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Sample records for comparable protective immunity

  1. Identification of immune and viral correlates of norovirus protective immunity through comparative study of intra-cluster norovirus strains.

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    Shu Zhu

    Full Text Available Whether or not primary norovirus infections induce protective immunity has become a controversial issue, potentially confounded by the comparison of data from genetically distinct norovirus strains. Early human volunteer studies performed with a norovirus-positive inoculum initially led to the conclusion that primary infection does not generate long-term, protective immunity. More recently though, the epidemiological pattern of norovirus pandemics has led to the extrapolation that primary norovirus infection induces herd immunity. While these are seemingly discordant observations, they may in fact reflect virus strain-, cluster-, or genogroup-specific differences in protective immunity induction. Here, we report that highly genetically related intra-cluster murine norovirus strains differ dramatically in their ability to induce a protective immune response: Primary MNV-3 infection induced robust and cross-reactive protection, whereas primary MNV-1 infection induced modest homotypic and no heterotypic protection. In addition to this fundamental observation that intra-cluster norovirus strains display remarkable differences in protective immunity induction, we report three additional important observations relevant to norovirus:host interactions. First, antibody and CD4⁺ T cells are essential to controlling secondary norovirus infections. Second, the viral minor structural protein VP2 regulates the maturation of antigen presenting cells and protective immunity induction in a virus strain-specific manner, pointing to a mechanism by which MNV-1 may prevent the stimulation of memory immune responses. Third, VF1-mediated regulation of cytokine induction also correlates with protective immunity induction. Thus, two highly genetically-related norovirus strains displayed striking differences in induction of protective immune responses, strongly suggesting that the interpretation of norovirus immunity and vaccine studies must consider potential virus

  2. Multiple vaccinations with UV- attenuated cercariae in pig enhance protective immunity against Schistosoma japonicum infection as compared to single vaccination.

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    Lin, Dandan; Tian, Fang; Wu, Haiwei; Gao, Yanan; Wu, Jingjiao; Zhang, Donghui; Ji, Minjun; McManus, Donald P; Driguez, Patrick; Wu, Guanling

    2011-06-10

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a major public health problem in the endemic areas of China, the Philippines, and Indonesia. To date, a vaccine has not been developed against this disease but immunization with UV-attenuated cercariae can induce a high level of protective immunity in Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc crossbred pigs. To compare the efficacy of a single vaccination and multiple vaccinations with UV-attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae, two groups of pigs received either one or three exposures to 10,000 cercariae attenuated with 400 μw UV. Pigs with a single immunization had a 59.33% reduction in adult worm burden, a 89.87% reduction in hepatic eggs and a 86.27% reduction in fecal eggs at eight weeks post-challenge (P vaccinated groups were higher than in the infection-control group. Triple vaccinations resulted in higher levels of antibodies, especially IgG2, compared with a single vaccination and IFN-γ levels increased with repeated immunization with UV-irradiated cercariae. The high levels of protection against S. japonicum infection can be achieved with a UV-attenuated vaccine in pigs, and that three vaccinations were possibly more effective than a single vaccination. Moreover, triple vaccinations evoked a more vigorous IFN-γ response and a stronger antibody-mediated response, especially an increase in the levels of IgG2 antibodies.

  3. Sculpting humoral immunity through dengue vaccination to enhance protective immunity

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    Wayne eCrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important mosquito transmitted viral pathogens infecting humans. DENV infection produces a spectrum of disease, most commonly causing a self-limiting flu-like illness known as dengue fever; yet with increased frequency, manifesting as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Waning cross-protective immunity from any of the four dengue serotypes may enhance subsequent infection with another heterologous serotype to increase the probability of DHF. Decades of effort to develop dengue vaccines are reaching the finishing line with multiple candidates in clinical trials. Nevertheless, concerns remain that imbalanced immunity, due to the prolonged prime-boost schedules currently used in clinical trials, could leave some vaccinees temporarily unprotected or with increased susceptibility to enhanced disease. Here we develop a DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 DNA vaccine with the immunodominant cross-reactive B cell epitopes associated with immune enhancement removed. We compare wild-type (WT with this cross-reactivity reduced (CRR vaccine and demonstrate that both vaccines are equally protective against lethal homologous DENV-1 challenge. Under conditions mimicking natural exposure prior to acquiring protective immunity, WT vaccinated mice enhanced a normally sub-lethal heterologous DENV-2 infection resulting in DHF-like disease and 95% mortality in AG129 mice. However, CRR vaccinated mice exhibited redirected serotype-specific and protective immunity, and significantly reduced morbidity and mortality not differing from naïve mice. Thus, we demonstrate in an in vivo DENV disease model, that non-protective vaccine-induced immunity can prime vaccinees for enhanced DHF-like disease and that CRR DNA immunization significantly reduces this potential vaccine safety concern. The sculpting of immune memory by the modified vaccine and resulting redirection of humoral immunity provide insight into DENV vaccine induced immune

  4. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection

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    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2012-01-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at...

  5. Rotavirus immune responses and correlates of protection.

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    Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A; Greenberg, Harry B

    2012-08-01

    Selected topics in the field of rotavirus immunity are reviewed focusing on recent developments that may improve efficacy and safety of current and future vaccines. Rotaviruses (RVs) have developed multiple mechanisms to evade interferon (IFN)-mediated innate immunity. Compared to more developed regions of the world, protection induced by natural infection and vaccination is reduced in developing countries where, among other factors, high viral challenge loads are common and where infants are infected at an early age. Studies in developing countries indicate that rotavirus-specific serum IgA levels are not an optimal correlate of protection following vaccination, and better correlates need to be identified. Protection against rotavirus following vaccination is substantially heterotypic; nonetheless, a role for homotypic immunity in selection of circulating postvaccination strains needs further study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Intradermal immunization of mice with radiation-attenuated sporozoites of Plasmodium yoelii induces effective protective immunity.

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    Voza, Tatiana; Kebaier, Chahnaz; Vanderberg, Jerome P

    2010-12-15

    Intravenous injection of mice with attenuated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites induces sterile immunity to challenge with viable sporozoites. Non-intravenous routes have been reported to yield poor immunity. Because intravenous immunization has been considered to be unacceptable for large scale vaccination of humans, assessment was made of the results of intradermal immunization of mice with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria parasite whose infectivity resembles that of human malaria. Mice were immunized with two injections of isolated, radiation-attenuated P. yoelii sporozoites, either by intravenous (IV) or intradermal (ID) inoculation. In an attempt to enhance protective immunogenicity of ID-injections, one group of experimental mice received topical application of an adjuvant, Imiquimod, while another group had their injections accompanied by local "tape-stripping" of the skin, a procedure known to disrupt the stratum corneum and activate local immunocytes. Challenge of immunized and non-immunized control mice was by bite of sporozoite-infected mosquitoes. Degree of protection among the various groups of mice was determined by microscopic examination of stained blood smears. Statistical significance of protection was determined by a one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Two intravenous immunizations produced 94% protection to mosquito bite challenge; intradermal immunization produced 78% protection, while intradermal immunization accompanied by "tape-stripping" produced 94% protection. There were no statistically significant differences in degree of protective immunity between immunizations done by intravenous versus intradermal injection. The use of a sub-microlitre syringe for intradermal injections yielded excellent protective immunity. ID-immunization with large numbers of radiation-attenuated P. yoelii sporozoites led to levels of protective immunity comparable to those achieved by IV-immunization. It remains to be determined whether an adjuvant

  7. Comparative Safety and Efficacy Profile of a Novel Oil in Water Vaccine Adjuvant Comprising Vitamins A and E and a Catechin in Protective Anti-Influenza Immunity

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    Sapna Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-replicating vaccines, such as those based on recombinant proteins, require adjuvants and delivery systems, which have thus far depended on mimicking pathogen danger signals and strong pro-inflammatory responses. In search of a safer and more efficacious alternative, we tested whether vaccinations with influenza recombinant hemagglutinin (HA mixed with a novel vegetable oil in water emulsion adjuvant (Natural Immune-enhancing Delivery System, NIDS, based on the immune-enhancing synergy of vitamins A and E and a catechin, could protect against intra-nasal challenge with live influenza virus. Vaccinations of inbred Brag Albino strain c (BALB/c mice, with HA mixed with NIDS compared to other adjuvants, i.e., a squalene oil in water emulsion (Sq. oil, and the Toll Like Receptor 3 (TLR3 agonist Poly (I:C, induced significantly lower select innate pro-inflammatory responses in serum, but induced significantly higher adaptive antibody and splenic T Helper 1 (TH1 or TH2, but not TH17, responses. Vaccinations with NIDS protected against infection, as measured by clinical scores, lung viral loads, and serum hemagglutination inhibition titers. The NIDS exhibited a strong dose sparing effect and the adjuvant action of NIDS was intact in the outbred CD1 mice. Importantly, vaccinations with the Sq. oil, but not NIDS, induced a significantly higher Serum Amyloid P component, an acute phase reactant secreted by hepatocytes, and total serum IgE. Thus, the NIDS may be used as a clinically safer and more efficacious vaccine adjuvant against influenza, and potentially other infectious diseases.

  8. Community Immunity: How Vaccines Protect Us All

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    ... Special Issues Subscribe October 2011 Print this issue Community Immunity How Vaccines Protect Us All Send us ... time. That’s because enough people in the surrounding communities had already been vaccinated against measles. “The important ...

  9. Smallpox vaccines: targets of protective immunity.

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    Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The eradication of smallpox, one of the great triumphs of medicine, was accomplished through the prophylactic administration of live vaccinia virus, a comparatively benign relative of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Nevertheless, recent fears that variola virus may be used as a biological weapon together with the present susceptibility of unimmunized populations have spurred the development of new-generation vaccines that are safer than the original and can be produced by modern methods. Predicting the efficacy of such vaccines in the absence of human smallpox, however, depends on understanding the correlates of protection. This review outlines the biology of poxviruses with particular relevance to vaccine development, describes protein targets of humoral and cellular immunity, compares animal models of orthopoxvirus disease with human smallpox, and considers the status of second- and third-generation smallpox vaccines. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Protective immunity and vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

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    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effective, and universally acceptable vaccine against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  11. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

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    Ifeoma eOkwor

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing effective vaccines against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  12. Protective immunity in fish against protozoan diseases.

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    Woo, P T K

    2007-09-01

    The demand for and costs of producing land-based animal protein continues to escalate as the world population increases. Fish is an excellent protein, but the catch-fishery is stagnant or in decline. Intensive cage culture of fish is a viable option especially in countries with lakes/rivers and/or a long coastline; however, disease outbreaks will likely occur more frequently with cage culture. Hence protective strategies are needed, and one approach is to exploit the piscine immune system. This discussion highlights immunity (innate/natural and adaptive/acquired) in fish against three pathogenic protozoa (Amyloodinium ocellatum, Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and Cryptobia salmositica). Histone-like proteins in the mucus and skin of naturally resistant fish kill trophonts of A. ocellatum, and also may cause abnormal development of tomonts. Breeding of Cryptobia-resistant brook charrs is possible as resistance is controlled by a dominant Mendelian locus, and the parasite is lysed via the Alternative Pathway of Complement Activation. Production of transgenic Cryptobia-tolerant salmon is an option. Recovered fish are protected from the three diseases (acquired immunity). Live I. multifiliis theronts injected intraperitoneally into fish elicit protection. Also, a recombinant immoblizing-antigen vaccine against ichthyophthirosis has been developed but further evaluations are necessary. The live Cryptobia vaccine protects salmonids from infections while the DNA-vaccine stimulates production of antibodies to neutralize the disease causing factor (metalloprotease) in cryptobiosis; hence infected fish recover more rapidly.

  13. Embryo vaccination of chickens using a novel adjuvant formulation stimulates protective immunity against Eimeria maxima infection

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    Our previous study demonstrated that chickens immunized subcutaneously with an Eimeria recombinant profilin protein vaccine emulsified in a Quil A/cholesterol/DDA/Carbopol (QCDC) adjuvant developed partial protection against experimental avian coccidiosis compared with animals immunized with profili...

  14. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells.

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    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-24

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy.

  15. Protection of piglets against neonatal colibacillosis based on antitoxic immunity.

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    Fürer, E; Cryz, S J; Germanier, R

    1983-01-01

    Substantial protection against colibacillosis in neonatal piglets was provided by transfer of colostral antitoxic antibody to suckling piglets from dams immunized with procholeragenoid. The physical properties of procholeragenoid, an aggregate with a high-molecular weight formed during the heating of cholera toxin, were dependent upon the buffer and the duration of heating used for production. Procholeragenoid possessed a higher molar ratio of subunit A to subunit B than native cholera toxin. The biological activity of procholeragenoid was greatly decreased in several assay systems as compared to cholera toxin. Immunization of pregnant dams with 50 micrograms of procholeragenoid 5 weeks and 2 weeks prior to delivery elicited high titers of antitoxic-IgG and toxin-neutralizing antibody in the serum and colostrum at parturition. In field trials, immunization with procholeragenoid markedly decreased the incidence of diarrhea (85%) and death (84%) due to colibacillosis in neonatal piglets. Reimmunization of dams with procholeragenoid during the following gestation period afforded comparable levels of protection against death in piglets (mortality rate of 0.86% compared to 0.77% following the first immunization schedule). These results demonstrate that only antitoxic immunity can afford a high degree of protection against colibacillosis in neonatal piglets.

  16. Protective immunization against Tetrahymena sp. infection in guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

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    Chettri, J Kumar; Leibowitz, M Pimenta; Ofir, R; Zilberg, D

    2009-08-01

    Systemic tetrahymenosis constitutes a serious problem in guppy (Poecilia reticulata) production worldwide and no therapeutic solution is available for this disease. Three immunization trials were conducted, testing the effectiveness of different Tetrahymena preparations applied by intraperitoneal injection (IP) with or without Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and with or without booster dose. In trial 1, immunization with the pathogenic Tet-NI 6 lysate and live attenuated Tet-NI 1 did not provide significant protection from infection, although infection rates were significantly lower in the Tet-NI 6-immunized group than in controls. In trial 2, mortality in Tet-NI 6 + FCA-immunized fish was 10%, significantly lower than in all other treatment groups, including Tet-NI 6 lysate, live attenuated Tet-NI 1 and controls (77, 67 and 73%, respectively). In trial 3, the lowest mortality rates were obtained in the Tet-NI 6 + FCA + booster-immunized group (15%). These levels were lower but not significantly different from the non-boostered Tet-NI 6-immunized group (28%) and the groups immunized with Tet-NI 1, with and without booster (32 and 34%, respectively). Mortality in these four groups was significantly lower than in controls, including adjuvant- and PBS-injected groups (72 and 81%, respectively). Body homogenates of immunized fish immobilized Tetrahymena in-vitro, as compared to no or very little immobilization in controls. Lysozyme levels in the Tet-NI 6 + FCA + booster group were significantly higher than in all other treatments in trial 2 and controls in trial 3. There was no significant difference in anti-protease activity among the differently immunized fish. We conclude that immunization with Tetrahymena lysates in FCA confers a high degree of protection from infection, suggesting this preparation as a basis for vaccine development.

  17. Differential protective effects of immune lymphoid cells against transplanted line Ib leukemia and immune polioencephalomyelitis. [X radiation, mice

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    Duffey, P.S.; Lukasewycz, O.A.; Olson, D.S.; Murphy, W.H.

    1978-12-01

    The capacity of immune cells obtained from the major lymphoid compartments to protect C58 mice from transplanted line Ib leukemia, and from an age-dependent autoimmune CNS disease (immune polioencephalomyelitis = IPE) elicited by immunizing old C58 mice with inactivated Ib cells was quantified. Cells used for comparative adoptive protection tests were harvested from the major lymphoid compartments 14 to 15 days after young C58 mice were immunized with inactivated Ib cell preparations. Regression curves were plotted from survival data and the log/sub 10/PD/sub 50/ values were determined. Immune spleen (ISC) and peritoneal cells (IPEC) were significantly more protective against transplanted Ib cells than immune lymph node (ILNC), thymic (ITC), and marrow cells (IMC). In contrast, IPEC and IMC were not protective against IPE and ITC were only marginally protective. ILNC afforded significant protection to transplantable leukemia but were only marginally protective to IPE. When ISC were treated with anti-thy 1.2 serum and complement, protection against transplanted leukemia and IPE was reduced > 99%. When donors of immune lymphoid cells were treated with 12.5 mg of cortisone acetate daily for 2 days before lymphoid cells were harvested, protection against transplanted Ib cells by ISC was reduced by approximately 90% whereas protection against IPE was totally eliminated. Considered together, these results indicate that the protective mechanisms to transplantable leukemia and IPE differ significantly in the same indicator mouse strain.

  18. Immune mechanisms of protection: can adjuvants rise to the challenge?

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    Kappler John W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For many diseases vaccines are lacking or only partly effective. Research on protective immunity and adjuvants that generate vigorous immune responses may help generate effective vaccines against such pathogens.

  19. ETHIOPIAN WITNESS PROTECTION SYSTEM: COMPARATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    law enforcement or judicial authorities in the maintenance of justice.12. 2.1. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND. Witness protection first came to prominence in the United State of America to dismantle Mafia style criminal organizations.13 Before its formal establishment by act, witness protection system started to protect people.

  20. Protection against colibacillosis in neonatal piglets by immunization of dams with procholeragenoid.

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    Fürer, E; Cryz, S J; Dorner, F; Nicolet, J; Wanner, M; Germanier, R

    1982-03-01

    Protection against colibacillosis in neonatal piglets was obtained by immunization of pregnant dams with procholeragenoid. Procholeragenoid is a stable high-molecular-weight aggregate of cholera toxin formed during the heating of cholera toxin. Procholeragenoid retained approximately 1% of the toxicity of native toxin as determined in the rabbit ileal loop and Y-1 adrenal cell assays and 5% of the activity in the rabbit skin assay. Immunization of pregnant dams with 50 micrograms of procholeragenoid 5 and 2 weeks before the expected delivery date elicited high titers of antitoxic immunoglobulin G and toxin-neutralizing antibody in both the colostrum and serum. In three independent field trials, immunization with procholeragenoid resulted in a substantial decrease in diarrhea (73% in controls versus 11% in immunized) and death (4.7% in controls versus 0.77% in immunized) in neonatal piglets. The protection rate in the immunized population was approximately 85% for both diarrhea and death. In the following gestation period, reimmunization of dams with a single dose of procholeragenoid (50 micrograms) 2 weeks before delivery elicited titers of antitoxic immunoglobulin G and toxin-neutralizing antibody comparable to those obtained during the primary immunization. The death rate in neonatal piglets (0.86%) was comparable to that seen after immunization during the first gestation period (0.77%). These results indicate that substantial protection of neonatal piglets against colibacillosis can be obtained by immunization of dams with procholeragenoid. Protection was found to be based solely on antitoxic immunity.

  1. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effect...

  2. Active protection against rotavirus infection of mice following intraperitoneal immunization.

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    McNeal, M M; Sheridan, J F; Ward, R L

    1992-11-01

    Active immunity to rotavirus has been demonstrated following oral inoculation with live virus but little is known about the effects of parenteral immunization. In this study, adult mice were immunized by intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation with live rotaviruses and later orally challenged with murine rotavirus (EDIM) to measure active immunity against infection. Three doses of EDIM (8 micrograms/dose) given intraperitoneally (ip) provided full protection against EDIM infection, whether administered with or without Freund's adjuvant. Only partial protection was found when the quantity of immunogen was reduced to protection of all mice. Significant protection was also observed after inoculation with one or three doses (2 micrograms/dose) of heterologous rotaviruses. Protection provided by the heterologous strains did not correlate with neutralizing antibody to EDIM, which indicated that neutralizing antibody to the challenge virus was not required for protection. uv-Inactivated EDIM also provided significant protection against EDIM, thus demonstrating that viral replication was not required for protection. These results suggest that parenteral immunization may be an effective method to vaccinate against rotavirus disease.

  3. Balancing immune protection and immune pathology by CD8+ T cell responses to influenza infection

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    Susu eDuan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is a significant human pathogen causing annual epidemics and periodic pandemics. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL-mediated immunity contributes to clearance of virus-infected cells; CTL immunity targeting the conserved internal proteins of IAVs is a key protection mechanism when neutralizing antibodies are absent during heterosubtypic IAV infection. However, CTL infiltration into the airways, their cytotoxicity, and the effects of produced pro-inflammatory cytokines can cause severe lung tissue injury, thereby contributing to immunopathology. Studies have discovered complicated and exquisite stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms that regulate CTL magnitude and effector activities during IAV infection. Here, we review the state of knowledge on the roles of IAV-specific CTLs in immune protection and immunopathology during IAV infection in animal models, highlighting the key findings of various requirements and constraints regulating the balance of immune protection and pathology involved in CTL immunity. We also discuss the evidence of cross-reactive CTL immunity as a positive correlate of cross-subtype protection during secondary IAV infection in both animal and human studies. We argue that the effects of CTL immunity on protection and immunopathology depend on multiple layers of host and viral factors, including complex host mechanisms to regulate CTL magnitude and effector activity, the pathogenic nature of the IAV, the innate response milieu, and the host historical immune context of influenza infection. Future efforts are needed to further understand these key host and viral factors, especially to differentiate those that constrain optimally effective CTL anti-viral immunity from those necessary to restrain CTL-mediated nonspecific immunopathology in the various contexts of IAV infection, in order to develop better vaccination and therapeutic strategies for modifying protective CTL immunity.

  4. Immunization of pregnant gilts with PRCV induces lactogenic immunity for protection of nursing piglets from challenge with TGEV.

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    Wesley, R D; Woods, R D

    1993-12-01

    The level of passive protection against transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was evaluated by experimentally infecting 12 pregnant gilts with different doses of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) and challenging their litters at 4 days of age. An overall survival rate of 70% was found for piglets nursing the 12 PRCV-infected gilts, compared to a 16% survival rate for piglets of nine uninfected control gilts. Six of the PRCV-infected gilts had adequate levels of immunity to resist infection with TGEV following the challenge of their litters. These six completely immuned gilts also solidly protected their litters from TGEV as shown by a 96% piglet survival rate through weaning at 3 weeks of age. The results suggest that respiratory infection with PRCV induces a substantial degree of protective lactogenic immunity against TGEV.

  5. Intragastric immunization with recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing flagellar antigen confers antibody-independent protective immunity against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

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    Kajikawa, A.; Satoh, E.; Leer, R.J.; Yamamoto, S.; Igimi, S.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing a flagellar antigen from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was constructed and evaluated as a mucosal vaccine. Intragastric immunization of the recombinant strain conferred protective immunity against Salmonella infection in mice. This immunization

  6. rEnolase maternal immunization confers caries protection on offspring.

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    Dinis, M; Trigo, G; Chaves, N; Fonseca, A J M M; Ribeiro, A; Tavares, D; Cabrita, A M S; Ferreira, P

    2011-03-01

    Therapeutic vaccination with Streptococcus sobrinus recombinant enolase (rEnolase) protects rats from dental caries. Here, we investigated the effect that maternal rEnolase vaccination before pregnancy had on the offspring's immune response to S. sobrinus oral infection and dental caries progression. Female Wistar rats were immunized by intranasal and subcutaneous routes with rEnolase adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant or similarly treated with the adjuvant alone (sham-immunized). Ten days after the last administration, the immunized females were paired with a male rat. The oral immune responses to S. sobrinus infection and dental caries in the offspring were evaluated. The results showed that pups born from rEnolase-immunized mothers had higher levels of rEnolase-specific salivary IgA and IgG antibodies (indicating a placental antibody transfer) and lower sulcal and proximal enamel caries scores than rats born from sham-immunized mothers. In conclusion, rEnolase maternal immunization before pregnancy provides offspring with protection against S. sobrinus-induced dental caries.

  7. Cytomegalovirus in the Neonate: Immune Correlates of Infection and Protection

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    Mark R. Schleiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal and neonatal infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (CMV are important causes of morbidity and occasional mortality. Development of a vaccine against congenital CMV infection is a major public health priority. Vaccine design is currently focused on strategies that aim to elicit neutralizing antibody and T-cell responses, toward the goal of preventing primary or recurrent infection in women of child-bearing age. However, there has been relatively little attention given to understanding the mechanisms of immune protection against acquisition of CMV infection in the fetus and newborn and how this information might be exploited for vaccine design. There has similarly been an insufficient study of what deficits in the immune response to CMV, both for mother and fetus, may increase susceptibility to congenital infection and disease. Protection of the fetus against vertical transmission can likely be achieved by protection of the placenta, which has its own unique immunological milieu, further complicating the analysis of the correlates of protective immunity. In this review, the current state of knowledge about immune effectors of protection against CMV in the maternal, placental, and fetal compartments is reviewed. A better understanding of immune responses that prevent and/or predispose to infection will help in the development of novel vaccine strategies.

  8. Heterologous Protection against Malaria after Immunization with Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites.

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    Remko Schats

    Full Text Available Sterile protection in >90% of volunteers against homologous Plasmodium falciparum infection has been achieved only using the controlled human malaria infection (CHMI model. This efficient model involves whole parasite immunizations under chloroquine prophylaxis (CPS-immunization, requiring only 30-45 mosquitoes bites infected with P. falciparum-sporozoites. Given the large diversity of P. falciparum parasites, it is essential to assess protection against heterologous parasite strains.In an open-label follow-up study, 16 volunteers previously CPS-immunized and challenged with P. falciparum NF54 (West-Africa in a dose de-escalation and challenge trial were re-challenged with clone NF135.C10 (Cambodia at 14 months after the last immunization (NCT01660854.Two out of thirteen NF54 protected volunteers previously fully protected against NF54 were also fully protected against NF135.C10, while 11/13 showed a delayed patency (median prepatent period of 10.5 days (range 9.0-15.5 versus 8.5 days in 5 malaria-naïve controls (p = 0.0005. Analysis of patency by qPCR indicated a 91 to >99% estimated reduction of liver parasite load in 7/11 partially protected subjects. Three volunteers previously not protected against NF54, were also not protected against NF135.C10.This study shows that CPS-immunization can induce heterologous protection for a period of more than one year, which is a further impetus for clinical development of whole parasite vaccines.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01660854.

  9. Protective immunization against melanoma by gp100 DNA-HVJ-liposome vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W Z; Kaneda, Y; Huang, S; Morishita, R; Hoon, D

    1999-10-01

    DNA-based vaccine immunization effectively induces both humoral and cell-mediated immunity to antigens and can confer protection against numerous infectious diseases as well as some cancers. Human and mouse melanomas consistently express the tumor-associated antigen interacted with the melanogenesis pathway. Gp100 is immunogenic and has been shown to induce both antibody and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses in humans. To explore the potential use of DNA immunization to induce melanoma-specific immune responses, we assessed HVJ-AVE liposome incorporated with plasmid DNA encoding human gp100. The gp100 DNA vaccine was used in a mouse melanoma model to assess immunity against the B16 melanoma of C57BL/6 mice. Intramuscular injection of the DNA-HVJ-AVE liposomes induced both anti-gp100 antibody and CTL responses. Gp100 DNA-HVJ-AVE liposome immunization significantly delayed tumor development in mice challenged with B16 melanoma cells. Mice immunized with gp100 DNA-HVJ-AVE liposomes survived longer compared with control mice immunized with HVJ-AVE liposome alone. These results indicate that immunization with human gp100 DNA by HVJ-AVE liposomes can induce protective immunity against melanoma in this pre-clinical mouse model. This strategy may provide an effective approach for vaccine therapy with tumor-associated antigens against human melanoma.

  10. Airway CD8(+) T cells induced by pulmonary DNA immunization mediate protective anti-viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivas-Benita, M; Gillard, G O; Bar, L; White, K A; Webby, R J; Hovav, A-H; Letvin, N L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for protection against a number of respiratory pathogens must induce T-cell populations in both the pulmonary airways and peripheral lymphoid organs. In this study, we show that pulmonary immunization using plasmid DNA formulated with the polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI-DNA) induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in the airways that persisted long after antigen local clearance. The persistence of the cells was not mediated by local lymphocyte proliferation or persistent antigen presentation within the lung or airways. These vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells effectively mediated protective immunity against respiratory challenges with vaccinia virus and influenza virus. Moreover, this protection was not dependent upon the recruitment of T cells from peripheral sites. These findings demonstrate that pulmonary immunization with PEI-DNA is an efficient approach for inducing robust pulmonary CD8(+) T-cell populations that are effective at protecting against respiratory pathogens.

  11. Intracellular replication-deficient Leishmania donovani induces long lasting protective immunity against visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Dey, Ranadhir; Nylen, Susanne; Duncan, Robert; Sacks, David; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2009-08-01

    No vaccine is currently available for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. This study addresses whether a live attenuated centrin gene-deleted L. donovani (LdCen1(-/-)) parasite can persist and be both safe and protective in animals. LdCen1(-/-) has a defect in amastigote replication both in vitro and ex vivo in human macrophages. Safety was shown by the lack of parasites in spleen and liver in susceptible BALB/c mice, immune compromised SCID mice, and human VL model hamsters 10 wk after infection. Mice immunized with LdCen1(-/-) showed early clearance of virulent parasite challenge not seen in mice immunized with heat killed parasites. Upon virulent challenge, the immunized mice displayed in the CD4(+) T cell population a significant increase of single and multiple cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF) producing cells and IFN-gamma/IL10 ratio. Immunized mice also showed increased IgG2a immunoglobulins and NO production in macrophages. These features indicated a protective Th1-type immune response. The Th1 response correlated with a significantly reduced parasite burden in the spleen and no parasites in the liver compared with naive mice 10 wk post challenge. Protection was observed, when challenged even after 16 wk post immunization, signifying a sustained immunity. Protection by immunization with attenuated parasites was also seen in hamsters. Immunization with LdCen1(-/-) also cross-protected mice against infection with L. braziliensis that causes mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Results indicate that LdCen1(-/-) can be a safe and effective vaccine candidate against VL as well as mucocutaneous leishmaniasis causing parasites.

  12. Immunity to Lutzomyia whitmani Saliva Protects against Experimental Leishmania braziliensis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Regis; Cavalcanti, Katrine; Teixeira, Clarissa; Carvalho, Augusto M; Mattos, Paulo S; Cristal, Juqueline R; Muniz, Aline C; Miranda, José Carlos; de Oliveira, Camila I; Barral, Aldina

    2016-11-01

    Previous works showed that immunization with saliva from Lutzomyia intermedia, a vector of Leishmania braziliensis, does not protect against experimental infection. However, L. braziliensis is also transmitted by Lutzomyia whitmani, a sand fly species closely related to Lu. intermedia. Herein we describe the immune response following immunization with Lu. whitmani saliva and the outcome of this response after L. braziliensis infection. BALB/c mice immunized with Lu. whitmani saliva developed robust humoral and cellular immune responses, the latter characterized by an intense cellular infiltrate and production of IFN-γ and IL-10, by both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Mice immunized as above and challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. whitmani saliva displayed significantly smaller lesions and parasite load at the challenge site. This protection was associated with a higher (p<0.05) IFN-γ production in response to SLA stimulation. Long-term persisting immunity was also detected in mice immunized with Lu. whitmani saliva. Furthermore, individuals residing in an endemic area for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) presented antibody responses to Lu. whitmani saliva. However CL patients, with active lesions, displayed a lower humoral response to Lu. whitmani saliva compared to individuals with subclinical Leishmania infection. Pre-exposure to Lu. whitmani saliva induces protection against L. braziliensis in a murine model. We also show that Lu. whitmani salivary proteins are immunogenic in naturally exposed individuals. Our results reinforce the importance of investigating the immunomodulatory effect of saliva from different species of closely related sand flies.

  13. Induction of protective immune responses in mice by double DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a double DNA vaccine encoding of Brucella melitensis omp31 gene and of Escherichia coli eae gene in inducing protective immune response in a mouse model. Methods: After performing PCR assays and cloning both the eae and omp31 genes, the generated. DNA vaccines were ...

  14. Induction of protective immune responses in mice by double DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a double DNA vaccine encoding of Brucella melitensis omp31 gene and of Escherichia coli eae gene in inducing protective immune response in a mouse model. Methods: After performing PCR assays and cloning both the eae and omp31 genes, the generated DNA vaccines were ...

  15. BCG-induced protection: effects on innate immune memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netea, Mihai G; van Crevel, Reinout

    2014-12-01

    The Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is the only vaccine proved to be effective against tuberculosis and it remains the most commonly used vaccine worldwide. In addition to its effects on mycobacterial diseases, an increasing body of epidemiological evidence accumulated since its introduction in 1921 shows that BCG also exerts beneficial non-specific effects ranging from protection against non-mycobacterial diseases, decreased incidence of allergic diseases, and treatment of certain malignancies. The biological substrate of these effects is mediated partly by heterologous effects on adaptive immunity, but also on the potentiation of innate immune responses through epigenetic mechanisms, a process termed 'trained immunity'. The process of trained immunity may also play a role in the beneficial effects of BCG against tuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and this could have important consequences for our quest for improving vaccination strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The serological response to heartwater immunization in cattle is an indicator of protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawrence, J A; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Whiteland, A P

    1995-01-01

    A significant correlation was demonstrated in Friesian-cross steers between the serological response to previous vaccination with the Ball 3 strain of Cowdria ruminantium and the development of protective immunity against the Kalota isolate from Malawi. Of 10 animals which seroconverted after...... vaccination, all were completely or partially immune to challenge. Ten of the 14 animals which failed to seroconvert were immune but the proportion was not significantly different from that in the unvaccinated controls (4/10). Of 29 animals vaccinated and treated simultaneously with a slow-release doxycycline...

  17. Does the immune system naturally protect against cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eCorthay

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the immune system in conferring protection against pathogens like viruses, bacteria, and parasitic worms is well established. In contrast, there is a long-lasting debate on whether cancer prevention is a primary function of the immune system. The concept of immunological surveillance of cancer was developed by Lewis Thomas and Frank Macfarlane Burnet more than fifty years ago. We are still lacking convincing data illustrating immunological eradication of precancerous lesions in vivo. Here, I present eight types of evidence in support of the cancer immunosurveillance hypothesis. First, primary immunodeficiency in mice and humans is associated with increased cancer risk. Second, organ transplant recipients, who are treated with immunosuppressive drugs, are more prone to cancer development. Third, acquired immunodeficiency due to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 leads to elevated risk of cancer. Fourth, the quantity and quality of the immune cell infiltrate found in human primary tumors represent an independent prognostic factor for patient survival. Fifth, cancer cells harbor mutations in protein-coding genes that are specifically recognized by the adaptive immune system. Sixth, cancer cells selectively accumulate mutations to evade immune destruction (immunoediting. Seventh, lymphocytes bearing the NKG2D receptor are able to recognize and eliminate stressed premalignant cells. Eighth, a promising strategy to treat cancer consists in potentiating the naturally occurring immune response of the patient, through blockade of the immune checkpoint molecules CTLA-4, PD-1, or PD-L1. Thus, there are compelling pieces of evidence that a primary function of the immune system is to confer protection against cancer.

  18. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  19. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Peters

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  20. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nathan C; Kimblin, Nicola; Secundino, Nagila; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lawyer, Phillip; Sacks, David L

    2009-06-01

    Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM)+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  1. BCG and protection against inflammatory and auto-immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Locht, Camille

    2017-07-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only available vaccine against tuberculosis. Although its protective efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis is still under debate, it provides protection against other mycobacterial diseases. BCG is also an effective therapy against superficial bladder cancer and potentially decreases overall childhood mortality. Areas covered: The purpose of this paper is to provide a state-of-the-art summary of the beneficial effects of BCG in inflammatory and auto-immune diseases. As a strong inducer of Th1 type immunity, BCG has been reported to protect against atopic conditions, such as allergic asthma, a Th2-driven disorder. Its protective effect has been well documented in mice, but still awaits definitive evidence in humans. Similarly, murine studies have shown a protective effect of BCG against auto-immune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and insulin-dependent diabetes, but studies in humans have come to conflicting conclusions. Expert commentary: Studies in mice have shown a beneficial effect of the BCG vaccine against allergic asthma, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. However, the understanding of its mechanism is still fragmentary and requires further in depth research. Some observational or intervention studies in humans have also suggested a beneficial effect, but definitive evidence for this requires confirmation in carefully conducted prospective studies.

  2. Effects of anti-schistosomal chemotherapy on immune responses, protection and immunity. II. Concomitant immunity and immunization with irradiated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A.F.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance of mice to challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni was evaluated before and after elimination of their primary, established S. mansoni infections with the chemotherapeutic drug praziquantel. Mice treated after either 10 or 20 weeks of primary infection were challenged 6 or 10 weeks after treatment. Mice infected for for 10 weeks prior to treatment expressed progressively less resistance 6 and 10 weeks after treatment. By 10 weeks after treatment significant levels of protection were no longer observed. Resistance waned more slowly if mice were treated 20 weeks after infection, and there was still significant expression of resistance to challenge 10 weeks after treatment. A separate set of experiments evaluated the use of highly irradiated cercariae as a vaccine in mice that had been previously infected with S. mansoni and cured with praziquantel. It was observed that effective immunizations were possible in previously infected mice. These studies demonstrate that established resistance waned after treatment and the rate of loss of protection was dependent upon the duration of infection prior to treatment. Furthermore, the irradiated cercarial vaccine studies indicate that in the murine model induction of immunological resistance was feasible following chemotherapeutic treatment of infected populations.

  3. Immunization with Bivalent Flagellin Protects Mice against Fatal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Behrouz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections present a major challenge to healthcare systems worldwide because they are commonly associated with high morbidity and mortality. Here, we demonstrate the protective efficacy of type a and b flagellins (bivalent flagellin against acute fatal pneumonia in mice. Mice immunized intranasally with a bivalent flagellin vaccine were challenged by different flagellated strains of P. aeruginosa in an acute pneumonia model. Besides the protective effect of the vaccine, we further measured the host innate and cellular immunity responses. The immunized mice in our study were protected against both strains. Remarkably, active immunization with type a or b flagellin significantly improved survival of mice against heterologous strain compared to flagellin a or b antisera. We also showed that after an intranasal challenge by P. aeruginosa strain, neutrophils are recruited to the airways of vaccinated mice, and that the bivalent flagellin vaccine was proved to be protective by the generated CD4+IL-17+ Th17 cells. In conclusion, bivalent flagellin vaccine can confer protection against different strains of P. aeruginosa in an acute pneumonia mouse model by eliciting effective cellular and humoral immune responses, including increased IL-17 production and improved opsonophagocytic killing.

  4. Protective immunity to a blood-feeding nematode (Haemonchus contortus) induced by parasite gut antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; McGuire, T C

    1991-01-01

    To determine the ability of gut antigens to induce a protective immune response against blood-feeding nematodes, isolated gut antigens were used to immunize goats against Haemonchus contortus. Immunization-induced antibody responses recognized parasite gut antigens which were associated predominantly with the microvillous membrane region of the parasite gut. Antibody from immune serum also recognized seven predominant gut proteins on a Western blot (immunoblot). Several of these proteins appeared to be integral membrane proteins on the basis of their solubility in the detergent Triton X-114, indicating that the presentation protocol stimulated an antibody response to microvillous membrane antigens. Three different age groups of goats ranging from less than 6 months to greater than 1 year were immunized for challenge experiments. After infection with 10(4) larvae, an 87 to 95% reduction in fecal egg counts for all age groups of goats was achieved in the immunized compared with the control group. The reduction of worms in immunized goats ranged from 65% (kids) to 89% (yearlings) compared with controls. These results indicate that gut antigens can induce significant protection against blood-feeding nematodes. Antibody to H. contortus gut antigens also cross-reacted with microvilli of other blood-feeding nematodes including Ostertagia ostertagi and small strongyles of horses, which indicates that epitopes associated with the gut are phylogenetically conserved. Images PMID:1937800

  5. Protective immunization against visceral leishmaniasis using Leishmania sterol 24-c-methyltransferase formulated in adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Bogatzki, Lisa Y; Bertholet, Sylvie; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2007-10-16

    We present here the identification and characterization of Leishmania sterol 24-c-methyltransferase (SMT), as well as data on protection of mice immunized with this Ag formulated in MPL-SE. Serological evaluation revealed that SMT is recognized by VL patients. C57BL/6 mice immunized with this vaccine candidate plus MPL-SE showed Ag-specific Th1 immune responses characterized by robust production of IFN-gamma upon specific Ag re-exposure in vitro. Upon challenge with L. infantum, mice immunized with SMT plus MPL-SE showed significant lower parasite burdens in both spleens and livers compared with non-immunized mice or mice injected with adjuvant alone. The results indicate that SMT/MPL-SE can be an effective vaccine candidate for use against VL.

  6. Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection and immune gene regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhee Sheen Wong

    Full Text Available The outcome of microbial infection of insects is dependent not only on interactions between the host and pathogen, but also on the interactions between microbes that co-infect the host. Recently the maternally inherited endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia has been shown to protect insects from a range of microbial and eukaryotic pathogens. Mosquitoes experimentally infected with Wolbachia have upregulated immune responses and are protected from a number of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, Plasmodium and filarial nematodes. It has been hypothesised that immune upregulation underpins Wolbachia-mediated protection. Drosophila is a strong model for understanding host-Wolbachia-pathogen interactions. Wolbachia-mediated antiviral protection in Drosophila has been demonstrated for a number of different Wolbachia strains. In this study we investigate whether Wolbachia-infected flies are also protected against pathogenic bacteria. Drosophila simulans lines infected with five different Wolbachia strains were challenged with the pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Serratia marcescens and Erwinia carotovora and mortality compared to paired lines without Wolbachia. No difference in mortality was observed in the flies with or without Wolbachia. Similarly no antibacterial protection was observed for D. melanogaster infected with Wolbachia. Interestingly, D. melanogaster Oregon RC flies which are naturally infected with Wolbachia showed no upregulation of the antibacterial immune genes TepIV, Defensin, Diptericin B, PGRP-SD, Cecropin A1 and Attacin D compared to paired flies without Wolbachia. Taken together these results indicate that Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection is not ubiquitous in insects and furthermore that the mechanisms of antibacterial and antiviral protection are independent. We suggest that the immune priming and antibacterial protection observed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may be a consequence of the recent

  7. Clostridium perfringens beta toxin DNA prime-protein boost elicits enhanced protective immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Amit Kumar; Bhatia, Bharati; Kaushik, Himani; Deshmukh, Sachin K; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2017-07-01

    Clostridium perfringens beta toxin (CPB) is the primary pathogenic factor responsible for necrotic enteritis in sheep, cattle and humans. Owing to rapid progression of the disease, vaccination is the only possible recourse to avoid high mortality in animal farms and huge economic losses. The present study reports evaluation of a cpb gene-based DNA vaccine encoding the beta toxin of C. perfringens with homologous as well as heterologous booster strategy. Immunization strategy employing heterologous booster with heat-inactivated rCPB mounted stronger immune response when compared to that generated by homologous booster. Antibody isotyping and cytokine ELISA demonstrated the immune response to be Th1-biased mixed immune response. While moderate protection of immunized BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice against rCPB challenge was observed with homologous booster strategy, heterologous booster strategy led to complete protection. Thus, beta toxin-based DNA vaccine using the heterologous prime-boosting strategy was able to generate better immune response and conferred greater degree of protection against high of dose rCPB challenge than homologous booster regimen, making it an effective vaccination approach against C. perfringens beta toxin.

  8. Intranasal immunization with influenza VLPs incorporating membrane-anchored flagellin induces strong heterosubtypic protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Zhong Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated previously that the incorporation of a membrane-anchored form of flagellin into influenza virus-like particles (VLPs improved the immunogenicity of VLPs significantly, inducing partially protective heterosubtypic immunity by intramuscular immunization. Because the efficacy of mucosal vaccination is highly dependent on an adjuvant, and is particularly effective for preventing mucosal infections such as influenza, we determined whether the membrane-anchored flagellin is an efficient adjuvant for VLP vaccines by a mucosal immunization route. We compared the adjuvant effect of membrane-anchored and soluble flagellins for immunization with influenza A/PR8 (H1N1 VLPs by the intranasal route in a mouse model. The results demonstrate that membrane-anchored flagellin is an effective adjuvant for intranasal (IN immunization, inducing enhanced systemic and mucosal antibody responses. High cellular responses were also observed as shown by cytokine production in splenocyte cultures when stimulated with viral antigens. All mice immunized with flagellin-containing VLPs survived challenge with a high lethal dose of homologous virus as well as a high dose heterosubtypic virus challenge (40 LD(50 of A/Philippines/82, H3N2. In contrast, no protection was observed with a standard HA/M1 VLP group upon heterosubtypic challenge. Soluble flagellin exhibited a moderate adjuvant effect when co-administered with VLPs by the mucosal route, as indicated by enhanced systemic and mucosal responses and partial heterosubtypic protection. The membrane-anchored form of flagellin incorporated together with antigen into influenza VLPs is effective as an adjuvant by the mucosal route and unlike standard VLPs, immunization with such chimeric VLPs elicits protective immunity to challenge with a distantly related influenza A virus.

  9. Protective immunity against malaria by 'natural immunization': a question of dose, parasite diversity, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Matuschewski, Kai

    2011-08-01

    Plasmodium undergoes an obligate liver phase before the onset of malaria, which is caused exclusively by cyclic propagation of the parasite inside erythrocytes. The diagnostically inaccessible and clinically silent pre-erythrocytic expansion phase is a promising target for inducing sterilizing immunity against reinfections. Recent studies in rodent and human malaria models called attention to the induction of potent protective immunity by administration of anti-malarial drugs during sporozoite exposure. Here, we review the concept of drug-mediated pathogen arrest as a natural immunization strategy. This previously unrecognized immunological benefit might also open new opportunities for population-wide presumptive drug administration as an adjunct malaria control tool. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective antigens against glanders identified by expression library immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Whitlock

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia (B. mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that IL-2 and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-and tumor necrosis factor-are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine.

  11. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell García-Quintanilla

    Full Text Available The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010, one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  12. Intranasal immunization with novel EspA-Tir-M fusion protein induces protective immunity against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 challenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruqin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Yiduo; Bai, Yang; Zhi, Fachao; Long, Beiguo; Li, Yawen; Wu, Yuhua; Wu, Xianbo; Fan, Hongying

    2017-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans. Due to the risks associated with antibiotic treatment against EHEC O157:H7 infection, vaccines represent a promising method for prevention of EHEC O157:H7 infection. Therefore, we constructed the novel bivalent antigen EspA-Tir-M as a candidate EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. We then evaluated the immunogenicity of this novel EHEC O157:H7 subunit vaccine. Immune responses to the fusion protein administered by intranasal and subcutaneous routes were compared in mice. Results showed higher levels of specific mucosal and systemic antibody responses induced by intranasal as compared to subcutaneous immunization. Intranasal immunization enhanced the concentration of interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and interferon-γ, while subcutaneous immunization enhanced only the latter two. In addition, intranasal immunization protected against EHEC O157:H7 colonization and infection in mice at a rate of 90%.Histopathological analysis revealed that vaccination reduced colon damage, especially when administered intranasally. In contrast, subcutaneous immunization elicited a weak immune response and exhibited a low protection rate. These findings demonstrate that intranasal immunization with the fusion protein induces both humoral and cellular immune (Th1/Th2) responses in mice. The novel EspA-Tir-M novel fusion protein therefore represents a promising subunit vaccine against EHEC O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Protective Immunity against Hepatitis C: Many Shades of Grey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S Abdel-Hakeem

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of individuals who become acutely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV develop chronic infection and suffer from progressive liver damage while approximately 25% are able to eliminate the virus spontaneously. Despite the recent introduction of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs, there is still no vaccine for HCV. As a result, new infections and reinfections will remain a problem in developing countries and among high risk populations like injection drug users (IDUs who have limited access to treatment and who continue to be exposed to the virus. The outcome of acute HCV is determined by the interplay between the host genetics, the virus and the virus-specific immune response. Studies in humans and chimpanzees have demonstrated the essential role of HCV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in protection against viral persistence. Recent data suggest that antibody responses play a more important role than what was previously thought. Individuals who spontaneously resolve acute HCV infection develop long-lived memory T cells and are less likely to become persistently infected upon re-exposure. New studies examining high risk cohorts are identifying correlates of protection during real life exposures and reinfections. In this review, we discuss correlates of protective immunity during acute HCV and upon reexposure. We draw parallels between HCV and the current knowledge about protective memory in other models of chronic viral infections. Finally, we discuss some of the yet unresolved questions about key correlates of protection and their relevance for vaccine development against HCV.

  14. [Effect of immune modulation on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal'nik, B V; Ponomareva, T S; Deriabin, P N; Denisova, T G; Mel'nikova, N N; Tugambaev, T I; Atshabar, B B; Zakarian, S B

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the effect of polyoxidonium and betaleukin on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine in model animal experiments. Plague vaccine EV, polyoxidonium, betaleukin, erythrocytic antigenic diagnosticum for determination of F1 antibodies and immune reagents for detection of lymphocytes with F1 receptors (LFR) in adhesive test developed by the authors were used. The experiments were carried out in 12 rabbits and 169 guinea pigs. Immune modulation accelerated the appearance and disappearance of LFR (early phase) and ensured a more rapid and intensive antibody formation (effector phase). Activation by betaleukin is more pronounced than by polyoxidonium. The more rapid and intensive was the development of early phase, the more effective was antibody response to the vaccine. Immune modulation in the experiment with guinea pigs significantly increased protective activity of the vaccine. The use of immune modulators increased immunogenic (in both early and effector phases of antigen-specific response) and protective activity of the EV vaccine. A connection between the acceleration of the first phase of antigen-specific response and general intensity of effector phase of immune response to the EV vaccine was detected. ,

  15. Immunization with Toxoplasma gondii GRA17 Deletion Mutant Induces Partial Protection and Survival in Challenged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lei Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis remains a world-threatening disease largely because of the lack of a fully effective vaccine. Here, we created a ΔGRA17 mutant by disrupting the virulence factor GRA17 using CRISPR-Cas9 method. Then, we tested whether ΔGRA17 tachyzoites can be used as a live-attenuated vaccine against acute, chronic, and congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice. Immune response evoked by ΔGRA17 immunization suggested a sequential Th1 and Th2 T cell response, indicated by high levels of Th1 and a mixed Th1/Th2 cytokines at 28 and 70 days after immunization, respectively. ΔGRA17-mediated immunity fully protected mice against lethal infection with wild-type (wt RH strain, heterologous challenge with PYS, and TgC7 strains of the Chinese ToxoDB#9 genotype, and T. gondii Pru strain. Although parasite cysts were detected in 8 out of 10 immunized mice, cyst burden in the brain was significantly reduced (P < 0.05 in immunized mice (53 ± 15 cysts/brain compared to non-immunized mice (4,296 ± 687 cysts/brain. In respect to congenital infection, the litter size, survival rate, and body weight (BW of pups born to ΔGRA17-immunized dams were not different compared to pups born to naïve control dams (P = 0.24. However, a marked reduction in the litter size (P < 0.001, survival rate, and BW (P < 0.01 of pups born to non-immunized and infected dams was detected. Also, immunized dams infected with type II Pru strain had significantly (P < 0.001 less cyst burden in the brain compared with non-immunized and infected dams. These findings show that immunization with ΔGRA17 strain evokes cell-mediated and neutralizing antibody responses and confers some degree of protection against challenge with homologous and heterologous virulent T. gondii strains.

  16. Active Immunity Induced by Passive IgG Post-Exposure Protection against Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Chen Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic antibodies can confer an instant protection against biothreat agents when administered. In this study, intact IgG and F(ab’2 from goat anti-ricin hyperimmune sera were compared for the protection against lethal ricin mediated intoxication. Similar ricin-binding affinities and neutralizing activities in vitro were observed between IgG and F(ab’2 when compared at the same molar concentration. In a murine ricin intoxication model, both IgG and F(ab’2 could rescue 100% of the mice by one dose (3 nmol administration of antibodies 1 hour after 5 × LD50 ricin challenge. Nine days later, when the rescued mice received a second ricin challenge (5 × LD50, only the IgG-treated mice survived; the F(ab’2-treated mice did not. The experimental design excluded the possibility of residual goat IgG responsible for the protection against the second ricin challenge. Results confirmed that the active immunity against ricin in mice was induced quickly following the passive delivery of a single dose of goat IgG post-exposure. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the induced active immunity against ricin in mice lasted at least 5 months. Therefore, passive IgG therapy not only provides immediate protection to the victim after ricin exposure, but also elicits an active immunity against ricin that subsequently results in long term protection.

  17. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers of an appropr......Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers......-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels...... of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination...

  18. Comparative assessment of immunization coverage of migrant children between national immunization program vaccines and non-national immunization program vaccines in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Luo, Shuying; Tang, Xuewen; Lou, Linqiao; Chen, Yaping; Guo, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the disparities in immunization coverage between National Immunization Program (NIP) vaccines and non-NIP vaccines in Yiwu and to identify potential determinants. A face-to-face interview-based questionnaire survey among 423 migrant children born from 1 June 2010 to 31 May 2013 was conducted. Immunization coverage was estimated according to the vaccines scheduled at different age, the birth cohorts, and socio- demographic characteristics. Single-level logistic regression analysis was applied to identify the determinants of coverage of non-NIP vaccines. We found that NIP vaccines recorded higher immunization coverage compared with non-NIP vaccines (87.9100%- vs 0%-74.8%). Among the non-NIP vaccines, varicella vaccine (VarV) recorded the highest coverage of 85.4%, which was introduced in 1998; while 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine(PCV7) recorded the lowest coverage of 0% for primary series, which was introduced recently. Lower coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significantly associated with more siblings in household, shorter duration of living in the surveyed areas, lower family income, mother with a job, mother with poor awareness of vaccination, and mother with lower education level. We found the immunization coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significant lower than that of NIP vaccines. Expansion of NIP to include non-NIP vaccines can provide better protection against the vaccine preventable diseases through increased immunization coverage.

  19. Immunization with truncated envelope protein of Zika virus induces protective immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Feng; Qiu, Yang; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Han-Xiao; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The global spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) as well as its unexpected link to infant microcephaly have resulted in serious public health concerns. No antiviral drugs against ZIKV is currently available, and vaccine development is of high priority to prepare for potential ZIKV pandemic. In the present study, a truncated E protein with the N-terminal 90% region reserved (E90) from a contemporary ZIKV strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by a Ni-NTA column, and characterized by Western blotting assays. Immunization with recombinant E90 induced robust ZIKV-specific humoral response in adult BALB/c mice. Passive transfer of the antisera from E90-immunized mice conferred full protection against lethal ZIKV challenge in a neonatal mice model. Our results indicate that recombinant ZIKV E90 described here represents as a promising ZIKV subunit vaccine that deserves further clinical development.

  20. Protective immunity induced in chicken by a single immunization with Mycoplasma gallisepticum immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundquist, B G; Czifra, G; Stipkovits, L

    1996-06-01

    An experimental immunostimulating complex vaccine has been prepared from detergent (Mega-10) solubilized Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) antigens. Sucrose gradient centrifugation, SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the ISCOM vaccine contained virtually all of the immunodominant MG membrane proteins, including p64 and p56. Protective immunity generated by the experimental MG ISCOM vaccine was demonstrated in challenge experiments. Chickens immunized with a single dose containing between 1 and 50 micrograms of MG ISCOMs had significantly reduced lesion scores in the air sac after challenge. The reisolation of the challenge MG strain was significantly less frequent from the chickens in vaccinated groups than from the unvaccinated control group. Presence of humoral antibodies in chickens vaccinated with 1-25 micrograms MG ISCOMs was not detectable by blocking ELISA or haemagglutination-inhibition before challenge. Chickens vaccinated once or twice with a 50 micrograms dose were transitory positive by blocking ELISA and rapid plate agglutination before challenge.

  1. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  2. Immunization of C57BL/6 Mice with GRA2 Combined with MPL Conferred Partial Immune Protection against Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Jalal; Amiri, Samira; Homayoun, Robab; Azimi, Ebrahim; Mohabati, Reyhaneh; Berizi, Mahboobe; Sadaie, M. Reza; Golkar, Majid

    2018-01-01

    We have previously reported that immunization with GRA2 antigen of Toxoplasma gondii induces protective immunity in CBA/J (H2k) and BALB/c mice (H2d). We aimed to examine whether immunization of a distinct strain of rodent with recombinant dense granule antigens (GRA2) combined with monophosphorryl lipid A (MPL) adjuvant elicits protective immune response against T. gondii. C57BL/6 (H2b haplotype) mice were immunized with GRA2, formulated in MPL adjuvant. Strong humoral response, predominantly of IgG1 subclass and cellular response, IFN-γ, was detected at three weeks post immunization. Mice immunized with GRA2 had significantly (p < 0.01) fewer brain cysts than those in the adjuvant group, upon challenge infection. Despite the production of a strong antibody response, IFN-γ production and brain cyst reduction were not significant when the immunized mice were infected four months after the immunization. We can conclude that GRA2 immunization partially protects against T. gondii infection in C57BL/6 mice, though the potency and longevity of this antigen as a standalone vaccine may vary in distinct genetic backgrounds. This observation further emphasizes the utility of GRA2 for incorporation into a multi-antigenic vaccine against T. gondii.

  3. Different immunization routes induce protection against Aeromonas salmonicida through different immune mechanisms in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Raida, Martin Kristian

    induced by immersion vaccination of rainbow trout against A. salmonicida, including an ELISA protocol investigating the antibody levels from vaccination until challenge. Here we present data showing that rainbow trout immunized via a mucosal route induce a high level of protection, similar...... in fish immunology and vaccinology, resulting in the development of both oral, immersion and injectable vaccine strategies over time. Applying mineral oil adjuvants, injectable vaccines inducing high levels of protection in salmon (Salmo salar) rose to prominence in the 1990’s. In general injectable......, adjuvanted vaccines have been shown to induce long-lasting increases in specific antibody levels. In general the majority of the published work concerning vaccination against A. salmonicida has been conducted on salmon. Using injectable oil-adjuvanted vaccines, we have previously shown that the induced level...

  4. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Pickar; Pei Xu; Andrew Elson; James Zengel; Christian Sauder; Steve Rubin; Biao He

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN...

