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Sample records for compacted clay layer

  1. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.W.W.; Chen, Z.K.; Coo, J.L.; Chen, R.; Zhou, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Explore feasibility of unsaturated clay as a gas barrier in landfill cover. • Gas breakthrough pressure increases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • Gas emission rate decreases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • A 0.6 m-thick clay layer may be sufficient to meet gas emission rate limit. - Abstract: Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas–water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different

  2. Gas breakthrough and emission through unsaturated compacted clay in landfill final cover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.W.W.; Chen, Z.K.; Coo, J.L. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Chen, R., E-mail: chenrui1005@hotmail.com [Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Urban and Civil Engineering for Disaster Prevention and Mitigation, Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explore feasibility of unsaturated clay as a gas barrier in landfill cover. • Gas breakthrough pressure increases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • Gas emission rate decreases with clay thickness and degree of saturation. • A 0.6 m-thick clay layer may be sufficient to meet gas emission rate limit. - Abstract: Determination of gas transport parameters in compacted clay plays a vital role for evaluating the effectiveness of soil barriers. The gas breakthrough pressure has been widely studied for saturated swelling clay buffer commonly used in high-level radioactive waste disposal facility where the generated gas pressure is very high (in the order of MPa). However, compacted clay in landfill cover is usually unsaturated and the generated landfill gas pressure is normally low (typically less than 10 kPa). Furthermore, effects of clay thickness and degree of saturation on gas breakthrough and emission rate in the context of unsaturated landfill cover has not been quantitatively investigated in previous studies. The feasibility of using unsaturated compacted clay as gas barrier in landfill covers is thus worthwhile to be explored over a wide range of landfill gas pressures under various degrees of saturation and clay thicknesses. In this study, to evaluate the effectiveness of unsaturated compacted clay to minimize gas emission, one-dimensional soil column tests were carried out on unsaturated compacted clay to determine gas breakthrough pressures at ultimate limit state (high pressure range) and gas emission rates at serviceability limit state (low pressure range). Various degrees of saturation and thicknesses of unsaturated clay sample were considered. Moreover, numerical simulations were carried out using a coupled gas–water flow finite element program (CODE-BRIGHT) to better understand the experimental results by extending the clay thickness and varying the degree of saturation to a broader range that is typical at different

  3. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  4. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  5. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F.

    2007-11-01

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  6. Effects of biochar on hydraulic conductivity of compacted kaolin clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Wong, Annie Yan Yan; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2018-03-01

    Compacted clay is widely used as capillary barriers in landfill final cover system. Recently, biochar amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as a sustainable alternative cover material. However, the effects of biochar on saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ) of clay with high degree of compaction is not yet understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of biochar on k sat of compacted kaolin clay. Soil specimens were prepared by amending kaolin clay with biochar derived from peanut-shell at 0, 5 and 20% (w/w). The k sat of soil specimens was measured using a flexible water permeameter. The effects of biochar on the microstructure of the compacted clay was also investigated using MIP. Adding 5% and 20% of biochar increased the k sat of compacted kaolin clay from 1.2 × 10 -9 to 2.1 × 10 -9 and 1.3 × 10 -8 ms -1 , respectively. The increase in k sat of clay was due to the shift in pore size distribution of compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC). MIP results revealed that adding 20% of biochar shifted the dominant pore diameter of clay from 0.01-0.1 μm (meso- and macropores) to 0.1-4 μm (macropores). Results reported in this communication revealed that biochar application increased the k sat of compacted clay, and the increment was positively correlated to the biochar percentage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Permeability response of oil-contaminated compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, V.; Mikhail, N.; Soulie, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation on the behavior of motor oil-contaminated, partially saturated compacted clays. For the study, both a natural clay and an artificially purified kaolinite, contaminated with 0 to 8% of motor oil, were firstly compacted following the ASTM standard procedure. Secondly, permeability tests were carried out in a triaxial cell on 10 cm-diameter compacted clay specimens. The results of the investigation indicate that increasing percentages of motor oil decrease both the optimum water content and the optimum dry density of the two clays. However, whereas the optimum water content on the average decreases by about 6% when the percentage contamination increases from 0 to 8%, the corresponding decrease in the optimum dry density is less than 3%. Even though the optimum dry density decreases as the percentage of oil increases from 0 to 8%, there is, however, a range in oil content varying between 2 and 4% for which the optimum dry density is slightly greater than that of the untreated soils. As far as the permeability tests are concerned, the results indicate that as the percentage of oil increases, the coefficient of permeability decreases substantially, especially for clay specimens which were initially compacted on the dry side of optimum

  8. Effect of Compaction on Compressive Strength of Unfired Clay Blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakho, N.A.; Zardari, M.A.; Pathan, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the possible use of unfired compacted clay blocks as a substitute of CSEB (Compressed Stabilized Earth Blocks) for the construction of economical houses. Cubes of 150 mm size were cut from the clay blocks which were compacted at various intensities of pressure during the casting. The results show that the compressive strength of the clay cubes increased with the compacting pressure to which the blocks were subjected during casting. The average crushing strength of the cubes, sawed from clay blocks that were subjected to compacting pressure of 7.2 MPa, was found to be 4.4 MPa. This value of compressive strength is about 50 percent more than that of normal CSEB. This study shows that the compacted clay blocks could be used as economical walling material as replacement of CSEB. (author)

  9. Mean electrostatic and Poisson-Boltzmann models for multicomponent transport through compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steefel, C.I.; Galindez, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Electrical double layer effects in the pore space of clays become increasingly important as the level of compaction increases and intergrain and interlayer spacings shift towards the range of nano-meters. At such scales, solute transport can no longer be explained by concentration gradients alone and it becomes necessary to include the electrostatic effects on chemical potentials. In fact, the electrical double layer (EDL) that develops in the neighborhood of the negatively charged clay surfaces can extend well into the aqueous phase, effectively constraining the space available to anions (known as anion exclusion), thus distorting the spatial distribution of ionic species in solution. In this study, we make use of two approaches for addressing the accumulation and transport of charged ionic species in the electrical double layers of compacted bentonite: 1) a mean electrostatic approach based on the assumption of Donnan equilibrium, and 2) a 2D numerical approach based on the multicomponent Poisson-Nernst-Planck (NPP) set of equations. For the mean electrostatic or Donnan approach to the electrical double layer [1], two options are considered: 1) a model in which surface complexation in the Stern layer may partly balance the fixed charge of the montmorillonite making up the bentonite buffer, and 2) a model in which the fixed mineral charge is balanced completely by the diffuse layer. In the mean electrostatic approach, one additional equation that balances the charge between the Stern layer and the diffuse layer is added to the multicomponent reactive transport code CrunchFlow. The only additional unknown that is required is the mean electrostatic potential, although it may be necessary in certain cases to consider the volume (or width) of the electrical double layer as an additional implicit unknown. Both ions and neutral species may diffuse within the diffuse layer according to their gradients and species

