molecular characterization. The mutant inbred lines were chosen because in addition to the improved GCA and SCA for grain yield, proven by their predominance in the Bulgarian breeding programs, they showed shifts in the flowering time as compared to the initial inbreds. Molecular markers (micro satellites and other PCR-based DNA markers were used for characterization of maize genotypes and determination of the induced by chemical mutagenesis genetic variability in maize germplasm. The tested nine SSR markers (umc 1001, umclO14, umcl057, umcll81, umcl0lS, umc 1029. umcl003, umc 1033 and umcl035 can discriminate between the initial classical breeding inbred lines and the originating mutant inbreds. Allelic diversity was also studied by PCR amplification with specifically de-signed primers in the coding regions and flanking sequence of two genes: dwarf8 (d&: chromosome 1, 198.5 cM, and indeterminate l (id1; chromosome 1. 175.0 cM. These are considered candidate genes for variation in plant height and/or flowering time, based on mutant phenotypes and chromosomal locations near major QTLs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels were detected in the region flanking the SH2 domain of dwarf8 gene in some of the mutant inbreds as a result of SSCP and sequencing analyses. However, these polymorphisms could not be associated with the observed variations in flowering time. PCR analysis of the promoter region dwarf8 showed a variant fragment of about 1 kb in the inbred line Oh43 that was not present in any other initial and mutant in-bred lines included in the study. PCR amplification of the 5' end of the Id1 coding sequence revealed polymorphic bands in the mutant lines XM535, XM521, XM250-l, XM98-8 and XM85

  16. Biogeography of Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in East and Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Guo Robert; Tsaur, Shun-Chern; Huang, Hsiao-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The causes of high biological diversity in biodiversity hotspots have long been a major subject of study in conservation biology. To investigate this matter, we conducted a phylogeographic study of five Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) species from East and Southeast Asia: Drosophila albomicans Duda, D. formosana Duda, D. immigrans Sturtevant, D. melanogaster Meigen, and D. simulans Sturtevant. We collected 185 samples from 28 localities in eight countries. From each collected individual, we sequenced the autosomal extra sex comb gene (esc) and seven mitochondrial genes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate-reductase dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4), ND4L, tRNA-His, tRNA-Pro, tRNA-Thr, partial ND5, and partial ND6. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum- likelihood and Bayesian methods revealed interesting population structure and identified the existence of two distinct D. formosana lineages (Southeast Asian and Taiwanese populations). Genetic differentiation among groups of D. immigrans suggests the possibility of endemic speciation in Taiwan. In contrast, D. melanogaster remained one extensively large population throughout East and Southeast Asia, including nearby islets. A molecular clock was used to estimate divergence times, which were compared with past geographical events to infer evolutionary scenarios. Our findings suggest that interglacial periods may have caused population isolation, thus enhancing population differentiation more strongly for some of the Drosophila species. The population structure of each Drosophila species in East and Southeast Asia has been influenced by past geographic events.

  17. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanis Missirlis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import, the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage. We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  18. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  19. Directed mutagenesis affects recombination in Azospirillum brasilense nif genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Nunes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the gene transfer/mutagenesis system for Azospirillum brasilense, gene-cartridge mutagenesis was used to replace the nifD gene with the Tn5 kanamycin resistance gene. The construct was transferred to A. brasilense by electrotransformation. Of the 12 colonies isolated using the suicide plasmid pSUP202 as vector, only four did not show vector integration into the chromosome. Nevertheless, all 12 colonies were deficient in acetylene reduction, indicating an Nif- phenotype. Four Nif- mutants were analyzed by Southern blot, using six different probes spanning the nif and Km r genes and the plasmid vector. Apparently, several recombination events occurred in the mutant genomes, probably caused mainly by gene disruption owing to the mutagenesis technique used: resistance gene-cartridge mutagenesis combined with electrotransformation.Com o objetivo de melhorar os sistemas de transferência gênica e mutagênese para Azospirillum brasilense, a técnica de mutagênese através do uso de um gene marcador ("gene-cartridge mutagenesis" foi utilizada para substituir a região genômica de A. brasilense correspondente ao gene nifD por um segmento de DNA do transposon Tn5 contendo o gene que confere resistência ao antibiótico canamicina. A construção foi transferida para a linhagem de A. brasilense por eletrotransformação. Doze colônias transformantes foram isoladas com o plasmídeo suicida pSUP202 servindo como vetor. Dessas, somente quatro não possuíam o vetor integrado no cromossomo da bactéria. Independentemente da integração ou não do vetor, as 12 colônias foram deficientes na redução do gás acetileno, evidenciando o fenótipo Nif -. Quatro mutantes Nif - foram analisados através da técnica de Southern blot, utilizando-se seis diferentes fragmentos contendo genes nif, de resistência à canamicina e do vetor como sondas. Os resultados sugerem a ocorrência de eventos recombinacionais variados no genoma dos mutantes. A

  20. Space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b and screening of higher yielding strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Changting; Liu, Jinyi; Fang, Xiangqun; Xu, Chen; Guo, Yinghua; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the space mutagenesis of genetically engineered bacteria expressing recombinant human interferon α1b. The genetically engineered bacteria expressing the recombinant interferon α1b were sent into outer space on the Chinese Shenzhou VIII spacecraft. After the 17 day space flight, mutant strains that highly expressed the target gene were identified. After a series of screening of spaceflight-treated bacteria and the quantitative comparison of the mutant strains and original strain, we found five strains that showed a significantly higher production of target proteins, compared with the original strain. Our results support the notion that the outer space environment has unique effects on the mutation breeding of microorganisms, including genetically engineered strains. Mutant strains that highly express the target protein could be obtained through spaceflight-induced mutagenesis.

  1. Combination of site-directed mutagenesis and yeast surface display enhances Rhizomucor miehei lipase esterification activity in organic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuang-yan; Zhang, Jun-hui; Han, Zhen-lin; Zheng, Sui-ping; Lin, Ying

    2011-12-01

    To increase the activity of Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML) in organic solvent, multiple sequence alignments and rational site-directed mutagenesis were used to create RML variants. The obtained proteins were surface-displayed on Pichia pastoris by fusion to Flo1p as an anchor protein. The synthetic activity of four variants showed from 1.1- to 5-fold the activity of native lipase in an esterification reaction in heptane with alcohol and caproic acid as substrates. The increase in esterification activity may be attributed to the four mutations changing the flexibility of RML or facilitating the reaction. In conclusion, this method demonstrated that multiple sequence alignments and rational site-directed mutagenesis combined with yeast display technology is a faster and more effective means of obtaining high-efficiency esterification lipase variants compared with previous similar methods.

  2. Random mutagenesis and media optimisation for hyperproduction of cellulase from Bacillus species using proximally analysed Saccharum spontaneum in submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Roheena; Zafar, Wajeeha; Nadeem, Muhammad; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Naz, Shagufta; Syed, Quratulain; Butt, Zahid Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the isolation of novel mutant of Bacillus and optimisation of media for the hyperproduction of cellulase. Cellulase-producing Bacillus PC-BC6 was subjected to physical and chemical mutagenesis to enhance the cellulolytic potential. Later, mutagenesis isolates were screened both qualitatively and quantitatively. Among all the tested isolates, Bacillus N3 yielded maximum (CMCase 1250 IU/mL/min and FPase 629 IU/mL/min) activity. The Bacillus N3 strain exhibited 1.7-fold more enzyme production as compared with the parental strain. Proximate analysis of untreated and pretreated Saccharum spontaneum was carried out to improve cellulase production. Three different media were tested for the production of cellulase, among which M2 medium containing MgSO4, pretreated S. spontaneum, K2HPO4, (NH4)2SO4 and peptone was found to be the best for maximum enzyme production by mutant Bacillus N3.

  3. Molecular cloning of DNA complementary to Drosophila melanogaster alpha-amylase mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, B F; Abukashawa, S; Boer, P H; Hickey, D A

    1987-06-01

    Several lambda clones containing cDNAs from Drosophila melanogaster were identified in a lambda cDNA bank using two different approaches: (i) cross-species hybridization using a mouse amylase cDNA probe, and (ii) probing with a differential probe, generated from Drosophila RNA. An amylase cDNA fragment was used, in turn, for the isolation and characterization of amylase genomic clones. The size of the Drosophila amylase mRNA was estimated at 1650 b. This is comparable with the size of the murine amylase messenger that encodes a protein of similar molecular weight. In Drosophila larvae, amylase mRNA can account for as little as 0.01% of the poly(A)+ RNA under conditions of dietary glucose repression or greater than 1% of poly(A)+ RNA under derepressing dietary conditions.

  4. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérando, H Máté de; Fayolle-Guichard, F; Rudant, L; Millah, S K; Monot, F; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A M

    2016-06-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of putatively improved strains was done by submitting the mutants to toxic levels of inhibitory chemicals or by screening for their tolerance to isopropanol (>35 g/L). Suicide substrates, such as ethyl or methyl bromobutyrate or alcohol dehydrogenase inhibitors like allyl alcohol, were tested and, finally, 36 mutants were isolated. The fermentation profiles of these NTG mutant strains were characterized, and the best performing mutants were used for consecutive rounds of genome shuffling. Screening of strains with further enhancement in isopropanol tolerance at each recursive shuffling step was then used to spot additionally improved strains. Three highly tolerant strains were finally isolated and able to withstand up to 50 g/L isopropanol on plates. Even if increased tolerance to the desired end product was not always accompanied by higher production capabilities, some shuffled strains showed increased solvent titers compared to the parental strains and the original C. beijerinckii DSM 6423. This study confirms the efficiency of genome shuffling to generate improved strains toward a desired phenotype such as alcohol tolerance. This tool also offers the possibility of obtaining improved strains of Clostridium species for which targeted genetic engineering approaches have not been described yet.

  5. Restriction enzyme-free construction of random gene mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Jen C; Entzminger, Kevin C; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2012-02-15

    Directed evolution relies on both random and site-directed mutagenesis of individual genes and regulatory elements to create variants with altered activity profiles for engineering applications. Central to these experiments is the construction of large libraries of related variants. However, a number of technical hurdles continue to limit routine construction of random mutagenesis libraries in Escherichia coli, in particular, inefficiencies during digestion and ligation steps. Here, we report a restriction enzyme-free approach to library generation using megaprimers termed MegAnneal. Target DNA is first exponentially amplified using error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then linearly amplified with a single 3' primer to generate long, randomly mutated, single-stranded megaprimers. These are annealed to single-stranded dUTP-containing template plasmid and extended with T7 polymerase to create a complementary strand, and the resulting termini are ligated with T4 DNA ligase. Using this approach, we are able to reliably generate libraries of approximately 10⁷ colony-forming units (cfu)/μg DNA/transformation in a single day. We have created MegAnneal libraries based on three different single-chain antibodies and identified variants with enhanced expression and ligand-binding affinity. The key advantages of this approach include facile amplification, restriction enzyme-free library generation, and a significantly reduced risk of mutations outside the targeted region and wild-type contamination as compared with current methods.

  6. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of rice and tobacco genomes using Cpf1 from Francisella novicida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Masafumi, Mikami; Kaya, Hidetaka; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems are nowadays applied extensively to effect genome editing in various organisms including plants. CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) is a newly characterized RNA-guided endonuclease that has two distinct features as compared to Cas9. First, Cpf1 utilizes a thymidine-rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) while Cas9 prefers a guanidine-rich PAM. Cpf1 could be used as a sequence-specific nuclease to target AT-rich regions of a genome that Cas9 had difficulty accessing. Second, Cpf1 generates DNA ends with a 5′ overhang, whereas Cas9 creates blunt DNA ends after cleavage. “Sticky” DNA ends should increase the efficiency of insertion of a desired DNA fragment into the Cpf1-cleaved site using complementary DNA ends. Therefore, Cpf1 could be a potent tool for precise genome engineering. To evaluate whether Cpf1 can be applied to plant genome editing, we selected Cpf1 from Francisella novicida (FnCpf1), which recognizes a shorter PAM (TTN) within known Cpf1 proteins, and applied it to targeted mutagenesis in tobacco and rice. Our results show that targeted mutagenesis had occurred in transgenic plants expressing FnCpf1 with crRNA. Deletions of the targeted region were the most frequently observed mutations. Our results demonstrate that FnCpf1 can be applied successfully to genome engineering in plants. PMID:27905529

  7. The effect of chronic alcohol consumption on mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wurmb-Schwark, N; Ringleb, A; Schwark, T; Broese, T; Weirich, S; Schlaefke, D; Wegener, R; Oehmichen, M

    2008-01-01

    The 4977bp deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to accumulate with increasing age in post mitotic tissues. Recently, studies came out detecting this specific alteration also in fast replicating cells, e.g. in blood or skin tissue, often in correlation to specific diseases or -- specifically in skin -- external stressors such as UV radiation. In this study, we investigated mitochondrial mutagenesis in 69 patients with a chronic alcoholic disease and 46 age matched controls with a moderate drinking behavior. Two different fragments, specific for total and for deleted mtDNA (dmtDNA) were amplified in a duplex-PCR. A subsequent fragment analysis was performed and for relative quantification, the quotient of the peak areas of amplification products specific for deleted and total mtDNA was determined. Additionally, a real time PCR was performed to quantify mtDNA copy number. The relative amount of 4977bp deleted mtDNA in alcoholics was significantly increased compared to controls. On the other hand, no difference regarding the mtDNA/nuclear DNA ratio in both investigated groups was detected. Additionally, no age dependence could be found nor in alcoholics, neither in the control group. These findings indicate that mtDNA mutagenesis in blood can be influenced by stressors such as alcohol. Ethanol seems to be a significant factor to alter mitochondrial DNA in blood and might be an additional contributor for the cellular aging process.

  8. The effect of chronic alcohol consumption on mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis in human blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurmb-Schwark, N. von [Institute of Legal Medicine, Christian Albrecht University of Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Str. 12, 24105 Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: nvonwurmb@rechtsmedizin.uni-kiel.de; Ringleb, A.; Schwark, T. [Institute of Legal Medicine, Christian Albrecht University of Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Str. 12, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Broese, T.; Weirich, S.; Schlaefke, D. [Clinic of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Rostock, Gehlsheimer Str. 20, Rostock (Germany); Wegener, R. [Institute of Legal Medicine, St-Georg-Str. 108, University of Rostock, 18055 Rostock (Germany); Oehmichen, M. [Institute of Legal Medicine, Christian Albrecht University of Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Str. 12, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2008-01-01

    The 4977 bp deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is known to accumulate with increasing age in post mitotic tissues. Recently, studies came out detecting this specific alteration also in fast replicating cells, e.g. in blood or skin tissue, often in correlation to specific diseases or - specifically in skin - external stressors such as UV radiation. In this study, we investigated mitochondrial mutagenesis in 69 patients with a chronic alcoholic disease and 46 age matched controls with a moderate drinking behavior. Two different fragments, specific for total and for deleted mtDNA (dmtDNA) were amplified in a duplex-PCR. A subsequent fragment analysis was performed and for relative quantification, the quotient of the peak areas of amplification products specific for deleted and total mtDNA was determined. Additionally, a real time PCR was performed to quantify mtDNA copy number. The relative amount of 4977 bp deleted mtDNA in alcoholics was significantly increased compared to controls. On the other hand, no difference regarding the mtDNA/nuclear DNA ratio in both investigated groups was detected. Additionally, no age dependence could be found nor in alcoholics, neither in the control group. These findings indicate that mtDNA mutagenesis in blood can be influenced by stressors such as alcohol. Ethanol seems to be a significant factor to alter mitochondrial DNA in blood and might be an additional contributor for the cellular aging process.

  9. Positive and purifying selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nadia D; Koerich, Leonardo B; Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Clark, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    Y chromosomes, with their reduced effective population size, lack of recombination, and male-limited transmission, present a unique collection of constraints for the operation of natural selection. Male-limited transmission may greatly increase the efficacy of selection for male-beneficial mutations, but the reduced effective size also inflates the role of random genetic drift. Together, these defining features of the Y chromosome are expected to influence rates and patterns of molecular evolution on the Y as compared with X-linked or autosomal loci. Here, we use sequence data from 11 genes in 9 Drosophila species to gain insight into the efficacy of natural selection on the Drosophila Y relative to the rest of the genome. Drosophila is an ideal system for assessing the consequences of Y-linkage for molecular evolution in part because the gene content of Drosophila Y chromosomes is highly dynamic, with orthologous genes being Y-linked in some species whereas autosomal in others. Our results confirm the expectation that the efficacy of natural selection at weakly selected sites is reduced on the Y chromosome. In contrast, purifying selection on the Y chromosome for strongly deleterious mutations does not appear to be compromised. Finally, we find evidence of recurrent positive selection for 4 of the 11 genes studied here. Our results thus highlight the variable nature of the mode and impact of natural selection on the Drosophila Y chromosome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A mathematical model for apoptotic switch in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziraldo, Riccardo; Ma, Lan

    2015-10-01

    Apoptosis is an evolutionarily-conserved process of autonomous cell death. The molecular switch mechanism underlying the fate decision of apoptosis in mammalian cells has been intensively studied by mathematical modeling. In contrast, the apoptotic switch in invertebrates, with highly conserved signaling proteins and pathway, remains poorly understood mechanistically and calls for theoretical elucidation. In this study, we develop a mathematical model of the apoptosis pathway in Drosophila and compare the switch mechanism to that in mammals. Enumeration of the elementary reactions for the model demonstrates that the molecular interactions among the signaling components are considerably different from their mammalian counterparts. A notable distinction in network organization is that the direct positive feedback from the effector caspase (EC) to the initiator caspase in mammalian pathway is replaced by a double-negative regulation in Drosophila. The model is calibrated by experimental input-output relationship and the simulated trajectories exhibit all-or-none bimodal behavior. Bifurcation diagrams confirm that the model of Drosophila apoptotic switch possesses bistability, a well-recognized feature for an apoptosis system. Since the apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (APAF1) induced irreversible activation of caspase is an essential and beneficial property for the mammalian apoptotic switch, we perform analysis of the bistable caspase activation with respect to the input of DARK protein, the Drosophila homolog of APAF1. Interestingly, this bistable behavior in Drosophila is predicted to be reversible. Further analysis suggests that the mechanism underlying the systems property of reversibility is the double-negative feedback from the EC to the initiator caspase. Using theoretical modeling, our study proposes plausible evolution of the switch mechanism for apoptosis between organisms.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of an acetylcholinesterase gene from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti confers insecticide insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A; Rocheleau, T; ffrench-Constant, R

    1997-11-01

    Insecticide resistance is a serious problem facing the effective control of insect vectors of disease. Insensitive acetylcholinesterase (AChE) confers resistance to organophosphorus (OP) and carbamate insecticides and is a widespread resistance mechanism in vector mosquitoes. Although the point mutations that underlie AChE insensitivity have been described from Drosophila, the Colorado potato beetle, and house flies, no resistance associated mutations have been documented from mosquitoes to date. We are therefore using a cloned acetylcholinesterase gene from the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti as a model in which to perform site directed mutagenesis in order to understand the effects of potential resistance associated mutations. The same resistance associated amino-acid replacements as found in other insects also confer OP and carbamate resistance to the mosquito enzyme. Here we describe the levels of resistance conferred by different combinations of these mutations and the effects of these mutations on the kinetics of the AChE enzyme. Over-expression of these constructs in baculovirus will facilitate purification of each of the mutant enzymes and a more detailed analysis of their associated inhibition kinetics.

  12. Drosophila as a model for antiviral immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Susanna; Valanne; Mika; Rmet

    2010-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used to study numerous biological processes including immune response.Flies are naturally infected with more than twenty RNA viruses making it a valid model organism to study host-pathogen interactions during viral infections.The Drosophila antiviral immunity includes RNA interference,activation of the JAK/STAT and other signaling cascades and other mechanisms such as autophagy and interactions with other microorganisms.Here we review Drosophila as an immunological research model as well as recent advances in the field ofDrosophila antiviral immunity.

  13. Enhanced Specificity and Efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 System with Optimized sgRNA Parameters in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjie Ren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for functional genomic studies in Drosophila melanogaster. However, single-guide RNA (sgRNA parameters affecting the specificity and efficiency of the system in flies are still not clear. Here, we found that off-target effects did not occur in regions of genomic DNA with three or more nucleotide mismatches to sgRNAs. Importantly, we document for a strong positive correlation between mutagenesis efficiency and sgRNA GC content of the six protospacer-adjacent motif-proximal nucleotides (PAMPNs. Furthermore, by injecting well-designed sgRNA plasmids at the optimal concentration we determined, we could efficiently generate mutations in four genes in one step. Finally, we generated null alleles of HP1a using optimized parameters through homology-directed repair and achieved an overall mutagenesis rate significantly higher than previously reported. Our work demonstrates a comprehensive optimization of sgRNA and promises to vastly simplify CRISPR/Cas9 experiments in Drosophila.

  14. Pyrosequencing: applicability for studying DNA damage-induced mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, Irina G; Earley, Lauriel F; Larlee, Kimberly E; Lin, Ying-Chih; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Site-specifically modified DNAs are routinely used in the study of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. These analyses involve the creation of DNA vectors containing a lesion at a pre-determined position, DNA replication, and detection of mutations at the target site. The final step has previously required the isolation of individual DNA clones, hybridization with radioactively labeled probes, and verification of mutations by Sanger sequencing. In the search for an alternative procedure that would allow direct quantification of sequence variants in a mixed population of DNA molecules, we evaluated the applicability of pyrosequencing to site-specific mutagenesis assays. The progeny DNAs were analyzed that originated from replication of N(6) -(deoxy-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-2,6-diamino-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (MeFapy-dG)-containing vectors in primate cells, with the lesion being positioned in the 5'-GCNGG-3' sequence context. Pyrosequencing detected ∼8% G to T transversions and ∼3.5% G to A transitions, a result that was in excellent agreement with frequencies previously measured by the standard procedure (Earley LF et al. [2013]: Chem Res Toxicol 26:1108-1114). However, ∼3.5% G to C transversions and ∼2.0% deletions could not be detected by pyrosequencing. Consistent with these observations, the sensitivity of pyrosequencing for measuring the single deoxynucleotide variants differed depending on the deoxynucleotide identity, and in the given sequence contexts, was determined to be ∼1-2% for A and T and ∼5% for C. Pyrosequencing of other DNA isolates that were obtained following replication of MeFapy-dG-containing vectors in primate cells or Escherichia coli, identified several additional limitations. Collectively, our data demonstrated that pyrosequencing can be used for studying DNA damage-induced mutagenesis as an effective complementary experimental approach to current protocols.

  15. mtDNA Mutagenesis Disrupts Pluripotent Stem Cell Function by Altering Redox Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Ahlqvist, Kati J.; Ellonen, Pekka; Lepistö, Maija; Logan, Angela; Otonkoski, Timo; Murphy, Michael P.; Suomalainen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Summary mtDNA mutagenesis in somatic stem cells leads to their dysfunction and to progeria in mouse. The mechanism was proposed to involve modification of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/redox signaling. We studied the effect of mtDNA mutagenesis on reprogramming and stemness of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and show that PSCs select against specific mtDNA mutations, mimicking germline and promoting mtDNA integrity despite their glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, mtDNA mutagenesis is associate...

  16. Chromatin assembly using Drosophila systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Dmitry V; Levenstein, Mark E

    2002-05-01

    To successfully study chromatin structure and activity in vitro, it is essential to have a chromatin assembly system that will prepare extended nucleosome arrays with highly defined protein content that resemble bulk chromatin isolated from living cell nuclei in terms of periodicity and nucleosome positioning. The Drosophila ATP-dependent chromatin assembly system described in this unit meets these requirements. The end product of the reaction described here has highly periodic extended arrays with physiologic spacing and positioning of the nucleosomes.

  17. Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Andrew G.; Pachter, Lior

    2007-01-01

    Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illumin...

  18. Different baits and bait amendments to attract Drosophila suzukii

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii is a major pest of soft fruits. Baited traps are widely used for monitoring and mass trapping: different commercial baits, different recipes for home-made baits as well as several literature references on attractive compounds are available. In a series of 15 laboratory experiments we compared the attractiveness of different baits for D. suzukii: the commercially available Dros’attract (Biobest Belgium NV) and the Gasser-bait (Biologische Becherfalle für die Kirschessigf...

  19. Kinetic characterization of the sole nonmuscle myosin-2 from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Sellers, James R

    2015-04-01

    Nonmuscle myosin-2 is the primary enzyme complex powering contractility of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the model organism Drosophila. Despite myosin's essential function in fly development and homeostasis, its kinetic features remain elusive. The purpose of this in vitro study is a detailed steady-state and presteady-state kinetic characterization of the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 motor domain. Kinetic features are a slow steady-state ATPase activity, high affinities for F-actin and ADP, and a low duty ratio. Comparative analysis of the overall enzymatic signatures across the nonmuscle myosin-2 complement from model organisms indicates that the Drosophila protein resembles nonmuscle myosin-2s from metazoa rather than protozoa, though modulatory aspects of myosin motor function are distinct. Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is uniquely insensitive toward blebbistatin, a commonly used myosin-2 inhibitor. An in silico modeling approach together with kinetic studies indicate that the nonconsensus amino acid Met466 in the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 active-site loop switch-2 acts as blebbistatin desensitizer. Introduction of the M466I mutation sensitized the protein for blebbistatin, resulting in a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 36.3 ± 4.1 µM. Together, these data show that Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is a bona fide molecular motor and establish an important link between switch-2 and blebbistatin sensitivity.

  20. 'Peer pressure' in larval Drosophila?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewalda, Thomas; Jeske, Ines; Michels, Birgit; Gerber, Bertram

    2014-06-06

    Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on 'peer pressure', that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i) by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii) by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii) by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv) by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  1. Drosophila's view on insect vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Alexander

    2009-01-13

    Within the last 400 million years, insects have radiated into at least a million species, accounting for more than half of all known living organisms: they are the most successful group in the animal kingdom, found in almost all environments of the planet, ranging in body size from a mere 0.1 mm up to half a meter. Their eyes, together with the respective parts of the nervous system dedicated to the processing of visual information, have long been the subject of intense investigation but, with the exception of some very basic reflexes, it is still not possible to link an insect's visual input to its behavioral output. Fortunately for the field, the fruit fly Drosophila is an insect, too. This genetic workhorse holds great promise for the insect vision field, offering the possibility of recording, suppressing or stimulating any single neuron in its nervous system. Here, I shall give a brief synopsis of what we currently know about insect vision, describe the genetic toolset available in Drosophila and give some recent examples of how the application of these tools have furthered our understanding of color and motion vision in Drosophila.

  2. Transcription-associated mutagenesis increases protein sequence diversity more effectively than does random mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunchul Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During transcription, the nontranscribed DNA strand becomes single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, which can form secondary structures. Unpaired bases in the ssDNA are less protected from mutagens and hence experience more mutations than do paired bases. These mutations are called transcription-associated mutations. Transcription-associated mutagenesis is increased under stress and depends on the DNA sequence. Therefore, selection might significantly influence protein-coding sequences in terms of the transcription-associated mutability per transcription event under stress to improve the survival of Escherichia coli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The mutability index (MI was developed by Wright et al. to estimate the relative transcription-associated mutability of bases per transcription event. Using the most stable fold of each ssDNA that have an average length n, MI was defined as (the number of folds in which the base is unpaired/nx(highest -DeltaG of all n folds in which the base is unpaired, where DeltaG is the free energy. The MI values show a significant correlation with mutation data under stress but not with spontaneous mutations in E. coli. Protein sequence diversity is preferred under stress but not under favorable conditions. Therefore, we evaluated the selection pressure on MI in terms of the protein sequence diversity for all the protein-coding sequences in E. coli. The distributions of the MI values were lower at bases that could be substituted with each of the other three bases without affecting the amino acid sequence than at bases that could not be so substituted. Start codons had lower distributions of MI values than did nonstart codons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the majority of protein-coding sequences have evolved to promote protein sequence diversity and to reduce gene knockout under stress. Consequently, transcription-associated mutagenesis increases protein sequence diversity more effectively

  3. TALEN-mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L; Gerard, Robert D; Zhu, Hao

    2014-09-15

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biologic relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked whether these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity, and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5311-21. ©2014 AACR.

  4. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ávila, Ana I; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  5. Mariner-based transposon mutagenesis for Bacteroides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Minoru; Uchida, Keiko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tada, Tomoyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yasutomo, Koji; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides is one of the most predominant groups of human gut microbiota. Recent metagenomic analyses and studies on gnotobiotic mice demonstrated the tight association of Bacteroides with epithelial function, the gut immune system and systemic metabolism in the host. The mariner family transposon shows relatively low target site specificity and has hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Thereby, random mutagenesis using the mariner family transposon is expected to identify key molecules for human-Bacteroides symbiosis. In this study, we constructed the plasmid pMI07 to deliver the gene cassette (ermF/ITR), which harbors the erythromycin resistant marker (ermF) and the inverted repeat sequences (ITRs) recognized by Himar1 transposase, to Bacteroides via electrotransformation. pMI07 successfully delivered ermF/ITR to the Bacteroides genomes and generated thousands of insertion mutants/μg of pMI07 in B. thetaiotaomicron, B. fragilis, B. ovatus, and also, although to a lesser extent, B. vulgatus. Analyses of the ermF/ITR insertion sites in B. thetaiotaomicron and B. vulgatus revealed that the cassette targeted the dinucleotide TA and integrated into the genomes in an unbiased manner. The data reported here will provide useful information for transposon mutagenesis in Bacteroides species, which will enable identification of the genes responsible for their unique phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  7. Heritable site-specific mutagenesis using TALENs in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Si Nian; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Frame, Bronwyn; Briggs, Sarah A; Main, Marcy; Spalding, Martin H; Vollbrecht, Erik; Wang, Kan; Yang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology has been utilized widely for targeted gene mutagenesis, especially for gene inactivation, in many organisms, including agriculturally important plants such as rice, wheat, tomato and barley. This report describes application of this technology to generate heritable genome modifications in maize. TALENs were employed to generate stable, heritable mutations at the maize glossy2 (gl2) locus. Transgenic lines containing mono- or di-allelic mutations were obtained from the maize genotype Hi-II at a frequency of about 10% (nine mutated events in 91 transgenic events). In addition, three of the novel alleles were tested for function in progeny seedlings, where they were able to confer the glossy phenotype. In a majority of the events, the integrated TALEN T-DNA segregated independently from the new loss of function alleles, producing mutated null-segregant progeny in T1 generation. Our results demonstrate that TALENs are an effective tool for genome mutagenesis in maize, empowering the discovery of gene function and the development of trait improvement.

  8. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation by chemical carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Langenbach, R.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies that showed that mutagenesis of mammalian cells can be achieved by carcinogenic polycyclic hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, and aflatoxins when tested in the presence of fibroblasts and hepatocytes which are able to metabolize these carcinogens. Further, we have found that there is a relationship between the degree of mutant induction and the degree of carcinogenicity of the different chemicals tested. By simultaneously measuring the frequency of cell transformation and the frequency of mutation at one locus (ouabain resistance) in the same cell system, it was possible to estimate the genetic target site for cell transformation. The results indicated that the target site for transformation is approximately 20 times larger than that determined for ouabain resistance. The results suggest that cell transformation may be due to a mutational event and the mutation can occur in one out of a small number of the same or different genes, and that the cell-mediated mutagenesis approach may be a valuable means of detecting tissue-specific carcinogens.

  9. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Stumpf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mt

  10. BAX and tumor suppressor TRP53 are important in regulating mutagenesis in spermatogenic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guogang; Vogel, Kristine S; McMahan, C Alex; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2010-12-01

    During the first wave of spermatogenesis, and in response to ionizing radiation, elevated mutant frequencies are reduced to a low level by unidentified mechanisms. Apoptosis is occurring in the same time frame that the mutant frequency declines. We examined the role of apoptosis in regulating mutant frequency during spermatogenesis. Apoptosis and mutant frequencies were determined in spermatogenic cells obtained from Bax-null or Trp53-null mice. The results showed that spermatogenic lineage apoptosis was markedly decreased in Bax-null mice and was accompanied by a significantly increased spontaneous mutant frequency in seminiferous tubule cells compared to that of wild-type mice. Apoptosis profiles in the seminiferous tubules for Trp53-null were similar to control mice. Spontaneous mutant frequencies in pachytene spermatocytes and in round spermatids from Trp53-null mice were not significantly different from those of wild-type mice. However, epididymal spermatozoa from Trp53-null mice displayed a greater spontaneous mutant frequency compared to that from wild-type mice. A greater proportion of spontaneous transversions and a greater proportion of insertions/deletions 15 days after ionizing radiation were observed in Trp53-null mice compared to wild-type mice. Base excision repair activity in mixed germ cell nuclear extracts prepared from Trp53-null mice was significantly lower than that for wild-type controls. These data indicate that BAX-mediated apoptosis plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis in seminiferous tubule cells obtained from neonatal mice, whereas tumor suppressor TRP53 plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis between postmeiotic round spermatid and epididymal spermatozoon stages of spermiogenesis.

  11. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  12. UV-induced mutagenesis of oxidation activity of ferrous ion of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An excellent strain named T. f6 was isolated and screened, the dose and other condition for the UV-induced mutagenesis were studied and the richened positive mutant m+ T. f6 was applied in the column leaching of copper-contain ing sulfides. The results show that T. f6 is characterized by rapid oxidation of ferrous ion and cupric sulfide, high tolerance of toxic ion and short generation time. The best mutagenic effectiveness can be obtained under the dose of low kill rate of UV and low temperature treatment, under which the best richened m+ T. f6 can be shortened 1.4h. It was shown by the column leaching of copper that the leaching rate can be enhanced by at least 11% compared with the original one by the mutants.

  13. Enu mutagenesis identifies a novel platelet phenotype in a loss-of-function Jak2 allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Anderson

    Full Text Available Utilizing ENU mutagenesis, we identified a mutant mouse with elevated platelets. Genetic mapping localized the mutation to an interval on chromosome 19 that encodes the Jak2 tyrosine kinase. We identified a A3056T mutation resulting in a premature stop codon within exon 19 of Jak2 (Jak2(K915X, resulting in a protein truncation and functionally inactive enzyme. This novel platelet phenotype was also observed in mice bearing a hemizygous targeted disruption of the Jak2 locus (Jak2(+/-. Timed pregnancy experiments revealed that Jak2(K915X/K915X and Jak2(-/- displayed embryonic lethality; however, Jak2(K915X/K915X embryos were viable an additional two days compared to Jak2(-/- embryos. Our data suggest that perturbing JAK2 activation may have unexpected consequences in elevation of platelet number and correspondingly, important implications for treatment of hematological disorders with constitutive Jak2 activity.

  14. Drosophila Models of Tauopathies: What Have We Learned?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Gistelinck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein Tau are neuropathological hallmark lesions in Alzheimer's disease (AD and related primary tauopathies. In addition, Tau is genetically implicated in a number of human neurodegenerative disorders including frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Parkinson's disease (PD. The exact mechanism by which Tau exerts its neurotoxicity is incompletely understood. Here, we give an overview of how studies using the genetic model organism Drosophila over the past decade have contributed to the molecular understanding of Tau neurotoxicity. We compare the different available readouts for Tau neurotoxicity in flies and review the molecular pathways in which Tau has been implicated. Finally, we emphasize that the integration of genome-wide approaches in human or mice with high-throughput genetic validation in Drosophila is a fruitful approach.

  15. Chemical mutagenesis--a promising technique to increase metal concentration and extraction in sunflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehnevajova, Erika; Herzig, Rolf; Federer, Guido; Erismann, Karl-Hans; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Since most of the metal-hyperaccumulating wild plants only produce very low biomass and many high-yielding crops accumulate only moderate amounts of metals, the current research is mainly focused on overcoming these limitations and the optimization of metal phytoextraction. The main goal of the present study was the improvement of metal concentration and extraction properties of Helianthus annuus L by chemical mutagenesis (the non-GMO approach). Sunflowers--hybrid cultivar Salut and inbred lines-were treated with the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). The effect of chemical mutagenesis on metal concentration in and extraction by new sunflower M1 and M2 mutants was directly assessed on a metal-contaminated field in Raft, Switzerland. Mutants of the M2 generation showed a 2-3 times higher metal shoot concentration than the control plants. The best M2 sunflower "giant mutant" 14/185/04 showed a significantly enhanced metal extraction ability: 7.5 times for Cd, 9.2 times for Zn, and 8.2 times for Pb in aboveground parts, as compared to the control plants. Theoretical calculations for the phytoextraction potential of new sunflower variants note that the best sunflower mutant can produce up to 26 t dry matter per hectare and remove 13.3 kg Zn per hectare and year at the sewage sludge contaminated site of Raft; that is a gain factor of 9 compared to Zn extraction by sunflower controls. Furthermore, the use of sunflower oil and biomass for technical purposes (lubricants, biodiesel, biogas) should produce an additional value and improve the economical balance of phytoextraction.

  16. Enhancement of the enantioselectivity of carboxylesterase A by structure-based mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Luis F; Reis, Carlos R; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Dekker, Frank J; Dijkstra, Bauke W; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Quax, Wim J

    2012-03-31

    Previously studied Bacillus subtilis carboxylesterases (CesA and CesB) have potential for the kinetic resolution of racemic esters of 1,2-O-isopropylideneglycerol (IPG). CesA exhibits high activity but low enantioselectivity towards IPG-butyrate and IPG-caprylate, while the more enantioselective CesB does not process IPG-butyrate and exhibits several-fold lower activity than CesA towards IPG-caprylate. A sequence and structure comparison allowed us to identify active site residues that may cause the difference in (enantio)selectivities of CesA and CesB towards these IPG esters. This structure-based approach led to the identification of two active site residues in CesA (F166 and F182), as promising candidates for mutagenesis in order to enhance its enantioselectivity. Mutagenesis of positions 166 and 182 in CesA yielded novel variants with enhanced enantioselectivity and without significant loss of catalytic activity. For IPG-butyrate, a CesA double mutant F166V/F182C (ER=13) was generated showing a ∼13-fold increased enantioselectivity as compared to wild-type CesA (E=1). For IPG-caprylate, we designed a CesA double mutant F166V/F182Y (ER=9) displaying a ∼5-fold increased enantioselectivity as compared to the wild-type enzyme (ER=2). These findings, combined with the results of molecular docking experiments, demonstrate the importance of residues at positions 166 and 182 for the enantioselectivity of CesA, and may contribute to the development of efficient biocatalysts.

  17. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Smad4 in gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Haruna; Rust, Alistair G; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2016-04-05

    Mutations in SMAD4 predispose to the development of gastrointestinal cancer, which is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. To identify genes driving gastric cancer (GC) development, we performed a Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen in the stomach of Smad4(+/-) mutant mice. This screen identified 59 candidate GC trunk drivers and a much larger number of candidate GC progression genes. Strikingly, 22 SB-identified trunk drivers are known or candidate cancer genes, whereas four SB-identified trunk drivers, including PTEN, SMAD4, RNF43, and NF1, are known human GC trunk drivers. Similar to human GC, pathway analyses identified WNT, TGF-β, and PI3K-PTEN signaling, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, adherens junctions, and RNA degradation in addition to genes involved in chromatin modification and organization as highly deregulated pathways in GC. Comparative oncogenomic filtering of the complete list of SB-identified genes showed that they are highly enriched for genes mutated in human GC and identified many candidate human GC genes. Finally, by comparing our complete list of SB-identified genes against the list of mutated genes identified in five large-scale human GC sequencing studies, we identified LDL receptor-related protein 1B (LRP1B) as a previously unidentified human candidate GC tumor suppressor gene. In LRP1B, 129 mutations were found in 462 human GC samples sequenced, and LRP1B is one of the top 10 most deleted genes identified in a panel of 3,312 human cancers. SB mutagenesis has, thus, helped to catalog the cooperative molecular mechanisms driving SMAD4-induced GC growth and discover genes with potential clinical importance in human GC.