  5. Montanide ISA™ 201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces improved immune responses and protection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Pervaiz; Kalaivanan, Ramya; Sied, Nuru; Mamo, Bedaso; Kishore, Subodh; Suryanarayana, V V S; Kondabattula, Ganesh

    2013-07-18

    Despite significant advancements in modern vaccinology, inactivated whole virus vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remain the mainstay for prophylactic and emergency uses. Many efforts are currently devoted to improve the immune responses and protective efficacy of these vaccines. Adjuvants, which are often used to potentiate immune responses, provide an excellent mean to improve the efficacy of FMD vaccines. This study aimed to evaluate three oil adjuvants namely: Montanide ISA-201, ISA-206 (SEPPIC, France) and GAHOL (an in-house developed oil-adjuvant) for adjuvant potential in inactivated FMD vaccine. Groups of cattle (n=6) were immunized once intramuscularly with monovalent FMDV 'O' vaccine formulated in these adjuvants, and humoral (serum neutralizing antibody, IgG1 and IgG2) and cellular (lymphoproliferation) responses were measured. Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted vaccine induced earlier and higher neutralizing antibody responses as compared to the two other adjuvants. All the adjuvants induced mainly serum IgG1 isotype antibody responses against FMDV. However, Montanide ISA-201 induced relatively higher IgG2 responses than the other two adjuvants. Lymphoproliferative responses to recall FMDV antigen were relatively higher with Montanide ISA-201, although not always statistically significant. On homologous FMDV challenge at 30 days post-vaccination, 100% (6/6) of the cattle immunized with Montanide-201 adjuvanted vaccine were protected, which was superior to those immunized with ISA-206 (66.6%, 4/6) or GAHOL adjuvanted vaccine (50%, 3/6). Virus replication following challenge infection, as determined by presence of the viral genome in oropharynx and non-structural protein serology, was lowest with Montanide ISA-201 adjuvant. Collectively, these results indicate that the Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces enhanced immune responses and protective efficacy in cattle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Immune Response in Measles: Virus Control, Clearance and Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E

    2016-10-12

    Measles is an acute systemic viral infection with immune system interactions that play essential roles in multiple stages of infection and disease. Measles virus (MeV) infection does not induce type 1 interferons, but leads to production of cytokines and chemokines associated with nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasome. This restricted response allows extensive virus replication and spread during a clinically silent latent period of 10-14 days. The first appearance of the disease is a 2-3 day prodrome of fever, runny nose, cough, and conjunctivitis that is followed by a characteristic maculopapular rash that spreads from the face and trunk to the extremities. The rash is a manifestation of the MeV-specific type 1 CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell adaptive immune response with lymphocyte infiltration into tissue sites of MeV replication and coincides with clearance of infectious virus. However, clearance of viral RNA from blood and tissues occurs over weeks to months after resolution of the rash and is associated with a period of immunosuppression. However, during viral RNA clearance, MeV-specific antibody also matures in type and avidity and T cell functions evolve from type 1 to type 2 and 17 responses that promote B cell development. Recovery is associated with sustained levels of neutralizing antibody and life-long protective immunity.

  7. Contribution of epithelial innate immunity to systemic protection afforded by prolyl hydroxylase inhibition in murine colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keely, Simon; Campbell, Eric L.; Baird, Alan W.; Hansbro, Philip M.; Shalwitz, Robert A.; Kotsakis, Anna; McNamee, Eoin N.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Kominsky, Douglas J.; Colgan, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) through prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibition limits mucosal damage associated with models of murine colitis. However, little is known about how PHD inhibitors (PHDi) influence systemic immune function during mucosal inflammation or the relative importance of immunological changes to mucosal protection. We hypothesized that PHDi enhances systemic innate immune responses to colitis-associated bacteremia. Mice with colitis induced by TNBS were treated with AKB-4924, a new HIF-1 isoform-predominant PHDi and clinical, immunological and biochemical endpoints were assessed. Administration of AKB-4924 led to significantly reduced weight loss and disease activity compared to vehicle controls. Treated groups were pyrexic, but did not become subsequently hypothermic. PHDi treatment augmented epithelial barrier function and led to an approximately 50-fold reduction in serum endotoxin during colitis. AKB-4924 also decreased cytokines involved in pyrogenesis and hypothermia, significantly reducing serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, while increasing IL-10. Treatment offered no protection against colitis in epithelial-specific HIF-1α deficient mice, strongly implicating epithelial HIF-1α as the tissue target for AKB-4924-mediated protection. Taken together, these results indicate that inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase with AKB-4924 enhances innate immunity and identifies the epithelium is a central site of inflammatory protection afforded by PHDi in murine colitis. PMID:23695513

  8. Intramuscular immunization of mice with live influenza virus is more immunogenic and offers greater protection than immunization with inactivated virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichelberger Maryna C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus continues to cause significant hospitalization rates in infants and young children. A 2-dose regime of trivalent inactivated vaccine is required to generate protective levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HAI antibodies. A vaccine preparation with enhanced immunogenicity is therefore desirable. Methods Mice were inoculated intramuscularly (IM with live and inactivated preparations of A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2. Serum cytokine levels, hemagglutinin (HA-specific antibody responses and nucleoprotein (NP-specific CD8+ T cell responses were compared between vaccinated groups, as well as to responses measured after intranasal infection. The protective efficacy of each vaccine type was compared by measuring virus titers in the lungs and weight loss of mice challenged intranasally with a heterosubtypic virus, A/PR/8/34 (H1N1. Results Intramuscular administration of live virus resulted in greater amounts of IFN-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ, HA-specific antibodies, and virus-specific CD8+ T cells, than IM immunization with inactivated virus. These increases corresponded with the live virus vaccinated group having significantly less weight loss and less virus in the lungs on day 7 following challenge with a sublethal dose of a heterosubtypic virus. Conclusions Inflammatory cytokines, antibody titers to HA and CD8+ T cell responses were greater to live than inactivated virus delivered IM. These increased responses correlated with greater protection against heterosubtypic virus challenge, suggesting that intramuscular immunization with live influenza virus may be a practical means to increase vaccine immunogenicity and to broaden protection in pediatric populations.

  9. Heat killed multi-serotype Shigella immunogens induced humoral immunity and protection against heterologous challenge in rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Barman, Soumik; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Shinoda, Sumio; Chakrabarti, M K; Koley, Hemanta

    2015-11-01

    Recently we have shown the homologous protective efficacy of heat killed multi-serotype Shigella (HKMS) immunogens in a guinea pig colitis model. In our present study, we have advanced our research by immunizing rabbits with a reduced number of oral doses and evaluating the host's adaptive immune responses. The duration of immunogenicity and subsequently protective efficacy was determined against wild type heterologous Shigella strains in a rabbit luminal model. After three successive oral immunizations with HKMS immunogens, serum and lymphocyte supernatant antibody titer against the heterologous shigellae were reciprocally increased and remained at an elevated level up to 180 days. Serogroup and serotype specific O-antigen of lipopolysaccharide and immunogenic proteins of heterologous challenge strains were detected by immunoblot assay. Up-regulation of IL-12p35, IFN-γ and IL-10 mRNA expression was detected in immunized rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) after stimulation with HKMS in vitro. HKMS-specific plasma cell response was confirmed by production of a relatively higher level of HKMS-specific IgG in immunized PBMC supernatant compared to control group. Furthermore, the immunized groups of rabbits exhibited complete protection against wild type heterologous shigellae challenge. Thus HKMS immunogens induced humoral and Th1-mediated adaptive immunity and provided complete protection in a rabbit model. These immunogens could be a broad spectrum non-living vaccine candidate for human use in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Interleukin-21 receptor signalling is important for innate immune protection against HSV-2 infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sine K Kratholm

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL -21 is produced by Natural Killer T (NKT cells and CD4(+ T cells and is produced in response to virus infections, where IL-21 has been shown to be essential in adaptive immune responses. Cells from the innate immune system such as Natural Killer (NK cells and macrophages are also important in immune protection against virus. These cells express the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R and respond to IL-21 with increased cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Currently, however it is not known whether IL-21 plays a significant role in innate immune responses to virus infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 and IL-21R in the innate immune response to a virus infection. We used C57BL/6 wild type (WT and IL-21R knock out (KO mice in a murine vaginal Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection model to show that IL-21 - IL-21R signalling is indeed important in innate immune responses against HSV-2. We found that the IL-21R was expressed in the vaginal epithelium in uninfected (u.i WT mice, and expression increased early after HSV-2 infection. IL-21R KO mice exhibited increased vaginal viral titers on day 2 and 3 post infection (p.i. and subsequently developed significantly higher disease scores and a lower survival rate compared to WT mice. In addition, WT mice infected with HSV-2 receiving intra-vaginal pre-treatment with murine recombinant IL-21 (mIL-21 had decreased vaginal viral titers on day 2 p.i., significantly lower disease scores, and a higher survival rate compared to infected untreated WT controls. Collectively our data demonstrate the novel finding that the IL-21R plays a critical role in regulating innate immune responses against HSV-2 infection.

  11. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gu, Yuan; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis infection induces protective immunity against re-infection in animal models. Identification of the antigens eliciting acquired immunity during infection is important for vaccine development against Trichinella infection and immunodiagnosis. Methods and Findings The T. spiralis adult cDNA library was immunoscreened with sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 infective T. spiralis larvae. Total 43 positive clones encoding for 28 proteins were identified; one of the immunodominant proteins was 20 kDa Ts-ES-1 secreted by Trichinella stichocytes and existing in the excretory/secretory (ES) products of T. spiralis adult and muscle larval worms. Ts-ES-1 contains 172 amino acids with a typical signal peptide in the first 20 amino acids. The expression of Ts-ES-1 was detected in both the adult and muscle larval stages at the mRNA and protein expression levels. Mice immunized with recombinant Ts-ES-1 (rTs-ES-1) formulated with ISA50v2 adjuvant exhibited a significant worm reduction in both the adult worm (27%) and muscle larvae burden (42.1%) after a challenge with T. spiralis compared to the adjuvant control group (pTrichinella stichocytes during natural infection and enables to the induction of partial protective immunity in vaccinated mice against Trichinella infection. Therefore, rTs-ES-1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development against trichinellosis. PMID:26288365

  12. Co-expression of Interleukin-15 Enhances the Protective Immune Responses Induced by Immunization with a Murine Malaria MVA-Based Vaccine Encoding the Circumsporozoite Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Marcela; Liu, Xia; Derrick, Steven C; Yang, Amy; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Zheng, Hong; Thao Pham, Phuong; Sedegah, Martha; Belmonte, Arnel; Litilit, Dianne D; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kumar, Sanjai; Morris, Sheldon L; Perera, Liyanage P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global public health problem with an estimated 200 million cases detected in 2012. Although the most advanced candidate malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has shown promise in clinical trials, its modest efficacy and durability have created uncertainty about the impact of RTS,S immunization (when used alone) on global malaria transmission. Here we describe the development and characterization of a novel modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-based malaria vaccine which co-expresses the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and IL-15. Vaccination/challenge studies showed that C57BL/6 mice immunized with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine were protected significantly better against a P. yoelii 17XNL sporozoite challenge than either mice immunized with an MVA vaccine expressing only CSP or naïve controls. Importantly, the levels of total anti-CSP IgG were elevated about 100-fold for the MVA-CSP/IL15 immunized group compared to mice immunized with the MVA-CSP construct that does not express IL-15. Among the IgG subtypes, the IL-15 expressing MVA-CSP vaccine induced levels of IgG1 (8 fold) and IgG2b (80 fold) higher than the MVA-CSP construct. The significantly enhanced humoral responses and protection detected after immunization with the MVA-CSP/IL15 vaccine suggest that this IL-15 expressing MVA construct could be considered in the development of future malaria immunization strategies.

  13. No protection in chickens immunized by the oral or intra-muscular immunization route with Ascaridia galli soluble antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Janne Pleidrup; Norup, Liselotte R.; Dalgaard, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    In chickens, the nematode Ascaridia galli is found with prevalences of up to 100% causing economic losses to farmers. No avian nematode vaccines have yet been developed and detailed knowledge about the chicken immune response towards A. galli is therefore of great importance. The objective...... of this study was to evaluate the induction of protective immune responses to A. galli soluble antigen by different immunization routes. Chickens were immunized with a crude extract of A. galli via an oral or intra-muscular route using cholera toxin B subunit as adjuvant and subsequently challenged with A...

  14. Partially Protective Immunity Induced by a 20 kDa Protein Secreted by Trichinella spiralis Stichocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Bi

    Full Text Available Trichinella spiralis infection induces protective immunity against re-infection in animal models. Identification of the antigens eliciting acquired immunity during infection is important for vaccine development against Trichinella infection and immunodiagnosis.The T. spiralis adult cDNA library was immunoscreened with sera from pigs experimentally infected with 20,000 infective T. spiralis larvae. Total 43 positive clones encoding for 28 proteins were identified; one of the immunodominant proteins was 20 kDa Ts-ES-1 secreted by Trichinella stichocytes and existing in the excretory/secretory (ES products of T. spiralis adult and muscle larval worms. Ts-ES-1 contains 172 amino acids with a typical signal peptide in the first 20 amino acids. The expression of Ts-ES-1 was detected in both the adult and muscle larval stages at the mRNA and protein expression levels. Mice immunized with recombinant Ts-ES-1 (rTs-ES-1 formulated with ISA50v2 adjuvant exhibited a significant worm reduction in both the adult worm (27% and muscle larvae burden (42.1% after a challenge with T. spiralis compared to the adjuvant control group (p<0.01. The rTs-ES-1-induced protection was associated with a high level of specific anti-Ts-ES-1 IgG antibodies and a Th1/Th2 mixed immune response.The newly identified rTs-ES-1 is an immunodominant protein secreted by Trichinella stichocytes during natural infection and enables to the induction of partial protective immunity in vaccinated mice against Trichinella infection. Therefore, rTs-ES-1 is a potential candidate for vaccine development against trichinellosis.

  15. Protective Immunity and Defects in the Neonatal and Elderly Immune Response to Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Lori F.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Vanzant, Erin; Cuenca, Angela; Cuenca, Alex G.; Ungaro, Ricardo; Szpila, Ben E.; Larson, Shawn; Joseph, Anna; Moore, Frederick; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Baker, Henry V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Efron, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Populations encompassing extremes of age, including neonates and elderly, have greater mortality from sepsis. We propose that the increased mortality observed in the neonatal and elderly populations after sepsis is due to fundamental differences in host protective immunity, and are manifested at the level of the leukocyte transcriptome. Neonatal (5–7 days), young adult (6–12 weeks), or elderly (20–24 months) mice underwent a cecal slurry model of intra-abdominal sepsis. Both neonatal and elderly mice exhibited significantly greater mortality to sepsis (pNeonates in particular exhibited significant attenuation of their inflammatory response (pneonatal and elderly mice have profoundly different responses to sepsis that are manifested at the level of their circulating leukocyte transcriptome, although the net result of increased mortality, is similar. Considering these differences are fundamental aspects of the genomic response to sepsis, interventional therapies will require individualization based on the age of the population. PMID:24591376

  16. Cutting Edge: Innate Immune Augmenting Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Zika Virus Proteins Confers Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; de Queiroz, Nina M G P; Xia, Tianli; Ahn, Jeonghyun; Barber, Glen N

    2017-04-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has become a serious public health concern because of its link to brain damage in developing human fetuses. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) was shown to be a highly effective and safe vector for the delivery of foreign immunogens for vaccine purposes. In this study, we generated rVSVs (wild-type and attenuated VSV with mutated matrix protein [VSVm] versions) that express either the full length ZIKV envelope protein (ZENV) alone or include the ZENV precursor to the membrane protein upstream of the envelope protein, and our rVSV-ZIKV constructs showed efficient immunogenicity in murine models. We also demonstrated maternal protective immunity in challenged newborn mice born to female mice vaccinated with VSVm-ZENV containing the transmembrane domain. Our data indicate that rVSVm may be a suitable strategy for the design of effective vaccines against ZIKV. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  18. Transfer of maternal immunity to piglets is involved in early protection against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, K Tølbøll; Hagedorn-Olsen, T; Jungersen, G; Riber, U; Stryhn, H; Friis, N F; Lind, P; Kristensen, B

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae causes arthritis in pigs older than 12 weeks. The role of colostrum in protection of piglets against M. hyosynoviae infection is not clear. Our objective was therefore to investigate whether transfer of maternal immunity to piglets was involved in early protection against the infection. Experimental infections were carried out in three groups of weaners receiving different levels of M. hyosynoviae-specific colostrum components; Group NC derived from Mycoplasma free sows and possessed no specific immunity to M. hyosynoviae. Group CAb pigs, siblings of the NC group, received colostrum with M. hyosynoviae-specific antibodies immediately after birth. Group CCE pigs were born and raised by infected sows and presumably had the full set of colostrally transferred factors, including specific antibodies. When 4½ weeks old, all pigs were inoculated intranasally with M. hyosynoviae. The course of infection was measured through clinical observations of lameness, cultivation of M. hyosynoviae from tonsils, blood and synovial fluid and observation for gross pathological lesions in selected joints. Specific immune status in the pigs was evaluated through detection of antibodies by immunoblotting and measurement of M. hyosynoviae-specific T-cell proliferation. The latter analysis may possibly indicate that M. hyosynoviae infection induces a T-cell response. The CCE piglets were significantly protected against development of lameness and pathology, as well as infection with M. hyosynoviae in tonsils, blood and joints, when compared to the two other groups. Raising the CCE pigs in an infected environment until weaning, with carrier sows as mothers, apparently made them resistant to M. hyosynoviae-arthritis when challenge-infected at 4½ weeks of age. More pigs in group NC had M. hyosynoviae related pathological lesions than in group CAb, a difference that was significant for cubital joints when analysed on joint type level. This finding indicates a partially

  19. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Zengel, James; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steve; He, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR-/-) for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity.

  20. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pickar

    Full Text Available Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR-/- for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity.

  1. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Zengel, James; Sauder, Christian; Rubin, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR−/−) for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity. PMID:28362871

  2. Discovering naturally processed antigenic determinants that confer protective T cell immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Spencer, Charles T; Conant, Stephanie B

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (TCD8) confer protective immunity against many infectious diseases, suggesting that microbial TCD8 determinants are promising vaccine targets. Nevertheless, current T cell antigen identification approaches do not discern which epitopes drive protective immunity during active infectio...

  3. "The Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" - Meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, Cesar; Eichelberg, Katrin; Ramachandra, Lakshmi; Shea, Jaqueline; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Behar, Samuel; Ernst, Joel D; Porcelli, Steven A; Maeurer, Markus; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2017-06-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the major cause of death from infectious diseases around the world, particularly in HIV infected individuals. TB vaccine design and development have been focused on improving Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and evaluating recombinant and viral vector expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins, for boosting BCG-primed immunity, but these approaches have not yet yielded significant improvements over the modest effects of BCG in protecting against infection or disease. On March 7-8, 2016, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) convened a workshop on "The Impact of Mtb Immune Evasion on Protective Immunity: Implications for TB Vaccine Design" with the goal of defining immune mechanisms that could be targeted through novel research approaches, to inform vaccine design and immune therapeutic interventions for prevention of TB. The workshop addressed early infection events, the impact of Mtb evolution on the development and maintenance of an adaptive immune response, and the factors that influence protection against and progression to active disease. Scientific gaps and areas of study to revitalize and accelerate TB vaccine design were discussed and prioritized. These included a comprehensive evaluation of innate and Mtb-specific adaptive immune responses in the lung at different stages of disease; determining the role of B cells and antibodies (Abs) during Mtb infection; development of better assays to measure Mtb burden following exposure, infection, during latency and after treatment, and approaches to improving current animal models to study Mtb immunogenicity, TB disease and transmission. Copyright © 2017.

  4. Protective immunity to a blood-feeding nematode (Haemonchus contortus) induced by parasite gut antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmer, D P; McGuire, T C

    1991-01-01

    To determine the ability of gut antigens to induce a protective immune response against blood-feeding nematodes, isolated gut antigens were used to immunize goats against Haemonchus contortus. Immunization-induced antibody responses recognized parasite gut antigens which were associated predominantly with the microvillous membrane region of the parasite gut. Antibody from immune serum also recognized seven predominant gut proteins on a Western blot (immunoblot). Several of these proteins appe...

  5. Protection and humoral immune responses against Bordetella pertussis infection in mice immunized with acellular or cellular pertussis immunogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, B M; David, S; Beekhuizen, H; Mooi, F R; van Furth, R

    2000-12-08

    In the present study, protection against Bordetella pertussis infection and humoral immunological responses in mice has been assessed upon immunization with custom-made acellular pertussis vaccines (ACVs) and whole-cell pertussis vaccine (WCV). Mice were immunized, next intranasally infected with B. pertussis and during 14 days the number of bacteria in the trachea and lungs and the level of serum antibodies were determined. ACV contained five immunogens, filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, fimbriae serotypes 2 and 3, and chemically detoxified pertussis toxin (PMC-5), or three immunogens, filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and genetically detoxified (BC-3) or chemically detoxified pertussis toxin (SKB-3). Immunization with a high or low dose of ACV or WCV resulted in significant protection against B. pertussis, with differences in the degree of protection between the vaccines. The lowest protection was found with a low dose of SKB-3 and WCV. The pattern of cytokine production by spleen cells of immunized, non-infected, mice indicated that T-helper 1 cells are activated by vaccination with WCV, and T-helper 1 and T-helper 2 cells are involved in the immune response upon vaccination with ACVs. Each vaccine stimulated the production of IgG, but not IgA, antibodies. In mice immunized with ACV, elimination of B. pertussis from trachea and lungs correlated significantly with the titre of IgG1, but not IgG2a, antibodies.

  6. Effects of immunosuppression on avian coccidiosis: cyclosporin A but not hormonal bursectomy abrogates host protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillehoj, H S

    1987-01-01

    The effects of cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment and hormonal bursectomy on Eimeria tenella infection of chickens were investigated to evaluate the role of humoral antibody and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the host protective immunity to an intestinal protozoan disease, coccidiosis. Hormonal bursectomy had no significant effect on the host response to E. tenella. CsA treatment had a differential effect on the course of disease depending on how CsA was given relative to infection. Daily administration of CsA for 7 days beginning 1 day before primary infection with E. tenella enhanced disease resistance, whereas a single dose of CsA given before primary infection enhanced disease susceptibility compared with that of untreated controls. Chickens treated with CsA during the primary infection were resistant to reinfection at 5 weeks post-primary infection. Treatment of chickens immune to E. tenella with CsA at the time of secondary infection abrogated their resistance to reinfection despite the presence of high levels of coccidia-specific secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G. Splenic lymphocytes obtained after CsA treatment demonstrated a substantially depressed concanavalin A response, but not a depressed lipopolysaccharide response. Because CsA was not directly toxic to parasites in vivo when administered during the secondary infection, these results suggest that CsA interacts with the immune system to allow priming during the primary infection, while interfering with the effector function of CMI during the secondary infection. Taken together, present findings indicate that CMI plays a major role in host protective immunity to E. tenella. PMID:3496277

  7. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  8. Immune complex-based vaccine for pig protection against parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roić, B; Cajavec, S; Ergotić, N; Lipej, Z; Madić, J; Lojkić, M; Pokrić, B

    2006-02-01

    The insoluble immune complexes (ICs) were prepared under the conditions of double immunodiffusion in gel, using the suspension of the ultrasound treated PK-15 cell-line infected with porcine parvovirus (PPV) containing both viral particles and viral proteins, as well as pig or rabbit anti-PPV polyclonal immune sera. The immunodiffusion performed in an agarose gel allows only viral subunits with a molecular mass equal to or less than 1000 kDa, rather than the viral particles, to diffuse through the gel and reach the point where the immunoprecipitate is to be formed. The immunoprecipitation under the conditions of the diffusion ensures the optimal, i.e. equimolar ratio of both immunoprecipitating components, antibody/antigen in the IC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the Western blot analyses showed the ICs were composed of two proteins, a protein in which molecular mass corresponded to the VP2 of the PPV and a protein with a molecular mass of the IgG. This suggests that the ICs are mainly composed of the VP2 antigen and IgG class antibodies. The potency of the IC-vaccines prepared in the form of a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion was compared with that of a commercially available, inactivated oil vaccine. The vaccination of gilts, 6 weeks before mating, with the IC containing allogeneic pig antibodies, resulted in the development of high and long-lasting anti-PPV antibody titres, similar to those generated by the licenced vaccine (P > 0.01). The content of the virus material administered by the IC was twice lower than that in the licenced vaccine. Neither systemic nor local reactions were observed in the gilts during the period of the trial with the IC vaccine. The number of viable piglets per litter varied between 9 and 12 and no signs of the PPV infection were detected. Rabbits were used as one of the alternative laboratory animal models accepted for the testing of the vaccine against the PPV. The rabbit humoral immune response

  9. Immunogenic characterization and protection against Streptococcus mutans infection induced by intranasal DNA prime-protein boost immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Hong; Huang, ShengFu; Du, MinQuan; Bian, Zhuan; Chen, Zhi; Fan, Ming Wen

    2010-07-19

    Mucosal immune responses act as the first line of defense against dental caries. In this study, an optimal vaccination strategy was developed to enhance anti-caries mucosal immune responses. Mice and rats were vaccinated intranasally firstly with plasmid pCIA-P encoding PAc antigen of Streptococcus mutans and then with rPAc, or with pCIA-P for twice, or with rPAc protein for twice, respectively. The potential of inducing mucosal and systemic immune responses to special antigens was measured by ELISA. In addition, antibody type, cytokine production and protection effectiveness against dental caries were also evaluated. Although all immunized groups developed immune responses, the antibody responses in the DNA prime-protein boost group were stronger compared with those elicited by either the DNA vaccine or the protein vaccine. In particular, the Th1-biased response that was established by the DNA immunization was diverted to Th1/Th2-mixed response following the rPAc protein boost. Moreover, protection against S. mutans challenge was obtained in the rats treated with the DNA prime-protein boost regimen, as shown by a significant reduction in dental caries lesion, compared with the control groups immunized with the DNA or protein only. All these findings may provide useful information about effective mucosal vaccines against dental caries. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protective immune responses during prepatency in goat kids experimentally infected with Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, L; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Rodríguez, F; Perez, D; Lopez, A; Ferrer, O; Hermosilla, C; Taubert, A; Ruiz, A

    2017-08-15

    group compared to the challenged control animals. Furthermore, in the challenged E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected animals a significantly higher number of mucosal CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes were observed, indicating that these T cell subpopulations might be involved in protective host immune response elicited against early stages of parasite development. The immune response was however very complex, as antigen presenting cells and other effector cell populations of the innate immune system, as well as certain cytokines, were involved. In summary, the results of this study contribute to the better understanding of local cellular and humoral immune responses against caprine E. ninakohlyakimovae, particularly during the prepatency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune protection of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) exposed to different infectious doses of ectoparasite (Cryptocaryon irritans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misumi, Ichiro; Leong, Jo-Ann C; Takemura, Akihiro; Lewis, Teresa D

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to standardize a reproducible infection procedure with Cryptocaryon irritans and to examine the effects of infectious dose level on the immune protection in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). This study demonstrated that direct enumeration of trophonts on the pectoral fin was useful to quantitatively assess immune protection against C. irritans. The number of trophonts on a pectoral fin was positively correlated with infectious dose of live theronts. Fish immunized by direct exposure under controlled laboratory conditions allowed for in depth examination of the effects of the degree of infectious dose on immune response. There was no significant positive correlation between the initial infectious dose and degree of immune responses. Mozambique tilapia initiated a strong immune protection by direct exposure with even a small number of parasites (e.g. 300 theronts per fish). Moreover, as the result of the protein analysis, we identified 28 kD proteins that could be responsible for the immobilizing antigen.

  12. Gentamicin-attenuated Leishmania infantum: cellular immunity production and protection of dogs against experimental canine leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, H; Molaei, M M; Kamiabi, H; Burchmore, R; Hagan, P; Stephen Phillips, R

    2010-01-01

    An attenuated line of Leishmania infantum (L. infantum H-line) has been established by culturing promastigotes in vitro under gentamicin pressure. Here, we show that L. infantum H-line induced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ and lower levels of IL-10 compared with those in dogs infected with L. infantum wild type (WT). Anti-Leishmania-specific total IgG, IgG1, and IgG2 antibodies were present in the serum of all infected dogs, with levels of IgG2 subclass highest in the sera of dogs inoculated with L. infantum H-line. Relatively high levels of IgG1 were found in the sera of dogs infected with L. infantum WT. Six of seven dogs immunized intradermally (i.d.) with the attenuated line later showed a positive skin test to leishmanin, whereas the dogs infected with L. infantum WT did not. No clinical abnormalities were observed, and no parasites found in the visceral organs of the dogs inoculated intravenously (i.v.) with L. infantum H-line over 24 months post-inoculation. Dogs which had been immunized with L. infantum H-line i.d. 12 months previously were protected against challenge with L. infantum WT. These data suggest that the L. infantum H-line was safe and induced a protection which is correlated with cellular immunity in dogs. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The immune response against Chlamydia suis genital tract infection partially protects against re-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Evelien; Devriendt, Bert; Yin, Lizi; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2014-09-25

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the characteristic features of genital Chlamydia suis infection and re-infection in female pigs by studying the immune response, pathological changes, replication of chlamydial bacteria in the genital tract and excretion of viable bacteria. Pigs were intravaginally infected and re-infected with C. suis strain S45, the type strain of this species. We demonstrated that S45 is pathogenic for the female urogenital tract. Chlamydia replication occurred throughout the urogenital tract, causing inflammation and pathology. Furthermore, genital infection elicited both cellular and humoral immune responses. Compared to the primo-infection of pigs with C. suis, re-infection was characterized by less severe macroscopic lesions and less chlamydial elementary bodies and inclusions in the urogenital tract. This indicates the development of a certain level of protection following the initial infection. Protective immunity against re-infection coincided with higher Chlamydia-specific IgG and IgA antibody titers in sera and vaginal secretions, higher proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), higher percentages of blood B lymphocytes, monocytes and CD8⁺ T cells and upregulated production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by PBMC.

  14. Staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide protects against Caenorhabditis elegans immune defenses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Begun

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections that have become increasingly difficult to treat due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in these organisms. The ability of staphylococci to produce biofilm is an important virulence mechanism that allows bacteria both to adhere to living and artificial surfaces and to resist host immune factors and antibiotics. Here, we show that the icaADBC locus, which synthesizes the biofilm-associated polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA in staphylococci, is required for the formation of a lethal S. epidermidis infection in the intestine of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Susceptibility to S. epidermidis infection is influenced by mutation of the C. elegans PMK-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase or DAF-2 insulin-signaling pathways. Loss of PIA production abrogates nematocidal activity and leads to reduced bacterial accumulation in the C. elegans intestine, while overexpression of the icaADBC locus in S. aureus augments virulence towards nematodes. PIA-producing S. epidermidis has a significant survival advantage over ica-deficient S. epidermidis within the intestinal tract of wild-type C. elegans, but not in immunocompromised nematodes harboring a loss-of-function mutation in the p38 MAP kinase pathway gene sek-1. Moreover, sek-1 and pmk-1 mutants are equally sensitive to wild-type and icaADBC-deficient S. epidermidis. These results suggest that biofilm exopolysaccharide enhances virulence by playing an immunoprotective role during colonization of the C. elegans intestine. These studies demonstrate that C. elegans can serve as a simple animal model for studying host-pathogen interactions involving staphylococcal biofilm exopolysaccharide and suggest that the protective activity of biofilm matrix represents an ancient conserved function for resisting predation.

  15. Reprogramming Intestinal Immunity by Novel L. Acidophilus Strains Results in Protective Immunity against Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Analyses of the microbiota of wt mice treated with NCK2187 or its SlpA compared to NCK56 clearly illustrated a significant rebalance of the composition of...beneficial microbiota . A prominent member of microbiota is Lactobacillus acidophilus, displaying a unique surface layer protein (Slp) complex, including...protected (Fig. 3A-B), and the composition of microbial symbiosis was maintained (Fig. 3C-D) in NCK2187- or SlpA-treated Rag1-/- mice. In contrast

  16. Host immunity in the protective response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paessler Slobodan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed initial cell, cytokine and complement depletion studies to investigate the possible role of these effectors in response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei in a susceptible BALB/c mouse model of infection. Results While protection with heat-killed bacilli did not result in sterilizing immunity, limited protection was afforded against an otherwise lethal infection and provided insight into potential host protective mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that mice depleted of either B cells, TNF-α or IFN-γ exhibited decreased survival rates, indicating a role for these effectors in obtaining partial protection from a lethal challenge by the intraperitoneal route. Additionally, complement depletion had no effect on immunoglobulin production when compared to non-complement depleted controls infected intranasally. Conclusion The data provide a basis for future studies of protection via vaccination using either subunit or whole-organism vaccine preparations from lethal infection in the experimental BALB/c mouse model. The results of this study demonstrate participation of B220+ cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α in protection following HK vaccination.

  17. Gamma irradiated antigen extracts improves the immune response and protection in experimental toxoplasmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Andrea da; Galisteo Junior, Andres Jimenez; Andrade Junior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: andreacosta@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Medicina Tropical; Zorgi, Nahiara Estevez [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to use ionizing radiation on soluble extracts of T. gondii tachyzoites (AgTg) and tested the ability of these extracts to induce immunity in BALB/c mice against a challenge. T. gondii RH strain AgTg was irradiated with Co-60 at 0.25 to 4 kGy and were affected after 1 kGy, as evidenced by a progressive high molecular weight protein aggregates and no loss in antigenicity, as detected by immunoblotting, except after 4kGy. BALB/c mice were immunized with biweekly doses of 03 s.c. native or irradiated AgTg without adjuvants; the anti-T.gondii IgG production was detected by ELISA, and higher levels and avidity were detected in mice immunized with 1.5 kGy AgTg compared to controls (p<0.05). Mice immunized with native AgTg exhibited spleen CD19{sup +} B, CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation levels of 5%, while 1.5 kGy-immunized mice exhibited spleen cell proliferation levels of 12.2%, primarily for CD19{sup +} or CD3{sup +}CD8{sup +} lymphocytes and less evidently for CD3{sup +}CD4{sup +} (8.8%) helper T lymphocytes. All cells from control mice showed little to no proliferation when stimulated with AgTg. These cells secreted more IFN-γ in the 1.5 kGy AgTg-immunized group (p<0.05). BALB/c mice immunized with 1.5 kGy and challenged with different strains of T. gondii were partially protected, as evidenced by survival after RH virulent strain challenge (p<0.0001) but also after ME-49 strain challenge: the brain cyst numbers (p<0.05) and the levels of T. gondii DNA measured by real-time PCR (p<0.05) decreased compared to non-immunized controls. (author)

  18. Sublingual immunization with adenovirus F protein-based vaccines stimulates protective immunity against botulinum neurotoxin A intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, SangMu; Clapp, Beata; Zlotkowska, Dagmara; Hoyt, Teri; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Sublingual (s.l.) vaccination is an efficient way to induce elevated levels of systemic and mucosal immune responses. To mediate mucosal uptake, ovalbumin (OVA) was genetically fused to adenovirus 2 fiber protein (OVA-Ad2F) to assess whether s.l. immunization was as effective as an alternative route of vaccination. Ad2F-delivered vaccines were efficiently taken up by dendritic cells and migrated mostly to submaxillary gland lymph nodes, which could readily stimulate OVA-specific CD4+ T cells. OVA-Ad2F + cholera toxin (CT)-immunized mice elicited significantly higher OVA-specific serum IgG, IgA and mucosal IgA antibodies among the tested immunization groups. These were supported by elevated OVA-specific IgG and IgA antibody-forming cells. A mixed Th-cell response was induced as evident by the enhanced IL-4, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α-specific cytokine-forming cells. To assess whether this approach can stimulate neutralizing antibodies, immunizations were performed with the protein encumbering the β-trefoil domain of C-terminus heavy chain (Hcβtre) from botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) as well as when fused to Ad2F. Hcβtre-Ad2F + CT-dosed mice showed the greatest serum IgG, IgA and mucosal IgA titers among the immunization groups. Hcβtre-Ad2F alone also induced elevated antibody production in contrast to Hcβtre alone. Plasma from Hcβtre + CT- and Hcβtre-Ad2F + CT-immunized groups neutralized BoNT/A and protected mice from BoNT/A intoxication. Most importantly, Hcβtre-Ad2F + CT-immunized mice were protected from BoNT/A intoxication relative to Hcβtre + CT-immunized mice, which only showed ∼60% protection. This study shows that s.l. immunization with Ad2F-based vaccines is effective in conferring protective immunity. PMID:22207133

  19. Active protection of mice against Salmonella typhi by immunization with strain-specific porins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isibasi, A; Ortiz-Navarrete, V; Paniagua, J; Pelayo, R; González, C R; García, J A; Kumate, J

    1992-01-01

    NIH mice were immunized with between 2.5 and 30 micrograms of two highly purified porins, 34 kDa and 36 kDa, isolated from the virulent strain Salmonella typhi 9,12, Vi:d. Of mice immunized with 10 micrograms of porins, 90% were protected against a challenge with up to 500 LD50 (50% lethal doses) of S. typhi 9,12,Vi:d and only 30% protection was observed in mice immunized with the same dose of porins but challenged with the heterologous strain Salmonella typhimurium. These results demonstrate the utility of porins for the induction of a protective status against S. typhi in mice.

  20. TNF-dependent regulation and activation of innate immune cells are essential for host protection against cerebral tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Keeton, Roanne; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Govender, Dhirendra; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2015-06-26

    Tuberculosis (TB) affects one third of the global population, and TB of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is the most severe form of tuberculosis which often associates with high mortality. The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) plays a critical role in the initial and long-term host immune protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) which involves the activation of innate immune cells and structure maintenance of granulomas. However, the contribution of TNF, in particular neuron-derived TNF, in the control of cerebral M. tuberculosis infection and its protective immune responses in the CNS were not clear. We generated neuron-specific TNF-deficient (NsTNF(-/-)) mice and compared outcomes of disease against TNF(f/f) control and global TNF(-/-) mice. Mycobacterial burden in brains, lungs and spleens were compared, and cerebral pathology and cellular contributions analysed by microscopy and flow cytometry after M. tuberculosis infection. Activation of innate immune cells was measured by flow cytometry and cell function assessed by cytokine and chemokine quantification using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intracerebral M. tuberculosis infection of TNF(-/-) mice rendered animals highly susceptible, accompanied by uncontrolled bacilli replication and eventual mortality. In contrast, NsTNF(-/-) mice were resistant to infection and presented with a phenotype similar to that in TNF(f/f) control mice. Impaired immunity in TNF(-/-) mice was associated with altered cytokine and chemokine synthesis in the brain and characterised by a reduced number of activated innate immune cells. Brain pathology reflected enhanced inflammation dominated by neutrophil influx. Our data show that neuron-derived TNF has a limited role in immune responses, but overall TNF production is necessary for protective immunity against CNS-TB.

  1. Leishmania infantum FML pulsed-dendritic cells induce a protective immune response in murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi-Parvar, Faeze; Hatam, Gholam-Reza; Sarkari, Bahador; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of FML loaded dendritic cells (DCs) in protection against visceral leishmaniasis. Mice were immunized with FML- or soluble Leishmania antigen-loaded DCs as well as FML or soluble Leishmania antigen in saponin and challenged with parasite. The levels of cytokines before and after challenge were detected by ELISA. Parasite burden (total Leishman-Donovan unit) was determined after parasite challenge. FML-saponin induced the highest IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio among vaccinated groups, though this ratio was higher in FML-loaded DCs group subsequent to challenge with Leishmania infantum. Moreover, the greatest reduction in parasite number was detected in mice vaccinated with FML-loaded DCs compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice (p = 0.002). FML-loaded DCs are one of the promising tools for protection against murine visceral leishmaniasis.

  2. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol Dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis.

  3. Clinical disease, immunity and protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in populations living in endemic areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L

    1998-01-01

    reviews of malarial immunity exist; rather than attempting to add another, this review summarises some of the recent evidence on how protective immunity is acquired in humans and what precipitates clinical disease, specifically as it relates to populations living in areas where the disease is endemic...... and mortality in an endemic setting (malaria is regularly found) is concentrated in children below the age of five years, and the increasing resistance to infection and disease with age is conventionally thought to reflect a slow and gradual acquisition of protective immunity. Many recent and comprehensive....... It is becoming increasingly clear that naturally acquired protective immunity depends largely on responses directed against highly variable parasite antigens. This implies that a successful blood-stage vaccine against this disease must be able to either induce protective responses against many of these variants...

  4. Humoral immunity through immunoglobulin M protects mice from an experimental actinomycetoma infection by Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2004-10-01

    An experimental model of infection with Nocardia brasiliensis, used as an example of a facultative intracellular pathogen, was tested. N. brasiliensis was injected into the rear foot pads of BALB/c mice to establish an infection. Within 30 days, infected animals developed a chronic actinomycetoma infection. Batch cultures of N. brasiliensis were used to purify P61, P38, and P24 antigens; P61 is a catalase, and P38 is a protease with strong caseinolytic activity. Active and passive immunizations of BALB/c mice with these three purified soluble antigens were studied. Protection was demonstrated for actively immunized mice. However, immunity lasted only 30 days. Other groups of immunized mice were bled at different times, and their sera were passively transferred to naive recipients that were then infected with N. brasiliensis. Sera collected 5, 6, and 7 days after donor immunization conferred complete, long-lasting protection. The protective effect of passive immunity decreased when sera were collected 2 weeks after donor immunization. However, neither the early sera (1-, 2-, and 3-day sera) nor the later sera (30- or 45-day sera) prevented the infection. Hyperimmune sera with the highest levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to N. brasiliensis antigens did not protect at all. The antigens tested induced two IgM peaks. The first peak was present 3 days after immunization but was not antigen specific and did not transfer protection. The second peak was evident 7 days after immunization, was an IgM response, was antigen specific, and conferred protection. This results clearly demonstrate that IgM antibodies protect the host against a facultative intracellular bacterium.

  5. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael; Brühl, Peter; Kreil, Thomas R; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Barrett, P Noel

    2010-02-23

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  6. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otfried Kistner

    Full Text Available The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  7. Lymphatic System: An Active Pathway for Immune Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shan; von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels are well known to participate in the immune response by providing the structural and functional support for the delivery of antigens and antigen presenting cells to draining lymph nodes. Recent advances have improved our understanding of how the lymphatic system works and how it participates to the development of immune responses. New findings suggest that the lymphatic system may control the ultimate immune response through a number of ways which include guiding antigen/dendritic cells (DC) entry into initial lymphatics at the periphery; promoting antigen/DC trafficking through afferent lymphatic vessels by actively facilitating lymph and cell movement; enabling antigen presentation in lymph nodes via a network of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymph node stroma cell and finally by direct lymphocytes exit from lymph nodes. The same mechanisms are likely also important to maintain peripheral tolerance. In this review we will discuss how the morphology and gene expression profile of the lymphatic endothelial cells in lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes provides a highly efficient pathway to initiate immune responses. The fundamental understanding of how lymphatic system participates in immune regulation will guide the research on lymphatic function in various diseases. PMID:25534659

  8. Protection against HIV-disease progression: From immune activation to T-cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.B.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection undermines the immune system by causing a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells. Eventually, the weakened immune system is no longer able to offer resistance to opportunistic infections and the HIV-infected individual will develop AIDS. Even after 30 years of intensive research on HIV, there is

  9. A role for immune responses against non-CS components in the cross-species protection induced by immunization with irradiated malaria sporozoites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Mauduit

    Full Text Available Immunization with irradiated Plasmodium sporozoites induces sterile immunity in rodents, monkeys and humans. The major surface component of the sporozoite the circumsporozoite protein (CS long considered as the antigen predominantly responsible for this immunity, thus remains the leading candidate antigen for vaccines targeting the parasite's pre-erythrocytic (PE stages. However, this role for CS was questioned when we recently showed that immunization with irradiated sporozoites (IrrSpz of a P. berghei line whose endogenous CS was replaced by that of P. falciparum still conferred sterile protection against challenge with wild type P. berghei sporozoites. In order to investigate the involvement of CS in the cross-species protection recently observed between the two rodent parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii, we adopted our gene replacement approach for the P. yoelii CS and exploited the ability to conduct reciprocal challenges. Overall, we found that immunization led to sterile immunity irrespective of the origin of the CS in the immunizing or challenge sporozoites. However, for some combinations, immune responses to CS contributed to the acquisition of protective immunity and were dependent on the immunizing IrrSpz dose. Nonetheless, when data from all the cross-species immunization/challenges were considered, the immune responses directed against non-CS parasite antigens shared by the two parasite species played a major role in the sterile protection induced by immunization with IrrSpz. This opens the perspective to develop a single vaccine formulation that could protect against multiple parasite species.

  10. Protective properties of vaccinia virus-based vaccines: skin scarification promotes a nonspecific immune response that protects against orthopoxvirus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amanda D; Adams, Mathew M; Lindsey, Scott F; Swetnam, Daniele M; Manning, Brandi R; Smith, Andrew J; Burrage, Andrew M; Wallace, Greg; MacNeill, Amy L; Moyer, Richard W

    2014-07-01

    The process of vaccination introduced by Jenner generated immunity against smallpox and ultimately led to the eradication of the disease. Procedurally, in modern times, the virus is introduced into patients via a process called scarification, performed with a bifurcated needle containing a small amount of virus. What was unappreciated was the role that scarification itself plays in generating protective immunity. In rabbits, protection from lethal disease is induced by intradermal injection of vaccinia virus, whereas a protective response occurs within the first 2 min after scarification with or without virus, suggesting that the scarification process itself is a major contributor to immunoprotection. importance: These results show the importance of local nonspecific immunity in controlling poxvirus infections and indicate that the process of scarification should be critically considered during the development of vaccination protocols for other infectious agents. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Remote glucosyltransferase-microparticle vaccine delivery induces protective immunity in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D J; Lam, A; Barnes, L A; King, W F; Peacock, Z; Wise, D L; Trantolo, D J; Taubman, M A

    2003-08-01

    Intranasally administered dental caries vaccines show significant promise for human application. Alternate mucosal routes may be required, however, to induce caries-protective salivary IgA antibody in children with respiratory diseases. Since rectal mucosa contains inductive lymphoid tissue, we hypothesized that the rectal route could be used to induce salivary immunity to mutans streptococcal glucosyltransferase (GTF), resulting in protective immunity to experimental dental caries. We first explored the ability of glucosyltransferase, incorporated into polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles (MP), and administered rectally together with mucosal adjuvant, to induce a salivary IgA antibody response. Groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (6/group) were immunized rectally on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 with a) GTF-MP alone, b) GTF-MP with cholera toxin, c) GTF-MP with detoxified mutant Escherichia coli toxin (dLT), or d) sham immunized with PLGA and cholera toxin. An additional group was immunized intranasally with GTF-MP alone. Saliva and nasal washes of all intranasally immunized rats contained IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase on day 28. Salivary IgA antibody was also detected in 7/12 rats rectally immunized with GTF-MP and cholera toxin or dLT, although responses were lower than those obtained by intranasal immunization. Most fecal extracts from rectally delivered GTF-MP plus cholera toxin or dLT rats contained IgA antibody to GTF-MP. Low levels of fecal IgA antibody were detected in 3/6 intranasally immunized rats and 2/6 rats rectally immunized with GTF-MP alone. We then examined the extent to which salivary IgA antibody induced by the rectal route could be protective. At 25, 31 and 38 days of age, two groups of female Sprague-Dawley rats (13/group) were rectally immunized with GTF-MP and cholera toxin or with empty microparticles and cholera toxin (sham group). A third group was intranasally immunized with GTF-MP alone. After demonstrating salivary IgA responses to

  12. A prime-boost immunization regimen based on a simian adenovirus 36 vectored multi-stage malaria vaccine induces protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jairo A; McCaffery, Jessica N; Kashentseva, Elena; Singh, Balwan; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Moreno, Alberto

    2017-05-31

    Malaria remains a considerable burden on public health. In 2015, the WHO estimates there were 212 million malaria cases causing nearly 429,000 deaths globally. A highly effective malaria vaccine is needed to reduce the burden of this disease. We have developed an experimental vaccine candidate (PyCMP) based on pre-erythrocytic (CSP) and erythrocytic (MSP1) stage antigens derived from the rodent malaria parasite P. yoelii. Our protein-based vaccine construct induces protective antibodies and CD4 + T cell responses. Based on evidence that viral vectors increase CD8 + T cell-mediated immunity, we also have tested heterologous prime-boost immunization regimens that included human adenovirus serotype 5 vector (Ad5), obtaining protective CD8 + T cell responses. While Ad5 is commonly used for vaccine studies, the high prevalence of pre-existing immunity to Ad5 severely compromises its utility. Here, we report the use of the novel simian adenovirus 36 (SAd36) as a candidate for a vectored malaria vaccine since this virus is not known to infect humans, and it is not neutralized by anti-Ad5 antibodies. Our study shows that the recombinant SAd36PyCMP can enhance specific CD8 + T cell response and elicit similar antibody titers when compared to an immunization regimen including the recombinant Ad5PyCMP. The robust immune responses induced by SAd36PyCMP are translated into a lower parasite load following P. yoelii infectious challenge when compared to mice immunized with Ad5PyCMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of polyether ionophores on the protective immune responses of broiler chickens against Angara disease and Newcastle disease viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, K; Muneer, M A; Tiwari, A; Chaudhry, R M; Muruganandan, S

    2007-10-01

    Immunization against Angara disease virus (ADV), a serotype 4 avian adenovirus, and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus serotype 1, is the mainstay of a broiler vaccination programme, while polyether ionophores usually form an essential component of a broiler medication programme in most parts of India and Pakistan. The role of polyether ionophores in the protective immune responses of broiler chickens vaccinated and challenged with ADV and NDV was investigated. A total of 1600 birds were divided into eight groups of 200 birds each. First four groups were vaccinated against NDV and ADV, while the remaining four served as unvaccinated controls. The first 3 groups of birds were administered salinomycin, monensin and cyclophosphamide (CYP), respectively. The last group served as an untreated control. The same treatment schedule was also followed for the next four unvaccinated groups. The post-vaccination and post-challenge serological responses to NDV and ADV, body and lymphoid organ weight gains, post-challenge survival rate and detection of NDV and ADV in the tissues of infected birds were evaluated. Birds administered salinomycin showed a significant stimulation of protective immune responses against both NDV and ADV as compared to the untreated and CYP-treated birds. Monensin also enhanced the protective immune responses against both viruses but the effect was not statistically significant. Thus, it is concluded that monensin and salinomycin augment the anti-NDV and anti-ADV immune responses in broiler chickens, which supports their use in poultry flocks.

  14. Protective immunity by oral immunization with heat-killed Shigella strains in a guinea pig colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Soumik; Koley, Hemanta; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chakrabarti, Manoj Kumar; Shinoda, Sumio; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2013-11-01

    The protective efficacy of and immune response to heat-killed cells of monovalent and hexavalent mixtures of six serogroups/serotypes of Shigella strains (Shigella dysenteriae 1, Shigella flexneri 2a, S. flexneri 3a, S. flexneri 6, Shigella boydii 4, and Shigella sonnei) were examined in a guinea pig colitis model. A monovalent or hexavalent mixture containing 1 × 10(7) of each serogroup/serotype of heat-killed Shigella cells was administered orally on Days 0, 7, 14 and 21. On Day 28, the immunized animals were challenged rectally with 1 × 10(9) live virulent cells of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes. In all immunized groups, significant levels of protection were observed after these challenges. The serum titers of IgG and IgA against the lipopolysaccharide of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes increased exponential during the course of immunization. High IgA titers against the lipopolysaccharide of each of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes were also observed in intestinal lavage fluid from all immunized animals. These data indicate that a hexavalent mixture of heat-killed cells of the six Shigella serogroups/serotypes studied would be a possible broad-spectrum candidate vaccine against shigellosis. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID: An Acute Response to Ocular Insult Protects from Future Immune-Mediated Damage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Cone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The “immune privilege” that inhibits immune defense mechanisms that could lead to damage to sensitive ocular tissue is based on the expression of immunosuppressive factors on ocular tissue and in ocular fluids. In addition to this environmental protection, the injection of antigen into the anterior chamber or infection in the anterior chamber induces a systemic suppression of potentially damaging cell-mediated and humoral responses to the antigen. Here we discuss evidence that suggests that Anterior Chamber-Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID a is initiated by an ocular response to moderate inflammation that leads to a systemic immunoregulatory response. Injection into the anterior chamber induces a rise in TNF-α and MCP-1 in aqueous humor and an infiltration of circulating F4/80 + monocytes that home to the iris. The induction of ACAID is dependent on this infiltration of circulating monocytes that eventually emigrate to the thymus and spleen where they induce regulatory T cells that inhibit the inductive or effector phases of a cell-mediated immune response. ACAID therefore protects the eye from the collateral damage of an immune response to infection by suppressing a future potentially damaging response to infection.

  16. Adaptive immune responses to booster vaccination against yellow fever virus are much reduced compared to those after primary vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, Michael; Bassi, Maria R; Rasmussen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    vaccination is deemed to confer life-long immune protection. Here, we have examined humoral (neutralizing antibody) and cellular (CD8 and CD4 T cell) immune responses in primary and booster vaccinees (the latter spanning 8 to 36 years after primary vaccination). After primary vaccination, we observed strong...... cellular immune responses with T cell activation peaking ≈2 weeks and subsiding to background levels ≈ 4 weeks post-vaccination. The number of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells declined over the following years. In >90% of vaccinees, in vitro expandable T cells could still be detected >10 years post......-vaccination. Although most vaccinees responded to a booster vaccination, both the humoral and cellular immune responses observed following booster vaccination were strikingly reduced compared to primary responses. This suggests that pre-existing immunity efficiently controls booster inoculums of YF-17D. In a situation...

  17. Dermatopathology of Caprine Scabies and Protective Immunity in Sensitised Goats Against Sarcoptes scabiei Reinfestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare macroscopic dermatopathology in naïve and sensitised goats, and to assess protective immunity possessed by sensitised goats against Sarcoptes scabiei challenge. Eighteen goats were allocated evenly into 3 groups; group 1 sensitised with the mite twice, group 2 once and group 3 was not sensitised (naïve. Sensitisation was done by infesting goats with the mites on the auricle and infestation was allowed to progress for 7 weeks, then the goats were treated with Ivermectin to obtain complete recovery. After sensitisation, all sensitised and naïve goats were infested with the mites on the auricles. Infestation in the sensitised goat caused severe immediate hypersensitivity that resulted in severe peracute pustular dermatitis. After one week, however, the lesion waned slowly. At 7 weeks post infestation, the remnant of lesion could only be perceived by palpation on the primary site of infestation as a mild papular dermatitis. Infestation on the naïve goats, in contrast, produced slowly progressing lesions which at 7-week post infestation, it ended up with severe crusted scabies affecting almost the whole skin. Antigens responsible for the immediate hypersensitivity which are supposedly contained in the mite secretions or excretions are immunologically protective but unlikely to have the capacity to induce a complete protection against mite challenge in immunised animals. This notion is based on the fact obtained from this study that goats sensitised twice did not possess a higher immune protection against mite challenge than goats sensitised once.

  18. Immunization with recombinant actin from Trypanosoma evansi induces protective immunity against T. evansi, T. equiperdum and T. b. brucei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, San-Qiang; Yang, Wu-Biao; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Ma, Ling-Jun; Xi, Shou-Min; Chen, Qun-Li; Song, Xiao-Wei; Kang, Jian; Yang, Lan-Ze

    2009-01-01

    Actin gene of Trypanosoma evansi (STIB 806) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The predicted amino acid sequence of T. evansi actin shows 100%, 98.7%, and 93.1%, homology with Trypanosoma equiperdum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi. Recombinant actin was expressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli. It was purified and renatured for immunological studies. Mice immunized with the renatured recombinant actin were protected from lethal challenge with T. evansi STIB 806, T. equiperdum STIB 818, and T. b. brucei STIB 940, showing 63.3%, 56.7%, and 53.3% protection, respectively. Serum collected from the rabbit immunized with recombinant actin inhibited the growth of T. evansi, T. equiperdum, and T. b. brucei in vitro cultivation. Serum from mice and rabbits immunized with recombinant actin only recognized T. evansi actin but not mouse actin. The results of this study suggest that the recombinant T. evansi actin induces protective immunity against T. evansi, T. equiperdum, and T. b. brucei infection and may be useful in the development of a vaccine with other cytoskeletal proteins to prevent animal trypanosomiasis caused by these three trypanosome species.

  19. VAR2CSA and protective immunity against pregnancy-associated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Salanti, A

    2007-01-01

    that the selective placental accumulation of IEs that characterizes pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is caused by an immunologically and functionally unique subset of VSA (VSAPAM) that is only expressed by parasites infecting pregnant women, and that protective immunity to PAM is mediated by IgG with specificity......People living in areas with stable transmission of P. falciparum parasites acquire protective immunity to malaria over a number of years and following multiple disease episodes. Immunity acquired this way is mediated by IgG with specificity for parasite-encoded, clonally variant surface antigens...

  20. Protective immunity against Naegleria fowleri infection on mice immunized with the rNfa1 protein using mucosal adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyoung; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Hee-kyoung; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    The free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes a fatal disease called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. Of the pathogenic mechanism of N. fowleri concerning host tissue invasion, the adherence of amoeba to hose cells is the most important. We previously cloned the nfa1 gene from N. fowleri. The protein displayed immunolocalization in the pseudopodia, especially the food-cups structure, and was related to the contact-dependent mechanism of the amoebic pathogenicity in N. fowleri infection. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) have been used as potent mucosal adjuvants via the parenteral route of immunization in most cases. In this study, to examine the effect of protective immunity of the Nfa1 protein for N. fowleri infection with enhancement by CTB or LTB adjuvants, intranasally immunized BALB/c mice were infected with N. fowleri trophozoites for the development of PAM. The mean time to death of mice immunized with the Nfa1 protein using LTB or CTB adjuvant was prolonged by 5 or 8 days in comparison with that of the control mice. In particular, the survival rate of mice immunized with Nfa1 plus CTB was 100% during the experimental period. The serum IgG levels were significantly increased in mice immunized with Nfa1 protein plus CTB or LTB adjuvants. These results suggest that the Nfa1 protein, with CTB or LTB adjuvants, induces strong protective immunity in mice with PAM due to N. fowleri infection.

  1. Immunization with baculovirus-expressed VP4 protein passively protects against simian and murine rotavirus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackow, E R; Vo, P T; Broome, R; Bass, D; Greenberg, H B

    1990-04-01

    A baculovirus-expressed VP4 protein derived from the simian rhesus rotavirus (RRV) was used to parenterally immunize murine dams. VP4-immunized dams developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against RRV and low levels of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies against human strains Wa, ST3, and S2 and animal strains SA-11, NCDV, and Eb. Newborn mice suckled on VP4-immunized dams were protected against a virulent challenge dose of the simian strain RRV and against murine rotavirus Eb. The cross-reactive nature of the serum-neutralizing response generated by VP4 immunization and the protective efficacy of the immunization suggest that recombinant-expressed VP4 proteins should be considered as viable vaccine candidates.

  2. CD47 Promotes Protective Innate and Adaptive Immunity in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarathna, Dhammika H. M. L. P.; Stein, Erica V.; Lessey-Morillon, Elizabeth C.; Nayak, Debasis; Martin-Manso, Gema; Roberts, David D.