  10. The effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.; Anderson, L.; Caliendo, J.; McFarland, M.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the detrimental effects of freeze-thaw on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that molding water content has on the hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay soil that is subjected to freeze-thaw cycles, and to determine the relationship between the number of freeze-thaw cycles and the hydraulic conductivity of the compacted clay soil. Clay soils compacted and frozen wet of optimum experienced an increase in hydraulic conductivity of approximately 140 fold. The hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increased ten fold. These results are consistent with recent research which suggests that clay compacted wet of optimum experiences large increases in hydraulic conductivity while the hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increases to a lesser extent. 12 refs., 9 figs

  11. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Compressive Strength of Compacted Clay-Sand Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faseel Suleman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sand to improve the strength of natural clays provides a viable alternative for civil infrastructure construction involving earthwork. The main objective of this note was to investigate the compressive strength of compacted clay-sand mixes. A natural clay of high plasticity was mixed with 20% and 40% sand (SP and their compaction and strength properties were determined. Results indicated that the investigated materials exhibited a brittle behaviour on the dry side of optimum and a ductile behaviour on the wet side of optimum. For each material, the compressive strength increased with an increase in density following a power law function. Conversely, the compressive strength increased with decreasing water content of the material following a similar function. Finally, the compressive strength decreased with an increase in sand content because of increased material heterogeneity and loss of sand grains from the sides during shearing.

  13. Compaction of microfossil and clay-rich chalk sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microfossils and clay in the compaction of chalk facies sediments. To meet this aim, chalk sediments with varying micro texture were studied. The sediments have been tested uniaxially confined in a stainless-steel compaction cell. The sediments are......: 1) Pure carbonate chalk with mudstone texture from Stevns Klint (Denmark), 2) Relatively pure chalk sediments with varying content of microfossils from the Ontong Java Plateau (Western Pacific), 3) Clay-rich chalk and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The tested samples were characterised...

  14. Clastic compaction unit classification based on clay content and integrated compaction recovery using well and seismic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Hong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Compaction correction is a key part of paleo-geomorphic recovery methods. Yet, the influence of lithology on the porosity evolution is not usually taken into account. Present methods merely classify the lithologies as sandstone and mudstone to undertake separate porosity-depth compaction modeling. However, using just two lithologies is an oversimplification that cannot represent the compaction history. In such schemes, the precision of the compaction recovery is inadequate. To improve the precision of compaction recovery, a depth compaction model has been proposed that involves both porosity and clay content. A clastic lithological compaction unit classification method, based on clay content, has been designed to identify lithological boundaries and establish sets of compaction units. Also, on the basis of the clastic compaction unit classification, two methods of compaction recovery that integrate well and seismic data are employed to extrapolate well-based compaction information outward along seismic lines and recover the paleo-topography of the clastic strata in the region. The examples presented here show that a better understanding of paleo-geomorphology can be gained by applying the proposed compaction recovery technology.

  15. Effect of temperature on volume change behaviour of statically compacted kaolin clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileme Ogechi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several soils are subjected to high temperature due to the environment where they are located or activities around them. For instance, upper layer of soils in tropical regions, soils around geothermal structures, clay barriers around nuclear waste repository systems. Numerous studies have pointed out that high temperature affects the hydro-mechanical properties of soils. Notwithstanding already existing studies, the influence of temperature on soils is still a challenge, as most of these studies are soil specific and cannot be inferred as the behaviour of all soils. This paper presents an experimental study on the influence of temperature on the volume change behaviour of statically compacted kaolin clay. Compacted samples were tested at varying temperatures using a suction controlled oedometer cell. The influence of temperature on the magnitude of volumetric strain occurring during mechanical and thermal loading was investigated. The study showed that an increase in temperature increased the magnitude of volumetric strain of the soil on loading. Additionally, the results presented in the light of LC curve showed that an increase in temperature resulted in the contraction and a change in the position of the LC curve.

  16. Procedures and apparatus for measuring diffusion and distribution coefficients in compacted clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, H B

    1993-12-01

    Diffusion and distribution coefficients are needed to assess the migration of radionuclides through the compacted clay-based buffer and backfill materials proposed for use in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. This report describes the techniques used to measure these coefficients. Both steady-state and transient diffusion experiments are discussed. The procedures used to prepare the clay plug, assemble the cell, conduct the experiment and calculate the results are described. In addition, methods for obtaining distribution coefficients for radionuclides on both loose and compacted clays are discussed. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs.

  17. Procedures and apparatus for measuring diffusion and distribution coefficients in compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, H.B.

    1993-12-01

    Diffusion and distribution coefficients are needed to assess the migration of radionuclides through the compacted clay-based buffer and backfill materials proposed for use in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. This report describes the techniques used to measure these coefficients. Both steady-state and transient diffusion experiments are discussed. The procedures used to prepare the clay plug, assemble the cell, conduct the experiment and calculate the results are described. In addition, methods for obtaining distribution coefficients for radionuclides on both loose and compacted clays are discussed. (author). 18 refs., 3 tabs., 16 figs

  18. A study on water infiltration barriers with compacted layered soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Y.; Komori, K.; Fujiwara, A.

    1993-01-01

    In shallow-ground disposal of low-level radioactive wastes, water movements due to natural processes in the soil covering the disposal facility must be properly controlled. A capillary barrier with compacted layered soils can provide an effective means of controlling water movement in the soil covering placed on a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. An experiment was performed to determine the effectiveness of a full-scale fill as a capillary barrier. The fill used in the experiment was constructed of compacted layers of clay, fine sand, and gravel. Man-made rain was caused to fall on the surfaces of the fill to observe the infiltration of rainwater into the fill and to measure the amount of water drained from within. The experiment established the effectiveness of the capillary barrier

  19. EFFECTS OF INORGANIC SALT SOLUTION ON SOME PROPERTIES OF COMPACTED CLAY LINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHALID R. MAHMOOD AL-JANABI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Processed and natural clays are widely used to create impermeable liners in solid waste disposal landfills. The engineering properties of clay liners can be significantly affected by the leachate from the waste mass. In this study, the effect of inorganic salt solutions will be investigated. These solutions used at different concentrations. Two type of inorganic salt MnSO4 and FeCl3 are used at different concentration 2%,5%, 10%. Clay used in this study was the CL- clay (kaolinite. The results show that the consistency limits and unconfined compressive strength increased as the concentration of salts increased. While the permeability tends to decrease as salt concentration increased. Also, the compression index decreases as the concentration increased from 2% to 5%. The swelling index tends to increase slightly as the concentration of MnSO4 increased, while its decrease as the concentration of FeCl3. In this paper, it is aimed to investigate the performance of compacted clay liner exposed to the certain chemicals generated by the leachate and their effects on the geotechnical properties of compacted clay liner such consistency limits, permeability coefficient, compressibility characteristics and unconfined compressive strength.