  18. Silver nanoparticle toxicity in Drosophila: size does matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Gorth

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Deborah J Gorth1, David M Rand2, Thomas J Webster11School of Engineering, 2Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Brown University, Providence, RI, USABackground: Consumer nanotechnology is a growing industry. Silver nanoparticles are the most common nanomaterial added to commercially available products, so understanding the influence that size has on toxicity is integral to the safe use of these new products. This study examined the influence of silver particle size on Drosophila egg development by comparing the toxicity of both nanoscale and conventional-sized silver particles.Methods: The toxicity assays were conducted by exposing Drosophila eggs to particle concentrations ranging from 10 ppm to 100 ppm of silver. Size, chemistry, and agglomeration of the silver particles were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering.Results: This analysis confirmed individual silver particle sizes in the ranges of 20–30 nm, 100 nm, and 500–1200 nm, with similar chemistry. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope data also indicated agglomeration in water, with the transmission electron microscopic images showing individual particles in the correct size range, but the dynamic light scattering z-average sizes of the silver nanoparticles were 782 ± 379 nm for the 20–30 nm silver nanoparticles, 693 ± 114 nm for the 100 nm silver nanoparticles, and 508 ± 32 nm for the 500–1200 nm silver particles. Most importantly, here we show significantly more Drosophila egg toxicity when exposed to larger, nonnanometer silver particles. Upon exposure to silver nanoparticles sized 20–30 nm, Drosophila eggs did not exhibit a statistically significant (P < 0.05 decrease in their likelihood to pupate, but eggs exposed to larger silver particles (500–1200 nm were 91% ± 18% less likely to pupate. Exposure to silver nanoparticles reduced the percentage of pupae able

  19. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...

  20. Establishment of a Counter-selectable Markerless Mutagenesis System in Veillonella atypica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Qi, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    Using an alternative sigma factor ecf3 as target, we successfully established the first markerless mutagenesis system in the Veillonella genus. This system will be a valuable tool for mutagenesis of multiple genes for gene function analysis as well as for gene regulation studies in Veillonella. PMID:25771833

  1. Improving isopropanol tolerance and production of Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423 by random mutagenesis and genome shuffling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Máté De Gérando, H.; Fayolle-Guichard, F.; Rudant, L.; Millah, S.K.; Monot, F.; Ferreira, Nicolas Lopes; López-Contreras, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and genome shuffling was applied to improve solvent tolerance and isopropanol/butanol/ethanol (IBE) production in the strictly anaerobic bacteria Clostridium beijerinckii DSM 6423. Following chemical mutagenesis with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NTG), screening of putat

  2. Characterization of highly efficient heavy-ion mutagenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazama Yusuke

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heavy-ion mutagenesis is recognised as a powerful technology to generate new mutants, especially in higher plants. Heavy-ion beams show high linear energy transfer (LET and thus more effectively induce DNA double-strand breaks than other mutagenic techniques. Previously, we determined the most effective heavy-ion LET (LETmax: 30.0 keV μm-1 for Arabidopsis mutagenesis by analysing the effect of LET on mutation induction. However, the molecular structure of mutated DNA induced by heavy ions with LETmax remains unclear. Knowledge of the structure of mutated DNA will contribute to the effective exploitation of heavy-ion beam mutagenesis. Results Dry Arabidopsis thaliana seeds were irradiated with carbon (C ions with LETmax at a dose of 400 Gy and with LET of 22.5 keV μm-1 at doses of 250 Gy or 450 Gy. The effects on mutation frequency and alteration of DNA structure were compared. To characterise the structure of mutated DNA, we screened the well-characterised mutants elongated hypocotyls (hy and glabrous (gl and identified mutated DNA among the resulting mutants by high-resolution melting curve, PCR and sequencing analyses. The mutation frequency induced by C ions with LETmax was two-fold higher than that with 22.5 keV μm-1 and similar to the mutation frequency previously induced by ethyl methane sulfonate. We identified the structure of 22 mutated DNAs. Over 80% of the mutations caused by C ions with both LETs were base substitutions or deletions/insertions of less than 100 bp. The other mutations involved large rearrangements. Conclusions The C ions with LETmax showed high mutation efficiency and predominantly induced base substitutions or small deletions/insertions, most of which were null mutations. These small alterations can be determined by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP detection systems. Therefore, C ions with LETmax might be useful as a highly efficient reverse genetic system in conjunction with SNP detection

  3. Exploration of the Drosophila buzzatii transposable element content suggests underestimation of repeats in Drosophila genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Nuria; Guillén, Yolanda; Delprat, Alejandra; Kapusta, Aurélie; Feschotte, Cédric; Ruiz, Alfredo

    2016-05-10

    Many new Drosophila genomes have been sequenced in recent years using new-generation sequencing platforms and assembly methods. Transposable elements (TEs), being repetitive sequences, are often misassembled, especially in the genomes sequenced with short reads. Consequently, the mobile fraction of many of the new genomes has not been analyzed in detail or compared with that of other genomes sequenced with different methods, which could shed light into the understanding of genome and TE evolution. Here we compare the TE content of three genomes: D. buzzatii st-1, j-19, and D. mojavensis. We have sequenced a new D. buzzatii genome (j-19) that complements the D. buzzatii reference genome (st-1) already published, and compared their TE contents with that of D. mojavensis. We found an underestimation of TE sequences in Drosophila genus NGS-genomes when compared to Sanger-genomes. To be able to compare genomes sequenced with different technologies, we developed a coverage-based method and applied it to the D. buzzatii st-1 and j-19 genome. Between 10.85 and 11.16 % of the D. buzzatii st-1 genome is made up of TEs, between 7 and 7,5 % of D. buzzatii j-19 genome, while TEs represent 15.35 % of the D. mojavensis genome. Helitrons are the most abundant order in the three genomes. TEs in D. buzzatii are less abundant than in D. mojavensis, as expected according to the genome size and TE content positive correlation. However, TEs alone do not explain the genome size difference. TEs accumulate in the dot chromosomes and proximal regions of D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis chromosomes. We also report a significantly higher TE density in D. buzzatii and D. mojavensis X chromosomes, which is not expected under the current models. Our easy-to-use correction method allowed us to identify recently active families in D. buzzatii st-1 belonging to the LTR-retrotransposon superfamily Gypsy.

  4. p21-ras effector domain mutants constructed by "cassette" mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, J C; Vass, W C; Willumsen, B M;

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutations encoding single-amino-acid substitutions within the v-rasH effector domain were constructed, and the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells was studied. The mutations, which spanned codons 32 to 40, were made by a "cassette" mutagenesis...... technique that involved replacing this portion of the v-rasH effector domain with a linker carrying two BspMI sites in opposite orientations. Since BspMI cleaves outside its recognition sequence, BspMI digestion of the plasmid completely removed the linker, creating a double-stranded gap whose missing ras...... sequences were reconstructed as an oligonucleotide cassette. Based upon the ability of the mutants to induce focal transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, a range of phenotypes from virtually full activity to none (null mutants) was seen. Three classes of codons were present in this segment: one which could...

  5. Role of Nicotinamide in DNA Damage, Mutagenesis, and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devita Surjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide is a water-soluble amide form of niacin (nicotinic acid or vitamin B3. Both niacin and nicotinamide are widely available in plant and animal foods, and niacin can also be endogenously synthesized in the liver from dietary tryptophan. Nicotinamide is also commercially available in vitamin supplements and in a range of cosmetic, hair, and skin preparations. Nicotinamide is the primary precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+, an essential coenzyme in ATP production and the sole substrate of the nuclear enzyme poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have clearly shown that PARP-1 and NAD+ status influence cellular responses to genotoxicity which can lead to mutagenesis and cancer formation. This paper will examine the role of nicotinamide in the protection from carcinogenesis, DNA repair, and maintenance of genomic stability.

  6. Mouse Mutagenesis Using N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinger, Andrew P; Justice, Monica J

    2008-04-01

    INTRODUCTIONThis protocol describes chemical mutagenesis of male mice using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), which is the most efficient method for obtaining mouse mutations in phenotype-driven screens. A fractionated dose of ENU, an alkylating agent, can produce a mutation rate as high as 1.5 × 10(-3) in male mouse spermatogonial stem cells. Treatment with ENU produces point mutations that provide a unique mutant resource: They reflect the consequences of single gene changes independent of position effects, provide a fine structure dissection of protein function, display a range of mutant effects from complete or partial loss of function to exaggerated function, and discover gene functions in an unbiased manner. After treatment with ENU, mice are mated in genetic screens designed to uncover mutations of interest. Screens for dominant, recessive, and modifying mutations can be performed.

  7. Quantitative studies of the mutagenesis of Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferkorn, E.R.; Pfefferkorn, L.C.

    1979-06-01

    The induction of mutants resistant to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUDR) was used to measure the efficiency of various physical and chemical mutagens on extracellular and intracellular Toxoplasma gondii. The frequency of resistant mutant was measured by plaque assay in human fibroblast cultures in the presence and absence of FUDR. When considered as a function of lethality, the most efficient mutagenesis was obtained with nitrosoguanidine treatment of extracellular parasites and with ethylmethane sulfonate treatment of actively growing intracellular parasites. Each of these treatments increased the frequency of FUDR-resistant mutants from less than one to more than 200 per million parasites. Ultraviolet irradiation, X-rays, and the alkylating mustard ICR-191 also induced FUDR-resistant mutants in a dose-dependent fashion.

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junping; Wang, Genhong; Ma, Sanyuan; Xie, Xiaodong; Wu, Xiangwei; Zhang, Xingtan; Wu, Yuqian; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing is one of the most powerful tools for revealing gene function and improving crop plants. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as a powerful and efficient tool for genome editing in various organisms. Here, we report genome editing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Two genes, NtPDS and NtPDR6, were used for targeted mutagenesis. First, we examined the transient genome editing activity of this system in tobacco protoplasts, insertion and deletion (indel) mutations were observed with frequencies of 16.2-20.3% after transfecting guide RNA (gRNA) and the nuclease Cas9 in tobacco protoplasts. The two genes were also mutated using multiplexing gRNA at a time. Additionally, targeted deletions and inversions of a 1.8-kb fragment between two target sites in the NtPDS locus were demonstrated, while indel mutations were also detected at both the sites. Second, we obtained transgenic tobacco plants with NtPDS and NtPDR6 mutations induced by Cas9/gRNA. The mutation percentage was 81.8% for NtPDS gRNA4 and 87.5% for NtPDR6 gRNA2. Obvious phenotypes were observed, etiolated leaves for the psd mutant and more branches for the pdr6 mutant, indicating that highly efficient biallelic mutations occurred in both transgenic lines. No significant off-target mutations were obtained. Our results show that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a useful tool for targeted mutagenesis of the tobacco genome.

  9. Quantitative analysis of bristle number in Drosophila mutants identifies genes involved in neural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norga, Koenraad K.; Gurganus, Marjorie C.; Dilda, Christy L.; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Lyman, Richard F.; Patel, Prajal H.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Mackay, Trudy F.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The identification of the function of all genes that contribute to specific biological processes and complex traits is one of the major challenges in the postgenomic era. One approach is to employ forward genetic screens in genetically tractable model organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, P element-mediated insertional mutagenesis is a versatile tool for the dissection of molecular pathways, and there is an ongoing effort to tag every gene with a P element insertion. However, the vast majority of P element insertion lines are viable and fertile as homozygotes and do not exhibit obvious phenotypic defects, perhaps because of the tendency for P elements to insert 5' of transcription units. Quantitative genetic analysis of subtle effects of P element mutations that have been induced in an isogenic background may be a highly efficient method for functional genome annotation. RESULTS: Here, we have tested the efficacy of this strategy by assessing the extent to which screening for quantitative effects of P elements on sensory bristle number can identify genes affecting neural development. We find that such quantitative screens uncover an unusually large number of genes that are known to function in neural development, as well as genes with yet uncharacterized effects on neural development, and novel loci. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings establish the use of quantitative trait analysis for functional genome annotation through forward genetics. Similar analyses of quantitative effects of P element insertions will facilitate our understanding of the genes affecting many other complex traits in Drosophila.

  10. The effect of engineered disulfide bonds on the stability of Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamouroux Lucille

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Acetylcholinesterase is irreversibly inhibited by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides allowing its use in biosensors for detection of these insecticides. Drosophila acetylcholinesterase is the most sensitive enzyme known and has been improved by in vitro mutagenesis. However, its stability has to be improved for extensive utilization. Results To create a disulfide bond that could increase the stability of the Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase, we selected seven positions taking into account first the distance between Cβ of two residues, in which newly introduced cysteines will form the new disulfide bond and second the conservation of the residues in the cholinesterase family. Most disulfide bonds tested did not increase and even decreased the stability of the protein. However, one engineered disulfide bridge, I327C/D375C showed significant stability increase toward denaturation by temperature (170 fold at 50°C, urea, organic solvent and provided resistance to protease degradation. The new disulfide bridge links the N-terminal domain (first 356 aa to the C-terminal domain. The quantities produced by this mutant were the same as in wild-type flies. Conclusion Addition of a disulfide bridge may either stabilize or unstabilize proteins. One bond out of the 7 tested provided significant stabilisation.

  11. [A Simple and Efficient Method of Inducing Targeted Deletions in the Drosophila Genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, O I; Mikhailov, V S; Savitsky, M Yu

    2015-11-01

    Deletion mutagenesis is one of the most efficient approaches to studying gene function. However, conventional methods of inducing targeted mutations in the drosophila genome are time- and labor-consuming. This work proposes a new, simple, and effective method of producing drosophila mutants with gene deletions. The method involves the insertion of I-Scel and I-CreI recognition sites and a fragment homologous to the target sequence into the chromosome region of interest by means of an attB-containing construct, the induction of double-strand DNA breaks by the appropriate meganuclease, and their repair by homologous recombination. The procedure results in a deletion extending from the attP-site to the target locus. A cassette was designed to enable single-step construct production for the deletion of any given genomic region. A set of markers facilitates the selection of recombination events. The efficacy of the proposed technique was confirmed by the induction of a 47-kb deletion containing the qtc gene.

  12. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A. Apostolopoulou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances.

  13. Transcriptomic Response of Drosophila Melanogaster Pupae Developed in Hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Hateley, Shannon; Bhardwaj, Shilpa R.; Pachter, Lior; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The metamorphosis of Drosophila is evolutionarily adapted to Earth's gravity, and is a tightly regulated process. Deviation from 1g to microgravity or hypergravity can influence metamorphosis, and alter associated gene expression. Understanding the relationship between an altered gravity environment and developmental processes is important for NASA's space travel goals. In the present study, 20 female and 20 male synchronized (Canton S, 2 to 3day old) flies were allowed to lay eggs while being maintained in a hypergravity environment (3g). Centrifugation was briefly stopped to discard the parent flies after 24hrs of egg laying, and then immediately continued until the eggs developed into P6-staged pupae (25 - 43 hours after pupation initiation). Post hypergravity exposure, P6-staged pupae were collected, total RNA was extracted using Qiagen RNeasy mini kits. We used RNA-Seq and qRT-PCR techniques to profile global transcriptomic changes in early pupae exposed to chronic hypergravity. During the pupal stage, Drosophila relies upon gravitational cues for proper development. Assessing gene expression changes in the pupa under altered gravity conditions helps highlight gravity dependent genetic pathways. A robust transcriptional response was observed in hypergravity-exposed pupae compared to controls, with 1,513 genes showing a significant (q Drosophila pupae in response to hypergravity.

  14. A drosophila full-length cDNA resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, Mark; Carlson, Joseph; Brokstein, Peter; Yu, Charles; Champe, Mark; George, Reed; Guarin, Hannibal; Kronmiller, Brent; Pacleb, Joanne; Park, Soo; Rubin, Gerald M.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2003-05-09

    Background: A collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs is an important resource both for functional genomics studies and for the determination of the intron-exon structure of genes. Providing this resource to the Drosophila melanogaster research community has been a long-term goal of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. We have previously described the Drosophila Gene Collection (DGC), a set of putative full-length cDNAs that was produced by generating and analyzing over 250,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a variety of tissues and developmental stages. Results: We have generated high-quality full-insert sequence for 8,921 clones in the DGC. We compared the sequence of these clones to the annotated Release 3 genomic sequence, and identified more than 5,300 cDNAs that contain a complete and accurate protein-coding sequence. This corresponds to at least one splice form for 40 percent of the predicted D. melanogaster genes. We also identified potential new cases of RNA editing. Conclusions: We show that comparison of cDNA sequences to a high-quality annotated genomic sequence is an effective approach to identifying and eliminating defective clones from a cDNA collection and ensure its utility for experimentation. Clones were eliminated either because they carry single nucleotide discrepancies, which most probably result from reverse transcriptase errors, or because they are truncated and contain only part of the protein-coding sequence.

  15. Drosophila Adaptation to Viral Infection through Defensive Symbiont Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Vitor G.; Magalhães, Sara; Paulo, Tânia F.; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial symbionts can modulate host interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. Such interactions may affect the evolutionary trajectories of both host and symbiont. Wolbachia protects Drosophila melanogaster against several viral infections and the strength of the protection varies between variants of this endosymbiont. Since Wolbachia is maternally transmitted, its fitness depends on the fitness of its host. Therefore, Wolbachia populations may be under selection when Drosophila is subjected to viral infection. Here we show that in D. melanogaster populations selected for increased survival upon infection with Drosophila C virus there is a strong selection coefficient for specific Wolbachia variants, leading to their fixation. Flies carrying these selected Wolbachia variants have higher survival and fertility upon viral infection when compared to flies with the other variants. These findings demonstrate how the interaction of a host with pathogens shapes the genetic composition of symbiont populations. Furthermore, host adaptation can result from the evolution of its symbionts, with host and symbiont functioning as a single evolutionary unit. PMID:27684942

  16. Tropics accelerate the evolution of hybrid male sterility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukilevich, Roman

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms that facilitate speciation and explain global patterns of species diversity has remained a challenge for decades. The most general pattern of species biodiversity is the latitudinal gradient, whereby species richness increases toward the tropics. Although such a global pattern probably has a multitude of causes, recent attention has focused on the hypothesis that speciation and the evolution of reproductive isolation occur faster in the tropics. Here, I tested this prediction using a dataset on premating and postzygotic isolation between recently diverged Drosophila species. Results showed that while the evolution of premating isolation was not greater between tropical Drosophila relative to nontropical species, postzygotic isolation evolved faster in the tropics. In particular, hybrid male sterility was much greater among tropical Drosophila compared to nontropical species pairs of similar genetic age. Several testable explanations for the novel pattern are discussed, including greater role for sterility-inducing bacterial endosymbionts in the tropics and more intense sperm-sperm competition or sperm-egg sexual conflict in the tropics. The results imply that processes of speciation in the tropics may evolve at different rates or may even be somewhat different from those at higher latitudes.

  17. The Immune Phenotype of Three Drosophila Leukemia Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrul Arefin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many leukemia patients suffer from dysregulation of their immune system, making them more susceptible to infections and leading to general weakening (cachexia. Both adaptive and innate immunity are affected. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has an innate immune system, including cells of the myeloid lineage (hemocytes. To study Drosophila immunity and physiology during leukemia, we established three models by driving expression of a dominant-active version of the Ras oncogene (RasV12 alone or combined with knockdowns of tumor suppressors in Drosophila hemocytes. Our results show that phagocytosis, hemocyte migration to wound sites, wound sealing, and survival upon bacterial infection of leukemic lines are similar to wild type. We find that in all leukemic models the two major immune pathways (Toll and Imd are dysregulated. Toll–dependent signaling is activated to comparable extents as after wounding wild-type larvae, leading to a proinflammatory status. In contrast, Imd signaling is suppressed. Finally, we notice that adult tissue formation is blocked and degradation of cell masses during metamorphosis of leukemic lines, which is akin to the state of cancer-dependent cachexia. To further analyze the immune competence of leukemic lines, we used a natural infection model that involves insect-pathogenic nematodes. We identified two leukemic lines that were sensitive to nematode infections. Further characterization demonstrates that despite the absence of behavioral abnormalities at the larval stage, leukemic larvae show reduced locomotion in the presence of nematodes. Taken together, this work establishes new Drosophila models to study the physiological, immunological, and behavioral consequences of various forms of leukemia.

  18. Adaptation of A-to-I RNA editing in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuange Duan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I editing is hypothesized to facilitate adaptive evolution by expanding proteomic diversity through an epigenetic approach. However, it is challenging to provide evidences to support this hypothesis at the whole editome level. In this study, we systematically characterized 2,114 A-to-I RNA editing sites in female and male brains of D. melanogaster, and nearly half of these sites had events evolutionarily conserved across Drosophila species. We detected strong signatures of positive selection on the nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains, and the beneficial editing sites were significantly enriched in genes related to chemical and electrical neurotransmission. The signal of adaptation was even more pronounced for the editing sites located in X chromosome or for those commonly observed across Drosophila species. We identified a set of gene candidates (termed "PSEB" genes that had nonsynonymous editing events favored by natural selection. We presented evidence that editing preferentially increased mutation sequence space of evolutionarily conserved genes, which supported the adaptive evolution hypothesis of editing. We found prevalent nonsynonymous editing sites that were favored by natural selection in female and male adults from five strains of D. melanogaster. We showed that temperature played a more important role than gender effect in shaping the editing levels, although the effect of temperature is relatively weaker compared to that of species effect. We also explored the relevant factors that shape the selective patterns of the global editomes. Altogether we demonstrated that abundant nonsynonymous editing sites in Drosophila brains were adaptive and maintained by natural selection during evolution. Our results shed new light on the evolutionary principles and functional consequences of RNA editing.

  19. Fungal diversity associated with Hawaiian Drosophila host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S Ort

    Full Text Available Hawaiian Drosophila depend primarily, sometimes exclusively, on specific host plants for oviposition and larval development, and most specialize further on a particular decomposing part of that plant. Differences in fungal community between host plants and substrate types may establish the basis for host specificity in Hawaiian Drosophila. Fungi mediate decomposition, releasing plant micronutrients and volatiles that can indicate high quality substrates and serve as cues to stimulate oviposition. This study addresses major gaps in our knowledge by providing the first culture-free, DNA-based survey of fungal diversity associated with four ecologically important tree genera in the Hawaiian Islands. Three genera, Cheirodendron, Clermontia, and Pisonia, are important host plants for Drosophila. The fourth, Acacia, is not an important drosophilid host but is a dominant forest tree. We sampled fresh and rotting leaves from all four taxa, plus rotting stems from Clermontia and Pisonia. Based on sequences from the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rDNA gene, we identified by BLAST search representatives from 113 genera in 13 fungal classes. A total of 160 operational taxonomic units, defined on the basis of ≥97% genetic similarity, were identified in these samples, but sampling curves show this is an underestimate of the total fungal diversity present on these substrates. Shannon diversity indices ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 among the Hawaiian samples, a slight reduction compared to continental surveys. We detected very little sharing of fungal taxa among the substrates, and tests of community composition confirmed that the structure of the fungal community differed significantly among the substrates and host plants. Based on these results, we hypothesize that fungal community structure plays a central role in the establishment of host preference in the Hawaiian Drosophila radiation.

  20. Faster-X Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Richard P.; Malone, John H.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequences on X chromosomes often have a faster rate of evolution when compared to similar loci on the autosomes, and well articulated models provide reasons why the X-linked mode of inheritance may be responsible for the faster evolution of X-linked genes. We analyzed microarray and RNA–seq data collected from females and males of six Drosophila species and found that the expression levels of X-linked genes also diverge faster than autosomal gene expression, similar to the “faster-X” effect often observed in DNA sequence evolution. Faster-X evolution of gene expression was recently described in mammals, but it was limited to the evolutionary lineages shortly following the creation of the therian X chromosome. In contrast, we detect a faster-X effect along both deep lineages and those on the tips of the Drosophila phylogeny. In Drosophila males, the dosage compensation complex (DCC) binds the X chromosome, creating a unique chromatin environment that promotes the hyper-expression of X-linked genes. We find that DCC binding, chromatin environment, and breadth of expression are all predictive of the rate of gene expression evolution. In addition, estimates of the intraspecific genetic polymorphism underlying gene expression variation suggest that X-linked expression levels are not under relaxed selective constraints. We therefore hypothesize that the faster-X evolution of gene expression is the result of the adaptive fixation of beneficial mutations at X-linked loci that change expression level in cis. This adaptive faster-X evolution of gene expression is limited to genes that are narrowly expressed in a single tissue, suggesting that relaxed pleiotropic constraints permit a faster response to selection. Finally, we present a conceptional framework to explain faster-X expression evolution, and we use this framework to examine differences in the faster-X effect between Drosophila and mammals. PMID:23071459

  1. Mutation of C/EBPalpha predisposes to the development of myeloid leukemia in a retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasemann, Marie S; Damgaard, Inge; Schuster, Mikkel B;

    2008-01-01

    and incomplete penetrance, suggesting that accumulation of secondary mutations is necessary for disease progression. Here, we use SRS19-6-driven retroviral insertional mutagenesis to compare the phenotypes of leukemias arising in Cebpa(+/+), Cebpa(+/BRM2), and Cebpa(BRM2/BRM2) mice, with respect to disease type......, latency of tumor development, and identity of the retroviral insertion sites (RISs). Both Cebpa(+/BRM2) and Cebpa(BRM2/BRM2) mice preferentially develop myeloid leukemias, but with differing latencies, thereby demonstrating the importance of gene dosage. Determination of RISs led to the identification...

  2. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  3. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne O. Miles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  4. Drosophila Cajal bodies: accessories not included

    OpenAIRE

    Matera, A. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear sites of small ribonucleoprotein (RNP) remodeling and maturation. A recent study describes the discovery of the Drosophila Cajal body, revealing some interesting insights into the subnuclear organization of RNA processing machineries among different species.

  5. Behavioral modification in choice process of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Shunpeng; (王顺鹏); TANG; Shiming; (唐世明); LI; Yan; (李; 岩); GUO; Aike; (郭爱克)

    2003-01-01

    In visual operant conditioning of Drosophila at the flight simulator, only motor output of flies--yaw torque--is recorded, which is involved in the conditioning process. The current study used a newly-designed data analysis method to study the torque distribution of Drosophila. Modification of torque distribution represents the effects of operant conditioning on flies' behavioral mode. Earlier works[10] showed that, when facing contradictory visual cues, flies could make choices based upon the relative weightiness of different cues, and it was demonstrated that mushroom bodies might play an important role in such choice behavior. The new "torque-position map" method was used to explore the CS-US associative learning and choice behavior in Drosophila from the aspect of its behavioral mode. Finally, this work also discussed various possible neural bases involved in visual associative learning, choice processing and modification processing of the behavioral mode in the visual operant conditioning of Drosophila.

  6. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Wayne O; Dyson, Nicholas J; Walker, James A

    2011-11-01

    Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  7. On the Morphology of the Drosophila Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Rotstein

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster represents an easily amenable genetic model whose analysis at different levels, i.e., from single molecules up to functional anatomy, has provided new insights into general aspects of cardiogenesis, heart physiology and cardiac aging, to name a few examples. In recent years, the Drosophila heart has also attracted the attention of researchers in the field of biomedicine. This development is mainly due to the fact that several genes causing human heart disease are also present in Drosophila, where they play the same or similar roles in heart development, maintenance or physiology as their respective counterparts in humans. This review will attempt to briefly introduce the anatomy of the Drosophila circulatory system and then focus on the different cell types and non-cellular tissue that constitute the heart.

  8. Transcriptional networks for alcohol sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Tatiana V; Mackay, Trudy F C; Anholt, Robert R H

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of polygenic traits requires investigating how complex networks of interacting molecules mediate the effect of genetic variation on organismal phenotypes. We used a combination of P-element mutagenesis and analysis of natural variation in gene expression to predict transcriptional networks that underlie alcohol sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified 139 unique P-element mutations (124 in genes) that affect sensitivity or resistance to alcohol exposure. Further analyses of nine of the lines showed that the P-elements affected expression levels of the tagged genes, and P-element excision resulted in phenotypic reversion. The majority of the mutations were in computationally predicted genes or genes with unexpected effects on alcohol phenotypes. Therefore we sought to understand the biological relationships among 21 of these genes by leveraging genetic correlations among genetically variable transcripts in wild-derived inbred lines to predict coregulated transcriptional networks. A total of 32 "hub" genes were common to two or more networks associated with the focal genes. We used RNAi-mediated inhibition of expression of focal genes and of hub genes connected to them in the network to confirm their effects on alcohol-related phenotypes. We then expanded the computational networks using the hub genes as foci and again validated network predictions. Iteration of this approach allows a stepwise expansion of the network with simultaneous functional validation. Although coregulated transcriptional networks do not provide information about causal relationships among their constituent transcripts, they provide a framework for subsequent functional studies on the genetic basis of alcohol sensitivity.

  9. Stationary-State Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli: a Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. K. Mahajan; A. V. S. S. Narayana Rao; S. K. Bhattacharjee

    2000-04-01

    Stationary-phase mutagenesis in nondividing E. coli cells exposed to a nonlethal stress was, a few years ago, claimed to be a likely case of a Lamarckian mechanism capable of producing exclusively useful mutations in a directed manner. After a heated debate over the last decade it now appears to involve a Darwinian mechanism that generates a transient state of hypermutagenesis, operating on a large number of sites spread over the entire genome, at least in a proportion of the resting cells. Most of the studies that clarified this position were on the reversion of a frameshift mutation present in a lacI -- lacZ fusion in E. coli strain FC40. Several groups have extensively examined both the sequence changes associated with these reversions and the underlying genetic requirements. On the basis of our studies on the genomic sequence analysis, we recently proposed a model to explain the specific changes associated with the reversion hotspots. Here we propose a more detailed version of this model that also takes into account the observed genetic requirements of stationary-state mutagenesis. Briefly, G:T/U mismatches produced at methylatable cytosines are preferentially repaired in nondividing cells by the very short patch mismatch repair (VSPMR) mechanism which is itself mutagenic and can produce mutations in very short stretches located in the immediate vicinity of these cytosine methylation sites. This mechanism requires a homologous or homeologous strand invasion step and an error-prone DNA synthesis step and is dependent on RecA, RecBCD and a DNA polymerase. The process is initiated near sequences recognized by Dcm and Vsr enzymes and further stimulated if these sequences are a part of CHI or CHI-like sequences, but a double-strand-break-dependent recombination mediated by the RecBCD pathways proposed by others seems to be nonessential. The strand transfer step is proposed to depend on RecA, RuvA, RuvB and RuvC and is opposed by RecG and MutS. The model also gives

  10. Progress in understanding the Drosophila dnc locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighorn, A; Qiu, Y; Davis, R L

    1994-05-01

    The genetic dissection of learning and memory in Drosophila is two decades old. Recently, a great deal of progress has been made towards isolating new mutants as well as towards a better understanding of the originally isolated ones. This paper reviews the recent developments in the understanding of the structure and function of the gene identified by the first and best-characterized of these mutants, the Drosophila dunce mutant.

  11. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabli...

  12. The Role of AMPK in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnett, Sarah E; Brenman, Jay E

    2016-01-01

    In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, mono-allelic expression of AMPK-α, -β, and -γ yields a single heterotrimeric energy sensor that regulates cellular and whole-body energetic homeostasis. The genetic simplicity of Drosophila, with only a single gene for each subunit, makes the fruit fly an appealing organism for elucidating the effects of AMPK mutations on signaling pathways and phenotypes. In addition, Drosophila presents researchers with an opportunity to use straightforward genetic approaches to elucidate metabolic signaling pathways that contain a level of complexity similar to that observed in mammalian pathways. Just as in mammals, however, the regulatory realm of AMPK function extends beyond metabolic rates and lipid metabolism. Indeed, experiments using Drosophila have shown that AMPK may exert protective effects with regard to life span and neurodegeneration. This chapter addresses a few of the research areas in which Drosophila has been used to elucidate the physiological functions of AMPK. In doing so, this chapter provides a primer for basic Drosophila nomenclature, thereby eliminating a communication barrier that persists for AMPK researchers trained in mammalian genetics.

  13. Characterization of Autophagic Responses in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Kumar, S; Denton, D

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying autophagy during animal development due to the availability of genetic reagents and opportunity for in vivo cell biological analysis. The regulation and mechanism of autophagy are highly evolutionarily conserved and the role of autophagy has been characterized during various stages of Drosophila development as well as following starvation. Studies in Drosophila have revealed novel insights into the role of distinct components of the autophagy machinery. This chapter describes protocols for examining autophagy during Drosophila development. A crucial step in the induction of autophagy is the incorporation of Atg8a into the autophagosome. This can be measured as autophagic puncta using live fluorescent imaging, immunostaining, or immunoblot analysis of LC3/Atg8a processing. The level of autophagy can also be examined using other specific components of the autophagy pathway as markers detected by immunofluorescent imaging. Based on the distinct morphology of autophagy, it can also be examined by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, one of the advantages of using Drosophila as a model is the ability to undertake genetic analysis of individual components of the autophagy machinery. Current approaches that can be used to monitor autophagy, including the overall flux and individual steps in Drosophila melanogaster, will be discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thanh Men

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity.

  15. Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura)(Diptera: drosophilidae), trapped with combinations of wines and vinegars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field trapping experiments evaluated wine and vinegar baits for spotted wing drosophila flies, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), and assessed variance in biat attractiveness with wit type, vinegar type, and bait age. A mixture of apple cider vinegar and a Merlot wine attracted more flies than a mixtur...

  16. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-02-01

    Differences in gene sequences, many of which are single nucleotide polymorphisms, underlie some of the most important traits in plants. With humanity facing significant challenges to increase global agricultural productivity, there is an urgent need to accelerate the development of these traits in plants. oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis (ODM), one of the many tools of Cibus' Rapid Trait Development System (RTDS(™) ) technology, offers a rapid, precise and non-transgenic breeding alternative for trait improvement in agriculture to address this urgent need. This review explores the application of ODM as a precision genome editing technology, with emphasis on using oligonucleotides to make targeted edits in plasmid, episomal and chromosomal DNA of bacterial, fungal, mammalian and plant systems. The process of employing ODM by way of RTDS technology has been improved in many ways by utilizing a fluorescence conversion system wherein a blue fluorescent protein (BFP) can be changed to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) by editing a single nucleotide of the BFP gene (CAC→TAC; H66 to Y66). For example, dependent on oligonucleotide length, applying oligonucleotide-mediated technology to target the BFP transgene in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts resulted in up to 0.05% precisely edited GFP loci. Here, the development of traits in commercially relevant plant varieties to improve crop performance by genome editing technologies such as ODM, and by extension RTDS, is reviewed.

  17. CRISPR/Cas-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakanishi

    Full Text Available The water flea Daphnia magna has been used as an animal model in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences. Thanks to the recent progress in Daphnia genomics, genetic information such as the draft genome sequence and expressed sequence tags (ESTs is now available. To investigate the relationship between phenotypes and the available genetic information about Daphnia, some gene manipulation methods have been developed. However, a technique to induce targeted mutagenesis into Daphnia genome remains elusive. To overcome this problem, we focused on an emerging genome editing technique mediated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas system to introduce genomic mutations. In this study, we targeted a functionally conserved regulator of eye development, the eyeless gene in D. magna. When we injected Cas9 mRNAs and eyeless-targeting guide RNAs into eggs, 18-47% of the survived juveniles exhibited abnormal eye morphology. After maturation, up to 8.2% of the adults produced progenies with deformed eyes, which carried mutations in the eyeless loci. These results showed that CRISPR/Cas system could introduce heritable mutations into the endogenous eyeless gene in D. magna. This is the first report of a targeted gene knockout technique in Daphnia and will be useful in uncovering Daphnia gene functions.

  18. CRISPR/Cas-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The water flea Daphnia magna has been used as an animal model in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences. Thanks to the recent progress in Daphnia genomics, genetic information such as the draft genome sequence and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is now available. To investigate the relationship between phenotypes and the available genetic information about Daphnia, some gene manipulation methods have been developed. However, a technique to induce targeted mutagenesis into Daphnia genome remains elusive. To overcome this problem, we focused on an emerging genome editing technique mediated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas) system to introduce genomic mutations. In this study, we targeted a functionally conserved regulator of eye development, the eyeless gene in D. magna. When we injected Cas9 mRNAs and eyeless-targeting guide RNAs into eggs, 18-47% of the survived juveniles exhibited abnormal eye morphology. After maturation, up to 8.2% of the adults produced progenies with deformed eyes, which carried mutations in the eyeless loci. These results showed that CRISPR/Cas system could introduce heritable mutations into the endogenous eyeless gene in D. magna. This is the first report of a targeted gene knockout technique in Daphnia and will be useful in uncovering Daphnia gene functions.

  19. Sleeping Beauty transposon mutagenesis in rat spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Medrano, Gerardo; Chapman, Karen M; Hamra, F Kent

    2011-09-08

    We describe an experimental approach for generating mutant alleles in rat spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) using Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis. The protocol is based on mobilization of mutagenic gene-trap transposons from transfected plasmid vectors into the genomes of cultured stem cells. Cells with transposon insertions in expressed genes are selected on the basis of activation of an antibiotic-resistance gene encoded by the transposon. These gene-trap clones are transplanted into the testes of recipient males (either as monoclonal or polyclonal libraries); crossing of these founders with wild-type females allows the insertions to be passed to F(1) progeny. This simple, economic and user-friendly methodological pipeline enables screens for functional gene annotation in the rat, with applicability in other vertebrate models where germ line-competent stem cells have been established. The complete protocol from transfection of SSCs to the genotyping of heterozygous F(1) offspring that harbor genomic SB gene-trap insertions takes 5-6 months.

  20. ldentification and Mutagenesis of Lactic Acid Bacteria from Chinese Sauerkraut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajing CHAl; Hao SHl; Ri NA

    2015-01-01

    ln order to analyze the fermentation properties of lactic acid bacteria in Chinese sauerkraut and to improve acid production, 21 samples of Chinese sauerkraut from lnner Mongolia and Northeast China were col ected and isolated with a Man-Rogosa-Sharpe (MRS) culture. Sixteen strains of lactic acid bacteria were identified by combining both phenotype and genotype methods. After activation, the 16 strains were inoculated into the MRS medium with a concentration of 4%and then incubated at 37 ℃. The pH and the absorbance of the culture were mea-sured. The activated strains were then mutagenized in a field of 4 KV/cm mutation, with dosages administered within 20 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. The variation curves of the pH and the absorbance of the culture were determined. The experimental results showed that the lactic acid bacteria isolated from the soup were identified as Lactobacil us and the acid production of the bacteria was signifi-cantly improved by the mutagenesis of the corona electric field.

  1. Ultraviolet mutagenesis and inducible DNA repair in Caulobacter crescentus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, R.A.

    1984-11-19

    The ability to reactivate ultraviolet (UV) damaged phage phiCbK (W-reactivation) is induced by UV irradiation of Caulobacter crescentus cells. Induction of W-reactivation potential is specific for phage phiCbK, requires protein synthesis, and is greatly reduced in the presence of the rec-526 mutation. The induction signal generated by UV irradiation is transient, lasting about 1 1/2 - 2 h at 30/sup 0/C; if chloramphenicol is present during early times after UV irradiation, induction of W-reactivation does not occur. Induction is maximal when cells are exposed to 5-10 J/m/sup 2/ of UV, a dose that also results in considerable mutagenesis of the cells. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of a UV inducible, protein synthesis requiring, transiently signalled, rec-requiring DNA repair system analogous to W-reactivation in Escherichia coli. In addition, C. crescentus also has an efficient photoreactivation system that reverses UV damage in the presence of strong visible light.

  2. Radio frequency electromagnetic fields: cancer, mutagenesis, and genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynick, Louis N; Johnston, Sheila A; Mason, Patrick A

    2003-01-01

    We present critiques of epidemiologic studies and experimental investigations, published mostly in peer-reviewed journals, on cancer and related effects from exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic fields in the nominal frequency range of 3 kHz to 300 GHz of interest to Subcommittee 4 (SC4) of the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety (ICES). The major topics discussed are presented under the headings Epidemiologic and Other Findings on Human Exposure, Mammals Exposed In Vivo, Mammalian Live Tissues and Cell Preparations Exposed In Vitro, and Mutagenesis and Genotoxicity in Microorganisms and Fruit Flies. Under each major topic, we present minireviews of papers on various specific endpoints investigated. The section on Epidemiologic and Other Findings on Human Exposure is divided into two subsections, the first on possible carcinogenic effects of exposure from emitters not in physical contact with the populations studied, for example, transmitting antennas and other devices. Discussed in the second subsection are studies of postulated carcinogenic effects from use of mobile phones, with prominence given to brain tumors from use of cellular and cordless telephones in direct physical contact with an ear of each subject. In both subsections, some investigations yielded positive findings, others had negative findings, including papers directed toward experimentally verifying positive findings, and both were reported in a few instances. Further research on various important aspects may resolve such differences. Overall, however, the preponderance of published epidemiologic and experimental findings do not support the supposition that in vivo or in vitro exposures to such fields are carcinogenic.