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed receptor that regulates immunity by engaging its counter-receptor SIRPα on phagocytes and its secreted ligand thrombospondin-1. Mice lacking CD47 can exhibit enhanced or impaired host responses to bacterial pathogens, but its role in fungal immunity has not been examined. cd47-/- mice on a C57BL/6 background showed significantly increased morbidity and mortality following Candida albicans infection when compared with wild-type mice. Despite normal fungal colonization at earlier times, cd47-/- mice at four days post-infection had increased colonization of brain and kidneys accompanied by stronger inflammatory reactions. Neutrophil and macrophage numbers were significantly elevated in kidneys and neutrophils in the brains of infected cd47-/- mice. However, no defect in phagocytic activity towards C. albicans was observed in cd47-/- bone-marrow-derived macrophages, and neutrophil and macrophage killing of C. albicans was not impaired. CD47-deficiency did not alter the early humoral immune response to C. albicans. Th1, Th2, and Th17 population of CD4+ T cells were expanded in the spleen, and gene expression profiles of spleen and kidney showed stronger pro-inflammatory signaling in infected cd47-/- mice. The chemoattractant chemokines MIP-2α and MIP-2β were highly expressed in infected spleens of cd47-/- mice. G-CSF, GM-CSF, and the inflammasome component NLRP3 were more highly expressed in infected cd47-/- kidneys than in infected wild-type controls. Circulating pro- (TNF-α, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) were significantly elevated, but IL-17 was decreased. These data indicate that CD47 plays protective roles against disseminated candidiasis and alters pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive pathways known to regulate innate and T cell immunity. PMID:26010544

  3. CD47 Promotes Protective Innate and Adaptive Immunity in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhammika H M L P Navarathna

    Full Text Available CD47 is a widely expressed receptor that regulates immunity by engaging its counter-receptor SIRPα on phagocytes and its secreted ligand thrombospondin-1. Mice lacking CD47 can exhibit enhanced or impaired host responses to bacterial pathogens, but its role in fungal immunity has not been examined. cd47-/- mice on a C57BL/6 background showed significantly increased morbidity and mortality following Candida albicans infection when compared with wild-type mice. Despite normal fungal colonization at earlier times, cd47-/- mice at four days post-infection had increased colonization of brain and kidneys accompanied by stronger inflammatory reactions. Neutrophil and macrophage numbers were significantly elevated in kidneys and neutrophils in the brains of infected cd47-/- mice. However, no defect in phagocytic activity towards C. albicans was observed in cd47-/- bone-marrow-derived macrophages, and neutrophil and macrophage killing of C. albicans was not impaired. CD47-deficiency did not alter the early humoral immune response to C. albicans. Th1, Th2, and Th17 population of CD4+ T cells were expanded in the spleen, and gene expression profiles of spleen and kidney showed stronger pro-inflammatory signaling in infected cd47-/- mice. The chemoattractant chemokines MIP-2α and MIP-2β were highly expressed in infected spleens of cd47-/- mice. G-CSF, GM-CSF, and the inflammasome component NLRP3 were more highly expressed in infected cd47-/- kidneys than in infected wild-type controls. Circulating pro- (TNF-α, IL-6 and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 were significantly elevated, but IL-17 was decreased. These data indicate that CD47 plays protective roles against disseminated candidiasis and alters pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive pathways known to regulate innate and T cell immunity.

  4. CD47 Promotes Protective Innate and Adaptive Immunity in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarathna, Dhammika H M L P; Stein, Erica V; Lessey-Morillon, Elizabeth C; Nayak, Debasis; Martin-Manso, Gema; Roberts, David D

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed receptor that regulates immunity by engaging its counter-receptor SIRPα on phagocytes and its secreted ligand thrombospondin-1. Mice lacking CD47 can exhibit enhanced or impaired host responses to bacterial pathogens, but its role in fungal immunity has not been examined. cd47-/- mice on a C57BL/6 background showed significantly increased morbidity and mortality following Candida albicans infection when compared with wild-type mice. Despite normal fungal colonization at earlier times, cd47-/- mice at four days post-infection had increased colonization of brain and kidneys accompanied by stronger inflammatory reactions. Neutrophil and macrophage numbers were significantly elevated in kidneys and neutrophils in the brains of infected cd47-/- mice. However, no defect in phagocytic activity towards C. albicans was observed in cd47-/- bone-marrow-derived macrophages, and neutrophil and macrophage killing of C. albicans was not impaired. CD47-deficiency did not alter the early humoral immune response to C. albicans. Th1, Th2, and Th17 population of CD4+ T cells were expanded in the spleen, and gene expression profiles of spleen and kidney showed stronger pro-inflammatory signaling in infected cd47-/- mice. The chemoattractant chemokines MIP-2α and MIP-2β were highly expressed in infected spleens of cd47-/- mice. G-CSF, GM-CSF, and the inflammasome component NLRP3 were more highly expressed in infected cd47-/- kidneys than in infected wild-type controls. Circulating pro- (TNF-α, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10) were significantly elevated, but IL-17 was decreased. These data indicate that CD47 plays protective roles against disseminated candidiasis and alters pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive pathways known to regulate innate and T cell immunity.

  5. Protective immunity against Megalocytivirus infection in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) following CpG ODN administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwa; Lee, Jehee; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Perez, Luis; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2017-06-27

    Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) disease in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) remains an unsolved problem in Korea aquaculture farms. CpG ODNs are known as immunostimulant, can improve the innate immune system of fish providing resistance to diseases. In this study, we evaluated the potential of CpG ODNs to induce anti-viral status protecting rock bream from different RBIV infection conditions. We found that, when administered into rock bream, CpG ODN 1668 induces better antiviral immune responses compared to other 5 CpG ODNs (2216, 1826, 2133, 2395 and 1720). All CpG ODN 1668 administered fish (1/5µg) at 2days before infection (1.1×10 7 ) held at 26°C died even though mortality was delayed from 8days (1µg) and 4days (5µg). Similarly, CpG ODN 1668 administered (5µg) at 2days before infection (1.2×10 6 ) held at 23/20°C had 100% mortality; the mortality was delayed from 9days (23°C) and 11days (20°C). Moreover, when CpG ODN 1668 administered (1/5/10µg) at 2/4/7days before infection or virus concentration was decreased to 1.1×10 4 and held at 20°C had mortality rates of 20/60/30% (2days), 30/40/60% (4days) and 60/60/20% (7days), respectively, for the respective administration dose, through 100 dpi. To investigate the development of a protective immune response, survivors were re-infected with RBIV (1.1×10 7 ) at 100 and 400 dpi, respectively. While 100% of the previously unexposed fish died, 100% of the previously infected fish survived. The high survival rate of fish following re-challenge with RBIV indicates that protective immunity was established in the surviving rock bream. Our results showed the possibility of developing preventive measures against RBIV using CpG ODN 1668 by reducing RBIV replication speed (i.e. water temperature of 20°C and infection dose of 1.1×10 4 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation — 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD). PMID:26837602

  7. Influence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus F Glycoprotein Conformation on Induction of Protective Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Thom, Michelle; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Taylor, Geraldine; Melero, José A

    2016-06-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) vaccine development has received new impetus from structure-based studies of its main protective antigen, the fusion (F) glycoprotein. Three soluble forms of F have been described: monomeric, trimeric prefusion, and trimeric postfusion. Most human neutralizing antibodies recognize epitopes found exclusively in prefusion F. Although prefusion F induces higher levels of neutralizing antibodies than does postfusion F, postfusion F can also induce protection against virus challenge in animals. However, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three forms of F have not hitherto been directly compared. Hence, BALB/c mice were immunized with a single dose of the three proteins adjuvanted with CpG and challenged 4 weeks later with virus. Serum antibodies, lung virus titers, weight loss, and pulmonary pathology were evaluated after challenge. Whereas small amounts of postfusion F were sufficient to protect mice, larger amounts of monomeric and prefusion F proteins were required for protection. However, postfusion and monomeric F proteins were associated with more pathology after challenge than was prefusion F. Antibodies induced by all doses of prefusion F, in contrast to other F protein forms, reacted predominantly with the prefusion F conformation. At high doses, prefusion F also induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies, and all mice were protected, yet at low doses of the immunogen, these antibodies neutralized virus poorly, and mice were not protected. These findings should be considered when developing new hRSV vaccine candidates. Protection against hRSV infection is afforded mainly by neutralizing antibodies, which recognize mostly epitopes found exclusively in the viral fusion (F) glycoprotein trimer, folded in its prefusion conformation, i.e., before activation for membrane fusion. Although prefusion F is able to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies, highly stable postfusion F (found after

  8. c-di-GMP enhances protective innate immunity in a murine model of pertussis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokrollah Elahi

    Full Text Available Innate immunity represents the first line of defense against invading pathogens in the respiratory tract. Innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and granulocytes contain specific pathogen-recognition molecules which induce the production of cytokines and subsequently activate the adaptive immune response. c-di-GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that stimulates innate immunity and regulates biofilm formation, motility and virulence in a diverse range of bacterial species with potent immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, c-di-GMP was used to enhance the innate immune response against pertussis, a respiratory infection mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis. Intranasal treatment with c-di-GMP resulted in the induction of robust innate immune responses to infection with B. pertussis characterized by enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, natural killer cells and dendritic cells. The immune responses were associated with an earlier and more vigorous expression of Th1-type cytokines, as well as an increase in the induction of nitric oxide in the lungs of treated animals, resulting in significant reduction of bacterial numbers in the lungs of infected mice. These results demonstrate that c-di-GMP is a potent innate immune stimulatory molecule that can be used to enhance protection against bacterial respiratory infections. In addition, our data suggest that priming of the innate immune system by c-di-GMP could further skew the immune response towards a Th1 type phenotype during subsequent infection. Thus, our data suggest that c-di-GMP might be useful as an adjuvant for the next generation of acellular pertussis vaccine to mount a more protective Th1 phenotype immune response, and also in other systems where a Th1 type immune response is required.

  9. Contributions of capsule, lipoproteins and duration of colonisation towards the protective immunity of prior Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal colonisation

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan M Cohen; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Vogel, Corné; van Belkum, Alex; Baxendale, Helen E.; Brown, Jeremy S.

    2012-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines have been proposed as a strategy to induce protective immunity against infectious diseases. Recent data have demonstrated that nasopharyngeal colonisation with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces protective immunity against subsequent invasive infection, suggesting nasal vaccination with live attenuated bacteria could be a preventative strategy. However the bacterial factors affecting the strength of this adaptive immune response remain unclear. In a direct comparison wi...

  10. Evaluation of the protective immunity of a novel subunit fusion vaccine in a murine model of systemic MRSA infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Fei Zuo

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common commensal organism in humans and a major cause of bacteremia and hospital acquired infection. Because of the spread of strains resistant to antibiotics, these infections are becoming more difficult to treat. Therefore, exploration of anti-staphylococcal vaccines is currently a high priority. Iron surface determinant B (IsdB is an iron-regulated cell wall-anchored surface protein of S. aureus. Alpha-toxin (Hla is a secreted cytolytic pore-forming toxin. Previous studies reported that immunization with IsdB or Hla protected animals against S. aureus infection. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we constructed chimeric vaccines based on IsdB and Hla. Immunization with the chimeric bivalent vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses. When the protective efficacy of the chimeric bivalent vaccine was compared to that of individual proteins in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection, the bivalent vaccine showed a stronger protective immune response than the individual proteins (IsdB or Hla. Based on the results presented here, the chimeric bivalent vaccine affords higher levels of protection against S. aureus and has potential as a more effective candidate vaccine.

  11. Comparative efficacy of piperine and curcumin in deltamethrin induced splenic apoptosis and altered immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anoop; Sharma, Neelima

    2015-03-01

    Deltamethrin (DLM) being a potent immunotoxicant affects both humoral and cell mediated immunity. Thus, for the amelioration of its effects, two different bioactive herbal extracts piperine and curcumin are evaluated and their efficacy has been compared. The docking results demonstrated that curcumin has good binding affinity towards CD28 and CD45 receptors as compared to piperine but in vitro studies revealed that piperine is more effective. DLM induced apoptotic markers such as oxidative stress and caspase 3 have been attenuated more significantly by piperine as compared to curcumin. Phenotypic and cytokine changes have also been mitigated best with piperine. Thus, these findings strongly demonstrate that piperine displays the more anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and chemo-protective properties in the DLM induced splenic apoptosis as compared to curcumin. So, piperine can be considered the drug of choice under immunocompromised conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Basophils help establish protective immunity induced by irradiated larval vaccination for filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrero, Marina N.; Morris, C. Paul; Mitre, Blima K.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mueller, Ellen; Karasuyama, Hajime; Mitre, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Basophils are increasingly recognized as playing important roles in the immune response towards helminths. In this study, we evaluated the role of basophils in vaccine-mediated protection against filariae, tissue-invasive parasitic nematodes responsible for diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. Protective immunity and immunological responses were assessed in BALB/c mice vaccinated with irradiated L3 stage larvae and depleted of basophils with weekly injections of anti-CD200R3 antibody. Depletion of basophils after administration of the vaccination regimen but before challenge infection did not alter protective immunity. In contrast, basophil depletion initiated prior to vaccination and continued after challenge infection significantly attenuated the protective effect conferred by vaccination. Vaccine-induced cellular immune responses to parasite antigen were substantially decreased in basophil-depleted mice, with significant decreases in CD4+ T-cell production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, skin mast cell numbers, which increased significantly after vaccination with irradiated L3 larvae, were unchanged after vaccination in basophil-depleted mice. These findings demonstrate that basophils help establish the immune responses responsible for irradiated L3 vaccine protection. PMID:23777951

  13. Vertical toxoplasmosis in a murine model. Protection after immunization with antigens of Toxoplasma gondii incorporated into liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsaid Mohamed MA

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct Toxoplasma gondii antigens were entrapped within liposomes and evaluated for their ability to protect Balb/c mice against congenital transmission: soluble tachyzoite antigen (L/STAg, soluble tissue cyst antigen (L/SCAg, soluble tachyzoite plus tissue cyst (L/STCAg or purified 32kDa antigen of tachyzoite (L/pTAg. Soluble tachyzoite antigen alone in PBS (STAg or emulsified in Freund's Complete Adjuvant (FCA/STAg was also evaluated. Dams were inoculated subcutaneously with these antigens 6, 4 and 2 weeks prior to a challenge with four tissue cysts of the P strain of T. gondii orally between 10 and 14 days of pregnancy. Significant diminution differences were observed between the frequency of infected pups born of the dams immunized with the antigens incorporated into liposomes and that of pups born of the dams immunized with antigen emulsified in FCA or non immunized group (p<0.05. There was a significant decrease in the number of pups born dead in the groups L/STAg, L/SCAg and L/pTAg when compared with pups from all other groups (p <0.05. All dams immunized with or without adjuvant showed an antibody response and a proliferation of T-cells. However, no correlation was found between immune response and protection against the challenge.

  14. Heat-killed Lactobacillus gasseri TMC0356 protects mice against influenza virus infection by stimulating gut and respiratory immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Manabu; He, Fang; Kubota, Akira; Yoda, Kazutoyo; Miyazawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Masaru

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated whether heat-killed Lactobacillus protects host animal against influenza virus infection and stimulates their immunity. Heat-killed Lactobacillus gasseri TMC0356 was orally administered to BALB/c mice for 19 days; the mice were intranasally infected with Flu A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) on day 14, and clinical symptoms were monitored. After 6 days, the mice were sacrificed, and pulmonary virus titres were determined. Splenic activation of natural killer (NK) cells and the mRNA expression of cytokines and other immune molecules in the lung and Peyer's patch (PP) were analysed. Clinical symptom scores of mice orally fed TMC0356 ameliorated significantly (P < 0.01); their pulmonary virus titres decreased significantly compared with those of control mice (P < 0.05); their mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15 and IL-21 in PP and the pulmonary mRNA expression of IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12a, IL-12rbl, IL-2rb and perforin 1 increased significantly (P < 0.05). Oral administration of heat-killed lactobacilli may protect against influenza virus infection by stimulating local and systemic immune responses. Cellular components of lactobacilli may be pivotal in protecting against viral infection by enhancing gut and respiratory immune responses. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Induction of protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan that is a causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a disease which may result in a spectrum of consequences. It has been shown that DNA vaccine can be effective in partial protection against this parasite. In the present work, a single DNA vaccine containing ROP1 was ...

  16. Restoration of innate immune activation accelerates Th1-cell priming and protection following pulmonary mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rocky; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Shaler, Christopher R; Damjanovic, Daniela; Khera, Amandeep; Horvath, Carly; Ashkar, Ali A; Xing, Zhou

    2014-05-01

    The immune mechanisms underlying delayed induction of Th1-type immunity in the lungs following pulmonary mycobacterial infection remain poorly understood. We have herein investigated the underlying immune mechanisms for such delayed responses and whether a selected innate immune-modulating strategy can accelerate Th1-type responses. We have found that, in the early stage of pulmonary infection with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb H37Ra), the levels of infection in the lung continue to increase logarithmically until days 14 and 21 postinfection in C57BL/6 mice. The activation of innate immune responses, particularly DCs, in the lung is delayed. This results in a delay in the subsequent downstream immune responses including the migration of antigen-bearing DCs to the draining lymph node (dLN), the Th1-cell priming in dLN, and the recruitment of Th1 cells to the lung. However, single lung mucosal exposure to the TLR agonist FimH postinfection is able to accelerate protective Th1-type immunity via facilitating DC migration to the lung and draining lymph nodes, enhancing DC antigen presentation and Th1-cell priming. These findings hold implications for the development of immunotherapeutic and vaccination strategies and suggest that enhancement of early innate immune activation is a viable option for improving Th1-type immunity against pulmonary mycobacterial diseases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Protective immune mechanisms against pre-erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium berghei depend on the target antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke S. Bergmann-Leitner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines are believed to either stop the injected sporozoites from reaching the liver or to direct cellular immune responses towards eliminating infected hepatocytes. The present study reveals for the first time the anatomical sites at which these immune mechanisms act against the malaria parasites. To determine the mechanisms leading to protection mediated by two previously characterized vaccines against either the circumsporozoite protein (CSP or the cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS, mice were immunized and subsequently challenged by subcutaneous injection of salivary gland sporozoites of luciferase-transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites. The In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS was used to identify the anatomical site where the vaccine-induced immune response eliminates sporozoites after injection. The data demonstrate that CSP-based immunity acts at the site of infection (skin whereas CelTOS-based immunity is only partially efficient in the skin and allows reduced levels of liver infection that can be subsequently cleared. The results of this study challenge assumptions regarding CSP-mediated immune mechanisms and call into question the validity of some commonly used assays to evaluate anti-CSP immune responses. The knowledge of the mechanism and events leading to infection or immune defense will guide supportive treatment with drugs or combination therapies and thus accelerate the development of effective antimalarial strategies.

  18. Protective immunization with homologous and heterologous antigens against Helicobacter suis challenge in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flahou, Bram; Hellemans, Ann; Meyns, Tom; Duchateau, Luc; Chiers, Koen; Baele, Margo; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard

    2009-02-25

    Helicobacter (H.) suis colonizes the stomach of more than 60% of slaughter pigs and is also of zoonotic importance. Recently, this bacterium was isolated in vitro, enabling the use of pure cultures for research purposes. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with whole bacterial cell lysate of H. suis or the closely related species H. bizzozeronii and H. cynogastricus, and subsequently challenged with H. suis. Control groups consisted of non-immunized and non-challenged mice (negative control group), as well as of sham-immunized mice that were inoculated with H. suis (positive control group). Urease tests on stomach tissue samples at 7 weeks after challenge infection were negative in all negative control mice, all intranasally immunized mice except one, and in all and 3 out of 5 animals of the H. cynogastricus and H. suis subcutaneously immunized groups, respectively. H. suis DNA was detected by PCR in the stomach of all positive control animals and all subcutaneously immunized/challenged animals. All negative control animals and some intranasally immunized/challenged mice were PCR-negative. In conclusion, immunization using antigens derived from the same or closely related bacterial species suppressed gastric colonization with H. suis, but complete protection was only achieved in a minority of animals following intranasal immunization.

  19. CD47 Plays a Role as a Negative Regulator in Inducing Protective Immune Responses to Vaccination against Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Youri; Lee, Yu-Na; Bian, Zhen; Liu, Yuan; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-08-01

    An integrin-associated protein CD47, which is a ligand for the inhibitory receptor signal regulatory protein α, is expressed on B and T cells, as well as on most innate immune cells. However, the roles of CD47 in the immune responses to viral infection or vaccination remain unknown. We investigated the role of CD47 in inducing humoral immune responses after intranasal infection with virus or immunization with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs). Virus infection or vaccination with VLPs containing hemagglutinin from A/PR8/34 influenza virus induced higher levels of antigen-specific IgG2c isotype dominant antibodies in CD47-deficient (CD47KO) mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. CD47KO mice with vaccination showed greater protective efficacy against lethal challenge, as evidenced by no loss in body weight and reduced lung viral titers compared to WT mice. In addition, inflammatory responses which include cytokine production, leukocyte infiltrates, and gamma interferon-producing CD4(+) T cells, as well as an anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10), were reduced in the lungs of vaccinated CD47KO mice after challenge with influenza virus. Analysis of lymphocytes indicated that GL7(+) germinal center B cells were induced at higher levels in the draining lymph nodes of CD47KO mice compared to those in WT mice. Notably, CD47KO mice exhibited significant increases in the numbers of antigen-specific memory B cells in spleens and plasma cells in bone marrow despite their lower levels of background IgG antibodies. These results suggest that CD47 plays a role as a negative regulator in inducing protective immune responses to influenza vaccination. Molecular mechanisms that control B cell activation to produce protective antibodies upon viral vaccination remain poorly understood. The CD47 molecule is known to be a ligand for the inhibitory receptor signal regulatory protein α and expressed on the surfaces of most immune cell types. CD47 was previously demonstrated to play

  20. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Mortensen

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is responsible for a wide array of infections. Respiratory transmission via droplets is the most common mode of transmission but it may also infect the host via other routes such as lesions in the skin. To advance the development of a future vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate that locally primed immunity is important for the defense against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes.

  1. Immune mediated protection in multiple sclerosis: A role for neurokines in oligodendrocyte survival and macrophage modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome; CARMANS, Sofie; Slaets, Leen; Dumont, Debora; Vanderlocht, Joris; Stinissen, Piet

    2007-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), immune mediated destruction of the myelin sheath, oligodendrocytes and axons leads to irreversible neurological deficits. Recent data show that immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) may also confer protective effects. We recently demonstrated that autoreactive T cells and macrophages produce leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the IL-6 family of neurokines. CD4+ T cells from relapsing remitting MS-patients show a reduced LIF production. Sti...

  2. Targets for the Induction of Protective Immunity Against Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, Rogier; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2010-01-01

    The current pandemic caused by the new influenza A(H1N1) virus of swine origin and the current pandemic threat caused by the highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses of the H5N1 subtype have renewed the interest in the development of vaccines that can induce broad protective immunity. Preferably, vaccines not only provide protection against the homologous strains, but also against heterologous strains, even of another subtype. Here we describe viral targets and the arms of the immune response involved in protection against influenza virus infections such as antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin, neuraminidase and the M2 protein and cellular immune responses directed against the internal viral proteins. PMID:21994606

  3. Transfer of maternal immunity to piglets is involved in early protection against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøl; Hagedorn-Olsen, Tine; Jungersen, Gregers

    2017-01-01

    pathology. Thus, the level of passive immunity transferred from sow to piglet seems to provide, at least partial, protection against development of arthritis. It cannot be ruled out that the CCE pigs, by growing up in an infected environment, have had the chance to establish an active anti-M. hyosynoviae......Mycoplasma hyosynoviae causes arthritis in pigs older than 12 weeks. The role of colostrum in protection of piglets against M. hyosynoviae infection is not clear. Our objective was therefore to investigate whether transfer of maternal immunity to piglets was involved in early protection against...... the infection. Experimental infections were carried out in three groups of weaners receiving different levels of M. hyosynoviae-specific colostrum components; Group NC derived from Mycoplasma free sows and possessed no specific immunity to M. hyosynoviae. Group CAb pigs, siblings of the NC group, received...

  4. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  5. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin E Kara

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H1/T(H2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  6. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  7. Apical Organelle Secretion by Toxoplasma Controls Innate and Adaptive Immunity and Mediates Long-Term Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloves, Pierre-Julien; Mouveaux, Thomas; Ait-Yahia, Saliha; Vorng, Han; Everaere, Laetitia; Sangare, Lamba Omar; Tsicopoulos, Anne; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2015-11-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have unique apical rhoptry and microneme secretory organelles that are crucial for host infection, although their role in protection against Toxoplasma gondii infection is not thoroughly understood. Here, we report a novel function of the endolysosomal T. gondii sortilin-like receptor (TgSORTLR), which mediates trafficking to functional apical organelles and their subsequent secretion of virulence factors that are critical to the induction of sterile immunity against parasite reinfection. We further demonstrate that the T. gondii armadillo repeats-only protein (TgARO) mutant, which is deficient only in apical secretion of rhoptries, is also critical in mounting protective immunity. The lack of TgSORTLR and TgARO proteins completely inhibited T-helper 1-dependent adaptive immunity and compromised the function of natural killer T-cell-mediated innate immunity. Our findings reveal an essential role for apical secretion in promoting sterile protection against T. gondii and provide strong evidence for rhoptry-regulated discharge of antigens as a key effector for inducing protective immunity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Mycobacterium indicus pranii as a booster vaccine enhances BCG induced immunity and confers higher protection in animal models of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Mohd; Khatri, Rahul; Singh, Bindu; Gupta, Ananya; Kumar, Arvind; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2016-12-01

    BCG, the only approved vaccine protects against severe form of childhood tuberculosis but its protective efficacy wanes in adolescence. BCG has reduced the incidence of infant TB considerably in endemic areas; therefore prime-boost strategy is the most realistic measure for control of tuberculosis in near future. Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) shares significant antigenic repertoire with Mtb and BCG and has been shown to impart significant protection in animal models of tuberculosis. In this study, MIP was given as a booster to BCG vaccine which enhanced the BCG mediated immune response, resulting in higher protection. MIP booster via aerosol route was found to be more effective in protection than subcutaneous route of booster immunization. Pro-inflammatory cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-17 were induced at higher level in infected lungs of 'BCG-MIP' group both at mRNA expression level and in secretory form when compared with 'only BCG' group. BCG-MIP groups had increased frequency of multifunctional T cells with high MFI for IFN-γ and TNF-α in Mtb infected mice. Our data demonstrate for the first time, potential application of MIP as a booster to BCG vaccine for efficient protection against tuberculosis. This could be very cost effective strategy for efficient control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glycan elongation beyond the mucin associated Tn antigen protects tumor cells from immune-mediated killing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Lavrsen, Kirstine; Steentoft, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bound mucins are up-regulated and aberrantly glycosylated during malignant transformation in many cancer cells. This results in a negatively charged glycoprotein coat which may protect cancer cells from immune surveillance. However, only limited data have so far demonstrated the critical...... mediated killing, and observed an inverse correlation between MUC16/MUC1 expression and the sensitivity to ADCC and CTL-mediated killing. Together, these data suggest that up-regulation of membrane bound mucins protects cells from immune mediated killing, and that particular glycosylation steps...

  10. Recombinant capripoxviruses expressing proteins of bluetongue virus: evaluation of immune responses and protection in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Aurélie; Albina, Emmanuel; Bréard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Promé, Sylvie; Grillet, Colette; Kwiatek, Olivier; Russo, Pierre; Thiéry, Richard; Zientara, Stephan; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine

    2007-09-17

    The development of recombinant capripoxviruses for protective immunization of ruminants against bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is described. Sheep (n=11) and goats (n=4) were immunized with BTV recombinant capripoxviruses (BTV-Cpox) individually expressing four different genes encoding two capsid proteins (VP2 and VP7) and two non-structural proteins (NS1, NS3) of BTV serotype 2 (BTV-2). Seroconversion was observed against NS3, VP7 and VP2 in both species and a lymphoproliferation specific to BTV antigens was also demonstrated in goats. Finally, partial protection of sheep challenged 3 weeks after BTV-Cpox administration with a virulent strain of BTV-2, was observed.

  11. Therapeutic enhancement of protective immunity during experimental leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senad Divanovic

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropics. Available therapies are problematic due to toxicity, treatment duration and emerging drug resistance. Mouse models of leishmaniasis have demonstrated that disease outcome depends critically on the balance between effector and regulatory CD4(+ T cell responses, something mirrored in descriptive studies of human disease. Recombinant IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (rIL-2/DTx, a drug that is FDA-approved for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, has been reported to deplete regulatory CD4(+ T cells.We investigated the potential efficacy of rIL-2/DTx as adjunctive therapy for experimental infection with Leishmania major. Treatment with rIL-2/DTx suppressed lesional regulatory T cell numbers and was associated with significantly increased antigen-specific IFN-γ production, enhanced lesion resolution and decreased parasite burden. Combined administration of rIL-2/DTx and sodium stibogluconate had additive biological and therapeutic effects, allowing for reduced duration or dose of sodium stibogluconate therapy.These data suggest that pharmacological suppression of immune counterregulation using a commercially available drug originally developed for cancer therapy may have practical therapeutic utility in leishmaniasis. Rational reinvestigation of the efficacy of drugs approved for other indications in experimental models of neglected tropical diseases has promise in providing new candidates to the drug discovery pipeline.

  12. Ebola virus: immune mechanisms of protection and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Fahey, John L; Sands, Heather; Casillas, Adrian M

    2003-04-01

    Vaccination is one of our most powerful antiviral strategies. Despite the emergence of deadly viruses such as Ebola virus, vaccination efforts have focused mainly on childhood communicable diseases. Although Ebola virus was once believed to be limited to isolated outbreaks in distant lands, forces of globalization potentiate outbreaks anywhere in the world through incidental transmission. Moreover, since this virus has already been transformed into weapon-grade material, the potential exists for it to be used as a biological weapon with catastrophic consequences for any population vulnerable to attack. Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is a syndrome that can rapidly lead to death within days of symptom onset. The disease directly affects the immune system and vascular bed, with correspondingly high mortality rates. Patients with severe disease produce dangerously high levels of inflammatory cytokines, which destroy normal tissue and microcirculation, leading to profound capillary leakage, renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Vaccine development has been fraught with obstacles, primarily of a biosafety nature. Case reports of acutely ill patients with EHF showing improvement with the transfusion of convalescent plasma are at odds with animal studies demonstrating further viral replication with the same treatment. Using mRNA extracted from bone marrow of Ebola survivors, human monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus surface protein have been experimentally produced and now raise the hope for the development of a safe vaccine.

  13. Oral administration of a recombinant attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis strain elicits protective immunity against plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Sanapala, Shilpa; Rahav, Hannah; Curtiss, Roy

    2015-11-27

    A Yersinia pseudotuberculosis PB1+ (Yptb PB1+) mutant strain combined with chromosome insertion of the caf1R-caf1A-caf1M-caf1 operon and deletions of yopJ and yopK, χ10068 [pYV-ω2 (ΔyopJ315 ΔyopK108) ΔlacZ044::caf1R-caf1M-caf1A-caf1] was constructed. Results indicated that gene insertion and deletion did not affect the growth rate of χ10068 compared to wild-type Yptb cultured at 26 °C. In addition, the F1 antigen in χ10068 was synthesized and secreted on the surface of bacteria at 37 °C (mammalian body temperature), not at ambient culture temperature (26 °C). Immunization with χ10068 primed antibody responses and specific T-cell responses to F1 and YpL (Y. pestis whole cell lysate). Oral immunization with a single dose of χ10068 provided 70% protection against a subcutaneous (s.c.) challenge with ∼ 2.6 × 10(5) LD50 of Y. pestis KIM6+ (pCD1Ap) (KIM6+Ap) and 90% protection against an intranasal (i.n.) challenge with ∼ 500 LD50 of KIM6+Ap in mice. Our results suggest that χ10068 can be used as an effective precursor to make a safe vaccine to prevent plague in humans and to eliminate plague circulation among humans and animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of protection and comparative advantage in rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    added rice as well as analyze the comparative advantage and competitiveness of rice processing in Nigeria. The extent of policy distortion and agricultural protection was also determined by the study. The data were collected from Ebonyi State, ...

  15. Heterologous Prime-Boost Vaccination Enhances TsPmy’s Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis Infection in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available TsPmy is a paramyosin expressed by parasitic Trichinella spiralis and confers a protective immunity when its recombinant protein or DNA was used as an immunogen. To improve its immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy, we conducted a heterologous prime-boost strategy by orally delivering one dose of TsPmy DNA carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207, followed by two doses of recombinant TsPmy intramuscularly. This strategy effectively induced intestinal mucosal sIgA response and an enhanced and balanced Th1/Th2 immune responses that improve protection against T. spiralis larval challenge, with 55.4% muscle larvae reduction and 41.8% adult worm reduction compared to PBS control. The muscle larvae reduction induced by heterologous prime-boost regimen was significant higher than that induced by the homologous DNA or protein prime-boost regimens, which could act as a practical prophylactic approach to prevent T. spiralis infection.

  16. A sulfated galactans supplemented diet enhances the expression of immune genes and protects against Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection in shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Boonsri, Nantavadee; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2017-06-01

    A sulfated galactans (SG) supplemented diet was evaluated for the potential to stimulate immune activity in shrimp Penaeus vannamei (P. vannamei). Shrimp given the SG supplemented diet (0.5, 1 and 2% w/w) for 7 days showed enhanced expression of the downstream signaling mediator of lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) and immune related genes including p-NF-κB, IMD, IKKβ and IKKε, antimicrobial peptide PEN-4, proPO-I and II. Following immersion with Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) for 14 days, the shrimp given the SG supplemented diet (1 and 2% w/w) showed a decrease in bacterial colonies and bacterial toxin gene expression, compared to shrimp given a normal diet, and they reached 50% mortality at day 14. However, shrimp given the normal diet and challenged with the bacteria reached 100% mortality at day 6. SG-fed shrimp increased expression of immune genes related to LGBP signaling at day 1 after the bacterial immersion compared to control (no immersion), which later decreased to control levels. Shrimp on the normal diet also increased expression of immune related genes at day 1 after immersion which however decreased below control levels by day 3. Taken together, the results indicate the efficacy of the SG supplemented diet to enhance the immune activity in shrimp which could offer protection from V. parahaemolyticus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of an Adherence Domain and a Structural Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II in Protective Immunity against Dental Caries in Rats after Intranasal Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Hajishengallis, George; Russell, Michael W.; Michalek, Suzanne M.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have identified an N-terminal saliva-binding region (SBR) on Streptococcus mutans surface antigen I/II (AgI/II) and suggested its importance in the initial adherence of S. mutans to saliva-coated tooth surfaces and subsequent development of dental caries. In this study, we compared the SBR with a C-terminal structural region of AgI/II (AgII) in their abilities to induce protective immunity against caries in rats. When SBR, AgII, or the whole AgI/II molecule was administered i...

  18. Intranasal immunization with recombinant HA and mast cell activator C48/80 elicits protective immunity against 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Meng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pandemic influenza represents a major threat to global health. Vaccination is the most economic and effective strategy to control influenza pandemic. Conventional vaccine approach, despite being effective, has a number of major deficiencies including limited range of protection, total dependence on embryonated eggs for production, and time consuming for vaccine production. There is an urgent need to develop novel vaccine strategies to overcome these deficiencies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The major objective of this work was to develop a novel vaccine strategy combining recombinant haemagglutinin (HA protein and a master cell (MC activator C48/80 for intranasal immunization. We demonstrated in BALB/c mice that MC activator C48/80 had strong adjuvant activity when co-administered with recombinant HA protein intranasally. Vaccination with C48/80 significantly increased the serum IgG and mucosal surface IgA antibody responses against HA protein. Such increases correlated with stronger and durable neutralizing antibody activities, offering protection to vaccinated animals from disease progression after challenge with lethal dose of A/California/04/2009 live virus. Furthermore, protected animals demonstrated significant reduction in lung virus titers, minimal structural alteration in lung tissues as well as higher and balanced production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in the stimulated splenocytes when compared to those without C48/80. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study demonstrates that the novel vaccine approach of combining recombinant HA and mucosal adjuvant C48/80 is safe and effective in eliciting protective immunity in mice. Future studies on the mechanism of action of C48/80 and potential combination with other vaccine strategies such as prime and boost approach may help to induce even more potent and broad immune responses against viruses from various clades.

  19. Measurements of Immune Responses for Establishing Correlates of Vaccine Protection Against HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Burgers, Wendy A.; Manrique, Amapola; Masopust, David; McKinnon, Lyle R.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Rolland, Morgane; BLISH, Catherine; Chege, Gerald K.; Curran, Rhonda; Fischer, William; Herrera, Carolina; Sather, D. Noah

    2012-01-01

    Well-defined correlates of protective immunity are an essential component of rational vaccine development. Despite years of basic science and three HIV vaccine efficacy trials, correlates of immunological protection from HIV infection remain undefined. In December 2010, a meeting of scientists engaged in basic and translational work toward developing HIV-1 vaccines was convened. The goal of this meeting was to discuss current opportunities and optimal approaches for defining correlates of pro...

  20. Protection Against Malaria by Immunization with Plasmid DNA Encoding Circumsporozoite Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    and the circum- bacteria, fungi , or parasites. We now ;-uort that i.m. injec. sporozoite protein is a target of this protective immunity. We lion of...FUNDING NUMBERS Protection against malaria by immounization with plasmid DNA encoding ci rcumisporozoi te protein PE -61102A I PR -001 .01 6. AUTI(OR...plasmodlum.yoelil; malaria vaccines; DNA vaccines; ___________ nucleic acid vaccines; clrculnsporozoite protein % 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  1. Active immunization with Brucella abortus S19 phage lysate elicits serum IgG that protects guinea pigs against virulent B. abortus and protects mice by passive immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Lata; Rawat, Mayank; Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Kumar, Bablu

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is an economically important zoonosis of worldwide significance. Earlier (Jain et al., 2015) we reported methodology for generation of phage lysate preparations against Brucella abortus S19 using brucellaphage 'ϕLd'. In this study, using a fixed dose (Two mouse PD 100 ) of lysates, the prophylactic efficacies of both plain and alum gel adjuvanted lysates were evaluated in guinea pig by direct virulent challenge and passive mouse protection test (PMPT). Strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses in guinea pigs and protection comparable to S19 vaccine was observed with low dose (1.0 μg protein and 120 μg carbohydrate adsorbed on 0.1% aluminium gel). Passive transfer of antibodies to mice using d 90 post immunization sera of guinea pig protected the animals against challenge. The study suggested the significance of humoral immunity in murine brucellosis. Further, the methodology can be explored to produce a new class of immunotherapeutic agents against bovine brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunization with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) induces partial immune protection against acute toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cao, Aiping; Li, Yawen; Li, Xun; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2017-06-07

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals including humans and causes toxoplasmosis. An effective vaccine could be an ideal choice for preventing and controlling toxoplasmosis. T. gondii Superoxide dismutase (TgSOD) might participate in affecting the intracellular growth of both bradyzoite and tachyzoite forms. In the present study, the TgSOD gene was used to construct a DNA vaccine (pEGFP-SOD). TgSOD gene was amplified and inserted into eukaryotic vector pEGFP-C1 and formed the DNA vaccine pEGFP-SOD. Then the BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine and those injected with pEGFP-C1, PBS or nothing were treated as controls. Four weeks after the last immunization, all mouse groups followed by challenging intraperitoneally with tachyzoites of T. gondii ME49 strain. Results showed higher levels of total IgG, IgG2α in the sera and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in the splenocytes from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice than those unvaccinated, or inoculated with either empty plasmid vector or PBS. The proportions of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells in the spleen from pEGFP-SOD inoculated mice were significantly (p < 0.05) increased compared to control groups. In addition, the survival time of mice immunized with pEGFP-SOD was significantly prolonged as compared to the controls (p < 0.05) although all the mice died. The present study revealed that the DNA vaccine triggered strong humoral and cellular immune responses, and aroused partial protective immunity against acute T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. The collective data suggests the SOD may be a potential vaccine candidate for further development.

  3. Transcutaneous immunization via rapidly dissolvable microneedles protects against hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhuangzhi; Ye, Xiaohua; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Shen, Chaoyun; Luo, Huafei; Luan, Hansen; Zhang, Chenghao; Tian, Shaoqiong; Lim, CheeYen; Huang, Zhong; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-10

    Recent large outbreaks of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) have seriously affected the health of young children. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of HFMD. Herein, for the first time, rapidly dissolvable microneedles (MNs) loaded with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs) were evaluated whether they could induce robust immune responses that confer protection against EV71 infection. The characteristics of prepared MNs including hygroscopy, mechanical strength, insertion capacity, dissolution profile, skin irritation and storage stability were comprehensively assessed. EV71 VLPs remained morphologically stable during fabrication. The MNs made of sodium hyaluronate maintained their insertion ability for at least 3h even at a high relative humidity of 75%. With the aid of spring-operated applicator, EV71 MNs (approximately 500μm length) could be readily penetrated into the mouse skin in vivo, and then rapidly dissolved to release encapsulated antigen within 2min. Additionally, MNs induced slight erythema that disappeared within a few hours. More importantly, mouse immunization and virus challenge studies demonstrated that MNs immunization induced high level of antibody responses conferring full protection against lethal EV71 virus challenge that were comparable to conventional intramuscular injection, but with only 1/10th of the delivered antigen (dose sparing). Consequently, our rapidly dissolving MNs may present as an effective and promising transcutaneous immunization device for HFMD prophylaxis among children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal immunization with vaccines containing recombinant NetB toxin partially protects progeny chickens from necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyburn, Anthony L; Portela, Ricardo W; Ford, Mark E; Bannam, Trudi L; Yan, Xu X; Rood, Julian I; Moore, Robert J

    2013-11-13

    Avian necrotic enteritis is a major economic and welfare issue throughout the global poultry industry and is caused by isolates of Clostridium perfringens that produce NetB toxin. Previously we have shown that birds directly vaccinated with inactivated C. perfringens type A culture supernatant (toxoid) combined with recombinant NetB (rNetB) protein were significantly protected from homologous and heterologous challenge. In the present study the protective effect of maternal immunization was examined. Broiler breeder hens were injected subcutaneously with genetically toxoided rNetB(S254L) alone, C. perfringens type A toxoid and toxoid combined with rNetB(S254L). Vaccination resulted in a strong serum immunoglobulin Y response to NetB in hens immunized with rNetB(S254L) formulations. Anti-NetB antibodies were transferred to the eggs and on into the hatched progeny. Subclinical necrotic enteritis was induced experimentally in the progeny and the occurrence of specific necrotic enteritis lesions evaluated. Birds derived from hens immunized with rNetB(S254L) combined with toxoid and challenged with a homologous strain (EHE-NE18) at either 14 or 21 days post-hatch had significantly lower levels of disease compared to birds from adjuvant only vaccinated hens. In addition, birds from hens immunized with rNetB(S254L) alone were significantly protected when challenged at 14 days post-hatch. These results demonstrate that maternal immunization with a NetB-enhanced toxoid vaccine is a promising method for the control of necrotic enteritis in young broiler chickens.

  5. Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Exercise training has been extensively studied in cancer settings as part of prevention or rehabilitation strategies, yet emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can also directly affect tumor-specific outcomes. The underlying mechanisms for this exercise-dependent cancer protection...... are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from...... cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through...

  6. Can VHS virus bypass the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination in rainbow trout?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability...... and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly...... pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus...

  7. CD19(+) B cells confer protection against experimental cerebral malaria in semi-immune rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lam Quoc; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Senba, Masachika; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Honma, Kiri; Yui, Katsuyuki; Hirayama, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    In African endemic area, adults are less vulnerable to cerebral malaria than children probably because of acquired partial immunity or semi-immune status. Here, we developed an experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model for semi-immune mice. C57BL/6 (B6) mice underwent one, two and three cycles of infection and radical treatment (1-cure, 2-cure and 3-cure, respectively) before being finally challenged with 10(4) Plasmodium berghei ANKA without treatment. Our results showed that 100% of naïve (0-cure), 67% of 1-cure, 37% of 2-cure and none of 3-cure mice succumbed to ECM within 10 days post challenge infection. In the protected 3-cure mice, significantly higher levels of plasma IL-10 and lower levels of IFN-γ than the others on day 7 post challenge infection were observed. Major increased lymphocyte subset of IL-10 positive cells in 3-cure mice was CD5(-)CD19(+) B cells. Passive transfer of splenic CD19(+) cells from 3-cure mice protected naïve mice from ECM. Additionally, aged 3-cure mice were also protected from ECM 12 and 20 months after the last challenge infection. In conclusion, mice became completely resistant to ECM after three exposures to malaria. CD19(+) B cells are determinants in protective mechanism of semi-immune mice against ECM possibly via modulatory IL-10 for pathogenic IFN-γ production.

  8. Senecavirus A infection in market weight gilts, sows and neonates with subsequent protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize SVA infection in market weight pigs, late-gestation sows, and neonates and 2) examine protective immunity in late-gestation gilts Materials and Methods: For Part 1 of the study 15 gilts were inoculated with SVA, bled regularly for 2 we...

  9. Senecavirus A infection in sows, neonates, and market weight gilts with subsequent protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize SVA infection late-gestation sows, neonates, and market weight gilts and 2) examine protective immunity in late-gestation gilts Methods: For Part 1, 15 market weight gilts were inoculated with SVA, bled regularly, and clinical observat...

  10. Targets for the induction of protective immunity against influenza a viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bodewes (Rogier); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe current pandemic caused by the new influenza A(H1N1) virus of swine origin and the current pandemic threat caused by the highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses of the H5N1 subtype have renewed the interest in the development of vaccines that can induce broad protective immunity.

  11. Immune suppression of challenged vaccinates as a rigorous assessment of sterile protection by lentiviral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2007-01-15

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAV(PV)) challenge [Li F, Craigo JK, Howe L, Steckbeck JD, Cook S, Issel C, et al. A live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus proviral vaccine with a modified S2 gene provides protection from detectable infection by intravenous virulent virus challenge of experimentally inoculated horses. J Virol 2003;77(13):7244-53; Craigo JK, Li F, Steckbeck JD, Durkin S, Howe L, Cook SJ, et al. Discerning an effective balance between equine infectious anemia virus attenuation and vaccine efficacy. J Virol 2005;79(5):2666-77]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any infecting EIAV. At 2 months post-challenge the horses were all protected from virulent-virus challenge, evidenced by a lack of EIA signs and detectable challenge plasma viral RNA. Upon immune suppression, 6/12 horses displayed clinical EIA. Post-immune suppression characterizations demonstrated that the attenuated vaccine evidently prevented detectable challenge virus infection in 50% of horses. These data highlight the utility of post-challenge immune suppression for evaluating persistent viral vaccine protective efficacy.

  12. Development of vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum malaria: taking lessons from naturally acquired protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The acquisition of substantial anti-malarial protection in people naturally exposed to P. falciparum is often cited as evidence that malaria vaccines can be developed, but is rarely used to guide the development. We are pursuing the development of vaccines based on antigens and immune responses...

  13. DNA Immunization with the Gene Encoding P4 Nuclease of Leishmania amazonensis Protects Mice against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kimberly; Diao, Hong; Ji, Jiaxiang; Soong, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Leishmania amazonensis can cause diverse clinical forms of leishmaniasis. Immunization with purified P4 nuclease protein has been shown to elicit a protective response in mice challenged with L. amazonensis and L. pifanoi. To explore the potential of a DNA-based vaccine, we tested the L. amazonensis gene encoding P4 nuclease as well as adjuvant constructs encoding murine interleukin-12 (IL-12) and L. amazonensis HSP70. Susceptible BALB/c mice were immunized with the DNA encoding P4 alone, P4/IL-12, or P4/HSP70 prior to challenge with L. amazonensis promastigotes. Mice given P4/IL-12 exhibited no lesion development and had a 3- to 4-log reduction in tissue parasite burdens compared to controls. This protection corresponded to significant increases in gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha production and a reduction in parasite-specific immunoglobulin G1, suggesting an enhancement in Th1 responses. Moreover, we immunized mice with the L. amazonensis vaccines to determine if this vaccine regimen could provide cross-protection against a genetically diverse species, L. major. While the P4/HSP70 vaccine led to self-healing lesions, the P4/IL-12 vaccine provided negligible protection against L. major infection. This is the first report of successful use of a DNA vaccine to induce protection against L. amazonensis infection. Additionally, our results indicate that different vaccine combinations, including DNA encoding P4, HSP70, or IL-12, can provide significant protection against both Old World and New World cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:14573646

  14. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains.IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  15. Virus-like nanoparticle and DNA vaccination confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus by modulating innate and adaptive immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun-Ju; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Jong Seok; Hwang, Hye Suk; Yoo, Si-Eun; Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Min Kyoung; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Song, Jae-Min; Lee, Sujin; Moore, Martin L; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important human pathogen. Expression of virus structural proteins produces self-assembled virus-like nanoparticles (VLP). We investigated immune phenotypes after RSV challenge of immunized mice with VLP containing RSV F and G glycoproteins mixed with F-DNA (FdFG VLP). In contrast to formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing vaccination-associated eosinophilia, FdFG VLP immunization induced low bronchoalveolar cellularity, higher ratios of CD11c(+) versus CD11b(+) phenotypic cells and CD8(+) T versus CD4(+) T cells secreting interferon (IFN)-γ, T helper type-1 immune responses, and no sign of eosinophilia upon RSV challenge. Furthermore, RSV neutralizing activity, lung viral clearance, and histology results suggest that FdFG VLP can be comparable to live RSV in conferring protection against RSV and in preventing RSV disease. This study provides evidence that a combination of recombinant RSV VLP and plasmid DNA may have a potential anti-RSV prophylactic vaccine inducing balanced innate and adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), but not measles virus iscoms, protect dogs against CDV infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe potential of immune-stimulating complexes (iscoms), a novel form of antigenic presentation, for the induction of protective immunity against morbillivirus infection was shown by immunizing dogs with canine distemper virus (CDV) iscoms, which contained the fusion (F) protein and a

  17. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Petitdidier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA, from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA, combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates.

  18. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates.

  19. Studies on the protection effects of functional foods for skin immune system from radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Sung Tae; Shin, Seong Hae; Kim, Do Sun; Heo, Ji Yun; Kang, Hye In [Sunchon National University, Sunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    We evaluated the protective effects of pilot products (HemoHIM and HemoTonic) on the UV-induced skin immune damages as the following. centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic against UV using contact hypersensitivity model - Protection against depression of contact hypersensitivity by administration and skin application of HemoHIM and HemoTonic - Induction of dendritic cell differentiation and maturation by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment - Improvement of antigen-presenting activity of dedritic cells by HemoHIM and HemoTonic treatment centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic on skin immune system against UV-irradiation - Protection of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells under UV-irradiation - In vivo protection of antigen-presenting activity of Langerhans cells in UV-irradiated mice centre dot Protective effects of HemoHIM on UV-induced apoptosis of dendritic cells - Inhibition of cell membrane change, mitochondrial potential change, SubG1 cell population, nuclear condensation, and DNA fragmentation in UV-irradiated dendritic cells centre dot Anti-allergic effects of HemoHIM and HemoTonic in human adipocyte HMC-1 cells - Inhibition of allergic histamine release from adipocytes - Inhibition of secretion of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, GM-CSF) - Inhibition of c-kit, tryptase, FcepsilonRI mRNA expression From these results, the developed functional food products (HemoHIM, HemoTonic) showed the protection and recovery of the immune functions in the UV-irradiated skin. It is suggested that these products may be used as a new functional food or cosmetic material for the protection of skin damage and the promotion of recovery

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TUMORIGENESIS AND TUMOR IMMUNITY IN INVERTEBRATES AND NONMAMMALIAN VERTEBRATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Despite intense study in mammals, the different roles played by the immune system in detecting (immunosurveillance), controlling and remodeling (immunoediting) neoplasia, and perhaps in metastasis are not fully understood. In this review, I will present evidence of neoplasia and invasive malignancy, as well as tumor immunity in invertebrates and nonmammalian vertebrates. I will also present a comparative and evolutionary view of the complex interactions between neoplasia and the host immune system. Overall, I wish to go beyond the too simplistic dichotomy between invertebrates with innate immunity that are only affected with benign neoplasia and vertebrates with adaptive immunity that are affected by metastatic malignancies or cancer. PMID:20553753

  1. Recombinant Toxoplasma gondii phosphoglycerate mutase 2 confers protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wen, Li-Min; Pei, Yan-Jiang; Wang, Fen; Yin, Li-Tian; Bai, Ji-Zhong; Guo, Rui; Wang, Chun-Fang; Yin, Guo-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses worldwide. It has a high incidence and can result in severe disease in humans and livestock. Effective vaccines are needed to limit and prevent infection with Toxoplasma gondii. In this study, we evaluated the immuno-protective efficacy of a recombinant Toxoplasma gondii phosphoglycerate mutase 2 (rTgPGAM 2) against T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice. We report that the mice nasally immunised with rTgPGAM 2 displayed significantly higher levels of special IgG antibodies against rTgPGAM 2 (including IgG1, IgG2a and IgAs) and cytokines (including IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4) in their blood sera and supernatant of cultured spleen cells compared to those of control animals. In addition, an increased number of spleen lymphocytes and enhanced lymphocyte proliferative responses were observed in the rTgPGAM 2-immunised mice. After chronic infection and lethal challenge with the highly virulent T. gondii RH strain by oral gavage, the survival time of the rTgPGAM 2-immunised mice was longer (P < 0.01) and the survival rate (70%) was higher compared with the control mice (P < 0.01). The reduction rate of brain and liver tachyzoites in rTgPGAM 2-vaccinated mice reached approximately 57% and 69% compared with those of the control mice (P < 0.01). These results suggest that rTgPGAM 2 can generate protective immunity against T. gondii infection in BALB/c mice and may be a promising antigen in the further development of an effective vaccine against T. gondii infection. © H.-L. Wang et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2016.

  2. Comparison of mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses and subsequent protection in mice orally inoculated with a homologous or a heterologous rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, N; Burns, J W; Bracy, L; Greenberg, H B

    1994-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide, and vaccination is probably the most effective way to control the disease. Most current live virus vaccine candidates are based on the host range-restricted attenuation of heterologous animal rotaviruses in humans. The protective efficacy of these vaccine candidates has been variable. To better understand the nature of the heterologous rotavirus-induced active immune response, we compared the differences in the mucosal and systemic immune responses generated by heterologous (nonmurine) and homologous (murine) rotaviruses as well as the ability of these infections to produce subsequent protective immunity in a mouse model. Sucking mice were orally inoculated with a heterologous simian or bovine rotavirus (strain RRV or NCDV) or a homologous murine rotavirus (wild-type or tissue culture-adapted) strain EHP at various doses. Six weeks later, mice were challenged with a virulent murine rotavirus (wild-type strain ECW) and the shedding of viral antigen in feces was quantitated. Levels of rotavirus-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and fecal IgA prior to challenge were measured and correlated with subsequent viral shedding or protection. Heterologous rotavirus-induced active protection was highly dependent on the strain and dose of the virus tested. Mice inoculated with a high dose (10(7) PFU per mouse) of RRV were completely protected, while the protection was diminished in animals inoculated with NCDV or lower doses of RRV. The ability of a heterologous rotavirus to stimulate a detectable intestinal IgA response correlated with the ability of the virus to generate protective immunity. Serum IgG titer did not correlate with protection. Homologous rotavirus infection, on the other hand, was much more efficient at inducing both mucosal and systemic immune responses as well as protection regardless of the virulence of the virus strain or the size of the immunizing dose.

  3. Virus-specific T cells as correlate of (cross-)protective immunity against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburg, Arwen F; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; de Vries, Rory D

    2015-01-15

    Since inactivated influenza vaccines mainly confer protective immunity by inducing strain-specific antibodies to the viral hemagglutinin, these vaccines only afford protection against infection with antigenically matching influenza virus strains. Due to the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the inevitable future emergence of pandemic influenza viruses, there is considerable interest in the development of influenza vaccines that induce broader protective immunity. It has long been recognized that influenza virus-specific CD8(+) T cells directed to epitopes located in the relatively conserved internal proteins can cross-react with various subtypes of influenza A virus. This implies that these CD8(+) T cells, induced by prior influenza virus infections or vaccinations, could afford heterosubtypic immunity. Furthermore, influenza virus-specific CD4(+) T cells have been shown to be important in protection from infection, either via direct cytotoxic effects or indirectly by providing help to B cells and CD8(+) T cells. In the present paper, we review the induction of virus-specific T cell responses by influenza virus infection and the role of virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in viral clearance and conferring protection from subsequent infections with homologous or heterologous influenza virus strains. Furthermore, we discuss vector-based vaccination strategies that aim at the induction of a cross-reactive virus-specific T cell response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Circumsporozoite protein-specific K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells mediate protective antimalaria immunity in sporozoite-immunized MHC-I-K(d) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Tsuji, Moriya

    2014-01-01

    Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6) transgenic (Tg) mice, expressing K(d) molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg), which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  5. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  6. Genetically attenuated, P36p-deficient malarial sporozoites induce protective immunity and apoptosis of infected liver cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.R. van; Douradinha, B.G.; Franke-Fayard, B.; Heussler, V.; Dooren, M.W. van; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Mota, M.M.; Waters, A.P.; Janse, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Immunization with Plasmodium sporozoites that have been attenuated by gamma-irradiation or specific genetic modification can induce protective immunity against subsequent malaria infection. The mechanism of protection is only known for radiation-attenuated sporozoites, involving cell-mediated and

  7. Continuous and Discontinuous Cigarette Smoke Exposure Differentially Affects Protective Th1 Immunity against Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaler, Christopher R.; Horvath, Carly N.; McCormick, Sarah; Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Khera, Amandeep; Zganiacz, Anna; Kasinska, Joanna; Stampfli, Martin R.; Xing, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the leading cause of death due to a bacterial pathogen. Emerging epidemiologic evidence suggests that the leading risk factor associated with TB mortality is cigarette smoke exposure. Despite this, it remains poorly understood what is the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on anti-TB immunity and whether its potential detrimental effect can be reversed by cigarette smoking cessation. In our current study, we have investigated the impact of both continuous and discontinuous cigarette smoke exposure on the development of anti-mycobacterial type 1 immunity in murine models. We find that while continuous cigarette smoke exposure severely impairs type 1 immunity in the lung, a short-term smoking cessation allows rapid restoration of anti-mycobacterial immunity. The ability of continuous cigarette smoke exposure to dampen type 1 protective immunity is attributed locally to its affects on innate immune cells in the lung. Continuous cigarette smoke exposure locally, by not systemically, impairs APC accumulation and their production of TNF, IL-12, and RANTES, blunts the recruitment of CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells to the lung, and weakens the formation of granuloma. On the other hand, smoking cessation was found to help restore type 1 immunity by rapidly improving the functionality of lung APCs, enhancing the recruitment of CD4+IFN-γ+ T cells to the lung, and promoting the formation of granuloma. Our study for the first time demonstrates that continuous, but not discontinuous, cigarette smoke exposure severely impedes the lung expression of anti-TB Th1 immunity via inhibiting innate immune activation and lung T cell recruitment. Our findings thus suggest cigarette smoking cessation to be beneficial to the control of pulmonary TB. PMID:23527127

  8. Stimulation of local immunity and protection in mice by intramuscular immunization with triple- or double-layered rotavirus particles and QS-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, M M; Rae, M N; Conner, M E; Ward, R L

    1998-03-30

    Based on studies in animal models, parenteral immunization has become recognized as a potential vaccination strategy against rotavirus. Using an adult mouse model, the effects of the saponin adjuvant QS-21 on protection against murine rotavirus (strain EDIM) infection was determined following two intramuscular (i.m.) immunizations with purified EDIM particles including triple-layered (tl) infectious particles, tl particles inactivated with psoralen/UV, and double-layered (dl) inactivated particles. All three particles stimulated large serum rotavirus IgG responses and small amounts of serum rotavirus IgA, but undetectable stool rotavirus IgA. Inclusion of QS-21 during immunization increased the serum responses approximately 2- to 10-fold and also stimulated low levels of stool rotavirus IgA. Protection based on reduced shedding of rotavirus following EDIM challenge was significant (P immunized group and was enhanced (P immunization. Mice immunized with either live or inactivated tl particles and QS-21 were almost fully protected. Furthermore, animals inoculated with dl particles and the adjuvant shed significantly (P = .02) less virus following challenge than mice immunized with inactivated tl particles even though the latter induced measurable titers of neutralizing antibody to EDIM. These results demonstrate significant protection against rotavirus following i.m. immunization with both dl and tl EDIM particles which is consistently enhanced with QS-21.