  20. Electric Resistance Tests on Compacted Clay Material under Dynamic Load Coupled with Dry-Wet Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of compacted clay material under dynamic load coupled with dry-wet cycling is one of the most important areas in the field of transportation. In this paper, experiments in terms of compacted clay under dynamic load coupled with dry-wet cycling are performed, and synchronous resistivity tests are also conducted. According to the test results, the influences of cumulative plastic strain, dry-wet cycles, and amplitudes on the soil resistivity are analyzed. Then a new damage factor based on resistivity is proposed to evaluate the long-term performance of compacted clay material. The result of research shows that the evolution of the soil resistivity can be divided into two stages, which has a contrary tendency with that of cumulative plastic strain. The dry-wet cycles and amplitudes have a significant effect on the damage of the compacted soil, which indicates that the dry-wet cycling of compacted soil materials should not be ignored in road engineering, especially in rainy and humid areas.

  1. Discrete analysis of clay layer tensile strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.N.H.; Ple, O.; Villard, P.; Gourc, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used to investigate the tensile behaviour and cracks mechanisms of a clay material submitted to bending loading. It is the case of compacted clay liners in landfill cap cover application. Such as the soil tested in this study is plastic clay, the distinct elements model was calibrated with previous data results by taking into account cohesive properties. Various contact and cohesion laws are tested to show that the numerical model is able to reproduce the failure mechanism. Numerical results are extending to simulate a landfill cap cover and comparing to experimental large scale field bending tests achieved in a real site of storage. (authors)

  2. Permeability Characteristics of Compacted and Stabilized Clay with Cement, Peat Ash and Silica Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Esmaeil Mousavi; Leong Sing Wong

    2016-01-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of stabilization with cement, peat ash, and silica sand on permeability coefficient (kv) of compacted clay, using a novel approach to stabilize the clay with peat ash as a supplementary material of cement in the compacted and stabilized soil. In order to assess the mentioned influence, test specimens of both untreated and stabilized soil have been tested in the laboratory so that their permeability could be evaluated. Falling head and one dimension...

  3. Mechanical interaction between swelling compacted clay and fractured rock, and the leaching of clay colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grindrod, P.; Peletier, M.A.; Takase, H.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the interaction between a saturated clay buffer layer and a fractured crystalline rock engineered disturbed zone. Once saturated, the clay extrudes into the available rock fractures, behaving as a compressible non-Newtonian fluid. We discuss the modelling implications of published

  4. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jen Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropyleneamine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  5. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  6. Microbial incidence on copper and titanium embedded in compacted bentonite clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Joergen; Lydmark, Sara; Edlund, Johanna; Paeaejaervi, Anna; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    The incidence of bacteria on metal surfaces was examined in an experimental setting simulating conditions of the proposed Swedish concept for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Titanium and copper rods were embedded in compacted bentonite clay saturated with groundwater collected at a depth of 450 m. Bentonite blocks were exposed to an external flux of groundwater with or without added lactate or H{sub 2} for up to 203 days. Bacterial accumulation on metal rods and in the surrounding bentonite was analyzed using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), with genetic markers for overall bacterial presence (16S rDNA) as well as specific for sulfate-reducing bacteria (apsA). Clay species composition was analyzed by cloning and sequencing 16S rDNA extracted from the clay. Results suggest limited bacterial accumulation on metal surfaces, amounting to a maximum of approximately 106 apsA copies cm-2, corresponding to a 3.7% coverage of metal surfaces. Bacterial species composition appeared to be a mix of species originating from the bentonite clay and from the added groundwater, including an apparently high proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria. While titanium surfaces exhibited higher bacterial presence than did copper surfaces, neither the degree of bentonite compaction nor the addition of lactate or H{sub 2} appeared to have any effect on the bacterial incidence on metal surfaces

  7. Microbial incidence on copper and titanium embedded in compacted bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Joergen; Lydmark, Sara; Edlund, Johanna; Paeaejaervi, Anna; Pedersen, Karsten

    2011-10-01

    The incidence of bacteria on metal surfaces was examined in an experimental setting simulating conditions of the proposed Swedish concept for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Titanium and copper rods were embedded in compacted bentonite clay saturated with groundwater collected at a depth of 450 m. Bentonite blocks were exposed to an external flux of groundwater with or without added lactate or H 2 for up to 203 days. Bacterial accumulation on metal rods and in the surrounding bentonite was analyzed using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), with genetic markers for overall bacterial presence (16S rDNA) as well as specific for sulfate-reducing bacteria (apsA). Clay species composition was analyzed by cloning and sequencing 16S rDNA extracted from the clay. Results suggest limited bacterial accumulation on metal surfaces, amounting to a maximum of approximately 10 6 apsA copies cm -2 , corresponding to a 3.7% coverage of metal surfaces. Bacterial species composition appeared to be a mix of species originating from the bentonite clay and from the added groundwater, including an apparently high proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria. While titanium surfaces exhibited higher bacterial presence than did copper surfaces, neither the degree of bentonite compaction nor the addition of lactate or H 2 appeared to have any effect on the bacterial incidence on metal surfaces

  8. Feasibility of using overburden clays for sealing purposes and laboratory testing of the clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, J. (Vyzkumny Ustav pro Hnede Uhli, Most (Czechoslovakia))

    1992-03-01

    Studies properties of overburden clay from North Bohemian surface coal mines for use as sealants of industrial and household waste that will be dumped at Czechoslovak surface mine sites. Basic requirements of sealing layers are optimum compressibility and impermeability by suitable compacting. Laboratory soil mechanical tests of different clay samples were carried out using the Proctor standard tests (PCS) and the Norwegian Geonor A/S - m 45 instrument. Laboratory tests were used to select the best available clay types with optimum density and moisture content. Experimental results of laboratory tests are provided.