  3. Directed mutagenesis as a probe of photosystem II function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowlby, N.; Sithole, I.; McIntosh, L. (MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (USA)); James, J.; Babcock, G. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Several mutants of Synechocystis 6803 have been generated by site-directed mutagenesis of psbA and psbD in order to study the roles of the D1 and D2 proteins during H{sub 2}O oxidation. Of key importance to these studies is the analysis of PSII electron transfer components such as Y{sub Z}{sup +} and Y{sub D}{sup +}, and the identification of possible ligands to Mn and Ca. Detailed information can be gained through EPR spectroscopy, however, sensitivity is limited by the PSII concentration of the sample. A simple procedure for the purification of PSII from this cyanobacterium, in sufficient amounts for EPR studies, will be presented. Preliminary results from mutant analysis extend the characterization of the two tyrosine radicals and suggest an important structural role for Pro{sup 162} of D1 and Pro{sup 161} of D2 in the ability of the photosystem to form the radical species on the adjacent tyrosine residues Tyr{sup 161} and Tyr{sup 160} on D1 and D2 respectively.

  4. Combinatorial Mutagenesis and Selection to Understand and Improve Yeast Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Berg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial promoters are important targets both for understanding the global gene expression and developing genetic tools for heterologous expression of proteins and complex biosynthetic pathways. Previously, we have developed and used combinatorial mutagenesis methods to analyse and improve bacterial expression systems. Here, we present for the first time an analogous strategy for yeast. Our model promoter is the strong and inducible promoter in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. The Zeocin resistance gene was applied as a valuable reporter for mutant promoter activity, and we used an episomal plasmid vector to ensure a constant reporter gene dosage in the yeast host cells. This novel design enabled direct selection for colonies of recombinant cells with altered Zeocin tolerance levels originating solely from randomly introduced point mutations in the promoter DNA sequence. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to select for promoter variants with abolished glucose repression in large mutant libraries. We also selected promoter variants with elevated expression level under induced conditions. The properties of the selected promoter variants were confirmed by expressing luciferase as an alternative reporter gene. The tools developed here should be useful for effective screening, characterization, and improvement of any yeast promoters.

  5. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M.O. Rawson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  6. Retroviral vectors for analysis of viral mutagenesis and recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Mansky, Louis M

    2014-09-24

    Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  7. Insertion and deletion mutagenesis of the human cytomegalovirus genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaete, R.R.; Mocarski, E.S.

    1987-10-01

    Studies on human cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been limited by a paucity of molecular genetic techniques available for manipulating the viral genome. The authors have developed methods for site-specific insertion and deletion mutagenesis of CMV utilizing a modified Escherichia coli lacZ gene as a genetic marker. The lacZ gene was placed under the control of the major ..beta.. gene regulatory signals and inserted into the viral genome by homologous recombination, disrupting one of two copies of this ..beta.. gene within the L-component repeats of CMV DNA. They observed high-level expression of ..beta..-galactosidase by the recombinant in a temporally authentic manner, with levels of this enzyme approaching 1% of total protein in infected cells. Thus, CMV is an efficient vector for high-level expression of foreign gene products in human cells. Using back selection of lacZ-deficient virus in the presence of the chromogenic substrate 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl ..beta..-D-galactoside, they generated random endpoint deletion mutants. Analysis of these mutant revealed that CMV DNA sequences flanking the insert had been removed, thereby establishing this approach as a means of determining whether sequences flanking a lacZ insertion are dispensable for viral growth. In an initial test of the methods, they have shown that 7800 base pairs of one copy of L-component repeat sequences can be deleted without affecting viral growth in human fibroblasts.

  8. Targeted mutagenesis using CRISPR/Cas system in medaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ansai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas system-based RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN has recently emerged as a simple and efficient tool for targeted genome editing. In this study, we showed successful targeted mutagenesis using RGENs in medaka, Oryzias latipes. Somatic and heritable mutations were induced with high efficiency at the targeted genomic sequence on the DJ-1 gene in embryos that had been injected with the single guide RNA (sgRNA transcribed by a T7 promoter and capped RNA encoding a Cas9 nuclease. The sgRNAs that were designed for the target genomic sequences without the 5′ end of GG required by the T7 promoter induced the targeted mutations. This suggests that the RGEN can target any sequence adjacent to an NGG protospacer adjacent motif (PAM sequence, which occurs once every 8 bp. The off-target alterations at 2 genomic loci harboring double mismatches in the 18-bp targeting sequences were induced in the RGEN-injected embryos. However, we also found that the off-target effects could be reduced by lower dosages of sgRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CRISPR/Cas-mediated RGENs may be an efficient and flexible tool for genome editing in medaka.

  9. Site Saturation Mutagenesis Applications on Candida methylica Formate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşah P. Özgün

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In NADH regeneration, Candida methylica formate dehydrogenase (cmFDH is a highly significant enzyme in pharmaceutical industry. In this work, site saturation mutagenesis (SSM which is a combination of both rational design and directed evolution approaches is applied to alter the coenzyme specificity of NAD+-dependent cmFDH from NAD+ to NADP+ and increase its thermostability. For this aim, two separate libraries are constructed for screening a change in coenzyme specificity and an increase in thermostability. To alter the coenzyme specificity, in the coenzyme binding domain, positions at 195, 196, and 197 are subjected to two rounds of SSM and screening which enabled the identification of two double mutants D195S/Q197T and D195S/Y196L. These mutants increase the overall catalytic efficiency of NAD+ to 5.6×104-fold and 5×104-fold value, respectively. To increase the thermostability of cmFDH, the conserved residue at position 1 in the catalytic domain of cmFDH is subjected to SSM. The thermodynamic and kinetic results suggest that 8 mutations on the first residue can be tolerated. Among all mutants, M1L has the best residual activity after incubation at 60°C with 17%. These studies emphasize that SSM is an efficient method for creating “smarter libraries” for improving the properties of cmFDH.

  10. Reverse genetics through random mutagenesis in Histoplasma capsulatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rappleye Chad A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum causes respiratory and systemic disease in humans and other mammals. Progress in understanding the mechanisms underlying the biology and the pathogenesis of Histoplasma has been hindered by a shortage of methodologies for mutating a gene of interest. Results We describe a reverse genetics process that combines the random mutagenesis of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with screening techniques to identify targeted gene disruptions in a collection of insertion mutants. Isolation of the desired mutant is accomplished by arraying individual clones from a pool and employing a PCR-addressing method. Application of this procedure facilitated the isolation of a cbp1 mutant in a North American type 2 strain, a Histoplasma strain recalcitrant to gene knock-outs through homologous recombination. Optimization of cryopreservation conditions allows pools of mutants to be banked for later analysis and recovery of targeted mutants. Conclusion This methodology improves our ability to isolate mutants in targeted genes, thereby facilitating the molecular genetic analysis of Histoplasma biology. The procedures described are widely applicable to many fungal systems and will be of particular interest to those for which homologous recombination techniques are inefficient or do not currently exist.

  11. Singling out Drosophila tendon cells: a dialogue between two distinct cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, T

    1999-11-01

    The precise match between somatic muscles and their epidermal attachment cells is achieved through a continuous dialogue between these two cell types. Whereas tendon cells direct myotube migration and final patterning, the muscles are essential for the maintenance of the fate of tendon cells. The Drosophila neuregulin-like ligand, Vein, and its receptor, the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr), are critical components in the inductive signaling process that takes place between muscles and tendon cells. Additional gene products that relay the Vein-Egfr effect in Drosophila are conserved in the vertebrate neuregulin-mediated cascade. This review describes genetic and molecular aspects of the muscle-tendon inductive processes in Drosophila, and compares them with the relevant mechanisms in the vertebrate embryo.

  12. Molecular neurobiology of Drosophila taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Erica Gene; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila is a powerful model in which to study the molecular and cellular basis of taste coding. Flies sense tastants via populations of taste neurons that are activated by compounds of distinct categories. The past few years have borne witness to studies that define the properties of taste neurons, identifying functionally distinct classes of sweet and bitter taste neurons that express unique subsets of gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, as well as water, salt, and pheromone sensing neurons that express members of the pickpocket (ppk) or ionotropic receptor (Ir) families. There has also been significant progress in terms of understanding how tastant information is processed and conveyed to higher brain centers, and modulated by prior dietary experience or starvation.

  13. Hemolymph metabolites and osmolality are tightly linked to cold tolerance of Drosophila species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Trine; MacMillan, Heath A.; Nyberg, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila, like most insects, are susceptible to low temperatures, and will succumb to temperatures above the freezing point of their hemolymph. For these insects, cold exposure causes a loss of extracellular ion and water homeostasis, leading to chill injury and eventually death. Chill...... that the larger contribution of classical cryoprotectants in chill-tolerant Drosophila plays a non-colligative role for cold tolerance that contributes to osmotic and ion homeostasis during cold exposure and, in addition, we discuss how these comparative differences may represent an evolutionary pathway toward...... more extreme cold tolerance of insects....

  14. Analysis of mammalian cytochrome P450 structure and function by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, T L; Halpert, J R

    2001-06-01

    Over the past decade, site-directed mutagenesis has become an essential tool in the study of mammalian cytochrome P450 structure-function relationships. Residues affecting substrate specificity, cooperativity, membrane localization, and interactions with redox partners have been identified using a combination of amino-acid sequence alignments, homology modeling, chimeragenesis, and site-directed mutagenesis. As homology modeling and substrate docking technology continue to improve, the ability to predict more precise functions for specific residues will also advance, making it possible to utilize site-directed mutagenesis to test these predictions. Future studies will employ site-directed mutagenesis to learn more about cytochrome P450 substrate access channels, to define the role of residues that do not lie within substrate recognition sites, to engineer additional soluble forms of microsomal cytochromes P450 for x-ray crystallography, and to engineer more efficient enzymes for drug activation and/or bioremediation.

  15. Combination Primer Polymerase Chain Reaction for Multi-Site Mutagenesis of Close Proximity Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Pia Hønnerup; Weilguny, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    We describe a rapid and efficient polymerase chain reaction procedure for multi-site-directed mutagenesis for cases in which the sites to be mutated are in close proximity. The combination primer polymer chain reaction method is based on a multi-site directed mutagenesis protocol together with a splicing by overlapping extension polymerase chain reaction protocol. several different combinations of multiple mutations were successfully performed with this method and are reported in this study.

  16. Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have revealed the...15-Apr-2009 14-Apr-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Gene Networks Underlying Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila The...Chronic Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila Report Title Studies of the gene network affected by sleep deprivation and stress in the fruit fly Drosophila have

  17. The effects of inbreeding and heat stress on male sterility in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Dybdahl; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Bijlsma, Kuke

    2011-01-01

    in benign and stressful environments using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism. Male sterility was compared in 21 inbred lines and five non-inbred control lines at 25.0 and 29.0 °C. The effect of inbreeding on sterility was significant only at 29.0 °C. This stress-induced increase in sterility...

  18. Metabolomic analysis of the selection response of Drosophila melanogaster to environmental stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Overgaard, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including gene...

  19. EFFECTS ON ADH ACTIVITY AND DISTRIBUTION, FOLLOWING SELECTION FOR TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERVER, JWM; WOLF, W; KAMPING, A; VANDELDEN, W

    1992-01-01

    Strains of Drosophila melanogaster homozygous for either the Adh(F) or the Adh(S) allele were kept on food supplemented with ethanol for 20 generations. These strains (FE and SE) were tested for tolerance to ethanol and compared with control strains (FN and SN). The E strains showed increased tolera

  20. Factors affecting the efficacy of a vinegar trap for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to develop an optimized, economical trap for monitoring the spotted wing fruit fly, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura. Flies were attracted to dark colors ranging from red to black compared with low attraction to white, yellow, and light blue. Similarly, fly catches in 237 ml plast...

  1. Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Andrew G; Eisen, Michael B; Smith, Douglas R

    2007-01-01

    Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the ...

  2. EFFECTS ON ADH ACTIVITY AND DISTRIBUTION, FOLLOWING SELECTION FOR TOLERANCE TO ETHANOL IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERVER, JWM; WOLF, W; KAMPING, A; VANDELDEN, W

    1992-01-01

    Strains of Drosophila melanogaster homozygous for either the Adh(F) or the Adh(S) allele were kept on food supplemented with ethanol for 20 generations. These strains (FE and SE) were tested for tolerance to ethanol and compared with control strains (FN and SN). The E strains showed increased

  3. Fast protein evolution and germ line expression of a Drosophila parental gene and its young retroposed paralog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrán, Esther; Bai, Yongsheng; Motiwale, Mansi

    2006-11-01

    This is the first detailed study of the evolution, phylogenetic distribution, and transcription of one young retroposed gene, CG13732, and its parental gene CG15645, whose functions are unknown. CG13732 is a recognizable retroposed copy of CG15645 retaining the signals of this process. We name the parental gene Cervantes and the retrogene Quijote. To determine when this duplication occurred and the phylogenetic distribution of Quijote, we employed polymerase chain reaction, Southern blotting, and the available information on sequenced Drosophila genomes. Interestingly, these analyses revealed that Quijote is present only in 4 species of Drosophila (Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila simulans, Drosophila sechellia, and Drosophila mauritiana) and that retroposed copies of Cervantes have also originated in the lineages leading to Drosophila yakuba and Drosophila erecta independently in the 3 instances. We name the new retrogene in the D. yakuba lineage Rocinante and the new retrogene in the D. erecta lineage Sancho. In this work, we present data on Quijote and its parental gene Cervantes. Polymorphism analysis of the derived gene and divergence data for both parental and derived genes were used to determine that both genes likely produce functional proteins and that they are changing at a fast rate (KA/KS approximately 0.38). The negative value of H of Fay and Wu in the non-African sample reveals an excess of derived variants at high frequency. This could be explained either by positive selection in the region or by demographic effects. The comparative expression pattern shows that both genes express in the same adult tissues (male and female germ line) in D. melanogaster. Quijote is also expressed in male and female in D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. We argue that the fast rate of evolution of these genes could be related to their putative germ line function and are further studying the independent recruitment of Cervantes-derived retrogenes in

  4. Handling alters aggression and "loser" effect formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trannoy, Severine; Chowdhury, Budhaditya; Kravitz, Edward A

    2015-02-01

    In Drosophila, prior fighting experience influences the outcome of later contests: losing a fight increases the probability of losing second contests, thereby revealing "loser" effects that involve learning and memory. In these experiments, to generate and quantify the behavioral changes observed as consequences of losing fights, we developed a new behavioral arena that eliminates handling. We compared two commonly used fly handling procedures with this new chamber and demonstrated that handling influences aggressive behavior and prevents "loser" effect formation. In addition, we induced and observed novel aspects of learning associated with aggression such as the formation of robust winner effects. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Inbreeding affects locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster at different ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manenti, Tommaso; Pertoldi, Cino; Nasiri Moghadam, Neda

    2015-01-01

    The ability to move is essential for many behavioural traits closely related to fitness. Here we studied the effect of inbreeding on locomotor activity (LA) of Drosophila melanogaster at different ages under both dark and light regimes. We expected to find a decreased LA in inbred lines compared...... LA than control lines. Moreover, age per se did not affect LA neither in control nor in inbred lines, while we found a strong line by age interaction between inbred lines. Interestingly, inbreeding changed the daily activity pattern of the flies: these patterns were consistent across all control...

  6. A Model of Drosophila Larva Chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Davies

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed observations of larval Drosophila chemotaxis have characterised the relationship between the odour gradient and the runs, head casts and turns made by the animal. We use a computational model to test whether hypothesised sensorimotor control mechanisms are sufficient to account for larval behaviour. The model combines three mechanisms based on simple transformations of the recent history of odour intensity at the head location. The first is an increased probability of terminating runs in response to gradually decreasing concentration, the second an increased probability of terminating head casts in response to rapidly increasing concentration, and the third a biasing of run directions up concentration gradients through modulation of small head casts. We show that this model can be tuned to produce behavioural statistics comparable to those reported for the larva, and that this tuning results in similar chemotaxis performance to the larva. We demonstrate that each mechanism can enable odour approach but the combination of mechanisms is most effective, and investigate how these low-level control mechanisms relate to behavioural measures such as the preference indices used to investigate larval learning behaviour in group assays.

  7. A genetic analysis of senescence in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K A; Charlesworth, B

    1994-01-06

    Two attractive theories for the evolution of senescence are based on the principle that the force of natural selection decreases with age. The theories differ in the type of age-specific gene action that they assume. Antagonistic pleiotropy postulates that pleiotropic genes with positive effects early in life and negative effects of comparable magnitude late in life are favoured by selection, whereas genes with the reverse pattern of action are selected against. Mutation accumulation assumes that deleterious mutant alleles with age-specific effects will equilibrate at a lower frequency if their effects are expressed early rather than late in life. Explicit models demonstrate that both mechanisms can lead to the evolution of senescent life histories under reasonable conditions. Antagonistic pleiotropy has gained considerable empirical support, but the evidence in support of mutation accumulation is more sparse. Here we report that the genetic variability of mortality in male Drosophila melanogaster increases greatly at very late ages, as predicted by the mutation accumulation hypothesis. The rate of increase in mortality with age exhibits substantial genetic and environmental variability. This result provides a possible explanation for recent observations of non-increasing mortality rates in very old flies.

  8. A Model of Drosophila Larva Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alex; Louis, Matthieu; Webb, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Detailed observations of larval Drosophila chemotaxis have characterised the relationship between the odour gradient and the runs, head casts and turns made by the animal. We use a computational model to test whether hypothesised sensorimotor control mechanisms are sufficient to account for larval behaviour. The model combines three mechanisms based on simple transformations of the recent history of odour intensity at the head location. The first is an increased probability of terminating runs in response to gradually decreasing concentration, the second an increased probability of terminating head casts in response to rapidly increasing concentration, and the third a biasing of run directions up concentration gradients through modulation of small head casts. We show that this model can be tuned to produce behavioural statistics comparable to those reported for the larva, and that this tuning results in similar chemotaxis performance to the larva. We demonstrate that each mechanism can enable odour approach but the combination of mechanisms is most effective, and investigate how these low-level control mechanisms relate to behavioural measures such as the preference indices used to investigate larval learning behaviour in group assays.

  9. Molecular evolution of Drosophila cuticular protein genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Scott Cornman

    Full Text Available Several multigene families have been described that together encode scores of structural cuticular proteins in Drosophila, although the functional significance of this diversity remains to be explored. Here I investigate the evolutionary histories of several multigene families (CPR, Tweedle, CPLCG, and CPF/CPFL that vary in age, size, and sequence complexity, using sequenced Drosophila genomes and mosquito outgroups. My objective is to describe the rates and mechanisms of 'cuticle-ome' divergence, in order to identify conserved and rapidly evolving elements. I also investigate potential examples of interlocus gene conversion and concerted evolution within these families during Drosophila evolution. The absolute rate of change in gene number (per million years is an order of magnitude lower for cuticular protein families within Drosophila than it is among Drosophila and the two mosquito taxa, implying that major transitions in the cuticle proteome have occurred at higher taxonomic levels. Several hotspots of intergenic conversion and/or gene turnover were identified, e.g. some gene pairs have independently undergone intergenic conversion within different lineages. Some gene conversion hotspots were characterized by conversion tracts initiating near nucleotide repeats within coding regions, and similar repeats were found within concertedly evolving cuticular protein genes in Anopheles gambiae. Rates of amino-acid substitution were generally severalfold higher along the branch connecting the Sophophora and Drosophila species groups, and 13 genes have Ka/Ks significantly greater than one along this branch, indicating adaptive divergence. Insect cuticular proteins appear to be a source of adaptive evolution within genera and, at higher taxonomic levels, subject to periods of gene-family expansion and contraction followed by quiescence. However, this relative stasis is belied by hotspots of molecular evolution, particularly concerted evolution, during

  10. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Finola E; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Martinez, Sarah A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Khayter, Cyd; Ramirez, Cherie L; Joung, J Keith; Langenau, David M

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  11. Ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis-enhanced mineral phosphate solubilization by groundnut-associated Serratia marcescens GPS-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripura, Chaturvedula; Sashidhar, Burla; Podile, Appa Rao

    2007-02-01

    Twenty-three bacterial isolates were screened for their mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) ability on Pikovskaya and National Botanical Research Institute's phosphate (NBRIP) agar. The majority of the isolates exhibited a strong ability to solubilize hydroxyapatite in both solid and liquid media. The solubilization in liquid medium corresponded with a decrease in the pH of the medium. Serratia marcescens GPS-5, known for its biocontrol of late leaf spot in groundnut, emerged as the best solubilizer. S. marcescens GPS-5 was subjected to ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis, and a total of 1700 mutants, resulting after 45 minutes of exposure, were screened on buffered NBRIP medium for alterations in MPS ability compared with that of the wild type. Seven mutants with increased (increased-MPS mutants) and 6 mutants with decreased (decreased-MPS mutants) MPS ability were isolated. All seven increased-MPS mutants were efficient at solubilizing phosphate in both solid and liquid NBRIP medium. Among the increased-MPS mutants, EMS XVIII Sm-35 showed the maximum (40%) increase in the amount of phosphate released in liquid medium compared with wild-type S. marcescens GPS-5, therefore, it would be a useful microbial inoculant in groundnut cultivation. EMS III Sm W, a nonpigmented mutant, showed the lowest solubilization of phosphate among the 6 decreased-MPS mutants.

  12. Comparative vs ontogenetic paradigms for tests of the intrinsic mutagenesis hypothesis of aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines certain aspects of the biology of longevity and aging that bear on the role of DNA in the ontogenetic aging process, and on the genetic basis for the differences of longevity among mammal species. (PCS)

  13. Drosophila muscleblind is involved in troponin T alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vicente-Crespo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL have been involved in a developmental switch in the use of defined cassette exons. Such transition fails in the CTG repeat expansion disease myotonic dystrophy due, in part, to sequestration of MBNL proteins by CUG repeat RNA. Four protein isoforms (MblA-D are coded by the unique Drosophila muscleblind gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used evolutionary, genetic and cell culture approaches to study muscleblind (mbl function in flies. The evolutionary study showed that the MblC protein isoform was readily conserved from nematods to Drosophila, which suggests that it performs the most ancestral muscleblind functions. Overexpression of MblC in the fly eye precursors led to an externally rough eye morphology. This phenotype was used in a genetic screen to identify five dominant suppressors and 13 dominant enhancers including Drosophila CUG-BP1 homolog aret, exon junction complex components tsunagi and Aly, and pro-apoptotic genes Traf1 and reaper. We further investigated Muscleblind implication in apoptosis and splicing regulation. We found missplicing of troponin T in muscleblind mutant pupae and confirmed Muscleblind ability to regulate mouse fast skeletal muscle Troponin T (TnnT3 minigene splicing in human HEK cells. MblC overexpression in the wing imaginal disc activated apoptosis in a spatially restricted manner. Bioinformatics analysis identified a conserved FKRP motif, weakly resembling a sumoylation target site, in the MblC-specific sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis of the motif revealed no change in activity of mutant MblC on TnnT3 minigene splicing or aberrant binding to CUG repeat RNA, but altered the ability of the protein to form perinuclear aggregates and enhanced cell death-inducing activity of MblC overexpression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together our genetic approach identify cellular processes influenced by Muscleblind function, whereas in vivo and cell culture experiments

  14. Stabilization of a prokaryotic LAT transporter by random mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Banqueri, Arturo; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Bartoccioni, Paola; Kowalczyk, Lukasz; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palacín, Manuel; Vázquez-Ibar, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution of membrane transport proteins has improved considerably our understanding of their physiological roles and pathological implications. However, most structural biology techniques require an optimal candidate within a protein family for structural determination with (a) reasonable production in heterologous hosts and (b) good stability in detergent micelles. SteT, the Bacillus subtilis L-serine/L-threonine exchanger is the best-known prokaryotic paradigm of the mammalian L-amino acid transporter (LAT) family. Unfortunately, SteT's lousy stability after extracting from the membrane prevents its structural characterization. Here, we have used an approach based on random mutagenesis to engineer stability in SteT. Using a split GFP complementation assay as reporter of protein expression and membrane insertion, we created a library of 70 SteT mutants each containing random replacements of one or two residues situated in the transmembrane domains. Analysis of expression and monodispersity in detergent of this library permitted the identification of evolved versions of SteT with a significant increase in both expression yield and stability in detergent with respect to wild type. In addition, these experiments revealed a correlation between the yield of expression and the stability in detergent micelles. Finally, and based on protein delipidation and relipidation assays together with transport experiments, possible mechanisms of SteT stabilization are discussed. Besides optimizing a member of the LAT family for structural determination, our work proposes a new approach that can be used to optimize any membrane protein of interest. © 2016 Rodríguez-Banqueri et al.

  15. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F

    2003-11-27

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Pol{kappa}). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development.

  16. Generation of Enterobacter sp. YSU auxotrophs using transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caguiat, Jonathan James

    2014-10-31

    Prototrophic bacteria grow on M-9 minimal salts medium supplemented with glucose (M-9 medium), which is used as a carbon and energy source. Auxotrophs can be generated using a transposome. The commercially available, Tn5-derived transposome used in this protocol consists of a linear segment of DNA containing an R6Kγ replication origin, a gene for kanamycin resistance and two mosaic sequence ends, which serve as transposase binding sites. The transposome, provided as a DNA/transposase protein complex, is introduced by electroporation into the prototrophic strain, Enterobacter sp. YSU, and randomly incorporates itself into this host's genome. Transformants are replica plated onto Luria-Bertani agar plates containing kanamycin, (LB-kan) and onto M-9 medium agar plates containing kanamycin (M-9-kan). The transformants that grow on LB-kan plates but not on M-9-kan plates are considered to be auxotrophs. Purified genomic DNA from an auxotroph is partially digested, ligated and transformed into a pir+ Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain. The R6Kγ replication origin allows the plasmid to replicate in pir+ E. coli strains, and the kanamycin resistance marker allows for plasmid selection. Each transformant possesses a new plasmid containing the transposon flanked by the interrupted chromosomal region. Sanger sequencing and the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) suggest a putative identity of the interrupted gene. There are three advantages to using this transposome mutagenesis strategy. First, it does not rely on the expression of a transposase gene by the host. Second, the transposome is introduced into the target host by electroporation, rather than by conjugation or by transduction and therefore is more efficient. Third, the R6Kγ replication origin makes it easy to identify the mutated gene which is partially recovered in a recombinant plasmid. This technique can be used to investigate the genes involved in other characteristics of Enterobacter sp. YSU or of a

  17. Characterization of the activity of β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster in fixed and non-fixed Drosophila tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuki Tomizawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available β-Galactosidase encoded by the Escherichia coli lacZ gene, is widely used as a reporter molecule in molecular biology in a wide variety of animals. β-Galactosidase retains its enzymatic activity in cells or tissues even after fixation and can degrade X-Gal, a frequently used colormetric substrate, producing a blue color. Therefore, it can be used for the activity staining of fixed tissues. However, the enzymatic activity of the β-galactosidase that is ectopically expressed in the non-fixed tissues of animals has not been extensively studied. Here, we report the characterization of β-galactosidase activity in Drosophila tissues with and without fixation in various experimental conditions comparing the activity of two evolutionarily orthologous β-galactosidases derived from the E. coli lacZ and Drosophila melanogaster DmelGal genes. We performed quantitative analysis of the activity staining of larval imaginal discs and an in vitro assay using larval lysates. Our data showed that both E. coli and Drosophila β-galactosidase can be used for cell-type-specific activity staining, but they have their own preferences in regard to conditions. E. coli β-galactosidase showed a preference for neutral pH but not for acidic pH compared with Drosophila β-galactosidase. Our data suggested that both E. coli and Drosophila β-galactosidase show enzymatic activity in the physiological conditions of living animals when they are ectopically expressed in a desired specific spatial and temporal pattern. This may enable their future application to studies of chemical biology using model animals.

  18. Evidence that low concentrations of chlorophyllin (CHLN) increase the genetic damage induced by gamma rays in somatic cells of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, M P; Pimentel, E; Zimmering, S

    2009-01-01

    It was first demonstrated in Salmonella that higher and lower concentrations of chlorophyllin (CHLN) may have effects in opposite directions, higher doses inhibiting and lower doses promoting the mutagenic activity of certain tobacco-related nitrosamines. Previous work of our group demonstrated that CHLN may have both a promoter and an inhibitory effect on mutagenesis in Drosophila. The present paper reviews the evidence obtained in our laboratory using gamma rays as the mutagenic agent, that higher and lower pretreatment concentrations of CHLN are associated with inhibitory and promoting effects, respectively, as in Salmonella. Employing the wing spot test, 48h larvae were pretreated with various concentrations of CHLN from 0 to 69 mM and then treated with 10 Gy gamma rays. With the highest concentration of CHLN, an approximate 54% reduction in mutagenesis was observed. At 35 mM a remnant of this inhibitory effect was found in that a significant decrease was limited to the twin spot category. Evidence of promotion was first seen at 4.3mM CHLN, an effect which persisted for the remaining five lower concentrations, the most pronounced evidence of promotion being found at the four lowest concentrations, 0.03-1.1 mM CHLN. It should be noted that no evidence of genotoxicity was found for CHLN alone, an observation consistent with the several reports in the literature. The results are taken as strong evidence that pretreatment with low concentrations of CHLN promotes DNA damage induced by gamma rays in somatic cells of Drosophila.

  19. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqian Yi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  20. Mutation breeding of extracellular polysaccharide-producing microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii by a novel mutagenesis with atmospheric and room temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Zheng; Ma, Xiaonian; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yue; Wei, Dong; Chen, Feng

    2015-04-13

    Extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) produced by marine microalgae have the potential to be used as antioxidants, antiviral agents, immunomodulators, and anti-inflammatory agents. Although the marine microalga Crypthecodinium cohnii releases EPS during the process of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) production, the yield of EPS remains relatively low. To improve the EPS production, a novel mutagenesis of C. cohnii was conducted by atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP). Of the 12 mutants obtained, 10 mutants exhibited significantly enhanced EPS yield on biomass as compared with the wild type strain. Among them, mutant M7 was the best as it could produce an EPS volumetric yield of 1.02 g/L, EPS yield on biomass of 0.39 g/g and EPS yield on glucose of 94 mg/g, which were 33.85%, 85.35% and 57.17% higher than that of the wild type strain, respectively. Results of the present study indicated that mutagenesis of the marine microalga C. cohnii by ARTP was highly effective leading to the high-yield production of EPS.

  1. 31 Flavors of Drosophila Rab proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Schulze, Karen L.; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Suyama, Kaye; Wang, Stream; Fish, Matthew; Acar, Melih; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, HugoJ.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2007-04-03

    Rab proteins are small GTPases that play important roles intransport of vesicle cargo and recruitment, association of motor andother proteins with vesicles, and docking and fusion of vesicles atdefined locations. In vertebrates, more than 75 Rab genes have beenidentified, some of which have been intensively studied for their rolesin endosome and synaptic vesicle trafficking. Recent studies of thefunctions of certain Rab proteins have revealed specific roles inmediating developmental signal transduction. We have begun a systematicgenetic study of the 33 Rab genes in Drosophila. Most of the fly proteinsare clearly related to specific vertebrate proteins. We report here thecreation of a set of transgenic fly lines that allow spatially andtemporally regulated expression of Drosophila Rab proteins. We generatedfluorescent protein-tagged wild-type, dominant-negative, andconstitutively active forms of 31 Drosophila Rab proteins. We describeDrosophila Rab expression patterns during embryogenesis, the subcellularlocalization of some Rab proteins, and comparisons of the localization ofwild-type, dominant-negative, and constitutively active forms of selectedRab proteins. The high evolutionary conservation and low redundancy ofDrosophila Rab proteins make these transgenic lines a useful toolkit forinvestigating Rab functions in vivo.

  2. Site-specific genomic (SSG and random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honigberg Saul M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A valuable weapon in the arsenal available to yeast geneticists is the ability to introduce specific mutations into yeast genome. In particular, methods have been developed to introduce deletions into the yeast genome using PCR fragments. These methods are highly efficient because they do not require cloning in plasmids. Results We have modified the existing method for introducing deletions in the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome using PCR fragments in order to target point mutations to this genome. We describe two PCR-based methods for directing point mutations into the yeast genome such that the final product contains no other disruptions. In the first method, site-specific genomic (SSG mutagenesis, a specific point mutation is targeted into the genome. In the second method, random domain-localized (RDL mutagenesis, a mutation is introduced at random within a specific domain of a gene. Both methods require two sequential transformations, the first transformation integrates the URA3 marker into the targeted locus, and the second transformation replaces URA3 with a PCR fragment containing one or a few mutations. This PCR fragment is synthesized using a primer containing a mutation (SSG mutagenesis or is synthesized by error-prone PCR (RDL mutagenesis. In SSG mutagenesis, mutations that are proximal to the URA3 site are incorporated at higher frequencies than distal mutations, however mutations can be introduced efficiently at distances of at least 500 bp from the URA3 insertion. In RDL mutagenesis, to ensure that incorporation of mutations occurs at approximately equal frequencies throughout the targeted region, this region is deleted at the same time URA3 is integrated. Conclusion SSG and RDL mutagenesis allow point mutations to be easily and efficiently incorporated into the yeast genome without disrupting the native locus.

  3. Structural Analysis and Deletion Mutagenesis Define Regions of QUIVER/SLEEPLESS that Are Responsible for Interactions with Shaker-Type Potassium Channels and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilin Wu

    Full Text Available Ly6 proteins are endogenous prototoxins found in most animals. They show striking structural and functional parallels to snake α-neurotoxins, including regulation of ion channels and cholinergic signaling. However, the structural contributions of Ly6 proteins to regulation of effector molecules is poorly understood. This question is particularly relevant to the Ly6 protein QUIVER/SLEEPLESS (QVR/SSS, which has previously been shown to suppress excitability and synaptic transmission by upregulating potassium (K channels and downregulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in wake-promoting neurons to facilitate sleep in Drosophila. Using deletion mutagenesis, co-immunoprecipitations, ion flux assays, surface labeling and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that only loop 2 is required for many of the previously described properties of SSS in transfected cells, including interactions with K channels and nAChRs. Collectively our data suggest that QVR/SSS, and by extension perhaps other Ly6 proteins, target effector molecules using limited protein motifs. Mapping these motifs may be useful in rational design of drugs that mimic or suppress Ly6-effector interactions to modulate nervous system function.

  4. Mutagenesis of Ser24 of cytochrome b559 α subunit affects PSⅡ activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA JingJing; LI LiangBi; JING YuXiang; KUANG TingYun

    2007-01-01

    In order to study the functions of cytochrome b559 (Cyt b559) in photosystem two (PSⅡ) activity, mutant S24F of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was constructed using site directed mutagenesis, in which Serine24 (Ser24) locating downstream of Histidine23 (His23) in c subunit of Cyt b559 was replaced by Phenylalanine (Phe). Physiological and biochemical analysis showed that mutant S24F could be grown photoautotrophically or photoheterotrophically. However, their growth rate was slower either on HSM or TAP medium than that of the control; Analysis of PSⅡ activity revealed that its oxygen evolution was about 71% of wild type (WT); The Photochemical efficiency of PSll (Fv/Fm) of S24F was reduced 0.23 compared with WT; S24F was more sensitive to strong light irradiance than the wild type; Furthermore,SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting analysis indicated that the expression levels of c subunit of Cyt b559,LHCⅡ and PsbO of S24F were a little less than those of the wild type. Overall, these data suggests that Ser24 plays a significant role in making Cyt b559 structure maintain PSⅡ complex activity of oxygen evolution although it is not directly bound to heme group.

  5. Emulating structural stability of Pseudomonas mendocina lipase: in silico mutagenesis and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Parameswaran; Dubey, Vikash Kumar; Patra, Sanjukta

    2014-11-01

    The need of alkaline detergent-stable lipases has been growing rapidly as they are highly attractive for the production of detergents, biodiesel, pharmaceuticals agents, and various other applications. Lipase from Pseudomonas mendocina (PML) is one such candidate with triglyceride activity and non-homologous with other reported Pseudomonas lipases. The present work provides insights on the role of amino acids toward structural stability of PML. PML was subjected to mutagenesis through in silico point mutations for emulating its structural stability, the foremost property to enhance biophysiochemical properties for industrial process. The structural effects of identified mutants on PML have been analyzed through comparative atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on wild type and mutants. The in silico mutants P187A and P219A were found to stabilize their respective local dynamics and improved the structural stability of PML. The current study sheds light on the rational engineering of PML through in silico methodologies to improvise its structural stability as well as prototype for rational engineering of the lipases.

  6. ENU-induced mutagenesis in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus by treating mature sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia-Yun Jiang

    Full Text Available N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis is a useful approach for genetic improvement of plants, as well as for inducing functional mutants in animal models including mice and zebrafish. In the present study, mature sperm of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus were treated with a range of ENU concentrations for 45 min, and then wild-type eggs were fertilized. The results indicated that the proportion of embryos with morphological abnormalities at segmentation stage or dead fry at hatching stage increased with increasing ENU dose up to 10 mM. Choosing a dose that was mutagenic, but provided adequate numbers of viable fry, an F1 population was generated from 1 mM ENU-treated sperm for screening purposes. The ENU-treated F1 population showed large variations in growth during the first year. A few bigger mutants with morphologically normal were generated, as compared to the controls. Analysis of DNA from 15 F1 ENU-treated individuals for mutations in partial coding regions of igf-2a, igf-2b, mstn-1, mstn-2, fst-1 and fst-2 loci revealed that most ENU-treated point mutations were GC to AT or AT to GC substitution, which led to nonsense, nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations. The average mutation rate at the examined loci was 0.41%. These results indicate that ENU treatment of mature sperm can efficiently induce point mutations in grass carp, which is a potentially useful approach for genetic improvement of these fish.

  7. Radiation-induced mutagenesis of antifungal metabolite producing bacillus sp. HKA-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Senthilkumar, M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Bacillus sp. Strain HKA-17, isolated from the surface sterilized root nodule of Glycine max, inhibited several fungal plant pathogens. It produced a diffusible extracellular antifungal metabolite that was extracted with n-butanol. The crude extract was purified through Superdex{sup TM} 75 10/300 GL FPLC column. FT-IR spectrum of the FPLC purified-antifungal metabolite confirmed the presence of peptide and glycosidic bonds in its structure. Gamma induced mutagenesis of HKA-17 was carried out at an LD{sub 99} dose (8.46 kGy) to generate a mutant library. By screening the mutant library through a duel plate assay with Alternaria alternata, we selected one mutant with enhanced biocontrol activity (HKA-17e1) and two defective mutants (HKA-17d1 and HKA-17d2). Overproducing mutant recorded the largest inhibition zone (16.25 {+-} 0.86 mm) compared to any other mutant clone as well as wild type, and could be used as a potential biocontrol agent for plant disease suppression. The effect of HKA-17 antifungal metabolite on hyphal morphology was clearly demonstrated through scanning electron microscopy. The crude extract of defective mutant HKA-17 d1 did not induce any changes in hyphal morphology of A. alternata. However, antifungal metabolites of HKA-17 induced abnormal hyphal structures such as hyphal shrivelling, the bulging and swelling of intercalary cells, fragmentation, and cell lysis.

  8. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis reveals cooperating mutations and pathways in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Karen M; Ward, Jerrold M; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Kovochich, Anne; Dawson, David W; Black, Michael A; Brett, Benjamin T; Sheetz, Todd E; Dupuy, Adam J; Chang, David K; Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Grimmond, Sean M; Rust, Alistair G; Adams, David J; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2012-04-17

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly cancers affecting the Western world. Because the disease is highly metastatic and difficult to diagnosis until late stages, the 5-y survival rate is around 5%. The identification of molecular cancer drivers is critical for furthering our understanding of the disease and development of improved diagnostic tools and therapeutics. We have conducted a mutagenic screen using Sleeping Beauty (SB) in mice to identify new candidate cancer genes in pancreatic cancer. By combining SB with an oncogenic Kras allele, we observed highly metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Using two independent statistical methods to identify loci commonly mutated by SB in these tumors, we identified 681 loci that comprise 543 candidate cancer genes (CCGs); 75 of these CCGs, including Mll3 and Ptk2, have known mutations in human pancreatic cancer. We identified point mutations in human pancreatic patient samples for another 11 CCGs, including Acvr2a and Map2k4. Importantly, 10% of the CCGs are involved in chromatin remodeling, including Arid4b, Kdm6a, and Nsd3, and all SB tumors have at least one mutated gene involved in this process; 20 CCGs, including Ctnnd1, Fbxo11, and Vgll4, are also significantly associated with poor patient survival. SB mutagenesis provides a rich resource of mutations in potential cancer drivers for cross-comparative analyses with ongoing sequencing efforts in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  9. Activity after Site-Directed Mutagenesis of CD59 on Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhong Zhu; Meihua Gao; Shurong Ren; Qiubo Wang; Cunzhi Lin

    2008-01-01

    CD59 may inhibit the cytolytic activity of complement by binding to C8/C9 and protect host cell membranes against homologous membrane attack complex (MAC). However, CD59 is widely overexpressed on tumor cells,which has been implicated in tumorigenesis. The active site of CD59 relative to MAC is still confused. As reported the MAC binding site is located in the vicinity of a hydrophobic groove on the membrane distal face of the protein centered around residue W40. Here two site-directed mutagenesis were performed by overlapping extension PCR to delete residue W40 site (Mutant 1, M1) or to change C39W40K41 to W39W40W41 (Mutant 2, M2). Then we constructed mutant CD59 eukaryotic expression system and investigated their biological function on CHO cells compared with wild-type CD59. Stable populations of CHO cells expressing recombinant proteins were screened by immunotechnique. After 30 passages culturing, proteins could be tested. Dye release assays suggest that M1CD59 loses the activity against complement, while M2CD59 increases the anti-complement activity slightly.Results indicate that W40 of human CD59 is important to its activity, and prohibition of this site may be a potential way to increase complement activity and to treat tumors.