  9. Immunization of baboons with attenuated schistosomula of Schistosoma haematobium: levels of protection induced by immunization with larvae irradiated with 20 and 60 krad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, R.A. (US Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3, Cairo (Egypt) Wellcome Trust Research Labs., Nairobi (Kenya)); Bickle, Q.D.; Sturrock, R.F.; Taylor, M.G.; Webbe, G. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK)); Kiare, S. (Wellcome Trust Research Labs., Nairobi (Kenya) Institute of Primate Research, Nairobi (Kenya)); James, E.R. (Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (USA). Dept. of Ophthalmology); Andrews, B.J. (Bergen Univ. (Norway). Medical Dept. B)

    1990-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that baboons can be immunized with S. haemotobium schistosomula irradiated with 20 krad in a regimen that induces 90% protection. While this high level of protection has stimulated a discussion on the feasibility of a human volunteer trial (Von Lichtenberg, 1985), results of further studies particularly on (i) the pathogensis of immunization per se (Byram et al., 1989), (ii) the longevity of protection, and (iii) the protective efficacy of cryopreserved irradiated S. haemotobium schistosomula (R. Harrison et al., in preparation), prevent recommending this form of vaccination for human application. (author).

  10. Immune correlates of protection for dengue: State of the art and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Harris, Eva

    2017-08-24

    Dengue viruses (DENV1-4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses estimated to cause up to ∼400 million infections and ∼100 million dengue cases each year. Factors that contribute to protection from and risk of dengue and severe dengue disease have been studied extensively but are still not fully understood. Results from Phase 3 vaccine efficacy trials have recently become available for one vaccine candidate, now licensed for use in several countries, and more Phase 2 and 3 studies of additional vaccine candidates are ongoing, making these issues all the more urgent and timely. At the "Summit on Dengue Immune Correlates of Protection", held in Annecy, France, on March 8-9, 2016, dengue experts from diverse fields came together to discuss the current understanding of the immune response to and protection from DENV infection and disease, identify key unanswered questions, discuss data on immune correlates and plans for comparison of results across assays/consortia, and propose a research agenda for investigation of dengue immune correlates, all in the context of both natural infection studies and vaccine trials. Copyright © 2017.

  11. Intramammary immunization with ultraviolet-killed Escherichia coli shows partial protection against late gestation intramammary challenge with a homologous strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, B; Gurjar, A; Sipka, A; Klaessig, S; Salmon, S; Quesnell, R; Schukken, Y H

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary immunization with UV-killed Escherichia coli ECC-Z on prevention of intramammary colonization after a challenge with a dose of the homologous E. coli ECC-Z live bacteria. A total of 10 cows were included in a study to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary immunization. All 10 cows received an intramammary immunization of 100 cfu of UV-killed E. coli ECC-Z bacteria into one hind quarter at the time of dry off. Approximately 2wk before the anticipated calving date, both hind quarters of all cows were challenged with 100 cfu of live E. coli ECC-Z bacteria. Five of the cows were vaccinated parenterally with a commercial J5 bacterin, and 5 cows served as controls with no parenteral vaccination. The cows were then followed over time and infection risk, clinical scores, somatic cell count, and milk production were observed over time. The results of these 10 cows showed partial protection of intramammary immunization on the outcome of a subsequent homologous intramammary challenge. Immunization resulted in a lower probability of infection, a lower bacteria count, lower somatic cell counts and milk conductivity, a lower clinical mastitis score, and increased milk production compared with unimmunized control quarters. Once the analysis was corrected for immunization, parenteral J5 vaccination had no significant effect on any of the measured parameters. These results provide the first evidence that intramammary immunization may improve the outcome of an intramammary E. coli infection in late gestation and onset of mastitis immediately following parturition. Unlike systemic vaccination, which generally does not reduce the intramammary infection risk, the intramammary immunization did show a 5-times reduced odds of an established intramammary infection after challenge. Cytokine profiles indicated a local return of proinflammatory response after challenge as the data showed a more pronounced increase in in

  12. Combination of protein and viral vaccines induces potent cellular and humoral immune responses and enhanced protection from murine malaria challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Claire L; Birkett, Ashley J; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2007-12-01

    The search for an efficacious vaccine against malaria is ongoing, and it is now widely believed that to confer protection a vaccine must induce very strong cellular and humoral immunity concurrently. We studied the immune response in mice immunized with the recombinant viral vaccines fowlpox strain FP9 and modified virus Ankara (MVA), a protein vaccine (CV-1866), or a combination of the two; all vaccines express parts of the same preerythrocytic malaria antigen, the Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein (CSP). Mice were then challenged with P. berghei sporozoites to determine the protective efficacies of different vaccine regimens. Two immunizations with the protein vaccine CV-1866, based on the hepatitis B core antigen particle, induced strong humoral immunity to the repeat region of CSP that was weakly protective against sporozoite challenge. Prime-boost with the viral vector vaccines, FP9 followed by MVA, induced strong T-cell immunity to the CD8+ epitope Pb9 and partially protected animals from challenge. Physically mixing CV-1866 with FP9 or MVA and then immunizing with the resultant combinations in a prime-boost regimen induced both cellular and humoral immunity and afforded substantially higher levels of protection (combination, 90%) than either vaccine alone (CV-1866, 12%; FP9/MVA, 37%). For diseases such as malaria in which different potent immune responses are required to protect against different stages, using combinations of partially effective vaccines may offer a more rapid route to achieving deployable levels of efficacy than individual vaccine strategies.

  13. Innate lymphoid cells: models of plasticity for immune homeostasis and rapid responsiveness in protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, F F; Belz, G T

    2016-09-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have stormed onto the immune landscape as "newly discovered" cell types. These tissue-resident sentinels are enriched at mucosal surfaces and engage in complex cross talk with elements of the adaptive immune system and microenvironment to orchestrate immune homeostasis. Many parallels exist between innate cells and T cells leading to the initial partitioning of ILCs into rather rigid subsets that reflect their "adaptive-like" effector cytokines profiles. ILCs themselves, however, have unique attributes that are only just beginning to be elucidated. These features result in complementarity with, rather than complete duplication of, functions of the adaptive immune system. Key transcription factors determine the pathway of differentiation of progenitors towards an ILC1, ILC2, or ILC3 subset. Once formed, flexibility in the responses of these subsets to stimuli unexpectedly allows transdifferentation between the different subsets and the acquisition of altered phenotypes and function. This provides a mechanism for rapid innate immune responsiveness. Here, we discuss the models of differentiation for maintenance and activation of tissue-resident ILCs in maintaining immune homeostasis and protection.

  14. Live AttenuatedLeishmania donovaniCentrin Gene-Deleted Parasites Induce IL-23-Dependent IL-17-Protective Immune Response against Visceral Leishmaniasis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Antara; Bhattacharya, Parna; Dagur, Pradeep K; Karmakar, Subir; Ismail, Nevien; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Akue, Adovi D; KuKuruga, Mark; McCoy, John Philip; Dey, Ranadhir; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2018-01-01

    No vaccine exists against visceral leishmaniasis. To develop effective vaccines, we have previously reported protective role of live attenuated centrin gene-deleted Leishmania donovani ( LdCen -/- ) parasites through induction of Th1 type immune response in mice, hamsters, and dogs. In this study, we specifically explored the role of Th17 cells in LdCen -/- -induced host protection in mice. Our results showed that compared with wild-type L. donovani infection, LdCen -/- parasites induce significantly higher expression of Th17 differentiation cytokines in splenic dendritic cells. There was also induction of IL-17 and its promoting cytokines in total splenocytes and in both CD4 and CD8 T cells following immunization with LdCen -/- Upon challenge with wild-type parasites, IL-17 and its differentiating cytokines were significantly higher in LdCen -/- -immunized mice compared with nonimmunized mice that resulted in parasite control. Alongside IL-17 induction, we observed induction of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells as reported earlier. However, Th17 cells are generated before Th1 cells. Neutralization of either IL-17 or IFN-γ abrogated LdCen -/- -induced host protection further confirming the essential role of Th17 along with Th1 cytokines in host protection. Treatment with recombinant IL-23, which is required for stabilization and maintenance of IL-17, heightened Th17, and Tc17 responses in immunized mice splenocytes. In contrast, Th17 response was absent in immunized IL-23R -/- mice that failed to induce protection upon virulent Leishmania challenge suggesting that IL-23 plays an essential role in IL-17-mediated protection by LdCen -/- parasites. This study unveiled the role of IL-23-dependent IL-17 induction in LdCen -/- parasite-induced immunity and subsequent protection against visceral leishmaniasis.

  15. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis - discovery and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    individuals. In addition, comparative analysis of biomarkers in PBMCs from asymptomatic or healed visceral leishmaniasis individuals in response to vaccine candidates including live attenuated parasites may provide clues about determinants of protective immunity and be helpful in shaping the final Leishmania vaccine formulation in the clinical trials.

  16. Biomarkers of Safety and Immune Protection for Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania Vaccines Against Visceral Leishmaniasis – Discovery and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2014-01-01

    individuals. In addition, comparative analysis of biomarkers in PBMCs from asymptomatic or healed visceral leishmaniasis individuals in response to vaccine candidates including live attenuated parasites may provide clues about determinants of protective immunity and be helpful in shaping the final Leishmania vaccine formulation in the clinical trials. PMID:24904589

  17. Immunity against tetanus infection, risk factors for non-protection and validation of a rapid immunotest kit among hospitalised children in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebola Emmanuel Orimadegun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Seroepidemiological studies of tetanus in Africans have focused mainly on adults especially pregnant women and data on children are scarcely reported. We investigated the seroprevalence of protective immunity level, determined risk factors for non-protection against tetanus and evaluated the performance of Tetanos Quick Stick® (TQS among hospitalised children aged 1 to 9 years in Nigeria. Blood IgG antibody levels to tetanus was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the laboratory and TQS (an immunochromatogrphic test at the bedside for 304 children admitted into emergency unit of a tertiary hospital in Ibadan Nigeria. Demographic information and vaccination history were also collected. TQS results were compared with anti-tetanus antibody measured by ELISA using seroprotection cut-off of 0.1 IU/ml. Seroprevalence of protective level of immunity against tetanus using ELISA and TQS methods was 44.7% and 45.4% respectively. Protective level of immunity increased as age increases. Of the seven potential factors assessed, male gender and being second or more position among mother’s children were independent predictors of non-protective level of immunity. Absence of history of recent tetanus toxoid injection was significantly associated with non-protective level of immunity in univariate analysis but not logistic regression model. The agreement between the ELISA and the TQS results was good with a k coefficient of 0.931. TQS sensitivity was, 95.7%, specificity 97.6%, positive predictive value 98.0% and negative predictive values 96.0%. This study showed that lack of protective immunity against tetanus is common; few demographic characteristics correctly predict non-protection and IgG antibody levels to tetanus was accurately detected by TQS.

  18. Immunity Against Tetanus Infection, Risk Factors for Non-Protection, and Validation of a Rapid Immunotest Kit among Hospitalized Children in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimadegun, Adebola Emmanuel; Orimadegun, Bose Etaniamhe; Adepoju, Akinlolu Adedayo

    2013-01-01

    Seroepidemiological studies of tetanus in Africans have focused mainly on adults especially pregnant women and data on children are scarcely reported. We investigated the seroprevalence of protective immunity level, determined risk factors for non-protection against tetanus, and evaluated the performance of Tetanos Quick Stick(®) (TQS) among hospitalized children aged 1-9 years in Nigeria. Blood IgG antibody levels to tetanus was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the laboratory and TQS (an immunochromatographic test) at the bedside for 304 children admitted into emergency unit of a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria. Demographic information and vaccination history were also collected. TQS results were compared with anti-tetanus antibody measured by ELISA using seroprotection cut-off of 0.1 IU/ml. Seroprevalence of protective level of immunity against tetanus using ELISA and TQS methods was 44.7 and 45.4% respectively. Protective level of immunity increased as age increases. Of the seven potential factors assessed, male gender and being second or more position among mother's children were independent predictors of non-protective level of immunity. Absence of history of recent tetanus toxoid injection was significantly associated with non-protective level of immunity in univariate analysis but not logistic regression model. The agreement between the ELISA and the TQS results was good with a k coefficient of 0.931. TQS sensitivity was 95.7%, specificity 97.6%, positive predictive value 98.0%, and negative predictive values 96.0%. This study showed that lack of protective immunity against tetanus is common; few demographic characteristics correctly predict non-protection and IgG antibody levels to tetanus was accurately detected by TQS.

  19. Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster by Intramuscular Immunization with an Autographa californica Baculovirus Driving the Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce María Meneses-Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we demonstrated that oral immunization using Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment (AcNPV-LC3 of Entamoeba histolytica conferred protection against ALA development in hamsters. In this study, we determined the ability of AcNPV-LC3 to protect against ALA by the intramuscular route as well as the liver immune response associated with protection. Results showed that 55% of hamsters IM immunized with AcNPV-LC3 showed sterile protection against ALA, whereas other 20% showed reduction in the size and extent of abscesses, resulting in some protection in 75% of animals compared to the sham control group. Levels of protection showed a linear correlation with the development and intensity of specific antiamoeba cellular and humoral responses, evaluated in serum and spleen of hamsters, respectively. Evaluation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns expressed in the liver of hamsters showed that sterile protection was associated with the production of high levels of IFNγ and IL-4. These results suggest that the baculovirus system is equally efficient by the intramuscular as well as the oral routes for ALA protection and that the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment is a highly protective antigen against hepatic amoebiasis through the local induction of IFNγ and IL-4.

  20. Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster by Intramuscular Immunization with an Autographa californica Baculovirus Driving the Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses-Ruiz, Dulce María; Aguilar-Diaz, Hugo; Bobes, Raúl José; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis; Laclette, Juan Pedro; Carrero, Julio César

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that oral immunization using Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment (AcNPV-LC3) of Entamoeba histolytica conferred protection against ALA development in hamsters. In this study, we determined the ability of AcNPV-LC3 to protect against ALA by the intramuscular route as well as the liver immune response associated with protection. Results showed that 55% of hamsters IM immunized with AcNPV-LC3 showed sterile protection against ALA, whereas other 20% showed reduction in the size and extent of abscesses, resulting in some protection in 75% of animals compared to the sham control group. Levels of protection showed a linear correlation with the development and intensity of specific antiamoeba cellular and humoral responses, evaluated in serum and spleen of hamsters, respectively. Evaluation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns expressed in the liver of hamsters showed that sterile protection was associated with the production of high levels of IFNγ and IL-4. These results suggest that the baculovirus system is equally efficient by the intramuscular as well as the oral routes for ALA protection and that the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment is a highly protective antigen against hepatic amoebiasis through the local induction of IFNγ and IL-4.

  1. Novel chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored respiratory mucosal tuberculosis vaccine: overcoming local anti-human adenovirus immunity for potent TB protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanathan, M; Thanthrige-Don, N; Afkhami, S; Lai, R; Damjanovic, D; Zganiacz, A; Feng, X; Yao, X-D; Rosenthal, K L; Medina, M Fe; Gauldie, J; Ertl, H C; Xing, Z

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains to be a major global health problem despite many decades of parenteral use of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Developing safe and effective respiratory mucosal TB vaccines represents a unique challenge. Over the past decade or so, the human serotype 5 adenovirus (AdHu5)-based TB vaccine has emerged as one of the most promising candidates based on a plethora of preclinical and early clinical studies. However, anti-AdHu5 immunity widely present in the lung of humans poses a serious gap and limitation to its real-world applications. In this study we have developed a novel chimpanzee adenovirus 68 (AdCh68)-vectored TB vaccine amenable to the respiratory route of vaccination. We have evaluated AdCh68-based TB vaccine for its safety, T-cell immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in relevant animal models of human pulmonary TB with or without parenteral BCG priming. We have also compared AdCh68-based TB vaccine with its AdHu5 counterpart in both naive animals and those with preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity in the lung. We provide compelling evidence that AdCh68-based TB vaccine is not only safe when delivered to the respiratory tract but, importantly, is also superior to its AdHu5 counterpart in induction of T-cell responses and immune protection, and limiting lung immunopathology in the presence of preexisting anti-AdHu5 immunity in the lung. Our findings thus suggest AdCh68-based TB vaccine to be an ideal candidate for respiratory mucosal immunization, endorsing its further clinical development in humans.

  2. Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii ROP54 induces protective immunity against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zou, Yang; Chen, Kai; Liu, Qing; Wang, Jin-Lei; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2017-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligatory intracellular protozoan, which infects most of the warm-blooded animals, causing serious public health problems and enormous economic losses worldwide. The rhoptry effector protein 54 (ROP54) has been indicated as a virulence factor that promotes Toxoplasma infection by modulating GBP2 loading onto parasite-containing vacuoles, which can modulate some aspects of the host immune response. In order to evaluate the immuno-protective value of ROP54, we constructed a eukaryotic recombinant plasmid expressing T. gondii ROP54 and intramuscularly immunized Kunming mice with this recombinant plasmid against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. All mice immunized with pVAX-ROP54 elicited a high level of specific antibody responses, a significant increase of lymphocyte proliferation, and a significant level of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12p70), in addition to an increased production of Th2-type cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). These results demonstrated that pVAX-ROP54 induced significant cellular and humoral (Th1/Th2) immune responses, which extended the survival time (13.0±1.15days for pVAX-ROP54 vs 6.7±0.48days for pVAX I, 6.8±0.42days for PBS and 6.5±0.53 for blank control) and significantly reduced cyst burden (35.9% for pVAX-ROP54, 1% for pVAX I and 2% for PBS, compared with blank control) of immunized mice. These results indicate that the recombinant ROP54 plasmid can provide partial protection and might be a potential vaccine candidate against acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan M Painter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP, in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3 established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  4. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Meghan M; Morrison, James H; Zoecklein, Laurie J; Rinkoski, Tommy A; Watzlawik, Jens O; Papke, Louisa M; Warrington, Arthur E; Bieber, Allan J; Matchett, William E; Turkowski, Kari L; Poeschla, Eric M; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-12-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection.

  5. Partial protective effect of intranasal immunization with recombinant Toxoplasma gondii rhoptry protein 17 against toxoplasmosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Long Wang

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects a variety of mammals, including humans. An effective vaccine for this parasite is therefore needed. In this study, RH strain T. gondii rhoptry protein 17 was expressed in bacteria as a fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST and the recombinant proteins (rTgROP17 were purified via GST-affinity chromatography. BALB/c mice were nasally immunised with rTgROP17, and induction of immune responses and protection against chronic and lethal T. gondii infections were investigated. The results revealed that mice immunised with rTgROP17 produced high levels of specific anti-rTgROP17 IgGs and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response of IgG2a predominance. The systemic immune response was associated with increased production of Th1 (IFN-γand IL-2 and Th2 (IL-4 cytokines, and enhanced lymphoproliferation (stimulation index, SI in the mice immunised with rTgROP17. Strong mucosal immune responses with increased secretion of TgROP17-specific secretory IgA (SIgA in nasal, vaginal and intestinal washes were also observed in these mice. The vaccinated mice displayed apparent protection against chronic RH strain infection as evidenced by their lower liver and brain parasite burdens (59.17% and 49.08%, respectively than those of the controls. The vaccinated mice also exhibited significant protection against lethal infection of the virulent RH strain (survival increased by 50% compared to the controls. Our data demonstrate that rTgROP17 can trigger strong systemic and mucosal immune responses against T. gondii and that ROP17 is a promising candidate vaccine for toxoplasmosis.

  6. Characterization of the protective immune response to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection in mice vaccinated with an LcrV-secreting strain of Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Catherine; Titecat, Marie; Poiret, Sabine; Cayet, Delphine; Boutillier, Denise; Simonet, Michel; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Lemaître, Nadine; Sebbane, Florent

    2016-11-11

    Pseudotuberculosis is an infection caused by the bacterial enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and is considered to be a significant problem in veterinary medicine. We previously found that intranasal administration of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain that secretes the low-calcium response V (LcrV) antigen from Y. pseudotuberculosis (Ll-LcrV) confers protection against a lethal Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Here, we aimed at characterizing the immunological basis of this LcrV-elicited protective response and at determining the duration of vaccine-induced immunity. Splenocytes from BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with Ll-LcrV or Ll as control were immunostained then analyzed by flow cytometry. Protection against a lethal intravenous injection of Y. pseudotuberculosis was also determined (i) in immunized BALB/c mice depleted or not of CD4+, CD8+ or CD25+ cells and (ii) in naïve BALB/c mice receiving serum from immunized mice by counting the number of bacteria in liver and spleen. Lastly, survival rate of immunized BALB/c mice following a lethal intravenous injection of Y. pseudotuberculosis was followed up to 9-months. We found that T and B lymphocytes but not non-conventional lymphoid cells were affected by Ll-LcrV immunization. We also observed that depletion of CD4+ and CD25+ but not CD8+ cells in immunized mice eradicated protection against a lethal systemic Y. pseudotuberculosis infection, suggesting that activated CD4+ T lymphocytes are required for vaccine-induced protection. Adoptive transfer of LcrV-specific antibodies from Ll-LcrV-immunized animals significantly reduced the bacterial counts in the liver compared to non-vaccinated mice. Lastly, the protective immunity conferred by Ll-LcrV decreased slightly over time; nevertheless almost 60% of the mice survived a lethal bacterial challenge at 9months post-vaccination. Mucosal vaccination of mice with Ll-LcrV induced cell- and antibody-mediated protective immunity against Y

  7. Comparative Study of the Protective Effect of Granulated Sugar and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    8362. All rights reserved. J. Appl. Sci. Environ. Manage. April. 2017. Vol. 21 (2) 314-319. Full-text Available Online at www.ajol.infoand www.bioline.org.br/ja. Comparative Study of the Protective Effect of Granulated Sugar and Garri Meal on.

  8. Growth, immune responses and protection of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus immunized with formalin-killed Streptococcus agalactiae serotype Ia and III vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atchariya Suwannasang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The protective efficacy of formalin-killed Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS serotype Ia (GBS-Ia and III (GBS-III vaccines were assessed in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. The fish with an average weight of 34.45± 0.08 g were immunized by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection with 4 different formalin-killed vaccines prepared from GBS-Ia (1x1010 CFU/mL, GBS-III (1x1010 CFU/mL, and combined GBS-Ia and GBS-III in an equal volume at final concentrations 1x1010 CFU/mL and 2x1010 CFU/mL in comparison with the non-immunized control group. At 2 and 4 weeks post vaccination, no significant differences were observed (p>0.05 among treatments in growth performance or haemato-immunological parameters, except the increased red blood cell at 2 weeks. Significantly increased antibody titers (p<0.05 against GBS-Ia and GBS-III antigens were noted in the groups immunized with homologous GBS vaccines, whereas the group reacted with heterologous GBS antigen showed less antibody titer as compared with the control group. The vaccination experiment indicated that i.p. injection of Nile tilapia with formalin-killed cells prepared from GBS-Ia or GBS-III provides significant protection, with relative percent survival (RPS value of 52.17 to 71.42%, against a challenge with the homologous serotype isolate, whereas the RPS in fish challenged with a heterologous serotype isolate varied from 20.00 to 53.57%. These results suggested that vaccines from either GBS-Ia or GBS-III have insufficient cross-protective efficacy against the other serotypes. However, a mixed vaccine produced from both GBS serotypes Ia and III provided significant protection with 65.00 to 95.66% RPS which could be an excellent vaccine to protect fish against streptococcosis caused by both GBS serotypes Ia and III.

  9. A novel MVA vectored Chikungunya virus vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Chu, Haiyan; Aliota, Matthew T; Partidos, Charalambos D; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus associated with febrile illness often accompanied by rash and arthralgia that may persist for several years. Outbreaks are associated with high morbidity and create a public health challenge for countries affected. Recent outbreaks have occurred in both Europe and the Americas, suggesting CHIKV may continue to spread. Despite the sustained threat of the virus, there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapy against CHIKV. Therefore, it is critical to develop a vaccine that is both well tolerated and highly protective. In this study, we describe the construction and characterization of a modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) virus expressing CHIKV E3 and E2 proteins (MVA-CHIK) that protected several mouse models from challenge with CHIKV. In particular, BALB/c mice were completely protected against viremia upon challenge with CHIKV after two doses of MVA-CHIK. Additionally, A129 mice (deficient in IFNα/β) were protected from viremia, footpad swelling, and mortality. While high anti-virus antibodies were elicited, low or undetectable levels of neutralizing antibodies were produced in both mouse models. However, passive transfer of MVA-CHIK immune serum to naïve mice did not protect against mortality, suggesting that antibodies may not be the main effectors of protection afforded by MVA-CHIK. Furthermore, depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+) T-cells from vaccinated mice resulted in 100% mortality, implicating the indispensable role of CD4(+) T-cells in the protection afforded by MVA-CHIK. The results presented herein demonstrate the potential of MVA to effectively express CHIKV E3-E2 proteins and generate protective immune responses. Our findings challenge the assumption that only neutralizing antibodies are effective in providing protection against CHIKV, and provides a framework for the development of novel, more effective vaccine strategies to combat CHIKV.

  10. A novel MVA vectored Chikungunya virus vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Weger-Lucarelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging arbovirus associated with febrile illness often accompanied by rash and arthralgia that may persist for several years. Outbreaks are associated with high morbidity and create a public health challenge for countries affected. Recent outbreaks have occurred in both Europe and the Americas, suggesting CHIKV may continue to spread. Despite the sustained threat of the virus, there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapy against CHIKV. Therefore, it is critical to develop a vaccine that is both well tolerated and highly protective.In this study, we describe the construction and characterization of a modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA virus expressing CHIKV E3 and E2 proteins (MVA-CHIK that protected several mouse models from challenge with CHIKV. In particular, BALB/c mice were completely protected against viremia upon challenge with CHIKV after two doses of MVA-CHIK. Additionally, A129 mice (deficient in IFNα/β were protected from viremia, footpad swelling, and mortality. While high anti-virus antibodies were elicited, low or undetectable levels of neutralizing antibodies were produced in both mouse models. However, passive transfer of MVA-CHIK immune serum to naïve mice did not protect against mortality, suggesting that antibodies may not be the main effectors of protection afforded by MVA-CHIK. Furthermore, depletion of CD4(+, but not CD8(+ T-cells from vaccinated mice resulted in 100% mortality, implicating the indispensable role of CD4(+ T-cells in the protection afforded by MVA-CHIK.The results presented herein demonstrate the potential of MVA to effectively express CHIKV E3-E2 proteins and generate protective immune responses. Our findings challenge the assumption that only neutralizing antibodies are effective in providing protection against CHIKV, and provides a framework for the development of novel, more effective vaccine strategies to combat CHIKV.

  11. Carbohydrates in plant immunity and plant protection: roles and potential application as foliar sprays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eTrouvelot

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing interest is devoted to carbohydrates for their roles in plant immunity. Some of them are elicitors of plant defenses whereas other ones act as signaling molecules in a manner similar to phytohormones. This review first describes the main classes of carbohydrates associated to plant immunity, their role and mode of action. More precisely, the state of the art about perception of PAMP, MAMP and DAMP type oligosaccharides is presented and examples of induced defense events are provided. A particular attention is paid to the structure / activity relationships of these compounds. The role of sugars as signaling molecules, especially in plant microbe interactions, is also presented. Secondly, the potentialities and limits of foliar sprays of carbohydrates to stimulate plant immunity for crop protection against diseases are discussed, with focus on the roles of the leaf cuticle and phyllosphere microflora.

  12. Serum IgA levels induced by rotavirus natural infection, but not following immunization with the RRV-TV vaccine (Rotashield), correlate with protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rosabel; Franco, Manuel; Sarmiento, Luis; Romero, Milagros; Schael, Irene Pérez

    2005-08-01

    To directly compare serum rotavirus specific IgA as a marker of protection in children vaccinated with the RRV-TV (Rotashield) vaccine and in naturally infected children, we studied pre-existing rotavirus IgA antibodies by ELISA assays in these groups of children within the first 5 days after the onset of a diarrhea episode, due or not to rotavirus. In immunized children, rotavirus IgA titers were similar between infected and non-RV infected children. In non-immunized children, the proportion with rotavirus IgA titers was significantly greater in non-RV infected children (58%) than in infected children (31%). Additionally, a titer >/=1:800 was associated with 68% protection. Thus, in this study serum rotavirus IgA showed a good correlation with protection in children pre-exposed to natural infection but not in those immunized with the RRV-TV vaccine. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. SEVERAL MUCOSAL VACCINATION ROUTES CONFER IMMUNITY AGAINST ENTERIC REDMOUTH DISEASE IN RAINBOW TROUT, BUT THE PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS ARE DIFFERENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    Vaccination is a keystone in prophylactic strategies preventing outbreaks of fish pathogenic bacterial diseases in aquaculture. The first commercial fish vaccine consisted of a bacterin of Yersinia ruckeri serotype O1 biotype 1. The vaccine has been very successful and has been used for more than...... 35 years. A vast experience has been gained concerning the applications of the vaccine, which can be utilized through several mucosal immunization routes such as bath, oral and anal application, all resulting in significantly increased survival compared to un-vaccinated control groups during bath...... antibodies. Further, plasma from bath vaccinated fish kills significantly more Y. ruckeri in vitro than plasma from un-vaccinated control fish. Increased plasma antibody titer against Y. ruckeri seems to be an important part of the protective immune response obtained post bath vaccination. These results all...

  14. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  15. New gorilla adenovirus vaccine vectors induce potent immune responses and protection in a mouse malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Keith; Stefaniak, Maureen; Chen, Ping; Patterson, Noelle B; Liao, Grant; Weng, Shaojie; Krepkiy, Svetlana; Ekberg, Greg; Torano, Holly; Ettyreddy, Damodar; Gowda, Kalpana; Sonawane, Sharvari; Belmonte, Arnel; Abot, Esteban; Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Moormann, Ann; Vulule, John; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L; Brough, Douglas E; Bruder, Joseph T

    2017-07-03

    A DNA-human Ad5 (HuAd5) prime-boost malaria vaccine has been shown to protect volunteers against a controlled human malaria infection. The potency of this vaccine, however, appeared to be affected by the presence of pre-existing immunity against the HuAd5 vector. Since HuAd5 seroprevalence is very high in malaria-endemic areas of the world, HuAd5 may not be the most appropriate malaria vaccine vector. This report describes the evaluation of the seroprevalence, immunogenicity and efficacy of three newly identified gorilla adenoviruses, GC44, GC45 and GC46, as potential malaria vaccine vectors. The seroprevalence of GC44, GC45 and GC46 is very low, and the three vectors are not efficiently neutralized by human sera from Kenya and Ghana, two countries where malaria is endemic. In mice, a single administration of GC44, GC45 and GC46 vectors expressing a murine malaria gene, Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), induced robust PyCSP-specific T cell and antibody responses that were at least as high as a comparable HuAd5-PyCSP vector. Efficacy studies in a murine malaria model indicated that a prime-boost regimen with DNA-PyCSP and GC-PyCSP vectors can protect mice against a malaria challenge. Moreover, these studies indicated that a DNA-GC46-PyCSP vaccine regimen was significantly more efficacious than a DNA-HuAd5-PyCSP regimen. These data suggest that these gorilla-based adenovectors have key performance characteristics for an effective malaria vaccine. The superior performance of GC46 over HuAd5 highlights its potential for clinical development.

  16. Protective immunity in grouper (Epinephelus coioides) following exposure to or injection with Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Chun; Xie, Ming-Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Li, An-Xing

    2007-04-01

    The protective immunity of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) against Cryptocaryon irritans was determined after immunisation by surface exposure or intraperitoneal injection. Specific antibody titres of immunised fish serum and skin culture supernatant were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immobilisation assays. Specific antibody can be detected in some immunised fish at Week 1 and in all immunised fish at Week 2, and the peaks were between Weeks 4-6. Specific antibody was still evident in the serum and skin of immunised fish at Week 8, and provided good protection against challenge with C. irritans. These findings indicated that humoral and skin mucosal immunity play important roles in fish against C. irritans infection.

  17. Exercise protects from cancer through regulation of immune function and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2017-08-15

    Exercise training has been extensively studied in cancer settings as part of prevention or rehabilitation strategies, yet emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can also directly affect tumor-specific outcomes. The underlying mechanisms for this exercise-dependent cancer protection are just starting to be elucidated. To this end, evasion of immune surveillance and tumor-associated inflammation are established as hallmarks of cancer, and exercise may target cancer incidence and progression through regulation of these mechanisms. Here, I review the role of exercise in protection from cancer through mobilization and activation of cytotoxic immune cells, restriction of inflammatory signaling pathways in myeloid immune cells, and regulation of acute and chronic systemic inflammatory responses. In conclusion, I propose that exercise has the potential to target tumor growth through regulation of immune and inflammatory functions, and exercise may be pursued as anticancer treatment through incorporation into standard oncological therapy to the benefit of the cancer patients. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Protection of pigs against genital Chlamydia trachomatis challenge by parenteral or mucosal DNA immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schautteet, Katelijn; De Clercq, Evelien; Jönsson, Yannick; Lagae, Stefanie; Chiers, Koen; Cox, Eric; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2012-04-16

    The current study evaluates combined aerosol-vaginal delivery of a MOMP-based Chlamydia trachomatis (serovar E) DNA vaccine in a pig genital challenge model. Most non-replicating antigens are rather poor mucosal immunogens in comparison to replicating antigens. Therefore, a mucosal administered DNA vaccine, which actually mimics a live vaccine, could be promising. Protection was promoted by plasmids encoding the porcine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (pcDNA3.1zeo::GM-CSF), the Escherichia coli thermo-labile enterotoxin (LT) subunit A (plasmid PJV2004::LTa) and subunit B (plasmid PJV2005::LTb). Mucosal C. trachomatis DNA vaccination induced significant protection against genital C. trachomatis challenge although the infection could not be eradicated. Intradermal immunization was significantly less efficient in protecting experimentally infected pigs. Protection was correlated with efficient T cell priming and significantly higher serum IgA titers following primo vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative genomics RNAi screen identifies Eftud2 as a novel regulator of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Arras, Lesly; Laws, Rebecca; Leach, Sonia M; Pontis, Kyle; Freedman, Jonathan H; Schwartz, David A; Alper, Scott

    2014-06-01

    The extent of the innate immune response is regulated by many positively and negatively acting signaling proteins. This allows for proper activation of innate immunity to fight infection while ensuring that the response is limited to prevent unwanted complications. Thus mutations in innate immune regulators can lead to immune dysfunction or to inflammatory diseases such as arthritis or atherosclerosis. To identify novel innate immune regulators that could affect infectious or inflammatory disease, we have taken a comparative genomics RNAi screening approach in which we inhibit orthologous genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and murine macrophages, expecting that genes with evolutionarily conserved function also will regulate innate immunity in humans. Here we report the results of an RNAi screen of approximately half of the C. elegans genome, which led to the identification of many candidate genes that regulate innate immunity in C. elegans and mouse macrophages. One of these novel conserved regulators of innate immunity is the mRNA splicing regulator Eftud2, which we show controls the alternate splicing of the MyD88 innate immunity signaling adaptor to modulate the extent of the innate immune response. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  2. IMMUNE SUPPRESSION OF CHALLENGED VACCINATES AS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT OF STERILE PROTECTION BY LENTIVIRAL VACCINES

    OpenAIRE

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAVPV) challenge [1,2]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any i...

  3. Nasally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate respiratory antiviral immune responses and induce protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomosada, Yohsuke; Chiba, Eriko; Zelaya, Hortensia; Takahashi, Takuya; Tsukida, Kohichiro; Kitazawa, Haruki; Alvarez, Susana; Villena, Julio

    2013-08-15

    Some studies have shown that nasally administered immunobiotics had the potential to improve the outcome of influenza virus infection. However, the capacity of immunobiotics to improve protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection was not investigated before. The aims of this study were: a) to evaluate whether the nasal administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 (Lr05) and L. rhamnosus CRL1506 (Lr06) are able to improve respiratory antiviral defenses and beneficially modulate the immune response triggered by TLR3/RIG-I activation; b) to investigate whether viability of Lr05 or Lr06 is indispensable to modulate respiratory immunity and; c) to evaluate the capacity of Lr05 and Lr06 to improve the resistance of infant mice against RSV infection. Nasally administered Lr05 and Lr06 differentially modulated the TLR3/RIG-I-triggered antiviral respiratory immune response. Lr06 administration significantly modulated the production of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-6 in the response to poly(I:C) challenge, while nasal priming with Lr05 was more effective to improve levels of IFN-γ and IL-10. Both viable Lr05 and Lr06 strains increased the resistance of infant mice to RSV infection while only heat-killed Lr05 showed a protective effect similar to those observed with viable strains. The present work demonstrated that nasal administration of immunobiotics is able to beneficially modulate the immune response triggered by TLR3/RIG-I activation in the respiratory tract and to increase the resistance of mice to the challenge with RSV. Comparative studies using two Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains of the same origin and with similar technological properties showed that each strain has an specific immunoregulatory effect in the respiratory tract and that they differentially modulate the immune response after poly(I:C) or RSV challenges, conferring different degree of protection and using distinct immune mechanisms. We also demonstrated in this work that it is possible

  4. Arginase 1 activity worsens lung-protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippenberg, Sarah; Brumshagen, Christina; Aschenbrenner, Franziska; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 helper cell (Th2) dominated chronic lung diseases such as asthma are characterized by an increased risk for bacterial lung infections. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. Arginase 1 (Arg1) has been suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma, and is rapidly induced in lung macrophages by Th2 cytokines, thereby limiting macrophage-derived antimicrobial nitric oxide (NO) production. Here we examined the effect of Th2 cytokine induced upregulation or lung myeloid cell specific conditional knockdown of Arg1 on lung resistance against Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) in mice. Lung macrophages responded with a profound induction of Arg1 mRNA and protein to treatment with IL-13 both in vitro and in vivo. IL-13-induced Arg1 activity in the lungs of mice led to significantly attenuated lung-protective immunity against Spn, while conditional Arg1 knockdown had no effect on lung-protective immunity against Spn. Collectively, the data show that Th2 cytokine induced increased Arg1 activity worsens lung-protective immunity against Spn, and interventions to block Th2 cytokine induced lung Arg1 activity may thus be a novel immunomodulatory strategy to lower the risk of bacterial infections in asthmatic patients. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Similar protective immunity induced by an inactivated enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine in neonatal rhesus macaques and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Ma, Kaili; Yang, Erxia; Wang, Jingjing; Che, Yanchun; Jiang, Li; Pu, Jing; Guo, Lei; Feng, Min; Liang, Yan; Cui, Wei; Yang, Huai; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-17

    During the development of enterovirus 71 (EV71) inactivated vaccine for preventing human hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) by EV71 infection, an effective animal model is presumed to be significant and necessary. Our previous study demonstrated that the vesicles in oral regions and limbs potentially associated with viremia, which are the typical manifestations of HFMD, and remarkable pathologic changes were identified in various tissues of neonatal rhesus macaque during EV71 infection. Although an immune response in terms of neutralizing antibody and T cell memory was observed in animals infected by the virus or stimulated by viral antigen, whether such a response could be considered as an indicator to justify the immune response in individuals vaccinated or infected in a pandemic needs to be investigated. Here, a comparative analysis of the neutralizing antibody response and IFN-γ-specific T cell response in vaccinated neonatal rhesus macaques and a human clinical trial with an EV71 inactivated vaccine was performed, and the results showed the identical tendency and increased level of neutralizing antibody and the IFN-γ-specific T cell response stimulated by the EV71 antigen peptide. Importantly, the clinical protective efficacy against virus infection by the elicited immune response in the immunized population compared with the placebo control and the up-modulated gene profile associated with immune activation were similar to those in infected macaques. Further safety verification of this vaccine in neonatal rhesus macaques and children confirmed the potential use of the macaque as a reliable model for the evaluation of an EV71 candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MyD88 Expression by CNS-Resident Cells is Pivotal for Eliciting Protective Immunity in Brain Abscesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Garg

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available MyD88 KO (knockout mice are exquisitely sensitive to CNS (central nervous system infection with Staphylococcus aureus, a common aetiological agent of brain abscess, exhibiting global defects in innate immunity and exacerbated tissue damage. However, since brain abscesses are typified by the involvement of both activated CNS-resident and infiltrating immune cells, in our previous studies it has been impossible to determine the relative contribution of MyD88-dependent signalling in the CNS compared with the peripheral immune cell compartments. In the present study we addressed this by examining the course of S. aureus infection in MyD88 bone marrow chimaera mice. Interestingly, chimaeras where MyD88 was present in the CNS, but not bone marrow-derived cells, mounted pro-inflammatory mediator expression profiles and neutrophil recruitment equivalent to or exceeding that detected in WT (wild-type mice. These results implicate CNS MyD88 as essential in eliciting the initial wave of inflammation during the acute response to parenchymal infection. Microarray analysis of infected MyD88 KO compared with WT mice revealed a preponderance of differentially regulated genes involved in apoptotic pathways, suggesting that the extensive tissue damage characteristic of brain abscesses from MyD88 KO mice could result from dysregulated apoptosis. Collectively, the findings of the present study highlight a novel mechanism for CNS-resident cells in initiating a protective innate immune response in the infected brain and, in the absence of MyD88 in this compartment, immunity is compromised.

  7. Protective yeasts control V. anguillarum pathogenicity and modulate the innate immune response of challenged zebrafish (Danio rerio larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Stefano Caruffo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated mechanisms involved in the protection of zebrafish (Danio rerio larvae by two probiotic candidate yeasts, Debaryomyces hansenii 97 (Dh97 and Yarrowia lypolitica 242 (Yl242, against a Vibrio anguillarum challenge. We determined the effect of different yeast concentrations (104 – 107 UFC/mL to: i protect larvae from the challenge, ii reduce the in vivo pathogen concentration and iii modulate the innate immune response of the host. To evaluate the role of zebrafish microbiota in protection, the experiments were performed in conventionally raised and germ-free larvae. In vitro co-aggregation assays were performed to determine a direct yeast-pathogen interaction. Results showed that both yeasts significantly increased the survival rate of conventionally raised larvae challenged with V. anguillarum. The concentration of yeasts in larvae tended to increase with yeast inoculum, which was more pronounced for Dh97. Better protection was observed with Dh97 at a concentration of 106 CFU/mL compared to 104 CFU/mL. In germ-free conditions V. anguillarum reached higher concentrations in larvae and provoked significantly more mortality than in conventional conditions, revealing the protective role of the host microbiota. Interestingly, yeasts were equally (Dh97 or more effective (Yl242 in protecting germ-free than conventionally-raised larvae, showing that protection can be exerted only by yeasts and is not necessarily related to modulation of the host microbiota. Although none of the yeasts co-aggregated with V. anguillarum, they were able to reduce its proliferation in conventionally raised larvae, reduce initial pathogen concentration in germ-free larvae and prevent the upregulation of key components of the inflammatory/anti-inflammatory response (il1b, tnfa, c3, mpx and il10, respectively. These results show that protection by yeasts of zebrafish larvae challenged with V. anguillarum relates to an in vivo anti-pathogen effect, the

  8. A Whole Virus Pandemic Influenza H1N1 Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Protective in Active Immunization and Passive Protection Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A.; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G.; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus c...

  9. Adoptive transfer of CD8alpha+ dendritic cells (DC) isolated from mice infected with Chlamydia muridarum are more potent in inducing protective immunity than CD8alpha- DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilenki, Laura; Wang, Shuhe; Yang, Jie; Fan, Yijun; Jiao, Lei; Joyee, Antony George; Han, Xiaobing; Yang, Xi

    2006-11-15

    Chlamydial infections are serious public health concerns worldwide. In this study, we examined the role of dendritic cell (DC) subsets in inducing protective immunity against chlamydial infection using an adoptive transfer approach. We found that CD11c+CD8alpha+ (double-positive, DP) DC, compared with CD11c+CD8alpha- (single-positive, SP) DC isolated from infected mice, are more potent inducers of protective immunity. Specifically, mice pretreated with DPDC from infected mice, upon infection with Chlamydia trachomatis mouse pneumonitis (MoPn), experienced significantly less severe body weight loss and in vivo chlamydial growth. Analysis of MoPn-driven cytokine production by immune cells revealed that mice that were treated with DPDC produced significantly higher levels of Th1 (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-12) but lower levels of Th2 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13)-related cytokines than the recipients of SPDC following infection challenge. Moreover, DPDC-treated mice displayed significantly higher levels of MoPn-specific IgG2a production and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses compared with SPDC-treated mice. Furthermore, DPDC isolated from infected mice produced higher amounts of IL-12 and IL-10 in vitro in comparison with SPDC. These data indicate that CD8alpha+ DC have a significantly higher capacity in inducing protective immunity compared with CD8alpha- DC, demonstrating the crucial role of DC1-like cells in eliciting protection against C. trachomatis infection.

  10. Protection of aouts monkeys after immunization with recombinant antigens of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhard Enders

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Aotus spp. (owl monkey is one of the WHO recommended experimental models for Plasmodium falciparum blood stage infection, especially relevant for vaccination studies with asexual blood stage antigens of this parasite. For several immunization trials with purified recombinant merozoite/schizont antigens, the susceptible Aouts kenotypes II, III, IV and VI were immunized with Escherichia coli derived fusion proteins containg partial sequences of the proteins MSAI (merozoite surface antigen I, SERP (serine-strech protein and HRPII (histidine alanine rich protein II as well as with a group of recombinant antigens obtained by an antiserum raised against a protective 41 kD protein band. The subcutaneous application (3x of the antigen preparations was carried out in intact animals followed by splenectomy prior to challange, in order to increase the susceptibility of the experimental hosts to the parasite. A partial sequence of HRPII, the combination of three different fusion proteins of the 41 kD group and mixture of two sequences of SERP in the presence of the modified Al(OH3 adjuvant conferred significant protection against a challange infection with P. falciparum blood stages (2-5 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência i. RBC. Monkey immunized with the MS2-fusion protein carrying the N-terminal part of the 195 kD precursor of the major merozoite surface antigens induced only marginal protection showing some correlation between antibody titer and degree of parasitaemia. Based on the protective capacity of these recombinant antigens we have expressed two hybrid proteins (MS2/SERP/HRPII and SERP/MSAI/HRPII in E. coli containing selected partial sequences of SERP, HRPII and MSAI. Antibodies raised against both hybrid proteins in rabbits and Aotus monkeys recognize the corresponding schizont polypeptides. In two independent immunization trials using 13 animals (age 7 months to 3 years we could show that immunization of Aotus monkeys with either of the

  11. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? ... fault if you don't have all the immunizations (vaccinations) you need. Shots that doctors recommend today ...

  12. Immunity to Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Proteins Protects Rabbits from Serious Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Adam. R.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Merriman, Joseph A.; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes significant illnesses throughout the world, including toxic shock syndrome (TSS), pneumonia, and infective endocarditis. Major contributors to S. aureus illnesses are secreted virulence factors it produces, including superantigens and cytolysins. This study investigates the use of superantigens and cytolysins as staphylococcal vaccine candidates. Importantly, 20% of humans and 50% of rabbits in our TSS model cannot generate antibody responses to native superantigens. We generated three TSST-1 mutants; G31S/S32P, H135A, and Q136A. All rabbits administered these TSST-1 toxoids generated strong antibody responses (titers>10,000) that neutralized native TSST-1 in TSS models, both in vitro and in vivo. These TSST-1 mutants lacked detectable residual toxicity. Additionally, the TSST-1 mutants exhibited intrinsic adjuvant activity, increasing antibody responses to a second staphylococcal antigen (β-toxin). This effect may be due to TSST-1 mutants binding to the immune co-stimulatory molecule CD40. The superantigens TSST-1 and SEC and the cytolysin α-toxin are known to contribute to staphylococcal pneumonia. Immunization of rabbits against these secreted toxins provided complete protection from highly lethal challenge with a USA200 S. aureus strain producing all three exotoxins; USA200 strains are common causes of staphylococcal infections. The same three exotoxins plus the cytolysins β-toxin and γ-toxin contribute to infective endocarditis and sepsis caused by USA200 strains. Immunization against these five exotoxins protected rabbits from infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. These data suggest that immunization against toxoid proteins of S. aureus exotoxins protects from serious illnesses, and concurrently superantigen toxoid mutants provide endogenous adjuvant activity. PMID:22691432

  13. Lactococcus lactis displayed neuraminidase confers cross protective immunity against influenza A viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Zhao, Daxian; Ouyang, Jiexiu; Jiao, Huifeng; Shu, Handing; Ge, Xinqi

    2015-02-01

    Influenza A viruses pose a serious threat to public health. Current influenza A vaccines predominantly focus on hemagglutinin (HA) and show strain-specific protection. Neuraminidase (NA) is much less studied in the context of humoral immunity against influenza A viruses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the cross protective immunity of NA presented on Lactococcus lactis (L.lactis) surface against homologous and heterologous influenza A viruses in the mouse model. L.lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-NA was constructed in which pgsA was used as an anchor protein. Mice vaccinated orally with L.lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-NA could elicit significant NA-specific serum IgG and mucosa IgA antibodies, as well as neuraminidase inhibition (NI) titers. Importantly, L.lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-NA provided 80% protection against H5N1, 60% protection against H3N2 and H1N1, respectively. These findings suggest that recombinant L.lactis/pNZ110-pgsA-NA in the absence of adjuvant via oral administration can be served as an effective vaccine candidate against diverse strains of influenza A viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intranasal Immunization with Influenza Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored Cholera Toxin B or Ricin Toxin B Enhances Adaptive Immune Responses and Protection against an Antigenically Distinct Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianliang Ji

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most effective means to prevent influenza virus infection, although current approaches are associated with suboptimal efficacy. Here, we generated virus-like particles (VLPs composed of the hemagglutinin (HA, neuraminidase (NA and matrix protein (M1 of A/Changchun/01/2009 (H1N1 with or without either membrane-anchored cholera toxin B (CTB or ricin toxin B (RTB as molecular adjuvants. The intranasal immunization of mice with VLPs containing membrane-anchored CTB or RTB elicited stronger humoral and cellular immune responses when compared to mice immunized with VLPs alone. Administration of VLPs containing CTB or RTB significantly enhanced virus-specific systemic and mucosal antibody responses, hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers, virus neutralizing antibody titers, and the frequency of virus-specific IFN-γ and IL-4 secreting splenocytes. VLPs with and without CTB or RTB conferred complete protection against lethal challenge with a mouse-adapted homologous virus. When challenged with an antigenically distinct H1N1 virus, all mice immunized with VLPs containing CTB or RTB survived whereas mice immunized with VLPs alone showed only partial protection (80% survival. Our results suggest that membrane-anchored CTB and RTB possess strong adjuvant properties when incorporated into an intranasally-delivered influenza VLP vaccine. Chimeric influenza VLPs containing CTB or RTB may represent promising vaccine candidates for improved immunological protection against homologous and antigenically distinct influenza viruses.

  15. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  16. Local Th17/IgA immunity correlate with protection against intranasal infection with Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Christensen, Dennis; Hansen, Lasse Bøllehuus

    2017-01-01

    the intranasal route was able to induce protection against repeated intranasal GAS infections in a murine challenge model. The lack of intranasal protection induced by the parenteral vaccine correlated with a reduced mucosal recall response at the site of infection. Taken together, our results demonstrate...... vaccine against GAS, it is therefore important to investigate how protective immunity is related to the route of vaccine administration. To explore this, we examined whether a parenterally administered anti-GAS vaccine could protect against an intranasal GAS infection or if this would require locally...... primed immunity. We foundd that a parenteral CAF01 adjuvanted GAS vaccine offered no protection against intranasal infection despite inducing strong systemic Th1/Th17/IgG immunity that efficiently protected against an intraperitoneal GAS infection. However, the same vaccine administered via...

  17. Protective immunity to Haemonchus contortus induced by immunoaffinity isolated antigens that share a phylogenetically conserved carbohydrate gut surface epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Perryman, L E; Conder, G A; Crow, S; McGuire, T

    1993-11-15

    Whole gut homogenates of the blood-sucking nematode Haemonchus contortus induce protective immunity in goats, and some of these gut Ag are conserved among related parasitic nematode species. To identify gut Ag that induce protective immunity and have phylogenetically conserved epitopes, mAb were made to gut-surface Ag of H. contortus. Forty-nine mAb reacted with microvilli of the parasite gut. Two of these mAb (42/10.6.1 and 42/53.3.5) were analyzed here. Both of the mAb bound to the microvillar surface of freshly isolated gut, and each mAb recognized carbohydrate epitopes, based on sensitivity to periodate oxidation. The 42/10.6.1 epitope occurred on at least 18 proteins in Western blots and in several H. contortus tissues. Proteins recognized by this mAb localized to membrane and excretory/secretory fractions of the worm. This epitope was also identified on the gut and other tissues and multiple proteins of related adult and larval nematodes, including larval Ancylostoma caninum and a mixed population of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In contrast, the 42/53.3.5 mAb bound to the gut surface and recognized proteins of 100 and 46 kDa from adult H. contortus gut. Four proteins of 100, 52, 46, and 30 kDa were isolated from the 42/53.3.5 immunoaffinity columns, and except for the 30-kDa protein, each was recognized by both the 42/10.6.1 and 42/53.3.5 mAb. Epitopes recognized by each mAb were distinct from one another and phosphorylcholine. When used to immunize goats, Ag isolated by both mAb induced protection that significantly (p < 0.05) reduced total worm counts after challenge infections compared with the control groups.

  18. Immune response in bovine neosporosis: Protection or contribution to the pathogenesis of abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almería, Sonia; Serrano-Pérez, Beatriz; López-Gatius, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Neospora caninum is a protozoan parasite with a preference for cattle and dogs as hosts. When N. caninum infection occurs in cattle it induces abortion, bovine neosporosis being a main cause of abortion worldwide. In dairy cattle, the economic burden of neosporosis-associated abortion is so great that it might results in closure of a farm. However, not all infected cows abort and it is not yet understood why this occurs. At present there is no effective treatment or vaccine. This review provides insights on how immune response against the parasite determines protection or contribution to abortion. Aspects on markers of risk of abortion are also discussed. Humoral immune responses are not protective against N. caninum but seropositivity and antibody level can be good markers for a diagnosis of bovine neosporosis and its associated abortion risk. In addition, humoral mechanisms against N. caninum infection and abortion differ in pure-breed and cross-breed pregnant dairy and beef cattle. Concentrations of Pregnancy Associated glycoprotein -2 (PAG-2) can also be used to predict abortion. A partially protective immune response encompasses increased IFN-γ expression, which has to be counterbalanced by other cytokines such as IL-12 and IL-10, especially towards the end of pregnancy. Although IFN-γ is required to limit parasite proliferation a critical threshold of the IFN-γ response is also required to limit adverse effects on pregnancy. In clinical terms, it may be stated that IFN-γ production and cross-breed pregnancy can protect Neospora-infected dairy cows against abortion. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Protective immunization against group B meningococci using anti-idiotypic mimics of the capsular polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninati, Concetta; Arseni, Simona; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Midiri, Angelina; Biondo, Carmelo; Polonelli, Luciano; Teti, Giuseppe

    2004-02-15

    Use of the serogroup B meningococcal capsular polysaccharide (MenB CP) as a vaccine is hampered by the presence of epitopes that cross-react with human polysialic acid. As non-cross-reactive, protective capsular epitopes have also been described, we set out to develop protein mimics of one of such epitopes using as a template a highly protective mAb (mAb Seam 3) raised against a chemically modified form of the MenB CP (N-Pr MenB CP). Using phage display, anti-idiotypic single-chain Ab fragments (scFvs) were obtained from spleen cells of mice immunized with the Seam 3 mAb. Two Seam 3-specific scFvs competed with N-Pr MenB CP for binding to either mAb Seam 3 or rabbit Abs present in typing sera. Moreover, in mice and rabbits the scFvs elicited the production of Abs reacting with both N-Pr MenB CP and whole meningococci, but not with human polysialic acid. These scFv-induced Ab responses were boostable and of the Th1 type, as shown by a predominance of IgG2a. In addition, passive immunization with sera from scFv-immunized animals partially protected neonatal mice from experimental infection with group B meningococci. In conclusion, we have produced anti-idiotypic scFvs that mimic a protective MenB CP epitope and may be useful in the development of an alternative group B meningococcal vaccine.

  20. Combination of Protein and Viral Vaccines Induces Potent Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses and Enhanced Protection from Murine Malaria Challenge▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, Claire L.; Birkett, Ashley J.; Moore, Anne C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2007-01-01

    The search for an efficacious vaccine against malaria is ongoing, and it is now widely believed that to confer protection a vaccine must induce very strong cellular and humoral immunity concurrently. We studied the immune response in mice immunized with the recombinant viral vaccines fowlpox strain FP9 and modified virus Ankara (MVA), a protein vaccine (CV-1866), or a combination of the two; all vaccines express parts of the same preerythrocytic malaria antigen, the Plasmodium berghei circums...