  9. Reduction of cracking and shrinkage in compressed clay beams during dying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakho, N.A.; Zardari, M.A.; Memon, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled evaporation of moisture from compressed clay beams can cause surface cracks, resulting in reduction of strength. This paper presents various treatments applied to clay beams during the process of casting, compacting and drying in order to curtail the possibility of cracking and to decrease percentage of drying shrinkage. Following treatments were applied to the beams during casting and drying: (i) a steel plate and double layer of plastic sheet was provided between the beam and the plank, (ii) the beam was enveloped with a propylene fabric sheet during casting and (iii) beams were covered with plastic sheet during drying. Using these treatments, the clay beams were cast and compacted at various intensities of compaction. The results show that the drying shrinkage was reduced to minimum and the cracks were curtailed. The rate of drying shrinkage was decreased depending upon the level of compaction. Thus at the higher degree of compaction, more density of clay beams was achieved, which resulted in higher degree of compressive strength in baked and unbaked state. (author)

  10. Hydraulic performance of compacted clay liners under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaeef, A A; Rayhani, M T

    2015-10-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) are commonly used as hydraulic barriers in several landfill applications to isolate contaminants from the surrounding environment and minimize the escape of leachate from the landfill. Prior to waste placement in landfills, CCLs are often exposed to temperature fluctuations which can affect the hydraulic performance of the liner. Experimental research was carried out to evaluate the effects of daily thermal cycles on the hydraulic performance of CCLs under simulated landfill conditions. Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on different soil specimens after being exposed to various thermal and dehydration cycles. An increase in the CCL hydraulic conductivity of up to one order of magnitude was recorded after 30 thermal cycles for soils with low plasticity index (PI = 9.5%). However, medium (PI = 25%) and high (PI = 37.2%) plasticity soils did not show significant hydraulic deviation due to their self-healing potential. Overlaying the CCL with a cover layer minimized the effects of daily thermal cycles, and maintained stable hydraulic performance in the CCLs even after exposure to 60 thermal cycles. Wet-dry cycles had a significant impact on the hydraulic aspect of low plasticity CCLs. However, medium and high plasticity CCLs maintained constant hydraulic performance throughout the test intervals. The study underscores the importance of protecting the CCL from exposure to atmosphere through covering it by a layer of geomembrane or an interim soil layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disposal of radioactive waste into clay layers the most natural option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetsle, L.H.; Bonne, A.

    1990-01-01

    Among the geological formations suitable for the disposal of radioactive waste, the clay formations provide outstanding opportunities : impermeable for water, self-healing, strongly absorbing for ions, widespread in nature. The self-healing properties of large clay deposits have been demonstrated by their auto-sealing and plastic response to tectonic stress and magmatic intrusion. The discovery of fossil trees preserved after geologic periods of burial in clay is one of the most dramatic illustrations of their entombment ability. The physicochemical and hydrologic characteristics of the Boom clay are very favorable for the confinement of migrating radionuclides within the layer. Except for the extremely long half-lives ( 237 Np, 129 I,...) no radionuclide can escape from the clay body. The effects of heat, metal corrosion, material interaction and biochemical degradation on the natural properties of the clay layer are discussed in some detail and related to the natural properties of the clay formation which have to stay unaltered for geologic periods. The first Safety Assessment Report, established by NIRAS-ONDRAF in close collaboration with SCK-CEN, has been submitted to a multi-disciplinary task force which is to advise the Belgian Government on the suitability of the Boom clay layer below the Nuclear Research site of Mol as a potential host formation for nuclear waste coming from the electronuclear program. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. SPRAYED CLAY TECHNOLOGY FOR THE DEEP REPOSITORY OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hausmannová

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sealing barrier will play very important role in the Czech disposal concept of high level radioactive waste. It follows Swedish SKB3 design where granitic rock environment will host the repository. Swelling clay based materials as the most favorable for sealing purposes were selected. Such clays must fulfill certain requirements (e.g. on swelling properties, hydraulic conductivity or plasticity and must be stable for thousands of years. Better sealing behavior is obtained when the clay is compacted. Technology of the seal construction can vary according to its target dry density. Very high dry density is needed for buffer (sealing around entire canister with radioactive waste. Less strict requirements are on material backfilling the access galleries. It allows compaction to lower dry density than in case of buffer. One of potential technology for backfilling is to compact clay layers in most of the gallery profile by common compaction machines (rollers etc. and to spray clay into the uppermost part afterwards. The paper introduces the research works on sprayed clay technology performed at the Centre of Experimental Geotechnics of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Large scale in situ demonstration of filling of short drift in the Josef Gallery is also mentioned.

  13. Investigating the swelling pressure of compacted crushed-Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C. S.; Tang, A. M.; Cui, Y. J.; Delage, P.; Schroeder, C.; De Laure, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the swelling pressure of heavily compacted crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone at a dry unit mass ρ d =2.0 Mg/m 3 using four different methods: constant-volume, swell-reload, zero-swell and adjusted constant-volume method. Results show that the swelling pressure varies in the range of 1-5 MPa and depends significantly on the test method. From the constant-volume tests, it is observed that the swelling behavior during wetting is a function of the suction and depends on both the hydration paths and wetting conditions (e.g. vapor-wetting or liquid-wetting). The swelling pressure decreases significantly with saturation time. To identify the microstructure changes of specimens before and after wetting, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests were performed. It is observed that, after wetting, the large inter-aggregate pores observed in the as-compacted specimen are no longer apparent; the whole pattern is characterized by a general swell of hydrated clay particles, rendering the soil more homogenous. Results from MIP indicated that wetting caused a significant reduction of the entrance diameter of the dominant inter-aggregate pores from 2.1 to 0.5μm whereas intra-aggregate pores were not significantly influenced. (authors)

  14. Influence of coupling phenomena on the transport through compacted clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosanne, M.; Koudina, N.; Adler, P.M. [IPGP, Paris (France); Tevissen, E. [ANDRA, Dept. Etude-Experimentation et Calcul, Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2001-07-01

    Our principal motivation was to study the influence of the coupling phenomena on transport through compacted clays. Coupled transports may occur when a pressure gradient {nabla}P, and electrical field E and a concentration gradient {nabla}C interact. These three gradients induce three fluxes. A flow is generated characterized by the seepage velocity U; a solute flux J{sub L} and a current density I are generated. Close to equilibrium, when the gradients are not to large, the problem is linear and the fluxes are linear functions of the gradients. A first series of experiments was performed with argillite to determine the diagonal properties, i.e., permeability, conductivity, and diffusion coefficient. In a second series of experiments, the voltage resulting from an imposed concentration gradient between two reservoirs separated by a clay sample was systematically measured; this corresponds to the coefficient L{sub 13}. (orig.)

  15. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  16. High-pressure gas-breakthrough apparatus and a procedure for determining the gas-breakthrough pressure of compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, H.B.

    1997-08-01

    Gas may be produced in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Given that the vault will be sealed with clay-based materials, the fate of the gas is uncertain. Therefore, an instrument was previously built to measure the pressure required to pass gas through compacted clay materials (a gas-breakthrough apparatus). However, the 10 MPa pressure limit of the apparatus was insufficient to test compacted buffer material at the density proposed in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Therefore, a high-pressure (50 Wa) gas-breakthrough apparatus was designed, constructed and installed. This report describes the components of the apparatus and the materials and procedures that are used for the gas-breakthrough tests. (author)

  17. Transport and leaching of technetium and uranium from spent UO2 fuel in compacted bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Albinsson, Y.; Skaalberg, M.; Eklund, U.B.; Kjellberg, L.; Werme, L.