  10. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila.

  11. Apoptosis in Drosophila: which role for mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavier, Amandine; Rincheval-Arnold, Aurore; Colin, Jessie; Mignotte, Bernard; Guénal, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that the mitochondrion is a central regulator of mammalian cell apoptosis. However, the importance of this organelle in non-mammalian apoptosis has long been regarded as minor, mainly because of the absence of a crucial role for cytochrome c in caspase activation. Recent results indicate that the control of caspase activation and cell death in Drosophila occurs at the mitochondrial level. Numerous proteins, including RHG proteins and proteins of the Bcl-2 family that are key regulators of Drosophila apoptosis, constitutively or transiently localize in mitochondria. These proteins participate in the cell death process at different levels such as degradation of Diap1, a Drosophila IAP, production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or stimulation of the mitochondrial fission machinery. Here, we review these mitochondrial events that might have their counterpart in human.

  12. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Anand T; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C; Tokuda, Joshua M; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W; Crane, Brian R

    2013-12-17

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation.

  13. Sexual Behavior of Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revadi, Santosh; Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Anfora, Gianfranco; Dekker, Teun; Becher, Paul G

    2015-03-09

    A high reproductive potential is one reason for the rapid spread of Drosophila suzukii in Europe and in the United States. In order to identify mechanisms that mediate mating and reproduction in D. suzukii we studied the fly's reproductive behavior, diurnal mating activity and sexual maturation. Furthermore, we studied the change of female cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) with age and conducted a preliminary investigation on the role of female-derived chemical signals in male mating behavior. Sexual behavior in D. suzukii is characterized by distinct elements of male courtship leading to female acceptance for mating. Time of day and age modulate D. suzukii mating activity. As with other drosophilids, female sexual maturity is paralleled by a quantitative increase in CHCs. Neither female CHCs nor other olfactory signals were required to induce male courtship, however, presence of those signals significantly increased male sexual behavior. With this pilot study we hope to stimulate research on the reproductive biology of D. suzukii, which is relevant for the development of pest management tools.

  14. Drosophila melanogaster Models of Galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daenzer, J M I; Fridovich-Keil, J L

    2017-01-01

    The galactosemias are a family of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from impaired function of the Leloir pathway of galactose metabolism. Type I, or classic galactosemia, results from profound deficiency of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, the second enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type II galactosemia results from profound deficiency of galactokinase, the first enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Type III galactosemia results from partial deficiency of UDP galactose 4'-epimerase, the third enzyme in the Leloir pathway. Although at least classic galactosemia has been recognized clinically for more than 100 years, and detectable by newborn screening for more than 50 years, all three galactosemias remain poorly understood. Early detection and dietary restriction of galactose prevent neonatal lethality, but many affected infants grow to experience a broad range of developmental and other disabilities. To date, there is no intervention known that prevents or reverses these long-term complications. Drosophila melanogaster provides a genetically and biochemically facile model for these conditions, enabling studies that address mechanism and open the door for novel approaches to intervention.

  15. Quantification of Histamine and Carcinine in Drosophila melanogaster Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denno, Madelaine E; Privman, Eve; Borman, Ryan P; Wolin, Danielle C; Venton, B Jill

    2016-03-16

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter crucial to the visual processing of Drosophila melanogaster. It is inactivated by metabolism to carcinine, a β-alanyl derivative, and the same enzyme that controls that process also converts dopamine to N-β-alanyl-dopamine. Direct detection of histamine and carcinine has not been reported in single Drosophila brains. Here, we quantify histamine, carcinine, dopamine, and N-β-alanyl-dopamine in Drosophila tissues by capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (CE-FSCV). Limits of detection were low, 4 ± 1 pg for histamine, 10 ± 4 pg for carcinine, 2.8 ± 0.3 pg for dopamine, and 9 ± 3 pg for N-β-alanyl-dopamine. Tissue content was compared in the brain, eyes, and cuticle from wild-type (Canton S) and mutant (tan(3) and ebony(1)) strains. In tan(3) mutants, the enzyme that produces histamine from carcinine is nonfunctional, whereas in ebony(1) mutants, the enzyme that produces carcinine from histamine is nonfunctional. In all fly strains, the neurotransmitter content was highest in the eyes and there were no strain differences for tissue content in the cuticle. The main finding was that carcinine levels changed significantly in the mutant flies, whereas histamine levels did not. In particular, tan(3) flies had significantly higher carcinine levels in the eyes and brain than Canton S or ebony(1) flies. N-β-Alanyl-dopamine was detected in tan(3) mutants but not in other strains. These results show the utility of CE-FSCV for sensitive detection of histamine and carcinine, which allows a better understanding of their content and metabolism in different types of tissues to be obtained.

  16. Capulet and Slingshot share overlapping functions during Drosophila eye morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chiao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CAP/Capulet (Capt, Slingshot (Ssh and Cofilin/Twinstar (Tsr are actin-binding proteins that restrict actin polymerization. Previously, it was shown that low resolution analyses of loss-of-function mutations in capt, ssh and tsr all show ectopic F-actin accumulation in various Drosophila tissues. In contrast, RNAi depletion of capt, tsr and ssh in Drosophila S2 cells all affect actin-based lamella formation differently. Whether loss of these three related genes might cause the same effect in the same tissue remains unclear. Methods Loss-of-function mutant clones were generated using the MARCM or EGUF system whereas overexpression clones were generated using the Flip-out system. Immunostaining were then performed in eye imaginal discs with clones. FRAP was performed in cultured eye discs. Results Here, we compared their loss-of-function phenotype at single-cell resolution, using a sheet of epithelial cells in the Drosophila eye imaginal disc as a model system. Surprisingly, we found that capt and ssh, but not tsr, mutant cells within and posterior to the morphogenetic furrow (MF shared similar phenotypes. The capt/ssh mutant cells possessed: (1 hexagonal cell packing with discontinuous adherens junctions; and (2 largely complementary accumulation of excessive phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC and F-actin rings at the apical cortex. We further showed that the capt/ssh mutant phenotypes depended on the inactivation of protein kinase A (PKA and activation of Rho. Conclusions Although Capt, Ssh and Tsr were reported to negatively regulate actin polymerization, we found that Capt and Ssh, but not Tsr, share overlapping functions during eye morphogenesis.

  17. Drosophila X-Linked Genes Have Lower Translation Rates than Autosomal Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenguo; Presgraves, Daven C

    2016-02-01

    In Drosophila, X-linked and autosomal genes achieve comparable expression at the mRNA level. Whether comparable X-autosome gene expression is realized at the translational and, ultimately, the protein levels is, however, unknown. Previous studies suggest the possibility of higher translation rates for X-linked genes owing to stronger usage of preferred codons. In this study, we use public ribosome profiling data from Drosophila melanogaster to infer translation rates on the X chromosome versus the autosomes. We find that X-linked genes have consistently lower ribosome densities than autosomal genes in S2 cells, early embryos, eggs, and mature oocytes. Surprisingly, the lower ribosome densities of X-linked genes are not consistent with faster translation elongation but instead imply slower translation initiation. In particular, X-linked genes have sequence features known to slow translation initiation such as stronger mRNA structure near start codons and longer 5'-UTRs. Comparison to outgroup species suggests that stronger mRNA structure is an evolved feature of Drosophila X chromosomes. Finally, we find that the magnitude of the X-autosome difference in ribosome densities is smaller for genes encoding members of protein complexes, suggesting that stoichiometry constrains the evolution of translation rates. In sum, our analyses suggest that Drosophila X-linked genes have evolved lower translation rates than autosomal genes despite stronger usage of preferred codons.

  18. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  19. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  20. Developing a Drosophila Model of Schwannomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    found to associate with RasV12;scrib–/– tumors and to reduce tumor growth in scrib–/– animals (Pastor- Pareja et al., 2008). The Drosophila genome...2006). Loss of cell polarity drives tumor growth and invasion through JNK activation in Drosophila. Curr. Biol. 16, 1139-1146. Igaki, T., Pastor- Pareja ...genome. Nat. Genet. 36, 288-292. Pastor- Pareja , J. C., Wu, M. and Xu. T. (2008). An innate immune response of blood cells to tumors and tissue damage in

  1. Exploring the potential of megaprimer PCR in conjunction with orthogonal array design for mutagenesis library construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lixia; Zheng, Kai; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Huayu; Wang, Hu; Song, Chunlei; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Although megaprimer PCR mutagenesis has been used routinely in protein directed evolution, users sometimes encounter technical hurdles, particularly inefficiency during amplification when large fragments are used or the template is difficult to be amplified. Instead of methodology development, here we simply overcome the limitation by optimizing megaprimer PCR conditions via orthogonal array design of the four PCR components in three levels of each: template, primer, Mg(2+) , and dNTPs. For this, only nine PCRs need to be performed. The strategy (termed as OptiMega) was not only successfully applied for the construction of one multiple-site saturation mutagenesis library of halohydrin dehalogenase HheC, which failed to be constructed previously using the standard QuikChange™ protocol, but also expanded the construction of two high-quality random mutagenesis libraries of HheA and HheC. Most importantly, OptiMega offers a quick and simple way of constructing random mutagenesis libraries by eliminating the ligation step. Our results demonstrated that the OptiMega strategy could greatly strengthen the potential of megaprimer PCR mutagenesis for library construction.

  2. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Mutagenesis - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demple, Bruce [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). School of Medicine

    2012-08-24

    The delicate balance among cellular pathways that control mutagenic changes in DNA will be the focus of the 2012 Mutagenesis Gordon Research Conference. Mutagenesis is essential for evolution, while genetic stability maintains cellular functions in all organisms from microbes to metazoans. Different systems handle DNA lesions at various times of the cell cycle and in different places within the nucleus, and inappropriate actions can lead to mutations. While mutation in humans is closely linked to disease, notably cancers, mutational systems can also be beneficial. The conference will highlight topics of beneficial mutagenesis, including full establishment of the immune system, cell survival mechanisms, and evolution and adaptation in microbial systems. Equal prominence will be given to detrimental mutation processes, especially those involved in driving cancer, neurological diseases, premature aging, and other threats to human health. Provisional session titles include Branching Pathways in Mutagenesis; Oxidative Stress and Endogenous DNA Damage; DNA Maintenance Pathways; Recombination, Good and Bad; Problematic DNA Structures; Localized Mutagenesis; Hypermutation in the Microbial World; and Mutation and Disease.

  3. Rapid Mutation of Spirulina platensis by a New Mutagenesis System of Atmospheric and Room Temperature Plasmas (ARTP) and Generation of a Mutant Library with Diverse Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Tan, Yinyee; Jiang, Peixia; Ge, Nan; Heping Li; Xing, Xinhui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae. PMID:24319517

  4. Rapid mutation of Spirulina platensis by a new mutagenesis system of atmospheric and room temperature plasmas (ARTP and generation of a mutant library with diverse phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Fang

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aimed to improve the carbohydrate productivity of Spirulina platensis by generating mutants with increased carbohydrate content and growth rate. ARTP was used as a new mutagenesis tool to generate a mutant library of S. platensis with diverse phenotypes. Protocol for rapid mutation of S. platensis by 60 s treatment with helium driven ARTP and high throughput screening method of the mutants using the 96-well microplate and microplate reader was established. A mutant library of 62 mutants was then constructed and ideal mutants were selected out. The characteristics of the mutants after the mutagenesis inclined to be stable after around 9(th subculture, where the total mutation frequency and positive mutation frequency in terms of specific growth rate reached 45% and 25%, respectively. The mutants in mutant library showed diverse phenotypes in terms of cell growth rate, carbohydrate content and flocculation intensity. The positive mutation frequency in terms of cellular carbohydrate content with the increase by more than 20% percent than the wild strain was 32.3%. Compared with the wild strain, the representative mutants 3-A10 and 3-B2 showed 40.3% and 78.0% increase in carbohydrate content, respectively, while the mutant 4-B3 showed 10.5% increase in specific growth rate. The carbohydrate contents of the representative mutants were stable during different subcultures, indicating high genetic stability. ARTP was demonstrated to be an effective and non-GMO mutagenesis tool to generate the mutant library for multicellular microalgae.

  5. Mutagenic and recombinagenic activity of airborne particulates, PM10 and TSP, organic extracts in the Drosophila wing-spot test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Dihl, Rafael [Programa de Pos Graduacao em Genetica e Biologia Molecular (PPGBM), Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grazielli Azevedo da Silva, Carla [Instituto de Quimica, Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Souza do Amaral, Viviane; Reguly, Maria Luiza [Laboratorio de Diagnostico da Toxicidade Genetica (TOXIGEN), Programa de Pos Graduacao em Genetica e Toxicologia Aplicada (PPGGTA), Universidade Luterana do Brasil - ULBRA, Avenida Farroupilha 8001, 92420280 Canoas, RS (Brazil); Rodrigues de Andrade, Heloisa Helena [Laboratorio de Diagnostico da Toxicidade Genetica (TOXIGEN), Programa de Pos Graduacao em Genetica e Toxicologia Aplicada (PPGGTA), Universidade Luterana do Brasil -ULBRA, Avenida Farroupilha 8001, 92420280 Canoas, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: heloisa@ulbra.br

    2008-01-15

    The genotoxicity associated with air pollution in the city of Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil), was assessed in November (spring) and January (summer). We applied the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster in its standard version with normal bioactivation (ST) and in its variant with increased cytochrome P450-dependent biotransformation capacity (HB). The data indicated the genotoxicity of TSP and PM10 collected in November, in both ST and HB crosses. The genotoxic activity of the PM10 material in the spring sample was exclusively associated with the induction of mitotic recombination, whereas the TSP genetic toxicity was due to both recombinational as well as point and/or chromosomal mutation events. Considering PM10 collected in January, a positive response-100% (17.10 m{sup 3}/ml) concentration-was observed in the HB cross, which was not detected in the ST cross. - Drosophila Wing-Spot Test can be used for detection of airborne particulates mutagenesis.

  6. A young Drosophila duplicate gene plays essential roles in spermatogenesis by regulating several Y-linked male fertility genes.

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    Yun Ding

    Full Text Available Gene duplication is supposed to be the major source for genetic innovations. However, how a new duplicate gene acquires functions by integrating into a pathway and results in adaptively important phenotypes has remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated the biological roles and the underlying molecular mechanism of the young kep1 gene family in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup to understand the origin and evolution of new genes with new functions. Sequence and expression analysis demonstrates that one of the new duplicates, nsr (novel spermatogenesis regulator, exhibits positive selection signals and novel subcellular localization pattern. Targeted mutagenesis and whole-transcriptome sequencing analysis provide evidence that nsr is required for male reproduction associated with sperm individualization, coiling, and structural integrity of the sperm axoneme via regulation of several Y chromosome fertility genes post-transcriptionally. The absence of nsr-like expression pattern and the presence of the corresponding cis-regulatory elements of the parental gene kep1 in the pre-duplication species Drosophila yakuba indicate that kep1 might not be ancestrally required for male functions and that nsr possibly has experienced the neofunctionalization process, facilitated by changes of trans-regulatory repertories. These findings not only present a comprehensive picture about the evolution of a new duplicate gene but also show that recently originated duplicate genes can acquire multiple biological roles and establish novel functional pathways by regulating essential genes.

  7. Postsynaptic actin regulates active zone spacing and glutamate receptor apposition at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunk, Aline D; Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W; Lee, Jihye; Walldorf, Uwe; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Guisheng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Littleton, J Troy

    2014-07-01

    Synaptic communication requires precise alignment of presynaptic active zones with postsynaptic receptors to enable rapid and efficient neurotransmitter release. How transsynaptic signaling between connected partners organizes this synaptic apparatus is poorly understood. To further define the mechanisms that mediate synapse assembly, we carried out a chemical mutagenesis screen in Drosophila to identify mutants defective in the alignment of active zones with postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields at the larval neuromuscular junction. From this screen we identified a mutation in Actin 57B that disrupted synaptic morphology and presynaptic active zone organization. Actin 57B, one of six actin genes in Drosophila, is expressed within the postsynaptic bodywall musculature. The isolated allele, act(E84K), harbors a point mutation in a highly conserved glutamate residue in subdomain 1 that binds members of the Calponin Homology protein family, including spectrin. Homozygous act(E84K) mutants show impaired alignment and spacing of presynaptic active zones, as well as defects in apposition of active zones to postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields. act(E84K) mutants have disrupted postsynaptic actin networks surrounding presynaptic boutons, with the formation of aberrant actin swirls previously observed following disruption of postsynaptic spectrin. Consistent with a disruption of the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton, spectrin, adducin and the PSD-95 homolog Discs-Large are all mislocalized in act(E84K) mutants. Genetic interactions between act(E84K) and neurexin mutants suggest that the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton may function together with the Neurexin-Neuroligin transsynaptic signaling complex to mediate normal synapse development and presynaptic active zone organization.

  8. Automated measurement of Drosophila wings

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    Mezey Jason

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in evolutionary biology and genetics are limited by the rate at which phenotypic information can be acquired. The wings of Drosophila species are a favorable target for automated analysis because of the many interesting questions in evolution and development that can be addressed with them, and because of their simple structure. Results We have developed an automated image analysis system (WINGMACHINE that measures the positions of all the veins and the edges of the wing blade of Drosophilid flies. A video image is obtained with the aid of a simple suction device that immobilizes the wing of a live fly. Low-level processing is used to find the major intersections of the veins. High-level processing then optimizes the fit of an a priori B-spline model of wing shape. WINGMACHINE allows the measurement of 1 wing per minute, including handling, imaging, analysis, and data editing. The repeatabilities of 12 vein intersections averaged 86% in a sample of flies of the same species and sex. Comparison of 2400 wings of 25 Drosophilid species shows that wing shape is quite conservative within the group, but that almost all taxa are diagnosably different from one another. Wing shape retains some phylogenetic structure, although some species have shapes very different from closely related species. The WINGMACHINE system facilitates artificial selection experiments on complex aspects of wing shape. We selected on an index which is a function of 14 separate measurements of each wing. After 14 generations, we achieved a 15 S.D. difference between up and down-selected treatments. Conclusion WINGMACHINE enables rapid, highly repeatable measurements of wings in the family Drosophilidae. Our approach to image analysis may be applicable to a variety of biological objects that can be represented as a framework of connected lines.

  9. Drosophila bitter taste(s

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    Alice eFrench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called bitter. By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induce aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to inhibitory pheromones such as 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different categories of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction

  10. Signaling by Drosophila capa neuropeptides.

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    Davies, Shireen-A; Cabrero, Pablo; Povsic, Manca; Johnston, Natalie R; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T

    2013-07-01

    The capa peptide family, originally identified in the tobacco hawk moth, Manduca sexta, is now known to be present in many insect families, with increasing publications on capa neuropeptides each year. The physiological actions of capa peptides vary depending on the insect species but capa peptides have key myomodulatory and osmoregulatory functions, depending on insect lifestyle, and life stage. Capa peptide signaling is thus critical for fluid homeostasis and survival, making study of this neuropeptide family attractive for novel routes for insect control. In Dipteran species, including the genetically tractable Drosophila melanogaster, capa peptide action is diuretic; via elevation of nitric oxide, cGMP and calcium in the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules. The identification of the capa receptor (capaR) in several insect species has shown this to be a canonical GPCR. In D. melanogaster, ligand-activated capaR activity occurs in a dose-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-12)M. Lower concentrations of capa peptide do not activate capaR, either in adult or larval Malpighian tubules. Use of transgenic flies in which capaR is knocked-down in only Malpighian tubule principal cells demonstrates that capaR modulates tubule fluid secretion rates and in doing so, sets the organismal response to desiccation. Thus, capa regulates a desiccation-responsive pathway in D. melanogaster, linking its role in osmoregulation and fluid homeostasis to environmental response and survival. The conservation of capa action between some Dipteran species suggests that capa's role in desiccation tolerance may not be confined to D. melanogaster.

  11. In vivo functional analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster nicotinic acetylcholine receptor Dα6 using the insecticide spinosad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Jason; Nguyen, Joseph; Lumb, Chris; Batterham, Phil; Perry, Trent

    2015-09-01

    The vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used to identify and manipulate insecticide resistance genes. The advancement of genome engineering technology and the increasing availability of pest genome sequences has increased the predictive and diagnostic capacity of the Drosophila model. The Drosophila model can be extended to investigate the basic biology of the interaction between insecticides and the proteins they target. Recently we have developed an in vivo system that permits the expression and study of key insecticide targets, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), in controlled genetic backgrounds. Here this system is used to study the interaction between the insecticide spinosad and a nAChR subunit, Dα6. Reciprocal chimeric subunits were created from Dα6 and Dα7, a subunit that does not respond to spinosad. Using the in vivo system, the Dα6/Dα7 chimeric subunits were tested for their capacity to respond to spinosad. Only the subunits containing the C-terminal region of Dα6 were able to respond to spinosad, thus confirming the importance this region for spinosad binding. A new incompletely dominant, spinosad resistance mechanism that may evolve in pest species is also examined. First generated using chemical mutagenesis, the Dα6(P146S) mutation was recreated using the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, the first use of this technology to introduce a resistant mutation into a controlled genetic background. Both alleles present with the same incompletely dominant, spinosad resistance phenotype, proving the P146S replacement to be the causal mutation. The proximity of the P146S mutation to the conserved Cys-loop indicates that it may impair the gating of the receptor. The results of this study enhance the understanding of nAChR structure:function relationships. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutagenesis and phenotyping resources in zebrafish for studying development and human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Gaurav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an important model organism for studying development and human disease. The zebrafish has an excellent reference genome and the functions of hundreds of genes have been tested using both forward and reverse genetic approaches. Recent years have seen an increasing number of large-scale mutagenesis projects and the number of mutants or gene knockouts in zebrafish has increased rapidly, including for the first time conditional knockout technologies. In addition, targeted mutagenesis techniques such as zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short sequences (CRISPR) or CRISPR-associated (Cas), have all been shown to effectively target zebrafish genes as well as the first reported germline homologous recombination, further expanding the utility and power of zebrafish genetics. Given this explosion of mutagenesis resources, it is now possible to perform systematic, high-throughput phenotype analysis of all zebrafish gene knockouts. PMID:24162064

  13. Improvement of megaprimer method for site-directed mutagenesis and its application to phytase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiqiang LU; Hongwei YU; Runfang GUO; Yingmin JIA

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is used extensively for probing gene function. In this paper we describe an improved megaprimer method to the site-directed muta-genesis of phytase from Aspergillus niger, which allowed the mutations to be performed more efficiently in less time than other traditional methods. Three rounds of PCR and two pairs of primers were required in this method, and additionally, the restriction enzyme Dpn I was used for the elimination of template instead of the gel purification in this process. The entire procedure was performed in one tube. Moreover, this method was easier for obtaining large mutant genes than other methods. We successfully carried out the site-directed mutagenesis of phytase by adopting this method.

  14. Flies across the water: genetic differentiation and reproductive isolation in allopatric desert Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markow, Therese A; Castrezana, Sergio; Pfeiler, Edward

    2002-03-01

    Between sister species of Drosophila, both pre- and postzygotic reproductive isolation commonly appear by the time a Nei's genetic distance of 0.5 is observed. The degree of genetic differentiation present when allopatric populations of the same Drosophila species exhibit incipient reproductive isolation has not been systematically investigated. Here we compare the relationship between genetic differentiation and pre- and postzygotic isolation among allopatric populations of three cactophilic desert Drosophila: D. mettleri, D. nigrospiracula, and D. mojavensis. The range of all three is interrupted by the Gulf of California, while two species, D. mettleri and D. mojavensis, have additional allopatric populations residing on distant Santa Catalina Island, off the coast of southern California. Significant population structure exists within all three species, but only for allopatric populations of D. mojavensis is significant isolation at the prezygotic level observed. The genetic distances for the relevant populations of D. mojavensis were in the range of 0.12, similar to that for D. mettleri whose greatest D = 0.11 was unassociated with any form of isolation. These observations suggest further investigations of Drosophila populations with genetic distances in this range be undertaken to identify any potential patterns in the relationship between degree of genetic differentiation and the appearance of pre- and/or postzygotic isolation.

  15. Antistress property of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Athimadhura on stress induced Drosophila melanogaster

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    Sowmya M.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as a condition that disturbs the normal function of the biological system or a condition that decreases fitness. The present study was to evaluate the antistress property of Glycyrrhiza glabra (Athimadura. Here the Antistress property was experimented on Drosophila melanogaster. Stress was induced by adding methotrixate (MTX to the media. The 4 groups of Drosophila melanogaster were cultured in the laboratory. In the first group only control flies. In the second group MTX induced flies, in the third group MTX along with plant powder induced flies. In the fourth group only plant powder induced flies were cultured. Stress related enzymes like Catalase (CAT and Super Oxide Dismutase (SOD are most widely used paradigm for the evaluation of enzyme activity . SOD and CAT Activity in Stress induced flies was increased compared to that of normal flies. After incorporation of the plant powder to the media fed for Drosophila melanogaster, both SOD and CAT Activity was decreased indicating the reduction in Stress by the plant powder. Thus Glycyrrhiza glabra may have Antistress property, as it has reduced stress in Drosophila melanogaster induced by MTX at different concentration.

  16. Coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures: early interactions in the Drosophila leg

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    cedric esoler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the musculoskeletal system is a remarkable example of tissue assembly. In both vertebrates and invertebrates, precise connectivity between muscles and skeleton (or exoskeleton via tendons or equivalent structures is fundamental for movement and stability of the body. The molecular and cellular processes underpinning muscle formation are well established and significant advances have been made in understanding tendon development. However, the mechanisms contributing to proper connection between these two tissues have received less attention. Observations of coordinated development of tendons and muscles suggest these tissues may interact during the different steps in their development. There is growing evidence that, depending on animal model and muscle type, these interactions can take place from progenitor induction to the final step of the formation of the musculoskeletal system. Here we briefly review and compare the mechanisms behind muscle and tendon interaction throughout the development of vertebrates and Drosophila before going on to discuss our recent findings on the coordinated development of muscles and tendon-like structures in Drosophila leg. By altering apodeme formation (the functional Drosophila equivalent of tendons in vertebrates during the early steps of leg development, we affect the spatial localisation of subsequent myoblasts. These findings provide the first evidence of the developmental impact of early interactions between muscle and tendon-like precursors, and confirm the appendicular Drosophila muscle system as a valuable model for studying these processes.

  17. Evolution in the fast lane: rapidly evolving sex-related genes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerty, Wilfried; Jagadeeshan, Santosh; Kulathinal, Rob J; Wong, Alex; Ravi Ram, Kristipati; Sirot, Laura K; Levesque, Lisa; Artieri, Carlo G; Wolfner, Mariana F; Civetta, Alberto; Singh, Rama S

    2007-11-01

    A large portion of the annotated genes in Drosophila melanogaster show sex-biased expression, indicating that sex and reproduction-related genes (SRR genes) represent an appreciable component of the genome. Previous studies, in which subsets of genes were compared among few Drosophila species, have found that SRR genes exhibit unusual evolutionary patterns. Here, we have used the newly released genome sequences from 12 Drosophila species, coupled to a larger set of SRR genes, to comprehensively test the generality of these patterns. Among 2505 SRR genes examined, including ESTs with biased expression in reproductive tissues and genes characterized as involved in gametogenesis, we find that a relatively high proportion of SRR genes have experienced accelerated divergence throughout the genus Drosophila. Several testis-specific genes, male seminal fluid proteins (SFPs), and spermatogenesis genes show lineage-specific bursts of accelerated evolution and positive selection. SFP genes also show evidence of lineage-specific gene loss and/or gain. These results bring us closer to understanding the details of the evolutionary dynamics of SRR genes with respect to species divergence.

  18. NIP/DuoxA is essential for Drosophila embryonic development and regulates oxidative stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaojun; Hu, Jack; Liu, Xiping; Qin, Hanjuan; Percival-Smith, Anthony; Rao, Yong; Li, Shawn S C

    2010-05-11

    NIP/DuoxA, originally cloned as a protein capable of binding to the cell fate determinant Numb in Drosophila, was recently identified as a modulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mammalian systems. Despite biochemical and cellular studies that link NIP/DuoxA to the generation of ROS through the dual oxidase (Duox) enzyme, the in vivo function of NIP/DuoxA has not been characterized to date. Here we report a genetic and functional characterization of nip in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that nip is essential for Drosophila development as nip null mutants die at the 1(st) larval instar. Expression of UAS-nip, but not UAS-Duox, rescued the lethality. To understand the function of nip beyond the early larval stage, we generated GAL4 inducible UAS-RNAi transgenes. da(G32)-GAL4 driven, ubiquitous RNAi-mediated silencing of nip led to profound abnormality in pre-adult development, crinkled wing and markedly reduced lifespan at 29 degrees C. Compared to wild type flies, da-GAL4 induced nip-RNAi transgenic flies exhibited significantly reduced ability to survive under oxidative stress and displayed impaired mitochondrial aconitase function. Our work provides in vivo evidence for a critical role for nip in the development and oxidative stress response in Drosophila.

  19. NIP/DuoxA is essential for Drosophila embryonic development and regulates oxidative stress response

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    Xiaojun Xie, Jack Hu, Xiping Liu, Hanjuan Qin, Anthony Percival-Smith, Yong Rao, Shawn S.C. Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available NIP/DuoxA, originally cloned as a protein capable of binding to the cell fate determinant Numb in Drosophila, was recently identified as a modulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS production in mammalian systems. Despite biochemical and cellular studies that link NIP/DuoxA to the generation of ROS through the dual oxidase (Duox enzyme, the in vivo function of NIP/DuoxA has not been characterized to date. Here we report a genetic and functional characterization of nip in Drosophila melanogaster. We show that nip is essential for Drosophila development as nip null mutants die at the 1st larval instar. Expression of UAS-nip, but not UAS-Duox, rescued the lethality. To understand the function of nip beyond the early larval stage, we generated GAL4 inducible UAS-RNAi transgenes. daG32-GAL4 driven, ubiquitous RNAi-mediated silencing of nip led to profound abnormality in pre-adult development, crinkled wing and markedly reduced lifespan at 29°C. Compared to wild type flies, da-GAL4 induced nip-RNAi transgenic flies exhibited significantly reduced ability to survive under oxidative stress and displayed impaired mitochondrial aconitase function. Our work provides in vivo evidence for a critical role for nip in the development and oxidative stress response in Drosophila.

  20. Ecological insights from assessments of phenotypic plasticity in a Neotropical species of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska, Maria Stefania; Brito, Felipe Alves de; Tidon, Rosana

    2016-12-01

    Several authors have called attention to the evolutionary importance of phenotypic plasticity and niche construction, because such phenomena require a new status and a new perspective. Drosophila species are traditionally used as models in investigations of phenotypic plasticity, although the majority of such research has been conducted with species of the subgenus Sophophora, primarily Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we investigated the phenotypic plasticity of Drosophila cardini, a Neotropical species of the subgenus Drosophila, and focused on the wing size, wing shape, thorax length and wing: thorax ratio of lines that were collected in the Brazilian savanna and exposed to different temperatures during growth. All of the analyzed traits presented plasticity to temperature, and the reaction norms were similar to those previously found in other drosophilid species; in addition, the maximum values were consistent with the temperature variations at the collection sites. The specimens that emerged at low temperatures were larger and had more rounded wings compared with those that emerged at high temperatures, which were smaller and had narrower wings. We hypothesized that the differences observed in the shape of the wings might be associated with flight performance. Nevertheless, further investigation of the relationships among wing shape, wing loading and flight performance is required. Investigations on phenotypic plasticity using species with diverse ecologies should help us to better understand how this phenomenon operates in nature, and studies of this type must be encouraged.

  1. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  2. Isolation of Drosophila egg chambers for imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an important model for basic research into the molecular mechanisms underlying cell function and development, as well as a major biomedical research tool. A significant advantage of Drosophila is the ability to apply live cell imaging to a variety of living tissues that can be dissected and imaged in vivo, ex vivo, or in vitro. Drosophila egg chambers, for example, have proven to be a useful model system for studying border cell migration, Golgi unit transport, the rapid movement of mRNA and protein particles, and the role of microtubules in meiosis and oocyte differentiation. A crucial first step before imaging is preparation of the experimental material to ensure physiological relevance and to achieve the best conditions for image quality. Early- to mid-stage egg chambers cannot be mounted in an aqueous-based medium, because this causes a change in microtubule organization and follicle cell morphology. Such egg chambers survive better in Halocarbon oil, which allows free diffusion of oxygen, has low viscosity, and thus prevents dehydration and hypoxia. With a refractive index similar to glycerol, Halocarbon oil also has good optical properties for imaging. It also provides a good environment for injection and is particularly useful for long-term imaging of embryos. However, unlike with aqueous solutions, changes in the medium are not possible. This protocol describes the isolation of Drosophila egg chambers.

  3. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

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    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  4. Drosophila Melanogaster as an Experimental Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the fruit fly in genetics research requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Describes embryological and genetic methods used in the experimental analysis of this organism. Outlines the use of Drosophila in the study of the development and function of the nervous system. (RT)

  5. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, N.E.; Clausen, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 angstrom resolution s...

  6. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  7. The hemolymph proteome of fed and starved Drosophila larvae.

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    Björn Handke

    Full Text Available The co-operation of specialized organ systems in complex multicellular organisms depends on effective chemical communication. Thus, body fluids (like blood, lymph or intraspinal fluid contain myriads of signaling mediators apart from metabolites. Moreover, these fluids are also of crucial importance for immune and wound responses. Compositional analyses of human body fluids are therefore of paramount diagnostic importance. Further improving their comprehensiveness should increase our understanding of inter-organ communication. In arthropods, which have trachea for gas exchange and an open circulatory system, the single dominating interstitial fluid is the hemolymph. Accordingly, a detailed analysis of hemolymph composition should provide an especially comprehensive picture of chemical communication and defense in animals. Therefore we used an extensive protein fractionation workflow in combination with a discovery-driven proteomic approach to map out the detectable protein composition of hemolymph isolated from Drosophila larvae. Combined mass spectrometric analysis revealed more than 700 proteins extending far beyond the previously known Drosophila hemolymph proteome. Moreover, by comparing hemolymph isolated from either fed or starved larvae, we provide initial provisional insights concerning compositional changes in response to nutritional state. Storage proteins in particular were observed to be strongly reduced by starvation. Our hemolymph proteome catalog provides a rich basis for data mining, as exemplified by our identification of potential novel cytokines, as well as for future quantitative analyses by targeted proteomics.

  8. Appetitive and aversive visual learning in freely moving Drosophila

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    Christopher Schnaitmann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To compare appetitive and aversive visual memories of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, we developed a new paradigm for classical conditioning. Adult flies are trained en masse to differentially associate one of two visual conditioned stimuli (blue and green light as conditioned stimuli or CS with an appetitive or aversive chemical substance (unconditioned stimulus or US. In a test phase, flies are given a choice between the paired and the unpaired visual stimuli. Associative memory is measured based on altered visual preference in the test. If a group of flies has, for example, received a sugar reward with green light, they show a significantly higher preference for the green stimulus during the test than another group of flies having received the same reward with blue light. We demonstrate critical parameters for the formation of visual appetitive memory, such as training repetition, order of reinforcement, starvation, and individual conditioning. Furthermore, we show that formic acid can act as an aversive chemical reinforcer, yielding weak, yet significant, aversive memory. These results provide a basis for future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying visual memory and perception in Drosophila.

  9. Using Drosophila to discover mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes

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    Ronald W. Alfa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of glucose homeostasis are remarkably well conserved between the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and mammals. From the initial characterization of insulin signaling in the fly came the identification of downstream metabolic pathways for nutrient storage and utilization. Defects in these pathways lead to phenotypes that are analogous to diabetic states in mammals. These discoveries have stimulated interest in leveraging the fly to better understand the genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin insufficiency in the context of ongoing insulin resistance. Although genetic susceptibility is thought to govern the propensity of individuals to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus under appropriate environmental conditions, many of the human genes associated with the disease in genome-wide association studies have not been functionally studied. Recent advances in the phenotyping of metabolic defects have positioned Drosophila as an excellent model for the functional characterization of large numbers of genes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we examine results from studies modeling metabolic disease in the fruit fly and compare findings to proposed mechanisms for diabetic phenotypes in mammals. We provide a systematic framework for assessing the contribution of gene candidates to insulin-secretion or insulin-resistance pathways relevant to diabetes pathogenesis.

  10. Electric shock-induced associative olfactory learning in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Dennis; Pfitzenmaier, Johanna E R; Krebs-Wheaton, Rebecca; Selcho, Mareike; Stocker, Reinhard F; Thum, Andreas S

    2010-05-01

    Associative plasticity is a basic essential attribute of nervous systems. As shown by numerous reports, Drosophila is able to establish simple forms of appetitive and aversive olfactory associations at both larval and adult stages. Whereas most adult studies on aversive learning employed electric shock as a negative reinforcer, larval paradigms essentially utilized gustatory stimuli to create negative associations, a discrepancy that limits the comparison of data. To overcome this drawback, we critically revisited larval odor-electric shock conditioning. First, we show that lithium chloride (LiCl), which was used in all previous larval electric shock paradigms, is not required per se in larval odor-electric shock learning. This is of considerable practical advantage because beside its peculiar effects LiCl is attractive to larvae at low concentration that renders comparative learning studies on genetically manipulated larvae complicated. Second, we confirm that in both a 2-odor reciprocal and a 1-odor nonreciprocal conditioning regimen, larvae are able to associate an odor with electric shock. In the latter experiments, initial learning scores reach an asymptote after 5 training trials, and aversive memory is still detectable after 60 min. Our experiments provide a comprehensive basis for future comparisons of larval olfactory conditioning reinforced by different modalities, for studies aimed at analyzing odor-electric shock learning in the larva and the adult, and for investigations of the cellular and molecular substrate of aversive olfactory learning in the simple Drosophila model.

  11. Neurofibromin Loss of Function Drives Excessive Grooming in Drosophila

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    Lanikea B. King

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis I is a common genetic disorder that results in tumor formation, and predisposes individuals to a range of cognitive/behavioral symptoms, including deficits in attention, visuospatial skills, learning, language development, and sleep, and autism spectrum disorder-like traits. The nf1-encoded neurofibromin protein (Nf1 exhibits high conservation, from the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to humans. Drosophila provides a powerful platform to investigate the signaling cascades upstream and downstream of Nf1, and the fly model exhibits similar behavioral phenotypes to mammalian models. In order to understand how loss of Nf1 affects motor behavior in flies, we combined traditional activity monitoring with video analysis of grooming behavior. In nf1 mutants, spontaneous grooming was increased up to 7x. This increase in activity was distinct from previously described dopamine-dependent hyperactivity, as dopamine transporter mutants exhibited slightly decreased grooming. Finally, we found that relative grooming frequencies can be compared in standard activity monitors that measure infrared beam breaks, enabling the use of activity monitors as an automated method to screen for grooming phenotypes. Overall, these data suggest that loss of nf1 produces excessive activity that is manifested as increased grooming, providing a platform to dissect the molecular genetics of neurofibromin signaling across neuronal circuits.

  12. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finola E Moore

    Full Text Available Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  13. Ultrafast solvation dynamics at internal site of staphylococcal nuclease investigated by site-directed mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guang-yu, Gao; Wei, Wang; Shu-feng, Wang; Zhong, Dongping; Qi-huang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is essential for protein activities. To study internal solvation of protein, site-directed mutagenesis is applied. Intrinsic fluorescent probe, tryptophan, is inserted into desired position inside protein molecule for ultrafast spectroscopic study. Here we review this unique method for protein dynamics researches. We introduce the frontiers of protein solvation, site-directed mutagenesis, protein stability and characteristics, and the spectroscopic methods. Then we present time-resolved spectroscopic dynamics of solvation dynamics inside caves of active sites. The studies are carried out on a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease. The solvation at internal sites of the caves indicate clear characteristics of local environment. These solvation behaviors correlated to the enzyme activity directly.