  1. Targeting and retention of HPV16 E7 to the endoplasmic reticulum enhances immune tumour protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loera-Arias, MJ; Martínez-Pérez, AG; Barrera-Hernández, A; Ibarra-Obregón, ER; González-Saldívar, G; Martínez-Ortega, JI; Rosas-Taraco, A; Villanueva-Olivo, A; Esparza-González, SC; Villatoro-Hernandez, J; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is where the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are loaded with epitopes to cause an immune cellular response. Most of the protein antigens are degraded in the cytoplasm to amino acids and few epitopes reach the ER. Antigen targeting of this organelle by Calreticulin (CRT) fusion avoids this degradation and enhances the immune response. We constructed a recombinant adenovirus to express the E7 antigen with an ER-targeting signal peptide (SP) plus an ER retention signal (KDEL sequence). In cell-culture experiments we demonstrated that this new E7 antigen, SP-E7-KDEL, targeted the ER. Infection of mice with this recombinant adenovirus that expresses SP-E7-KDEL showed interferon induction and tumour-protection response, similar to that provided by an adenovirus expressing the E7 antigen fused to CRT. This work demonstrated that just by adding a SP and the KDEL sequence, antigens can be targeted and retained in the ER with a consequent enhancement of immune response and tumour protection. These results will have significant clinical applications. PMID:19818090

  2. Chlamydial Type III Secretion System Needle Protein Induces Protective Immunity against Chlamydia muridarum Intravaginal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Koroleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis imposes serious health problems and causes infertility. Because of asymptomatic onset, it often escapes antibiotic treatment. Therefore, vaccines offer a better option for the prevention of unwanted inflammatory sequelae. The existence of serologically distinct serovars of C. trachomatis suggests that a vaccine will need to provide protection against multiple serovars. Chlamydia spp. use a highly conserved type III secretion system (T3SS composed of structural and effector proteins which is an essential virulence factor. In this study, we expressed the T3SS needle protein of Chlamydia muridarum, TC_0037, an ortholog of C. trachomatis CdsF, in a replication-defective adenoviral vector (AdTC_0037 and evaluated its protective efficacy in an intravaginal Chlamydia muridarum model. For better immune responses, we employed a heterologous prime-boost immunization protocol in which mice were intranasally primed with AdTC_0037 and subcutaneously boosted with recombinant TC_0037 and Toll-like receptor 4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A mixed in a squalene nanoscale emulsion. We found that immunization with TC_0037 antigen induced specific humoral and T cell responses, decreased Chlamydia loads in the genital tract, and abrogated pathology of upper genital organs. Together, our results suggest that TC_0037, a highly conserved chlamydial T3SS protein, is a good candidate for inclusion in a Chlamydia vaccine.

  3. Immunogenicity and protective immunity against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague by immunization of mice with the recombinant V10 antigen, a variant of LcrV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBord, Kristin L; Anderson, Deborah M; Marketon, Melanie M; Overheim, Katie A; DePaolo, R William; Ciletti, Nancy A; Jabri, Bana; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to Yersinia pestis LcrV, the recombinant V10 (rV10) variant (lacking residues 271 to 300) does not suppress the release of proinflammatory cytokines by immune cells. Immunization with rV10 generates robust antibody responses that protect mice against bubonic plague and pneumonic plague, suggesting that rV10 may serve as an improved plague vaccine.

  4. Protective immunity and safety of a genetically modified influenza virus vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Polidoro Alves Barbosa

    Full Text Available Recombinant influenza viruses are promising viral platforms to be used as antigen delivery vectors. To this aim, one of the most promising approaches consists of generating recombinant viruses harboring partially truncated neuraminidase (NA segments. To date, all studies have pointed to safety and usefulness of this viral platform. However, some aspects of the inflammatory and immune responses triggered by those recombinant viruses and their safety to immunocompromised hosts remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we generated a recombinant influenza virus harboring a truncated NA segment (vNA-Δ and evaluated the innate and inflammatory responses and the safety of this recombinant virus in wild type or knock-out (KO mice with impaired innate (Myd88 -/- or acquired (RAG -/- immune responses. Infection using truncated neuraminidase influenza virus was harmless regarding lung and systemic inflammatory response in wild type mice and was highly attenuated in KO mice. We also demonstrated that vNA-Δ infection does not induce unbalanced cytokine production that strongly contributes to lung damage in infected mice. In addition, the recombinant influenza virus was able to trigger both local and systemic virus-specific humoral and CD8+ T cellular immune responses which protected immunized mice against the challenge with a lethal dose of homologous A/PR8/34 influenza virus. Taken together, our findings suggest and reinforce the safety of using NA deleted influenza viruses as antigen delivery vectors against human or veterinary pathogens.

  5. Active and passive immunization protects against lethal, extreme drug resistant-Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

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    Guanpingshen Luo

    Full Text Available Extreme-drug-resistant (XDR Acinetobacter baumannii is a rapidly emerging pathogen causing infections with unacceptably high mortality rates due to inadequate available treatment. New methods to prevent and treat such infections are a critical unmet medical need. To conduct a rational vaccine discovery program, OmpA was identified as the primary target of humoral immune response after intravenous infection by A. baumannii in mice. OmpA was >99% conserved at the amino acid level across clinical isolates harvested between 1951 and 2009 from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, lung, and wound infections, including carbapenem-resistant isolates, and was ≥89% conserved among other sequenced strains, but had minimal homology to the human proteome. Vaccination of diabetic mice with recombinant OmpA (rOmpA with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant markedly improved survival and reduced tissue bacterial burden in mice infected intravenously. Vaccination induced high titers of anti-OmpA antibodies, the levels of which correlated with survival in mice. Passive transfer with immune sera recapitulated protection. Immune sera did not enhance complement-mediated killing but did enhance opsonophagocytic killing of A. baumannii. These results define active and passive immunization strategies to prevent and treat highly lethal, XDR A. baumannii infections.

  6. Protective immune response of oral rabies vaccine in stray dogs, corsacs and steppe wolves after a single immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugunissov, K; Bulatov, Ye; Taranov, D; Yershebulov, Z; Koshemetov, Zh; Abduraimov, Ye; Kondibayeva, Zh; Samoltyrova, A; Amanova, Zh; Khairullin, B; Sansyzbay, A

    2017-11-01

    In this study the safety and protective immunity of an oral rabies vaccine, based on the live, modified rabies virus strain VRC-RZ2, was examined in stray dogs (Canis Sp.), corsacs (Vulpes corsac) and steppe wolves (Canis lupus campestris). In the safety group (dogs, n=6; corsacs, n=3; wolves, n=3) which was vaccinated with a 10-times field dose/animal, no animals showed any signs of disease or changes in behavior or appetite during the period of clinical observation, similar to the animals in the negative control group. Saliva samples taken from animals prior and post (5 th and 10 th days) vaccination failed to demonstrate rabies virus antigen. Observations of immunogenicity in vaccinated carnivores (dogs, corsacs and wolves) during a 180 day period showed the titers of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) in the blood sera of vaccinated dogs to be within 0.59-1.37 IU/mL. On 14 days post vaccination (dpv), all the wild carnivores had detectable levels of neutralizing antibodies, with mean titers ranging from 0.50 ± 0.07 IU/mL (for wolves) to 0.59 ± 0.10 IU/mL (for corsacs). Weeks after vaccination, all the vaccinated wolves and corsacs had higher levels of neutralizing antibodies: 0.70 ± 0.10 - 0.71 ± 0.08 IU/mL at 30 dpv, 1.06 ± 0.08 - 1.28 ± 0.21 IU/mL at 60 dpv and 0.41 ± 0.09 - 047 ± 0.06 at 180 dpv. The highest level of VNA (˃1.0 IU/ml) was detected at 60 dpv, in all vaccinated animals. After challenge all vaccinated dogs remained healthy for 180 days. Control animals (unvaccinated dogs) developed symptoms of rabies on day 6 post administration of a virulent virus and died of rabies on days 11-13. Of note, the VNA titers in all the wild carnivores (corsacs and wolves) immunized with VRC-RZ2 were higher than 0.5 IU/ml (0.59 ± 0.11 IU/ml), even as early as 14 days post vaccination. These, presumably protective, titers of antibodies to rabies virus were present in the dogs and wild carnivores examined in this study for at

  7. Intracutaneous DNA Vaccination with the E8 Gene of Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus Induces Protective Immunity against Virus Challenge in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiafen; Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D.

    2002-01-01

    The cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model has been used in several studies for testing prophylactic and therapeutic papillomavirus vaccines. Earlier observations had shown that the CRPV nonstructural genes E1, E2, and E6 induced strong to partial protective immunity against CRPV infection. In this study, we found that CRPV E8 immunization eliminated virus-induced papillomas in EIII/JC inbred rabbits (100%) and provided partial protection (55%) against virus challenge in outbred...

  8. COMPARATIVE IMMUNE RESPONSES OF CHILDREN AFTER INTRADERMAL AND INTRAMUSCULAR RABIES VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. N. Subawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rabies is a cause of death to people within 100% of Case Fatality Rate. Approximately 55.000 people died because of rabies each year, the vast majority of these deaths happen in Asia and Africa. This study aims to find out comparative immune responses of intradermal (ID and intramuscular (IM vaccination in children. Method: This was an experimental study to determine antibody response of ID and IM rabies vaccines with randomized pre and posttest control group design. ID and IM vaccination were carried out in 4 replication for each group. A number of 16 children were recruited for each group. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA was applied to determine titers antibody on day 0, 7, 21, and 28 after vaccination. Results: This study found that titer antibody induced by ID vaccination was lower than IM vaccination. However, the different is not statistically significant in both groups (p > 0.05. Titers antibody on day 7 after vaccination were 3.08 ± 2.09 IU/ml intradermally and 4.22 ± 3.02 IU/ml intramuscularly. On day 21 and 28 after intradermal vaccination, titers antibody were 6.78 ± 3.52 IU/ml and 12.53 ± 5.92 IU/ml, respectively. Intramuscularly, antibody titers were 9.76 ± 4.86 IU/ml on day 21 and 14.98 ± 7.76 IU/ml on day 28.Conclusion: ID vaccination is safe and can be used as an alternative vaccination for rabies in human. In addition, 0, 7, 21 ID vaccination methods can be recommended for use to control rabies cases in Indonesia because that methods induce protective immune response.

  9. Early infections by myxoma virus of young rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) protected by maternal antibodies activate their immune system and enhance herd immunity in wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchandeau, Stéphane; Pontier, Dominique; Guitton, Jean-Sébastien; Letty, Jérôme; Fouchet, David; Aubineau, Jacky; Berger, Francis; Léonard, Yves; Roobrouck, Alain; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Peralta, Brigitte; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2014-03-04

    The role of maternal antibodies is to protect newborns against acute early infection by pathogens. This can be achieved either by preventing any infection or by allowing attenuated infections associated with activation of the immune system, the two strategies being based on different cost/benefit ratios. We carried out an epidemiological survey of myxomatosis, which is a highly lethal infectious disease, in two distant wild populations of rabbits to describe the epidemiological pattern of the disease. Detection of specific IgM and IgG enabled us to describe the pattern of immunity. We show that maternal immunity attenuates early infection of juveniles and enables activation of their immune system. This mechanism associated with steady circulation of the myxoma virus in both populations, which induces frequent reinfections of immune rabbits, leads to the maintenance of high immunity levels within populations. Thus, myxomatosis has a low impact, with most infections being asymptomatic. This work shows that infection of young rabbits protected by maternal antibodies induces attenuated disease and activates their immune system. This may play a major role in reducing the impact of a highly lethal disease when ecological conditions enable permanent circulation of the pathogen.

  10. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  11. CD4+ T lymphocytes contribute to protective immunity induced in sheep and goats by Haemonchus contortus gut antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanu, F N; McGuire, T C; Davis, W C; Besser, T E; Jasmer, D P

    1997-10-01

    Immunization with parasite antigens derived from the gut of adult Haemonchus contortus induces significant levels of protection against the parasite in sheep and goats. However, the mechanisms of immunity involved in this protection are not clear. Here, we investigate the requirement for CD4+ T lymphocytes in gut antigen-induced immunity against H. contortus. Gut antigen immunized animals were depleted (> 98%) of their CD4+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood by intravenous injection of an anti-CD4 MoAb. Depletion in peripheral blood persisted for at least eight days, after which there was gradual recovery of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Serum antibody levels in gut antigen-immunized animals correlated significantly with worm parameters, suggesting a contribution by antibody to the immunity observed. By covariate analysis, using ELISA OD as the covariate, CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion was shown to partially abrogate immunity induced by gut antigen immunization, against challenge infection with H. contortus. The greatest effect of CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion was observed at 14 days post-infection with differences between CD4+ T lymphocyte depleted and intact animals less apparent between days 21 and 25. Collectively, our data indicate that CD4+ T lymphocytes contribute to immunity induced by gut antigens. Our results also suggest that antibody works synergistically with CD4+ T lymphocytes to confer this immunity.

  12. An immune basis for malaria protection by the sickle cell trait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas N Williams

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria resistance by the sickle cell trait (genotype HbAS has served as the prime example of genetic selection for over half a century. Nevertheless, the mechanism of this resistance remains the subject of considerable debate. While it probably involves innate factors such as the reduced ability of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to grow and multiply in HbAS erythrocytes, recent observations suggest that it might also involve the accelerated acquisition of malaria-specific immunity.We studied the age-specific protection afforded by HbAS against clinical malaria in children living on the coast of Kenya. We found that protection increased with age from only 20% in the first 2 y of life to a maximum of 56% by the age of 10 y, returning thereafter to 30% in participants greater than 10 y old.Our observations suggest that malaria protection by HbAS involves the enhancement of not only innate but also of acquired immunity to the parasite. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms might yield important insights into both these processes.

  13. Allicin enhances host pro-inflammatory immune responses and protects against acute murine malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yonghui; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Qinghui; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong; Cui, Liwang; Cao, Yaming

    2012-08-08

    During malaria infection, multiple pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, TNF and nitric oxide (NO) play a crucial role in the protection against the parasites. Modulation of host immunity is an important strategy to improve the outcome of malaria infection. Allicin is the major biologically active component of garlic and shows anti-microbial activity. Allicin is also active against protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, which is thought to be mediated by inhibiting cysteine proteases. In this study, the immunomodulatory activities of allicin were assessed during acute malaria infection using a rodent malaria model Plasmodium yoelii 17XL. To determine whether allicin modulates host immune responses against malaria infection, mice were treated with allicin after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Mortality was checked daily and parasitaemia was determined every other day. Pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-4 were quantified by ELISA, while NO level was determined by the Griess method. The populations of dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, CD4+ T and regulatory T cells (Treg) were assessed by FACS. Allicin reduced parasitaemia and prolonged survival of the host in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is at least partially due to improved host immune responses. Results showed that allicin treatment enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12p70 and NO. The absolute numbers of CD4+ T cells, DCs and macrophages were significantly higher in allicin-treated mice. In addition, allicin promoted the maturation of CD11c+ DCs, whereas it did not cause major changes in IL-4 and the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Allicin could partially protect host against P. yoelii 17XL through enhancement of the host innate and adaptive immune responses.

  14. Allicin enhances host pro-inflammatory immune responses and protects against acute murine malaria infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yonghui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malaria infection, multiple pro-inflammatory mediators including IFN-γ, TNF and nitric oxide (NO play a crucial role in the protection against the parasites. Modulation of host immunity is an important strategy to improve the outcome of malaria infection. Allicin is the major biologically active component of garlic and shows anti-microbial activity. Allicin is also active against protozoan parasites including Plasmodium, which is thought to be mediated by inhibiting cysteine proteases. In this study, the immunomodulatory activities of allicin were assessed during acute malaria infection using a rodent malaria model Plasmodium yoelii 17XL. Methods To determine whether allicin modulates host immune responses against malaria infection, mice were treated with allicin after infection with P. yoelii 17XL. Mortality was checked daily and parasitaemia was determined every other day. Pro-inflammatory mediators and IL-4 were quantified by ELISA, while NO level was determined by the Griess method. The populations of dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, CD4+ T and regulatory T cells (Treg were assessed by FACS. Results Allicin reduced parasitaemia and prolonged survival of the host in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is at least partially due to improved host immune responses. Results showed that allicin treatment enhanced the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-12p70 and NO. The absolute numbers of CD4+ T cells, DCs and macrophages were significantly higher in allicin-treated mice. In addition, allicin promoted the maturation of CD11c+ DCs, whereas it did not cause major changes in IL-4 and the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Conclusions Allicin could partially protect host against P. yoelii 17XL through enhancement of the host innate and adaptive immune responses.

  15. AdHu5Ag85A Respiratory Mucosal Boost Immunization Enhances Protection against Pulmonary Tuberculosis in BCG-Primed Non-Human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanathan, Mangalakumari; Shao, Zhongqi; Yu, Xuefeng; Harkness, Robin; Jiang, Rong; Li, Junqiang; Xing, Zhou; Zhu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Persisting high global tuberculosis (TB) morbidity and mortality and poor efficacy of BCG vaccine emphasizes an urgent need for developing effective novel boost vaccination strategies following parenteral BCG priming in humans. Most of the current lead TB vaccine candidates in the global pipeline were developed for parenteral route of immunization. Compelling evidence indicates respiratory mucosal delivery of vaccine to be the most effective way to induce robust local mucosal protective immunity against pulmonary TB. However, despite ample supporting evidence from various animal models, there has been a lack of evidence supporting the safety and protective efficacy of respiratory mucosal TB vaccination in non-human primates (NHP) and humans. By using a rhesus macaque TB model we have evaluated the safety and protective efficacy of a recombinant human serotype 5 adenovirus-based TB vaccine (AdHu5Ag85A) delivered via the respiratory mucosal route. We show that mucosal AdHu5Ag85A boost immunization was safe and well tolerated in parenteral BCG-primed rhesus macaques. A single AdHu5Ag85A mucosal boost immunization in BCG-primed rhesus macaques enhanced the antigen-specific T cell responses. Boost immunization significantly improved the survival and bacterial control following M.tb challenge. Furthermore, TB-related lung pathology and clinical outcomes were lessened in BCG-primed, mucosally boosted animals compared to control animals. Thus, for the first time we show that a single respiratory mucosal boost immunization with a novel TB vaccine enhances protection against pulmonary TB in parenteral BCG-primed NHP. Our study provides the evidence for the protective potential of AdHu5Ag85A as a respiratory mucosal boost TB vaccine for human application.

  16. Vaccination of goats with fresh extract from Sarcoptes scabiei confers partial protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Protective immunity has been known to develop in animals infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. However, our previous attempt to induce protective immunity in goats by vaccination with fractions of soluble or insoluble mite proteins had been unsuccessful. Degradation or denaturation of protective antigens occurred during vaccine preparation was suggested as one possible cause of the failure. In this study, mite proteins that used to immunise animals were prepared rapidly in order to prevent protein degradation or denaturation. About 150 mg of freshly isolated mites were rapidly homogenised, centrifuged then separated into supernatant and pellet fractions. Twenty-eight goats were allocated equally into 4 groups. Group-1 goats were vaccinated with the whole mite homogenate supernatant, group 2 with the supernatant, group 3 with the pellet, and group 4 with PBS (unvaccinated control. Vaccination was conducted three times, with three-week intervals between vaccinations, using Quil A as adjuvant, and each vaccination using fresh mite homogenates. One week after the last vaccination, all animals were challenged with approximately 2000 live mites. The severity of lesions, scored from 0 (no lesions to 5 (>75% infested auricle affected, were determined one day, two days, then every week after challenge. Mite challenge caused the development of skin lesions in all animals. No significant differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated animals were observed in regards to the severity of lesions. However, the mite densities in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (P=0.015 than those in unvaccinated control. This study indicates that the protective antigens of S. scabiei are liable to degradation or denaturation and exist in a very low concentration or have vary low antigenicity. This implies isolation of the protective antigens by the conventional approach, fracionation of the whole mite proteins and testing each fractions in vaccination trials, is

  17. Induction of mucosal immunity and protection by intranasal immunization with a respiratory syncytial virus subunit vaccine formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R; Latimer, L; Simko, E; Gerdts, V; Potter, A; van den Hurk, S van Drunen Littel-

    2014-02-01

    The majority of infections, including those caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), occur at mucosal surfaces. As no RSV vaccine is available our goal is to produce an effective subunit vaccine with an adjuvant suitable for mucosal delivery and cross-presentation. A truncated secreted version of the RSV fusion (ΔF) protein formulated with polyI : C, an innate defence regulator peptide and polyphosphazene, induced local and systemic immunity, including affinity maturation of RSV F-specific IgG, IgA and virus-neutralizing antibodies, and F-specific CD8(+) T-cells in the lung, when delivered intranasally. Furthermore, this ΔF protein formulation promoted the production of CD8(+) central memory T-cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes and provided protection from RSV challenge. Formulation of ΔF protein with this adjuvant combination enhanced uptake by lung dendritic cells and trafficking to the draining lymph nodes. The ΔF protein formulation was confirmed to be highly efficacious and safe in cotton rats.

  18. CD8+ T cells provide immune protection against murine disseminated endotheliotropic Orientia tsutsugamushi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus, caused by a Gram-negative obligately intracellular coccobacillus, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is a long neglected but important tropical disease. Orientia tsutsugamushi causes illness in one million people each year, and 1 billion people are at risk. Without appropriate diagnosis and treatment, the disease can cause severe multiorgan failure with a case fatality rate of 7-15%. The current gaps in knowledge of immunity include the unknown mechanisms of host immunity to O. tsutsugamushi. Using an intravenous (i.v. disseminated infection mouse model, we observed that more CD8+ T cells than CD4+ T cells were present in the spleen of infected mice at 12 dpi. We also determined that Treg cells and the proportion of T cells producing IL-10 were significantly increased from 6 dpi, which correlated with the onset of illness, body weight loss, and increased bacterial loads. We further studied CD8-/-, MHC I-/- and wild type control (WT C57BL/6J mice to determine the importance of CD8+ T cells and MHC I molecules. After infection with an ordinarily sub-lethal dose of O. tsutsugamushi, all CD8-/- and MHC I-/- mice were moribund between 12 and 15 dpi, whereas all WT mice survived. Bacterial loads in the lung, kidney, liver and spleen of CD8-/- and MHC I-/- mice were significantly greater than those in WT mice. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ and granzyme B mRNA levels in the liver of CD8-/- and MHC I-/- mice were significantly greater than in WT mice. In addition, more severe histopathologic lesions were observed in CD8-/- mice. Finally, adoptive transfer confirmed a major role of immune CD8+ T cells as well as a less effective contribution by immune CD8 T cell-depleted splenocytes in protection against O. tsutsugamushi infection. These studies demonstrated the critical importance of CD8+ T cells in the host immune response during O. tsutsugamushi infection.

  19. Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium delivering DNA vaccine encoding duck enteritis virus UL24 induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and conferred good protection against challenge

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    Yu Xia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Orally delivered DNA vaccines against duck enteritis virus (DEV were developed using live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (SL7207 as a carrier and Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB as a mucosal adjuvant. DNA vaccine plasmids pVAX-UL24 and pVAX-LTB-UL24 were constructed and transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL7207 resulting SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 and SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 respectively. After ducklings were orally inoculated with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24 or SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24, the anti-DEV mucosal and systemic immune responses were recorded. To identify the optimum dose that confers maximum protection, we used different doses of the candidate vaccine SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 during oral immunization. The strongest mucosal and systemic immune responses developed in the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 (1011 CFU immunized group. Accordingly, oral immunization of ducklings with SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 showed superior efficacy of protection (60-80% against a lethal DEV challenge (1000 LD50, compared with the limited survival rate (40% of ducklings immunized with SL7207 (pVAX-UL24. Our study suggests that the SL7207 (pVAX-LTB-UL24 can be a candidate DEV vaccine.

  20. AIM2 Co-immunization with VP1 Is Associated with Increased Memory CD8 T Cells and Mounts Long Lasting Protection against Coxsackievirus B3 Challenge

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    Liang Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recurrent Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 infection is the most important cause of intractable myocarditis which often leads to chronic myocarditis and even dilated cardiomyopathy. Therefore, enhanced DNA vaccines capable of memory CD8 T cells are essential for long-lasting immunological protection against CVB3 infection. In this study, absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2 was used as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of memory CD8 T cells elicited by VP1 (viral capsid protein 1 vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly injected with 50 μg AIM2 plasmid and equal amount of VP1 plasmid (pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine 4 times at 2 week-intervals. We observed that the protection of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine against CVB3 challenge was evidenced by significantly improved cardiac function, reduced myocardial injuries, and increased survival rate when compared with immunization with pVP1. Co-immunization with pAIM2/pVP1 robustly augmented T lymphocytes proliferation and CVB3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Importantly, 16 weeks after the last immunization, pAIM2/pVP1 co-immunization significantly enhanced the expression of Bcl-6, SOCS3, and Sca-1 which are critical for memory CD8 T cells as compared with pVP1 immunization. Notably, CD8 T cells that are likely vaccine-induced memory T cells were responsible for the protective efficacy of pAIM2/pVP1 vaccine by abolition of a CD8 T cell immune response following a lethal dose of CVB3 infection. Our results indicate that AIM2-adjuvanted vaccine could be a potential and promising approach to promote a long-lasting protection against CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  1. Immunization with Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae-live attenuated oocysts protect goat kids from clinical coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Antonio; Muñoz, María Carmen; Molina, José Manuel; Hermosilla, Carlos; Andrada, Marisa; Lara, Pedro; Bordón, Elisa; Pérez, Davinia; López, Adassa María; Matos, Lorena; Guedes, Aránzazu Carmen; Falcón, Soraya; Falcón, Yaiza; Martín, Sergio; Taubert, Anja

    2014-01-17

    Caprine coccidiosis, affecting mainly young goat kids around the weaning period, is worldwide the most important disease in the goat industry. Control of caprine coccidiosis is increasingly hampered by resistances developed against coccidiostatic drugs leading to an enhanced need for anticoccidial vaccines. In the current study we conducted an oral immunization trial with live attenuated sporulated Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae oocysts. Sporulated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts were attenuated by X-irradiation technique. The experimental design included a total of 18 goat kids divided into the following groups: (i) animals immunized with attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 5 weeks of age and challenged 3 weeks later with non-irradiated homologous oocysts (group 1); (ii) animals infected with non-attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 5 weeks of age and challenged 3 weeks later with non-attenuated homologous oocysts (group 2); (iii) animals primary-infected with untreated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts at 8 weeks of age (control of the challenge infection, group 3); (iv) non-infected control animals (group 4). Goat kids immunized with live attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts (group 1) excreted significantly less oocysts in the faeces (95.3% reduction) than kids infected with non-attenuated ones (group 2). Furthermore, immunization with live but attenuated oocysts resulted in ameliorated clinical coccidiosis compared to goat kids infected with untreated oocysts (group 2) and resulted in equally reduced signs of coccidiosis after challenge infection compared to acquired immunity driven by non-attenuated oocysts. Overall, the present study demonstrates for the first time that live attenuated E. ninakohlyakimovae oocysts orally administered showed almost no pathogenicity but enough immunogenicity in terms of immunoprotection. Importantly, vaccinated animals still shed low amounts of oocysts, guaranteeing environmental contamination and consecutive booster

  2. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TRAIL Modulates the Immune System and Protects against the Development of Diabetes

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    Fleur Bossi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TRAIL or tumor necrosis factor (TNF related apoptosis-inducing ligand is a member of the TNF superfamily of proteins, whose best characterized function is the induction of apoptosis in tumor, infected, or transformed cells through activation of specific receptors. In nontransformed cells, however, the actions of TRAIL are less well characterized. Recent studies suggest that TRAIL may be implicated in the development and progression of diabetes. Here we review TRAIL biological actions, its effects on the immune system, and how and to what extent it has been shown to protect against diabetes.

  4. Bivalent mucosal peptide vaccines administered using the LCP carrier system stimulate protective immune responses against Streptococcus pyogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kai; Ebensen, Thomas; Chandrudu, Saranya; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan; Olive, Colleen; Guzman, Carlos A

    2017-11-01

    Despite the broad knowledge about the pathogenicity of Streptococcus pyogenes there is still a controversy about the correlate of protection in GAS infections. We aimed in further improving the immune responses stimulated against GAS comparing different vaccine formulations including bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) and BPPCysMPEG, a derivative of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide (MALP-2), as adjuvants, respectively, to be administered with and without the universal T helper cell epitope P25 along with the optimized B cell epitope J14 of the M protein and B and T cell epitopes of SfbI. Lipopeptide based nano carrier systems (LCP) were used for efficient antigen delivery across the mucosal barrier. The stimulated immune responses were efficient in protecting mice against a respiratory challenge with a lethal dose of a heterologous S. pyogenes strain. Moreover, combination of the LCP based peptide vaccine with c-di-AMP allowed reduction of antigen dose at the same time maintaining vaccine efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of electromagnetic waves from mobile phone on immune status of male rats: possible protective role of vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Ola Ahmed; Said, Mona Abdel-Azeem

    2017-02-01

    There are considerable public concerns about the relationship between mobile phone radiation and human health. The present study assesses the effect of electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted from a mobile phone on the immune system in rats and the possible protective role of vitamin D. Rats were randomly divided into six groups: Group I: control group; Group II: received vitamin D (1000 IU/kg/day) orally; Group III: exposed to EMF 1 h/day; Group IV: exposed to EMF 2 h/day; Group V: exposed to EMF 1 h/day and received vitamin D (1000 IU/kg/day); Group VI: exposed to EMF 2 h/day and received vitamin D (1000 IU/kg/day). After 30 days of exposure time, 1 h/day EMF exposure resulted in significant decrease in immunoglobulin levels (IgA, IgE, IgM, and IgG); total leukocyte, lymphocyte, eosinophil and basophil counts; and a significant increase in neutrophil and monocyte counts. These changes were more increased in the group exposed to 2 h/day EMF. Vitamin D supplementation in EMF-exposed rats reversed these results when compared with EMF-exposed groups. In contrast, 7, 14, and 21 days of EMF exposure produced nonsignificant differences in these parameters among all experimental groups. We concluded that exposure to mobile phone radiation compromises the immune system of rats, and vitamin D appears to have a protective effect.

  6. Protective effect of intranasal immunization with Neospora caninum membrane antigens against murine neosporosis established through the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreirinha, Pedro; Dias, Joana; Correia, Alexandra; Pérez-Cabezas, Begoña; Santos, Carlos; Teixeira, Luzia; Ribeiro, Adília; Rocha, António; Vilanova, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that in the last two decades was acknowledged as the main pathogenic agent responsible for economic losses in the cattle industry. In the present study, the effectiveness of intranasal immunization with N. caninum membrane antigens plus CpG adjuvant was assessed in a murine model of intragastrically established neosporosis. Immunized mice presented a lower parasitic burden in the brain on infection with 5 × 10(7) tachyzoites, showing that significant protection was achieved by this immunization strategy. Intestinal IgA antibodies raised by immunization markedly agglutinated live N. caninum tachyzoites whereas previous opsonization with IgG antibodies purified from immunized mice sera reduced parasite survival within macrophage cells. Although an IgG1 : IgG2a ratio neosporosis and indicate that parasite-specific mucosal and circulating antibodies have a protective role against this parasitic infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Complete protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-mediated lethal respiratory disease in aged mice by immunization with a mouse-adapted virus lacking E protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, Craig; DeDiego, Marta L; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Enjuanes, Luis; Perlman, Stanley

    2013-06-01

    Zoonotic coronaviruses, including the one that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. No specific therapy for any human coronavirus is available, making vaccine development critical for protection against these viruses. We previously showed that recombinant SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) (Urbani strain based) lacking envelope (E) protein expression (rU-ΔE) provided good but not perfect protection in young mice against challenge with virulent mouse-adapted SARS-CoV (MA15). To improve vaccine efficacy, we developed a second set of E-deleted vaccine candidates on an MA15 background (rMA15-ΔE). rMA15-ΔE is safe, causing no disease in 6-week-, 12-month-, or 18-month-old BALB/c mice. Immunization with this virus completely protected mice of three ages from lethal disease and effected more-rapid virus clearance. Compared to rU-ΔE, rMA15-ΔE immunization resulted in significantly greater neutralizing antibody and SARS-CoV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. After challenge, inflammatory cell infiltration, edema, and lung destruction were decreased in the lungs of rMA15-ΔE-immunized mice compared to those in rU-ΔE-immunized 12-month-old mice. Collectively, these results show that immunization with a species-adapted attenuated coronavirus lacking E protein expression is safe and provides optimal immunogenicity and long-term protection against challenge with lethal virus. This approach will be generally useful for development of vaccines protective against human coronaviruses as well as against coronaviruses that cause disease in domestic and companion animals.

  8. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

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    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  9. Duration of protective immunity after a single vaccination with a live attenuated bivalent bluetongue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugunissov, Kuandyk; Yershebulov, Zakir; Barakbayev, Kainar; Bulatov, Yerbol; Taranov, Dmitriy; Amanova, Zhanat; Abduraimov, Yergali

    2015-12-01

    The prevention of bluetongue is typically achieved with mono- or polyvalent modified- live-attenuated virus (MLV) vaccines. MLV vaccines typically elicit a strong antibody response that correlates directly with their ability to replicate in the vaccinated animal. They are inexpensive, stimulate protective immunity after a single inoculation, and have been proven effective in preventing clinical bluetongue disease. In this study, we evaluated the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a bluetongue vaccine against Bluetongue virus serotypes 4 and 16 in sheep. All the animals remained clinically healthy during the observation period. The vaccinated animals showed no clinical signs except fever (>40.8 °C) for 2-4 days. Rapid seroconversion was observed in the sheep, with the accumulation of high antibody titers in the vaccinated animals. No animal became ill after the challenge, indicating that effective protection was achieved. Therefore, this vaccine, prepared from attenuated bluetongue virus strains, is safe, immunogenic, and efficacious.

  10. Identification of a protective antigen of Coccidioides immitis by expression library immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, F Douglas; Magee, D Mitchell; Woitaske, Melanie D; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Cox, Rebecca A

    2003-10-01

    Coccidioides immitis is a fungal pathogen of humans and is classified as a Select Agent. We have identified a new potential vaccine candidate for this pathogen using cDNA expression library immunization (ELI). A C. immitis spherule-phase cDNA library containing 800-1000 genes was divided into 10 pools and each was tested for its protective capacity in BALB/c mice against intraperitoneal challenge with 2500 arthroconidia of this dimorphic fungus. The most protective pool, designated Pool 7, was fractionated into five sublibraries, each containing 60 genes, and of these, only Pool 7-3 induced a significant level of protection in mice. Fractionation of Pool 7-3 into six sublibraries, each with 10 genes, yielded a protective fraction, designated Pool 7-3-5. Subsequent fraction of the latter pool into 10 sublibraries, each with one clone, yielded a clone designated 7-3-5-5 that was highly protective. Clone 7-3-5-5 was sequenced and found to contain a 672bp ORF encoding a 224 amino acid protein having a 19 amino acid signal sequence on the N-terminus and a 15 amino acid C-terminal GPI anchor site. The 7-3-5-5 clone, designated ELI-Antigen 1 (ELI-Ag1), showed partial homology with a hypothetical protein from Neurospora crassa. This is the first study to identify a protective antigen from a fungus using ELI, and it is also the first report in which sequential fractionation of an expression library successfully identified a single protective gene.

  11. EU and US Data Protection Reforms. A Comparative View

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    Gabriela Zanfir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This research makes a comparative analysis of two significant reform projects in data protectionlegislation, proposed in early 2012 in the EU and the US, in order to identify the common philosophies andalso the main differences between them. Its outcomes are important as transatlantic data transfers areexponentially increasing and their main actors need to know what to expect from both legal regimes. Thepaper builds on a ground zero, as both reform projects were made public in late January – respectively lateFebruary, so such a comparison can only refer to researches made prior to the announcements regarding thegeneral concepts of privacy and data protection in the European and American view. The main methodemployed is comparative observation. The results show that EU and US legislations start using the samelanguage regarding data protection law – by the legal definitions proposed and main principles implemented,while still keeping significant differences. Academics and researchers will have a starting point for futurecomparative analyzes in a legal field which enjoys a lot of attention from lawmakers all over the globalizedworld. The paper focuses on very recent legal developments, which need throughout analysis in order tomake them functional in practice.

  12. Comparison of an Adherence Domain and a Structural Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II in Protective Immunity against Dental Caries in Rats after Intranasal Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Russell, Michael W.; Michalek, Suzanne M.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have identified an N-terminal saliva-binding region (SBR) on Streptococcus mutans surface antigen I/II (AgI/II) and suggested its importance in the initial adherence of S. mutans to saliva-coated tooth surfaces and subsequent development of dental caries. In this study, we compared the SBR with a C-terminal structural region of AgI/II (AgII) in their abilities to induce protective immunity against caries in rats. When SBR, AgII, or the whole AgI/II molecule was administered intranasally as a conjugate with the B subunit of cholera toxin (CT), in the presence of CT adjuvant, substantial levels of salivary immunoglobulin A anti-AgI/II antibodies were induced. Evaluation of caries activity showed that the SBR, though not as protective as the parent molecule, was superior to AgII and thus can be further considered as a component in a multivalent caries vaccine. PMID:9529105

  13. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis of innate immunity reveals novel and conserved components in crustacean food crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alvina G; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2017-05-18

    Growing global demands for crustacean food crop species have driven large investments in aquaculture research worldwide. However, large-scale production is susceptible to pathogen-mediated destruction particularly in developing economies. Thus, a thorough understanding of the immune system components of food crop species is imperative for research to combat pathogens. Through a comparative genomics approach utilising extant data from 55 species, we describe the innate immune system of the class Malacostraca, which includes all food crop species. We identify 7407 malacostracan genes from 39 gene families implicated in different aspects of host defence and demonstrate dynamic evolution of innate immunity components within this group. Malacostracans have achieved flexibility in recognising infectious agents through divergent evolution and expansion of pathogen recognition receptors genes. Antiviral RNAi, Toll and JAK-STAT signal transduction pathways have remained conserved within Malacostraca, although the Imd pathway appears to lack several key components. Immune effectors such as the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have unique evolutionary profiles, with many malacostracan AMPs not found in other arthropods. Lastly, we describe four putative novel immune gene families, potentially representing important evolutionary novelties of the malacostracan immune system. Our analyses across the broader Malacostraca have allowed us to not only draw analogies with other arthropods but also to identify evolutionary novelties in immune modulation components and form strong hypotheses as to when key pathways have evolved or diverged. This will serve as a key resource for future immunology research in crustacean food crops.

  15. Incubation period and immune function: A comparative field study among coexisting birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, M.G.; Martin, T.E.

    2006-01-01

    Developmental periods are integral components of life history strategies that can have important fitness consequences and vary enormously among organisms. However, the selection pressures and mechanisms causing variation in length of developmental periods are poorly understood. Particularly puzzling are prolonged developmental periods, because their selective advantage is unclear. Here we tested the hypotheses that immune function is stronger in species that are attacked at a higher rate by parasites and that prolonged embryonic development allows the development of this stronger immune system. Through a comparative field study among 12 coexisting passerine bird species, we show that species with higher blood parasite prevalence mounted stronger cellular immune responses than species with lower prevalence. These results provide support for the hypothesis that species facing greater selection pressure from parasites invest more in immune function. However, species with longer incubation periods mounted weaker cellular immune responses than species with shorter periods. Therefore, cellular immune responses do not support the hypothesis that longer development time enhances immunocompentence. Future studies should assess other components of the immune system and test alternative causes of variation in incubation periods among bird species. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  16. Immunization of rabbits with cottontail rabbit papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes: protective immunity induced by gene gun-mediated intracutaneous delivery but not by intramuscular injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, R; Reed, C A; Cladel, N M; Christensen, N D

    2000-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that gene gun-based intracutaneous vaccination of rabbits with a combination of, but not with individual papillomavirus E1, E2, E6 and E7 genes provided complete protection against cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection. In the present study, we tested whether vaccination of inbred and outbred rabbits with a combination of CRPV E1 and E2 genes could provide complete protection against virus infection. In the first experiment, gene gun-based intracutaneous vaccination with E1 and E2 genes prevented papilloma formation in the majority of inbred rabbits and promoted systemic papilloma regression in one non-protected rabbit. In contrast, needle-mediated intramuscular injection of E1 and E2 genes did not prevent papilloma formation nor promoted systemic papilloma regression, indicating an absence of strong protective immunity. In the second experiment, six outbred rabbits were immunized by gene gun-based intracutaneous administration of the E1 and E2 genes. Prevention of papilloma formation or systemic papilloma regression was observed in three vaccinated rabbits. Papillomas persisted on the remaining three rabbits, but were significantly smaller than that on control rabbits. These results suggested that gene gun-based intracutaneous vaccination with the combination of papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes induced strong protective antivirus immunity but may be insufficient for complete protection in an outbred population.

  17. Immunization with the Entamoeba histolytica surface metalloprotease EhMSP-1 protects hamsters from amebic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncolato, Eduardo C; Teixeira, José E; Barbosa, José E; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra N; Huston, Christopher D

    2015-02-01

    Diarrhea and amebic liver abscesses due to invasive Entamoeba histolytica infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Entamoeba histolytica adherence and cell migration, two phenotypes linked to virulence, are both aberrant in trophozoites deficient in the metallosurface protease EhMSP-1, which is a homologue of the Leishmania vaccine candidate leishmanolysin (GP63). We examined the potential of EhMSP-1 for use as a vaccine antigen to protect against amebic liver abscesses. First, existing serum samples from South Africans naturally infected with E. histolytica were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of EhMSP-1-specific IgG. Nine of 12 (75%) people with anti-E. histolytica IgG also had EhMSP-1-specific IgG antibodies. We next used a hamster model of amebic liver abscess to determine the effect of immunization with a mixture of four recombinant EhMSP-1 protein fragments. EhMSP-1 immunization stimulated a robust IgG antibody response. Furthermore, EhMSP-1 immunization of hamsters reduced development of severe amebic liver abscesses following intrahepatic injection of E. histolytica by a combined rate of 68% in two independent animal experiments. Purified IgG from immunized compared to control animals bound to the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites and accelerated amebic lysis via activation of the classical complement cascade. We concluded that EhMSP-1 is a promising antigen that warrants further study to determine its full potential as a target for therapy and/or prevention of invasive amebiasis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Interleukin-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) as a central regulator of the protective immune response against Giardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protozoan parasite Giardia is a highly prevalent intestinal pathogen with a wide host range. Data obtained in mice, cattle and humans revealed the importance of IL-17A in the development of a protective immune response against Giardia. The aim of this study was to further unravel the protective ...

  19. Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani Centrin Knock Out Parasites Generate Non-inferior Protective Immune Response in Aged Mice against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Parna; Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Ismail, Nevien; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Debrabant, Alain; Akue, Adovi D; KuKuruga, Mark A; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, John Philip; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani causes severe disease. Age appears to be critical in determining the clinical outcome of VL and at present there is no effective vaccine available against VL for any age group. Previously, we showed that genetically modified live attenuated L. donovani parasites (LdCen-/-) induced a strong protective innate and adaptive immune response in young mice. In this study we analyzed LdCen-/- parasite mediated modulation of innate and adaptive immune response in aged mice (18 months) and compared to young (2 months) mice. Analysis of innate immune response in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from both young and aged mice upon infection with LdCen-/- parasites, showed significant enhancement of innate effector responses, which consequently augmented CD4+ Th1 cell effector function compared to LdWT infected BMDCs in vitro. Similarly, parasitized splenic dendritic cells from LdCen-/- infected young and aged mice also revealed induction of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-12, IL-6, IFN-γ and TNF) and subsequent down regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) genes compared to LdWT infected mice. We also evaluated in vivo protection of the LdCen-/- immunized young and aged mice against virulent L. donovani challenge. Immunization with LdCen-/- induced higher IgG2a antibodies, lymphoproliferative response, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses and stimulated splenocytes for heightened leishmanicidal activity associated with nitric oxide production in young and aged mice. Furthermore, upon virulent L. donovani challenge, LdCen-/- immunized mice from both age groups displayed multifunctional Th1-type CD4 and cytotoxic CD8 T cells correlating to a significantly reduced parasite burden in the spleen and liver compared to naïve mice. It is interesting to note that even though there was no difference in the LdCen-/- induced innate response in dendritic cells between aged and young

  20. Depo-provera treatment does not abrogate protection from intravenous SIV challenge in female macaques immunized with an attenuated AIDS virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Genescà

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a previous study, progesterone treatment of female monkeys immunized with live, attenuated SHIV89.6 abrogated the generally consistent protection from vaginal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV challenge. The mechanisms responsible for the loss of protection remain to be defined. The objective of the present study was to determine whether Depo-Provera administration alters protection from intravenous SIV challenge in SHIV-immunized female macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two groups of female macaques were immunized with attenuated SHIV89.6 and then challenged intravenously with SIVmac239. Four weeks before challenge, one animal group was treated with Depo-Provera, a commonly used injectable contraceptive progestin. As expected, SHIV-immunized monkeys had significantly lower peak and set-point plasma viral RNA levels compared to naïve controls, but in contrast to previously published findings with vaginal SIV challenge, the Depo-Provera SHIV-immunized animals controlled SIV replication to a similar, or even slightly greater, degree than did the untreated SHIV-immunized animals. Control of viral replication from week 4 to week 20 after challenge was more consistent in the progesterone-treated, SHIV-immunized animals than in untreated, SHIV-immunized animals. Although levels of interferon-gamma production were similar, the SIV-specific CD8(+ T cells of progesterone-treated animals expressed more functions than the anti-viral CD8(+ T cells from untreated animals. CONCLUSIONS: Depo-Provera did not diminish the control of viral replication after intravenous SIV challenge in female macaques immunized with a live-attenuated lentivirus. This result contrasts with the previously reported effect of Depo-Provera(R on protection from vaginal SIV challenge and strongly implies that the decreased protection from vaginal challenge is due to effects of progesterone on the genital tract rather than to systemic effects. Further, these results

  1. Partial pathogen protection by tick-bite sensitization and epitope recognition in peptide-immunized HLA DR3 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Wendy M C; Dyer, Megan C; Desrosiers, Joe; Fast, Loren D; Terry, Frances E; Martin, William D; Moise, Leonard; De Groot, Anne S; Mather, Thomas N

    2014-01-01

    Ticks are notorious vectors of disease for humans, and many species of ticks transmit multiple pathogens, sometimes in the same tick bite. Accordingly, a broad-spectrum vaccine that targets vector ticks and pathogen transmission at the tick/host interface, rather than multiple vaccines against every possible tickborne pathogen, could become an important tool for resolving an emerging public health crisis. The concept for such a tick protective vaccine comes from observations of an acquired tick resistance (ATR) that can develop in non-natural hosts of ticks following sensitization to tick salivary components. Mice are commonly used as models to study immune responses to human pathogens but normal mice are natural hosts for many species of ticks and fail to develop ATR. We evaluated HLA DR3 transgenic (tg) "humanized" mice as a potential model of ATR and assessed the possibility of using this animal model for tick protective vaccine discovery studies. Serial tick infestations with pathogen-free Ixodes scapularis ticks were used to tick-bite sensitize HLA DR3 tg mice. Sensitization resulted in a cytokine skew favoring a Th2 bias as well as partial (57%) protection to infection with Lyme disease spirochetes (Borrelia burgdorferi) following infected tick challenge when compared to tick naïve counterparts. I. scapularis salivary gland homogenate (SGH) and a group of immunoinformatic-predicted T cell epitopes identified from the I. scapularis salivary transcriptome were used separately to vaccinate HLA DR3 tg mice, and these mice also were assessed for both pathogen protection and epitope recognition. Reduced pathogen transmission along with a Th2 skew resulted from SGH vaccination, while no significant protection and a possible T regulatory bias was seen in epitope-vaccinated mice. This study provides the first proof-of-concept for using HLA DR tg "humanized" mice for studying the potential tick protective effects of immunoinformatic- or otherwise-derived tick salivary

  2. Active immunizations with peptide-DC vaccines and passive transfer with antibodies protect neutropenic mice against disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong

    2016-01-04

    We previously report that peptide-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, which targeting two peptides (Fba and Met6) expressed on the cell surface of Candida albicans, can induce high degree of protection against disseminated candidiasis in immunocompetent mice. Passive transfer of immune sera from the peptide immunized mice or peptide-related monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that protection was medicated by peptide-specific antibodies. In this study the efficacy of active and passive immunization against disseminated candidiasis was tested in mice with cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia. Peptide-DC vaccines were given to mice prior to induction of neutropenia. We show active immunization with either Fba or Met6 peptide-DC vaccine significantly improved the survival and reduced the fungal burden of disseminated candidiasis in those immunocompromised mice. Importantly, we show that administration of two protective monoclonal antibodies also protect neutropenic mice against the disease, implying possibility of developing a successful passive immunotherapy strategy to treat the disease and protect against disseminated candidiasis. The results of this study are crucial as they address the fundamental questions as to whether the synthetic peptide vaccine induced immunity protects the host during a neutropenic episode. We anticipate that this peptide-vaccine study will serve as the foundation of future investigations into new peptide vaccines comprised of cell surface peptides from other medically important Candida species, as well as other fungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ISCOMs-Immunity, protection and safety in young conventional calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Sara; Hu, Kefei; Vargmar, Karin; Poré, Lesly; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Blodörn, Krister; Anderson, Jenna; Ahooghalandari, Parvin; Pringle, John; Taylor, Geraldine; Valarcher, Jean-François

    2011-11-03

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in cattle and causes yearly outbreaks with high morbidity in Europe. Commercial vaccines against this virus needs improvement of efficacy, especially in calves with BRSV-specific maternally derived antibodies (MDA). We previously reported that an experimental BRSV-ISCOM vaccine, but not a commercial vaccine, induced strong clinical and virological protection in calves with MDA, immunized at 7-15 weeks of age. The aim of the present study was to characterize the immune responses, as well as to investigate the efficacy and safety in younger animals, representing the target population for vaccination. Four groups of five 3-8 week old calves with variable levels of BRSV-specific MDA were immunized s.c. twice at a 3 weeks interval with (i) BRSV immunostimulating complexes (BRSV-ISCOMs), (ii) BRSV-protein, (iii) adjuvant, or (iv) PBS. All calves were challenged with virulent BRSV by aerosol 2 weeks later and euthanized on day 6 after infection. The cellular and humoral responses were monitored as well as the clinical signs, the viral excretion and the pathology following challenge. Despite presence of MDA at the time of the immunization, only a minimum of clinical signs were observed in the BRSV-ISCOM group after challenge. In contrast, in all control groups, clinical signs of disease were observed in most of the animals (respiratory rates up to 76min(-1) and rectal temperatures up to 41°C). The clinical protection was associated to a highly significant reduction of virus replication in the upper and lower respiratory tract of calves, rapid systemic and local antibody responses and T helper cell responses dominated by IFNγ production. Animals that did not shed virus detectable by PCR or cell culture following challenge possessed particularly high levels of pulmonary IgA. The protective immunological responses to BRSV proteins and the ability to overcome the inhibiting effect of

  4. Pathogens Inactivated by Low-Energy-Electron Irradiation Maintain Antigenic Properties and Induce Protective Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertey, Jasmin; Bayer, Lea; Grunwald, Thomas; Pohl, Alexandra; Beckmann, Jana; Gotzmann, Gaby; Casado, Javier Portillo; Schönfelder, Jessy; Rögner, Frank-Holm; Wetzel, Christiane; Thoma, Martin; Bailer, Susanne M.; Hiller, Ekkehard; Rupp, Steffen; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Inactivated vaccines are commonly produced by incubating pathogens with chemicals such as formaldehyde or β-propiolactone. This is a time-consuming process, the inactivation efficiency displays high variability and extensive downstream procedures are often required. Moreover, application of chemicals alters the antigenic components of the viruses or bacteria, resulting in reduced antibody specificity and therefore stimulation of a less effective immune response. An alternative method for inactivation of pathogens is ionizing radiation. It acts very fast and predominantly damages nucleic acids, conserving most of the antigenic structures. However, currently used irradiation technologies (mostly gamma-rays and high energy electrons) require large and complex shielding constructions to protect the environment from radioactivity or X-rays generated during the process. This excludes them from direct integration into biological production facilities. Here, low-energy electron irradiation (LEEI) is presented as an alternative inactivation method for pathogens in liquid solutions. LEEI can be used in normal laboratories, including good manufacturing practice (GMP)- or high biosafety level (BSL)-environments, as only minor shielding is necessary. We show that LEEI efficiently inactivates different viruses (influenza A (H3N8), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1)) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) and maintains their antigenicity. Moreover, LEEI-inactivated influenza A viruses elicit protective immune responses in animals, as analyzed by virus neutralization assays and viral load determination upon challenge. These results have implications for novel ways of developing and manufacturing inactivated vaccines with improved efficacy. PMID:27886076

  5. A mouse model to study immunity against pseudorabies virus infection: Significance of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bianchi, A.T.J.; Moonen-Leusen, H.W.M.; Milligen, van F.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Zwart, R.J.; Kimman, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we firstly established a vaccination/challenge model to study pseudorabies virus infection in mice. The mouse model was used to investigate the significance of CD4 and CD8 cells and of IFN production in protective immunity. Functional depletion of CD4 and CD8 and IFN was obtained in

  6. Priming Cross-Protective Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Specific Immunity Using Live-Vectored Mosaic Antigens.

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    Shehnaz Lokhandwala

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV plays a key role in bovine respiratory disease complex, which can lead to pneumonia, diarrhea and death of calves. Current vaccines are not very effective due, in part, to immunosuppressive traits and failure to induce broad protection. There are diverse BVDV strains and thus, current vaccines contain representative genotype 1 and 2 viruses (BVDV-1 & 2 to broaden coverage. BVDV modified live virus (MLV vaccines are superior to killed virus vaccines, but they are susceptible to neutralization and complement-mediated destruction triggered by passively acquired antibodies, thus limiting their efficacy. We generated three novel mosaic polypeptide chimeras, designated NproE2123; NS231; and NS232, which incorporate protective determinants that are highly conserved among BVDV-1a, 1b, and BVDV-2 genotypes. In addition, strain-specific protective antigens from disparate BVDV strains were included to broaden coverage. We confirmed that adenovirus constructs expressing these antigens were strongly recognized by monoclonal antibodies, polyclonal sera, and IFN-γ-secreting T cells generated against diverse BVDV strains. In a proof-of-concept efficacy study, the multi-antigen proto-type vaccine induced higher, but not significantly different, IFN-γ spot forming cells and T-cell proliferation compared to a commercial MLV vaccine. In regards to the humoral response, the prototype vaccine induced higher BVDV-1 specific neutralizing antibody titers, whereas the MLV vaccine induced higher BVDV-2 specific neutralizing antibody titers. Following BVDV type 2a (1373 challenge, calves immunized with the proto-type or the MLV vaccine had lower clinical scores compared to naïve controls. These results support the hypothesis that a broadly protective subunit vaccine can be generated using mosaic polypeptides that incorporate rationally selected and validated protective determinants from diverse BVDV strains. Furthermore, regarding

  7. Recombinant tandem multi-linear neutralizing epitopes of human enterovirus 71 elicited protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhao, Hui; Cao, Rui-Yuan; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Han, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Ma, Jie; Liu, Long; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-05-06

    Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as the leading cause of viral encephalitis in children, especially in the Asia-Pacific regions. EV71 vaccine development is of high priority at present, and neutralization antibodies have been documented to play critical roles during in vitro and in vivo protection against EV71 infection. In this study, a novel strategy to produce EV71 vaccine candidate based on recombinant multiple tandem linear neutralizing epitopes (mTLNE) was proposed. The three well identified EV71 linear neutralizing epitopes in capsid proteins, VP1-SP55, VP1-SP70 and VP2-SP28, were sequentially linked by a Gly-Ser linker ((G4S)3), and expressed in E.coli in fusion with the Trx and His tag at either terminal. The recombinant protein mTLNE was soluble and could be purified by standard affinity chromatography. Following three dosage of immunization in adult mice, EV71-specific IgG and neutralization antibodies were readily induced by recombinant mTLNE. IgG subtyping demonstrated that lgG1 antibodies dominated the mTLNE-induced humoral immune response. Especially, cytokine profiling in spleen cells from the mTLNE-immunized mice revealed high production of IL-4 and IL-6. Finally, in vivo challenge experiments showed that passive transfer with anti-mTLNE sera conferred full protection against lethal EV71 challenge in neonatal mice. Our results demonstrated that this rational designed recombinant mTLNE might have the potential to be further developed as an EV71 vaccine in the future.