    2000-01-01

    The transport properties of Tc and U in compacted bentonite clay and the leaching behaviour of these elements from spent nuclear fuel in the same system were investigated. Pieces of spent UO 2 fuel were embedded in bentonite clay (ρ d =2100 kg/m 3 ). A low saline synthetic groundwater was used as the aqueous phase. After certain experimental times, the bentonite clay was cut into 0.1 mm thick slices, which were analysed for their content of Tc and U. Measurements were made using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Tc analysis comprised chemical separation. The analysis of U was done by means of detecting 236 U, since the natural content of U in bentonite clay made it impossible to distinguish between U originating from the fuel and the clay. The influence of different additives mixed into the clay was studied. The results showed an influence on both transport and leaching behaviour when metallic Fe was mixed into the clay. This indicates that Tc and U are reduced to their lower oxidation states as a result of this additive

  18. Numerical simulation of mechanical compaction of deepwater shallow sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Wu, Shiguo; Deng, Jingen; Lin, Hai; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Jiliang; Gao, Jinwei

    2018-02-01

    To study the compaction law and overpressure evolution in deepwater shallow sediments, a large-strain compaction model that considers material nonlinearity and moving boundary is formulated. The model considers the dependence of permeability and material properties on void ratio. The modified Cam-Clay model is selected as the constitutive relations of the sediments, and the deactivation/reactivation method is used to capture the moving top surface during the deposition process. A one-dimensional model is used to study the compaction law of the shallow sediments. Results show that the settlement of the shallow sediments is large under their own weight during compaction. The void ratio decreases strictly with burial depth and decreases more quickly near the seafloor than in the deeper layers. The generation of abnormal pressure in the shallow flow sands is closely related to the compaction law of shallow sediments. The two main factors that affect the generation of overpressure in the sands are deposition rate and permeability of overlying clay sediments. Overpressure increases with an increase in deposition rate and a decrease in the permeability of the overlying clay sediment. Moreover, an upper limit for the overpressure exists. A two-dimensional model is used to study the differential compaction of the shallow sediments. The pore pressure will still increase due to the inflow of the pore fluid from the neighboring clay sediment even though the deposition process is interrupted.

  19. A mechanistic study of the uniform corrosion of copper in compacted clay-sand soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litke, C.D.; Ryan, S.R.; King, F.

    1992-08-01

    The results of a study of the mechanism of uniform corrosion of copper under simulated nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions are presented. Evidence is given that suggests that the rate-controlling process is the transport of copper corrosion products away from the corroding surface. In the experiments described here, the copper diffused through a column of compacted clay-sand buffer. The properties of the buffer material, especially its ability to sorb copper species, are significant in determining the rate of uniform corrosion of copper. The evidence that copper diffusion is rate-controlling stems from the effect of γ-radiation on the tests. In the presence of γ-radiation, copper diffused farther along the column of compacted buffer material than in the unirradiated tests, but the corrosion rate was lower. These two effects can be best explained in terms of a slow copper-diffusion process. Irradiation is thought to reduce the extent of sorption of copper by the clay component of the buffer. This results in a more mobile copper species and a smaller interfacial flux of copper (i.e., a lower corrosion rate)

  20. Variation of crack intensity factor in three compacted clay liners exposed to annual cycle of atmospheric conditions with and without geotextile cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, E; Jalili Ghazizade, M; Abduli, M A; Gatmiri, B

    2014-08-01

    Performance of compacted clay liners commonly used as landfill barrier systems can be subject to decline in terms of hydraulic conductivity if left exposed to atmospheric conditions for an extended period of time prior to placement of overlaying layers. The resulting desiccation cracking can lead to increased hydraulic conductivity. Desiccation crack intensity was studied for three clayey soils commonly used for construction of landfill barrier system in a relatively large scale test setup exposed to real time atmospheric conditions over a complete annual cycle. A white separator geotextile cover was presumed to be capable of reducing the intensity of desiccation cracking through absorbing and maintaining higher amounts of moisture and reducing the temperature of the soil surface in comparison to a directly exposed soil surface. Desiccation cracking was monitored using a digital imaging technique for three compacted clay liners in two sets, one open to air and the second covered with the white geotextile. Crack intensity factor approached a relatively stable phase after certain cycles corresponding to atmospheric dry wet cycles. The results indicated that the white separator geotextile was capable of reducing the crack intensity factor by 37.4-45.9% throughout the experiment including the cyclic phase of desiccation cracking. During the stable phase, the maximum reduction in crack intensity factor of 90.4% as a result of applying geotextile cover was observed for the soil with the lowest plastic index and clay content and therefore the lowest magnitude of crack intensity factor. The other two soils with similar clay content but different plastic index showed 23.6% and 52.2% reductions in crack intensity factor after cyclic phase when covered with geotextile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preparation of ultra-thin and high-quality WO{sub 3} compact layers and comparision of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} compact layer thickness in planar perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jincheng; Shi, Chengwu, E-mail: shicw506@foxmail.com; Chen, Junjun; Wang, Yanqing; Li, Mingqian

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, the ultra-thin and high-quality WO{sub 3} compact layers were successfully prepared by spin-coating-pyrolysis method using the tungsten isopropoxide solution in isopropanol. The influence of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} compact layer thickness on the photovoltaic performance of planar perovskite solar cells was systematically compared, and the interface charge transfer and recombination in planar perovskite solar cells with TiO{sub 2} compact layer was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results revealed that the optimum thickness of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} compact layer was 15 nm and 60 nm. The planar perovskite solar cell with 15 nm WO{sub 3} compact layer gave a 9.69% average and 10.14% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency, whereas the planar perovskite solar cell with 60 nm TiO{sub 2} compact layer achieved a 11.79% average and 12.64% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency. - Graphical abstract: The planar perovskite solar cell with 15 nm WO{sub 3} compact layer gave a 9.69% average and 10.14% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency, whereas the planar perovskite solar cell with 60 nm TiO{sub 2} compact layer achieved a 11.79% average and 12.64% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Preparation of ultra-thin and high-quality WO{sub 3} compact layers. • Perovskite solar cell with 15 nm-thick WO{sub 3} compact layer achieved PCE of 10.14%. • Perovskite solar cell with 60 nm-thick TiO{sub 2} compact layer achieved PCE of 12.64%.