  14. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  15. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Penghe; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Tans, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster shares many similarities with vertebrates in heart development. Comparison of heart structural and functional characteristic between male and female Drosophila melanogaster at different developmental stages is helpful to understand heart morphogenesis and function for different genders. And also, it opens up the possibility to uncover the role of sex-related genes in heart development. In this longitudinal study, we cultured and tracked dozens of individually labeled flies throughout their lifecycle. The heart characteristic was measured at different developmental stages during culturing. The gender of each individual fly was determined by adult stage so that the collected data of early stages could be classified to male or female group. We adapted a high-speed optical coherence microscopy (OCM) system with axial and transverse resolution of 2um and 4um, respectively, to perform non-invasive M-mode imaging at a frame rate of 132Hz in Drosophila heart at third instar larva, early pupa and adult stage. Based on those GPU processed M-mode OCM images, we segmented the fly heart region and then quantified the cardiac structural and functional parameters such as heart rate, heart chamber size and so on. Despite large variances of wild type Drosophila in terms of some cardiac characteristic, our results suggest that the heart rate is lower for male flies than for female flies, especially at third instar larva stage. The end diastolic area (EDA) and end systolic area (ESA) of the heart are both slightly larger in female flies than in male flies at larva and adult stage. In summary, we showed gender differences of wild type drosophila in heart functional and structural characteristic.

  16. A study on the effect of surface lysine to arginine mutagenesis on protein stability and structure using green fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Sokalingam

    Full Text Available Two positively charged basic amino acids, arginine and lysine, are mostly exposed to protein surface, and play important roles in protein stability by forming electrostatic interactions. In particular, the guanidinium group of arginine allows interactions in three possible directions, which enables arginine to form a larger number of electrostatic interactions compared to lysine. The higher pKa of the basic residue in arginine may also generate more stable ionic interactions than lysine. This paper reports an investigation whether the advantageous properties of arginine over lysine can be utilized to enhance protein stability. A variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP was created by mutating the maximum possible number of lysine residues on the surface to arginines while retaining the activity. When the stability of the variant was examined under a range of denaturing conditions, the variant was relatively more stable compared to control GFP in the presence of chemical denaturants such as urea, alkaline pH and ionic detergents, but the thermal stability of the protein was not changed. The modeled structure of the variant indicated putative new salt bridges and hydrogen bond interactions that help improve the rigidity of the protein against different chemical denaturants. Structural analyses of the electrostatic interactions also confirmed that the geometric properties of the guanidinium group in arginine had such effects. On the other hand, the altered electrostatic interactions induced by the mutagenesis of surface lysines to arginines adversely affected protein folding, which decreased the productivity of the functional form of the variant. These results suggest that the surface lysine mutagenesis to arginines can be considered one of the parameters in protein stability engineering.

  17. Organization and evolution of Drosophila terminin: similarities and differences between Drosophila and human telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Daniela Raffa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila lacks telomerase and fly telomeres are elongated by occasional transposition of three specialized retroelements. Drosophila telomeres do not terminate with GC-rich repeats and are assembled independently of the sequence of chromosome ends. Recent work has shown that Drosophila telomeres are capped by the terminin complex, which includes the fast-evolving proteins HOAP, HipHop, Moi and Ver. These proteins are not conserves outside Drosophilidae and localize and function exclusively at telomeres, protecting them from fusion events. Other proteins required to prevent end-to-end fusion in flies include HP1, Eff/UbcD1, ATM, the components of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs (MRN complex, and the Woc transcription factor. These proteins do not share the terminin properties; they are evolutionarily conserved non-fast-evolving proteins that do not accumulate only telomeres and do not serve telomere-specific functions. We propose that following telomerase loss, Drosophila rapidly evolved terminin to bind chromosome ends in a sequence-independent manner. This hypothesis suggests that terminin is the functional analog of the shelterin complex that protects human telomeres. The non-terminin proteins are instead likely to correspond to ancestral telomere-associated proteins that did not evolve as rapidly as terminin because of the functional constraints imposed by their involvement in diverse cellular processes. Thus, it appears that the main difference between Drosophila and human telomeres is in the protective complexes that specifically associate with the DNA termini. We believe that Drosophila telomeres offer excellent opportunities for investigations on human telomere biology. The identification of additional Drosophila genes encoding non-terminin proteins involved in telomere protection might lead to the discovery of novel components of human telomeres.

  18. Use of the Photoactic Ability of a Bacterium to Teach the Genetic Principles of Random Mutagenesis & Mutant Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Neena; Bird, Terry H.; Berleman, James E.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a laboratory activity that relies on the use of a very versatile bacterial system to introduce the concept of how mutagenesis can be used for molecular and genetic analysis of living organisms. They have used the techniques of random mutagenesis and selection/screening to obtain strains of the organism "R.…

  19. Hydrophobic Mutagenesis and Semi-rational Engineering of Arginine Deiminase for Markedly Enhanced Stability and Catalytic Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Serwanja; Liu, Meng-Han; Liu, Yong-Mei; Han, Rui-Zhi; Xu, Guo-Chao; Ni, Ye

    2015-07-01

    Due to its systemic arginine degradation, arginine deiminase (ADI) has attracted attentions as an anti-tumor drug. Its low activity at physiological conditions among other limitations has necessitated its engineering for improved properties. The present study describes the hydrophobic mutagenesis and semi-rational engineering of ADI from Pseudomonas plecoglossicida (PpADI). Using an improved ADI variant M13 (D38H/A128T/E296K/H404R/I410L) as parent, site saturation mutagenesis at position 162 resulted in an over 20 % increase in protein solubility. Compared with M13 (15.23 U/mg), mutants M13-2 (M13+S245D) and M13-5 (M13+R243L) exhibited enhanced specific activity of 21.19 and 31.20 U/mg at physiological conditions. M13-5 displayed enhanced substrate specificity with a dramatic reduction in its K m value (from 0.52 to 0.16 mM). It is speculated that the improvements in M13-5 could mainly be attributed to the enhanced structural stability due to an R243L substitution. The hydrophobic contribution of Leu 243 was supported by mutant M13-9 (M13+A276W) generated based on the hydrophobic mutagenesis concept. M13-9 showed a specific activity of 18.68 U/mg, as well as remarkable thermal and pH stability. It retained over 90 % activity over pH range from 4.5 to 8.5. At 60 °C, the half-life of M13-9 was enhanced from 4 to 17.5 min in comparison with M13, and its specific activity at 62 °C (93.0 U/mg) was approximately fivefold of that determined at 37 °C. Our results suggest that the increased hydrophobicity around the active regions of PpADI might be crucial in improving its structural stability and ultimately catalytic efficiency.

  20. Golgi analysis of tangential neurons in the lobula plate of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K P Rajashekhar; V R Shamprasad

    2004-03-01

    The lobula plate (LP), which is the third order optic neuropil of flies, houses wide-field neurons which are exquisitely sensitive to motion. Among Diptera, motion-sensitive neurons of larger flies have been studied at the anatomical and physiological levels. However, the neurons of Drosophila lobula plate are relatively less explored. As Drosophila permits a genetic analysis of neural functions, we have analysed the organization of lobula plate of Drosophila melanogaster. Neurons belonging to eight anatomical classes have been observed in the present study. Three neurons of the horizontal system (HS) have been visualized. The HS north (HSN) neuron, occupying the dorsal lobula plate is stunted in its geometry compared to that of larger flies. Associated with the HS neurons, thinner horizontal elements known as h-cells have also been visualized in the present study. Five of the six known neurons of the vertical system (VS) have been visualized. Three additional neurons in the proximal LP comparable in anatomy to VS system have been stained. We have termed them as additional VS (AVS)-like neurons. Three thinner tangential cells that are comparable to VS neurons, which are elements of twin vertical system (tvs); and two cells with wide dendritic fields comparable to CH neurons of Diptera have been also observed. Neurons comparable to VS cells but with ‘tufted’ dendrites have been stained. The HSN and VS1-VS2 neurons are dorsally stunted. This is possibly due to the shape of the compound eye of Drosophila which is reduced in the fronto-dorsal region as compared to larger flies.

  1. Drosophila neural stem cells in brain development and tumor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells in Drosophila, generate the complex neural structure of the central nervous system. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila neuroblast lineages. Deregulation of these mechanisms can lead to severe developmental defects and the formation of malignant brain tumors. Here, the authors review the molecular genetics of Drosophila neuroblasts and discuss some recent advances in stem cell and cancer biology using this model system.

  2. Classical and operant learning in the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Eschbach, Claire

    2012-01-01

    In dieser Doktorarbeit studiere ich einige psychologische Aspekte im Verhalten der Drosophila, insbesondere von Drosophila Larven. Nach einer Einleitung, in der ich den wissenschaftlichen Kontext darstelle und die Mechanismen der olfaktorischen Wahrnehmung sowie des klassichen und operanten Lernens beschreibe, stelle ich die verschiedenen Experimente meiner Doktorarbeit vor. Wahrnehmung Das zweite Kapitel behandelt die Art, in der adulte Drosophila zwischen Einzeldüften und Duftgemischen gene...

  3. Pre-breeding of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) for herbicide resistance through seed mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Jawad; Abbas, Ghulam; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Shimelis, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Lentil is a poor competitor of weeds and its sensitivity to herbicides is a major hurdle for large scale production. The present study was conducted to select herbicide resistant lentil genotypes through seed mutagenesis. Seeds of three advanced lentil genotypes (LPP 11001, LPP 11100 and LPP 11116) were treated with two different concentrations of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS; 0.1 and 0.2%), hydrazine hydrate (HH; 0.02 and 0.03%) and sodium azide (SA; 0.01 and 0.02%) to develop M1 seed. The M2 was screened against two herbicides including Ally Max 28.6% SG (X = 34.58 g/ha and 1.5X = 51.87 g/ha) and Atlantis 3.6% WG (X = 395.2 g/ha and 1.5X = 592.8 g/ha) using the following three screening methods: post plant emergence (PPE), pre-plant incorporation (PPI) and seed priming (SP). Data were recorded on survival index and survival percentage from each experimental unit of every population. Plants in all populations were categorized following their reaction to herbicides. The newly developed populations showed greater variation for herbicide resistance when compared to their progenitors. Phenotypic traits were significantly reduced in all the screening environments. Overall, 671 herbicide resistant mutants were selected from all testing environments. The seeds from selected plants were re-mutagenized at 150 Gy of gamma radiation and evaluated against higher dose of herbicides. This allowed selection of 134 herbicide resistant mutants. The selected mutants are useful germplasm for herbicide resistance breeding of lentil. PMID:28196091

  4. Characteristic and inheritance analysis of targeted mutagenesis mediated by genome editing in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tang; Yaokui, Li; Dan, Zhang; Bigang, Mao; Qiming, Lv; Yuanyi, Hu; Ye, Shao; Yan, Peng; Binran, Zhao; Shitou, Xia

    2016-08-01

    The transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) systems are two current genome editing technologies. Here, we compare and analyze the characteristics of the targeted mutations mediated by these two systems, such as efficiency, type, position, time, and genetic patterns. Both the TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 systems can induce site-specific mutations in T0 rice plants effectively, but CRISPR/Cas9 is more effective. The major mutation type in both systems is the short insertion/deletion(InDel) mutation within 10 base pairs: deletions ranging from 1 to 10 bps are more often in TALEN, and 1bp insertions are more often in CRISPR/Cas9. Moreover, double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by CRISPR/Cas9 are more precise than TALEN. In addition, DSBs could be repaired by the homologous recombination at a low frequency, causing DNA fragment duplication mutations. In some cases, the DNA fragments between the two close targets are deleted or inverted, and the mutation efficiency does not positively correlatewith the mutation efficiency of each target. Mutagenesis mediated by the TALEN or CRISPR/Cas9 system can occur as early as in transformed callus cells, and less frequently in somatic cells. Consequently, four different mutation types are formed, including homozygous, heterozygous, bi-allelic and chimeric mutations, with bi-allelic mutations having the highest rate and chimeric mutations having the lowest rate. All, except chimeric mutations, can descend stably into the next generation.

  5. Mutagenesis and functional studies with succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors in the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalliet, Gabriel; Bowler, Judith; Luksch, Torsten; Kirchhofer-Allan, Lucy; Steinhauer, Diana; Ward, Keith; Niklaus, Michael; Verras, Andreas; Csukai, Michael; Daina, Antoine; Fonné-Pfister, Raymonde

    2012-01-01

    A range of novel carboxamide fungicides, inhibitors of the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH, EC 1.3.5.1) is currently being introduced to the crop protection market. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of structurally distinct carboxamides on target site resistance development and to assess possible impact on fitness. We used a UV mutagenesis approach in Mycosphaerella graminicola, a key pathogen of wheat to compare the nature, frequencies and impact of target mutations towards five subclasses of carboxamides. From this screen we identified 27 amino acid substitutions occurring at 18 different positions on the 3 subunits constituting the ubiquinone binding (Qp) site of the enzyme. The nature of substitutions and cross resistance profiles indicated significant differences in the binding interaction to the enzyme across the different inhibitors. Pharmacophore elucidation followed by docking studies in a tridimensional SDH model allowed us to propose rational hypotheses explaining some of the differential behaviors for the first time. Interestingly all the characterized substitutions had a negative impact on enzyme efficiency, however very low levels of enzyme activity appeared to be sufficient for cell survival. In order to explore the impact of mutations on pathogen fitness in vivo and in planta, homologous recombinants were generated for a selection of mutation types. In vivo, in contrast to previous studies performed in yeast and other organisms, SDH mutations did not result in a major increase of reactive oxygen species levels and did not display any significant fitness penalty. However, a number of Qp site mutations affecting enzyme efficiency were shown to have a biological impact in planta.Using the combined approaches described here, we have significantly improved our understanding of possible resistance mechanisms to carboxamides and performed preliminary fitness penalty assessment in an economically important plant pathogen years ahead of

  6. Mutagenesis and functional studies with succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors in the wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Scalliet

    Full Text Available A range of novel carboxamide fungicides, inhibitors of the succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH, EC 1.3.5.1 is currently being introduced to the crop protection market. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of structurally distinct carboxamides on target site resistance development and to assess possible impact on fitness. We used a UV mutagenesis approach in Mycosphaerella graminicola, a key pathogen of wheat to compare the nature, frequencies and impact of target mutations towards five subclasses of carboxamides. From this screen we identified 27 amino acid substitutions occurring at 18 different positions on the 3 subunits constituting the ubiquinone binding (Qp site of the enzyme. The nature of substitutions and cross resistance profiles indicated significant differences in the binding interaction to the enzyme across the different inhibitors. Pharmacophore elucidation followed by docking studies in a tridimensional SDH model allowed us to propose rational hypotheses explaining some of the differential behaviors for the first time. Interestingly all the characterized substitutions had a negative impact on enzyme efficiency, however very low levels of enzyme activity appeared to be sufficient for cell survival. In order to explore the impact of mutations on pathogen fitness in vivo and in planta, homologous recombinants were generated for a selection of mutation types. In vivo, in contrast to previous studies performed in yeast and other organisms, SDH mutations did not result in a major increase of reactive oxygen species levels and did not display any significant fitness penalty. However, a number of Qp site mutations affecting enzyme efficiency were shown to have a biological impact in planta.Using the combined approaches described here, we have significantly improved our understanding of possible resistance mechanisms to carboxamides and performed preliminary fitness penalty assessment in an economically important plant pathogen

  7. Improvement of Drosophila acetylcholinesterase stability by elimination of a free cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladurantie Caroline

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetylcholinesterase is irreversibly inhibited by organophosphate and carbamate insecticides allowing its use for residue detection with biosensors. Drosophila acetylcholinesterase is the most sensitive enzyme known and has been improved by in vitro mutagenesis. However, it is not sufficiently stable for extensive utilization. It is a homodimer in which both subunits contain 8 cysteine residues. Six are involved in conserved intramolecular disulfide bridges and one is involved in an interchain disulfide bridge. The 8th cysteine is not conserved and is present at position 290 as a free thiol pointing toward the center of the protein. Results The free cysteine has been mutated to valine and the resulting protein has been assayed for stability using various denaturing agents: temperature, urea, acetonitrile, freezing, proteases and spontaneous-denaturation at room temperature. It was found that the C290V mutation rendered the protein 1.1 to 2.7 fold more stable depending on the denaturing agent. Conclusion It seems that stabilization resulting from the cysteine to valine mutation originates from a decrease of thiol-disulfide interchanges and from an increase in the hydrophobicity of the buried side chain.

  8. ARK, the Apaf-1 related killer in Drosophila, requires diverse domains for its apoptotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, M; Scherr, H; Lackey, M; Xu, D; Chen, Z; Lu, J; Bergmann, A

    2007-01-01

    In mammals and Drosophila, apoptotic caspases are under positive control of the CED-4-like proteins Apaf-1 and ARK, respectively. In an EMS-mutagenesis screen, we isolated 33 ark mutants as recessive suppressors of hid-induced apoptosis. The ark mutants are loss-of-function alleles characterized by reduced developmental apoptosis. Using the phenotypic series of these alleles, we identified helical domain I in the nucleotide oligomerization domain as critical for ARK's apoptotic activity. Interestingly, the WD40 region may also have an unanticipated positive requirement for the apoptotic activity of ARK. Considering structural information, we discuss the roles of these domains for assembly and activity of the ARK apoptosome, and propose that the WD40 region is anti-apoptotic in the absence of apoptotic signals, and pro-apoptotic in the presence of such signals. Furthermore, a defined null allele reveals that ark is required for most, but not all apoptosis suggesting the existence of an ARK-independent apoptotic pathway.

  9. Alternative NF-κB Isoforms in the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction and Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    Full Text Available The Drosophila NF-κB protein Dorsal is expressed at the larval neuromuscular junction, where its expression appears unrelated to known Dorsal functions in embryonic patterning and innate immunity. Using confocal microscopy with domain-specific antisera, we demonstrate that larval muscle expresses only the B isoform of Dorsal, which arises by intron retention. We find that Dorsal B interacts with and stabilizes Cactus at the neuromuscular junction, but exhibits Cactus independent localization and an absence of detectable nuclear translocation. We further find that the Dorsal-related immune factor Dif encodes a B isoform, reflecting a conservation of B domains across a range of insect NF-κB proteins. Carrying out mutagenesis of the Dif locus via a site-specific recombineering approach, we demonstrate that Dif B is the major, if not sole, Dif isoform in the mushroom bodies of the larval brain. The Dorsal and Dif B isoforms thus share a specific association with nervous system tissues as well as an alternative protein structure.

  10. A mutagenesis screen in the mouse: Identification of novel gene functions in embryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansleeben, C.

    2010-01-01

    Developmental genetics has been a field of interest for over a hundred years. We have set out to perform an ENU mutagenesis screen in the mouse at E10.5. In the first chapter the pathways and developmental processes described in this thesis are introduced. In the second chapter we describe the ENU-m

  11. An ENU-mutagenesis screen in the mouse: identification of novel developmental gene functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansleeben, C.; van Gurp, L.; Feitsma, H.; Kroon, C.; Rieter, E.; Verberne, M.; Guryev, V.; Cuppen, E.; Meijlink, F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutagenesis screens in the mouse have been proven useful for the identification of novel gene functions and generation of interesting mutant alleles. Here we describe a phenotype-based screen for recessive mutations affecting embryonic development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice we

  12. Identification of a novel streptococcal gene cassette mediating SOS mutagenesis in Streptococcus uberis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varhimo, Emilia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Jalava, Jari; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Varmanen, Pekka

    2007-01-01

    Streptococci have been considered to lack the classical SOS response, defined by increased mutation after UV exposure and regulation by LexA. Here we report the identification of a potential self-regulated SOS mutagenesis gene cassette in the Streptococcaceae family. Exposure to UV light was found t

  13. Improvement of Biocatalysts for Industrial and Environmental Purposes by Saturation Mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Valetti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory evolution techniques are becoming increasingly widespread among protein engineers for the development of novel and designed biocatalysts. The palette of different approaches ranges from complete randomized strategies to rational and structure-guided mutagenesis, with a wide variety of costs, impacts, drawbacks and relevance to biotechnology. A technique that convincingly compromises the extremes of fully randomized vs. rational mutagenesis, with a high benefit/cost ratio, is saturation mutagenesis. Here we will present and discuss this approach in its many facets, also tackling the issue of randomization, statistical evaluation of library completeness and throughput efficiency of screening methods. Successful recent applications covering different classes of enzymes will be presented referring to the literature and to research lines pursued in our group. The focus is put on saturation mutagenesis as a tool for designing novel biocatalysts specifically relevant to production of fine chemicals for improving bulk enzymes for industry and engineering technical enzymes involved in treatment of waste, detoxification and production of clean energy from renewable sources.

  14. Building on the Past, Shaping the Future: The Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    In late 2012 the members of the Environmental Mutagen Society voted to change its name to the Environmental Mutagenesis and Genomics Society. Here we describe the thought process that led to adoption of the new name, which both respects the rich history of a Society founded in 19...

  15. Insertion mutagenesis of the yeast Candida famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) by random integration of linear DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of using random insertional mutagenesis to isolate mutants of the flavinogenic yeast Candida famata was explored. Mutagenesis was performed by transformation of the yeast with an integrative plasmid containing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae LEU2 gene as a selective marker. The addition of restriction enzyme together with the plasmid (restriction enzyme-mediated integration, REMI) increased the transformation frequency only slightly. Integration of the linearized plasmid occurred randomly in the C. famata genome. To investigate the potential of insertional mutagenesis, it was used for tagging genes involved in positive regulation of riboflavin synthesis in C. famata. Partial DNA sequencing of tagged genes showed that they were homologous to the S. cerevisiae genes RIB1, MET2, and SEF1. Intact orthologs of these genes isolated from Debaryomyces hansenii restored the wild phenotype of the corresponding mutants, i.e., the ability to overproduce riboflavin under iron limitation. The Staphylococcus aureus ble gene conferring resistance to phleomycin was used successfully in the study as a dominant selection marker for C. famata. The results obtained indicate that insertional mutagenesis is a powerful tool for tagging genes in C. famata.

  16. Identification of a novel streptococcal gene cassette mediating SOS mutagenesis in Streptococcus uberis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varhimo, Emilia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Jalava, Jari; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Varmanen, Pekka

    2007-01-01

    Streptococci have been considered to lack the classical SOS response, defined by increased mutation after UV exposure and regulation by LexA. Here we report the identification of a potential self-regulated SOS mutagenesis gene cassette in the Streptococcaceae family. Exposure to UV light was found t

  17. Applied an Efficient Site-directed Mutagenesis Method into Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muqing Qiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for conducting site-directed mutagenesis was developed. This method allows the color selection of mutants through the simultaneous activation or deactivation of the α-peptide of ß-galactosidase. The method can efficiently create mutations at multiple sites simultaneously and can be used to perform multiple rounds of mutation on the same construct. In this paper, in order to develop an efficient site-directed mutagenesis method in vivo, the tests were tested by the following methods. The methods that the fragment knock-out ompR gene was constructed through overlapping PCR, digested by Notand SalⅠⅠ, ligated to plasmid pKOV were applied. The recombination plasmid was transformed into Escherichia coli WMC-001 strain, integrated into the genomic DNA through two step homologous recombination. The Escherichia coli WMC-001/ompR- mutant was obtained due to gene replacement. The fragment of the mutant ompR gene was amplified through overlapping PCR, cloned into pKOV vector. The recombinant plasmid was introduced into Escherichia coli WMC-001/ompR- mutant. The Escherichia coli WMC-001/ompR mutant was also obtained due to gene replacement. Results: The site-directed mutagenesis has been successfully constructed in the ompR gene by sequencing. Conclusion: The method is effective for construction of gene site-directed mutagenesis in vivo.

  18. Using ultra-sensitive next generation sequencing to dissect DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaile; Ma, Xiaolu; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Dafei; Sun, Chenyi; Sun, Yazhou; Lu, Xuemei; Wu, Chung-I; Guo, Caixia; Ruan, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have dramatically improved studies in biology and biomedical science. However, no optimal NGS approach is available to conveniently analyze low frequency mutations caused by DNA damage treatments. Here, by developing an exquisite ultra-sensitive NGS (USNGS) platform “EasyMF” and incorporating it with a widely used supF shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, we can conveniently dissect roles of lesion bypass polymerases in damage-induced mutagenesis. In this improved mutagenesis analysis pipeline, the initial steps are the same as in the supF mutation assay, involving damaging the pSP189 plasmid followed by its transfection into human 293T cells to allow replication to occur. Then “EasyMF” is employed to replace downstream MBM7070 bacterial transformation and other steps for analyzing damage-induced mutation frequencies and spectra. This pipeline was validated by using UV damaged plasmid after its replication in lesion bypass polymerase-deficient 293T cells. The increased throughput and reduced cost of this system will allow us to conveniently screen regulators of translesion DNA synthesis pathway and monitor environmental genotoxic substances, which can ultimately provide insight into the mechanisms of genome stability and mutagenesis. PMID:27122023

  19. Workshop on ENU Mutagenesis: Planning for Saturation, July 25-28, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeau, Joseph H

    2002-07-25

    The goal of the conference is to enhance the development of improved technologies and new approaches to the identification of genes underlying chemically-induced mutant phenotypes. The conference brings together ENU mutagenesis experts from the United States and aborad for a small, intensive workshop to consider these issues.

  20. Statistical procedures for the design and analysis of in vitro mutagenesis assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaldor, J.

    1983-03-01

    In previous statistical treatments of a certain class of mutagenesis assays, stochastic models of mutation and cell growth have not been utilized. In this paper, we review the assumptions under which these models are derived, introduce some further assumptions, and propose ways to estimate and test hypotheses regarding the parameters of the models from assay data. It is shown via simulation and exact calculation that if the models are valid, the proposed statistical procedures provide very accurate Type I error rates for hypothesis tests, and coverage probabilities for confidence intervals. The cases of a linear dose response relationship for mutagenesis, and a comparison of a set of treated cell cultures with a set of control cultures are treated in detail. Approximate power functions for hypothesis tests of interest are then derived, and these are also shown to be satisfactorily close to the true power functions. The approximations are used to develop guidelines for planning aspects of a mutagenesis assay, including the number, spacing and range of dose levels employed. Examples of applications of the procedures are provided, and the paper concludes with a discussion of future statistical work which may be carried out in the area of mutagenesis assays. 38 references, 8 figures, 7 tables.

  1. Micro-plasticity of genomes as illustrated by the evolution of glutathione transferases in 12 Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonticha Saisawang

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GST are an ancient superfamily comprising a large number of paralogous proteins in a single organism. This multiplicity of GSTs has allowed the copies to diverge for neofunctionalization with proposed roles ranging from detoxication and oxidative stress response to involvement in signal transduction cascades. We performed a comparative genomic analysis using FlyBase annotations and Drosophila melanogaster GST sequences as templates to further annotate the GST orthologs in the 12 Drosophila sequenced genomes. We found that GST genes in the Drosophila subgenera have undergone repeated local duplications followed by transposition, inversion, and micro-rearrangements of these copies. The colinearity and orientations of the orthologous GST genes appear to be unique in many of the species which suggests that genomic rearrangement events have occurred multiple times during speciation. The high micro-plasticity of the genomes appears to have a functional contribution utilized for evolution of this gene family.

  2. Micro-plasticity of genomes as illustrated by the evolution of glutathione transferases in 12 Drosophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are an ancient superfamily comprising a large number of paralogous proteins in a single organism. This multiplicity of GSTs has allowed the copies to diverge for neofunctionalization with proposed roles ranging from detoxication and oxidative stress response to involvement in signal transduction cascades. We performed a comparative genomic analysis using FlyBase annotations and Drosophila melanogaster GST sequences as templates to further annotate the GST orthologs in the 12 Drosophila sequenced genomes. We found that GST genes in the Drosophila subgenera have undergone repeated local duplications followed by transposition, inversion, and micro-rearrangements of these copies. The colinearity and orientations of the orthologous GST genes appear to be unique in many of the species which suggests that genomic rearrangement events have occurred multiple times during speciation. The high micro-plasticity of the genomes appears to have a functional contribution utilized for evolution of this gene family.

  3. ZFN-induced mutagenesis and gene-targeting in Arabidopsis through Agrobacterium-mediated floral dip transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Sylvia; Neuteboom, Leon W; Pinas, Johan E; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2009-10-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial restriction enzymes, custom designed for induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at a specific locus. These DSBs may result in site-specific mutagenesis or homologous recombination at the repair site, depending on the DNA repair pathway that is used. These promising techniques for genome engineering were evaluated in Arabidopsis plants using Agrobacterium-mediated floral dip transformation. A T-DNA containing the target site for a ZFN pair, that was shown to be active in yeast, was integrated in the Arabidopsis genome. Subsequently, the corresponding pair of ZFN genes was stably integrated in the Arabidopsis genome and ZFN activity was determined by PCR and sequence analysis of the target site. Footprints were obtained in up to 2% of the PCR products, consisting of deletions ranging between 1 and 200 bp and insertions ranging between 1 and 14 bp. We did not observe any toxicity from expression of the ZFNs. In order to obtain ZFN-induced gene-targeting (GT), Arabidopsis plants containing the target site and expressing the ZFN pair were transformed with a T-DNA GT construct. Three GT plants were obtained from approximately 3000 transformants. Two of these represent heritable true GT events, as determined by PCR, Southern blot analysis and sequencing of the resulting recombined locus. The third plant showed an ectopic GT event. No GT plants were obtained in a comparable number of transformants that did not contain the ZFNs. Our results demonstrate that ZFNs enhance site-specific mutagenesis and gene-targeting of Agrobacterium T-DNA constructs delivered through floral dip transformation.

  4. Transfection and mutagenesis of target genes in mosquito cells by locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpour, Nazzy; Cheung, Kong Wai; Souvannaseng, Lattha; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Luckhart, Shirley

    2010-12-26

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agent of malaria, are transmitted through the bites of infected Anopheles mosquitoes resulting in over 250 million new infections each year. Despite decades of research, there is still no vaccine against malaria, highlighting the need for novel control strategies. One innovative approach is the use of genetically modified mosquitoes to effectively control malaria parasite transmission. Deliberate alterations of cell signaling pathways in the mosquito, via targeted mutagenesis, have been found to regulate parasite development (1). From these studies, we can begin to identify potential gene targets for transformation. Targeted mutagenesis has traditionally relied upon the homologous recombination between a target gene and a large DNA molecule. However, the construction and use of such complex DNA molecules for generation of stably transformed cell lines is costly, time consuming and often inefficient. Therefore, a strategy using locked nucleic acid-modified oligonucleotides (LNA-ONs) provides a useful alternative for introducing artificial single nucleotide substitutions into episomal and chromosomal DNA gene targets (reviewed in (2)). LNA-ON-mediated targeted mutagenesis has been used to introduce point mutations into genes of interest in cultured cells of both yeast and mice (3,4). We show here that LNA-ONs can be used to introduce a single nucleotide change in a transfected episomal target that results in a switch from blue fluorescent protein (BFP) expression to green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in both Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi cells. This conversion demonstrates for the first time that effective mutagenesis of target genes in mosquito cells can be mediated by LNA-ONs and suggests that this technique may be applicable to mutagenesis of chromosomal targets in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Predatory cannibalism in Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijendravarma, Roshan K; Narasimha, Sunitha; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2013-01-01

    Hunting live prey is risky and thought to require specialized adaptations. Therefore, observations of predatory cannibalism in otherwise non-carnivorous animals raise questions about its function, adaptive significance and evolutionary potential. Here we document predatory cannibalism on larger conspecifics in Drosophila melanogaster larvae and address its evolutionary significance. We found that under crowded laboratory conditions younger larvae regularly attack and consume 'wandering-stage' conspecifics, forming aggregations mediated by chemical cues from the attacked victim. Nutrition gained this way can be significant: an exclusively cannibalistic diet was sufficient for normal development from eggs to fertile adults. Cannibalistic diet also induced plasticity of larval mouth parts. Finally, during 118 generations of experimental evolution, replicated populations maintained under larval malnutrition evolved enhanced propensity towards cannibalism. These results suggest that, at least under laboratory conditions, predation on conspecifics in Drosophila is a functional, adaptive behaviour, which can rapidly evolve in response to nutritional conditions.

  6. Motor Control of Drosophila Courtship Song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy R. Shirangi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many animals utilize acoustic signals—or songs—to attract mates. During courtship, Drosophila melanogaster males vibrate a wing to produce trains of pulses and extended tone, called pulse and sine song, respectively. Courtship songs in the genus Drosophila are exceedingly diverse, and different song features appear to have evolved independently of each other. How the nervous system allows such diversity to evolve is not understood. Here, we identify a wing muscle in D. melanogaster (hg1 that is uniquely male-enlarged. The hg1 motoneuron and the sexually dimorphic development of the hg1 muscle are required specifically for the sine component of the male song. In contrast, the motoneuron innervating a sexually monomorphic wing muscle, ps1, is required specifically for a feature of pulse song. Thus, individual wing motor pathways can control separate aspects of courtship song and may provide a “modular” anatomical substrate for the evolution of diverse songs.

  7. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Nourmohammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis.

  8. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buescher, Jessica L; Musselman, Laura P; Wilson, Christina A; Lang, Tieming; Keleher, Madeline; Baranski, Thomas J; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie) feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  9. Evidence for transgenerational metabolic programming in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Buescher

    2013-09-01

    Worldwide epidemiologic studies have repeatedly demonstrated an association between prenatal nutritional environment, birth weight and susceptibility to adult diseases including obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Despite advances in mammalian model systems, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear, but might involve programming mechanisms such as epigenetics. Here we describe a new system for evaluating metabolic programming mechanisms using a simple, genetically tractable Drosophila model. We examined the effect of maternal caloric excess on offspring and found that a high-sugar maternal diet alters body composition of larval offspring for at least two generations, augments an obese-like phenotype under suboptimal (high-calorie feeding conditions in adult offspring, and modifies expression of metabolic genes. Our data indicate that nutritional programming mechanisms could be highly conserved and support the use of Drosophila as a model for evaluating the underlying genetic and epigenetic contributions to this phenomenon.

  10. Quantifying and predicting Drosophila larvae crawling phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Maximilian N.; Nettesheim, Guilherme; Shubeita, George T.

    2016-06-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model for cell biology, development, disease, and neuroscience. The fly’s power as a genetic model for disease and neuroscience can be augmented by a quantitative description of its behavior. Here we show that we can accurately account for the complex and unique crawling patterns exhibited by individual Drosophila larvae using a small set of four parameters obtained from the trajectories of a few crawling larvae. The values of these parameters change for larvae from different genetic mutants, as we demonstrate for fly models of Alzheimer’s disease and the Fragile X syndrome, allowing applications such as genetic or drug screens. Using the quantitative model of larval crawling developed here we use the mutant-specific parameters to robustly simulate larval crawling, which allows estimating the feasibility of laborious experimental assays and aids in their design.

  11. The translation factors of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marygold, Steven J.; Attrill, Helen; Lasko, Paul

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthesis of polypeptides from mRNA (translation) is a fundamental cellular process that is coordinated and catalyzed by a set of canonical ‘translation factors’. Surprisingly, the translation factors of Drosophila melanogaster have not yet been systematically identified, leading to inconsistencies in their nomenclature and shortcomings in functional (Gene Ontology, GO) annotations. Here, we describe the complete set of translation factors in D. melanogaster, applying nomenclature already in widespread use in other species, and revising their functional annotation. The collection comprises 43 initiation factors, 12 elongation factors, 3 release factors and 6 recycling factors, totaling 64 of which 55 are cytoplasmic and 9 are mitochondrial. We also provide an overview of notable findings and particular insights derived from Drosophila about these factors. This catalog, together with the incorporation of the improved nomenclature and GO annotation into FlyBase, will greatly facilitate access to information about the functional roles of these important proteins. PMID:27494710

  12. Plasticity in the Drosophila larval visual System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abud J Farca-Luna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable ability of the nervous system to modify its structure and function is mostly experience and activity modulated. The molecular basis of neuronal plasticity has been studied in higher behavioral processes, such as learning and memory formation. However, neuronal plasticity is not restricted to higher brain functions, but may provide a basic feature of adaptation of all neural circuits. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful genetic model to gain insight into the molecular basis of nervous system development and function. The nervous system of the larvae is again a magnitude simpler than its adult counter part, allowing the genetic assessment of a number of individual genetically identifiable neurons. We review here recent progress on the genetic basis of neuronal plasticity in developing and functioning neural circuits focusing on the simple visual system of the Drosophila larva.

  13. Development of larval motor circuits in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Okusawa, Satoko; Itakura, Yuki; Fushiki, Akira; Nose, Akinao

    2012-04-01

    How are functional neural circuits formed during development? Despite recent advances in our understanding of the development of individual neurons, little is known about how complex circuits are assembled to generate specific behaviors. Here, we describe the ways in which Drosophila motor circuits serve as an excellent model system to tackle this problem. We first summarize what has been learned during the past decades on the connectivity and development of component neurons, in particular motor neurons and sensory feedback neurons. We then review recent progress in our understanding of the development of the circuits as well as studies that apply optogenetics and other innovative techniques to dissect the circuit diagram. New approaches using Drosophila as a model system are now making it possible to search for developmental rules that regulate the construction of neural circuits.

  14. Remembering components of food in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav eDas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remembering features of past feeding experience can refine foraging and food choice. Insects can learn to associate sensory cues with components of food, such as sugars, amino acids, water, salt, alcohol, toxins and pathogens. In the fruit fly Drosophila some food components activate unique subsets of dopaminergic neurons that innervate distinct functional zones on the mushroom bodies. This architecture suggests that the overall dopaminergic neuron population could provide a potential cellular substrate through which the fly might learn to value a variety of food components. In addition, such an arrangement predicts that individual component memories reside in unique locations. Dopaminergic neurons are also critical for food memory consolidation and deprivation-state dependent motivational control of the expression of food-relevant memories. Here we review our current knowledge of how nutrient-specific memories are formed, consolidated and specifically retrieved in insects, with a particular emphasis on Drosophila.

  15. Exquisite Light Sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak, Pooja; Coupar, Jamie; Hughes, S. Emile; Fozdar, Preeya; Kilby, Jack; Garren, Emma; Yoshii, Taishi; Hirsh, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM) shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles. PMID:23874218

  16. Exquisite light sensitivity of Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Vinayak

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster shows exquisite light sensitivity for modulation of circadian functions in vivo, yet the activities of the Drosophila circadian photopigment cryptochrome (CRY have only been observed at high light levels. We studied intensity/duration parameters for light pulse induced circadian phase shifts under dim light conditions in vivo. Flies show far greater light sensitivity than previously appreciated, and show a surprising sensitivity increase with pulse duration, implying a process of photic integration active up to at least 6 hours. The CRY target timeless (TIM shows dim light dependent degradation in circadian pacemaker neurons that parallels phase shift amplitude, indicating that integration occurs at this step, with the strongest effect in a single identified pacemaker neuron. Our findings indicate that CRY compensates for limited light sensitivity in vivo by photon integration over extraordinarily long times, and point to select circadian pacemaker neurons as having important roles.

  17. Modelling planar cell polarity in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    During development, polarity is a common feature of many cell types. One example is the polarisation of whole fields of epithelial cells within the plane of the epithelium, a phenomenon called planar cell polarity (PCP). It is widespread in nature and plays important roles in development and physiology. Prominent examples include the epithelial cells of external structures of insects like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, polarised tissue morphogenesis in vertebrates and sensory hair cel...

  18. Three-dimensional imaging of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeanne McGurk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The major hindrance to imaging the intact adult Drosophila is that the dark exoskeleton makes it impossible to image through the cuticle. We have overcome this obstacle and describe a method whereby the internal organs of adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D by bleaching and clearing the adult and then imaging using a technique called optical projection tomography (OPT. The data is displayed as 2D optical sections and also in 3D to provide detail on the shape and structure of the adult anatomy. METHODOLOGY: We have used OPT to visualize in 2D and 3D the detailed internal anatomy of the intact adult Drosophila. In addition this clearing method used for OPT was tested for imaging with confocal microscopy. Using OPT we have visualized the size and shape of neurodegenerative vacuoles from within the head capsule of flies that suffer from age-related neurodegeneration due to a lack of ADAR mediated RNA-editing. In addition we have visualized tau-lacZ expression in 2D and 3D. This shows that the wholemount adult can be stained without any manipulation and that this stain penetrates well as we have mapped the localization pattern with respect to the internal anatomy. CONCLUSION: We show for the first time that the intact adult Drosophila can be imaged in 3D using OPT, also we show that this method of clearing is also suitable for confocal microscopy to image the brain from within the intact head. The major advantage of this is that organs can be represented in 3D in their natural surroundings. Furthermore optical sections are generated in each of the three planes and are not prone to the technical limitations that are associated with manual sectioning. OPT can be used to dissect mutant phenotypes and to globally map gene expression in both 2D and 3D.