  8. Biofilm Matrix Exoproteins Induce a Protective Immune Response against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Carmen; Solano, Cristina; Burgui, Saioa; Latasa, Cristina; García, Begoña; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus biofilm mode of growth is associated with several chronic infections that are very difficult to treat due to the recalcitrant nature of biofilms to clearance by antimicrobials. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest in preventing the formation of S. aureus biofilms and developing efficient antibiofilm vaccines. Given the fact that during a biofilm-associated infection, the first primary interface between the host and the bacteria is the self-produced extracellular matrix, in this study we analyzed the potential of extracellular proteins found in the biofilm matrix to induce a protective immune response against S. aureus infections. By using proteomic approaches, we characterized the exoproteomes of exopolysaccharide-based and protein-based biofilm matrices produced by two clinical S. aureus strains. Remarkably, results showed that independently of the nature of the biofilm matrix, a common core of secreted proteins is contained in both types of exoproteomes. Intradermal administration of an exoproteome extract of an exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm induced a humoral immune response and elicited the production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-17 in mice. Antibodies against such an extract promoted opsonophagocytosis and killing of S. aureus. Immunization with the biofilm matrix exoproteome significantly reduced the number of bacterial cells inside a biofilm and on the surrounding tissue, using an in vivo model of mesh-associated biofilm infection. Furthermore, immunized mice also showed limited organ colonization by bacteria released from the matrix at the dispersive stage of the biofilm cycle. Altogether, these data illustrate the potential of biofilm matrix exoproteins as a promising candidate multivalent vaccine against S. aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24343648

  9. Gut symbiotic microbes imprint intestinal immune cells with the innate receptor SLAMF4 which contributes to gut immune protection against enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabinian, Allison; Sinsimer, Daniel; Tang, May; Jang, Youngsoon; Choi, Bongkum; Laouar, Yasmina; Laouar, Amale

    2017-03-24

    Interactions between host immune cells and gut microbiota are crucial for the integrity and function of the intestine. How these interactions regulate immune cell responses in the intestine remains a major gap in the field. We have identified the signalling lymphocyte activation molecule family member 4 (SLAMF4) as an immunomodulator of the intestinal immunity. The aim is to determine how SLAMF4 is acquired in the gut and what its contribution to intestinal immunity is. Expression of SLAMF4 was assessed in mice and humans. The mechanism of induction was studied using GFP(tg) bone marrow chimaera mice, lymphotoxin α and TNLG8A-deficient mice, as well as gnotobiotic mice. Role in immune protection was revealed using oral infection with Listeria monocytogenes and Cytobacter rodentium. SLAMF4 is a selective marker of intestinal immune cells of mice and humans. SLAMF4 induction occurs directly in the intestinal mucosa without the involvement of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Gut bacterial products, particularly those of gut anaerobes, and gut-resident antigen-presenting cell (APC) (TNLG8A) are key contributors of SLAMF4 induction in the intestine. Importantly, lack of SLAMF4 expression leads the increased susceptibility of mice to infection by oral pathogens culminating in their premature death. SLAMF4 is a marker of intestinal immune cells which contributes to the protection against enteric pathogens and whose expression is dependent on the presence of the gut microbiota. This discovery provides a possible mechanism for answering the long-standing question of how the intertwining of the host and gut microbial biology regulates immune cell responses in the gut. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  11. Proteomic Identification of saeRS-Dependent Targets Critical for Protective Humoral Immunity against Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fan; Cheng, Brian L; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Daum, Robert S; Chong, Anita S; Montgomery, Christopher P

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common despite detectable antibody responses, leading to the belief that the immune response elicited by these infections is not protective. We recently reported that S. aureus USA300 SSTI elicits antibodies that protect against recurrent SSTI in BALB/c but not C57BL/6 mice, and in this study, we aimed to uncover the specificity of the protective antibodies. Using a proteomic approach, we found that S. aureus SSTI elicited broad polyclonal antibody responses in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and identified 10 S. aureus antigens against which antibody levels were significantly higher in immune BALB/c serum. Four of the 10 antigens identified are regulated by the saeRS operon, suggesting a dominant role for saeRS in protection. Indeed, infection with USA300Δsae failed to protect against secondary SSTI with USA300, despite eliciting a strong polyclonal antibody response against antigens whose expression is not regulated by saeRS. Moreover, the antibody repertoire after infection with USA300Δsae lacked antibodies specific for 10 saeRS-regulated antigens, suggesting that all or a subset of these antigens are necessary to elicit protective immunity. Infection with USA300Δhla elicited modest protection against secondary SSTI, and complementation of USA300Δsae with hla restored protection but incompletely. Together, these findings support a role for both Hla and other saeRS-regulated antigens in eliciting protection and suggest that host differences in immune responses to saeRS-regulated antigens may determine whether S. aureus infection elicits protective or nonprotective immunity against recurrent infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. SPI1 defective mutants of Salmonella enterica induce cross-protective immunity in chickens against challenge with serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulova, Marta; Havlickova, Hana; Sisak, Frantisek; Babak, Vladimir; Rychlik, Ivan

    2013-06-28

    In this study we were interested in the serovar cross-protection potential of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1) attenuated vaccine strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium and immune response of vaccinated and naive chickens to Salmonella infection. The immune response was characterized by real time PCR quantifying transcripts of interleukins IL1β, IL17, IL22, interferon gamma (IFNγ), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), immunoglobulins IgM, IgA, IgY and Ig light chain, and six genes of acute phase response including avidin, serum amyloid A, extracellular fatty acid-binding protein (Ex-FABP), immune responsive gene 1, chemokine AH221 and trappin-6. Vaccination with SPI1 mutants of both serovars protected chickens against Salmonella infection, independent of the serovar used for the challenge and the time post infection. However, expressions of all interleukins, iNOS and Ex-FABP showed that protection against homologous serovars was significantly higher than against heterologous serovars after intravenous challenge at 4 days post infection. The vaccination with a mixture of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium SPI1 mutants induced an intermediate protection against challenge with both serovars, i.e. the mixed vaccine provided an additional protective effect when compared with the chickens vaccinated with a vaccine formed by only a single Salmonella serovar. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neonatal protection by an innate immune system of human milk consisting of oligosaccharides and glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newburg, D S

    2009-04-01

    This review discusses the role of human milk glycans in protecting infants, but the conclusion that the human milk glycans constitute an innate immune system whereby the mother protects her offspring may have general applicability in all mammals, including species of commercial importance. Infants that are not breastfed have a greater incidence of severe diarrhea and respiratory diseases than those who are breastfed. In the past, this had been attributed primarily to human milk secretory antibodies. However, the oligosaccharides are major components of human milk, and milk is also rich in other glycans, including glycoproteins, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, and glycolipids. These milk glycans, especially the oligosaccharides, are composed of thousands of components. The milk factor that promotes gut colonization by Bifidobacterium bifidum was found to be a glycan, and such prebiotic characteristics may contribute to protection against infectious agents. However, the ability of human milk glycans to protect the neonate seems primarily to be due to their inhibition of pathogen binding to their host cell target ligands. Many such examples include specific fucosylated oligosaccharides and glycans that inhibit specific pathogens. Most human milk oligosaccharides are fucosylated, and their production depends on fucosyltransferase enzymes; mutations in these fucosyltransferase genes are common and underlie the various Lewis blood types in humans. Variable expression of specific fucosylated oligosaccharides in milk, also a function of these genes (and maternal Lewis blood type), is significantly associated with the risk of infectious disease in breastfed infants. Human milk also contains major quantities and large numbers of sialylated oligosaccharides, many of which are also present in bovine colostrum. These could similarly inhibit several common viral pathogens. Moreover, human milk oligosaccharides strongly attenuate inflammatory processes in the intestinal mucosa. These

  14. Subunit vaccine candidate AMM down-regulated the regulatory T cells and enhanced the protective immunity of BCG on a suitable schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y; Jiang, W; Da, Z; Wang, B; Hu, L; Zhang, Y; An, R; Yu, H; Sun, H; Tang, K; Tang, Z; Wang, Y; Jing, T; Zhu, B

    2012-03-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) priming and subunit vaccine boosting strategies are urgently needed to improve the protective efficacy of BCG in adult population. However, the schedule of subunit vaccine boosting is not well investigated, especially the optimal immune responses and vaccine immunization schedules are still not clear. We have constructed a novel subunit vaccine candidate consisting of fusion protein Ag85B-Mpt64 (190-198)-Mtb8.4 (AMM) in a complex adjuvant composed of dimo-thylidioctyl ammonium bromide (DDA) and BCG polysaccharide nucleic acid (BCG-PSN). In this study, we compared the effect of different boosting schedules of the subunit vaccine in the prime-boost strategies. C57BL/6 mice were primed with BCG first and then boosted with the AMM vaccine once at 10th week, twice at 8th, 10th week, or thrice at 6th, 8th, 10th week, respectively. The immune responses were evaluated at the 14th and 20th weeks, respectively. Twelve weeks after the last immunization, the mice were challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv, and the protective effect was evaluated. The results showed that BCG priming and the AMM vaccine boosting twice induced the strongest antigen-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 production, down-regulated CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and had the best protective effect among all groups, while boosting thrice induced the strongest IL-4 production and did not improve BCG-primed protection significantly. Boosting BCG with the AMM vaccine twice instead of once or thrice induced strong Th1-type immunity and down-regulated Tregs significantly, which correlated with the best protection against M. tuberculosis infection in mice. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Immune protection duration and efficacy stability of DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhao, Xiaofang; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2017-04-01

    In our previous study, an effective DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 was constructed. In the present study, the immunization dose of the DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 was further optimized. With the optimized dose, the dynamics of antibodies induced by the DNA vaccine was determined using indirect ELISA. To evaluate the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized twice and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella at 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21weeks post the last immunization (PLI) separately. To evaluate the efficacy stability of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were immunized with 3 batches of the DNA vaccine, and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella. The results showed that the optimal dose was 25μg. The induced antibody level persisted until 10weeks PPI. For the challenge time of 5 and 9weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs of 182.28 and 162.23 beyond 160, showing effective protection. However, for the challenge time of 13, 17 and 21weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs below 160 which means poor protection. Therefore, the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccination was at least 9weeks PLI. DNA immunization with three batches DNA vaccine resulted in ACIs of 187.52, 191.57 and 185.22, which demonstrated that efficacies of the three batches DNA vaccine were effective and stable. Overall, our results indicate that DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 has the potential to be developed as effective vaccine against coccidiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Vaccination with Salmonella Typhi recombinant outer membrane protein 28 induces humoral but non-protective immune response in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjani Saxena

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Typhoid is one of the most important food and water borne disease causing millions of deaths over the world. Presently, there is no cost effective vaccine available in India. The outer-membrane proteins (Omps of Salmonella have been exhibited as a potential candidate for development of subunit vaccine against typhoid. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of recombinant Omp 28 protein for immunization of rabbit to elucidate its protection against virulent Salmonella Typhi. Materials and Methods: Immune potential of recombinant Omp28 was tested in New Zealand Rabbits. Rabbits were divided into two groups, i.e., control and test group. Control group was injected with phosphate buffer saline with adjuvant while test group were injected with recombinant Omp28 along with adjuvant. Rabbits were bleed and serum was collected from each rabbit. Serum was tested by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for humoral response. Rabbits were challenged with virulent culture to test the protective immunity. Results: Humoral response was provoked at 15th day and maintained till 30th day. The mean ELISA titer at 15th day was 1 : 28000 (mean titer log 10 : 4.4472 and on the 30th day was 1 : 25866 (mean titer log 10 : 4.4127. Protective immune potential of Omp 28 was assessed by challenge studies in rabbits for which vaccinated and control rabbits were challenged with 109 cells of virulent culture of S. Typhi. In control group, out of six, no rabbit could survive after 48 days while in vaccinated group, three out of six rabbit were survived. Conclusion: Immunization of rabbit with recombinant Omp 28 induced a strong humoral response which was exhibited by high antibody titer in ELISA. Subsequently, intraperitoneal homologous challenge of the immunized New Zealand rabbit resulted in lack of significant protection. These findings indicate that Omp 28 though provoked the humoral immunity but could not provide the protective immunity in

  17. Immunogenicity is unrelated to protective immunity when induced by soluble and particulate antigens from Nocardia brasiliensis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Ramos, Alma I; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2006-08-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a major role in protection against intracellular microbes. Nocardia brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes chronic actinomycetoma. In this work, we injected BALB/c mice with soluble P24 and particulate antigens from N. brasiliensis. A higher antibody titer and lymphocyte proliferation was induced by the particulate antigen than by the soluble antigen. However, five months after antigen injection, antibody concentration and lymphocyte proliferation were similar. An increase in CD45R and CD4 T cells was unrelated to protective immunity. Active immunization with soluble or particulate antigens induced complete protection during the primary immune response. This protective response was IgM mediated. The higher immunogenicity was not related to protective immunity since the particulate antigen induced protection similar to the soluble antigen. Using particulate antigens for vaccination guarantees a stronger immune response, local and systemic side effects, but not necessarily protection.

  18. The HyVac4 subunit vaccine efficiently boosts BCG-primed anti-mycobacterial protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Billeskov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current vaccine against tuberculosis (TB, BCG, has failed to control TB worldwide and the protective efficacy is moreover limited to 10-15 years. A vaccine that could efficiently boost a BCG-induced immune response and thus prolong protective immunity would therefore have a significant impact on the global TB-burden. METHODS/FINDINGS: In the present study we show that the fusion protein HyVac4 (H4, consisting of the mycobacterial antigens Ag85B and TB10.4, given in the adjuvant IC31® or DDA/MPL effectively boosted and prolonged immunity induced by BCG, leading to improved protection against infection with virulent M. tuberculosis (M.tb. Increased protection correlated with an increased percentage of TB10.4 specific IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2 or TNFα/IL-2 producing CD4 T cells at the site of infection. Moreover, this vaccine strategy did not compromise the use of ESAT-6 as an accurate correlate of disease development/vaccine efficacy. Indeed both CD4 and CD8 ESAT-6 specific T cells showed significant correlation with bacterial levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H4-IC31® can efficiently boost BCG-primed immunity leading to an increased protective anti-M.tb immune response dominated by IFNγ/TNFα/IL-2 or TNFα/IL2 producing CD4 T cells. H4 in the CD4 T cell inducing adjuvant IC31® is presently in clinical trials.

  19. A Schistosoma japonicum chimeric protein with a novel adjuvant induced a polarized Th1 immune response and protection against liver egg burdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiangyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schitosomiasis japonica is still a significant public health problem in China. A protective vaccine for human or animal use represents an important strategy for long-term control of this disease. Due to the complex life cycle of schistosomes, different vaccine design approaches may be necessary, including polyvalent subunit vaccines. In this study, we constructed four chimeric proteins (designated SjGP-1~4 via fusion of Sj26GST and four individual paramyosin fragments. We tested these four proteins as vaccine candidates, and investigated the effect of deviating immune response on protection roles in mice. Methods The immunogencity and protection efficacy of chimeric proteins were evaluated in mice. Next, the chimeric protein SjGP-3 was selected and formulated in various adjuvants, including CFA, ISA 206, IMS 1312 and ISA 70M. The titers of antigen-specific IgG, IgE and IgG subclass were measured. The effect of adjuvant on cytokine production and percentages of CD3+CD8-IFN-γ+ cells and CD3+CD8-IL-4+ cells were analyzed at different time points. Worm burdens and liver egg counts in different adjuvant groups were counted to evaluate the protection efficacy against cercarial challenge. Results Immunization of mice with chimeric proteins provided various levels of protection. Among the four proteins, SjGP-3 induced the highest level of protection, and showed enhanced protective efficacy compared with its individual component Sj26GST. Because of this, SjGP-3 was further formulated in various adjuvants to investigate the effect of adjuvant on immune deviation. The results revealed that SjGP-3 formulated in veterinary adjuvant ISA 70M induced a lasting polarized Th1 immune response, whereas the other adjuvants, including CFA, ISA 206 and IMS 1312, generated a moderate mixed Th1/Th2 response after immunization but all except for IMS 1312 shifted to Th2 response after onset of eggs. More importantly, the SjGP-3/70M formulation induced

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Wellhead Protection: Virginia and Massachusetts

    OpenAIRE

    Raftery, Kelley Lynne

    2002-01-01

    Proactive drinking water programs assist communities in the long-term protection of their water supply. The 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) seek to protect groundwater sources of public drinking water. 42 United States Code Section 300h-7 created the Wellhead Protection Program. The 1986 SDWA Amendments require all states to submit a Wellhead Protection Program for public groundwater drinking sources. The 1996 SDWA Amendments require all states to submit Source Water As...

  1. Novel 6xHis tagged foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine bound to nanolipoprotein adjuvant via metal ions provides antigenic distinction and effective protective immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Devendra K.; Segundo, Fayna Diaz-San [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science, CANR, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Schafer, Elizabeth [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Burrage, Thomas G. [Department of Homeland Security, S & T, Targeted Advance Development, Virus, Cellular and Molecular Imaging Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Rodriguez, Luis L.; Santos, Teresa de los [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Hoeprich, Paul D. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Rieder, Elizabeth, E-mail: Elizabeth.Rieder@ars.usda.gov [Foreign Animal Disease Research Unit, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Here, we engineered two FMD viruses with histidine residues inserted into or fused to the FMDV capsid. Both 6xHis viruses exhibited growth kinetics, plaque morphologies and antigenic characteristics similar to wild-type virus. The 6xHis tag allowed one-step purification of the mutant virions by Co{sup 2+} affinity columns. Electron microscopy and biochemical assays showed that the 6xHis FMDVs readily assembled into antigen: adjuvant complexes in solution, by conjugating with Ni{sup 2+}-chelated nanolipoprotein and monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant (MPLA:NiNLP). Animals Immunized with the inactivated 6xHis-FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine acquired enhanced protective immunity against FMDV challenge compared to virions alone. Induction of anti-6xHis and anti-FMDV neutralizing antibodies in the immunized animals could be exploited in the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals needed for the improvement of FMD control measures. The novel marker vaccine/nanolipid technology described here has broad applications for the development of distinctive and effective immune responses to other pathogens of importance. - Highlights: • 6xHis-tags in A{sub 24} FMDV enable purification and biding to adjuvants via metal ions. • 6xHis A{sub 24} FMDV:MPLA:NiNLP vaccine enhanced protective immunity against FMDV. • Surface exposed capsid tags allow distinction of infected from vaccinated animals.

  2. Comparing fish communities in sanctuaries, partly protected areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The depletion of reef fish species inside protected areas and reconsideration of the classification of pelagic gamefish require managerial attention. Partly protected areas in Mozambique need to be supplemented with no-take zones. Keywords: conservation, coral reef fish, fishing, marine protected area, Mozambique, ...

  3. Enhanced CD8+ T cell immune responses and protection elicited against Plasmodium berghei malaria by prime boost immunization regimens using a novel attenuated fowlpox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard J; Hannan, Carolyn M; Gilbert, Sarah C; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Sheu, Eric G; Korten, Simone; Sinden, Robert; Butcher, Geoffrey A; Skinner, Michael A; Hill, Adrian V S

    2004-03-01

    Sterile immunity can be provided against the pre-erythrocytic stages of malaria by IFN-gamma-secreting CD8(+) T cells that recognize parasite-infected hepatocytes. In this study, we have investigated the use of attenuated fowlpox virus (FPV) strains as recombinant vaccine vectors for eliciting CD8(+) T cells against Plasmodium berghei. The gene encoding the P. berghei circumsporozoite (PbCS) protein was inserted into an FPV vaccine strain licensed for use in chickens, Webster's FPV, and the novel FPV vaccine strain FP9 by homologous recombination. The novel FP9 strain proved more potent as a vaccine for eliciting CD8(+) T cell responses against the PbCS Ag. Sequential immunization with rFP9 and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Anakara (MVA) encoding the PbCS protein, administered by clinically acceptable routes, elicited potent CD8(+) T cell responses against the PbCS protein. This immunization regimen elicited substantial protection against a stringent liver-stage challenge with P. berghei and was more immunogenic and protective than DNA/MVA prime/boost immunization. However, further improvement was not achieved by sequential (triple) immunization with a DNA vaccine, FP9, and MVA.

  4. Cloned defective interfering influenza virus protects ferrets from pandemic 2009 influenza A virus and allows protective immunity to be established.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J Dimmock

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population, causing epidemics in the winter, and occasional worldwide pandemics. In addition there are periodic outbreaks in domestic poultry, horses, pigs, dogs, and cats. Infections of domestic birds can be fatal for the birds and their human contacts. Control in man operates through vaccines and antivirals, but both have their limitations. In the search for an alternative treatment we have focussed on defective interfering (DI influenza A virus. Such a DI virus is superficially indistinguishable from a normal virus but has a large deletion in one of the eight RNAs that make up the viral genome. Antiviral activity resides in the deleted RNA. We have cloned one such highly active DI RNA derived from segment 1 (244 DI virus and shown earlier that intranasal administration protects mice from lethal disease caused by a number of different influenza A viruses. A more cogent model of human influenza is the ferret. Here we found that intranasal treatment with a single dose of 2 or 0.2 µg 244 RNA delivered as A/PR/8/34 virus particles protected ferrets from disease caused by pandemic virus A/California/04/09 (A/Cal; H1N1. Specifically, 244 DI virus significantly reduced fever, weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and infectious load. 244 DI RNA, the active principle, was amplified in nasal washes following infection with A/Cal, consistent with its amelioration of clinical disease. Animals that were treated with 244 DI RNA cleared infectious and DI viruses without delay. Despite the attenuation of infection and disease by DI virus, ferrets formed high levels of A/Cal-specific serum haemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies and were solidly immune to rechallenge with A/Cal. Together with earlier data from mouse studies, we conclude that 244 DI virus is a highly effective antiviral with activity potentially against all influenza A subtypes.

  5. Infection with non-lethal West Nile virus Eg101 strain induces immunity that protects mice against the lethal West Nile virus NY99 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; O'Connell, Maile; Namekar, Madhuri; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2014-06-06

    Herein we demonstrate that infection of mice with West Nile virus (WNV) Eg101 provides protective immunity against lethal challenge with WNV NY99. Our data demonstrated that WNV Eg101 is largely non-virulent in adult mice when compared to WNV NY99. By day 6 after infection, WNV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies, and neutralizing antibodies were detected in the serum of all WNV Eg101 infected mice. Plaque reduction neutralization test data demonstrated that serum from WNV Eg101 infected mice neutralized WNV Eg101 and WNV NY99 strains with similar efficiency. Three weeks after infection, WNV Eg101 immunized mice were challenged subcutaneously or intracranially with lethal dose of WNV NY99 and observed for additional three weeks. All the challenged mice were protected against disease and no morbidity and mortality was observed in any mice. In conclusion, our data for the first time demonstrate that infection of mice with WNV Eg101 induced high titers of WNV specific IgM and IgG antibodies, and cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, and the resulting immunity protected all immunized animals from both subcutaneous and intracranial challenge with WNV NY99. These observations suggest that WNV Eg101 may be a suitable strain for the development of a vaccine in humans against virulent strains of WNV.

  6. Comparison of mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses and subsequent protection in mice orally inoculated with a homologous or a heterologous rotavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, N; Burns, J W; Bracy, L; Greenberg, H B

    1994-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide, and vaccination is probably the most effective way to control the disease. Most current live virus vaccine candidates are based on the host range-restricted attenuation of heterologous animal rotaviruses in humans. The protective efficacy of these vaccine candidates has been variable. To better understand the nature of the heterologous rotavirus-induced active immune response, we compared the diffe...

  7. The status of wildlife in protected areas compared to non-protected areas of Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Western

    Full Text Available We compile over 270 wildlife counts of Kenya's wildlife populations conducted over the last 30 years to compare trends in national parks and reserves with adjacent ecosystems and country-wide trends. The study shows the importance of discriminating human-induced changes from natural population oscillations related to rainfall and ecological factors. National park and reserve populations have declined sharply over the last 30 years, at a rate similar to non-protected areas and country-wide trends. The protected area losses reflect in part their poor coverage of seasonal ungulate migrations. The losses vary among parks. The largest parks, Tsavo East, Tsavo West and Meru, account for a disproportionate share of the losses due to habitat change and the difficulty of protecting large remote parks. The losses in Kenya's parks add to growing evidence for wildlife declines inside as well as outside African parks. The losses point to the need to quantify the performance of conservation policies and promote integrated landscape practices that combine parks with private and community-based measures.

  8. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  9. Humoral Immunity to West Nile Virus Is Long-Lasting and Protective in the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Nicole M.; Oesterle, Paul T.; Bowen, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) is a common and abundant amplifying host of West Nile virus (WNV) and many survive infection and develop humoral immunity. We experimentally inoculated house sparrows with WNV and monitored duration and protection of resulting antibodies. Neutralizing antibody titers remained relatively constant for ≥ 36 months (N = 42) and provided sterilizing immunity for up to 36 months post-inoculation in 98.6% of individuals (N = 72). These results imply that immune house sparrows are protected from WNV infection for multiple transmission seasons. Additionally, individuals experiencing WNV-associated mortality reached significantly higher peak viremia titers than survivors, and mortality during acute infection was significantly higher in caged versus free-flight sparrows. A better understanding of the long-term immunity and mortality rates in birds is valuable in interpreting serosurveillance and diagnostic data and modeling transmission and disease dynamics. PMID:19407139

  10. Does age acquired immunity confer selective protection to common serotypes of Campylobacter jejuni?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogden Iain D

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter infection is a major cause of bacterial gastrointestinal disease. Exposure to Campylobacter is known to produce an immune response in humans that can prevent future symptomatic infections. Further, studies of the general population have shown that seroprevalence to Campylobacter increases with age. Methods A large collection of serotyped Campylobacter isolates, obtained from human clinical faecal samples, were analysed by comparing the ratio of uncommon to common serotypes by different age groups, using χ2 tests. Results We have identified that older age groups, as well as having generally lower incidence, are significantly less likely to be infected by the more common serotypes. Conclusion These results are indicative of acquired immunity, however, further studies are needed to rule out the confounding effects of the variations in exposure pathways experienced by different age groups.

  11. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jolene; O'Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G; Krug, Peter W; Gladue, Douglas P; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V

    2016-10-22

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms.

  12. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future. © 2015 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  13. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. II. Active and passive immunization as protection against a lethal bacterial dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    Immunization against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and thymus-bearing LEW rats. Active immunization was performed with formalin-killed whole cell vaccine or sublethal infection prior to the lethal infection. After vaccination with killed bacteria the euthymic...... animals produced antibodies against S.typhimurium, but neither the euthymic nor the athymic animals survived the infection. After non-lethal infection euthymic and thymus-grafted nude rats were not affected by the second and otherwise lethal bacterial dose, and had high antibody titres. All the athymic...... nude rats died after the second and lethal bacterial challenge. Passive immunization with plasma from immunized euthymic animals did not protect any of the animals against the lethal bacterial dose. However, all animals survived when treated with large doses of spleen cells from immunized euthymic rats...

  14. Mode of action of FK-506 on protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K; Taki, M; Matsuo, S; Yamada, K

    1996-01-01

    FK-506 (Tacrolimus) has been shown to block T cell proliferation in vitro by inhibiting the generation of several lymphokines, especially interleukin (IL)-2, but little direct evidence is available to support the view that the immunosuppressive effects of FK-506 in vivo are mediated by a similar inhibition of lymphokine cascade. To investigate the mechanisms of FK-506-induced immunosuppression, the effects of FK-506 on cell-mediated immunity to Hymenolepis nana were examined in mice. FK-506 administration into BALB/c mice daily at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg (but not 5.0 mg/kg) for 5 days caused suppression of protective immunity against H. nana challenge infection. During the infection of mice with H. nana, IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-gama were produced by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells with a time course corresponding to that of MLN T cell proliferation. These responses were completely suppressed by repeated administration of FK-506 for 5 days at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg/day (but not 5.0 mg/kg/day). In contrast to the effects of FK-506 on IL-2 and IFN-gamma productions in MLN, IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the intestinal wall, which were enhanced by H. nana infection, were not completely decreased as a result of 10.0 mg/kg FK-506 treatment. The reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed complete inhibition of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression on mesenteric L3T4+ cells that were induced by H. nana infection, when mice were given 10.0 mg/kg/day FK-506 for 5 days. These results strongly suggest that FK-506 affects cell-mediated immunity in vivo with mechanisms similar to those observed in vitro.

  15. Photodynamic therapy can induce non-specific protective immunity against a bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Kinoshita, Manabu; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer is known to induce an immune response against the tumor, in addition to its well-known direct cell-killing and vascular destructive effects. PDT is becoming increasingly used as a therapy for localized infections. However there has not to date been a convincing report of an immune response being generated against a microbial pathogen after PDT in an animal model. We have studied PDT as a therapy for bacterial arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse knee. We had previously found that PDT of an infection caused by injection of MRSA (5X107 CFU) into the mouse knee followed 3 days later by 1 μg of Photofrin and 635- nm diode laser illumination with a range of fluences within 5 minutes, gave a biphasic dose response. The greatest reduction of MRSA CFU was seen with a fluence of 20 J/cm2, whereas lower antibacterial efficacy was observed with fluences that were either lower or higher. We then tested the hypothesis that the host immune response mediated by neutrophils was responsible for most of the beneficial antibacterial effect. We used bioluminescence imaging of luciferase expressing bacteria to follow the progress of the infection in real time. We found similar results using intra-articular methylene blue and red light, and more importantly, that carrying out PDT of the noninfected joint and subsequently injecting bacteria after PDT led to a significant protection from infection. Taken together with substantial data from studies using blocking antibodies we believe that the pre-conditioning PDT regimen recruits and stimulates neutrophils into the infected joint which can then destroy bacteria that are subsequently injected and prevent infection.

  16. Protective Immunity against Lethal F. tularensis holarctica LVS Provided by Vaccination with Selected Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Haim, Erez; Bar-On, Liat; Ehrlich, Sharon; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2014-01-01

    Recently we described an unbiased bacterial whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis aimed at selection of potential CTL epitopes located in “hotspots” of predicted MHC-I binders. Applying this approach to the proteome of the facultative intra-cellular pathogen Francisella tularensis resulted in identification of 170 novel CTL epitopes, several of which were shown to elicit highly robust T cell responses. Here we demonstrate that by DNA immunization using a short DNA fragment expressing six of the most prominent identified CTL epitopes a potent and specific CD8+ T cell responses is being induced, to all encoded epitopes, a response not observed in control mice immunized with the DNA vector alone Moreover, this CTL-specific mediated immune response prevented disease development, allowed for a rapid clearance of the bacterial infection and provided complete protection against lethal challenge (10LD50) with F. tularensis holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) (a total to 30 of 30 immunized mice survived the challenge while all control DNA vector immunized mice succumbed). Furthermore, and in accordance with these results, CD8 deficient mice could not be protected from lethal challenge after immunization with the CTL-polyepitope. Vaccination with the DNA poly-epitope construct could even protect mice (8/10) against the more demanding pulmonary lethal challenge of LVS. Our approach provides a proof-of-principle for selecting and generating a multi-epitpoe CD8 T cell-stimulating vaccine against a model intracellular bacterium. PMID:24400128

  17. Protective immunity against lethal F. tularensis holarctica LVS provided by vaccination with selected novel CD8+ T cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Shahar; Cohen, Ofer; Bar-Haim, Erez; Bar-On, Liat; Ehrlich, Sharon; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2014-01-01

    Recently we described an unbiased bacterial whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis aimed at selection of potential CTL epitopes located in "hotspots" of predicted MHC-I binders. Applying this approach to the proteome of the facultative intra-cellular pathogen Francisella tularensis resulted in identification of 170 novel CTL epitopes, several of which were shown to elicit highly robust T cell responses. Here we demonstrate that by DNA immunization using a short DNA fragment expressing six of the most prominent identified CTL epitopes a potent and specific CD8+ T cell responses is being induced, to all encoded epitopes, a response not observed in control mice immunized with the DNA vector alone Moreover, this CTL-specific mediated immune response prevented disease development, allowed for a rapid clearance of the bacterial infection and provided complete protection against lethal challenge (10LD50) with F. tularensis holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) (a total to 30 of 30 immunized mice survived the challenge while all control DNA vector immunized mice succumbed). Furthermore, and in accordance with these results, CD8 deficient mice could not be protected from lethal challenge after immunization with the CTL-polyepitope. Vaccination with the DNA poly-epitope construct could even protect mice (8/10) against the more demanding pulmonary lethal challenge of LVS. Our approach provides a proof-of-principle for selecting and generating a multi-epitpoe CD8 T cell-stimulating vaccine against a model intracellular bacterium.

  18. Aeromonas hydrophila OmpW PLGA Nanoparticle Oral Vaccine Shows a Dose-Dependent Protective Immunity in Rohu (Labeo rohita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Dubey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes high mortality in different fish species and at different growth stages. Although vaccination has significantly contributed to the decline of disease outbreaks in aquaculture, the use of oral vaccines has lagged behind the injectable vaccines due to lack of proven efficacy, that being from primary immunization or by use of boost protocols. In this study, the outer membrane protein W (OmpW of A. hydrophila was cloned, purified, and encapsulated in poly d,l-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs for oral vaccination of rohu (Labeo rohita Hamilton. The physical properties of PLGA NPs encapsulating the recombinant OmpW (rOmpW was characterized as having a diameter of 370–375 nm, encapsulation efficiency of 53% and −19.3 mV zeta potential. In vitro release of rOmpW was estimated at 34% within 48 h of incubation in phosphate-buffered saline. To evaluate the efficacy of the NP-rOmpW oral vaccine, two antigen doses were orally administered in rohu with a high antigen (HiAg dose that had twice the amount of antigens compared to the low antigen (LoAg dose. Antibody levels obtained after vaccination showed an antigen dose dependency in which fish from the HiAg group had higher antibody levels than those from the LoAg group. The antibody levels corresponded with post challenge survival proportions (PCSPs and relative percent survival (RPS in which the HiAg group had a higher PCSP and RPS than the LoAg group. Likewise, the ability to inhibit A. hydrophila growth on trypticase soy agar (TSA by sera obtained from the HiAg group was higher than that from the LoAg group. Overall, data presented here shows that OmpW orally administered using PLGA NPs is protective against A. hydrophila infection with the level of protective immunity induced by oral vaccination being antigen dose-dependent. Future studies should seek to optimize the antigen dose and duration of oral immunization in rohu

  19. Protective Humoral Immunity in the Central Nervous System Requires Peripheral CD19-Dependent Germinal Center Formation following Coronavirus Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey R; Bergmann, Cornelia C

    2017-12-01

    B cell subsets with phenotypes characteristic of naive, non-isotype-switched, memory (Bmem) cells and antibody-secreting cells (ASC) accumulate in various models of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, including viral encephalomyelitis. During neurotropic coronavirus JHMV infection, infiltration of protective ASC occurs after T cell-mediated viral control and is preceded by accumulation of non-isotype-switched IgD+ and IgM+ B cells. However, the contribution of peripheral activation events in cervical lymph nodes (CLN) to driving humoral immune responses in the infected CNS is poorly defined. CD19, a signaling component of the B cell receptor complex, is one of multiple regulators driving B cell differentiation and germinal center (GC) formation by lowering the threshold of antigen-driven activation. JHMV-infected CD19-/- mice were thus used to determine how CD19 affects CNS recruitment of B cell subsets. Early polyclonal ASC expansion, GC formation, and virus-specific ASC were all significantly impaired in CLN of CD19-/- mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice, consistent with lower and unsustained virus-specific serum antibody (Ab). ASC were also significantly reduced in the CNS, resulting in increased infectious virus during persistence. Nevertheless, CD19 deficiency did not affect early CNS IgD+ B cell accumulation. The results support the notion that CD19-independent factors drive early B cell mobilization and recruitment to the infected CNS, while delayed accumulation of virus-specific, isotype-switched ASC requires CD19-dependent GC formation in CLN. CD19 is thus essential for both sustained serum Ab and protective local Ab within the CNS following JHMV encephalomyelitis.IMPORTANCE CD19 activation is known to promote GC formation and to sustain serum Ab responses following antigen immunization and viral infections. However, the contribution of CD19 in the context of CNS infections has not been evaluated. This study demonstrates that antiviral protective

  20. Protection of mice against Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-associated damage by maternal immunization with a Brucella lumazine synthase-Stx2 B subunit chimera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, María Pilar; Cabrera, Gabriel; Fernández-Brando, Romina Jimena; Baschkier, Ariela; Ghersi, Giselle; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Miliwebsky, Elizabeth; Meiss, Roberto; Goldbaum, Fernando; Zylberman, Vanesa; Rivas, Marta; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2014-04-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined as the triad of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Enterohemorrhagic Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (EHEC), which causes a prodromal hemorrhagic enteritis, remains the most common etiology of the typical or epidemic form of HUS. Because no licensed vaccine or effective therapy is presently available for human use, we recently developed a novel immunogen based on the B subunit of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2B) and the enzyme lumazine synthase from Brucella spp. (BLS) (BLS-Stx2B). The aim of this study was to analyze maternal immunization with BLS-Stx2B as a possible approach for transferring anti-Stx2 protection to the offspring. BALB/c female mice were immunized with BLS-Stx2B before mating. Both dams and pups presented comparable titers of anti-Stx2B antibodies in sera and fecal extracts. Moreover, pups were totally protected against a lethal dose of systemic Stx2 injection up to 2 to 3 months postpartum. In addition, pups were resistant to an oral challenge with an Stx2-producing EHEC strain at weaning and did not develop any symptomatology associated with Stx2 toxicity. Fostering experiments demonstrated that anti-Stx2B neutralizing IgG antibodies were transmitted through breast-feeding. Pups that survived the EHEC infection due to maternally transferred immunity prolonged an active and specific immune response that protected them against a subsequent challenge with intravenous Stx2. Our study shows that maternal immunization with BLS-Stx2B was very effective at promoting the transfer of specific antibodies, and suggests that preexposure of adult females to this immunogen could protect their offspring during the early phase of life.

  1. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Noy-Porat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1 that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  2. Amidase, a cell wall hydrolase, elicits protective immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nisha; Vinod, Vivek; Suresh, Maneesha K; Vijayrajratnam, Sukhithasri; Biswas, Lalitha; Peethambaran, Reshmi; Vasudevan, Anil Kumar; Biswas, Raja

    2015-01-01

    The morbidity and the mortality associated with Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis infections have greatly increased due to the rapid emergence of highly virulent and antibiotic resistant strains. Development of a vaccine-based therapy is greatly desired. However, no staphylococcal vaccine is available till date. In this study, we have identified Major amidase (Atl-AM) as a prime candidate for future vaccine design against these pathogens. Atl-AM is a multi-functional non-covalently cell wall associated protein which is involved in staphylococcal cell separation after cell division, host extracellular matrix adhesion and biofilm formation. Atl-AM is present on the surface of diverse S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains. When used in combination with Freund's adjuvant, Atl-AM generated a mixed Th1 and Th2 mediated immune response which is skewed more toward Th1; and showed increased production of opsonophagocytic IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies. Significant protective immune response was observed when vaccinated mice were challenged with S. aureus or S. epidermidis. Vaccination prevented the systemic dissemination of both organisms. Our results demonstrate the remarkable efficacy of Atl-AM as a vaccine candidate against both of these pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Human papillomavirus immunization uptake among girls with a refugee background compared with Danish-born girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P. Møller, Sanne; Kristiansen, Maria; Norredam, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Refugee children and their families may experience impaired access to healthcare; therefore, we aimed to uncover human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization patterns among a large group of refugee girls compared with Danish-born girls. We also examined possible predictors of uptake among refugee girl...

  4. Comparing immune-tumor growth models with drug therapy using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marisa C.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare the dynamics of three tumor growth models that include an immune system and a drug administration therapy using optimal control. The objective is to minimize a combined function of the total of tumor cells over time and a chemotherapeutic drug administration.

  5. A cell wall protein-based vaccine candidate induce protective immune response against Sporothrix schenckii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Martínez, Damiana Téllez; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; de Paula E Silva, Ana Carolina Alves; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco de; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by several closely related thermo-dimorphic fungi of the Sporothrix schenckii species complex, affecting humans and other mammals. In the last few years, new strategies have been proposed for controlling sporotrichosis owning to concerns about its growing incidence in humans, cats, and dogs in Brazil, as well as the toxicity and limited efficacy of conventional antifungal drugs. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective properties of two aluminum hydroxide (AH)-adsorbed S. schenckii cell wall protein (ssCWP)-based vaccine formulations in a mouse model of systemic S. schenckii infection. Fractioning by SDS-PAGE revealed nine protein bands, two of which were functionally characterized: a 44kDa peptide hydrolase and a 47kDa enolase, which was predicted to be an adhesin. Sera from immunized mice recognized the 47kDa enolase and another unidentified 71kDa protein, whereas serum from S. schenckii-infected mice recognized both these proteins plus another unidentified 9.4kDa protein. Furthermore, opsonization with the anti-ssCWP sera led to markedly increased phagocytosis and was able to strongly inhibit the fungus' adhesion to fibroblasts. Immunization with the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation led to increased ex vivo release of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17, whereas only IL-12 and IFN-γ were induced by the higher-dose non-adjuvanted formulation. Lastly, passive transference of the higher-dose AH-adjuvanted formulation's anti-ssCWP serum was able to afford in vivo protection in a subsequent challenge with S. schenckii, becoming a viable vaccine candidate for further testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunization with the Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Fused to Fimbria 2 Protein Protects against Bordetella pertussis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immunogenic properties of the fusion protein fimbria 2 of Bordetella pertussis (Fim2—cholera toxin B subunit (CTB in the intranasal murine model of infection. To this end B. pertussis Fim2 coding sequence was cloned downstream of the cholera toxin B subunit coding sequence. The expression and assembly of the fusion protein into pentameric structures (CTB-Fim2 were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and monosialotetrahexosylgaglioside (GM1-ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. To evaluate the protective capacity of CTB-Fim2, an intraperitoneal or intranasal mouse immunization schedule was performed with 50 μg of CTB-Fim2. Recombinant (rFim2 or purified (BpFim2 Fim2, CTB, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS were used as controls. The results showed that mice immunized with BpFim2 or CTB-Fim2 intraperitoneally or intranasally presented a significant reduction in bacterial lung counts compared to control groups (P<0.01 or P<0.001, resp.. Moreover, intranasal immunization with CTB-Fim2 induced significant levels of Fim2-specific IgG in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and Fim2-specific IgA in BAL. Analysis of IgG isotypes and cytokines mRNA levels showed that CTB-Fim2 results in a mixed Th1/Th2 (T-helper response. The data presented here provide support for CTB-Fim2 as a promising recombinant antigen against Bordetella pertussis infection.

  7. Analysis of the protective immune response following intramuscular vaccination of calves against the intestinal parasite Cooperia oncophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meulder, F; Ratman, D; Van Coppernolle, S; Borloo, J; Li, R W; Chiers, K; Van den Broeck, W; De Bosscher, K; Claerebout, E; Geldhof, P

    2015-08-01

    Recently we reported the successful vaccination of calves against Cooperia oncophora with a double domain activation-associated secreted protein, purified from the excretory-secretory material of adult stage parasites. In an attempt to elucidate the immune mechanisms involved in protection, the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses following vaccination and infection were compared with non-vaccinated control animals. Antigen-specific IgG1, IgG2 and IgA levels were significantly increased in sera of vaccinated animals post vaccination, whereas no effect was observed for IgM. Antigen-specific intestinal IgG1 levels were significantly increased in the vaccinated animals, whereas no differences were observed for antigen-specific IgA, IgM and IgG2 levels. Upon re-stimulation in vitro with the vaccine antigen, a significant proliferation of both αβ- and γδ-T cells, and B cells, collected from mesenteric lymph nodes, was only observed in vaccinated animals. RNA-seq analysis of intestinal tissue yielded a list of 67 genes that were differentially expressed in vaccinated animals following challenge infection, amongst which were several cell adhesion molecules, lectins and glycosyl transferases. A correlation analysis between all immunological and parasitological parameters indicated that intestinal anti-double domain activation-associated secreted protein IgG1 levels correlated negatively with cumulative faecal egg counts and positively with the proportion of L4s and L5s. The proportion of immature stages was also positively correlated with the proliferation of αβ T cells. Worm length was negatively correlated with the transcript levels of several lectins and cell adhesion molecules. Overall, the results indicate that intramuscular administration of the vaccine resulted in an immune memory response particularly characterised by increased antigen-specific IgG1 levels in the intestinal mucosa. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by

  8. Comparative tissue expression of American lobster (Homarus americanus) immune genes during bacterial and scuticociliate challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K Fraser; Acorn, Adam R; Wang, Haili; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2015-12-01

    The American lobster (Homarus americanus) fishery is the most economically significant fishery in Canada; although comparatively little is known about the lobsters' response to pathogenic challenge. This is the first study to investigate the expression of immune genes in tissues outside of the lobster hepatopancreas in response to challenges by the Gram-positive bacteria, Aerococcus viridans var. homari or the scuticociliate parasite, Anophryoides haemophila. The hepatopancreas has been regarded as the major humoral immune organ in crustaceans, but the contribution of other organs and tissues to the molecular immune response has largely been overlooked. This study used RT-qPCR to monitor the gene expression of several immune genes including three anti-lipopolysaccharide isoforms (ALF) Homame ALF-B1, Homame ALF-C1 and ALFHa-1, acute phase serum amyloid protein A (SAA), as well as thioredoxin and hexokinase, in antennal gland and gill tissues. Our findings indicate that the gene expression of the SAA and all ALF isoforms in the antennal gland and gill tissues increased in response to pathogenic challenge. However, there was differential expression of individual ALF isoforms that were dependent on both the tissue, and the pathogen used in the challenge. The gene expression changes of several immune genes were found to be higher in the antennal gland than have been previously reported for the hepatopancreas. This study demonstrates that increased immune gene expression from the gill and antennal gland over the course of pathogen induced disease contributes to the immune response of H. americanus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Deletion of the K1L Gene Results in a Vaccinia Virus That Is Less Pathogenic Due to Muted Innate Immune Responses, yet Still Elicits Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Cruz, Ariana G; Han, Aiguo; Roy, Edward J; Guzmán, Arielle B; Miller, Rita J; Driskell, Elizabeth A; O'Brien, William D; Shisler, Joanna L

    2017-08-01

    All viruses strategically alter the antiviral immune response to their benefit. The vaccinia virus (VACV) K1 protein has multiple immunomodulatory effects in tissue culture models of infection, including NF-κB antagonism. However, the effect of K1 during animal infection is poorly understood. We determined that a K1L-less vaccinia virus (vΔK1L) was less pathogenic than wild-type VACV in intranasal and intradermal models of infection. Decreased pathogenicity was correlated with diminished virus replication in intranasally infected mice. However, in intradermally inoculated ears, vΔK1L replicated to levels nearly identical to those of VACV, implying that the decreased immune response to vΔK1L infection, not virus replication, dictated lesion size. Several lines of evidence support this theory. First, vΔK1L induced slightly less edema than vK1L, as revealed by histopathology and noninvasive quantitative ultrasound technology (QUS). Second, infiltrating immune cell populations were decreased in vΔK1L-infected ears. Third, cytokine and chemokine gene expression was decreased in vΔK1L-infected ears. While these results identified the biological basis for smaller lesions, they remained puzzling; because K1 antagonizes NF-κB in vitro, antiviral gene expression was expected to be higher during vΔK1L infection. Despite these diminished innate immune responses, vΔK1L vaccination induced a protective VACV-specific CD8+ T cell response and protected against a lethal VACV challenge. Thus, vΔK1L is the first vaccinia virus construct reported that caused a muted innate immune gene expression profile and decreased immune cell infiltration in an intradermal model of infection yet still elicited protective immunity.IMPORTANCE The vaccinia virus (VACV) K1 protein inhibits NF-κB activation among its other antagonistic functions. A virus lacking K1 (vΔK1L) was predicted to be less pathogenic because it would trigger a more robust antiviral immune response than VACV. Indeed

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. © 2015 UICC.

  11. Mutual Interference between Cytomegalovirus and Reconstitution of Protective Immunity after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

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    Matthias J. Reddehase

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is a therapy option for aggressive forms of hematopoietic malignancies that are resistant to standard antitumoral therapies. Hematoablative treatment preceding HCT, however, opens a ‘window of opportunity’ for latent cytomegalovirus (CMV by releasing it from immune control with the consequence of reactivation of productive viral gene expression and recurrence of infectious virus. A ‘window of opportunity’ for the virus represents a ‘window of risk’ for the patient. In the interim between HCT and reconstitution of antiviral immunity, primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, initially low amounts of reactivated virus can expand exponentially, disseminate to essentially all organs, and cause multiple organ CMV disease, with interstitial pneumonia (CMV-IP representing the most severe clinical manifestation. Here I will review predictions originally made in the mouse model of experimental HCT and murine CMV infection, some of which have already paved the way to translational preclinical research and promising clinical trials of a pre-emptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease. Specifically, the mouse model has been pivotal in providing ‘proof of concept’ for preventing CMV disease after HCT by adoptive transfer of preselected, virus epitope-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cells bridging the critical interim. CMV, however, is not a ‘passive antigen’ but is a pathogen that actively interferes with the reconstitution of protective immunity by infecting bone marrow stromal cells that otherwise form niches for hematopoiesis by providing the structural microenvironment and by producing hematopoietically active cytokines, the hemopoietins. Depending on the precise conditions of HCT, reduced homing of transplanted hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells to infected bone marrow stroma and impaired colony growth and lineage differentiation can lead to ‘graft failure’. In consequence

  12. Protective Effect of Akkermansia muciniphila against Immune-Mediated Liver Injury in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrui Wu

    2017-09-01

    (Ruminococcaceae_UCG_009, Lachnospiraceae_UCG_001, Akkermansia, which were enriched in mice pretreated with A. muciniphila. Our results suggested that A. muciniphila MucT had beneficial effects on immune-mediated liver injury by alleviating inflammation and hepatocellular death. These effects may be driven by the protective profile of the intestinal community induced by the bacteria. The results provide a new perspective on the immune function of gut microbiota in host diseases.

  13. Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Prophylaxis During Live Malaria Sporozoite Immunization Induces Long-Lived, Homologous, and Heterologous Protective Immunity Against Sporozoite Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlotte V; Anderson, Charles; Neal, Jillian; Sahu, Tejram; Conteh, Solomon; Voza, Tatiana; Langhorne, Jean; Borkowsky, William; Duffy, Patrick E

    2017-01-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is widely used in malaria-endemic areas in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and HIV-uninfected, HIV-exposed children as opportunistic infection prophylaxis. Despite the known effects that TMP-SMX has in reducing clinical malaria, its impact on development of malaria-specific immunity in these children remains poorly understood. Using rodent malaria models, we previously showed that TMP-SMX, at prophylactic doses, can arrest liver stage development of malaria parasites and speculated that TMP-SMX prophylaxis during repeated malaria exposures would induce protective long-lived sterile immunity targeting pre-erythrocytic stage parasites in mice. Using the same models, we now demonstrate that repeated exposures to malaria parasites during TMP-SMX administration induces stage-specific and long-lived pre-erythrocytic protective anti-malarial immunity, mediated primarily by CD8+ T-cells. Given the HIV infection and malaria coepidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, clinical studies aimed at determining the optimum duration of TMP-SMX prophylaxis in HIV-infected or HIV-exposed children must account for the potential anti-infection immunity effect of TMP-SMX prophylaxis. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Transfer of maternal immunity to piglets is involved in early protection against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Klara Tølbøl; Hagedorn-Olsen, Tine; Jungersen, Gregers

    2017-01-01

    . The course of infection was measured through clinical observations of lameness, cultivation of M. hyosynoviae from tonsils, blood and synovial fluid and observation for gross pathological lesions in selected joints. Specific immune status in the pigs was evaluated through detection of antibodies...... in tonsils, blood and joints, when compared to the two other groups. Raising the CCE pigs in an infected environment until weaning, with carrier sows as mothers, apparently made them resistant to M. hyosynoviae-arthritis when challenge-infected at 4½ weeks of age. More pigs in group NC had M. hyosynoviae...

  15. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-17

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl(-)]/[OH(-)] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  16. Single-dose immunization with virus replicon particles confers rapid robust protection against Rift Valley fever virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Kimberly A; Bird, Brian H; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Nichol, Stuart T; Albariño, César G

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in people and livestock throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The potential for RVFV introduction outside the area of endemicity highlights the need for fast-acting, safe, and efficacious vaccines. Here, we demonstrate a robust system for the reverse genetics generation of a RVF virus replicon particle (VRP(RVF)) vaccine candidate. Using a mouse model, we show that VRP(RVF) immunization provides the optimal balance of safety and single-dose robust efficacy. VRP(RVF) can actively synthesize viral RNA and proteins but lacks structural glycoprotein genes, preventing spread within immunized individuals and reducing the risk of vaccine-induced pathogenicity. VRP(RVF) proved to be completely safe following intracranial inoculation of suckling mice, a stringent test of vaccine safety. Single-dose subcutaneous immunization with VRP(RVF), although it is highly attenuated, completely protected mice against a virulent RVFV challenge dose which was 100,000-fold greater than the 50% lethal dose (LD(50)). Robust protection from lethal challenge was observed by 24 h postvaccination, with 100% protection induced in as little as 96 h. We show that a single subcutaneous VRP(RVF) immunization initiated a systemic antiviral state followed by an enhanced adaptive response. These data contrast sharply with the much-reduced survivability and immune responses observed among animals immunized with nonreplicating viral particles, indicating that replication, even if confined to the initially infected cells, contributes substantially to protective efficacy at early and late time points postimmunization. These data demonstrate that replicon vaccines successfully bridge the gap between safety and efficacy and provide insights into the kinetics of antiviral protection from RVFV infection.

  17. Role of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 in Leishmania pathogenesis and in protective immunity by Leishmania vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Antara; Bhattacharya, Parna; Joshi, Amritanshu B; Ismail, Nevien; Dey, Ranadhir; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2016-11-01

    The clinical outcome of Leishmania pathogenesis ranges from active skin lesions to fatal visceral dissemination and severely impaired T cell immunity. It is well established that a strong Th1 immune response is protective against cutaneous forms of the disease, however a mixed Th1/Th2 response is most commonly observed against visceral infections as evident from previous studies. Aside from Th1/Th2 cytokines, the pro-inflammatory IL-17 cytokine family plays an important role in the clearance of intracellular pathogens. In Leishmania induced skin lesions, IL-17 produced by Th17 cells is shown to exacerbate the disease, suggesting a role in pathogenesis. However, a protective role for IL-17 is indicated by the expansion of IL-17 producing cells in vaccine-induced immunity. In human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) it has been demonstrated that IL-17 and IL-22 are associated with protection against re-exposure to Leishmania, which further suggests the involvement of IL-17 in vaccine induced protective immunity. Although there is no vaccine against any form of leishmaniasis, the development of genetically modified live attenuated parasites as vaccine candidates prove to be promising, as they successfully induce a robust protective immune response in various animal models. However, the role of IL-17 producing cells and Th17 cells in response to these vaccine candidates remains unexplored. In this article, we review the role of IL-17 in Leishmania pathogenesis and the potential impact on vaccine induced immunity, with a special focus on live attenuated Leishmania parasites. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Mechanisms of stage-transcending protection following immunization of mice with late liver stage-arresting genetically attenuated malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon K Sack

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by Plasmodium parasite infection, continues to be one of the leading causes of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Development of an effective vaccine has been encumbered by the complex life cycle of the parasite that has distinct pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of infection in the mammalian host. Historically, malaria vaccine development efforts have targeted each stage in isolation. An ideal vaccine, however, would target multiple life cycle stages with multiple arms of the immune system and be capable of eliminating initial infection in the liver, the subsequent blood stage infection, and would prevent further parasite transmission. We have previously shown that immunization of mice with Plasmodium yoelii genetically attenuated parasites (GAP that arrest late in liver stage development elicits stage-transcending protection against both a sporozoite challenge and a direct blood stage challenge. Here, we show that this immunization strategy engenders both T- and B-cell responses that are essential for stage-transcending protection, but the relative importance of each is determined by the host genetic background. Furthermore, potent anti-blood stage antibodies elicited after GAP immunization rely heavily on FC-mediated functions including complement fixation and FC receptor binding. These protective antibodies recognize the merozoite surface but do not appear to recognize the immunodominant merozoite surface protein-1. The antigen(s targeted by stage-transcending immunity are present in both the late liver stages and blood stage parasites. The data clearly show that GAP-engendered protective immune responses can target shared antigens of pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic parasite life cycle stages. As such, this model constitutes a powerful tool to identify novel, protective and stage-transcending T and B cell targets for incorporation into a multi-stage subunit vaccine.

  19. Sublingual immunization with adenovirus F protein-based vaccines stimulates protective immunity against botulinum neurotoxin A intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, SangMu; Clapp, Beata; Zlotkowska, Dagmara; Hoyt, Teri; Holderness, Kathryn; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Sublingual (s.l.) vaccination is an efficient way to induce elevated levels of systemic and mucosal immune responses. To mediate mucosal uptake, ovalbumin (OVA) was genetically fused to adenovirus 2 fiber protein (OVA-Ad2F) to assess whether s.l. immunization was as effective as an alternative route of vaccination. Ad2F-delivered vaccines were efficiently taken up by dendritic cells and migrated mostly to submaxillary gland lymph nodes, which could readily stimulate OVA-specific CD4+ T cells....

  20. Immune events associated with protection in C57BL/6 mice immunized with anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking protective antigens shared between gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model of Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeen, Sherif H

    2010-01-01

    Immunoregulation is central for successful manipulation of schistosomiasis. Unlike schistosome vaccine development strategies that relied on direct selection of antigens from crude responses leading to selection of mildly protective antigens, the present study tested the utility of selection of potentially protective antigens encompassed rounds of immunoregulation via idiotypic network. Anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab2) were purified from sera of New Zealand white rabbits multiply immunized with gamma-irradiated cercariae of S. haematobium, using adult worm specific idiotypes (Ab1) purified from sera of subjects resistant to reinfection. Ab2 was used for immunization of C57BL/6 mice and consequences of immunization were monitored before and after challenge infection with S. haematobium. Results showed an increase of splenic T cell expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) upon immunization (average % stimulated cells 54.9 vs. 20.4, P ids (Ab3) reactivity against antigens of approximate molecular weight 40, 80 and 160 kDa of adult worms, which were also recognized by Ab1. However, in contrast to Ab1, Ab3 showed no surface binding to 3 hr schistosomula. Strikingly, mice immunized with Ab2 showed strong resistance to challenge infection (approximately 82% reduction in worm burden, P < 0.001). Taking all, this alternative vaccine development strategy appears to filter out non-protective antigens. Indeed Ab3 recognizes much fewer numbers of antigens, which passed through two rounds of immune regulation. These antigens appear to represent a significant proportion of the protective response in the gamma-irradiated cercariae vaccine and human resistance model as well, providing the basis for an alternative vaccine for schistosomiasis.

  1. The evolutionarily conserved mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 links protective innate immune responses and xenobiotic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; McEwan, Deborah L; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2014-05-01

    Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses.

  2. The evolutionarily conserved mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 links protective innate immune responses and xenobiotic detoxification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses.

  3. Alum Adjuvant Enhances Protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus but Exacerbates Pulmonary Inflammation by Modulating Multiple Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Youri; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Soojin; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well-known for inducing vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease after vaccination of young children with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in alum formulation. Here, we investigated alum adjuvant effects on protection and disease after FI-RSV immunization with or without alum in comparison with live RSV reinfections. Despite viral clearance, live RSV reinfections caused weight loss and substantial pulmonary inflammation probably due to high levels of RSV specific IFN-γ+IL4-, IFN-γ-TNF-α+, IFN-γ+TNF-α- effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Alum adjuvant significantly improved protection as evidenced by effective viral clearance compared to unadjuvanted FI-RSV. However, in contrast to unadjuvanted FI-RSV, alum-adjuvanted FI-RSV (FI-RSV-A) induced severe vaccine-enhanced RSV disease including weight loss, eosinophilia, and lung histopathology. Alum adjuvant in the FI-RSV-A was found to be mainly responsible for inducing high levels of RSV-specific IFN-γ-IL4+, IFN-γ-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-4 as well as B220+ plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells, and inhibiting the induction of IFN-γ+CD8 T cells. This study suggests that alum adjuvant in FI-RSV vaccines increases immunogenicity and viral clearance but also induces atypical T helper CD4+ T cells and multiple inflammatory dendritic cell subsets responsible for vaccine-enhanced severe RSV disease.