  2. Poro-elasto-plastic behaviour of dry compacted Fo-Ca clay: experiment and modelling. Application to the re-saturation of an engineered clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassabatere, Th.; Imbert, Ch.; Etile, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Many projects of underground repositories for high level radioactive waste involve an engineered clay barrier, placed between the waste canister and the surrounding rock. When hydrated, this barrier seals the gap and provides a good watertightness. The natural clay powder, dried and compacted, exhibits hydro-mechanical couplings during the hydration. Such a coupled behaviour, interesting for the industrial application, has been clearly demonstrated by many studies and laboratory experiments. But the modelling of this behaviour, in order to predict the hydration of the clay barrier, is difficult. A coupled modelling, based, at a macroscopic scale, on the thermodynamics of unsaturated porous media, is proposed. This thermodynamical model founds a general framework for non linear poro-elastic and poro-elasto-plastic coupled behaviours. The symmetries of this coupling, induced by this thermodynamical framework, let us take into account the often neglected influence of the mechanical state on the hydraulic problem of the re-saturation of the clay. The complete resolution of the flow problem, coupled with the mechanical behaviour, leads us to study the influence of the rheological behaviour chosen for the clay (elastic - linear or no linear -, or elastoplastic) on the evaluation of the duration of the re-saturation of the clay barrier). (authors)

  3. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. ► Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). ► Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. ► Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10 −10 , 2.08 × 10 −9 and 6.8 × 10 −10 m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m 3 ). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m 3 ) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  4. Ultra-thin clay layers facilitate seismic slip in carbonate faults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Luca; Billi, Andrea; Carminati, Eugenio; Cavallo, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Spagnuolo, Elena; Zorzi, Federico

    2017-04-06

    Many earthquakes propagate up to the Earth's surface producing surface ruptures. Seismic slip propagation is facilitated by along-fault low dynamic frictional resistance, which is controlled by a number of physico-chemical lubrication mechanisms. In particular, rotary shear experiments conducted at seismic slip rates (1 ms -1 ) show that phyllosilicates can facilitate co-seismic slip along faults during earthquakes. This evidence is crucial for hazard assessment along oceanic subduction zones, where pelagic clays participate in seismic slip propagation. Conversely, the reason why, in continental domains, co-seismic slip along faults can propagate up to the Earth's surface is still poorly understood. We document the occurrence of micrometer-thick phyllosilicate-bearing layers along a carbonate-hosted seismogenic extensional fault in the central Apennines, Italy. Using friction experiments, we demonstrate that, at seismic slip rates (1 ms -1 ), similar calcite gouges with pre-existing phyllosilicate-bearing (clay content ≤3 wt.%) micro-layers weaken faster than calcite gouges or mixed calcite-phyllosilicate gouges. We thus propose that, within calcite gouge, ultra-low clay content (≤3 wt.%) localized along micrometer-thick layers can facilitate seismic slip propagation during earthquakes in continental domains, possibly enhancing surface displacement.

  5. Lightweight self-compacting concrete with light expanded clay aggregate (LECA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiza Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight concretes have been successfully applied in building constructions for many years due to their favorable material properties, particularly their low specific weight in connection with a high strength, a high capability of thermal insulation and a high durability. The development leading to lightweight self-compacting concrete (LWSCC represents an important advanced step within the recent years. This concrete combines the favorable properties of a lightweight concrete with those of a self-compacting concrete. Research work is aimed on development of (LWSCC with the use of light aggregates “Light expanded clay aggregate (LECA”. In this research, first by specific gravity factor method, twenty different mix designs of (LWSCC were cast and tested to find out the values of slump flow, J-ring , V-funnel and 28 day compressive strength. Based on the results obtained, the best mix design was selected for further investigation. This paper also focuses on studying the effect of changing the reinforcement ratio on reinforced two way slabs when the dimensions were kept constant.

  6. Experimental evaluation of the hydraulic resistance of compacted bentonite/boom clay interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Anh-Minh; Cui, Yu-Jun; Delage, Pierre; Munoz, Juan Jorge; Li, Xiang-Ling

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the in-situ PRACLAY Heater experiment to be performed in the HADES URF in Mol (Belgium), the feasibility of a hydraulic cut-off of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) and the Repository Components (RC) of the disposal galleries by using a horizontal seal will be examined. It has been planned to install an annular seal composed of compacted bentonite between the heated zone and the access gallery (PRACLAY seal test), so that to avoid any hydraulic shortcut towards the access gallery. According to numerical scoping calculations, heating until 80 deg C will induce a pore pressure of the order of 3.0 MPa. In order to verify the effects of this water pressure on the performance of the annular seal system and more specifically on the hydraulic resistance of the interface between the compacted bentonite and the host rock (Boom clay), laboratory percolation tests at 20 and 80 deg C were performed. The results confirm the performance of the compacted bentonite seal to avoid the hydraulic shortcut to the access gallery under the foreseen hydraulic and thermal conditions. (author)

  7. The effects of waste leachates on the hydraulic conductivity of natural clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, F

    1989-01-01

    Sanitary land filling remains a viable alternative for disposal of the ever increasing volumes of municipal solid waste. Current landfill design practice requires the presence of a clay barrier (liner) that may consist of either a natural stratum or compacted clay borrow. The liner acts as a hydraulic barrier to control the flux of contaminants from the waste into the adjacent groundwater. In order to do this clay liners are required to have low hydraulic conductivity, k (typically 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s) that shall not increase during exposure to waste leachate. This thesis reports the assessment of compatibility between natural clays from Sarnia, Ontario, and various leachates ranging from municipal solid waste leachate to concentrated organic solvents. The studies were performed using specially designed fixed-ring permeameters that allowed controlling confining effective stresses, volume changes in the soil specimen and chemistry of the influent and effluent permeants. The Sarnia clays appeared to be compatible with domestic waste leachate, showing slight reductions in k. Extensive retardation of potassium from the leachate required long testing periods (up to twelve pore volumes) before the soils were deemed to be in chemical equilibrium. Concentrated, water-soluble organics (ethanol and dioxane) increased the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clays by 100 to 1,000-fold, thus destroying their effectiveness as liners. Water-compacted clays appeared remarkably resistant to penetration by concentrated hydrophobic solvents such as cyclohexane. Large hydraulic gradients (up to {approximately}900) were required to produce breakthrough along compaction induced fractures. However, alcohols and surfactants can facilitate the entry of hydrophobic liquids into the double layers causing large increased in k.

  8. Woody plant roots fail to penetrate a clay-lined landfill: Managment implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, George R.; Handel, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    In many locations, regulatory agencies do not permit tree planting above landfills that are sealed with a capping clay, because roots might penetrate the clay barrier and expose landfill contents to leaching. We find, however, no empirical or theoretical basis for this restriction, and instead hypothesize that plant roots of any kind are incapable of penetrating the dense clays used to seal landfills. As a test, we excavated 30 trees and shrubs, of 12 species, growing over a clay-lined municipal sanitary landfill on Staten Island, New York. The landfill had been closed for seven years, and featured a very shallow (10 to 30-cm) soil layer over a 45-cm layer of compacted grey marl (Woodbury series) clay. The test plants had invaded naturally from nearby forests. All plants examined—including trees as tall as 6 m—had extremely shallow root plates, with deformed tap roots that grew entirely above and parallel to the clay layer. Only occasional stubby feeder roots were found in the top 1 cm of clay, and in clay cracks at depths to 6 cm, indicating that the primary impediment to root growth was physical, although both clay and the overlying soil were highly acidic. These results, if confirmed by experimental research should lead to increased options for the end use of many closed sanitary landfills.