  19. Psychomotor Behavior: A Practical Approach in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Iliadi, Konstantin G.; Gluscencova, Oxana B.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2016-01-01

    Psychomotor behaviors are governed by fine relationships between physical activity and cognitive functions. Disturbances in psychomotor development and performance are a hallmark of many mental illnesses and often appear as observable and measurable behaviors. Here, we describe a new method called an “equilibrist test,” which can be used to quantify psychomotor learning and performance in Drosophila. We also show how this test can be used to quantify motor disturbances at relatively early sta...

  20. Sexual Communication in the Drosophila Genus

    OpenAIRE

    Gwénaëlle Bontonou; Claude Wicker-Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In insects, sexual behavior depends on chemical and non-chemical cues that might play an important role in sexual isolation. In this review, we present current knowledge about sexual behavior in the Drosophila genus. We describe courtship and signals involved in sexual communication, with a special focus on sex pheromones. We examine the role of cuticular hydrocarbons as sex pheromones, their implication in sexual isolation, and their evolution. Finally, we discuss the roles of male cuticular...

  1. Detection of Cell Death in Drosophila Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Deepika; Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila has served as a particularly attractive model to study cell death due to the vast array of tools for genetic manipulation under defined spatial and temporal conditions in vivo as well as in cultured cells. These genetic methods have been well supplemented by enzymatic assays and a panel of antibodies recognizing cell death markers. This chapter discusses reporters, mutants and assays used by various laboratories to study cell death in the context of development and in response to external insults. PMID:27108437

  2. Innate immunity in Drosophila: Pathogens and pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Govind, Shubha

    2008-01-01

    Following in the footsteps of traditional developmental genetics, research over the last 15 years has shown that innate immunity against bacteria and fungi is governed largely by two NF-κB signal transduction pathways, Toll and IMD. Antiviral immunity appears to stem from RNA interference, whereas resistance against parasitoids is conferred by Toll signaling. The identification of these post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the annotation of most Drosophila immunity genes have derive...

  3. In-vivo Centrifugation of Drosophila Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Susan L.; Welte, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A major strategy for purifying and isolating different types of intracellular organelles is to separate them from each other based on differences in buoyant density. However, when cells are disrupted prior to centrifugation, proteins and organelles in this non-native environment often inappropriately stick to each other. Here we describe a method to separate organelles by density in intact, living Drosophila embryos. Early embryos before cellularization are harvested from population cages, an...

  4. Male and female Drosophila germline stem cells: two versions of immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Margaret T; Spradling, Allan C

    2007-04-20

    Drosophila male and female germline stem cells (GSCs) are sustained by niches and regulatory pathways whose common principles serve as models for understanding mammalian stem cells. Despite striking cellular and genetic similarities that suggest a common evolutionary origin, however, male and female GSCs also display important differences. Comparing these two stem cells and their niches in detail is likely to reveal how a common heritage has been adapted to the differing requirements of male and female gamete production.

  5. A mechanosensory receptor required for food texture detection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Alcañiz, Juan Antonio; Zappia, Giovanna; Marion-Poll, Frédéric; Benton, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Textural properties provide information on the ingestibility, digestibility and state of ripeness or decay of sources of nutrition. Compared with our understanding of the chemosensory assessment of food, little is known about the mechanisms of texture detection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster can discriminate food texture, avoiding substrates that are either too hard or too soft. Manipulations of food substrate properties and flies' chemosensory inputs indicate that texture preferences are revealed only in the presence of an appetitive stimulus, but are not because of changes in nutrient accessibility, suggesting that animals discriminate the substrates' mechanical characteristics. We show that texture preference requires NOMPC, a TRP-family mechanosensory channel. NOMPC localizes to the sensory dendrites of neurons housed within gustatory sensilla, and is essential for their mechanosensory-evoked responses. Our results identify a sensory pathway for texture detection and reveal the behavioural integration of chemical and physical qualities of food. PMID:28128210

  6. (Mutagenic effect of tritium on DNA of Drosophila melanogaster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    A series of Adh mutants induced in Drosophila by X-rays were compared to Adh mutants induced by tritiated water. Sequence analysis of 8 intragenic null mutations suggest a double strand break might occur, consistent with our linear dose response curve. Additional data are required before we accept this model; it is hoped experiments with {sup 60}Co will yield more intragenic deletions. Our current research project involves genetic and molecular analysis of {sup 3}H beta induced Adh null mutations. All 23 mutations induced at the Adh locus have been multilocus deletions. This is in contrast to results seen with X-ray induction of mutation; as a consequence, the emphasis of our molecular analysis has switched from sequencing intragenic mutations to developing methods for sequencing the break points of deletions. This will permit us to determine if our model of deletion formation is applicable outside the structural gene. 13 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. TRII: A Probabilistic Scoring of Drosophila melanogaster Translation Initiation Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative individual information is a measurement that scores the quality of DNA- and RNA-binding sites for biological machines. The development of analytical approaches to increase the power of this scoring method will improve its utility in evaluating the functions of motifs. In this study, the scoring method was applied to potential translation initiation sites in Drosophila to compute Translation Relative Individual Information (TRII scores. The weight matrix at the core of the scoring method was optimized based on high-confidence translation initiation sites identified by using a progressive partitioning approach. Comparing the distributions of TRII scores for sites of interest with those for high-confidence translation initiation sites and random sequences provides a new methodology for assessing the quality of translation initiation sites. The optimized weight matrices can also be used to describe the consensus at translation initiation sites, providing a quantitative measure of preferred and avoided nucleotides at each position.

  8. Hydrocarbon Patterns and Mating Behaviour in Populations of Drosophila yakuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Denis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila yakuba is widespread in Africa. Here we compare the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC profiles and mating behavior of mainland (Kounden, Cameroon and island (Mayotte, Sao-Tome, Bioko populations. The strains each had different CHC profiles: Bioko and Kounden were the most similar, while Mayotte and Sao-Tome contained significant amounts of 7-heptacosene. The CHC profile of the Sao-Tome population differed the most, with half the 7-tricosene of the other populations and more 7-heptacosene and 7-nonacosene. We also studied the characteristics of the mating behavior of the four strains: copulation duration was similar but latency times were higher in Mayotte and Sao-Tome populations. We found partial reproductive isolation between populations, especially in male-choice experiments with Sao-Tome females.

  9. The Role of PPK26 in Drosophila Larval Mechanical Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmeng Guo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila larvae, the class IV dendritic arborization (da neurons are polymodal nociceptors. Here, we show that ppk26 (CG8546 plays an important role in mechanical nociception in class IV da neurons. Our immunohistochemical and functional results demonstrate that ppk26 is specifically expressed in class IV da neurons. Larvae with mutant ppk26 showed severe behavioral defects in a mechanical nociception behavioral test but responded to noxious heat stimuli comparably to wild-type larvae. In addition, functional studies suggest that ppk26 and ppk (also called ppk1 function in the same pathway, whereas piezo functions in a parallel pathway. Consistent with these functional results, we found that PPK and PPK26 are interdependent on each other for their cell surface localization. Our work indicates that PPK26 and PPK might form heteromeric DEG/ENaC channels that are essential for mechanotransduction in class IV da neurons.

  10. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron's response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be

  11. Use of Early Ripening Cultivars to Avoid Infestation and Mass Trapping to Manage Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Vaccinium corymbosum (Ericales: Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Emily; Koski, Carissa; Barsoian, Olivia; Faubert, Heather; Cowles, Richard S; Alm, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    Use of early ripening highbush blueberry cultivars to avoid infestation and mass trapping were evaluated for managing spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura). Fourteen highbush blueberry cultivars were sampled for spotted wing drosophila infestation. Most 'Earliblue', 'Bluetta', and 'Collins' fruit were harvested before spotted wing drosophila oviposition commenced, and so escaped injury. Most fruit from 'Bluejay', 'Blueray', and 'Bluehaven' were also harvested before the first week of August, after which spotted wing drosophila activity led to high levels of blueberry infestation. In a separate experiment, damage to cultivars was related to the week in which fruit were harvested, with greater damage to fruit observed as the season progressed. Attractant traps placed within blueberry bushes increased nearby berry infestation by 5%, irrespective of cultivar and harvest date. The significant linear reduction in infestation with increasing distance from the attractant trap suggests that traps are influencing fly behavior to at least 5.5 m. Insecticides applied to the exterior of traps, compared with untreated traps, revealed that only 10-30% of flies visiting traps enter the traps and drown. Low trap efficiency may jeopardize surrounding fruits by increasing local spotted wing drosophila activity. To protect crops, traps for mass trapping should be placed in a perimeter outside fruit fields and insecticides need to be applied to the surface of traps or on nearby fruit to function as an attract-and-kill strategy. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  12. Pervasive natural selection in the Drosophila genome?

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    Guy Sella

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past four decades, the predominant view of molecular evolution saw little connection between natural selection and genome evolution, assuming that the functionally constrained fraction of the genome is relatively small and that adaptation is sufficiently infrequent to play little role in shaping patterns of variation within and even between species. Recent evidence from Drosophila, reviewed here, suggests that this view may be invalid. Analyses of genetic variation within and between species reveal that much of the Drosophila genome is under purifying selection, and thus of functional importance, and that a large fraction of coding and noncoding differences between species are adaptive. The findings further indicate that, in Drosophila, adaptations may be both common and strong enough that the fate of neutral mutations depends on their chance linkage to adaptive mutations as much as on the vagaries of genetic drift. The emerging evidence has implications for a wide variety of fields, from conservation genetics to bioinformatics, and presents challenges to modelers and experimentalists alike.

  13. Neurophysiology of Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ryan J H; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A C; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's disease. Firstly, Drosophila models are instrumental in exploring the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, with several PD-related mutations eliciting related phenotypes including sensitivity to energy supply and vesicular deformities. These are leading to the identification of plausible cellular mechanisms, which may be specific to (dopaminergic) neurons and synapses rather than general cellular phenotypes. Secondly, models show noncell autonomous signalling within the nervous system, offering the opportunity to develop our understanding of the way pathogenic signalling propagates, resembling Braak's scheme of spreading pathology in PD. Thirdly, the models link physiological deficits to changes in synaptic structure. While the structure-function relationship is complex, the genetic tractability of Drosophila offers the chance to separate fundamental changes from downstream consequences. Finally, the strong neuronal phenotypes permit relevant first in vivo drug testing.

  14. Homolog pairing and segregation in Drosophila meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, B D

    2009-01-01

    Pairing of homologous chromosomes is fundamental to their reliable segregation during meiosis I and thus underlies sexual reproduction. In most eukaryotes homolog pairing is confined to prophase of meiosis I and is accompanied by frequent exchanges, known as crossovers, between homologous chromatids. Crossovers give rise to chiasmata, stable interhomolog connectors that are required for bipolar orientation (orientation to opposite poles) of homologs during meiosis I. Drosophila is unique among model eukaryotes in exhibiting regular homolog pairing in mitotic as well as meiotic cells. I review the results of recent molecular studies of pairing in both mitosis and meiosis in Drosophila. These studies show that homolog pairing is continuous between pre-meiotic mitosis and meiosis but that pairing frequencies and patterns are altered during the mitotic-meiotic transition. They also show that, with the exception of X-Y pairing in male meiosis, which is mediated specifically by the 240-bp rDNA spacer repeats, chromosome pairing is not restricted to specific sites in either mitosis or meiosis. Instead, virtually all chromosome regions, both heterochromatic and euchromatic, exhibit autonomous pairing capacity. Mutations that reduce the frequencies of both mitotic and meiotic pairing have been recently described, but no mutations that abolish pairing completely have been discovered, and the genetic control of pairing in Drosophila remains to be elucidated.

  15. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

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    Thomas Niewalda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group of larvae is doing. We found that innate olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (i by the level of innate olfactory preference in the surrounding group nor (ii by the expression of learned olfactory preference in the group. Likewise, learned olfactory preference of a target individual was neither affected (iii by the level of innate olfactory preference of the surrounding group nor (iv by the learned olfactory preference the group was expressing. We conclude that larval Drosophila thus do not take note of specifically what surrounding larvae are doing. This implies that in a strict sense, and to the extent tested, there is no social interaction between larvae. These results validate widely used en mass approaches to the behaviour of larval Drosophila.

  16. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

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    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  17. Thermal evolution of gene expression profiles in Drosophila subobscura

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    Beltran Sergi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its pervasiveness, the genetic basis of adaptation resulting in variation directly or indirectly related to temperature (climatic gradients is poorly understood. By using 3-fold replicated laboratory thermal stocks covering much of the physiologically tolerable temperature range for the temperate (i.e., cold tolerant species Drosophila subobscura we have assessed whole-genome transcriptional responses after three years of thermal adaptation, when the populations had already diverged for inversion frequencies, pre-adult life history components, and morphological traits. Total mRNA from each population was compared to a reference pool mRNA in a standard, highly replicated two-colour competitive hybridization experiment using cDNA microarrays. Results A total of 306 (6.6% cDNA clones were identified as 'differentially expressed' (following a false discovery rate correction after contrasting the two furthest apart thermal selection regimes (i.e., 13°C vs . 22°C, also including four previously reported candidate genes for thermotolerance in Drosophila (Hsp26, Hsp68, Fst, and Treh. On the other hand, correlated patterns of gene expression were similar in cold- and warm-adapted populations. Analysis of functional categories defined by the Gene Ontology project point to an overrepresentation of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, nucleic acids metabolism and regulation of transcription among other categories. Although the location of differently expressed genes was approximately at random with respect to chromosomes, a physical mapping of 88 probes to the polytene chromosomes of D. subobscura has shown that a larger than expected number mapped inside inverted chromosomal segments. Conclusion Our data suggest that a sizeable number of genes appear to be involved in thermal adaptation in Drosophila, with a substantial fraction implicated in metabolism. This apparently illustrates the formidable challenge to

  18. Acidic Food pH Increases Palatability and Consumption and Extends Drosophila Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sonali A; Yamada, Ryuichi; Mak, Christine M; Hunter, Brooke; Soto Obando, Alina; Hoxha, Sany; Ja, William W

    2015-12-01

    Despite the prevalent use of Drosophila as a model in studies of nutrition, the effects of fundamental food properties, such as pH, on animal health and behavior are not well known. We examined the effect of food pH on adult Drosophila lifespan, feeding behavior, and microbiota composition and tested the hypothesis that pH-mediated changes in palatability and total consumption are required for modulating longevity. We measured the effect of buffered food (pH 5, 7, or 9) on male gustatory responses (proboscis extension), total food intake, and male and female lifespan. The effect of food pH on germfree male lifespan was also assessed. Changes in fly-associated microbial composition as a result of food pH were determined by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Male gustatory responses, total consumption, and male and female longevity were additionally measured in the taste-defective Pox neuro (Poxn) mutant and its transgenic rescue control. An acidic diet increased Drosophila gustatory responses (40-230%) and food intake (5-50%) and extended survival (10-160% longer median lifespan) compared with flies on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Alkaline food pH shifted the composition of fly-associated bacteria and resulted in greater lifespan extension (260% longer median survival) after microbes were eliminated compared with flies on an acidic (50%) or neutral (130%) diet. However, germfree flies lived longer on an acidic diet (5-20% longer median lifespan) compared with those on either neutral or alkaline pH food. Gustatory responses, total consumption, and longevity were unaffected by food pH in Poxn mutant flies. Food pH can directly influence palatability and feeding behavior and affect parameters such as microbial growth to ultimately affect Drosophila lifespan. Fundamental food properties altered by dietary or drug interventions may therefore contribute to changes in animal physiology, metabolism, and survival. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Effect of explosion-puffed coffee on locomotor activity and behavioral patterns in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Bong Soo; Ahn, So Hyun; Noh, Dong Ouk; Hong, Ki-Bae; Han, Sung Hee; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2017-10-01

    We hypothesized that the administration of explosion-puffed coffee, containing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), would be associated with a reduction of the caffeine effect on sleep behavior and behavioral patterns, which was investigated in a Drosophila model. The effects of feeding roasted coffee beans (RB), explosion-puffed coffee beans puffed at 0.75MPa and 0.9MPa (PB 7.5 and PB 9.0, respectively), or decaffeinated coffee beans (DeRB) on locomotor activity and behavioral patterns of Drosophila was analyzed. In the decreasing order, the total chlorogenic acid (caffeoylquinic acids, CQA) content was PB 7.5>PB 9.0>RB. PB content analysis showed high levels of GABA and 5-HTP, compared with that of RB, which corresponded with the sleep-wake behavior of Drosophila. The RB and PB (PB 7.5 and PB 9.0) groups were not significantly different with respect to an activity count during the subjective night and day period compared with the normal controls. Sleep bout numbers of the normal, PB, and DeRB groups showed significant differences as compared with the caffeine and RB groups (ptest; the average distance covered by the normal, PB 7.5, and DeRB groups was HTP with explosive puffing process carried out at 0.75MPa. Results of the underlying mechanism of the behavioral change patterns of explosive puffed with or without caffeine in Drosophila models, transcript level for the Dop1-R1 receptor in caffeine group was significantly higher than normal, PB, and DePB groups. Flies exposed to the caffeine had significantly decreased transcript levels for the GABA receptors. PB 7.5 and DePB showed higher level of GABA content than RB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genotype and environment shape the fitness of Drosophila melanogaster

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    Wesam S. Meshrif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fitness traits of Drosophila are believed to be expressed under genetic control and the environment. This study focuses on the interaction between the genotype (expressing high and low fitness level of Drosophila melanogaster and the environment (diet and infection. The environmental factors are supposed to modify traits such as the survival rate, development time, adult dry weight and response to microbial infection. The results indicated that yeast species (nutrients, bacterial infection and the genotype of Drosophila affected the survival rates and the development time of Drosophila. The fit Drosophila produces more survivors and develops faster than the unfit one. The yeast, Pichia toletana induced the highest survival and the fastest development of Drosophila, while Metschnikowia pulcherrima induced the opposite. The origin also had an effect on the development time; the African lines developed faster than the European ones. The yeast species and its concentration appeared to affect the dry weight of Drosophila too. Following infection with Pseudomonas stutzeri, several antimicrobial peptides, such as drosomycin and metchnikowin have been activated in Drosophila adults when they feed on less nutritive yeast (M. pulcherrima. The above mentioned results support the capacity of genotype-by-environment interactions to shape the fitness of D. melanogaster, where the contribution of each factor may differ according to the trait observed and the population under investigation.

  1. KIF27 is one of orthologs for Drosophila Costal-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2004-12-01

    Signals of Hedgehog family proteins (SHH, IHH and DHH) are transduced through Patched family receptors (PTCH1 and PTCH2) and Smoothened (SMO) to GLI family transcription factors (GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3). SHH plays a key role in development and progression of pancreatic cancer, gastric cancer, basal cell carcinoma, and brain tumors. Drosophila Costal-2 (Cos2) is implicated in the Hedgehog pathway through the interaction with Smoothened (Smo), Cubitus interruptus (Ci), Fused (Fu), and microtubule; however, mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Cos2 remained to be identified. Here we identified and characterized human ortholog of Drosophila Cos2 by using bioinformatics. Full-length Drosophila Cos2 was most homologous to human KIF27, followed by mouse Kif7, and other KIF family members. KIF27 gene at human chromosome 9q22.1 and KIF7 gene at human chromosome 15q26.1 were paralogs within the human genome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that KIF27, Kif7, KIF4A, KIF4B and KIF21A constitute the KIF27 subfamily among mammalian Kinesin family. Drosophila Cos2 protein consists of Kinesin motor (KISc) domain, Ci-binding domain, and Smo-binding domain. KIF27 itself shared the common domain structure with Drosophila Cos2, while other members of KIF27 subfamily shared partial domain structure with Drosophila Cos2. These facts indicate that KIF27 is one of mammalian orthologs for Drosophila Cos2.

  2. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  3. Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to study nanotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cynthia; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Cai, Yu; Bay, Boon-Huat; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as an in vivo model organism for the study of genetics and development since 100 years ago. Recently, the fruit fly Drosophila was also developed as an in vivo model organism for toxicology studies, in particular, the field of nanotoxicity. The incorporation of nanomaterials into consumer and biomedical products is a cause for concern as nanomaterials are often associated with toxicity in many in vitro studies. In vivo animal studies of the toxicity of nanomaterials with rodents and other mammals are, however, limited due to high operational cost and ethical objections. Hence, Drosophila, a genetically tractable organism with distinct developmental stages and short life cycle, serves as an ideal organism to study nanomaterial-mediated toxicity. This review discusses the basic biology of Drosophila, the toxicity of nanomaterials, as well as how the Drosophila model can be used to study the toxicity of various types of nanomaterials.

  4. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins. PMID:27651995

  5. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingkalai R. Senthilan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6 with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7. Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins.

  6. Edible bird's nest enhances antioxidant capacity and increases lifespan in Drosophila Melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q; Li, G; Yao, H; He, S; Li, H; Liu, S; Wu, Y; Lai, X

    2016-04-30

    In this study, we aims to investigate the effects of edible bird's nest (EBN) on anti-aging efficacy. In order to investigate lifespan and mortality rate of flies, we treated flies with various doses of EBN. Besides, fecundity, water content and food are determined and heat-stress test is conducted after flies treating with different medium. Effects of EBN on total antioxidant activity (T-AOC), super-oxide dismutase activity (SOD), catalase activity (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined in drosophila melanogaster. Results indicated that flies in EBN treated group illustrated significantly lower mortality rates and longer median and maximum lifespan compared to control group (Pdrosophila melanogaster aging, attributing to the increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and decreasing content of lipid peroxidation products in drosophila melanogaster.

  7. Functional analysis of Drosophila HSP70 promoter with different HSE numbers in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust, Nadezda; Rybalkina, Ekaterina; Mertsalov, Ilya; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Revishchin, Alexander; Pavlova, Gali

    2014-01-01

    The activation of genetic constructs including the Drosophila hsp70 promoter with four and eight HSE sequences in the regulatory region has been described in human cells. The promoter was shown to be induced at lower temperatures compared to the human hsp70 promoter. The promoter activity increased after a 60-min heat shock already at 38 °C in human cells. The promoter activation was observed 24 h after heat shock for the constructs with eight HSEs, while those with four HSEs required 48 h. After transplantation of in vitro heat-shocked transfected cells, the promoter activity could be maintained for 3 days with a gradual decline. The promoter activation was confirmed in vivo without preliminary heat shock in mouse ischemic brain foci. Controlled expression of the Gdnf gene under a Drosophila hsp70 promoter was demonstrated. This promoter with four and eight HSE sequences in the regulatory region can be proposed as a regulated promoter in genetic therapeutic systems.

  8. A highly conserved novel family of mammalian developmental transcription factors related to Drosophila grainyhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilanowski, Tomasz; Tuckfield, Annabel; Cerruti, Loretta; O'Connell, Sinead; Saint, Robert; Parekh, Vishwas; Tao, Jianning; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2002-06-01

    The Drosophila transcription factor Grainyhead regulates several key developmental processes. Three mammalian genes, CP2, LBP-1a and LBP-9 have been previously identified as homologues of grainyhead. We now report the cloning of two new mammalian genes (Mammalian grainyhead (MGR) and Brother-of-MGR (BOM)) and one new Drosophila gene (dCP2) that rewrite the phylogeny of this family. We demonstrate that MGR and BOM are more closely related to grh, whereas CP2, LBP-1a and LBP-9 are descendants of the dCP2 gene. MGR shares the greatest sequence homology with grh, is expressed in tissue-restricted patterns more comparable to grh and binds to and transactivates the promoter of the human Engrailed-1 gene, the mammalian homologue of the key grainyhead target gene, engrailed. This sequence and functional conservation indicates that the new mammalian members of this family play important developmental roles.

  9. Analysis of neurotransmitter tissue content of Drosophila melanogaster in different life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denno, Madelaine E; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-01-21

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development.

  10. Isolation of protease-free alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Drosophila simulans and several homozygous and heterozygous Drosophila melanogaster variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilda, T; Lamme, DA; Collu, G; Jekel, PA; Reinders, P; Beintema, JJ

    The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from several naturally occurring ADH variants of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans Lc,as isolated. Affinity chromatography with the ligand Cibacron Blue and elution with NAD(+) showed similar behavior for D. melanogaster ADH-FF, ADH-71k, and D.

  11. Rapid and highly accurate detection of Drosophila suzukii, spotted wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosophila suzukii, the spotted wing drosophila (SWD), is currently a major pest that causes severe economic losses to thin-skinned, small fruit growers in North America and Europe. The monitoring and early detection of SWD in the field is of the utmost importance for its proper management. Althou...

  12. Isolation of protease-free alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Drosophila simulans and several homozygous and heterozygous Drosophila melanogaster variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilda, T; Lamme, DA; Collu, G; Jekel, PA; Reinders, P; Beintema, JJ

    1998-01-01

    The enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from several naturally occurring ADH variants of Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans Lc,as isolated. Affinity chromatography with the ligand Cibacron Blue and elution with NAD(+) showed similar behavior for D. melanogaster ADH-FF, ADH-71k, and D. si

  13. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors...

  14. Multistate Comparison of Attractants for Monitoring Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Blueberries and Caneberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrack, Hannah J; Asplen, Mark; Bahder, Luz; Collins, Judith; Drummond, Francis A; Guédot, Christelle; Isaacs, Rufus; Johnson, Donn; Blanton, Anna; Lee, Jana C; Loeb, Gregory; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; van Timmeren, Steven; Walsh, Douglas; McPhie, Douglas R

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumara, also referred to as the spotted wing drosophila, has recently expanded its global range with significant consequences for its primary host crops: blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, cherries, and strawberries. D. suzukii populations can increase quickly, and their infestation is difficult to predict and prevent. The development of effective tools to detect D. suzukii presence in new areas, to time the beginning of activity within a crop, to track seasonal activity patterns, and to gauge the effectiveness of management efforts has been a key research goal. We compared the efficiency, selectivity, and relationship to fruit infestation of a range of commonly used homemade baits and a synthetic formulated lure across a wide range of environments in 10 locations throughout the United States. Several homemade baits were more efficient than apple cider vinegar, a commonly used standard, and a commercially formulated lure was, in some configurations and environments, comparable with the most effective homemade attractant as well as potentially more selective. All alternative attractants also captured flies between 1 and 2 wk earlier than apple cider vinegar, and detected the presence of D. suzukii prior to the development of fruit infestation. Over half the Drosophila spp. flies captured in traps baited with any of the attractants were not D. suzukii, which may complicate their adoption by nonexpert users. The alternative D. suzukii attractants tested are improvement on apple cider vinegar and may be useful in the development of future synthetic lures.

  15. Cardiac optogenetic pacing in drosophila melanogaster using red-shifted opsins (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Electrical pacing is the current gold standard for investigation of mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, this method requires an invasive surgical procedure to implant the pacing electrodes. Recently, optogenetic pacing has been developed as an alternative, non-invasive method for heartbeat pacing in animals. It induces heartbeats by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins which in turn activate light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we expressed recently engineered red-shifted opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in the heart of a well-developed animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, for the first time. Optogenetic pacing was successfully conducted in both ReaChR and CsChrimson flies at their larval, pupal, and adult stages using 617 nm excitation light pulse, enabling a much deeper tissue penetration compared to blue stimulation light. A customized high speed and ultrahigh resolution OCM system was used to non-invasively monitor the heartbeat pacing in Drosophila. Compared to previous studies on optogenetic pacing of Drosophila, higher penetration depth of optogenetic excitation light was achieved in opaque late pupal flies. Lower stimulating power density is needed for excitation at each developmental stage of both groups, which improves the safety of this technique for heart rhythm studies.

  16. New Drosophila P-like elements and reclassification of Drosophila P-elements subfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreto, Elgion L S; Zambra, Francis M B; Ortiz, Mauro F; Robe, Lizandra J

    2012-07-01

    Genomic searches for P-like transposable elements were performed (1) in silico in the 12 available Drosophila genomes and (2) by PCR using degenerate primers in 21 Neotropical Drosophila species. In silico searches revealed P-like sequences only in Drosophila persimilis and Drosophila willistoni. Sixteen new P-like elements were obtained by PCR. These sequences were added to sequences of previously described P-like elements, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. The subfamilies of P-elements described in the literature (Canonical, M, O, T, and K) were included in the reconstructed tree, and all were monophyletic. However, we suggest that some subfamilies can be enlarged, other subdivided, and some new subfamilies may be proposed, totalizing eleven subfamilies, most of which contain new P-like sequences. Our analyses support the monophyly of P-like elements in Drosophilidae. We suggest that, once these elements need host-specific factors to be mobilizable, the horizontal transfer (HT) of P-like elements may be inhibited among more distant taxa. Nevertheless, HT among Drosophilidae species appears to be a common phenomenon.

  17. Biological effects of radon in Drosophila; Efectos biologicos del radon en Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel P, A.E.; Tavera D, L.; Cruces M, M.P.; Arceo M, C.; Rosa D, M.E. de la

    1992-04-15

    The main objective of this investigation, is to study the biological effects of the Radon-222 at low dose in 'Drosophila melanogaster'. It is necessary to mention that these effects will analyze from the genetic point of view for: 1) To evaluate in which form the Radon-222 to low dose it influences in some genetic components of the adaptation in Drosophila, such as: fecundity, viability egg-adult and sex proportion. 2) To evaluate which is the genetic effect that induces the Radon to low dose by means of the SMART technique in Drosophila melanogaster, and this way to try of to identify which is the possible mechanism that causes the genetic damage to somatic level. The carried out investigation was divided in three stages: 1. Tests to the vacuum resistance. 2. Test of somatic mutation, and 3. Determination of the presence of radon daughters on the adult of Drosophila. It is necessary to point out that all the experiments were made by triplicate and in each one of them was placed detectors in preset places. Those obtained results are presented inside the 4 charts included in the present work. (Author)

  18. Large-scale discovery of promoter motifs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Down

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A key step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the repertoire of transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs that form the building blocks of promoters and other regulatory elements. Identifying these experimentally is very laborious, and the number of TFBMs discovered remains relatively small, especially when compared with the hundreds of transcription factor genes predicted in metazoan genomes. We have used a recently developed statistical motif discovery approach, NestedMICA, to detect candidate TFBMs from a large set of Drosophila melanogaster promoter regions. Of the 120 motifs inferred in our initial analysis, 25 were statistically significant matches to previously reported motifs, while 87 appeared to be novel. Analysis of sequence conservation and motif positioning suggested that the great majority of these discovered motifs are predictive of functional elements in the genome. Many motifs showed associations with specific patterns of gene expression in the D. melanogaster embryo, and we were able to obtain confident annotation of expression patterns for 25 of our motifs, including eight of the novel motifs. The motifs are available through Tiffin, a new database of DNA sequence motifs. We have discovered many new motifs that are overrepresented in D. melanogaster promoter regions, and offer several independent lines of evidence that these are novel TFBMs. Our motif dictionary provides a solid foundation for further investigation of regulatory elements in Drosophila, and demonstrates techniques that should be applicable in other species. We suggest that further improvements in computational motif discovery should narrow the gap between the set of known motifs and the total number of transcription factors in metazoan genomes.

  19. Context-specific comparison of sleep acquisition systems in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Garbe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is conserved across phyla and can be measured through electrophysiological or behavioral characteristics. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent model for investigating the genetic and neural mechanisms that regulate sleep. Multiple systems exist for measuring fly activity, including video analysis and single-beam (SB or multi-beam (MB infrared (IR-based monitoring. In this study, we compare multiple sleep parameters of individual flies using a custom-built video-based acquisition system, and commercially available SB- or MB-IR acquisition systems. We report that all three monitoring systems appear sufficiently sensitive to detect changes in sleep duration associated with diet, age, and mating status. Our data also demonstrate that MB-IR detection appeared more sensitive than the SB-IR for detecting baseline nuances in sleep architecture, while architectural changes associated with varying life-history and environment were generally detected across all acquisition types. Finally, video recording of flies in an arena allowed us to measure the effect of ambient environment on sleep. These experiments demonstrate a robust effect of arena shape and size as well as light levels on sleep duration and architecture, and highlighting the versatility of tracking-based sleep acquisition. These findings provide insight into the context-specific basis for choosing between Drosophila sleep acquisition systems, describe a novel cost-effective system for video tracking, and characterize sleep analysis using the MB-IR sleep analysis. Further, we describe a modified dark-place preference sleep assay using video tracking, confirming that flies prefer to sleep in dark locations.

  20. Identification and functional analysis of healing regulators in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Tamirisa, Srividya; Prada, Federico; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Blanco, Enrique; Martín-Blanco, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is an essential homeostatic mechanism that maintains the epithelial barrier integrity after tissue damage. Although we know the overall steps in wound healing, many of the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Genetically amenable systems, such as wound healing in Drosophila imaginal discs, do not model all aspects of the repair process. However, they do allow the less understood aspects of the healing response to be explored, e.g., which signal(s) are responsible for initiating tissue remodeling? How is sealing of the epithelia achieved? Or, what inhibitory cues cancel the healing machinery upon completion? Answering these and other questions first requires the identification and functional analysis of wound specific genes. A variety of different microarray analyses of murine and humans have identified characteristic profiles of gene expression at the wound site, however, very few functional studies in healing regulation have been carried out. We developed an experimentally controlled method that is healing-permissive and that allows live imaging and biochemical analysis of cultured imaginal discs. We performed comparative genome-wide profiling between Drosophila imaginal cells actively involved in healing versus their non-engaged siblings. Sets of potential wound-specific genes were subsequently identified. Importantly, besides identifying and categorizing new genes, we functionally tested many of their gene products by genetic interference and overexpression in healing assays. This non-saturated analysis defines a relevant set of genes whose changes in expression level are functionally significant for proper tissue repair. Amongst these we identified the TCP1 chaperonin complex as a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton essential for the wound healing response. There is promise that our newly identified wound-healing genes will guide future work in the more complex mammalian wound healing response.

  1. Identification and functional analysis of healing regulators in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Álvarez-Fernández

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an essential homeostatic mechanism that maintains the epithelial barrier integrity after tissue damage. Although we know the overall steps in wound healing, many of the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Genetically amenable systems, such as wound healing in Drosophila imaginal discs, do not model all aspects of the repair process. However, they do allow the less understood aspects of the healing response to be explored, e.g., which signal(s are responsible for initiating tissue remodeling? How is sealing of the epithelia achieved? Or, what inhibitory cues cancel the healing machinery upon completion? Answering these and other questions first requires the identification and functional analysis of wound specific genes. A variety of different microarray analyses of murine and humans have identified characteristic profiles of gene expression at the wound site, however, very few functional studies in healing regulation have been carried out. We developed an experimentally controlled method that is healing-permissive and that allows live imaging and biochemical analysis of cultured imaginal discs. We performed comparative genome-wide profiling between Drosophila imaginal cells actively involved in healing versus their non-engaged siblings. Sets of potential wound-specific genes were subsequently identified. Importantly, besides identifying and categorizing new genes, we functionally tested many of their gene products by genetic interference and overexpression in healing assays. This non-saturated analysis defines a relevant set of genes whose changes in expression level are functionally significant for proper tissue repair. Amongst these we identified the TCP1 chaperonin complex as a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton essential for the wound healing response. There is promise that our newly identified wound-healing genes will guide future work in the more complex mammalian wound healing response.

  2. Dynamic interpretation of hedgehog signaling in the Drosophila wing disc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Nahmad

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Morphogens are classically defined as molecules that control patterning by acting at a distance to regulate gene expression in a concentration-dependent manner. In the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, secreted Hedgehog (Hh forms an extracellular gradient that organizes patterning along the anterior-posterior axis and specifies at least three different domains of gene expression. Although the prevailing view is that Hh functions in the Drosophila wing disc as a classical morphogen, a direct correspondence between the borders of these patterns and Hh concentration thresholds has not been demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence that the interpretation of Hh signaling depends on the history of exposure to Hh and propose that a single concentration threshold is sufficient to support multiple outputs. Using mathematical modeling, we predict that at steady state, only two domains can be defined in response to Hh, suggesting that the boundaries of two or more gene expression patterns cannot be specified by a static Hh gradient. Computer simulations suggest that a spatial "overshoot" of the Hh gradient occurs, i.e., a transient state in which the Hh profile is expanded compared to the Hh steady-state gradient. Through a temporal examination of Hh target gene expression, we observe that the patterns initially expand anteriorly and then refine, providing in vivo evidence for the overshoot. The Hh gene network architecture suggests this overshoot results from the Hh-dependent up-regulation of the receptor, Patched (Ptc. In fact, when the network structure was altered such that the ptc gene is no longer up-regulated in response to Hh-signaling activation, we found that the patterns of gene expression, which have distinct borders in wild-type discs, now overlap. Our results support a model in which Hh gradient dynamics, resulting from Ptc up-regulation, play an instructional role in the establishment of patterns of gene expression.

  3. Centrosome and microtubule instability in aging Drosophila cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.; Hedrick, J.

    1999-01-01

    Several cytoskeletal changes are associated with aging which includes alterations in muscle structure leading to muscular atrophy, and weakening of the microtubule network which affects cellular secretion and maintenance of cell shape. Weakening of the microtubule network during meiosis in aging oocytes can result in aneuploidy or trisomic zygotes with increasing maternal age. Imbalances of cytoskeletal organization can lead to disease such as Alzheimer's, muscular disorders, and cancer. Because many cytoskeletal diseases are related to age we investigated the effects of aging on microtubule organization in cell cultures of the Drosophila cell model system (Schneider S-1 and Kc23 cell lines). This cell model is increasingly being used as an alternative system to mammalian cell cultures. Drosophila cells are amenable to genetic manipulations and can be used to identify and manipulate genes which are involved in the aging processes. Immunofluorescence, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy were employed for the analysis of microtubule organizing centers (centrosomes) and microtubules at various times after subculturing cells in fresh medium. Our results reveal that centrosomes and the microtubule network becomes significantly affected in aging cells after 5 days of subculture. At 5-14 days of subculture, 1% abnormal out of 3% mitoses were noted which were clearly distinguishable from freshly subcultured control cells in which 3% of cells undergo normal mitosis with bipolar configurations. Microtubules are also affected in the midbody during cell division. The midbody in aging cells becomes up to 10 times longer when compared with midbodies in freshly subcultured cells. During interphase, microtubules are often disrupted and disorganized, which may indicate improper function related to transport of cell organelles along microtubules. These results are likely to help explain some cytoskeletal disorders and diseases related to aging.

  4. Mechanical Coupling between Endoderm Invagination and Axis Extension in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Lye

    Full Text Available How genetic programs generate cell-intrinsic forces to shape embryos is actively studied, but less so how tissue-scale physical forces impact morphogenesis. Here we address the role of the latter during axis extension, using Drosophila germband extension (GBE as a model. We found previously that cells elongate in the anteroposterior (AP axis in the extending germband, suggesting that an extrinsic tensile force contributed to body axis extension. Here we further characterized the AP cell elongation patterns during GBE, by tracking cells and quantifying their apical cell deformation over time. AP cell elongation forms a gradient culminating at the posterior of the embryo, consistent with an AP-oriented tensile force propagating from there. To identify the morphogenetic movements that could be the source of this extrinsic force, we mapped gastrulation movements temporally using light sheet microscopy to image whole Drosophila embryos. We found that both mesoderm and endoderm invaginations are synchronous with the onset of GBE. The AP cell elongation gradient remains when mesoderm invagination is blocked but is abolished in the absence of endoderm invagination. This suggested that endoderm invagination is the source of the tensile force. We next looked for evidence of this force in a simplified system without polarized cell intercalation, in acellular embryos. Using Particle Image Velocimetry, we identify posteriorwards Myosin II flows towards the presumptive posterior endoderm, which still undergoes apical constriction in acellular embryos as in wildtype. We probed this posterior region using laser ablation and showed that tension is increased in the AP orientation, compared to dorsoventral orientation or to either orientations more anteriorly in the embryo. We propose that apical constriction leading to endoderm invagination is the source of the extrinsic force contributing to germband extension. This highlights the importance of physical

  5. Functional analysis of PGRP-LA in Drosophila immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Gendrin

    Full Text Available PeptidoGlycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs are key regulators of the insect innate antibacterial response. Even if they have been intensively studied, some of them have yet unknown functions. Here, we present a functional analysis of PGRP-LA, an as yet uncharacterized Drosophila PGRP. The PGRP-LA gene is located in cluster with PGRP-LC and PGRP-LF, which encode a receptor and a negative regulator of the Imd pathway, respectively. Structure predictions indicate that PGRP-LA would not bind to peptidoglycan, pointing to a regulatory role of this PGRP. PGRP-LA expression was enriched in barrier epithelia, but low in the fat body. Use of a newly generated PGRP-LA deficient mutant indicates that PGRP-LA is not required for the production of antimicrobial peptides by the fat body in response to a systemic infection. Focusing on the respiratory tract, where PGRP-LA is strongly expressed, we conducted a genome-wide microarray analysis of the tracheal immune response of wild-type, Relish, and PGRP-LA mutant larvae. Comparing our data to previous microarray studies, we report that a majority of genes regulated in the trachea upon infection differ from those induced in the gut or the fat body. Importantly, antimicrobial peptide gene expression was reduced in the tracheae of larvae and in the adult gut of PGRP-LA-deficient Drosophila upon oral bacterial infection. Together, our results suggest that PGRP-LA positively regulates the Imd pathway in barrier epithelia.