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein expressed in insect cells form protein nanoparticles that induce protective immunity in cotton rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale Smith

    Full Text Available Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is an important viral agent causing severe respiratory tract disease in infants and children as well as in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. The lack of a safe and effective RSV vaccine represents a major unmet medical need. RSV fusion (F surface glycoprotein was modified and cloned into a baculovirus vector for efficient expression in Sf9 insect cells. Recombinant RSV F was glycosylated and cleaved into covalently linked F2 and F1 polypeptides that formed homotrimers. RSV F extracted and purified from insect cell membranes assembled into 40 nm protein nanoparticles composed of multiple RSV F oligomers arranged in the form of rosettes. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of purified RSV F nanoparticles was compared to live and formalin inactivated RSV in cotton rats. Immunized animals induced neutralizing serum antibodies, inhibited virus replication in the lungs, and had no signs of disease enhancement in the respiratory track of challenged animals. RSV F nanoparticles also induced IgG competitive for binding of palivizumab neutralizing monoclonal antibody to RSV F antigenic site II. Antibodies to this epitope are known to protect against RSV when passively administered in high risk infants. Together these data provide a rational for continued development a recombinant RSV F nanoparticle vaccine candidate.

  5. A novel recombinant BCG vaccine encoding eimeria tenella rhomboid and chicken IL-2 induces protective immunity against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyue; Chen, Lifeng; Li, Jianhua; Zheng, Jun; Cai, Ning; Gong, Pengtao; Li, Shuhong; Li, He; Zhang, Xichen

    2014-06-01

    A novel recombinant Bacille Calmette-Guerin (rBCG) vaccine co-expressed Eimeria tenella rhomboid and cytokine chicken IL-2 (chIL-2) was constructed, and its efficacy against E. tenella challenge was observed. The rhomboid gene of E. tenella and chIL-2 gene were subcloned into integrative expression vector pMV361, producing vaccines rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2. Animal experiment via intranasal and subcutaneous route in chickens was carried out to evaluate the immune efficacy of the vaccines. The results indicated that these rBCG vaccines could obviously alleviate cacal lesions and oocyst output. Intranasal immunization with pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 elicited better protective immunity against E. tenella than subcutaneous immunization. Splenocytes from chickens immunized with either rBCG pMV361-rho and pMV361-rho-IL2 had increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell production. Our data indicate recombinant BCG is able to impart partial protection against E. tenella challenge and co-expression of cytokine with antigen was an effective strategy to improve vaccine immunity.

  6. Comparative Estimates of Crude and Effective Coverage of Measles Immunization in Low-Resource Settings: Findings from Salud Mesoamérica 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, K Ellicott; Zúñiga-Brenes, Paola; Ríos-Zertuche, Diego; Conde-Glez, Carlos J; Gagnier, Marielle C; Palmisano, Erin; Ranganathan, Dharani; Usmanova, Gulnoza; Salvatierra, Benito; Nazar, Austreberta; Tristao, Ignez; Sanchez Monin, Emmanuelle; Anderson, Brent W; Haakenstad, Annie; Murphy, Tasha; Lim, Stephen; Hernandez, Bernardo; Lozano, Rafael; Iriarte, Emma; Mokdad, Ali H

    2015-01-01

    Timely and accurate measurement of population protection against measles is critical for decision-making and prevention of outbreaks. However, little is known about how survey-based estimates of immunization (crude coverage) compare to the seroprevalence of antibodies (effective coverage), particularly in low-resource settings. In poor areas of Mexico and Nicaragua, we used household surveys to gather information on measles immunization from child health cards and caregiver recall. We also collected dried blood spots (DBS) from children aged 12 to 23 months to compare crude and effective coverage of measles immunization. We used survey-weighted logistic regression to identify individual, maternal, household, community, and health facility characteristics that predict gaps between crude coverage and effective coverage. We found that crude coverage was significantly higher than effective coverage (83% versus 68% in Mexico; 85% versus 50% in Nicaragua). A large proportion of children (19% in Mexico; 43% in Nicaragua) had health card documentation of measles immunization but lacked antibodies. These discrepancies varied from 0% to 100% across municipalities in each country. In multivariate analyses, card-positive children in Mexico were more likely to lack antibodies if they resided in urban areas or the jurisdiction of De Los Llanos. In contrast, card-positive children in Nicaragua were more likely to lack antibodies if they resided in rural areas or the North Atlantic region, had low weight-for-age, or attended health facilities with a greater number of refrigerators. Findings highlight that reliance on child health cards to measure population protection against measles is unwise. We call for the evaluation of immunization programs using serological methods, especially in poor areas where the cold chain is likely to be compromised. Identification of within-country variation in effective coverage of measles immunization will allow researchers and public health

  7. Tetraspanin-3 regulates protective immunity against Eimera tenella infection following immunization with dendritic cell-derived exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of immunization with dendritic cell (DC) exosomes, which had been incubated or non-incubated with an anti-tetraspanin-3 (Tspan-3) blocking antibody (Ab), were studied using an experimental model of Eimeria tenella avian coccidiosis. Purified exosomes from cecal tonsil and splenic DCs exp...

  8. Host immunity in the protective response to nasal immunization with a pneumococcal antigen associated to live and heat-killed Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vintiñi Elisa O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, available pneumococcal vaccines have failed to eradicate infections caused by S. pneumoniae. Search for effective vaccine continues and some serotype independent pneumococcal proteins are considered as candidates for the design of new vaccines, especially a mucosal vaccine, since pneumococci enter the body through mucosal surfaces. Selection of the appropriate adjuvant is important for mucosal vaccines, and lactic acid bacteria (LAB with immunostimulant properties are promissory candidates. In this work, we assessed the adjuvant effect of a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei, when nasally administered with a pneumococcal antigen (pneumococcal protective protein A: PppA for the prevention of pneumococcal infection. Adjuvanticity of both live (LcV and heat-killed (LcM was evaluated and humoral and cellular antigen-specific immune response was assessed in mucosal and systemic compartments. The potential mechanisms induced by nasal immunization were discussed. Results Nasal immunization of young mice with PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM induced anti-PppA IgA and IgG antibodies in mucosal and systemic compartments and levels of these specific antibodies remained high even at day 45 after the 3rd Immunization (3rd I. These results were correlated with IL-4 induction by the mixture of antigen plus LcV and LcM. Also, PppA+Lc (V and M induced stimulation of Th1 and Th17 cells involved in the defence against pneumococci. The protection against pneumococcal respiratory challenge at day 30 after the 3rd I showed that PppA+LcV and PppA+LcM immunizations significantly reduced pathogen counts in nasal lavages while prventing their passage into lung and blood. Survival of mice immunized with the co-application of PppA plus LcV and LcM was significantly higher than in mice immunized with PppA alone and control mice when intraperitoneal challenge was performed. No significant differences between the treatments involving LcV and

  9. P247 and p523: two in vivo-expressed megalocytivirus proteins that induce protective immunity and are essential to viral infection.

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    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Megalocytivirus is a DNA virus with a broad host range among teleost fish. Although the complete genome sequences of a number of megalocytivirus isolates have been reported, the functions of most of the genes of this virus are unknown. In this study, we selected two megalocytivirus immunogens, P247 and P523, which were expressed during host infection and, when in the form of DNA vaccines (pCN247 and pCN523 respectively, elicited strong protectivity against lethal megalocytivirus challenge in a turbot (Scophthalmus maximus model. Compared to control fish, fish vaccinated with pCN247 and pCN523 exhibited drastically reduced viral loads in tissues and high levels of survival rates. Immune response analysis showed that pCN247 and pCN523 (i induced production of specific serum antibodies, (ii caused generation of cytotoxic immune cells and specific memory immune cells that responded to secondary antigen stimulation, and (iii upregulated the expression of genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. To examine the potential role of P247 and P523 in viral infection, the expression of P247 and P523 was knocked down by siRNA. Subsequent in vivo infection study showed that P247 and P523 knockdown significantly impaired viral replication. Furthermore, whole-genome transcriptome analysis revealed that P247 and P523 knockdown altered the expression profiles of 26 and 41 viral genes, respectively, putatively participating in diverse aspects of viral infection. Taken together, these results indicate that P247 and P523 induce protective immunity in teleost and play fundamental roles essential to viral replication. These observations provide the first evidence that suggests a likely link between the protectivity of viral immunogens and their biological significance in viral replication.

  10. The protective effect of γ-aminobutyric acid on the development of immune function in chickens under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Chen, Z

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the development of immune function in chicks under heat stress (HS). One-day-old male Wenchang chicks were randomly divided into control (CK), HS and GABA+HS groups. The GABA+HS group was fed with 0.2 ml GABA solution (50 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage. The HS and GABA+HS groups were placed in 40 ± 0.5 °C environment for 2 h heat treatment from 13:00 each day. Blood samples were routinely taken at 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days respectively, and the contents of T and B lymphocyte subsets in the blood and tissue were analysed by flow cytometry after FITC/PE double staining; the plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-2, immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG and IgM were determined using ELISA. The thymus and the bursa of fabricius were also collected to analyse for organ index and observe for the changes in tissue microstructure. In addition, the chicks received primary and secondary immunizations with attenuated Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine (LaSota strain) at 7 and 28 days respectively; conventional hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was performed to monitor the titre changes in plasma antibody against ND virus in the birds. Our results indicated that the indices of both thymus and bursa of fabricius, the intactness of tissue structure and development, the plasma levels of IL-2, IgA, IgG and IgM, the titres of ND antibody, and the levels of B and T lymphocyte subsets in HS group were all significantly lower than those in CK group (p < 0.05). However, all above indices were significantly improved in GABA+HS group compared with those in HS group (p < 0.05). These results demonstrated that while HS seriously affected the development of immune function in Wenchang chicks, GABA effectively alleviated the damages of HS to the development of immune function in chicks. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Maternal immunity against avian influenza H5N1 in chickens: limited protection and interference with vaccine efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, H.A.; Rosema, S.; Zoelen-Bos, van D.J.; Kemper-Venema, S.

    2011-01-01

    After avian influenza (AI) vaccination, hens will produce progeny chickens with maternally derived AI-specific antibodies. In the present study we examined the effect of maternal immunity in young chickens on the protection against highly pathogenic AI H5N1 virus infection and on the effectiveness

  12. Complete protection against lethal Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice immunized with a plasmid encoding the SAG1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H V; Lauemøller, S L; Christiansen, L

    1999-01-01

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is transmitted to humans from infected animals by tissue cysts and oocysts excreted by cats. Immunization with inactivated parasites or recombinant proteins has at best shown partial protection. We constructed a plasmid expressing the SAG1...

  13. Genetically Engineered Ascorbic acid-deficient Live Mutants of Leishmania donovani induce long lasting Protective Immunity against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sneha; Madhubala, Rentala

    2015-06-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe systemic form of the disease. There are still no vaccines available for humans and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. Recently, we reported functional importance of Arabino-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) enzyme from L. donovani involved in ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we have shown that ΔALO parasites do not affect the ability of null mutants to invade visceral organs but severely impair parasite persistence beyond 16 week in BALB/c mice and hence are safe as an immunogen. Both short term (5 week) and long term (20 week) immunization with ΔALO parasites conferred sustained protection against virulent challenge in BALB/c mice, activated splenocytes and resulted in induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Protection in immunized mice after challenge correlated with the stimulation of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Antigen-mediated cell immunity correlated with robust nitrite and superoxide generation, macrophage-derived oxidants critical in controlling Leishmania infection. Our data shows that live attenuated ΔALO parasites are safe, induce protective immunity and can provide sustained protection against Leishmania donovani. We further conclude that the parasites attenuated in their anti-oxidative defence mechanism can be exploited as vaccine candidates.

  14. Immunity induced shortly after DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against rhabdoviruses protects against heterologous virus but not against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2002-01-01

    It was recently reported that DNA vaccination of rainbow trout fingerlings against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) induced protection within 8 days after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA. In order to analyse the specificity of this early immunity, fish were vaccinated with plasmi...

  15. Effects of novel vaccine/adjuvant complexes on the protective immunity against Eimeria acervulina and transcriptome profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the ability of two novel adjuvant formulations, QCDC (Quil A/cholesterol/DDA/Carbopol) and QCDCR (QCDC/Bay R1005), in combination with a recombinant profilin vaccine, to modulate host protective immunity and to alter gene expression during experimental avian coccidiosis. Vac...

  16. Interleukin-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) as a central regulator of the protective immune response against Giardia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paerewijck, O. (Oonagh); Maertens, B. (Brecht); L. Dreesen (Leentje); Van Meulder, F. (Frederik); Peelaers, I. (Iris); Ratman, D. (Dariusz); Li, R.W. (Robert W.); E.W. Lubberts (Erik); K. De Bosscher; P. Geldhof (Peter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe protozoan parasite Giardia is a highly prevalent intestinal pathogen with a wide host range. Data obtained in mice, cattle and humans revealed the importance of IL-17A in the development of a protective immune response against Giardia. The aim of this study was to further unravel the

  17. Subcomponent vaccine based on CTA1-DD adjuvant with incorporated UreB class II peptides stimulates protective Helicobacter pylori immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrud, John G; Bagheri, Nayer; Schön, Karin; Xin, Wei; Bergroth, Hilda; Eliasson, Dubravka Grdic; Lycke, Nils Y

    2013-01-01

    A mucosal vaccine against Helicobacter pylori infection could help prevent gastric cancers and peptic ulcers. While previous attempts to develop such a vaccine have largely failed because of the requirement for safe and effective adjuvants or large amounts of well defined antigens, we have taken a unique approach to combining our strong mucosal CTA1-DD adjuvant with selected peptides from urease B (UreB). The protective efficacy of the selected peptides together with cholera toxin (CT) was first confirmed. However, CT is a strong adjuvant that unfortunately is precluded from clinical use because of its toxicity. To circumvent this problem we have developed a derivative of CT, the CTA1-DD adjuvant, that has been found safe in non-human primates and equally effective compared to CT when used intranasally. We genetically fused the selected peptides into the CTA1-DD plasmid and found after intranasal immunizations of Balb/c mice using purified CTA1-DD with 3 copies of an H. pylori urease T cell epitope (CTA1-UreB3T-DD) that significant protection was stimulated against a live challenge infection. Protection was, however, weaker than with the gold standard, bacterial lysate+CT, but considering that we only used a single epitope in nanomolar amounts the results convey optimism. Protection was associated with enhanced Th1 and Th17 immunity, but immunizations in IL-17A-deficient mice revealed that IL-17 may not be essential for protection. Taken together, we have provided evidence for the rational design of an effective mucosal subcomponent vaccine against H. pylori infection based on well selected protective epitopes from relevant antigens incorporated into the CTA1-DD adjuvant platform.

  18. KIR2DL2 enhances protective and detrimental HLA class I-mediated immunity in chronic viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa-Katrin Seich Al Basatena

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs influence both innate and adaptive immunity. But while the role of KIRs in NK-mediated innate immunity is well-documented, the impact of KIRs on the T cell response in human disease is not known. Here we test the hypothesis that an individual's KIR genotype affects the efficiency of their HLA class I-mediated antiviral immune response and the outcome of viral infection. We show that, in two unrelated viral infections, hepatitis C virus and human T lymphotropic virus type 1, possession of the KIR2DL2 gene enhanced both protective and detrimental HLA class I-restricted anti-viral immunity. These results reveal a novel role for inhibitory KIRs. We conclude that inhibitory KIRs, in synergy with T cells, are a major determinant of the outcome of persistent viral infection.

  19. The protective immune response against Pseudorabies virus induced by DNA vaccination is impaired if the plasmid harbors a functional Porcine circovirus type 2 rep and origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Grasland, Béatrice; Béven, Véronique; Cariolet, Roland; Keranflec'h, André; Henry, Aurélie; Jestin, André; Dory, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    A plasmid rendered replicative in mammalian cells by inserting the Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) origin of replication and replicase gene (Ori-rep) has been previously constructed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the replication capacity of this plasmid could be advantageously used to improve the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination. In this case we used the porcine Pseudorabies virus (PrV) DNA vaccination model. The replicative capacity of the DNA vaccine did not improve the protective immunity against PrV in pigs, but on the contrary the presence of the PCV2 Ori-rep sequence was harmful in the induction of this immunity compared to an equivalent but non-replicative DNA vaccine. In addition, the distribution and the persistence of the replicative and non-replicative plasmids inside the body were the same. This is the first study showing an in vivo deleterious effect of the replicative active PCV2 Ori-rep on the natural and specific protection against PrV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Helminth allergens, parasite-specific IgE and its protective role in human immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Matthew Fitzsimmons

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths. Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g. EF-hand proteins, tropomyosin, and PR-1 proteins.During some helminth infection, especially with the well adapted hookworm, the Th2 response is moderated by parasite-expressed molecules. This has been associated with reduced allergy in helminth endemic areas and worm infection or products have been proposed as treatments for allergic conditions. However some infections (especially Ascaris are associated with increased allergy and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins and highly similar molecules in dust mites and insects. The overlap between allergy and helminth infection is best illustrated in Anisakis simplex, a nematode that when consumed in under-cooked fish can be both an infective helminth and a food allergen. Nearly 20 molecular allergens have been isolated from this species, including tropomyosin (Ani s3 and the EF-hand protein, Ani s troponin.In this review, we highlight aspects of the biology and biochemistry of helminths that may have influenced the evolution of the IgE response. We compare dominant IgE antigens in worms with clinically important environmental allergens and suggest that arrays of such molecules will provide important information on anti-worm immunity as well as allergy.

  1. Protective Role of ICOS and ICOS Ligand in Corneal Transplantation and in Maintenance of Immune Privilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishige, Tomoyuki; Taniguchi, Hiroko; Terada, Misao; Akiba, Hisaya; Yagita, Hideo; Abe, Ryo; Hori, Junko

    2016-12-01

    The interaction between the inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS) and ICOS ligand (ICOSL) has been implicated in the differentiation and functions of T cells. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of ICOS-ICOSL in the immune privilege of corneal allografts. Expression of ICOS and ICOSL mRNA from mouse eyes was assessed by RT-PCR. Corneas of C57BL/6 mice were orthotopically transplanted into the eyes of ICOS-/- BALB/c recipients and BALB/c wild-type (WT) recipients treated with anti-ICOSL mAb, and graft survival was assessed. A separate set of WT and ICOS-/- BALB/c mice received an anterior chamber injection of C57BL/6 splenocytes, and induction of allospecific anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID) was assessed. In vitro, cornea was incubated with T cells from WT and ICOS-/- BALB/c mice, and destruction of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) and the population of Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ T cells was assessed. Inducible costimulatory molecule ligand mRNA was constitutively expressed in the cornea, iris-ciliary body, and retina. Allograft survival in ICOS-/- recipients and WT recipients treated with anti-ICOSL mAb was significantly shorter than in control recipients. Anterior chamber-associated immune deviation was induced less efficiently in ICOS-/- mice. Destruction of CECs by alloreactive ICOS-/- T cells was enhanced compared with WT T cells. After coincubation with allogeneic corneal tissue, the proportion of regulatory T cells was significantly greater among WT T cells than in ICOS-/- T cells. The expression of ICOSL in the cornea and the ICOS-mediated induction of Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells may contribute to successful corneal allograft survival.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal the genetic basis underlying the immune function of three amphibians' skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenqiao; Jiang, Yusong; Zhang, Meixia; Yang, Donglin; Chen, Zhongzhu; Sun, Hanchang; Lan, Xuelian; Yan, Fan; Xu, Jingming; Yuan, Wanan

    2017-01-01

    Skin as the first barrier against external invasions plays an essential role for the survival of amphibians on land. Understanding the genetic basis of skin function is significant in revealing the mechanisms underlying immunity of amphibians. In this study, we de novo sequenced and comparatively analyzed skin transcriptomes from three different amphibian species, Andrias davidianus, Bufo gargarizans, and Rana nigromaculata Hallowell. Functional classification of unigenes in each amphibian showed high accordance, with the most represented GO terms and KEGG pathways related to basic biological processes, such as binding and metabolism and immune system. As for the unigenes, GO and KEGG distributions of conserved orthologs in each species were similar, with the predominantly enriched pathways including RNA polymerase, nucleotide metabolism, and defense. The positively selected orthologs in each amphibian were also similar, which were primarily involved in stimulus response, cell metabolic, membrane, and catalytic activity. Furthermore, a total of 50 antimicrobial peptides from 26 different categories were identified in the three amphibians, and one of these showed high efficiency in inhibiting the growth of different bacteria. Our understanding of innate immune function of amphibian skin has increased basis on the immune-related unigenes, pathways, and antimicrobial peptides in amphibians.

  3. Comparative transcriptome analyses reveal the genetic basis underlying the immune function of three amphibians’ skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meixia; Yang, Donglin; Chen, Zhongzhu; Lan, Xuelian; Yan, Fan; Xu, Jingming; Yuan, Wanan

    2017-01-01

    Skin as the first barrier against external invasions plays an essential role for the survival of amphibians on land. Understanding the genetic basis of skin function is significant in revealing the mechanisms underlying immunity of amphibians. In this study, we de novo sequenced and comparatively analyzed skin transcriptomes from three different amphibian species, Andrias davidianus, Bufo gargarizans, and Rana nigromaculata Hallowell. Functional classification of unigenes in each amphibian showed high accordance, with the most represented GO terms and KEGG pathways related to basic biological processes, such as binding and metabolism and immune system. As for the unigenes, GO and KEGG distributions of conserved orthologs in each species were similar, with the predominantly enriched pathways including RNA polymerase, nucleotide metabolism, and defense. The positively selected orthologs in each amphibian were also similar, which were primarily involved in stimulus response, cell metabolic, membrane, and catalytic activity. Furthermore, a total of 50 antimicrobial peptides from 26 different categories were identified in the three amphibians, and one of these showed high efficiency in inhibiting the growth of different bacteria. Our understanding of innate immune function of amphibian skin has increased basis on the immune-related unigenes, pathways, and antimicrobial peptides in amphibians. PMID:29267366

  4. Comparative transcriptomics of elasmobranchs and teleosts highlight important processes in adaptive immunity and regional endothermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Nicholas J; Richards, Vincent P; Early, Angela; Bogdanowicz, Steve M; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Stanhope, Michael J; Shivji, Mahmood S

    2017-01-30

    Comparative genomic and/or transcriptomic analyses involving elasmobranchs remain limited, with genome level comparisons of the elasmobranch immune system to that of higher vertebrates, non-existent. This paper reports a comparative RNA-seq analysis of heart tissue from seven species, including four elasmobranchs and three teleosts, focusing on immunity, but concomitantly seeking to identify genetic similarities shared by the two lamnid sharks and the single billfish in our study, which could be linked to convergent evolution of regional endothermy. Across seven species, we identified an average of 10,877 Swiss-Prot annotated genes from an average of 32,474 open reading frames within each species' heart transcriptome. About half of these genes were shared between all species while the remainder included functional differences between our groups of interest (elasmobranch vs. teleost and endotherms vs. ectotherms) as revealed by Gene Ontology (GO) and selection analyses. A repeatedly represented functional category, in both the uniquely expressed elasmobranch genes (total of 259) and the elasmobranch GO enrichment results, involved antibody-mediated immunity, either in the recruitment of immune cells (Fc receptors) or in antigen presentation, including such terms as "antigen processing and presentation of exogenous peptide antigen via MHC class II", and such genes as MHC class II, HLA-DPB1. Molecular adaptation analyses identified three genes in elasmobranchs with a history of positive selection, including legumain (LGMN), a gene with roles in both innate and adaptive immunity including producing antigens for presentation by MHC class II. Comparisons between the endothermic and ectothermic species revealed an enrichment of GO terms associated with cardiac muscle contraction in endotherms, with 19 genes expressed solely in endotherms, several of which have significant roles in lipid and fat metabolism. This collective comparative evidence provides the first multi

  5. Surface protein Adr2 of Rickettsia rickettsii induced protective immunity against Rocky Mountain spotted fever in C3H/HeN mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenping; Xiong, Xiaolu; Qi, Yong; Jiao, Jun; Duan, Changsong; Wen, Bohai

    2014-04-11

    Rickettsia rickettsii is the pathogen of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a life-threatening tick-transmitted infection. Adr2 was a surface-exposed adhesion protein of R. rickettsii and its immunoprotection against RMSF was investigated in mice. Recombinant Adr2 (rAdr2) was used to immunize C3H/HeN mice, and the rickettsial loads in organs of the mice were detected after challenge with R. rickettsii. The levels of specific antibodies of sera from the immunized mice were determined and the sera from immunized mice were applied to neutralize R. rickettsii. Proliferation and cytokine secretion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells isolated from R. rickettsii-infected mice were also assayed after rAdr2 stimulation. After R. rickettsii challenge, the rickettsial loads in spleens, livers, and lungs were significantly lower and the impairment degrees of these organs in rAdr2-immunized mice were markedly slighter, compared with those in negative control mice. The ratio of specific IgG2a/IgG1 of rAdr2-immunized mice kept increasing during the immunization. After treatment with rAdr2-immunized sera, the total number of R. rickettsii organisms adhering and invading host cells was significantly lower than that treated with PBS-immunized sera. Interferon-γ secretion by CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion by CD4(+) T cells from R. rickettsii-infected mice were respectively significantly greater than those from uninfected mice after rAdr2 stimulation. Adr2 is a protective antigen of R. rickettsii. Protection offered by Adr2 is mainly dependent on antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses, including efficient activity of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to produce great amount of TNF-α and/or IFN-γ as well as rapid increase of specific IgG2a, which synergistically activate and opsonize host cells to killing intracellular rickettsiae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Muscles provide protection during microbial infection by activating innate immune response pathways in Drosophila and zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunita Chatterjee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction brings about movement and locomotion in animals. However, muscles have also been implicated in several atypical physiological processes including immune response. The role of muscles in immunity and the mechanism involved has not yet been deciphered. In this paper, using Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs as a model, we show that muscles are immune-responsive tissues. Flies with defective IFMs are incapable of mounting a potent humoral immune response. Upon immune challenge, the IFMs produce anti-microbial peptides (AMPs through the activation of canonical signaling pathways, and these IFM-synthesized AMPs are essential for survival upon infection. The trunk muscles of zebrafish, a vertebrate model system, also possess the capacity to mount an immune response against bacterial infections, thus establishing that immune responsiveness of muscles is evolutionarily conserved. Our results suggest that physiologically fit muscles might boost the innate immune response of an individual.

  7. Comparison of the immunogenicity and protection against bovine tuberculosis following immunization by BCG-priming and boosting with adenovirus or protein based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, G; Whelan, A; Clifford, D; Salguero, F J; Xing, Z; Gilbert, S; McShane, H; Hewinson, R G; Vordermeier, M; Villarreal-Ramos, B

    2014-03-05

    There is a requirement for vaccines or vaccination strategies that confer better protection against TB than the current live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine for use in cattle. Boosting with recombinant viral vectors expressing mycobacterial proteins, such as Ag85A, has shown a degree of promise as a strategy for improving on the protection afforded by BCG. Experiments in small animal models have indicated that broadening the immune response to include mycobacterial antigens other than Ag85A, such as Rv0288, induced by boosting with Ad5 constructs has a direct effect on the protection afforded against TB. Here, we compared the immunogenicity and protection against challenge with M. bovis afforded by boosting BCG-vaccinated cattle with a human type 5 (Ad5)-based vaccine expressing the mycobacterial antigens Ag85A (Ad5-85A); or Ag85A, Rv0251, Rv0287 and Rv0288 (Ad5-TBF); or with protein TBF emulsified in adjuvant (Adj-TBF). Boosting with TBF broaden the immune response. The kinetics of Ad5-TBF and Adj-TBF were shown to be different, with effector T cell responses from the latter developing more slowly but being more durable than those induced by Ad5-TBF. No increase in protection compared to BCG alone was afforded by Ad5-TBF or Adj-TBF by gross pathology or bacteriology. Using histopathology, as a novel parameter of protection, we show that boosting BCG vaccinated cattle with Ad5-85A induced significantly better protection than BCG alone. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis infection induced by a multi-epitope vaccine in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gu

    Full Text Available Trichinellosis is one of the most important food-borne parasitic zoonoses throughout the world. Because infected pigs are the major source of human infections, and China is becoming the largest international producer of pork, the development of a transmission-blocking vaccine to prevent swine from being infected is urgently needed for trichinellosis control in China. Our previous studies have demonstrated that specific Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen could provide protective immunity against T. spiralis infection in immunized mice. Certain protective epitopes of Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen have been identified. To identify more Ts-Pmy protective epitopes, a new monoclonal antibody, termed 8F12, was produced against the N-terminus of Ts-Pmy. This antibody elicited significant protective immunity in mice against T. spiralis infection by passive transfer and was subsequently used to screen a random phage display peptide library to identify recognized epitopes. Seven distinct positive phage clones were identified and their displayed peptides were sequenced. Synthesized epitope peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin were used to immunize mice, four of which exhibited larval reduction (from 18.7% to 26.3%, respectively in vaccinated mice in comparison to the KLH control. To increase more effective protection, the epitope 8F7 that was found to induce the highest protection in this study was combined with two other previously identified epitopes (YX1 from Ts-Pmy and M7 from Ts-87 to formulate a multi-epitope vaccine. Mice immunized with this multi-epitope vaccine experienced a 35.0% reduction in muscle larvae burden after being challenged with T. spiralis larvae. This protection is significantly higher than that induced by individual-epitope peptides and is associated with high levels of subclasses IgG and IgG1. These results showed that a multi-epitope vaccine induced better protective immunity than an individual

  9. Protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis infection induced by a multi-epitope vaccine in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Wei, Junfei; Yang, Jing; Huang, Jingjing; Yang, Xiaodi; Zhu, Xinping

    2013-01-01

    Trichinellosis is one of the most important food-borne parasitic zoonoses throughout the world. Because infected pigs are the major source of human infections, and China is becoming the largest international producer of pork, the development of a transmission-blocking vaccine to prevent swine from being infected is urgently needed for trichinellosis control in China. Our previous studies have demonstrated that specific Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) and Ts-87 antigen could provide protective immunity against T. spiralis infection in immunized mice. Certain protective epitopes of Ts-Pmy and Ts-87 antigen have been identified. To identify more Ts-Pmy protective epitopes, a new monoclonal antibody, termed 8F12, was produced against the N-terminus of Ts-Pmy. This antibody elicited significant protective immunity in mice against T. spiralis infection by passive transfer and was subsequently used to screen a random phage display peptide library to identify recognized epitopes. Seven distinct positive phage clones were identified and their displayed peptides were sequenced. Synthesized epitope peptides conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin were used to immunize mice, four of which exhibited larval reduction (from 18.7% to 26.3%, respectively) in vaccinated mice in comparison to the KLH control. To increase more effective protection, the epitope 8F7 that was found to induce the highest protection in this study was combined with two other previously identified epitopes (YX1 from Ts-Pmy and M7 from Ts-87) to formulate a multi-epitope vaccine. Mice immunized with this multi-epitope vaccine experienced a 35.0% reduction in muscle larvae burden after being challenged with T. spiralis larvae. This protection is significantly higher than that induced by individual-epitope peptides and is associated with high levels of subclasses IgG and IgG1. These results showed that a multi-epitope vaccine induced better protective immunity than an individual epitope and provided a

  10. DNA vaccine encoding myristoylated membrane protein (MMP) of rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) induces protective immunity in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung-Hwa; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) causes severe mass mortalities in rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) in Korea. In this study, we investigated the potential of viral membrane protein to induce antiviral status protecting rock bream against RBIV infection. We found that fish administered with ORF008L (myristoylated membrane protein, MMP) vaccine exhibited significantly higher levels of survival compared to ORF007L (major capsid protein, MCP). Moreover, ORF008L-based DNA vaccinated fish showed significant protection at 4 and 8 weeks post vaccination (wpv) than non-vaccinated fish after infected with RBIV (6.7 × 10 5 ) at 23 °C, with relative percent survival (RPS) of 73.36% and 46.72%, respectively. All of the survivors from the first RBIV infection were strongly protected (100% RPS) from re-infected with RBIV (1.1 × 10 7 ) at 100 dpi. In addition, the MMP (ORF008L)-based DNA vaccine significantly induced the gene expression of TLR3 (14.2-fold), MyD88 (11.6-fold), Mx (84.7-fold), ISG15 (8.7-fold), PKR (25.6-fold), MHC class I (13.3-fold), Fas (6.7-fold), Fas ligand (6.7-fold), caspase9 (17.0-fold) and caspase3 (15.3-fold) at 7 days post vaccination in the muscle (vaccine injection site). Our results showed the induction of immune responses and suggest the possibility of developing preventive measures against RBIV using myristoylated membrane protein-based DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A lipidated peptide of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resuscitates the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine by evoking memory T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pradeep K; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Zeng, Weiguang; Nadeem, Sajid; Maurya, Sudeep K; Pahari, Susanta; Janmeja, Ashok K; Jackson, David C; Agrewala, Javed N

    2017-10-06

    The current BCG vaccine induces only short-term protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), suggesting its failure to generate long-lasting memory T cells. Previously, we have demonstrated that a self-adjuvanting peptide of Mtb (L91), successfully generated enduring memory Th1 cells. Consequently, we investigated if L91 was able to recuperate BCG potency in perpetuating the generation of memory T cells and protection against Mtb infected mice. In the present study, we evaluated the potency of a self adjuvanting Mtb peptide vaccine L91 in invigorating BCG immune response against Mtb in mice. Female BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG. Later, they were boosted twice with L91 or an antigenically irrelevant lipidated influenza virus hemagglutinin peptide (LH). Further, PBMCs obtained from BCG vaccinated healthy subjects were cultured in vitro with L91. T cell responses were determined by surface markers and intracellular cytokine staining. Secretion of cytokines was estimated in the culture supernatants (SNs) by ELISA. Compared to the BCG-vaccinated controls, L91 booster significantly enhanced the percentage of memory Th1 cells and Th17 cells and reduced the mycobacterial burden in BCG primed and L91-boosted (BCG-L91) group, even after 229 days of BCG vaccination. Further, substantial augmentation in the central (CD44 hi CD62L hi CD127 hi ) and effector memory (CD44 hi CD62L lo CD127 lo ) CD4 T cells was detected. Furthermore, greater frequency of polyfunctional Th1 cells (IFN-γ + TNF-α + ) and Th17 cells (IFN-γ + IL-17A + ) was observed. Importantly, BCG-L91 successfully prevented CD4 T cells from exhaustion by decreasing the expression of PD-1 and Tim-3. Additionally, augmentation in the frequency of Th1 cells, Th17 cells and memory CD4 T cells was observed in the PBMCs of the BCG-vaccinated healthy individuals following in vitro stimulation with L91. Our study demonstrated that L91 robustly reinvigorate BCG potency to invoke enduring protection against

  12. Long-Term Protective Immunity from an Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Administered with a Microneedle Patch

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Hye Suk; Compans, Richard W.; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Skin vaccination with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) using microneedles has been shown to induce protection similar to or better than that induced by intramuscular immunization. In this study, we examined the long-term protective efficacy of influenza (H1N1 A/PR/8/34) VLPs after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with the vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin induced 100% protection against lethal challenge infection with influenza A/PR/8/34 virus 14 month...

  13. Pulmonary immunity and durable protection induced by the ID93/GLA-SE vaccine candidate against the hyper-virulent Korean Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung Bin; Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Cho, Sang-Nae; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Shin, Sung Jae

    2016-04-27

    The majority of tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates advanced to clinical trials have been evaluated preclinically using laboratory-adapted strains. However, it has been proposed that challenge with clinical isolates in preclinical vaccine testing could provide further and more practical validation. Here, we tested the ID93/GLA-SE TB vaccine candidate against the clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain K (Mtb K) belonging to the Beijing family, the most prevalent Mtb strain in South Korea. Mice immunized with ID93/GLA-SE exhibited a significant reduction in bacteria and reduced lung inflammation against Mtb K when compared to non-immunized controls. In addition, we analyzed the immune responses in the lungs of ID93/GLA-SE-immunized mice, and showed that ID93/GLA-SE was able to elicit sustained Th1-biased immune responses including antigen-specific multifunctional CD4(+) T cell co-producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 as well as a high magnitude of IFN-γ response for up to 10 weeks post-challenge. Notably, further investigation of T cell subsets in the lung following challenge showed remarkable generation of CD8(+) central memory T cells by ID93/GLA-SE-immunization. Our findings showed that ID93/GLA-SE vaccine confers a high level of robust protection against the hypervirulent Mtb Beijing infection which was characterized by pulmonary Th1-polarized T-cell immune responses. These findings may also provide relevant information for potential utility of this vaccine candidate in East-Asian countries where the Beijing genotype is highly prevalent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The working mechanism of an immune complex vaccine that protects chickens against infectious bursal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.H.M.; Janse, E.M.; Lehrbach, P.R.; Haddad, E.E.; Avakian, A.; Whitfill, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    The role of immune complexes (Icx) in B-cell memory formation and affinity maturation allow for their potential use as vaccines. Recently, a new immune complex vaccine has been developed that is currently under field trials conducted in commercial poultry. This immune complex vaccine is developed by

  15. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni glycoproteins recognized by protective antibodies from mice immunized with irradiated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, J.P.; Strand, M.; Mangold, B.L.; Dean, D.A.

    1986-06-15

    The humoral immune response of mice patently infected with Schistosoma mansoni and of mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae were compared by radioimmunoassays and one-and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analyses of radioimmunoprecipitates. The binding observed with antibodies of mice vaccinated twice with radiation-attenuated cercariae over a period of 7 to 11 wk was less than 50% of the binding observed with antibodies of mice patently infected for 20 wk, but three to four times greater than that obtained with antibodies of mice infected for 6 wk, irrespective of whether the test extracts were derived from schistosomula or adult worms. Sera of vaccinated mice precipitated a restricted number of predominantly high m.w. glycoproteins of both schistosomula and adult worms metabolically labeled with sulfur-35 methionine. Each of the glycoproteins of 36 hr in vitro-cultured schistosomula that was precipitated by the sera of vaccinated mice was also precipitated by the sera of infected mice. Although radiation-attenuated larvae do not reach the adult stage, mice vaccinated with these still elicit a strong immune response against egg glycoproteins. These results show that the antibody response in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated larvae differs qualitatively and quantitatively from that of infected mice.

  16. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni glycoproteins recognized by protective antibodies from mice immunized with irradiated cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, J.P.; Strand, M.; Mangold, B.L.; Dean, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The humoral immune responses of mice patently infected with Schistosoma mansoni and of mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae were compared by radioimmunoassays and one-and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analyses of radioimmunoprecipitates. Sera of vaccinated mice precipitated a restricted number of predominantly high m.w. glycoproteins of both schistosomula and adult worms metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S) methinonine. Each of the glycoproteins of 36 hr in vitro-cultured schistosomula that was precipitated by the sera of vaccinated mice was also precipitated by sera of infected mice. In contrast, sera of vaccinated mice uniquely precipitated a 38,000 m.w. glycoprotein of schistosomula cultured for 5 days and a 94,000 m.w. glycoprotein of adult male worms. Although radiation-attenuated larvae do not reach the adult stage, mice vaccinated with these still elicit a strong immune response against egg glycoproteins. In particular, an egg glycoprotein of 85,000 to 70,000 and isoelectric point of 4.8 showed an enhanced reactivity with sera of vaccinated mice in comparison with infected mice. These results show that the antibody response in mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated larvae differs qualitatively and quantitatively from that of infected mice.

  17. Protective efficacy of a single immunization with capripoxvirus-vectored recombinant peste des petits ruminants vaccines in presence of pre-existing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufour, Philippe; Rufael, Tesfaye; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Lancelot, Renaud; Kidane, Menbere; Awel, Dino; Sertse, Tefera; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Geneviève; Sahle, Mesfin; Diallo, Adama; Albina, Emmanuel

    2014-06-24

    Sheeppox, goatpox and peste des petits ruminants (PPR) are highly contagious ruminant diseases widely distributed in Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Capripoxvirus (CPV)-vectored recombinant PPR vaccines (rCPV-PPR vaccines), which have been developed and shown to protect against both Capripox (CP) and PPR, would be critical tools in the control of these important diseases. In most parts of the world, these disease distributions overlap each other leaving concerns about the potential impact that pre-existing immunity against either disease may have on the protective efficacy of these bivalent rCPV-PPR vaccines. Currently, this question has not been indisputably addressed. Therefore, we undertook this study, under experimental conditions designed for the context of mass vaccination campaigns of small ruminants, using the two CPV recombinants (Kenya sheep-1 (KS-1) strain-based constructs) developed previously in our laboratory. Pre-existing immunity was first induced by immunization either with an attenuated CPV vaccine strain (KS-1) or the attenuated PPRV vaccine strain (Nigeria 75/1) and animals were thereafter inoculated once subcutaneously with a mixture of CPV recombinants expressing either the hemagglutinin (H) or the fusion (F) protein gene of PPRV (10(3) TCID50/animal of each). Finally, these animals were challenged with a virulent CPV strain followed by a virulent PPRV strain 3 weeks later. Our study demonstrated full protection against CP for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to PPRV and a partial protection against PPR for vaccinated animals with prior exposure to CPV. The latter animals exhibited a mild clinical form of PPR and did not show any post-challenge anamnestic neutralizing antibody response against PPRV. The implications of these results are discussed herein and suggestions made for future research regarding the development of CPV-vectored vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The NYCBH vaccinia virus deleted for the innate immune evasion gene, E3L, protects rabbits against lethal challenge by rabbitpox virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzler, Karen L; Rice, Amanda D; MacNeill, Amy L; Fukushima, Nobuko; Lindsey, Scott F; Wallace, Greg; Burrage, Andrew M; Smith, Andrew J; Manning, Brandi R; Swetnam, Daniele M; Gray, Stacey A; Moyer, RW; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus deleted for the innate immune evasion gene, E3L, has been shown to be highly attenuated and yet induces a protective immune response against challenge by homologous virus in a mouse model. In this manuscript the NYCBH vaccinia virus vaccine strain was compared to NYCBH vaccinia virus deleted for E3L (NYCBHΔE3L) in a rabbitpox virus (RPV) challenge model. Upon scarification, both vaccines produced a desired skin lesion, although the lesion produced by NYCBHΔE3L was smaller. Both vaccines fully protected rabbits against lethal challenge by escalating doses of RPV, from 10 LD50 to 1,000 LD50. A single dose of NYCBHΔE3L protected rabbits from weight loss, fever, and clinical symptoms following the lowest dose challenge of 10 LD50, however it allowed a moderate level of RPV replication at the challenge site, some spread to external skin and mucosal surfaces, and increased numbers of secondary lesions as compared to vaccination with NYCBH. Alternately, two doses of NYCBHΔE3L fully protected rabbits from weight loss, fever, and clinical symptoms, following challenge with 100 to 1,000 LD50 RPV, and it prevented development of secondary lesions similar to protection seen with NYCBH. Finally, vaccination with either one or two doses of NYCBHΔE3L resulted in similar neutralizing antibody titers following RPV challenge as compared to titers obtained by vaccination with NYCBH. These results support the efficacy of the attenuated NYCBHΔE3L in protection against an orthologous poxvirus challenge. PMID:21840358

  19. Protective value of immune responses developed in goats vaccinated with insoluble proteins from Sarcoptes Scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developed from certain membrane proteins lining the lumen of arthropod’s gut have been demonstrated effective in the control of some arthropod ectoparasites. A similar approach could also be applied to Sarcoptes scabiei since this parasite also ingests its host immunoglobulins. To evaluate immune protection of the membrane proteins, insoluble mite proteins were fractionated by successive treatment in the solutions of 1.14 M NaCl, 2% SB 3-14 Zwitterion detergent, 6 M urea, 6 M guanidine-HCl and 5% SDS. Five groups of goats (6 or 7 goats per group were immunised respectively with the protein fractions. Vaccination was performed 6 times, each with a dosage of 250 μg proteins, and 3 week intervals between vaccination. Group 6 (7 goats received PBS and adjuvant only, and served as an unvaccinated control. One week after the last vaccination, all goats were challenged with 2000 live mites on the auricles. The development of lesions were examined at 1 day, 2 days, and then every week from week 1 to 8. All animals were bled and weighed every week, and at the end of the experiment, skin scrapings were collected to determine the mite burden. Antibody responses induced by vaccination and challenge were examined by ELISA and Western blotting. This experiment showed that vaccination with the insoluble-protein fractions resulted in the development of high level of specific antibodies but the responses did not have any protective value. The severity of lesions and mite burden in the vaccinated animals were not different from those in the unvaccinated control.

  20. Vaccination Method Affects Immune Response and Bacterial Growth but Not Protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium Animal Model of Typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare L Kinnear

    Full Text Available Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the murine model for typhoid, where animals are infected with S. Typhimurium. Mice were vaccinated either intravenously or orally with the same live attenuated S. Typhimurium strain and data were collected on vaccine strain growth, shedding and stimulation of antibodies and cytokines. Following vaccination, mice were challenged with a virulent strain of S. Typhimurium and the protection conferred by the different vaccination routes was measured in terms of challenge suppression and animal survival. The main difference in immune stimulation found in this study was the development of a secretory IgA response in orally-vaccinated mice, which was absent in IV vaccinated mice. While both strains showed similar protection in terms of challenge suppression in systemic organs (spleen and liver as well as survival, they differed in terms of challenge suppression of virulent pathogens in gut-associated organs. This difference in gut colonisation presents important questions around the ability of vaccines to prevent shedding and transmission. These findings demonstrate that while protection conferred by two vaccines can appear to be the same, the mechanisms controlling the protection can differ and have important implications for infection dynamics within a population.

  1. Vaccination Method Affects Immune Response and Bacterial Growth but Not Protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium Animal Model of Typhoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, Clare L; Strugnell, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the murine model for typhoid, where animals are infected with S. Typhimurium. Mice were vaccinated either intravenously or orally with the same live attenuated S. Typhimurium strain and data were collected on vaccine strain growth, shedding and stimulation of antibodies and cytokines. Following vaccination, mice were challenged with a virulent strain of S. Typhimurium and the protection conferred by the different vaccination routes was measured in terms of challenge suppression and animal survival. The main difference in immune stimulation found in this study was the development of a secretory IgA response in orally-vaccinated mice, which was absent in IV vaccinated mice. While both strains showed similar protection in terms of challenge suppression in systemic organs (spleen and liver) as well as survival, they differed in terms of challenge suppression of virulent pathogens in gut-associated organs. This difference in gut colonisation presents important questions around the ability of vaccines to prevent shedding and transmission. These findings demonstrate that while protection conferred by two vaccines can appear to be the same, the mechanisms controlling the protection can differ and have important implications for infection dynamics within a population.

  2. Protective efficacy of a recombinant vaccinia virus in vaccinia-immune mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, M E

    1989-10-01

    Recombinant viral vectors offer a potential means of vaccinating against diseases for which there are no current safe vaccines. One of the criteria on which a viral vaccine vector would be selected is that it either circulates in the human or livestock population without producing overt disease (e.g. adenovirus) or has a history as a safe vaccine (e.g. vaccinia virus). However, this selection criterion also means that the target population is likely to have circulating antibodies that are specific to the vaccine vector. Since a percentage of the world's population has been vaccinated during the World Health Organization's Smallpox Eradication Campaign, such antibody titres, which are likely to lower vaccine efficacy, have been raised as an objection to the use of recombinant vaccinia viruses as vaccines. We have tested the effect of vaccinia-specific immunity on the protective efficacy of a recombinant virus, VV-PR8-HA6 (1) which expresses the haemagglutinin of the influenza virus A/PR/8/34.

  3. Stimulation of host immune defenses by a small molecule protects C. elegans from bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Pukkila-Worley

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers currently untapped potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of low molecular weight compound libraries to identify molecules that target a variety of cellular processes. We previously used a bacterial infection assay in C. elegans to identify 119 compounds that affect host-microbe interactions among 37,214 tested. Here we show that one of these small molecules, RPW-24, protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by stimulating the host immune response of the nematode. Using transcriptome profiling, epistasis pathway analyses with C. elegans mutants, and an RNAi screen, we show that RPW-24 promotes resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by inducing the transcription of a remarkably small number of C. elegans genes (∼1.3% of all genes in a manner that partially depends on the evolutionarily-conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway and the transcription factor ATF-7. These data show that the immunostimulatory activity of RPW-24 is required for its efficacy and define a novel C. elegans-based strategy to identify compounds with activity against antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  4. Stimulation of host immune defenses by a small molecule protects C. elegans from bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Kirienko, Natalia V; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers currently untapped potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of low molecular weight compound libraries to identify molecules that target a variety of cellular processes. We previously used a bacterial infection assay in C. elegans to identify 119 compounds that affect host-microbe interactions among 37,214 tested. Here we show that one of these small molecules, RPW-24, protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by stimulating the host immune response of the nematode. Using transcriptome profiling, epistasis pathway analyses with C. elegans mutants, and an RNAi screen, we show that RPW-24 promotes resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by inducing the transcription of a remarkably small number of C. elegans genes (∼1.3% of all genes) in a manner that partially depends on the evolutionarily-conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway and the transcription factor ATF-7. These data show that the immunostimulatory activity of RPW-24 is required for its efficacy and define a novel C. elegans-based strategy to identify compounds with activity against antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens.

  5. Experimental tuberculosis in the Wistar rat: a model for protective immunity and control of infection.

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    Amit Singhal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of many animal models for tuberculosis (TB research, there still exists a need for better understanding of the quiescent stage of disease observed in many humans. Here, we explored the use of the Wistar rat model for the study of protective immunity and control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The kinetics of bacillary growth, evaluated by the colony stimulating assay (CFU and the extent of lung pathology in Mtb infected Wistar rats were dependent on the virulence of the strains and the size of the infecting inoculums. Bacillary growth control was associated with induction of T helper type 1 (Th1 activation, the magnitude of which was also Mtb strain and dose dependent. Histopathology analysis of the infected lungs demonstrated the formation of well organized granulomas comprising epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells and foamy macrophages surrounded by large numbers of lymphocytes. The late stage subclinical form of disease was reactivated by immunosuppression leading to increased lung CFU. CONCLUSION: The Wistar rat is a valuable model for better understanding host-pathogen interactions that result in control of Mtb infection and potentially establishment of latent TB. These properties together with the ease of manipulation, relatively low cost and well established use of rats in toxicology and pharmacokinetic analyses make the rat a good animal model for TB drug discovery.

  6. Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (JVRS-100) combined with influenza vaccine (Fluzone) increases antibody response, cellular immunity, and antigenically drifted protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Marla; Callejo, Bernadette; Chang, Stella; Hong, David K; Lewis, David B; Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon; Fritts, Linda; Miller, Christopher J; Warner, John F; Liang, Lily; Fairman, Jeffery

    2009-06-12

    Safe and effective adjuvants for influenza vaccines that could increase both the levels of neutralizing antibody, including against drifted viral subtypes, and T-cell immunity would be a major advance in vaccine design. The JVRS-100 adjuvant, consisting of DOTIM/cholesterol cationic liposome-DNA complexes, is particularly promising for vaccines that require induction of high levels of antibody and T-cell immunity, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Inclusion of protein antigens with JVRS-100 results in the induction of enhanced humoral and cell-mediated (i.e., CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) immune responses. The JVRS-100 adjuvant combined with a split trivalent influenza vaccine (Fluzone-sanofi pasteur) elicited increased antibody and T-cell responses in mice and non-human primates compared to vaccination with Fluzone alone. Mice vaccinated with JVRS-100-Fluzone and challenged with antigenically drifted strains of H1N1 (PR/8/34) and influenza B (B/Lee/40) viruses had higher grade protection, as measured by attenuation of weight loss and increased survival, compared to recipients of unadjuvanted vaccine. The results indicate that the JVRS-100 adjuvant substantially increases immunogenicity and protection from drifted-strain challenge using an existing influenza vaccine.

  7. Prophylactic Sublingual Immunization with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Subunit Vaccine Incorporating the Natural Killer T Cell Agonist Alpha-Galactosylceramide Enhances Protective Immunity to Limit Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Bacterial Burden in Mice

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    Arshad Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb remains a major global concern and the available Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine is poorly efficacious in adults. Therefore, alternative vaccines and delivery strategies focusing on Mtb antigens and appropriate immune stimulating adjuvants are needed to induce protective immunity targeted to the lungs, the primary sites of infections and pathology. We present here evidence in support of mucosal vaccination by the sublingual route in mice using the subunit Mtb antigens Ag85B and ESAT-6 adjuvanted with the glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, a potent natural killer T (NKT cell agonist. Vaccinated animals exhibited strong antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells responses in the spleen, cervical lymph nodes and lungs. In general, inclusion of the α-GalCer adjuvant significantly enhanced these responses that persisted over 50 days. Furthermore, aerosolized Mtb infection of vaccinated mice resulted in a significant reduction of bacterial load of the lungs and spleens as compared to levels seen in naïve controls or those vaccinated with subunit proteins, adjuvant , or BCG alone. The protection induced by the Mtb antigens and-GalCer vaccine through sublingual route correlated with a TH1-type immunity mediated by antigen-specific IFN-γ and IL-2 producing T cells.

  8. Th1-Th17 cells mediate protective adaptive immunity against Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection in mice.

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    Lin Lin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We sought to define protective mechanisms of immunity to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans bloodstream infections in mice immunized with the recombinant N-terminus of Als3p (rAls3p-N vaccine plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH(3 adjuvant, or adjuvant controls. Deficiency of IFN-gamma but not IL-17A enhanced susceptibility of control mice to both infections. However, vaccine-induced protective immunity against both infections required CD4+ T-cell-derived IFN-gamma and IL-17A, and functional phagocytic effectors. Vaccination primed Th1, Th17, and Th1/17 lymphocytes, which produced pro-inflammatory cytokines that enhanced phagocytic killing of both organisms. Vaccinated, infected mice had increased IFN-gamma, IL-17, and KC, increased neutrophil influx, and decreased organism burden in tissues. In summary, rAls3p-N vaccination induced a Th1/Th17 response, resulting in recruitment and activation of phagocytes at sites of infection, and more effective clearance of S. aureus and C. albicans from tissues. Thus, vaccine-mediated adaptive immunity can protect against both infections by targeting microbes for destruction by innate effectors.

  9. Resistance and Protective Immunity in Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Exposed to M Type Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle; Purcell, Maureen K.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Differential virulence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates from the U and M phylogenetic subgroups is clearly evident in the Redfish Lake (RFL) strain of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. In these fish, experimental immersion challenges with U isolates cause extremely high mortality and M isolates cause low or no mortality. When survivors of M virus immersion challenges were exposed to a secondary challenge with virulent U type virus they experienced high mortality, indicating that the primary M challenge did not elicit protective immunity. Delivery of a moderate dose (2 × 104 plaque-forming units [PFU]/fish) of virus by intraperitoneal injection challenge did not overcome RFL sockeye salmon resistance to M type IHNV. Injection challenge with a high dose (5 × 106 PFU/fish) of M type virus caused 10% mortality, and in this case survivors did develop protective immunity against a secondary U type virus challenge. Thus, although it is possible for M type IHNV to elicit cross-protective immunity in this disease model, it does not develop after immersion challenge despite entry, transient replication of M virus to low levels, stimulation of innate immune genes, and development of neutralizing antibodies in some fish.

  10. Induction of innate immunity in lungs with virus-like nanoparticles leads to protection against influenza and Streptococcus pneumoniae challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Claudia; Rioux, Gervais; Dumas, Marie-Christine; Leclerc, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticles composed of the coat protein of a plant virus (papaya mosaic virus; PapMV) and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) trigger a strong innate immune stimulation in the lungs of the animals a few hours following instillation. A rapid recruitment of neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes follows. This treatment was able to provide protection to an influenza challenge that lasts at least 5 days. Protection could be recalled for longer periods by repeating the instillations once per week for more than 10 weeks. The treatment also conferred protection to a lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae--the major cause of bacterial pneumonia. Finally, we also showed that the nanoparticles could be used to treat mice infected with influenza and significantly decrease morbidity. These data strengthen the potential for using PapMV nanoparticles as non-specific inducers of the innate immune response in lungs during viral pandemics or to combat bioterrorist attack. In this study, virus-like nanoparticles were utilized to induce innate immune responses in a mouse model. They were also demonstrated to provide enhanced immune responses during actual pneumonia and ongoing viral infection. Strategies like this may become very helpful in human applications, including bioterrorism countermeasures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of IFN-gamma and IL-6 in a protective immune response to Yersinia enterocolitica in mice

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    Autenrieth Ingo B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yersinia outer protein (Yop H is a secreted virulence factor of Yersinia enterocolitica (Ye, which inhibits phagocytosis of Ye and contributes to the virulence of Ye in mice. The aim of this study was to address whether and how YopH affects the innate immune response to Ye in mice. Results For this purpose, mice were infected with wild type Ye (pYV+ or a YopH-deficient Ye mutant strain (ΔyopH. CD11b+ cells were isolated from the infected spleen and subjected to gene expression analysis using microarrays. Despite the attenuation of ΔyopH in vivo, by variation of infection doses we were able to achieve conditions that allow comparison of gene expression in pYV+ and ΔyopH infection, using either comparable infection courses or splenic bacterial burden. Gene expression analysis provided evidence that expression levels of several immune response genes, including IFN-γ and IL-6, are high after pYV+ infection but low after sublethal ΔyopH infection. In line with these findings, infection of IFN-γR-/- and IL-6-/- mice with pYV+ or ΔyopH revealed that these cytokines are not necessarily required for control of ΔyopH, but are essential for defense against infection with the more virulent pYV+. Consistently, IFN-γ pretreatment of bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM strongly enhanced their ability in killing intracellular Ye bacteria. Conclusion In conclusion, this data suggests that IFN-γ-mediated effector mechanisms can partially compensate virulence exerted by YopH. These results shed new light on the protective role of IFN-γ in Ye wild type infections.