  9. Permeability Characteristics of Compacted and Stabilized Clay with Cement, Peat Ash and Silica Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmaeil Mousavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates the influence of stabilization with cement, peat ash, and silica sand on permeability coefficient (kv of compacted clay, using a novel approach to stabilize the clay with peat ash as a supplementary material of cement in the compacted and stabilized soil. In order to assess the mentioned influence, test specimens of both untreated and stabilized soil have been tested in the laboratory so that their permeability could be evaluated. Falling head and one dimensional consolidation tests of laboratory permeability were performed on the clay specimens and the chemical compositions of the materials as well as microstructure of the stabilized soil with 18% cement, 2% peat ash, and 5% silica sand were investigated, using X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy respectively. Results show that for soil stabilization with up to 8% cement content (of the dry weight of the soil, the average value of coefficient of permeability (kv is very close to that of untreated soil, whereas the kv value decreases drastically for 18% cement under identical void ratio conditions. It is further revealed that addition of 18% cement, 2% peat ash, and 5% silica sand had decreased the coefficient of permeability by almost 2.2 folds after 24 h, while about 1.7 folds increase was observed in coefficient of permeability once 13.5% of cement, 1.5% of peat ash, and 20% of silica sand were added. The partial replacement of cement with the 2% peat ash can reduce the consumption of cement for soil stabilization.

  10. Water balance of an earth fill built of organic clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birle Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations on the water balance of an earth fill built of organic clay in humid climate. As the organic soil used for the fill contains geogenetically elevated concentrations of arsenic, particular attention is paid on the seepage flow through the fill. The test fill is 5 m high, 30 m long and 25 m wide. The fill consists of the organic clay compacted at water contents wet and dry of Proctor Optimum covered by a drainage mat and a 60 cm thick top layer. For the determination of the water balance extensive measuring systems were installed. The seepage at the bottom measured so far was less than 2 % of the precipitation. The interflow in the drainage mat above the compacted organic clay was of similar magnitude. The estimated evapotranspiration reached approx. 84 % of the precipitation. According to these measurements the percolation is much lower than the percolation of many landfill covers in humid climates.

  11. Clay sealing for dumps - new findings from suitability tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunde, L.; Kuntsche, K.; Duellmann, H.

    1988-06-01

    Extensive suitability tests were carried out in the laboratory and field on various clays of the Lower-Rhineland brown coal mining area. The purpose of these tests was to determine the basic suitability of these clays for use as sealing layers for residue dumps. The tests also furnished criteria according to which a specific imperviousness can be achieved. The results of the tests can be summed up as follows: Since the material properties of the in-situ clays vary widely, not only mean values but also corresponding variation coefficients must be adhered to. For the purpose of checking the quality - contrary to the hitherto applied assessment practice - the decisive factor is not the testing of the dry density as compared to the Proctor density, but the homogeneity of the sealing layer that is achieved as a result of the size reduction and compaction of the pseudo-granular structure. Using suitable equipment, homogeneities, for which permeability coefficients of k less than or equal to 10/sup -9/ m/s in the dump sealing are obtained can be achieved with the clays that were examined.

  12. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  13. Construction of clay sealings for dumping of brown coal ash and residues from gas desulfurization units. Herstellung von Tonabdichtungen zur Deponierung von Braunkohleaschen und REA-Rueckstaenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, W

    1989-07-01

    With the putting into operation of flue gas scrubbers at the brown coal-fired power stations of the RWE not only 5 to 6 Mt conventional power station ash but also up to 2 Mt gypsum and water from the flue gas desulphurisation units are obtained annually, and these residues together with the ash are tipped on mixed dumps. These dumps are enclosed on all sides by a mineral sealing of clay with a thickness of at least 0.6 m. In keeping with the detailed plans for the construction and operation of mixed dumps as submitted to the competent authorities for approval, the sealing must have a permeability of K < 5x10{sup -10} m/s for the dump base and of K < 1x10{sup -10} m/s for the cover of the dump. In order to meet these high quality requirements the clay, which is obtained by opencast working with the aid of bucket wheel excavators, must first of all be crushed for construction of the sealings. In addition to the crushing of the clay to as small a lump size as possible, the adjustment of the correct sealing moisture content of the clay is of primary importance. Conditioning of the clay is effected in the conventional way by means of a pulvimixer, but also by means of a processing plant in pilot operation in the construction of clay sealings for dumps. With the aid of the processing plant clay of a high homogenisation grade is constantly available for sealing construction. The clay is spread on the base and slopes of the dump layer by layer with the aid of scraper dozers, each layer having a compacted thickness of about 20 cm. Compaction of the sealing layers is effected by heavy rammer butt rollers. In the case of highly plastic earth materials of the type used here in the construction of dumps the weight of the compacting roller and also the shape of the rammer butt are of importance. Compaction in the 1:2.5 steep dump slopes by means of a detachable roller steered by a cable has proved very satisfactory.

  14. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  15. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  16. Clay content evaluation in soils through GPR signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Slob, Evert; Benedetto, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which arises some important issues in many fields of employment, such as civil and environmental engineering, geology, and agriculture. This work focuses on pavement engineering, although the method applies to other fields of interest. Clay content in bearing courses of road pavement frequently causes damages and defects (e.g., cracks, deformations, and ruts). Therefore, the road safety and operability decreases, directly affecting the increase of expected accidents. In this study, different ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods and techniques were used to non-destructively investigate the clay content in sub-asphalt compacted soils. Experimental layout provided the use of typical road materials, employed for road bearing courses construction. Three types of soils classified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as A1, A2, and A3 were used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated test boxes. Percentages of bentonite clay were gradually added, ranging from 2% to 25% by weight. Analyses were carried out for each clay content using two different GPR instruments. A pulse radar with ground-coupled antennae at 500 MHz centre frequency and a vector network analyzer spanning the 1-3 GHz frequency range were used. Signals were processed in both time and frequency domains, and the consistency of results was validated by the Rayleigh scattering method, the full-waveform inversion, and the signal picking techniques. Promising results were obtained for the detection of clay content affecting the bearing capacity of sub-asphalt layers.

  17. Deformation and Fabric in Compacted Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensrich, C. M.; Pineda, J.; Luzin, V.; Suwal, L.; Kisi, E. H.; Allameh-Haery, H.