  6. Genome-wide LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and high-throughput insertion detection in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Malolepszy, Anna; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    including software for automated data analysis, which take full advantage of high next-generation sequencing throughput. Here we address these challenges by developing the FSTpoolit protocol and software package and we demonstrate its efficacy by detecting 8,935 LORE1 insertions in 3,744 Lotus japonicus...... plants. The identified insertions showed that the endogenous LORE1 retrotransposon is well suited for insertion mutagenesis due to its homogenous gene targeting and exonic insertion preference. Since LORE1 transposition occurs in the germline, harvesting seeds from a single founder line and cultivating...... progeny generates a complete mutant population. This ease of LORE1 mutagenesis combined with the efficient FSTpoolit protocol, which exploits 2D pooling, Illumina sequencing, and automated data analysis, allows highly cost-efficient development of a comprehensive reverse genetic resource....

  7. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes that cooperate with mutant Pten in breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Lee, Song-Choon; Hon-Kim Ban, Kenneth; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Mann, Michael B.; Newberg, Justin Y.; McNoe, Leslie A.; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Ward, Jerrold M.; Rust, Alistair G.; Chin, Kuan-Yew; Black, Michael A.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the worst prognosis of any breast cancer subtype. To better understand the genetic forces driving TNBC, we performed a transposon mutagenesis screen in a phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) mutant mice and identified 12 candidate trunk drivers and a much larger number of progression genes. Validation studies identified eight TNBC tumor suppressor genes, including the GATA-like transcriptional repressor TRPS1. Down-regulation of TRPS1 in TNBC cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by deregulating multiple EMT pathway genes, in addition to increasing the expression of SERPINE1 and SERPINB2 and the subsequent migration, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Transposon mutagenesis has thus provided a better understanding of the genetic forces driving TNBC and discovered genes with potential clinical importance in TNBC. PMID:27849608

  8. A highly efficient transposon mutagenesis system for the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, O; Gartemann, K H; Zellermann, E M; Eichenlaub, R; Burger, A

    2001-11-01

    A transposon mutagenesis system for Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis was developed based on antibiotic resistance transposons that were derived from the insertion element IS1409 from Arthrobacter sp. strain TM1 NCIB12013. As a prerequisite, the electroporation efficiency was optimized by using unmethylated DNA and treatment of the cells with glycine such that about 5 x 10(6) transformants per microg of DNA were generally obtained. Electroporation of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis with a suicide vector carrying transposon Tn1409C resulted in approximately 1 x 10(3) transposon mutants per pg of DNA and thus is suitable for saturation mutagenesis. Analysis of Tn1409C insertion sites suggests a random mode of transposition. Transposition of Tn1409C was also demonstrated for other subspecies of C. michiganensis.

  9. Reducing codon redundancy and screening effort of combinatorial protein libraries created by saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kille, Sabrina; Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Parra, Loreto P; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Opperman, Diederik J; Reetz, Manfred T; Acevedo, Juan Pablo

    2013-02-15

    Saturation mutagenesis probes define sections of the vast protein sequence space. However, even if randomization is limited this way, the combinatorial numbers problem is severe. Because diversity is created at the codon level, codon redundancy is a crucial factor determining the necessary effort for library screening. Additionally, due to the probabilistic nature of the sampling process, oversampling is required to ensure library completeness as well as a high probability to encounter all unique variants. Our trick employs a special mixture of three primers, creating a degeneracy of 22 unique codons coding for the 20 canonical amino acids. Therefore, codon redundancy and subsequent screening effort is significantly reduced, and a balanced distribution of codon per amino acid is achieved, as demonstrated exemplarily for a library of cyclohexanone monooxygenase. We show that this strategy is suitable for any saturation mutagenesis methodology to generate less-redundant libraries.

  10. Improvement of PCR reaction conditions for site-directed mutagenesis of big plasmids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bogdan MUNTEANU; Mario BRAUN; Kajohn BOONROD

    2012-01-01

    QuickChange mutagenesis is the method of choice for site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of target sequences in a plasmid.It can be applied successfully to small plasmids (up to 10 kb).However,this method cannot efficiently mutate bigger plasmids.Using KOD Hot Start polymerase in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purified primers,we were able to achieve SDM in big plasmids (up to 16 kb) involving not only a single base change but also multiple base changes.Moreover,only six polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cycles and 0.5 μl of polymerase (instead of 18 PCR cycles and 1.0 μl of enzyme In the standard protocol) were sufficient for the reaction.

  11. Regulation of mutagenesis by exogenous biological factors in the eukaryotic cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukash L. L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The representations of the mutations and the nature of spontaneous mutation process and mutagenesis induced by exogenous oncoviruses, DNAs and proteins-mitogens are analysed. Exogenous biological factors induce DNA damages in regulatory-informational way, acting on the cellular systems for maintenance of genetical stability. Molecular mechanisms are the same as at spontaneous mutagenesis but they are realized with the participation of alien genetical material. Among biological mutagens, the oncoviruses and mobile genetic elements (MGEs are distinguished as the strongest destabilizing factors which direct tumor transformation of somatic mammalian cells. Genetical reprogramming or changing the programs of gene expression at the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells under growth factors and citokines is probably followed by mutations and recombinations as well.

  12. Rapid construction of mycobacterial mutagenesis vectors using ligation-independent cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhana, Ricardo; Stoker, Neil G.; Sikder, Mahmudul Hasan; Chauviac, Francois-Xavier; Kendall, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is one of the major tools for determining the function of a given gene and its involvement in bacterial pathogenesis. In mycobacteria, gene deletion is often accomplished by using allelic exchange techniques that commonly utilise a suicide delivery vector. We have adapted a widely-used suicide delivery vector (p1NIL) for cloning two flanking regions of a gene using ligation independent cloning (LIC). The pNILRB plasmid series produced allow a faster, more efficient and less laborious cloning procedure. In this paper we describe the making of pNILRB5, a modified version of p1NIL that contains two pairs of LIC sites flanking either a sacB or a lacZ gene. We demonstrate the success of this technique by generating 3 mycobacterial mutant strains. These vectors will contribute to more high-throughput methods of mutagenesis. PMID:20650290

  13. Altered lipid accumulation in Nannochloropsis salina CCAP849/3 following EMS and UV induced mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Beacham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have potential as a chemical feed stock in a range of industrial applications. Nannochloropsis salina was subject to EMS mutagenesis and the highest lipid containing cells selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Assessment of growth, lipid content and fatty acid composition identified mutant strains displaying a range of altered traits including changes in the PUFA content and a total FAME increase of up to 156% that of the wild type strain. Combined with a reduction in growth this demonstrated a productivity increase of up to 76%. Following UV mutagenesis, lipid accumulation of the mutant cultures was elevated to more than 3 fold that of the wild type strain, however reduced growth rates resulted in a reduction in overall productivity. Changes observed are indicative of alterations to the regulation of the omega 6 Kennedy pathway. The importance of these variations in physiology for industrial applications such as biofuel production is discussed.

  14. Crystal structure and structure-based mutagenesis of actin-specific ADP-ribosylating toxin CPILE-a as novel enterotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniti, Waraphan; Yoshida, Toru; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Irikura, Daisuke; Monma, Chie; Kamata, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Unusual outbreaks of food poisoning in Japan were reported in which Clostridium perfringens was strongly suspected to be the cause based on epidemiological information and fingerprinting of isolates. The isolated strains lack the typical C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) but secrete a new enterotoxin consisting of two components: C. perfringens iota-like enterotoxin-a (CPILE-a), which acts as an enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase, and CPILE-b, a membrane binding component. Here we present the crystal structures of apo-CPILE-a, NAD+-CPILE-a and NADH-CPILE-a. Though CPILE-a structure has high similarity with known iota toxin-a (Ia) with NAD+, it possesses two extra-long protruding loops from G262-S269 and E402-K408 that are distinct from Ia. Based on the Ia–actin complex structure, we focused on actin-binding interface regions (I-V) including two protruding loops (PT) and examined how mutations in these regions affect the ADP-ribosylation activity of CPILE-a. Though some site-directed mutagenesis studies have already been conducted on the actin binding site of Ia, in the present study, mutagenesis studies were conducted against both α- and β/γ-actin in CPILE-a and Ia. Interestingly, CPILE-a ADP-ribosylates both α- and β/γ-actin, but its sensitivity towards β/γ-actin is 36% compared with α-actin. Our results contrast to that only C2-I ADP-ribosylates β/γ-actin. We also showed that PT-I and two convex-concave interactions in CPILE-a are important for actin binding. The current study is the first detailed analysis of site-directed mutagenesis in the actin binding region of Ia and CPILE-a against both α- and β/γ-actin. PMID:28199340

  15. [Effects of the site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro on replicon vector derived from XJ-160 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Zhu, Wu-Yang; Fu, Shi-Hong; He, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro on the characteristics of replicon vector derived from XJ-160 virus, a Sindbis virus (SINV) isolated in China. The mutant vector pBRep-726L, pBRep-726S, pBRep-726V or pBRep-726A was constructed by introducing nsP2-726Pro --> Leu, nsP2-726Pro --> Ser, nsP2-726Pro --> Val or nsP2-726Pro --> Ala into XJ-160 viral replicon vector pBRepXJ respectively. To quantitatively and qualitatively determine the site-directed mutagenesis on the replicon, the recombinant plasmids expressing Neomycinr (Neo(r)), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or Renilla luciferase (R. luc) were constructed by cloning report genes into pBRepXJ or mutant XJ-160 vector respectively. And in vitro-synthesized RNA from expression vectors were electroporated into BHK-21 cells. Compared with the wild-type replicon, the mutation nsP2-726Pro --> Val or nsP2-726Pro --> Ala accelerated the processing of CPE on BHK-21 cells and simultaneously enhanced its self-replicating capacity. The mutant vector pBRep-726L with Leu substitution exhibited similar packaging capacity to that of pBRepXJ. In contrast, pBRep-726S exhibited a medium phenotype, including the process of CPE and the activity of R. luc expression in BHK-21 cells. The site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro not only regulates directly XJ-160 virus vector-host cell interactions, but also plays an important role in its packaging capacity. All of these results lay a basis for researching the relation between the structure and function of alphavirus genome and developing alphavirus vector system with Chinese intellectual property.

  16. Yeast Communities of Diverse Drosophila Species: Comparison of Two Symbiont Groups in the Same Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The combination of ecological diversity with genetic and experimental tractability makes Drosophila a powerful model for the study of animal-associated microbial communities. Despite the known importance of yeasts in Drosophila physiology, behavior, and fitness, most recent work has focused on Drosophila-bacterial interactions. In order to get a more complete understanding of the Drosophila microbiome, we characterized the yeast communities associated with different Drosophila species collect...

  17. CCHamide-2 Is an Orexigenic Brain-Gut Peptide in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin R Ren

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine peptides CCHamide-1 and -2, encoded by the genes ccha1 and -2, are produced by endocrine cells in the midgut and by neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 technique to disrupt the ccha1 and -2 genes and identify mutant phenotypes with a focus on ccha-2 mutants. We found that both larval and adult ccha2 mutants showed a significantly reduced food intake as measured in adult flies by the Capillary Feeding (CAFE assay (up to 72% reduced food intake compared to wild-type. Locomotion tests in adult flies showed that ccha2 mutants had a significantly reduced locomotor activity especially around 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., where adult Drosophila normally feeds (up to 70% reduced locomotor activity compared to wild-type. Reduced larval feeding is normally coupled to a delayed larval development, a process that is mediated by insulin. Accordingly, we found that the ccha2 mutants had a remarkably delayed development, showing pupariation 70 hours after the pupariation time point of the wild-type. In contrast, the ccha-1 mutants were not developmentally delayed. We also found that the ccha2 mutants had up to 80% reduced mRNA concentrations coding for the Drosophila insulin-like-peptides-2 and -3, while these concentrations were unchanged for the ccha1 mutants. From these experiments we conclude that CCHamide-2 is an orexigenic peptide and an important factor for controlling developmental timing in Drosophila.

  18. Mutation Induced Extinction in Finite Populations: Lethal Mutagenesis and Lethal Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    C Scott Wylie; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction is inherently risky, in part because genomic replication can introduce new mutations that are usually deleterious toward fitness. This risk is especially severe for organisms whose genomes replicate “semi-conservatively,” e.g. viruses and bacteria, where no master copy of the genome is preserved. Lethal mutagenesis refers to extinction of populations due to an unbearably high mutation rate (U), and is important both theoretically and clinically, where drugs can extinguish pathoge...

  19. A plasmid-transposon hybrid mutagenesis system effective in a broad range of Enterobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eMonson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways.

  20. Site-specific mutagenesis of histidine residues in the lac permease of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Padan, E; Sarkar, H K; Viitanen, P V; Poonian, M S; Kaback, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    The lacY gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes the lac permease, has been modified by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis such that each of the four histidine residues in the molecule is replaced with an arginine residue. Replacement of histidine-35 and histidine-39 with arginine has no apparent effect on permease activity. In contrast, replacement of either histidine-205 or histidine-322 by arginine causes a dramatic loss of transport activity, although the cells contain a ...

  1. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This in...

  2. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D.; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. F...

  3. A Plasmid-Transposon Hybrid Mutagenesis System Effective in a Broad Range of Enterobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Rita; Smith, Debra S.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Roberts, Kevin; Richardson, Elizabeth; Drew, Alison; Williamson, Neil; Ramsay, Josh; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii, and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways. PMID:26733980

  4. The mechanism of nucleotide excision repair-mediated UV-induced mutagenesis in nonproliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps.

  5. Using ultra-sensitive next generation sequencing to dissect DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaile Wang; Xiaolu Ma; Xue Zhang; Dafei Wu; Chenyi Sun; Yazhou Sun; Xuemei Lu; Chung-I Wu; Caixia Guo; Jue Ruan

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have dramatically improved studies in biology and biomedical science. However, no optimal NGS approach is available to conveniently analyze low frequency mutations caused by DNA damage treatments. Here, by developing an exquisite ultra-sensitive NGS (USNGS) platform “EasyMF” and incorporating it with a widely used supF shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, we can conveniently dissect roles of lesion bypass polymerases in damage-induced mutagene...

  6. Effects of flanking base sequences on 5-bromodeoxyuridine mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnak, M T; Davidson, R L

    1991-07-01

    The molecular mechanisms of incorporation-dependent, 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-induced mutagenesis were analyzed in murine A9 cells that possess a single copy of the Escherichia coli gpt gene integrated into the chromosomal DNA as part of a shuttle vector. Four independently derived GPT- mutants with single base changes within the integrated gpt gene were utilized in BrdU-induced reversion analyses to test the relative mutability of guanine residues in four different settings: the 5' and 3' guanine residues of a GG doublet, the 3' guanine residue of a GGGG quartet, and the middle guanine residue of a GGG triplet. Two of the mutant lines possessed GG doublet sequences in which a GC----AT transition at either guanine residue of the doublet leads to restoration of GPT enzyme activity without restoring wild-type DNA sequence. Both lines were shown to be effectively reverted by BrdU incorporation-dependent mutagenesis, and sequencing of the gpt genes from numerous independently derived revertants of both lines demonstrated that greater than 90% of the revertants arose due to GC----AT transitions at the 3' guanine residue of the doublet. BrdU-induced reversion of two additional GPT- mutant lines demonstrated that the 3' guanine residue of a GGGG quartet is efficiently mutated, while the middle guanine residue of a GGG triplet sequence is at least 10-fold less mutable by BrdU incorporation-dependent mutagenesis than the 3' guanine residue of a GG doublet or GGGG quartet. All four mutant lines tested were equally revertible by treatment with the alkylating agent ethyl methane sulfonate. The results from this study define a sequence-specific mechanism for BrdU-induced, incorporation-dependent mutagenesis and demonstrate the use of reversion analysis for the determination of sequence specific effects at precise sites within a gene.

  7. First record of spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae in Montenegro

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    Snježana Hrnčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spotted wing drosophila Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae is an invasive pest originating from Southeast Asia. It was detected for the first time in Europe in 2008 (Spain and Italy and subsequently in other European countries. It is a highly polyphagous pest that infests healthy, ripening fruit and presents a serious threat to fruit production, particularly of soft skinned fruit. In the first half of October 2013, a new fruit fly species was unexpectedly detected in Tephri traps baited with the three-component female-biased attractant BioLure that is regularly used for monitoring the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata Wiedem. (Diptera: Tephritidae in Montenegro. Brief visual inspection identified the new species as the spotted wing drosophila D. suzukii. The pest was first recorded in several localities on the Montenegrin seacoast around Boka Kotor Bay. After the finding, all Drosophila specimens were collected from traps for further laboratory observation. A quick follow-up monitoring of other Tephri traps was carried out within the next few days on the rest of the seacoast (localities from Tivat to Ulcinj. Additionally, Tephri traps were set up around Lake Skadar and in the city of Podgorica, as well as on fresh fruit markets in Podgorica. The results of this preliminary study showed that D. suzukii was present in all surveyed locations and adults were captured until late December. Both sexes were found in traps with BioLure. Our data show that D. suzukii is present in southern parts of Montenegro and there is a serious threat of its further spreading, particularly towards northern parts of the country where the main raspberry and blueberry production is placed. The results also show that Tephri traps baited with BioLure can be used for detection and monitoring of spotted wing drosophila.

  8. Sexual response of male Drosophila to honey bee queen mandibular pheromone: implications for genetic studies of social insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Justin R; Liu, Tom; Camiletti, Alison L; Simon, Anne F; Thompson, Graham J

    2017-02-01

    Honey bees secrete a queen mandibular pheromone that renders workers reproductively altruistic and drones sexually attentive. This sex-specific function of QMP may have evolved from a sexually dimorphic signaling mechanism derived from pre-social ancestors. If so, there is potential for pre-social insects to respond to QMP, and in a manner that is comparable to its normal effect on workers and drones. Remarkably, QMP applied to female Drosophila does induce worker-like qualities [Camiletti et al. (Entomol Exp Appl 147:262, 2013)], and we here extend this comparison to examine the effects of bee pheromone on male fruit flies. We find that male Drosophila melanogaster consistently orient towards a source of queen pheromone in a T-maze, suggesting a recruitment response comparable to the pheromone's normal effect on drones. Moreover, exposure to QMP renders male flies more sexually attentive; they display intensified pre-copulatory behavior towards conspecific females. We can inhibit this sexual effect through a loss-of-olfactory-function mutation, which suggests that the pheromone-responsive behavioral mechanism is olfactory-driven. These pheromone-induced changes to male Drosophila behavior suggest that aspects of sexual signaling are conserved between these two distantly related taxa. Our results highlight a role for Drosophila as a genetically tractable pre-social model for studies of social insect biology.

  9. Construction of a guide-RNA for site-directed RNA mutagenesis utilising intracellular A-to-I RNA editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Masatora; Umeno, Hiromitsu; Nose, Kanako; Nishitarumizu, Azusa; Noguchi, Ryoma; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    As an alternative to DNA mutagenesis, RNA mutagenesis can potentially become a powerful gene-regulation method for fundamental research and applied life sciences. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing alters genetic information at the transcript level and is an important biological process that is commonly conserved in metazoans. Therefore, a versatile RNA-mutagenesis method can be achieved by utilising the intracellular RNA-editing mechanism. Here, we report novel guide RNAs capable of inducing A-to-I mutations by guiding the editing enzyme, human adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR). These guide RNAs successfully introduced A-to-I mutations into the target-site, which was determined by the reprogrammable antisense region. In ADAR2-over expressing cells, site-directed RNA editing could also be performed by simply introducing the guide RNA. Our guide RNA framework provides basic insights into establishing a generally applicable RNA-mutagenesis method. PMID:28148949

  10. Targeted mutagenesis in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiugui; Lu, Xuke; Shu, Na; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Delong; Guo, Lixue; Ye, Wuwei

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas9 system has been widely used for genome editing in various plants because of its simplicity, high efficiency and design flexibility. However, to our knowledge, there is no report on the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in cotton. Here, we report the genome editing and targeted mutagenesis in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., hereafter cotton) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We designed two guide RNAs to target distinct sites of the cotton Cloroplastos alterados 1 (GhCLA1) and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (GhVP) genes. Mutations in these two genes were detected in cotton protoplasts. Most of the mutations were nucleotide substitutions, with one nucleotide insertion and one substitution found in GhCLA1 and one deletion found in GhVP in cotton protoplasts. Subsequently, the two vectors were transformed into cotton shoot apexes through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, resulting in efficient target gene editing. Most of the mutations were nucleotide deletions, and the mutation efficiencies were 47.6–81.8% in transgenic cotton plants. Evaluation using restriction-enzyme-PCR assay and sequence analysis detected no off-target mutations. Our results indicated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was an efficient and specific tool for targeted mutagenesis of the cotton genome. PMID:28287154

  11. Yeasts acquire resistance secondary to antifungal drug treatment by adaptive mutagenesis.

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    David Quinto-Alemany

    Full Text Available Acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment both by microorganisms and by tumor cells is a major public health concern. Several species of bacteria acquire resistance to various antibiotics through stress-induced responses that have an adaptive mutagenesis effect. So far, adaptive mutagenesis in yeast has only been described when the stress is nutrient deprivation. Here, we hypothesized that adaptive mutagenesis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans as model organisms would also take place in response to antifungal agents (5-fluorocytosine or flucytosine, 5-FC, and caspofungin, CSP, giving rise to resistance secondary to treatment with these agents. We have developed a clinically relevant model where both yeasts acquire resistance when exposed to these agents. Stressful lifestyle associated mutation (SLAM experiments show that the adaptive mutation frequencies are 20 (S. cerevisiae -5-FC, 600 (C. albicans -5-FC or 1000 (S. cerevisiae--CSP fold higher than the spontaneous mutation frequency, the experimental data for C. albicans -5-FC being in agreement with the clinical data of acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment. The spectrum of mutations in the S. cerevisiae -5-FC model differs between spontaneous and acquired, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that generate them are different. Remarkably, in the acquired mutations, an ectopic intrachromosomal recombination with an 87% homologous gene takes place with a high frequency. In conclusion, we present here a clinically relevant adaptive mutation model that fulfils the conditions reported previously.

  12. Insertional mutagenesis by a hybrid piggyBac and sleeping beauty transposon in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Kenryo; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Chen, Diane W; Xiao, Ningna; Overbeek, Paul A; Behringer, Richard R

    2012-12-01

    A hybrid piggyBac/Sleeping Beauty transposon-based insertional mutagenesis system that can be mobilized by simple breeding was established in the rat. These transposons were engineered to include gene trap sequences and a tyrosinase (Tyr) pigmentation reporter to rescue the albinism of the genetic background used in the mutagenesis strategy. Single-copy transposon insertions were transposed into the rat genome by co-injection of plasmids carrying the transposon and RNA encoding piggyBac transposase into zygotes. The levels of transgenic Tyr expression were influenced by chromosomal context, leading to transgenic rats with different pigmentation that enabled visual genotyping. Transgenic rats designed to ubiquitously express either piggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase were generated by standard zygote injection also on an albino background. Bigenic rats carrying single-copy transposons at known loci and transposase transgenes exhibited coat color mosaicism, indicating somatic transposition. PiggyBac or Sleeping Beauty transposase bigenic rats bred with wild-type albino rats yielded offspring with pigmentation distinct from the initial transposon insertions as a consequence of germline transposition to new loci. The germline transposition frequency for Sleeping Beauty and piggyBac was ∼10% or about one new insertion per litter. Approximately 50% of the insertions occurred in introns. Chimeric transcripts containing endogenous and gene trap sequences were identified in Gabrb1 mutant rats. This mutagenesis system based on simple crosses and visual genotyping can be used to generate a collection of single-gene mutations in the rat.

  13. 5-fluorouracil in lethal mutagenesis of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Rubén; Arias, Armando; Domingo, Esteban

    2009-06-01

    5-fluorouracil (FU) is a pyrimidine analogue extensively used in cancer chemotherapy. FU can be metabolized into 5-fluorouridine-triphosphate, which can be used as substrate for viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. This results in the incorporation of mutations into viral RNA. Accumulation of mutations may lead to loss of virus infectivity, in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. RNA virus pathogens are particularly difficult to control because they are highly mutable, and mutants resistant to antiviral agents are readily selected. Here, we review the basic principles of lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral approach, and the participation of FU in its development. Recent studies with foot-and-mouth disease virus indicate that FU can act both as an inhibitor and as a mutagen during foot-and-mouth disease virus replication. This dual activity renders FU an adequate drug for lethal mutagenesis. We suggest that structural and biochemical studies can contribute to the lead to new design of base or nucleoside analogues targeted specifically to viral polymerases.

  14. mtDNA Mutagenesis Disrupts Pluripotent Stem Cell Function by Altering Redox Signaling

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    Riikka H. Hämäläinen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available mtDNA mutagenesis in somatic stem cells leads to their dysfunction and to progeria in mouse. The mechanism was proposed to involve modification of reactive oxygen species (ROS/redox signaling. We studied the effect of mtDNA mutagenesis on reprogramming and stemness of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs and show that PSCs select against specific mtDNA mutations, mimicking germline and promoting mtDNA integrity despite their glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, mtDNA mutagenesis is associated with an increase in mitochondrial H2O2, reduced PSC reprogramming efficiency, and self-renewal. Mitochondria-targeted ubiquinone, MitoQ, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine efficiently rescued these defects, indicating that both reprogramming efficiency and stemness are modified by mitochondrial ROS. The redox sensitivity, however, rendered PSCs and especially neural stem cells sensitive to MitoQ toxicity. Our results imply that stem cell compartment warrants special attention when the safety of new antioxidants is assessed and point to an essential role for mitochondrial redox signaling in maintaining normal stem cell function.

  15. UV-induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli SOS response: a quantitative model.

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    Sandeep Krishna

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli bacteria respond to DNA damage by a highly orchestrated series of events known as the SOS response, regulated by transcription factors, protein-protein binding, and active protein degradation. We present a dynamical model of the UV-induced SOS response, incorporating mutagenesis by the error-prone polymerase, Pol V. In our model, mutagenesis depends on a combination of two key processes: damage counting by the replication forks and a long-term memory associated with the accumulation of UmuD'. Together, these provide a tight regulation of mutagenesis, resulting, we show, in a "digital" turn-on and turn-off of Pol V. Our model provides a compact view of the topology and design of the SOS network, pinpointing the specific functional role of each of the regulatory processes. In particular, we suggest that the recently observed second peak in the activity of promoters in the SOS regulon (Friedman et al., 2005, PLoS Biology 3(7: e238 is the result of positive feedback from Pol V to RecA filaments.

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis of the RIN locus that regulates tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Endo, Masaki; Mikami, Masafumi; Toki, Seiichi

    2015-11-06

    Site-directed mutagenesis using genetic approaches can provide a wealth of resources for crop breeding as well as for biological research. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) system is a novel strategy used to induce mutations in a specific genome region; the system functions in a variety of organisms, including plants. Here, we report application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to efficient mutagenesis of the tomato genome. In this study, we targeted the tomato RIN gene, which encodes a MADS-box transcription factor regulating fruit ripening. Three regions within the gene were targeted and mutations consisting either of a single base insertion or deletion of more than three bases were found at the Cas9 cleavage sites in T0 regenerated plants. The RIN-protein-defective mutants produced incomplete-ripening fruits in which red color pigmentation was significantly lower than that of wild type, while heterologous mutants expressing the remaining wild-type gene reached full-ripening red color, confirming the important role of RIN in ripening. Several mutations that were generated at three independent target sites were inherited in the T1 progeny, confirming the applicability of this mutagenesis system in tomato.

  17. Genome-wide LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and high-throughput insertion detection in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbański, Dorian Fabian; Małolepszy, Anna; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2012-02-01

    Use of insertion mutants facilitates functional analysis of genes, but it has been difficult to identify a suitable mutagen and to establish large populations for reverse genetics in most plant species. The main challenge is developing efficient high-throughput procedures for both mutagenesis and identification of insertion sites. To date, only floral-dip T-DNA transformation of Arabidopsis has produced independent germinal insertions, thereby allowing generation of mutant populations from seeds of single plants. In addition, advances in insertion detection have been hampered by a lack of protocols, including software for automated data analysis, that take full advantage of high-throughput next-generation sequencing. We have addressed these challenges by developing the FSTpoolit protocol and software package, and here we demonstrate its efficacy by detecting 8935 LORE1 insertions in 3744 Lotus japonicus plants. The identified insertions show that the endogenous LORE1 retrotransposon is well suited for insertion mutagenesis due to homogenous gene targeting and exonic insertion preference. As LORE1 transposition occurs in the germline, harvesting seeds from a single founder line and cultivating progeny generates a complete mutant population. This ease of LORE1 mutagenesis, combined with the efficient FSTpoolit protocol, which exploits 2D pooling, Illumina sequencing and automated data analysis, allows highly cost-efficient development of a comprehensive reverse genetic resource.

  18. An Efficient Rice Mutagenesis System Based on Suspension-Cultured Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Ling Chen; Hui-Lin Liang; Xing-Liang Ma; Su-Lin Lou; Yong-Yao Xie; Zhen-Lan Liu; Le-Tian Chen; Yao-Guang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Plant mutants are important bio-resources for crop breeding and gene functional studies.Conventional methods for generating mutant libraries by mutagenesis of seeds with physical or chemical agents are of low efficiency.Here,we developed a highly-efficient ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis system based on suspension-cultured cells,with rice (Oryza sativa L.) as an example.We show that treatment of suspension-cultured tiny cell clusters with 0.4% EMS for 18-22 h followed by differentiation and regeneration produced as high as 29.4% independent mutant lines with visible phenotypic variations,including a number of important agronomic traits such as grain size,panicle size,grain or panicle shape,tiller number and angle,heading date,male sterility,and disease sensitivity.No mosaic mutant was observed in the mutant lines tested.In this mutant library,we obtained a mutant with an abnormally elongated uppermost internode.Sequencing and functional analysis revealed that this is a new allelic mutant of eui (elongated uppermost internode) caused by two point mutations in the first exon of the EUI gene,representing a successful example of this mutagenesis system.

  19. Combined mutagenesis of Rhodosporidium toruloides for improved production of carotenoids and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaolei; Shen, Hongwei; Zhang, Xibin; Yu, Xue; Wang, Han; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Jihui; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2016-10-01

    To improve production of lipids and carotenoids by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by screening mutant strains. Upon physical mutagenesis of the haploid strain R. toruloides np11 with an atmospheric and room temperature plasma method followed by chemical mutagenesis with nitrosoguanidine, a mutant strain, R. toruloides XR-2, formed dark-red colonies on a screening plate. When cultivated in nitrogen-limited media, XR-2 cells grew slower but accumulated 0.23 g lipids/g cell dry wt and 0.75 mg carotenoids/g CDW. To improve its production capacity, different amino acids and vitamins were supplemented. p-Aminobenzoic acid and tryptophan had beneficial effects on cell growth. When cultivated in nitrogen-limited media in the presence of selected vitamins, XR-2 accumulated 0.41 g lipids/g CDW and 0.69 mg carotenoids/g CDW. A mutant R. toruloides strain with improved production profiles for lipids and carotenoids was obtained, indicating its potential to use combined mutagenesis for a more productive phenotype.

  20. Mouse ENU Mutagenesis to Understand Immunity to Infection: Methods, Selected Examples, and Perspectives

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    Grégory Caignard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are responsible for over 25% of deaths globally, but many more individuals are exposed to deadly pathogens. The outcome of infection results from a set of diverse factors including pathogen virulence factors, the environment, and the genetic make-up of the host. The completion of the human reference genome sequence in 2004 along with technological advances have tremendously accelerated and renovated the tools to study the genetic etiology of infectious diseases in humans and its best characterized mammalian model, the mouse. Advancements in mouse genomic resources have accelerated genome-wide functional approaches, such as gene-driven and phenotype-driven mutagenesis, bringing to the fore the use of mouse models that reproduce accurately many aspects of the pathogenesis of human infectious diseases. Treatment with the mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU has become the most popular phenotype-driven approach. Our team and others have employed mouse ENU mutagenesis to identify host genes that directly impact susceptibility to pathogens of global significance. In this review, we first describe the strategies and tools used in mouse genetics to understand immunity to infection with special emphasis on chemical mutagenesis of the mouse germ-line together with current strategies to efficiently identify functional mutations using next generation sequencing. Then, we highlight illustrative examples of genes, proteins, and cellular signatures that have been revealed by ENU screens and have been shown to be involved in susceptibility or resistance to infectious diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

  1. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  2. Lack of mutational hot spots during decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2015-11-01

    Decitabine has previously been shown to induce lethal mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, the factors that determine the susceptibilities of individual sequence positions in HIV-1 to decitabine have not yet been defined. To investigate this, we performed Illumina high-throughput sequencing of multiple amplicons prepared from proviral DNA that was recovered from decitabine-treated cells infected with HIV-1. We found that decitabine induced an ≈4.1-fold increase in the total mutation frequency of HIV-1, primarily due to a striking ≈155-fold increase in the G-to-C transversion frequency. Intriguingly, decitabine also led to an ≈29-fold increase in the C-to-G transversion frequency. G-to-C frequencies varied substantially (up to ≈80-fold) depending upon sequence position, but surprisingly, mutational hot spots (defined as upper outliers within the mutation frequency distribution) were not observed. We further found that every single guanine position examined was significantly susceptible to the mutagenic effects of decitabine. Taken together, these observations demonstrate for the first time that decitabine-mediated HIV-1 mutagenesis is promiscuous and occurs in the absence of a clear bias for mutational hot spots. These data imply that decitabine-mediated G-to-C mutagenesis is a highly effective antiviral mechanism for extinguishing HIV-1 infectivity.

  3. Comparison and Validation of Putative Pathogenicity-Related Genes Identified by T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis and Microarray Expression Profiling in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wáng, Ying; Tan, Qi; Gao, Ying Nv; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput technologies of functional genomics such as T-DNA insertional mutagenesis and microarray expression profiling have been employed to identify genes related to pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae. However, validation of the functions of individual genes identified by these high-throughput approaches is laborious. In this study, we compared two published lists of genes putatively related to pathogenicity in M. oryzae identified by T-DNA insertional mutagenesis (comprising 1024 genes) and microarray expression profiling (comprising 236 genes), respectively, and then validated the functions of some overlapped genes between the two lists by knocking them out using the method of target gene replacement. Surprisingly, only 13 genes were overlapped between the two lists, and none of the four genes selected from the overlapped genes exhibited visible phenotypic changes on vegetative growth, asexual reproduction, and infection ability in their knockout mutants. Our results suggest that both of the lists might contain large proportions of unrelated genes to pathogenicity and therefore comparing the two gene lists is hardly helpful for the identification of genes that are more likely to be involved in pathogenicity as we initially expected.

  4. Identification and field evaluation of fermentation volatiles from wine and vinegar that mediate attraction of spotted wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Dong H; Adams, Todd; Rogg, Helmuth; Landolt, Peter J

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies suggest that olfactory cues from damaged and fermented fruits play important roles in resource recognition of polyphagous spotted wing Drosophila flies (SWD), Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). They are attracted to fermented sweet materials, such as decomposing fruits but also wines and vinegars, and to ubiquitous fermentation volatiles, such as acetic acid and ethanol. Gas chromatography coupled with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), two-choice laboratory bioassays, and field trapping experiments were used to identify volatile compounds from wine and vinegar that are involved in SWD attraction. In addition to acetic acid and ethanol, consistent EAD responses were obtained for 13 volatile wine compounds and seven volatile vinegar compounds, with all of the vinegar EAD-active compounds also present in wine. In a field trapping experiment, the 9-component vinegar blend and 15-component wine blend were similarly attractive when compared to an acetic acid plus ethanol mixture, but were not as attractive as the wine plus vinegar mixture. In two-choice laboratory bioassays, 7 EAD-active compounds (ethyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, ethyl lactate, 1-hexanol, isoamyl acetate, 2-methylbutyl acetate, and ethyl sorbate), when added singly to the mixture at the same concentrations tested in the field, decreased the attraction of SWD to the mixture of acetic acid and ethanol. The blends composed of the remaining EAD-active chemicals, an 8-component wine blend [acetic acid + ethanol + acetoin + grape butyrate + methionol + isoamyl lactate + 2-phenylethanol + diethyl succinate] and a 5-component vinegar blend [acetic acid + ethanol + acetoin + grape butyrate + 2-phenylethanol] were more attractive than the acetic acid plus ethanol mixture, and as attractive as the wine plus vinegar mixture in both laboratory assays and the field trapping experiment. These results indicate that these

  5. Mutagenesis-mediated virus extinction: Virus-dependent effect of viral load on sensitivity to lethal defection

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Moreno; Héctor Tejero; Juan Carlos de la Torre; Esteban Domingo; Verónica Martín

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lethal mutagenesis is a transition towards virus extinction mediated by enhanced mutation rates during viral genome replication, and it is currently under investigation as a potential new antiviral strategy. Viral load and virus fitness are known to influence virus extinction. Here we examine the effect or the multiplicity of infection (MOI) on progeny production of several RNA viruses under enhanced mutagenesis. Results: The effect of the mutagenic base analogue 5-fluorouracil (F...

  6. Ion channels to inactivate neurons in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J L Hodge

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are the determinants of excitability; therefore, manipulation of their levels and properties provides an opportunity for the investigator to modulate neuronal and circuit function. There are a number of ways to suppress electrical activity in Drosophila neurons, for instance, over-expression of potassium channels (i.e. Shaker Kv1, Shaw Kv3, Kir2.1 and DORK that are open at resting membrane potential. This will result in increased potassium efflux and membrane hyperpolarisation setting resting membrane potential below the threshold required to fire action potentials. Alternatively over-expression of other channels, pumps or co-transporters that result in a hyperpolarised membrane potential will also prevent firing. Lastly, neurons can be inactivated by, disrupting or reducing the level of functional voltage-gated sodium (Nav1 paralytic or calcium (Cav2 cacophony channels that mediate the depolarisation phase of action potentials. Similarly, strategies involving the opposite channel manipulation should allow net depolarisation and hyperexcitation in a given neuron. These changes in ion channel expression can be brought about by the versatile transgenic (i.e. Gal4/UAS based systems available in Drosophila allowing fine temporal and spatial control of (channel transgene expression. These systems are making it possible to electrically inactivate (or hyperexcite any neuron or neural circuit in the fly brain, and much like an exquisite lesion experiment, potentially elucidate whatever interesting behaviour or phenotype each network mediates. These techniques are now being used in Drosophila to reprogram electrical activity of well-defined circuits and bring about robust and easily quantifiable changes in behaviour, allowing different models and hypotheses to be rapidly tested.