  12. Comparative analysis of cellular immune responses and cytokine levels in sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotype 1 and 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Pérez de Diego, A C; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Pleguezuelos, F J; Garfia, B; del Carmen, P; Pedrera, M

    2015-05-15

    Protective immunity in sheep with bluetongue virus (BTV) infection as well as the role of BTV-induced cytokines during immune response remains unclear. Understanding the basis immunological mechanisms in sheep experimentally infected with serotypes 1 and 8 (BTV-1 and -8) was the aim of this study. A time-course study was carried out in order to evaluate cell-mediated immune response and serum concentrations of cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-12, IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-10) with inflammatory and immunological functions. Depletion of T cell subsets (mainly CD4(+), γδ and CD25(+)) together with the absence of cytokines (IFNγ and IL-12) involved in the regulation of cell-mediated antiviral immunity at the first stage of the disease suggested that both BTV-1 and BTV-8 might impair host's capability against primary infections which would favor viral replication and spreading. However, cellular immune response and cytokines elicited an immune response in sheep that efficiently reduced viremia in the final stage of the experiment. Recovery of T cell subsets (CD4(+) and CD25(+)) together with a significant increase of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in both infected groups were observed in parallel with the decrease of viremia. Additionally, the recovery of CD4(+) T lymphocytes together with the significant increase of IL-4 serum levels at the final stage of the experiment might contribute to humoral immune response activation and neutralizing antibodies production against BTV previously described in the course of this experiment. These results suggested that both cellular and humoral immune response may contribute to protective immunity against BTV-1 and BTV-8 in sheep. The possible role played by IL-10 and CD25(+) cells in controlling inflammatory and immune response in the final stage of the experiment has also been suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sphingomyelin exhibits greatly enhanced protection compared with egg yolk phosphatidylcholine against detergent bile salts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschetta, A.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Portincasa, P.; Palasciano, G.; Groen, A. K.; van Erpecum, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    Inclusion of phosphatidylcholine within bile salt micelles protects against bile salt-induced cytotoxicity. In addition to phosphatidylcholine, bile may contain significant amounts of sphingomyelin, particularly under cholestatic conditions. We compared protective effects of egg yolk

  14. Evidence that active protection following oral immunization of mice with live rotavirus is not dependent on neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R L; McNeal, M M; Sheridan, J F

    1992-05-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether active immunity against murine rotavirus (EDIM) infection of mice correlated with titers of neutralizing antibody to the challenge virus. Neonatal mice administered either murine or heterologous rotaviruses all developed diarrhea and high titers of serum rotavirus IgG. However, only mice given EDIM, the murine EB, or simian SA11-FEM strains were protected against EDIM infection when challenged 60 days later. Other serotype 3 strains (RRV, SA11-SEM), as well as strains belonging to serotypes 5 and 6 (OSU, NCDV, WC3), were not protective. Serum neutralizing antibody titers to EDIM were almost undetectable after rotavirus infection with any strain and could not, therefore, be correlated with protection. Likewise, intestinal neutralizing antibody titers were extremely low 21 days after EDIM infection, and by 60 days after inoculation, EDIM-infected mice had no greater intestinal neutralizing antibody titers than uninoculated controls. Mice inoculated with SA11-FEM as neonates had much higher serum rotavirus IgG responses than mice inoculated as adults, and only those infected with this virus as neonates were protected. Thus, although immunity to EDIM did not correlate with the presence of neutralizing antibody to EDIM, it did correlate with the overall magnitude of the immune response after inoculation with SA11-FEM.

  15. Impact of maternally derived immunity on piglets' immune response and protection against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) after vaccination against PCV2 at different age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Paolo; Saleri, Roberta; Ferrarini, Giulia; De Angelis, Elena; Cavalli, Valeria; Benetti, Michele; Ferrari, Luca; Canelli, Elena; Bonilauri, Paolo; Arioli, Elena; Caleffi, Antonio; Nathues, Heiko; Borghetti, Paolo

    2016-05-11

    This study was aimed at evaluating the clinical protection, the level of Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) viremia and the immune response (antibodies and IFN-γ secreting cells (SC)) in piglets derived from PCV2 vaccinated sows and themselves vaccinated against PCV2 at different age, namely at 4, 6 and 8 weeks. The cohort study has been carried out over three subsequent production cycles (replicates). At the start/enrolment, 46 gilts were considered at first mating, bled and vaccinated. At the first, second and third farrowing, dams were bled and re-vaccinated at the subsequent mating after weaning piglets. Overall 400 piglets at each farrowing (first, second and third) were randomly allocated in three different groups (100 piglets/group) based on the timing of vaccination (4, 6 or 8 weeks of age). A fourth group was kept non-vaccinated (controls). Piglets were vaccinated intramuscularly with one dose (2 mL) of a commercial PCV2a-based subunit vaccine (Porcilis® PCV). Twenty animals per group were bled at weaning and from vaccination to slaughter every 4 weeks for the detection of PCV2 viremia, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Clinical signs and individual treatments (morbidity), mortality, and body weight of all piglets were recorded. All vaccination schemes (4, 6 and 8 weeks of age) were able to induce an antibody response and IFN-γ SC. The highest clinical and virological protection sustained by immune reactivity was observed in pigs vaccinated at 6 weeks of age. Overall, repeated PCV2 vaccination in sows at mating and the subsequent higher levels of maternally derived antibodies did not significantly interfere with the induction of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity in their piglets after vaccination. The combination of vaccination in sows at mating and in piglets at 6 weeks of age was more effective for controlling PCV2 natural infection, than other vaccination schemas, thus sustaining that some interference of MDA with the induction of an

  16. Immune protection against Trypanosoma cruzi induced by TcVac4 in a canine model.

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    José E Aparicio-Burgos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in southern parts of the American continent. Herein, we have tested the protective efficacy of a DNA-prime/T. rangeli-boost (TcVac4 vaccine in a dog (Canis familiaris model. Dogs were immunized with two-doses of DNA vaccine (pcDNA3.1 encoding TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens plus IL-12- and GM-CSF-encoding plasmids followed by two doses of glutaraldehyde-inactivated T. rangeli epimastigotes (TrIE; and challenged with highly pathogenic T. cruzi (SylvioX10/4 isolate. Dogs given TrIE or empty pcDNA3.1 were used as controls. We monitored post-vaccination and post-challenge infection antibody response by an ELISA, parasitemia by blood analysis and xenodiagnosis, and heart function by electrocardiography. Post-mortem anatomic and pathologic evaluation of the heart was conducted. TcVac4 induced a strong IgG response (IgG2>IgG1 that was significantly expanded post-infection, and moved to a nearly balanced IgG2/IgG1 response in chronic phase. In comparison, dogs given TrIE or empty plasmid DNA only developed high IgG titers with IgG2 predominance in response to T. cruzi infection. Blood parasitemia, tissue parasite foci, parasite transmission to triatomines, electrocardiographic abnormalities were significantly lower in TcVac4-vaccinated dogs than was observed in dogs given TrIE or empty plasmid DNA only. Macroscopic and microscopic alterations, the hallmarks of chronic Chagas disease, were significantly decreased in the myocardium of TcVac4-vaccinated dogs. We conclude that TcVac4 induced immunity was beneficial in providing resistance to T. cruzi infection, evidenced by control of chronic pathology of the heart and preservation of cardiac function in dogs. Additionally, TcVac4 vaccination decreased the transmission of parasites from vaccinated/infected animals to triatomines.

  17. Selected mild strains of Passion fruit woodiness virus (PWV fail to protect pre-immunized vines in Brazil

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    Novaes Quelmo Silva de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Passion fruit woodiness virus (PWV is the most important virus affecting passion fruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg. crops in Brazil. The main purpose of this work was to select mild strains of PWV and to evaluate their protective effect against a severe strain of the virus. Three mild strains were selected from outstanding plants found in orchards severely affected by the virus (F-101, F-102 and F-103 and three others were obtained from blisters formed in passion fruit vine leaves showing mosaic (F-99, F-144 and F-145. The protective effect of the mild strains was evaluated for vines under greenhouse and field conditions. Plants pre-immunized with mild strains F-101, F-102 and F-144, in a greenhouse, had partial protection against the severe strain PWV-SP. In a first field experiment, all passion fruit vines pre-immunized with the six selected mild strains showed severe symptoms of the disease, approximately four months after the challenge inoculation with the PWV-SP strain. Results from a second field experiment, with vines pre-immunized with strains F-101 and F-144, followed by a quantitative evaluation of the mild strains in different leaves of the protected plants, indicated that breakdown in protection seems to be related to the low concentration and/or irregular distribution of the mild strains in leaves, which allows the existence of infection sites available for the establishment of the severe strain. Pre-immunization was not an appropriate alternative for the control of the passion fruit woodiness disease.

  18. A booster vaccine expressing a latency-associated antigen augments BCG induced immunity and confers enhanced protection against tuberculosis.

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    Bappaditya Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of a consistent protection against tuberculosis (TB in children, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG fails to provide adequate protection against the disease in adults as well as against reactivation of latent infections or exogenous reinfections. It has been speculated that failure to generate adequate memory T cell response, elicitation of inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens and inability to impart long-term immunity against M. tuberculosis infections are some of the key factors responsible for the limited efficiency of BCG in controlling TB. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluated the ability of a DNA vaccine expressing α-crystallin--a key latency antigen of M. tuberculosis to boost the BCG induced immunity. 'BCG prime-DNA boost' regimen (B/D confers robust protection in guinea pigs along with a reduced pathology in comparison to BCG vaccination (1.37 log(10 and 1.96 log(10 fewer bacilli in lungs and spleen, respectively; p<0.01. In addition, B/D regimen also confers enhanced protection in mice. Further, we show that B/D immunization in mice results in a heightened frequency of PPD and antigen specific multi-functional CD4 T cells (3(+ simultaneously producing interferon (IFNγ, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results clearly indicate the superiority of α-crystallin based B/D regimen over BCG. Our study, also demonstrates that protection against TB is predictable by an increased frequency of 3(+ Th1 cells with superior effector functions. We anticipate that this study would significantly contribute towards the development of superior booster vaccines for BCG vaccinated individuals. In addition, this regimen can also be expected to reduce the risk of developing active TB due to reactivation of latent infection.

  19. Comparative aspects of immunity and vaccination in human and bovine trichomoniasis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapwanya, Aspinas; Usman, Abubakar Yusha'u; Irons, Pete Charles

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are important extracellular protozoans that cause, respectively, human and bovine venereal diseases. Trichomonads are extracellular parasites that primarily inhabit the genital tracts of the mammalian hosts where they overcome the mucus barrier and parasitize mucosa by contact-dependent or contact-independent cytotoxicity. Transient immunity is usually achieved by the host after clinical infection. At present, vaccination in cattle reduces infection rates and reproductive wastage in affected herds. After vaccination, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels increase in systemic circulation while immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels rise in the vagina. Only moderate protection is conferred by means of vaccination. Future vaccine development strategies are needed for cattle to enhance the antigenic component or use adjuvant that strongly activates the innate immune response to produce safe and potent vaccines. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the immunology of trichomoniasis infection and the challenges and potential of vaccines in the control of the infection in human and bovine trichomoniasis.

  20. Single-Dose Hepatitis A Immunization: 7.5-Year Observational Pilot Study in Nicaraguan Children to Assess Protective Effectiveness and Humoral Immune Memory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Orlando; Bühler, Silja; Jaeger, Veronika K; Bally, Seraina; Hatz, Christoph; Frösner, Gert; Protzer, Ulrike; Van Damme, Pierre; Egger, Matthias; Herzog, Christian

    2016-11-15

     Universal 2-dose hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination of toddlers effectively controls hepatitis A. High vaccine costs, however, impede implementation in endemic countries. To test single-dose vaccination as a possible alternative, we initiated an observational, longitudinal study in Nicaragua, to assess protective effectiveness and-through challenge vaccination-humoral immune memory response.  After a 2003 serosurvey, 130 originally seronegative children received one dose of virosomal HAV vaccine in 2005, followed by yearly serological and clinical assessments until 2012. After 7.5 years, a vaccine booster was administered. Concurrent antibody screening of patients presenting with hepatitis symptoms documented persistent HAV circulation in the communities studied.  Between serosurvey and vaccination, 25 children contracted hepatitis A subclinically (>8000 mIU/mL anti-HAV). In the remaining 105 children, immunization resulted in anti-HAV levels of 17-572 mIU/mL. Based on the ≥15% annual infection risk, an estimated 60% of children were exposed to HAV encounters during follow-up. No child presented with hepatitis symptoms. Serological breakthrough infection (7106 mIU/mL) was documented in 1 child, representing an estimated protective effectiveness of 98.3% (95% confidence interval, 87.9-99.8). Boosting elicited an average 29.7-fold increase of anti-HAV levels.  In children living in hyperendemic settings, a single dose of virosomal HAV vaccine is sufficient to activate immune memory and may provide long-term protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Neutralizing antibody affords comparable protection against vaginal and rectal simian/human immunodeficiency virus challenge in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldt, Brian; Le, Khoa M; Carnathan, Diane G; Whitney, James B; Schultz, Niccole; Lewis, Mark G; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin M; Mackel, Joseph J; Sweat, Shelby L; Hodges, Andrew P; Godzik, Adam; Parren, Paul W H I; Silvestri, Guido; Barouch, Dan H; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-06-19

    Passive administration of broadly neutralizing antibodies has been shown to protect against both vaginal and rectal challenge in the simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/macaque model of HIV transmission. However, the relative efficacy of antibody against the two modes of exposure is unknown and, given differences in the composition and immunology of the two tissue compartments, this is an important gap in knowledge. To investigate the significance of the challenge route for antibody-mediated protection, we performed a comparative protection study in macaques using the highly potent human monoclonal antibody, PGT126. Animals were administered PGT126 at three different doses before challenged either vaginally or rectally with a single dose of SHIVSF163P3. Viral loads, PGT126 serum concentrations, and serum neutralizing titers were monitored. In vaginally challenged animals, sterilizing immunity was achieved in all animals administered 10 mg/kg, in two of five animals administered 2 mg/kg and in one of five animals administered 0.4 mg/kg PGT126. Comparable protection was observed for the corresponding groups challenged rectally as sterilizing immunity was achieved in three of four animals administered 10 mg/kg, in two of four animals administered 2 mg/kg and in none of four animals administered 0.4 mg/kg PGT126. Serological analysis showed similar serum concentrations of PGT126 and serum neutralization titers in animals administered the same antibody dose. Our data suggest that broadly neutralizing antibody-mediated protection is not strongly dependent on the mucosal route of challenge, which indicates that a vaccine aimed to induce a neutralizing antibody response would have broadly similar efficacy against both primary transmission routes for HIV.

  2. BCG-induced trained immunity in NK cells: role for non-specific protection to infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Quintin, Jessica; Preijers, Frank; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Jacobs, Cor; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Van der Meer, Jos W. M.; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive features of innate immunity, also termed ‘trained immunity’, have recently been shown to characterize monocytes of BCG vaccinated healthy volunteers. Trained immunity leads to increased cytokine production in response to non-related pathogens via epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes. Recently, memory-like properties were also observed in NK cells during viral infections, but nothing is know whether memory properties of NK cells contribute to trained immunity due to BCG vaccination.

  3. Comparative transcriptome analysis quantifies immune cell transcript levels, metastatic progression and survival in osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Milcah C; Temiz, Nuri A; Sarver, Anne E; LaRue, Rebecca S; Rathe, Susan K; Varshney, Jyotika; Wolf, Natalie K; Moriarity, Branden S; O'Brien, Timothy D; Spector, Logan G; Largaespada, David A; Modiano, Jaime F; Subramanian, Subbaya; Sarver, Aaron L

    2017-10-24

    Overall survival of patients with osteosarcoma (OS) has improved little in the past three decades and better models for study are needed. OS is common in large dog breeds and is genetically inducible in mice, making the disease ideal for comparative genomic analyses across species. Understanding the level of conservation of inter-tumor transcriptional variation across species and how it is associated with progression to metastasis will enable us to more efficiently develop effective strategies to manage OS and improve therapy. In this study, transcriptional profiles of OS tumors and cell lines derived from humans (n=49), mice (n=103) and dogs (n=34) were generated using RNA-sequencing. Conserved inter-tumor transcriptional variation was present in tumor sets from all three species and comprised gene clusters associated with cell cycle and mitosis and with the presence or absence of immune cells. Further, we developed a novel Gene Cluster Expression Summary Score (GCESS) to quantify inter-tumor transcriptional variation and demonstrated that these GCESS values associated with patient outcome. Human OS tumors with GCESS values suggesting decreased immune cell presence were associated with metastasis and poor survival. We validated these results in an independent human OS tumor cohort and in 15 different tumor data sets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our results suggest that quantification of immune cell absence and tumor cell proliferation may better inform therapeutic decisions and improve overall survival for OS patients. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. The Immune Protective Effect of the Mediterranean Diet against Chronic Low-grade Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Rosa; Sacanella, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns high in refined starches, sugar, and saturated and trans-fatty acids, poor in natural antioxidants and fiber from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and poor in omega-3 fatty acids may cause an activation of the innate immune system, most likely by excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with a reduced production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) is a nutritional model inspired by the traditional dietary pattern of some of the countries of the Mediterranean basin. This dietary pattern is characterized by the abundant consumption of olive oil, high consumption of plant foods (fruits, vegetables, pulses, cereals, nuts and seeds); frequent and moderate intake of wine (mainly with meals); moderate consumption of fish, seafood, yogurt, cheese, poultry and eggs; and low consumption of red meat, processed meat products and seeds. Several epidemiological studies have evaluated the effects of a Mediterranean pattern as protective against several diseases associated with chronic low-grade inflammation such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome and cognition disorders. The adoption of this dietary pattern could counter the effects of several inflammatory markers, decreasing, for example, the secretion of circulating and cellular biomarkers involved in the atherosclerotic process. Thus, the aim of this review was to consider the current evidence about the effectiveness of the MedDiet in these chronic inflammatory diseases due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which may not only act on classical risk factors but also on inflammatory biomarkers such as adhesion molecules, cytokines or molecules related to the stability of atheromatic plaque. PMID:25244229

  5. Protective mucosal immunity mediated by epithelial CD1d and IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Torsten; Neves, Joana F; Dowds, C Marie; Baker, Kristi; Glickman, Jonathan; Davidson, Nicholas O; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Jobin, Christian; Brand, Stephan; Sotlar, Karl; Wada, Koichiro; Katayama, Kazufumi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Kunito; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Müller, Werner; Snapper, Scott B; Schreiber, Stefan; Kaser, Arthur; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2014-05-22

    The mechanisms by which mucosal homeostasis is maintained are of central importance to inflammatory bowel disease. Critical to these processes is the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC), which regulates immune responses at the interface between the commensal microbiota and the host. CD1d presents self and microbial lipid antigens to natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are involved in the pathogenesis of colitis in animal models and human inflammatory bowel disease. As CD1d crosslinking on model IECs results in the production of the important regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 (ref. 9), decreased epithelial CD1d expression--as observed in inflammatory bowel disease--may contribute substantially to intestinal inflammation. Here we show in mice that whereas bone-marrow-derived CD1d signals contribute to NKT-cell-mediated intestinal inflammation, engagement of epithelial CD1d elicits protective effects through the activation of STAT3 and STAT3-dependent transcription of IL-10, heat shock protein 110 (HSP110; also known as HSP105), and CD1d itself. All of these epithelial elements are critically involved in controlling CD1d-mediated intestinal inflammation. This is demonstrated by severe NKT-cell-mediated colitis upon IEC-specific deletion of IL-10, CD1d, and its critical regulator microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), as well as deletion of HSP110 in the radioresistant compartment. Our studies thus uncover a novel pathway of IEC-dependent regulation of mucosal homeostasis and highlight a critical role of IL-10 in the intestinal epithelium, with broad implications for diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis-Discovery and implications

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    Sreenivas eGannavaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, sub-unit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in L. donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen1-/- in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated

  7. Simultaneous approach using systemic, mucosal and transcutaneous routes of immunization for development of protective HIV-1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyakov, I M; Ahlers, J D

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are major sites of HIV entry and initial infection. Induction of a local mucosal cytotoxic T lymphocyte response is considered an important goal in developing an effective HIV vaccine. In addition, activation and recruitment of memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in systemic lymphoid circulation to mucosal effector sites might provide the firewall needed to prevent virus spread. Therefore a vaccine that generates CD4(+) and CD8(+) responses in both mucosal and systemic tissues might be required for protection against HIV. However, optimal routes and number of vaccinations required for the generation of long lasting CD4(+) and CD8(+) CTL effector and memory responses are not well understood especially for mucosal T cells. A number of studies looking at protective immune responses against diverse mucosal pathogens have shown that mucosal vaccination is necessary to induce a compartmentalized immune response including maximum levels of mucosal high-avidity CD8(+) CTL, antigen specific mucosal antibodies titers (especially sIgA), as well as induction of innate anti-viral factors in mucosa tissue. Immune responses are detectable at mucosal sites after systemic delivery of vaccine, and prime boost regimens can amplify the magnitude of immune responses in mucosal sites and in systemic lymphoid tissues. We believe that the most optimal mucosal and systemic HIV/SIV specific protective immune responses and innate factors might best be achieved by simultaneous mucosal and systemic prime and boost vaccinations. Similar principals of vaccination may be applied for vaccine development against cancer and highly invasive pathogens that lead to chronic infection.

  8. Single dose CpG immunization protects against a heterosubtypic challenge and generates antigen specific memory T cells

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    Alexander eVogel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research, influenza A virus (IAV remains a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. Emerging pandemics from highly pathogenic IAV strains such as H5N1 and pandemic H1N1 highlight the need for universal, cross-protective vaccines. Current vaccine formulations generate strain-specific neutralizing antibodies primarily against the outer coat proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. In contrast to these highly mutable proteins, internal proteins of IAV are more conserved and are a favorable target for developing vaccines that induce strong T cell responses in addition to humoral immunity. Here, we found that intranasal administration with a single dose of CpG and inactivated x31 (H3N2 reduced viral titers and partially protected mice from a heterosubtypic challenge with a lethal dose of PR8 (H1N1. Early after immunization, vaccinated mice showed increased innate immune activation with high levels of MHCII and CD86 expression on dendritic cells in both the draining lymph nodes and lungs. Three days after immunization, CD4 and CD8 cells in the lung upregulated CD69, suggesting that activated lymphocytes are present at the site of vaccine administration. The ensuing effector Th1 responses were capable of producing multiple cytokines and were present at least 30 days after immunization. Furthermore, functional memory responses were observed, as antigen specific IFN-γ+ and GrB+ cells were detected early after lethal infection. Together, this work provides evidence for using pattern recognition receptor agonists as a mucosal vaccine platform for inducing robust T cell responses capable of protecting against heterologous IAV challenges.

  9. Protective versus pathogenic anti-CD4 immunity: insights from the study of natural resistance to HIV infection

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    Lopalco Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 exposure causes several dramatic unbalances in the immune system homeostasis. Here, we will focus on the paradox whereby CD4 specific autoimmune responses, which are expected to contribute to the catastrophic loss of most part of the T helper lymphocyte subset in infected patients, may display the characteristics of an unconventional protective immunity in individuals naturally resistant to HIV-1 infection. Reference to differences in fine epitope mapping of these two oppositely polarized outcomes will be presented, with particular reference to partially or totally CD4-gp120 complex-specific antibodies. The fine tuning of the anti-self immune response to the HIV-1 receptor may determine whether viral exposure will result in infection or, alternatively, protective immunity. Along this line, an efficacious anti-HIV strategy can rely on the active (i.e., through immunization or passive targeting of cryptic epitopes of the CD4-gp120 complex, including those harboured within the CD4 molecule. Such epitopes are expected to be safe from genetic drift and thus allow for broad spectrum of efficacy. Moreover, since these epitopes are not routinely exposed in uninfected individuals, they are expected to become targets of neutralizing antibodies or other specifically designed molecules only after viral exposure, with a predictable low impact in terms of potentially harmful anti-CD4 self-reactivity. The experimentum naturae of naturally resistant individuals indicates a strategy to design innovative strategies to neutralize HIV-1 by acting on the sharp edge between harmful and protective self-reactivity.

  10. Effective antibody therapy induces host-protective antitumor immunity that is augmented by TLR4 agonist treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangzi; Astsaturov, Igor A; Bingham, Catherine A; McCarthy, Kenneth M; von Mehren, Margaret; Xu, Wei; Alpaugh, R Katherine; Tang, Yong; Littlefield, Bruce A; Hawkins, Lynn D; Ishizaka, Sally T; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors are potent activators of the innate immune system and generate signals leading to the initiation of the adaptive immune response that can be utilized for therapeutic purposes. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment with a Toll-like receptor agonist and an antitumor monoclonal antibody is effective and induces host-protective antitumor immunity. C57BL/6 human mutated HER2 (hmHER2) transgenic mice that constitutively express kinase-deficient human HER2 under control of the CMV promoter were established. These mice demonstrate immunological tolerance to D5-HER2, a syngeneic human HER2-expressing melanoma cell line. This human HER2-tolerant model offers the potential to serve as a preclinical model to test both antibody therapy and the immunization potential of human HER2-targeted therapeutics. Here, we show that E6020, a Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist effectively boosted the antitumor efficacy of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in immunodeficient C57BL/6 SCID mice as well as in C57BL/6 hmHER2 transgenic mice. E6020 and trastuzumab co-treatment resulted in significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than was observed with either agent individually. Furthermore, mice treated with the combination of trastuzumab and the TLR4 agonist were protected against rechallenge with human HER2-transfected tumor cells in hmHER2 transgenic mouse strains. These findings suggest that combined treatment with trastuzumab and a TLR4 agonist not only promotes direct antitumor effects but also induces a host-protective human HER2-directed adaptive immune response, indicative of a memory response. These data provide an immunological rationale for testing TLR4 agonists in combination with antibody therapy in patients with cancer.

  11. Alum Adjuvant Enhances Protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus but Exacerbates Pulmonary Inflammation by Modulating Multiple Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells.

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    Ki-Hye Kim

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is well-known for inducing vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease after vaccination of young children with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV in alum formulation. Here, we investigated alum adjuvant effects on protection and disease after FI-RSV immunization with or without alum in comparison with live RSV reinfections. Despite viral clearance, live RSV reinfections caused weight loss and substantial pulmonary inflammation probably due to high levels of RSV specific IFN-γ+IL4-, IFN-γ-TNF-α+, IFN-γ+TNF-α- effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Alum adjuvant significantly improved protection as evidenced by effective viral clearance compared to unadjuvanted FI-RSV. However, in contrast to unadjuvanted FI-RSV, alum-adjuvanted FI-RSV (FI-RSV-A induced severe vaccine-enhanced RSV disease including weight loss, eosinophilia, and lung histopathology. Alum adjuvant in the FI-RSV-A was found to be mainly responsible for inducing high levels of RSV-specific IFN-γ-IL4+, IFN-γ-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-4 as well as B220+ plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells, and inhibiting the induction of IFN-γ+CD8 T cells. This study suggests that alum adjuvant in FI-RSV vaccines increases immunogenicity and viral clearance but also induces atypical T helper CD4+ T cells and multiple inflammatory dendritic cell subsets responsible for vaccine-enhanced severe RSV disease.

  12. Influenza M2 virus-like particles confer a broader range of cross protection to the strain-specific pre-existing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Yu-Na; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Ha, Suk-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-07

    Immunity in humans with annual vaccination does not provide effective protection against antigenically distinct strains. As an approach to improve cross-protection in the presence of pre-existing strain-specific immunity, we investigated the efficacy of heterologous and heterosubtypic protection in previously vaccinated mice at earlier times after subsequent immunization with conserved-antigenic target influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) virus-like particle vaccine (M2e5× VLP). Immunization of mice with H1N1 split vaccine induced virus specific antibodies to homologous influenza virus but did not provide heterosubtypic hemagglutination inhibiting antibody responses and cross-protection. However, subsequent M2e5× VLP immunization induced an M2e specific antibody response as well as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) producing cells in systemic and mucosal sites. Upon lethal challenge with H3N2 or H5N1 subtype influenza viruses, subsequently immunized mice with M2e5× VLP were well protected against heterosubtypic influenza viruses. These results provide evidence that non-seasonal immunization with M2e5× VLP, an experimental candidate for universal vaccine, is a promising approach for broadening the cross-protection even in the presence of strain-specific immunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The highly conserved HA2 protein of the influenza A virus induces a cross protective immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Chowdhury, Mohammed Y E; Moon, Ho-Jin; Choi, Young-Ki; Talactac, Melbourne R; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Min-Eun; Son, Hwa-Young; Shin, Kwang-Soon; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2013-12-01

    Existing influenza vaccines protect mostly homologous subtypes and acted most effectively only when well matched to the circulating strain. Immunization with an updated vaccine is therefore necessary to maintain long-term protection and the development of a broadly protective influenza vaccine against the threat of pandemic outbreak. The highly conserved HA2 glyco-polypeptide (HA2 gp) is a promising new candidate for such an influenza vaccine. Helical domain and the fusion peptide (residues 15-137) of surface antigen from influenza A subtype A/EM/Korea/W149/06 (H5N1) was used to assess the potentiality of HA2 vaccination against multiple subtypes of the influenza viruses. The construct, named H5HA2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and allowed to refold from inclusion bodies. Purified proteins were used to investigate the immunogenicity of H5HA2 and its potential for cross protection. The immunization of mice with H5HA2 induced HA2 antibodies, HA2 specific T-cell responses, and protection against homologous A/EM/Korea/W149/06 (H5N1) influenza. Immunized mice were also protected from two distinct heterosubtypes of influenza: A/Puerto Rico/1/34(H1N1) and bird/Korea/w81/2005(H5N2). Results suggest that recombinant proteins based on the highly conserved residues within HA2 are candidates for the development of vaccines against pandemic outbreaks of emergent influenza variants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immune protection of nonhuman primates against Ebola virus with single low-dose adenovirus vectors encoding modified GPs.

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    Nancy J Sullivan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus causes a hemorrhagic fever syndrome that is associated with high mortality in humans. In the absence of effective therapies for Ebola virus infection, the development of a vaccine becomes an important strategy to contain outbreaks. Immunization with DNA and/or replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAd encoding the Ebola glycoprotein (GP and nucleoprotein (NP has been previously shown to confer specific protective immunity in nonhuman primates. GP can exert cytopathic effects on transfected cells in vitro, and multiple GP forms have been identified in nature, raising the question of which would be optimal for a human vaccine.To address this question, we have explored the efficacy of mutant GPs from multiple Ebola virus strains with reduced in vitro cytopathicity and analyzed their protective effects in the primate challenge model, with or without NP. Deletion of the GP transmembrane domain eliminated in vitro cytopathicity but reduced its protective efficacy by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, a point mutation was identified that abolished this cytopathicity but retained immunogenicity and conferred immune protection in the absence of NP. The minimal effective rAd dose was established at 10(10 particles, two logs lower than that used previously.Expression of specific GPs alone vectored by rAd are sufficient to confer protection against lethal challenge in a relevant nonhuman primate model. Elimination of NP from the vaccine and dose reductions to 10(10 rAd particles do not diminish protection and simplify the vaccine, providing the basis for selection of a human vaccine candidate.

  15. Cross-protection by co-immunization with influenza hemagglutinin DNA and inactivated virus vaccine using coated microneedles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Compans, Richard W; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-12-10

    The need for annual revaccination against influenza is a burden on the healthcare system, leads to low vaccination rates and makes timely vaccination difficult against pandemic strains, such as during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. In an effort toward achieving a broadly protective vaccine that provides cross-protection against multiple strains of influenza, this study developed a microneedle patch to co-immunize with A/PR8 influenza hemagglutinin DNA and A/PR8 inactivated virus vaccine. We hypothesize that this dual component vaccination strategy administered to the skin using microneedles will provide cross-protection against other strains of influenza. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel coating formulation that did not require additional excipients to increase coating solution viscosity by using the DNA vaccine itself to increase viscosity and thereby enable thick coatings of DNA vaccine and inactivated virus vaccine on metal microneedles. Co-immunization in this way not only generated robust antibody responses against A/PR8 influenza but also generated robust heterologous antibody responses against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in mice. Challenge studies showed complete cross-protection against lethal challenge with live pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. Control experiments using A/PR8 inactivated influenza virus vaccine with placebo DNA coated onto microneedles produced lower antibody titers and provided incomplete protection against challenge. Overall, this is the first study showing DNA solution as a microneedle coating agent and demonstrating cross-protection by co-immunization with inactivated virus and DNA vaccine using coated microneedles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. PROBLEMS IN TESTING DIGITAL PROTECTIVE RELAY FOR IMMUNITY TO INTENTIONAL DESTRUCTIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMPACTS. CONTINUATION OF THE THEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Gurevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is the continuation of the theme highlighted in the previous article with same title. The new article evaluates the results of digital protective relays (DPR testing for immunity to the E1 component of High-altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP and to Intentional Electromagnetic Interferences (IEMI impacts, conducted by some independent American organizations; discusses the features of relay protection devices as well as clarifies and supplements the procedure for testing these devices. Due to methodology errors during the DPR tests conducted by mentioned organizations earlier, they cannot be considered as satisfactory and their results as meaningful. At the moment there are no reliable data on the level of DPR immunity to IDEI, which suggests that the test should be conducted further.

  17. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Teixeira, Aline F; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Heinemann, Marcos B; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2017-04-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a widely disseminated disease of human and veterinary concern. The development of vaccines that elicit cross-protective immunity through multiple leptospiral serovars has long been pursued. The aim of this study was to develop a novel chimeric multi-epitope fusion antigen, containing sequences of previously studied outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Leptospira. The chimeric protein was designed based on the amino acid sequences of the LigA, Mce, Lsa45, OmpL1, and LipL41 proteins, cloned into pAE vector, the protein expressed in Escherichia coli, and its immune response evaluated in the hamster infection model. The recombinant chimeric protein (rChi) was recognized by antibodies present in serum samples of confirmed cases of human leptospirosis and experimentally infected hamsters, demonstrating that the rChi protein participates in the immune response activation during infection. However, despite high antibody titers achieved when the rChi protein was administered with either Alhydrogel or Bordetella pertussis monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), only 50% of the hamsters were protected against infection. Although a complete characterization of the immune response elicited by rChi/adjuvant in hamsters is required, it is believed that the construction of chimeric genes is an important attempt towards the generation of an effective vaccine against leptospirosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibody quality and protection from lethal Ebola virus challenge in nonhuman primates immunized with rabies virus based bivalent vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Blaney

    Full Text Available We have previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV vaccine platform based on (a replication-competent rabies virus (RABV, (b replication-deficient RABV, or (c chemically inactivated RABV expressing EBOV glycoprotein (GP. Mouse studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of these live or inactivated RABV/EBOV vaccines. Here, we evaluated these vaccines in nonhuman primates. Our results indicate that all three vaccines do induce potent immune responses against both RABV and EBOV, while the protection of immunized animals against EBOV was largely dependent on the quality of humoral immune response against EBOV GP. We also determined if the induced antibodies against EBOV GP differ in their target, affinity, or the isotype. Our results show that IgG1-biased humoral responses as well as high levels of GP-specific antibodies were beneficial for the control of EBOV infection after immunization. These results further support the concept that a successful EBOV vaccine needs to induce strong antibodies against EBOV. We also showed that a dual vaccine against RABV and filoviruses is achievable; therefore addressing concerns for the marketability of this urgently needed vaccine.

  19. L-Glutamine and L-arginine protect against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection via intestinal innate immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Ren, Wenkai; Fang, Jun; Hu, Chien-An Andy; Guan, Guiping; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yin, Jie; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Chen, Shuai; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) or arginine (Arg) supplementation is beneficial for intestinal health; however, whether Gln or Arg may confer protection against Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is not known. To address this, we used an ETEC-infected murine model to investigate the protective effects of Gln and Arg. Experimentally, we pre-treated mice with designed diet of Gln or Arg supplementation prior to the oral ETEC infection and then assessed mouse mortality and intestinal bacterial burden. We also determined the markers of intestinal innate immunity in treated mice, including secretory IgA response (SIgA), mucins from goblet cells, as well as antimicrobial peptides from Paneth cells. ETEC colonized in mouse small intestine, including duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, and inhibited the mRNA expression of intestinal immune factors, such as polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), cryptdin-related sequence 1C (CRS1C), and Reg3γ. We found that dietary Gln or Arg supplementation decreased bacterial colonization and promoted the activation of innate immunity (e.g., the mRNA expression of pIgR, CRS1C, and Reg3γ) in the intestine of ETEC-infected mice. Our results suggest that dietary arginine or glutamine supplementation may inhibit intestinal ETEC infection through intestinal innate immunity.

  20. Live non-invasive Shigella dysenteriae 1 strain induces homologous protective immunity in a guinea pig colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Soumik; Kumar, Ranajit; Chowdhury, Goutam; Rani Saha, Dhira; Wajima, Takeaki; Hamabata, Takashi; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Balakrish Nair, Gopinath; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Koley, Hemanta

    2011-10-01

    A non-invasive live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed from a Shiga toxin gene deleted mutant of Shigella dysenteriae 1 by introducing a plasmid vector pPR1347 that carried a lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene (rfb and rfc) of Salmonella typhimurium. In guinea pigs, four successive oral administrations of LTSH Δstx showed complete protection against rectal challenge with wild type S. dysenteriae 1 strain. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titer against lipopolysaccharide of LTSH Δstx was observed during immunization, peaked on day 28 and remained at that level until day 35 after the initiation of the immunization. In intestinal lavage of the immunized animals, significant increase of IgA titer against lipopolysaccharide of LTSH Δstx was also observed. These data suggested that LTSH Δstx could be a useful candidate to induce protective immunity against S. dysenteriae 1 infection. © 2011 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Th17/IL-17A might play a protective role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia immunity.

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    Iwona Hus

    Full Text Available Th17 cells, a recently discovered subset of T helper cells that secrete IL-17A, can affect the inflammation process autoimmune and cancer diseases development. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of Th17 cells and IL17A in biology of CLL. The study group included 294 untreated CLL patients in different clinical stages. Here, we show that higher Th17 and IL-17A values were associated with less advanced clinical stage of CLL. Th17 cells' percentages in PB were lower in patients who died due to CLL during follow-up due to CLL (as compared to surviving patients and in patients responding to first-line therapy with fludarabine-based regimens (as compared to non-responders. IL-17A inversely correlated with the time from CLL diagnosis to the start of therapy and was lower in patients who required treatment during follow-up. Th-17 and IL-17A values were lower in patients with adverse prognostic factors (17p and 11q deletion, CD38 and ZAP-70 expression. CLL patients with detectable IL-17A mRNA in T cells were in Rai Stage 0 and negative for both ZAP-70 and CD38 expression. Th17 percentages positively correlated with iNKT and adversely with Treg cells. The results of this study suggest that Th17 may play a beneficial role in CLL immunity.

  2. A Comparative study on the nonspecific immunity of juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei ever inhabiting freshwater and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xuying; Ding, Sen; Wang, Fang; Dong, Shuanglin

    2014-06-01

    A study on the nonspecific immunity of Litopenaeus vannamei ever inhabiting freshwater and seawater was carried out at different molt stages by comparing their total hemocyte count (THC) and respiratory burst (RB) and activity of phenol oxidase (PO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and lysozyme (LY). Two-way ANOVA showed that salinity and molt stage independently affected THC and RB and the activity of PO, NOS and LY of juvenile L. vannamei significantly ( P vannamei were significantly lower in freshwater than in seawater; whereas THC was significantly higher in freshwater than in seawater ( P vannamei was cultured in freshwater.

  3. Nanoparticle formulation enhanced protective immunity provoked by PYGPI8p-transamidase related protein (PyTAM) DNA vaccine in Plasmodium yoelii malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Mahamoud Sama; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Kodama, Yukinobu; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Helegbe, Gideon Kofi; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Ichinose, Akitoyo; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Yui, Katsuyuki; Tien, Nguyen Huy; Karbwang, Juntra; Hirayama, Kenji

    2014-04-07

    We have previously reported the new formulation of polyethylimine (PEI) with gamma polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) nanoparticle (NP) to have provided Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein-1 (PyMSP-1) plasmid DNA vaccine with enhanced protective cellular and humoral immunity in the lethal mouse malaria model. PyGPI8p-transamidase-related protein (PyTAM) was selected as a possible candidate vaccine antigen by using DNA vaccination screening from 29 GPI anchor and signal sequence motif positive genes picked up using web-based bioinformatics tools; though the observed protection was not complete. Here, we observed augmented protective effect of PyTAM DNA vaccine by using PEI and γ-PGA complex as delivery system. NP-coated PyTAM plasmid DNA immunized mice showed a significant survival rate from lethal P. yoelii challenge infection compared with naked PyTAM plasmid or with NP-coated empty plasmid DNA group. Antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2b subclass antibody levels, proportion of CD4 and CD8T cells producing IFN-γ in the splenocytes and IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α levels in the sera and in the supernatants from ex vivo splenocytes culture were all enhanced by the NP-coated PyTAM DNA vaccine. These data indicates that NP augments PyTAM protective immune response, and this enhancement was associated with increased DC activation and concomitant IL-12 production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Advantages of laparoscopic compared to conventional surgery are not related to an innate immune response of peritoneal immune activation: an animal study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingohr, Philipp; Dohmen, Jonas; Matthaei, Hanno; Schwandt, Timo; Stein, Kathy; Hong, Gun-Soo; Steitz, Julia; Longerich, Thomas; Bölke, Edwin; Wehner, Sven; Kalff, Jörg C

    2017-06-01

    Laparoscopic surgery (LS) has proved superior compared to conventional surgery (CS) regarding morbidity, length of hospital stay, rate of wound infection and time until recovery. An improved preservation of the postoperative immune function is assumed to contribute to these benefits though the role of the local peritoneal immune response is still poorly understood. Our study investigates the peritoneal immune response subsequent to abdominal surgery and compares it between laparoscopic and conventional surgery to find an immunological explanation for the clinically proven benefits of LS. Wistar rats (N = 140) underwent laparoscopic cecum resection (LCR; N = 28), conventional cecum resection (CCR; N = 28), laparoscopic sham operation (LSO; N = 28), conventional sham operation (CSO; N = 28), or no surgical treatment (CTRL; N = 28). Postoperatively, peritoneal lavages were performed, leukocytes isolated and analyzed regarding immune function and phagocytosis activity. Immune function was inhibited postoperatively in animals undergoing LCR or CCR compared to CTRL reflected by a lower TNF-α (CTRL 3956.65 pg/ml, LCR 2018.48 pg/ml (p = 0.023), CCR 2793.78 pg/ml (n.s.)) and IL-6 secretion (CTRL 625.84 pg/ml, LCR 142.84 pg/ml (p = 0.009), CCR 169.53 pg/ml (p = 0.01)). Phagocytosis was not affected in rats undergoing any kind of surgery compared to CTRL. Neither cytokine secretion nor phagocytosis activity differed significantly between laparoscopic and conventional surgery. According to our findings the benefits associated with LS compared to CS cannot be explained by differences in the postoperative peritoneal innate immune response. Further studies are needed to elucidate the causes for a more favorable postoperative outcome in patients after LS compared to CS.

  5. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans

    OpenAIRE

    Luis G.V. Fernandes; Teixeira, Aline F.; Antonio F.S. Filho; Gisele O. Souza; Silvio A. Vasconcellos; Marcos B Heinemann; Eliete C. ROMERO; Nascimento, Ana L. T. O.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pathogenic Leptospira is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a widely disseminated disease of human and veterinary concern. The development of vaccines that elicit cross-protective immunity through multiple leptospiral serovars has long been pursued. The aim of this study was to develop a novel chimeric multi-epitope fusion antigen, containing sequences of previously studied outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Leptospira. Methods: The chimeric protein was designed based on th...

  6. Long-term protective immunity from an influenza virus-like particle vaccine administered with a microneedle patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Hye Suk; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2013-09-01

    Skin vaccination with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) using microneedles has been shown to induce protection similar to or better than that induced by intramuscular immunization. In this study, we examined the long-term protective efficacy of influenza (H1N1 A/PR/8/34) VLPs after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with the vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin induced 100% protection against lethal challenge infection with influenza A/PR/8/34 virus 14 months after a single vaccine dose. Influenza virus-specific total IgG response and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers were maintained at high levels for over 1 year after microneedle vaccination. Microneedle vaccination also induced substantial levels of lung IgG and IgA antibody responses, and antibody-secreting plasma cells from spleen and bone marrow, as well as conferring effective control of lung viral loads, resulting in complete protection 14 months after vaccination. These strong and long-lasting immune responses were enabled in part by stabilization of the vaccine by formulation with trehalose during microneedle patch fabrication. Administration of the stabilized vaccine using microneedles was especially effective at enabling strong recall responses measured 4 days after lethal virus challenge, including increased HAI and antibody-secreting cells in the spleen and reduced viral titer and inflammatory response in the lung. The results in this study indicate that skin vaccination with VLP vaccine using a microneedle patch provides long-term protection against influenza in mice.

  7. An immune stimulating complex (iscom) subunit rabies vaccine protects dogs and mice against street rabies challenge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fekadu; J.H. Schaddock; J. Ekströ m; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D.W. Sanderlin; B. Sundquist; B. Morein (Bror)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractDogs and mice were immunized with either a rabies glycoprotein subunit vaccine incorporated into an immune stimulating complex (ISCOM) or a commercial human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV) prepared from a Pitman Moore (PM) rabies vaccine strain. Pre-exposure vaccination of mice with two

  8. Schistosoma Infection and Schistosoma-Derived Products Modulate the Immune Responses Associated with Protection against Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lian Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on parasite-induced immunoregulatory mechanisms could contribute to the development of new therapies for inflammatory diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D, which is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent elevated glucose levels due to insulin resistance. The association between previous Schistosoma infection and T2D has been confirmed—Schistosoma infection and Schistosoma-derived products modulate the immune system, including innate and acquired immune responses, contributing to T2D disease control. Schistosoma infections and Schistosoma-derived molecules affect the immune cell composition in adipose tissue, dampening inflammation and improving glucose tolerance. This protective role includes the polarization of immune cells to alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, eosinophils, and group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Furthermore, Schistosoma infection and Schistosoma products are effective for the treatment of T2D, as they increase the number of type 2 helper T cells (Th2 and regulatory T cells (Tregs and decrease type 1 helper T cells (Th1 and type 17 helper T cells (Th17 cells. Thus, our aim was to comprehensively review the mechanism through which Schistosoma infection and Schistosoma products modulate the immune response against T2D.

  9. Synergism/complementarity of recombinant adenoviral vectors and other vaccination platforms during induction of protective immunity against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Morais Martins Almeida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The lack of immunogenicity of most malaria antigens and the complex immune responses required for achieving protective immunity against this infectious disease have traditionally hampered the development of an efficient human malaria vaccine. The current boom in development of recombinant viral vectors and their use in prime-boost protocols that result in enhanced immune outcomes have increased the number of malaria vaccine candidates that access pre-clinical and clinical trials. In the frontline, adenoviruses and poxviruses seem to be giving the best immunization results in experimental animals and their mutual combination, or their combination with recombinant proteins (formulated in adjuvants and given in sequence or being given as protein/virus admixtures, has been shown to reach unprecedented levels of anti-malaria immunity that predictably will be somehow reproduced in the human setting. However, all this optimism was previously seen in the malaria vaccine development field without many real applicable results to date. We describe here the current state-of-the-art in the field of recombinant adenovirus research for malaria vaccine development, in particular referring to their use in combination with other immunogens in heterologous prime-boost protocols, while trying to simultaneously show our contributions and point of view on this subject.

  10. Altered adjuvant of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine improves immune response and protection from virus challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Eun Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD generally use oil adjuvants. For better immunization and safety, an adjuvant should be selected only after careful consideration. In this study, we produced vaccines for O, A, and Asia1 serotypes by mixing oil adjuvants, Emulsigen-D (ED, ISA 201, and ISA 206 with and without an aluminum hydroxide (AL gel and measured their immunogenicity and safety to obtain information regarding critical differences (survival or weight loss of vaccine quality in mice; the goal of this test was to overcome the difficulties associated with experiments large or medium-sized animals. The groups immunized with the vaccines containing only the oil adjuvants (ED, ISA 201, and ISA 206 had similar or higher levels of neutralizing antibodies and structural protein antibodies for the FMD virus (FMDV than the groups immunized with the vaccines including the oil adjuvants mixed with the gel. However, in a challenge test using a mouse model, the protection rate showed the highest results in ISA 201 and ISA 206 mixed with AL. The mice immunized with vaccines containing ED showed temporary weight loss in the early postvaccination stages. Cell-mediated immunity was formed relatively strongly in the group vaccinated with vaccines including ISA 201 and ISA 206. We proposed that combinations of these adjuvants represent candidates for future FMD vaccines.

  11. Immunization protected well nourished mice but not undernourished ones from lung injury in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection

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    da Cunha Maria

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant (MRSA has been frequently isolated from endotracheal and lung puncture aspirates in malnourished children with pneumonia. In this work we evaluated the susceptibility of undernourished BALB/c mice and its ability to mount a protective immunity against MRSA with emphasis on the lung involvement. Results BALB/c mice submitted to a 20% dietary restriction during 20 days presented a significant decrease in body weight, lymphocyte number and also atrophy in thymus and intestinal epithelium. Determination of bacterial load by the number of colony forming units (CFU indicated a similar susceptibility whereas the findings of Gram stain clearly suggested a higher amount of bacteria in the lungs of normal mice than in the undernourished ones. Immunization reduced bacterial growth in the lungs of normal mice but not in the undernourished ones. Histopathological analysis showed that inflammation appeared in the lungs from normal mice only after infection and that immunization prevented this pulmonary inflammatory process. On the other hand, undernourished mice presented lung inflammation even before infection. In addition, the degree of this inflammatory process did not change with infection or previous immunization. Conclusion Our results indicated that lung injury during MRSA infection is prevented by previous immunization in well nourished but not in undernourished mice.

  12. Trans-generational Immune Priming Protects the Eggs Only against Gram-Positive Bacteria in the Mealworm Beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Zanchi, Caroline; Boutet, Gwendoline; Moreau, Jérôme; Teixeira, Maria; Moret, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    In many vertebrates and invertebrates, offspring whose mothers have been exposed to pathogens can exhibit increased levels of immune activity and/or increased survival to infection. Such phenomena, called “Trans-generational immune priming” (TGIP) are expected to provide immune protection to the offspring. As the offspring and their mother may share the same environment, and consequently similar microbial threats, we expect the immune molecules present in the progeny to be specific to the microbes that immune challenged the mother. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that the antimicrobial activity found in the eggs is only active against Gram-positive bacteria, even when females were exposed to Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Fungi were weak inducers of TGIP while we obtained similar levels of anti-Gram-positive activity using different bacteria for the maternal challenge. Furthermore, we have identified an antibacterial peptide from the defensin family, the tenecin 1, which spectrum of activity is exclusively directed toward Gram-positive bacteria as potential contributor to this antimicrobial activity. We conclude that maternal transfer of antimicrobial activity in the eggs of T. molitor might have evolved from persistent Gram-positive bacterial pathogens between insect generations. PMID:26430786

  13. Trans-generational Immune Priming Protects the Eggs Only against Gram-Positive Bacteria in the Mealworm Beetle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Dubuffet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In many vertebrates and invertebrates, offspring whose mothers have been exposed to pathogens can exhibit increased levels of immune activity and/or increased survival to infection. Such phenomena, called "Trans-generational immune priming" (TGIP are expected to provide immune protection to the offspring. As the offspring and their mother may share the same environment, and consequently similar microbial threats, we expect the immune molecules present in the progeny to be specific to the microbes that immune challenged the mother. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that the antimicrobial activity found in the eggs is only active against Gram-positive bacteria, even when females were exposed to Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Fungi were weak inducers of TGIP while we obtained similar levels of anti-Gram-positive activity using different bacteria for the maternal challenge. Furthermore, we have identified an antibacterial peptide from the defensin family, the tenecin 1, which spectrum of activity is exclusively directed toward Gram-positive bacteria as potential contributor to this antimicrobial activity. We conclude that maternal transfer of antimicrobial activity in the eggs of T. molitor might have evolved from persistent Gram-positive bacterial pathogens between insect generations.

  14. Recombinant Kunjin virus replicon vaccines induce protective T-cell immunity against human papillomavirus 16 E7-expressing tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Karen A; Harvey, Tracey; Khromykh, Alexander A; Tindle, Robert W

    2004-02-20

    The persistence of the E7 oncoprotein in transformed cells in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical cancer provides a tumour-specific antigen to which immunotherapeutic strategies may be directed. Self-replicating RNA (replicon) vaccine vectors derived from the flavivirus Kunjin (KUN) have recently been reported to induce T-cell immunity. Here, we report that inclusion of a CTL epitope of HPV16 E7 protein into a polyepitope encoded by a KUN vector induced E7-directed T-cell responses and protected mice against challenge with an E7-expressing epithelial tumour. We found replicon RNA packaged into virus-like particles to be more effective than naked replicon RNA or plasmid DNA constructed to allow replicon RNA transcription in vivo. Protective immunity was induced although the E7 CTL epitope was subdominant in the context of other CTL epitopes in the polyepitope. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the KUN replicon vector system for inducing protective immunity directed towards a virally encoded human tumour-specific antigen, and for inducing multi-epitopic CTL responses.

  15. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  16. Passive immunization with anti-ActA and anti-listeriolysin O antibodies protects against Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Krisana; Sashinami, Hiroshi; Osanai, Arihiro; Hirose, Shouhei; Ono, Hisaya K; Narita, Kouji; Hu, Dong-Liang; Nakane, Akio

    2016-12-22

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that causes listeriosis. Due to its intracellular niche, L. monocytogenes has evolved to limit immune recognition and response to infection. Antibodies that are slightly induced by listerial infection are completely unable to protect re-infection of L. monocytogenes. Thus, a role of antibody on the protective effect against L. monocytogenes infection has been neglected for a long time. In the present study, we reported that passive immunization with an excessive amount of antibodies against ActA and listeriolysin O (LLO) attenuates severity of L. monocytogenes infection. Combination of these antibodies improved survival of L. monocytogenes infected mice. Bacterial load in spleen and liver of listerial infected mice and infected RAW264.7 cells were significantly reduced by administration of anti-ActA and anti-LLO antibodies. In addition, anti-LLO antibody neutralized LLO activity and inhibited the bacterial escape from the lysosomal compartments. Moreover, anti-ActA antibody neutralized ActA activity and suppressed actin tail formation and cell-to-cell spread. Thus, our studies reveal that passive immunization with the excessive amount of anti-ActA and -LLO antibodies has potential to provide the protective effect against listerial infection.

  17. Broadly protective immunity against divergent influenza viruses by oral co-administration of Lactococcus lactis expressing nucleoprotein adjuvanted with cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Jiao, Huifeng; Zhao, Daxian; Ouyang, Jiexiu

    2015-08-05

    Current influenza vaccines need to be annually reformulated to well match the predicated circulating strains. Thus, it is critical for developing a novel universal influenza vaccine that would be able to confer cross-protection against constantly emerging divergent influenza virus strains. Influenza virus A is a genus of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses. Influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) is a structural protein which encapsidates the negative strand viral RNA, and anti-NP antibodies play role in cross-protective immunity. Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is an ideal vaccine delivery vehicle via oral administration route. However, L. lactis vectored vaccine exhibits poor immunogenicity without the use of mucosal adjuvant. To enhance the immunogenicity of L. lactis vectored vaccine, cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit, one of mucosal adjuvants, is a safe adjuvant for oral route, when combined with L. lactis vectored vaccine. In this study, we hypothesized that pNZ8008, a L. lactis expression plasmid, encoding NP antigen, would be able to elicit cross-protection with the use of CTB via oral administration route. To construct L. lactis vectored vaccine, nucleoprotein (NP) gene of A/California/04/2009(H1N1) was sub-cloned into a L. lactis expression plasmid, pNZ8008. The expression of recombinant L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP was confirmed by Western blot, immunofluorescence assay and flow cytometric analysis. Further, immunogenicity of L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP alone or adjuvanted with cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit was evaluated in a mouse model via oral administration route. Antibodies responses were detected by ELISA. The result indicated that oral administration of L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP adjuvanted with CTB could elicit significant humoral and mucosal immune responses, as well as cellular immune response, compared with L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP alone. To further assess the cross-protective immunity of L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP adjuvanted with CTB, we used L. lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-HA1 alone or

  18. Mice Develop Effective but Delayed Protective Immune Responses When Immunized as Neonates either Intranasally with Nonliving VP6/LT(R192G) or Orally with Live Rhesus Rotavirus Vaccine Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    VanCott, John L.; Prada, Anne E.; McNeal, Monica M.; Stone, Susan C.; Basu, Mitali; Huffer, Bert; Smiley, Kristi L.; Shao, Mingyuan; Bean, Judy A.; Clements, John D.; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Ward, Richard L.

    2006-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccines are delivered early in life, when the immune system is immature. To determine the effects of immaturity on responses to candidate vaccines, neonatal (7 days old) and adult mice were immunized with single doses of either Escherichia coli-expressed rotavirus VP6 protein and the adjuvant LT(R192G) or live rhesus rotavirus (RRV), and protection against fecal rotavirus shedding following challenge with the murine rotavirus strain EDIM was determined. Neonatal mice immunized intr...

  19. Plant-produced Zika virus envelope protein elicits neutralizing immune responses that correlate with protective immunity against Zika virus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Haiyan; Lai, Huafang; Hurtado, Jonathan; Chen, Qiang

    2017-07-15

    The global Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak and its link to foetal and newborn microcephaly and severe neurological complications in adults call for the urgent development of ZIKV vaccines. In response, we developed a subunit vaccine based on the ZIKV envelope (E) protein and investigated its immunogenicity in mice. Transient expression of ZIKV E (zE) resulted in its rapid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Biochemical analysis revealed that plant-produced ZIKV E (PzE) exhibited specific binding to a panel of monoclonal antibodies that recognize various zE conformational epitopes. Furthermore, PzE can be purified to >90% homogeneity with a one-step Ni2+ affinity chromatography process. PzE are found to be highly immunogenic, as two doses of PzE elicited both potent zE-specific antibody and cellular immune responses in mice. The delivery of PzE with alum induced a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response, as the antigen-specific IgG isotypes were a mixture of high levels of IgG1/IgG2c and splenocyte cultures from immunized mice secreted significant levels of IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-6. Most importantly, the titres of zE-specific and neutralizing antibodies exceeded the threshold that correlates with protective immunity against multiple strains of ZIKV. Thus, our results demonstrated the feasibility of plant-produced ZIKV protein antigen as effective, safe and affordable vaccines against ZIKV. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  1. Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  2. Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster by Intramuscular Immunization with an Autographa californica Baculovirus Driving the Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Dulce María Meneses-Ruiz; Hugo Aguilar-Diaz; Raúl José Bobes; Alicia Sampieri; Luis Vaca; Juan Pedro Laclette; Julio César Carrero

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that oral immunization using Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment (AcNPV-LC3) of Entamoeba histolytica conferred protection against ALA development in hamsters. In this study, we determined the ability of AcNPV-LC3 to protect against ALA by the intramuscular route as well as the liver immune response associated with protection. Results showed that 55% of hamsters IM immunized with AcNPV-LC3 showed sterile...

  3. Recombinant TgHSP70 Immunization Protects against Toxoplasma gondii Brain Cyst Formation by Enhancing Inducible Nitric Oxide Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neide M. Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause congenital infection in humans and animals and severe disease in immunocompromised individuals; consequently development of vaccines against the parasite is highly necessary. Under stress conditions, T. gondii expresses the highly immunogenic heat shock protein 70 (TgHSP70. Here, we assessed the protective efficacy of rTgHSP70 immunization combined with Alum in oral ME-49 T. gondii infection and the mechanisms involved on it. It was obser