  7. Whole genome phylogenies for multiple Drosophila species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharam Arun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructing the evolutionary history of organisms using traditional phylogenetic methods may suffer from inaccurate sequence alignment. An alternative approach, particularly effective when whole genome sequences are available, is to employ methods that don’t use explicit sequence alignments. We extend a novel phylogenetic method based on Singular Value Decomposition (SVD to reconstruct the phylogeny of 12 sequenced Drosophila species. SVD analysis provides accurate comparisons for a high fraction of sequences within whole genomes without the prior identification of orthologs or homologous sites. With this method all protein sequences are converted to peptide frequency vectors within a matrix that is decomposed to provide simplified vector representations for each protein of the genome in a reduced dimensional space. These vectors are summed together to provide a vector representation for each species, and the angle between these vectors provides distance measures that are used to construct species trees. Results An unfiltered whole genome analysis (193,622 predicted proteins strongly supports the currently accepted phylogeny for 12 Drosophila species at higher dimensions except for the generally accepted but difficult to discern sister relationship between D. erecta and D. yakuba. Also, in accordance with previous studies, many sequences appear to support alternative phylogenies. In this case, we observed grouping of D. erecta with D. sechellia when approximately 55% to 95% of the proteins were removed using a filter based on projection values or by reducing resolution by using fewer dimensions. Similar results were obtained when just the melanogaster subgroup was analyzed. Conclusions These results indicate that using our novel phylogenetic method, it is possible to consult and interpret all predicted protein sequences within multiple whole genomes to produce accurate phylogenetic estimations of relatedness between

  8. Role of spectraplakin in Drosophila photoreceptor morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uyen Ngoc Mui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crumbs (Crb, a cell polarity gene, has been shown to provide a positional cue for the apical membrane domain and adherens junction during Drosophila photoreceptor morphogenesis. It has recently been found that stable microtubules in developing Drosophila photoreceptors were linked to Crb localization. Coordinated interactions between microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are involved in many polarized cellular processes. Since Spectraplakin is able to bind both microtubule and actin cytoskeletons, the role of Spectraplakin was analyzed in the regulations of apical Crb domain in developing Drosophila photoreceptors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The localization pattern of Spectraplakin in developing pupal photoreceptors showed a unique intracellular distribution. Spectraplakin localized at rhabdomere terminal web which is at the basal side of the apical Crb or rhabdomere, and in between the adherens junctions. The spectraplakin mutant photoreceptors showed dramatic mislocalizations of Crb, adherens junctions, and the stable microtubules. This role of Spectraplakin in Crb and adherens junction regulation was further supported by spectraplakin's gain-of-function phenotype. Spectraplakin overexpression in photoreceptors caused a cell polarity defect including dramatic mislocalization of Crb, adherens junctions and the stable microtubules in the developing photoreceptors. Furthermore, a strong genetic interaction between spectraplakin and crb was found using a genetic modifier test. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we found a unique localization of Spectraplakin in photoreceptors, and identified the role of spectraplakin in the regulation of the apical Crb domain and adherens junctions through genetic mutational analysis. Our data suggest that Spectraplakin, an actin-microtubule cross-linker, is essential in the apical and adherens junction controls during the photoreceptors morphogenesis.

  9. Appetitive associative olfactory learning in Drosophila larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Widmann, Annekathrin; Rohwedder, Astrid; Pfitzenmaier, Johanna E; Thum, Andreas S

    2013-02-18

    In the following we describe the methodological details of appetitive associative olfactory learning in Drosophila larvae. The setup, in combination with genetic interference, provides a handle to analyze the neuronal and molecular fundamentals of specifically associative learning in a simple larval brain. Organisms can use past experience to adjust present behavior. Such acquisition of behavioral potential can be defined as learning, and the physical bases of these potentials as memory traces. Neuroscientists try to understand how these processes are organized in terms of molecular and neuronal changes in the brain by using a variety of methods in model organisms ranging from insects to vertebrates. For such endeavors it is helpful to use model systems that are simple and experimentally accessible. The Drosophila larva has turned out to satisfy these demands based on the availability of robust behavioral assays, the existence of a variety of transgenic techniques and the elementary organization of the nervous system comprising only about 10,000 neurons (albeit with some concessions: cognitive limitations, few behavioral options, and richness of experience questionable). Drosophila larvae can form associations between odors and appetitive gustatory reinforcement like sugar. In a standard assay, established in the lab of B. Gerber, animals receive a two-odor reciprocal training: A first group of larvae is exposed to an odor A together with a gustatory reinforcer (sugar reward) and is subsequently exposed to an odor B without reinforcement. Meanwhile a second group of larvae receives reciprocal training while experiencing odor A without reinforcement and subsequently being exposed to odor B with reinforcement (sugar reward). In the following both groups are tested for their preference between the two odors. Relatively higher preferences for the rewarded odor reflect associative learning--presented as a performance index (PI). The conclusion regarding the associative

  10. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Wolfgang [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Mikkelsen, Nils Egil [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Clausen, Anders Ranegaard [Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden); Willer, Mette [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Eklund, Hans [Department of Molecular Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Gojkovic, Zoran [ZGene A/S, Agern Alle 7, DK-2970 Horsholm (Denmark); Piskur, Jure, E-mail: Jure.Piskur@cob.lu.se [BioCentrum-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Soelvegatan 35, SE-22362 Lund (Sweden)

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  11. Circadian Rhythms and Sleep in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowy, Christine; Sehgal, Amita

    2017-04-01

    The advantages of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, including low genetic redundancy, functional simplicity, and the ability to conduct large-scale genetic screens, have been essential for understanding the molecular nature of circadian (∼24 hr) rhythms, and continue to be valuable in discovering novel regulators of circadian rhythms and sleep. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of these interrelated biological processes in Drosophila and the wider implications of this research. Clock genes period and timeless were first discovered in large-scale Drosophila genetic screens developed in the 1970s. Feedback of period and timeless on their own transcription forms the core of the molecular clock, and accurately timed expression, localization, post-transcriptional modification, and function of these genes is thought to be critical for maintaining the circadian cycle. Regulators, including several phosphatases and kinases, act on different steps of this feedback loop to ensure strong and accurately timed rhythms. Approximately 150 neurons in the fly brain that contain the core components of the molecular clock act together to translate this intracellular cycling into rhythmic behavior. We discuss how different groups of clock neurons serve different functions in allowing clocks to entrain to environmental cues, driving behavioral outputs at different times of day, and allowing flexible behavioral responses in different environmental conditions. The neuropeptide PDF provides an important signal thought to synchronize clock neurons, although the details of how PDF accomplishes this function are still being explored. Secreted signals from clock neurons also influence rhythms in other tissues. SLEEP is, in part, regulated by the circadian clock, which ensures appropriate timing of sleep, but the amount and quality of sleep are also determined by other mechanisms that ensure a homeostatic balance between sleep and wake. Flies have been useful

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  13. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  14. ‘Peer pressure’ in larval Drosophila?

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Niewalda; Ines Jeske; Birgit Michels; Bertram Gerber

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding social behaviour requires a study case that is simple enough to be tractable, yet complex enough to remain interesting. Do larval Drosophila meet these requirements? In a broad sense, this question can refer to effects of the mere presence of other larvae on the behaviour of a target individual. Here we focused in a more strict sense on ‘peer pressure’, that is on the question of whether the behaviour of a target individual larva is affected by what a surrounding group ...

  15. Sexual Communication in the Drosophila Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontonou, Gwénaëlle; Wicker-Thomas, Claude

    2014-06-18

    In insects, sexual behavior depends on chemical and non-chemical cues that might play an important role in sexual isolation. In this review, we present current knowledge about sexual behavior in the Drosophila genus. We describe courtship and signals involved in sexual communication, with a special focus on sex pheromones. We examine the role of cuticular hydrocarbons as sex pheromones, their implication in sexual isolation, and their evolution. Finally, we discuss the roles of male cuticular non-hydrocarbon pheromones that act after mating: cis-vaccenyl acetate, developing on its controversial role in courtship behavior and long-chain acetyldienylacetates and triacylglycerides, which act as anti-aphrodisiacs in mated females.

  16. Acetylation regulates Jun protein turnover in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoyong; Suganuma, Tamaki; Workman, Jerry L

    2013-11-01

    C-Jun is a major transcription factor belonging to the activating protein 1 (AP-1) family. Phosphorylation has been shown to be critical for c-Jun activation and stability. Here, we report that Jra, the Drosophila Jun protein, is acetylated in vivo. We demonstrate that the acetylation of Jra leads to its rapid degradation in response to osmotic stress. Intriguingly, we also found that Jra phosphorylation antagonized its acetylation, indicating the opposite roles of acetylation and phosphorylation in Jra degradation process under osmotic stress. Our results provide new insights into how c-Jun proteins are precisely regulated by the interplay of different posttranslational modifications.

  17. Microfluidic system with integrated microinjector for automated Drosophila embryo injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delubac, Daniel; Highley, Christopher B; Witzberger-Krajcovic, Melissa; Ayoob, Joseph C; Furbee, Emily C; Minden, Jonathan S; Zappe, Stefan

    2012-11-21

    Drosophila is one of the most important model organisms in biology. Knowledge derived from the recently sequenced 12 genomes of various Drosophila species can today be combined with the results of more than 100 years of research to systematically investigate Drosophila biology at the molecular level. In order to enable automated, high-throughput manipulation of Drosophila embryos, we have developed a microfluidic system based on a Pyrex-silicon-Pyrex sandwich structure with integrated, surface-micromachined silicon nitride injector for automated injection of reagents. Our system automatically retrieves embryos from an external reservoir, separates potentially clustered embryos through a sheath flow mechanisms, passively aligns an embryo with the integrated injector through geometric constraints, and pushes the embryo onto the injector through flow drag forces. Automated detection of an embryo at injection position through an external camera triggers injection of reagents and subsequent ejection of the embryo to an external reservoir. Our technology can support automated screens based on Drosophila embryos as well as creation of transgenic Drosophila lines. Apart from Drosophila embryos, the layout of our system can be easily modified to accommodate injection of oocytes, embryos, larvae, or adults of other species and fills an important technological gap with regard to automated manipulation of multicellular organisms.

  18. Change in colony morphology and kinetics of tylosin production after UV and gamma irradiation mutagenesis of Streptomyces fradiae NRRL-2702.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Shazia; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Afzal Ghauri, Muhammad; Iqbal, Ruqia; Mukhtar Khalid, Ahmad; Muddassar, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Tylosin is a macrolide antibiotic used as veterinary drug and growth promoter. Attempts were made for hyper production of tylosin by a strain of Streptomyces fradiae NRRL-2702 through irradiation mutagenesis. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of wild-type strain caused development of six morphologically altered colony types on agar plates. After screening using Bacillus subtilis bioassay only morphological mutants indicated the production of tylosin. An increase of 2.7+/-0.22-fold in tylosin production (1500mg/l) in case of mutant UV-2 in complex medium was achieved as compared to wild-type strain (550mg/l). Gamma irradiation of mutant UV-2 using (60)Co gave one morphologically altered colony type gamma-1, which gave 2500mg/l tylosin yield in complex medium. Chemically defined media promoted tylosin production upto 3800mg/l. Maximum value of q(p) (3.34mg/gh) was observed by mutant gamma-1 as compared to wild strain (0.81mg/gh). Moreover, UV irradiation associated changes were unstable with loss of tylosin activity whereas mutant gamma-1 displayed high stability on subsequent culturing.

  19. Relationship of DNA repair processes to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. Progress report, August 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in mammalian cells. More specifically, mutant strains will be selected which are deficient in various DNA repair pathways. These strains will be studied with regard to (1) the nature of the defect in repair, and (2) the mutability and transformability of the defective cells by various agents as compared to the wild type parental cells. The results to date include progress in the following areas: (1) determination of optimum conditions for growth and maintenance of cells and for quantitative measurement of various cellular parameters; (2) investigation of the effect of holding mutagenized cells for various periods in a density inhibited state on survival and on mutation and transformation frequencies; (3) examination of the repair capabilities of BHK cells, as compared to repair-proficient and repair-deficient human cells and excision-deficient mouse cells, as measured by the reactivation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) treated with radiation and ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS); (4) initiation of host cell reactivation viral sucide enrichment and screening of survivors of the enrichment for sensitivity to ionizing radiation; and (5) investigation of the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of various metabolites of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO). (ERB)

  20. Ex vivo culture of Drosophila pupal testis and single male germ-line cysts: dissection, imaging, and pharmacological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Stefanie M K; Rathke, Christina; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate; Awe, Stephan

    2014-09-11

    During spermatogenesis in mammals and in Drosophila melanogaster, male germ cells develop in a series of essential developmental processes. This includes differentiation from a stem cell population, mitotic amplification, and meiosis. In addition, post-meiotic germ cells undergo a dramatic morphological reshaping process as well as a global epigenetic reconfiguration of the germ line chromatin-the histone-to-protamine switch. Studying the role of a protein in post-meiotic spermatogenesis using mutagenesis or other genetic tools is often impeded by essential embryonic, pre-meiotic, or meiotic functions of the protein under investigation. The post-meiotic phenotype of a mutant of such a protein could be obscured through an earlier developmental block, or the interpretation of the phenotype could be complicated. The model organism Drosophila melanogaster offers a bypass to this problem: intact testes and even cysts of germ cells dissected from early pupae are able to develop ex vivo in culture medium. Making use of such cultures allows microscopic imaging of living germ cells in testes and of germ-line cysts. Importantly, the cultivated testes and germ cells also become accessible to pharmacological inhibitors, thereby permitting manipulation of enzymatic functions during spermatogenesis, including post-meiotic stages. The protocol presented describes how to dissect and cultivate pupal testes and germ-line cysts. Information on the development of pupal testes and culture conditions are provided alongside microscope imaging data of live testes and germ-line cysts in culture. We also describe a pharmacological assay to study post-meiotic spermatogenesis, exemplified by an assay targeting the histone-to-protamine switch using the histone acetyltransferase inhibitor anacardic acid. In principle, this cultivation method could be adapted to address many other research questions in pre- and post-meiotic spermatogenesis.

  1. Evolution of Three Parent Genes and Their Retrogene Copies in Drosophila Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan S. O'Neill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrogenes form a class of gene duplicate lacking the regulatory sequences found outside of the mRNA-coding regions of the parent gene. It is not clear how a retrogene’s lack of parental regulatory sequences affects the evolution of the gene pair. To explore the evolution of parent genes and retrogenes, we investigated three such gene pairs in the family Drosophilidae; in Drosophila melanogaster, these gene pairs are CG8331 and CG4960, CG17734 and CG11825, and Sep2 and Sep5. We investigated the embryonic expression patterns of these gene pairs across multiple Drosophila species. Expression patterns of the parent genes and their single copy orthologs are relatively conserved across species, whether or not a species has a retrogene copy, although there is some variation in CG8331 and CG17734. In contrast, expression patterns of the retrogene orthologs have diversified. We used the genome sequences of 20 Drosophila species to investigate coding sequence evolution. The coding sequences of the three gene pairs appear to be evolving predominantly under negative selection; however, the parent genes and retrogenes show some distinct differences in amino acid sequence. Therefore, in general, retrogene expression patterns and coding sequences are distinct compared to their parents and, in some cases, retrogene expression patterns diversify.

  2. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Sebald

    Full Text Available The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  3. Medium from γ-irradiated Escherichia coli bacteria stimulates a unique immune response in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Bo G; Oldenvi, Sandra; Steiner, Håkan

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that γ-irradiated, non-dividing bacteria can elicit potent immune responses in mammals. Compared to traditional heat or chemical inactivation of microbes, γ-irradiation likely preserves metabolic activity and antigenic features to a larger extent. We have previously shown that antimicrobial peptides are induced in Drosophila by peptidoglycan fragments secreted into the medium of exponentially growing bacterial cultures. In this study, we γ-irradiated Escherichiacoli cells at a dose that halted cell division. The temporal synthesis and release of peptidoglycan fragments were followed as well as the potential of bacterial supernatants to induce immune responses in Drosophila S2 cells. We demonstrate that peptidoglycan synthesis continues for several days post irradiation and that monomeric peptidoglycan is shed into the medium. Whole transcriptome analysis revealed a strong immune response against the bacterial medium. The response to medium taken directly post irradiation shows a large overlap to that of peptidoglycan. Medium from prolonged bacterial incubation does, however, stimulate a selective set of immune genes. A shift towards a stress response was instead observed with a striking induction of several heat shock proteins. Our findings suggest that γ-irradiated bacteria release elicitors that stimulate a novel response in Drosophila.

  4. The role of pygopus in the differentiation of intracardiac valves in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Yuan, Wuzhou; Bodmer, Rolf; Wu, Xiushan; Ocorr, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac valves serve an important function; they support unidirectional blood flow and prevent blood regurgitation. Wnt signaling plays an important role in the formation of mouse cardiac valves and cardiac valve proliferation in Zebrafish, but identification of the specific signaling components involved has not been addressed systematically. Of the components involved in Wnt signal transduction, pygopus (pygo), first identified as a core component of Wnt signaling in Drosophila, has not yet to be investigated with respect to valve development and differentiation. Here, we take advantage of the Drosophila heart model to study the role of pygo in formation of valves between the cardiac chambers. We found that cardiac-specific pygo knockdown in the Drosophila heart causes dilation in the region of these cardiac valves, and their characteristic dense mesh of myofibrils does not form and resembles that of neighboring cardiomyocytes. In contrast, heart-specific knockdown of the transcription factors, arm/β-Cat, lgs/BCL9, or pan/TCF, which mediates canonical Wnt signal transduction, shows a much weaker valve differentiation defect. Double-heterozygous combinations of mutants for pygo and the Wnt-signaling components have no additional effect on heart function compared with pygo heterozygotes alone. These results are consistent with the idea that pygo functions independently of canonical Wnt signaling in the differentiation of the adult interchamber cardiac valves.

  5. Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebald, Johanna; Willi, Michaela; Schoberleitner, Ines; Krogsdam, Anne; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

  6. Genetic Dissection of Aversive Associative Olfactory Learning and Memory in Drosophila Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekathrin Widmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Memory formation is a highly complex and dynamic process. It consists of different phases, which depend on various neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In adult Drosophila it was shown that memory formation after aversive Pavlovian conditioning includes-besides other forms-a labile short-term component that consolidates within hours to a longer-lasting memory. Accordingly, memory formation requires the timely controlled action of different neuronal circuits, neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and molecules that were initially identified by classical forward genetic approaches. Compared to adult Drosophila, memory formation was only sporadically analyzed at its larval stage. Here we deconstruct the larval mnemonic organization after aversive olfactory conditioning. We show that after odor-high salt conditioning larvae form two parallel memory phases; a short lasting component that depends on cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP signaling and synapsin gene function. In addition, we show for the first time for Drosophila larvae an anesthesia resistant component, which relies on radish and bruchpilot gene function, protein kinase C activity, requires presynaptic output of mushroom body Kenyon cells and dopamine function. Given the numerical simplicity of the larval nervous system this work offers a unique prospect for studying memory formation of defined specifications, at full-brain scope with single-cell, and single-synapse resolution.

  7. Investigation of lipid homeostasis in living Drosophila by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2012-12-01

    To improve our understanding of lipid metabolism, Drosophila is used as a model animal, and its lipid homeostasis is monitored by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. We are able to achieve in vivo imaging of larval fat body (analogous to adipose tissue in mammals) and oenocytes (analogous to hepatocytes) in Drosophila larvae at subcellular level without any labeling. By overexpressing two lipid regulatory proteins-Brummer lipase (Bmm) and lipid storage droplet-2 (Lsd-2)-we found different phenotypes and responses under fed and starved conditions. Comparing with the control larva, we observed more lipid droplet accumulation by ˜twofold in oenocytes of fat-body-Bmm-overexpressing (FB-Bmm-overexpressing) mutant under fed condition, and less lipid by ˜fourfold in oenocytes of fat-body-Lsd-2-overexpressing (FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing) mutant under starved condition. Moreover, together with reduced size of lipid droplets, the lipid content in the fat body of FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant decreases much faster than that of the control and FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing mutant during starvation. From long-term starvation assay, we found FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant has a shorter lifespan, which can be attributed to faster consumption of lipid in its fat body. Our results demonstrate in vivo observations of direct influences of Bmm and Lsd-2 on lipid homeostasis in Drosophila larvae.

  8. Oxidative stress correlates with Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Wolbachia-Drosophila associations.

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    Wong, Zhee Sheen; Brownlie, Jeremy C; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-05-01

    Wolbachia mediates antiviral protection in insect hosts and is being developed as a potential biocontrol agent to reduce the spread of insect-vectored viruses. Definition of the molecular mechanism that generates protection is important for understanding the tripartite interaction between host insect, Wolbachia, and virus. Elevated oxidative stress was previously reported for a mosquito line experimentally infected with Wolbachia, suggesting that oxidative stress is important for Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection. However, Wolbachia experimentally introduced into mosquitoes impacts a range of host fitness traits, some of which are unrelated to antiviral protection. To explore whether elevated oxidative stress is associated with antiviral protection in Wolbachia-infected insects, we analyzed oxidative stress of five Wolbachia-infected Drosophila lines. In flies infected with protective Wolbachia strains, hydrogen peroxide concentrations were 1.25- to 2-fold higher than those in paired fly lines cured of Wolbachia infection. In contrast, there was no difference in the hydrogen peroxide concentrations in flies infected with nonprotective Wolbachia strains compared to flies cured of Wolbachia infection. Using a Drosophila mutant that produces increased levels of hydrogen peroxide, we investigated whether flies with high levels of endogenous reactive oxygen species had altered responses to virus infection and found that flies with high levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide were less susceptible to virus-induced mortality. Taken together, these results suggest that elevated oxidative stress correlates with Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in natural Drosophila hosts.

  9. Evidence for horizontal transfer of Wolbachia by a Drosophila mite.

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    Brown, Amy N; Lloyd, Vett K

    2015-07-01

    Mites are common ectoparasites of Drosophila and have been implicated in bacterial and mobile element invasion of Drosophila stocks. The obligate endobacterium, Wolbachia, has widespread effects on gene expression in their arthropod hosts and alters host reproduction to enhance its survival and propagation, often with deleterious effects in Drosophila hosts. To determine whether Wolbachia could be transferred between Drosophila melanogaster laboratory stocks by the mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae, mites were introduced to Wolbachia-infected Drosophila vials. These vials were kept adjacent to mite-free and Wolbachia-uninfected Drosophila stock vials. The Wolbachia infection statuses of the infected and uninfected flies were checked from generation 1 to 5. Results indicate that Wolbachia DNA could be amplified from mites infesting Wolbachia-infected fly stocks and infection in the previously uninfected stocks arose within generation 1 or 2, concomitant with invasion of mites from the Wolbachia-infected stock. A possible mechanism for the transfer of Wolbachia from flies to mites and vice versa, can be inferred from time-lapse photography of fly and mite interactions. We demonstrated that mites ingest Drosophila corpses, including Wolbachia-infected corpses, and Drosophila larva ingest mites, providing possible sources of Wolbachia infection and transfer. This research demonstrated that T. putrescentiae white mites can facilitate Wolbachia transfer between Drosophila stocks and that this may occur by ingestion of infected corpses. Mite-vectored Wolbachia transfer allows for rapid establishment of Wolbachia infection within a new population. This mode of Wolbachia introduction may be relevant in nature as well as in the laboratory, and could have a variety of biological consequences.

  10. A Drosophila Melanogaster Model of Diastolic Dysfunction and Cardiomyopathy Based on Impaired Troponin-T Function

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    Viswanathan, Meera Cozhimuttam; Kaushik, Gaurav; Engler, Adam J.; Lehman, William; Cammarato, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Regulation of striated muscle contraction is achieved by Ca2+-dependent steric modulation of myosin cross-bridge cycling on actin by the thin filament troponin-tropomyosin complex. Alterations in the complex can induce contractile dysregulation and disease. For example, mutations between or near residues 112–136 of cardiac troponin-T, the crucial N-terminal TnT1 tropomyosin-binding region, cause cardiomyopathy. The Drosophila up101 Glu/Lys amino acid substitution lies C-terminally adjacent to this phylogenetically conserved sequence. Objective Using a highly integrative approach, we sought to determine the molecular trigger of up101 myofibrillar degeneration, to evaluate contractile performance in the mutant cardiomyocytes, and to examine the effects of the mutation on the entire Drosophila heart to elucidate regulatory roles for conserved TnT1 regions and provide possible mechanistic insight into cardiac dysfunction. Methods and Results Live video imaging of Drosophila cardiac tubes revealed the troponin-T mutation prolongs systole and restricts diastolic dimensions of the heart, due to increased numbers of actively cycling myosin cross-bridges. Elevated resting myocardial stiffness, consistent with up101 diastolic dysfunction, was confirmed by an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation approach. Direct visualization of mutant thin filaments via electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction resolved destabilized tropomyosin positioning and aberrantly exposed myosin binding sites under low Ca2+ conditions. Conclusions As a result of troponin-tropomyosin dysinhibition, up101 hearts exhibit cardiac dysfunction and remodeling comparable to that observed during human restrictive cardiomyopathy. Thus, reversal of charged residues about the conserved tropomyosin-binding region of TnT1 may perturb critical intermolecular associations required for proper steric regulation, which likely elicits myopathy in our Drosophila model. PMID:24221941

  11. Clash of kingdoms or why Drosophila larvae positively respond to fungal competitors

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    Rohlfs Marko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Competition with filamentous fungi has been demonstrated to be an important cause of mortality for the vast group of insects that depend on ephemeral resources (e.g. fruit, dung, carrion. Recent data suggest that the well-known aggregation of Drosophila larvae across decaying fruit yields a competitive advantage over mould, by which the larvae achieve a higher survival probability in larger groups compared with smaller ones. Feeding and locomotor behaviour of larger larval groups is assumed to cause disruption of fungal hyphae, leading to suppression of fungal growth, which in turn improves the chances of larval survival to the adult stage. Given the relationship between larval density, mould suppression and larval survival, the present study has tested whether fungal-infected food patches elicit communal foraging behaviour on mould-infected sites by which larvae might hamper mould growth more efficiently. Results Based on laboratory experiments in which Drosophila larvae were offered the choice between fungal-infected and uninfected food patches, larvae significantly aggregated on patches containing young fungal colonies. Grouping behaviour was also visible when larvae were offered only fungal-infected or only uninfected patches; however, larval aggregation was less strong under these conditions than in a heterogeneous environment (infected and uninfected patches. Conclusion Because filamentous fungi can be deadly competitors for insect larvae on ephemeral resources, social attraction of Drosophila larvae to fungal-infected sites leading to suppression of mould growth may reflect an adaptive behavioural response that increases insect larval fitness and can thus be discussed as an anti-competitor behaviour. These observations support the hypothesis that adverse environmental conditions operate in favour of social behaviour. In a search for the underlying mechanisms of communal behaviour in Drosophila, this study highlights

  12. Neuroarchitecture of peptidergic systems in the larval ventral ganglion of Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Santos, Jonathan G; Vömel, Matthias; Struck, Rafael; Homberg, Uwe; Nässel, Dick R; Wegener, Christian

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies on Drosophila melanogaster and other insects have revealed important insights into the functions and evolution of neuropeptide signaling. In contrast, in- and output connections of insect peptidergic circuits are largely unexplored. Existing morphological descriptions typically do not determine the exact spatial location of peptidergic axonal pathways and arborizations within the neuropil, and do not identify peptidergic in- and output compartments. Such information is however fundamental to screen for possible peptidergic network connections, a prerequisite to understand how the CNS controls the activity of peptidergic neurons at the synaptic level. We provide a precise 3D morphological description of peptidergic neurons in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres of the Drosophila larva based on fasciclin-2 (Fas2) immunopositive tracts as landmarks. Comparing the Fas2 "coordinates" of projections of sensory or other neurons with those of peptidergic neurons, it is possible to identify candidate in- and output connections of specific peptidergic systems. These connections can subsequently be more rigorously tested. By immunolabeling and GAL4-directed expression of marker proteins, we analyzed the projections and compartmentalization of neurons expressing 12 different peptide genes, encoding approximately 75% of the neuropeptides chemically identified within the Drosophila CNS. Results are assembled into standardized plates which provide a guide to identify candidate afferent or target neurons with overlapping projections. In general, we found that putative dendritic compartments of peptidergic neurons are concentrated around the median Fas2 tracts and the terminal plexus. Putative peptide release sites in the ventral nerve cord were also more laterally situated. Our results suggest that i) peptidergic neurons in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord have separated in- and output compartments in specific areas, and ii) volume transmission is a prevailing

  13. Neuroarchitecture of peptidergic systems in the larval ventral ganglion of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Santos

    Full Text Available Recent studies on Drosophila melanogaster and other insects have revealed important insights into the functions and evolution of neuropeptide signaling. In contrast, in- and output connections of insect peptidergic circuits are largely unexplored. Existing morphological descriptions typically do not determine the exact spatial location of peptidergic axonal pathways and arborizations within the neuropil, and do not identify peptidergic in- and output compartments. Such information is however fundamental to screen for possible peptidergic network connections, a prerequisite to understand how the CNS controls the activity of peptidergic neurons at the synaptic level. We provide a precise 3D morphological description of peptidergic neurons in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres of the Drosophila larva based on fasciclin-2 (Fas2 immunopositive tracts as landmarks. Comparing the Fas2 "coordinates" of projections of sensory or other neurons with those of peptidergic neurons, it is possible to identify candidate in- and output connections of specific peptidergic systems. These connections can subsequently be more rigorously tested. By immunolabeling and GAL4-directed expression of marker proteins, we analyzed the projections and compartmentalization of neurons expressing 12 different peptide genes, encoding approximately 75% of the neuropeptides chemically identified within the Drosophila CNS. Results are assembled into standardized plates which provide a guide to identify candidate afferent or target neurons with overlapping projections. In general, we found that putative dendritic compartments of peptidergic neurons are concentrated around the median Fas2 tracts and the terminal plexus. Putative peptide release sites in the ventral nerve cord were also more laterally situated. Our results suggest that i peptidergic neurons in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord have separated in- and output compartments in specific areas, and ii volume transmission

  14. Quantifying Variation in the Ability of Yeasts to Attract Drosophila melanogaster

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    Palanca, Loida; Gaskett, Anne C.; Günther, Catrin S.; Newcomb, Richard D.; Goddard, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Yeasts that invade and colonise fruit significantly enhance the volatile chemical diversity of this ecosystem. These modified bouquets are thought to be more attractive to Drosophila flies than the fruit alone, but the variance of attraction in natural yeast populations is uncharacterised. Here we investigate how a range of yeast isolates affect the attraction of female D. melanogaster to fruit in a simple two choice assay comparing yeast to sterile fruit. Of the 43 yeast isolates examined, 33 were attractive and seven repellent to the flies. The results of isolate-versus-isolate comparisons provided the same relative rankings. Attractiveness varied significantly by yeast, with the strongly fermenting Saccharomyces species generally being more attractive than the mostly respiring non-Saccharomyces species (P = 0.0035). Overall the habitat (fruit or other) from which the isolates were directly sampled did not explain attraction (P = 0.2352). However, yeasts isolated from fruit associated niches were more attractive than those from non-fruit associated niches (P = 0.0188) regardless of taxonomic positioning. These data suggest that while attractiveness is primarily correlated with phylogenetic status, the ability to attract Drosophila is a labile trait among yeasts that is potentially associated with those inhabiting fruit ecosystems. Preliminary analysis of the volatiles emitted by four yeast isolates in grape juice show the presence/absence of ethanol and acetic acid were not likely explanations for the observed variation in attraction. These data demonstrate variation among yeasts for their ability to attract Drosophila in a pattern that is consistent with the hypothesis that certain yeasts are manipulating fruit odours to mediate interactions with their Drosophila dispersal agent. PMID:24086510

  15. Clash of kingdoms or why Drosophila larvae positively respond to fungal competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs, Marko

    2005-01-27

    BACKGROUND: Competition with filamentous fungi has been demonstrated to be an important cause of mortality for the vast group of insects that depend on ephemeral resources (e.g. fruit, dung, carrion). Recent data suggest that the well-known aggregation of Drosophila larvae across decaying fruit yields a competitive advantage over mould, by which the larvae achieve a higher survival probability in larger groups compared with smaller ones. Feeding and locomotor behaviour of larger larval groups is assumed to cause disruption of fungal hyphae, leading to suppression of fungal growth, which in turn improves the chances of larval survival to the adult stage. Given the relationship between larval density, mould suppression and larval survival, the present study has tested whether fungal-infected food patches elicit communal foraging behaviour on mould-infected sites by which larvae might hamper mould growth more efficiently. RESULTS: Based on laboratory experiments in which Drosophila larvae were offered the choice between fungal-infected and uninfected food patches, larvae significantly aggregated on patches containing young fungal colonies. Grouping behaviour was also visible when larvae were offered only fungal-infected or only uninfected patches; however, larval aggregation was less strong under these conditions than in a heterogeneous environment (infected and uninfected patches). CONCLUSION: Because filamentous fungi can be deadly competitors for insect larvae on ephemeral resources, social attraction of Drosophila larvae to fungal-infected sites leading to suppression of mould growth may reflect an adaptive behavioural response that increases insect larval fitness and can thus be discussed as an anti-competitor behaviour. These observations support the hypothesis that adverse environmental conditions operate in favour of social behaviour. In a search for the underlying mechanisms of communal behaviour in Drosophila, this study highlights the necessity of

  16. Wolbachia utilize host actin for efficient maternal transmission in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Irene L G Newton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis is a ubiquitous, maternally transmitted bacterium that infects the germline of insect hosts. Estimates are that Wolbachia infect nearly 40% of insect species on the planet, making it the most prevalent infection on Earth. The bacterium, infamous for the reproductive phenotypes it induces in arthropod hosts, has risen to recent prominence due to its use in vector control. Wolbachia infection prevents the colonization of vectors by RNA viruses, including Drosophila C virus and important human pathogens such as Dengue and Chikungunya. Here we present data indicating that Wolbachia utilize the host actin cytoskeleton during oogenesis for persistence within and transmission between Drosophila melanogaster generations. We show that phenotypically wild type flies heterozygous for cytoskeletal mutations in Drosophila profilin (chic(221/+ and chic(1320/+ or villin (qua(6-396/+ either clear a Wolbachia infection, or result in significantly reduced infection levels. This reduction of Wolbachia is supported by PCR evidence, Western blot results and cytological examination. This phenotype is unlikely to be the result of maternal loading defects, defects in oocyte polarization, or germline stem cell proliferation, as the flies are phenotypically wild type in egg size, shape, and number. Importantly, however, heterozygous mutant flies exhibit decreased total G-actin in the ovary, compared to control flies and chic(221 heterozygous mutants exhibit decreased expression of profilin. Additionally, RNAi knockdown of profilin during development decreases Wolbachia titers. We analyze evidence in support of alternative theories to explain this Wolbachia phenotype and conclude that our results support the hypothesis that Wolbachia utilize the actin skeleton for efficient transmission and maintenance within Drosophila.

  17. The calcineurin inhibitor Sarah (Nebula exacerbates Aβ42 phenotypes in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Soojin Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1 protein, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, is elevated in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome (DS or Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although increased levels of DSCR1 were often observed to be deleterious to neuronal health, its beneficial effects against AD neuropathology have also been reported, and the roles of DSCR1 on the pathogenesis of AD remain controversial. Here, we investigated the role of sarah (sra; also known as nebula, a Drosophila DSCR1 ortholog, in amyloid-β42 (Aβ42-induced neurological phenotypes in Drosophila. We detected sra expression in the mushroom bodies of the fly brain, which are a center for learning and memory in flies. Moreover, similar to humans with AD, Aβ42-expressing flies showed increased Sra levels in the brain, demonstrating that the expression pattern of DSCR1 with regard to AD pathogenesis is conserved in Drosophila. Interestingly, overexpression of sra using the UAS-GAL4 system exacerbated the rough-eye phenotype, decreased survival rates and increased neuronal cell death in Aβ42-expressing flies, without modulating Aβ42 expression. Moreover, neuronal overexpression of sra in combination with Aβ42 dramatically reduced both locomotor activity and the adult lifespan of flies, whereas flies with overexpression of sra alone showed normal climbing ability, albeit with a slightly reduced lifespan. Similarly, treatment with chemical inhibitors of calcineurin, such as FK506 and cyclosporin A, or knockdown of calcineurin expression by RNA interference (RNAi, exacerbated the Aβ42-induced rough-eye phenotype. Furthermore, sra-overexpressing flies displayed significantly decreased mitochondrial DNA and ATP levels, as well as increased susceptibility to oxidative stress compared to that of control flies. Taken together, our results demonstrating that sra overexpression augments Aβ42 cytotoxicity in Drosophila suggest that DSCR1

  18. Wolbachia utilize host actin for efficient maternal transmission in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Irene L G; Savytskyy, Oleksandr; Sheehan, Kathy B

    2015-04-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is a ubiquitous, maternally transmitted bacterium that infects the germline of insect hosts. Estimates are that Wolbachia infect nearly 40% of insect species on the planet, making it the most prevalent infection on Earth. The bacterium, infamous for the reproductive phenotypes it induces in arthropod hosts, has risen to recent prominence due to its use in vector control. Wolbachia infection prevents the colonization of vectors by RNA viruses, including Drosophila C virus and important human pathogens such as Dengue and Chikungunya. Here we present data indicating that Wolbachia utilize the host actin cytoskeleton during oogenesis for persistence within and transmission between Drosophila melanogaster generations. We show that phenotypically wild type flies heterozygous for cytoskeletal mutations in Drosophila profilin (chic(221/+) and chic(1320/+)) or villin (qua(6-396/+)) either clear a Wolbachia infection, or result in significantly reduced infection levels. This reduction of Wolbachia is supported by PCR evidence, Western blot results and cytological examination. This phenotype is unlikely to be the result of maternal loading defects, defects in oocyte polarization, or germline stem cell proliferation, as the flies are phenotypically wild type in egg size, shape, and number. Importantly, however, heterozygous mutant flies exhibit decreased total G-actin in the ovary, compared to control flies and chic(221) heterozygous mutants exhibit decreased expression of profilin. Additionally, RNAi knockdown of profilin during development decreases Wolbachia titers. We analyze evidence in support of alternative theories to explain this Wolbachia phenotype and conclude that our results support the hypothesis that Wolbachia utilize the actin skeleton for efficient transmission and maintenance within Drosophila.

  19. Sleep, aging, and lifespan in Drosophila

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    Tononi Giulio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies in humans suggest that a decrease in daily sleep duration is associated with reduced lifespan, but this issue remains controversial. Other studies in humans also show that both sleep quantity and sleep quality decrease with age. Drosophila melanogaster is a useful model to study aging and sleep, and inheriting mutations affecting the potassium current Shaker results in flies that sleep less and have a shorter lifespan. However, whether the link between short sleep and reduced longevity exists also in wild-type flies is unknown. Similarly, it is unknown whether such a link depends on sleep amount per se, rather than on other factors such as waking activity. Also, sleep quality has been shown to decrease in old flies, but it remains unclear whether aging-related sleep fragmentation is a generalized phenomenon. Results We compared 3 short sleeping mutant lines (Hk1, HkY and Hk2 carrying a mutation in Hyperkinetic, which codes for the beta subunit of the Shaker channel, to wild-type siblings throughout their entire lifespan (all flies kept at 20°C. Hk1 and HkY mutants were short sleeping relative to wild-type controls from day 3 after eclosure, and Hk2 flies became short sleepers about two weeks later. All 3 Hk mutant lines had reduced lifespan relative to wild-type flies. Total sleep time showed a trend to increase in all lines with age, but the effect was most pronounced in Hk1 and HkY flies. In both mutant and wild-type lines sleep quality did not decay with age, but the strong preference for sleep at night declined starting in "middle age". Using Cox regression analysis we found that in Hk1 and HkY mutants and their control lines there was a negative relationship between total sleep amount during the first 2 and 4 weeks of age and hazard (individual risk of death, while no association was found in Hk2 flies and their wild-type controls. Hk1 and HkY mutants and their control lines also showed an

  20. Genetic dissection of sexual orientation: behavioral, cellular, and molecular approaches in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Yamamoto, D; Ito, H; Fujitani, K

    1996-10-01

    Insertional mutagenesis using P-element vectors yielded several independent mutations that cause male homosexuality in Drosophila melanogaster. Subsequent analyses revealed that all of these insertions were located at the same chromosomal division, 91B, where one of the inversion breakpoints responsible for the bisexual phenotype of the fruitless (fru) mutant has been mapped. In addition to the altered sexual orientation, the fru mutants displayed a range of defects in the formation of a male-specific muscle, the muscle of Lawrence. Since the male-specific formation of this muscle was dependent solely on the sex of the innervating nerve and not on the sex of the muscle itself, the primary site of action of the fru gene should be in the neural cells. satori, one of the P-insertion alleles of fru which we isolated, carried the lacZ gene of E. coli as a reporter, and beta-galactosidase expression was found in a subset of brain cells including those in the antennal lobe in the satori mutant. Targeted expression of a sex determination gene, transformer (tra), was used to produce chromosomally male flies with certain feminized glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Such sexually mosaic flies courted not only females but also males when the DM2, DA3 and DA4 glomeruli were feminized, indicating that these substructures in the antennal lobe may be involved in the determination of the sexual orientation of flies. Molecular cloning and analyses of the genomic and complementary DNAs indicated that transcription of the fru locus yields several different transcripts, one of which encodes a putative transcription regulator with a BTB domain and two zinc finger motifs. In the 5' non-coding region, three putative Transformer binding sites were identified. It appears plausible therefore that the fru gene is one of the elements in the sex determination cascade that controls sexual fates of certain neuronal cells. Improper sex determination in these neural cells may lead to altered sexual