    2018-05-01

    Hydromechanical anisotropy of clay soils in response to deformation or deposition history is related to the micromechanics of platelike clay particles and their orientations. In this article, we examine the relationship between microstructure, deformation, and moisture content in kaolin clay using a technique based on neutron scattering. This technique allows for the direct characterization of microstructure within representative samples using traditional measures such as orientation density and soil fabric tensor. From this information, evidence for a simple relationship between components of the deviatoric strain tensor and the deviatoric fabric tensor emerge. This relationship may provide a physical basis for future anisotropic constitutive models based on the micromechanics of these materials.

  18. Effect of soil compactness on the growth and quality of carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Pietola

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were performed in Southern Finland on three soil types: fine sand (1989-1991, clay (1989 and mull (1990-1991. The following soil mechanical treatments were applied to autumn ploughed land: soil loosening by ridge preparation (ridge distance 45 cm, rotary harrowing (to a depth of 20 cm, clay 15 cm, and soil compaction track by track by a tractor weighing 3 Mg (1 or 3 passes, wheel width 33 cm before seed bed preparation. One plot was untreated. These treatments were set up in April (on clay in May under moist soil conditions. Sprinkler irrigation (one application of 30 mm was applied to clay and fine sand when soil moisture in top soil had decreased to around 50% of plant-available water capacity. PVC cylinders (r = 15 cm, h = 60 cm were fixed in the experimental areas during the growing periods. At harvest, these cylinders were removed for specific analysis of tap and fibrous roots of carrot. Length and width of fibrous roots were quantified by image analysis in the USA. The impacts of soil loosening and partial compaction were determined by measuring soil physical parameters to a depth of 25 cm in mineral soils, and to greater depths in organic soil. Dry bulk densities of the plough layers increased with increasing tractor passes by 8%, 10% and 13% for fine sand, mull and clay soils, respectively. The lowest dry soil bulk density in the plough layer was obtained by rotary harrowing to a depth of 20 cm. Comparison of gamma ray transmission and gravimetric analysis indicated that dry soil bulk density was slightly lower when determined by gravimetric analysis. Increased soil bulk densities were reflected by increased water retention capacity (matric suction ≤ 10 kPa and greater penetrometer resistance. Relatively similar increases in bulk density increased the penetrometer resistance much less in mull than in fine sand. In contrast, greater bulk densities in the mull soil affected soil air composition adversely by decreasing

  19. Aspects of clay/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Onofrei, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste management, both clay-based materials and concrete are proposed for use as barriers, seals or supporting structures. The main concern when clays and concrete are in proximity is the generation of a high-pH environment by concrete since clay minerals are relatively unstable at high pH. Here we examine the OH - -generating capacity of two high-performance concretes when in contact with several solutions. We also investigate various aspects of claylconcrete interactions. They are: (1) the alkalimetric titration of clay suspensions, (2) the effect of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite) on the swelling and hydraulic properties of compacted bentonite, and (3) the influence of cement grout on a backfill clay retrieved from the 900-d Buffer/Container Experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL. The results indicate that although high-performance concretes establish significantly lower poresolution pH (9 to 10) than does ordinary portland cement, the pH is still somewhat higher than that of clay/groundwater systems of about pH 8. Hence, even if high-performance concrete is used in a disposal vault, the potential still exists for clay minerals to alter over long periods of time if in contact with this concrete. The data show, however, that clays have a substantial buffering capacity, and clay-based barriers can thus neutralize much of the OH - potentially released from concrete in a vault. Moreover, even after reacting for 120 d at 85 o C with up to 5 wt.% Ca(OH) 2 , compacted bentonite (dry density = 1.2 Mg/m 3 ) retains much of its swelling capacity and has a permeability low enough (hydraulic conductivity ≤ 10 -11 m/s) to ensure that molecular diffusion will be the main transport mechanism through compacted clay-based barriers. Furthermore, according to X-ray diffractometry, the clay mineral component of backfill was not altered by contact with a cement grout for 900 d in the Buffer/Container Experiment

  20. Rill erosion on an oxisol influenced by a thin compacted layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Lopes Thomaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of compacted layers in soils can induce subprocesses (e.g., discontinuity of water flow and induces soil erosion and rill development. This study assesses how rill erosion in Oxisols is affected by a plow pan. The study shows that changes in hydraulic properties occur when the topsoil is eroded because the compacted layer lies close below the surface. The hydraulic properties that induce sediment transport and rill formation (i.e., hydraulic thresholds at which these processes occur are not the same. Because of the resistance of the compacted layer, the hydraulic conditions leading to rill incision on the soil surface differed from the conditions inducing rill deepening. The Reynolds number was the best hydraulic predictor for both processes. The formed rills were shallow and could easily be removed by tillage between crops. However, during rill development, large amounts of soil and contaminants could also be transferred.

  1. Geotechnical and geochemical assessments of shales in Anambra basin, SE-Nigeria as compacted clay liner in landfill system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijani, Moshood N.; Adesina, Rasheed B.; Wagner, Jean-Frank

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A major constraint to the development of properly engineered landfills is the high cost of synthetic liners and its scarcity in the local markets in developing country like Nigeria, which calls for alternative local materials for landfill liner. Consequently, crushed shale / clay shale deposits appear inexpensive and can be utilized to effectively retard the spread of leachate from landfills. Hence, this study focus on the assessment of geotechnical, geochemical and sorption characteristics of shale units from Anambra Basin, SE-Nigeria for suitability or otherwise as compacted clay liner (CCL) in landfills. Twelve samples consisting of three each from four different formations namely: Enugu, Nkporo, Imo and Ameki formations were collected and subjected to basic geotechnical tests such as grain size analysis, Atterberg's limits, compaction and coefficient of permeability following standard testing methods (BS 1377). In addition, mineralogical X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and geochemical ICP-MS / ICP-ES analyses were employed for geochemical characterization. CEC and batch sorption tests with respect to Pb, Ni, Cd, Cu and Zn as contaminant in leachates were also employed for sorption characterization. The results of the geotechnical tests conducted on the shale samples revealed that the crushed shale samples have liquid limit range of 55-79%, percentage fines of 80-93%, percentage clay of 23- 36% and activity of 0.8-2.1, all of which satisfy the basic requirements of clay liners according to the specifications of Daniel, 1993. Samples from Enugu, Nkporo and Imo shale have plasticity index range of 40- 54% which is above the recommended limit of 35% and thus likely to exhibit excessive shrinkage and settlement. However, the laboratory compaction shows maximum dry density of 16.8-18.4 kN/m 3 and 17.3- 19.1 kN/m 3 respectively for Standard Proctor and Modified AASHTO energy levels which suggests no significant change the

  2. Optimization of compaction specifications for different pavements layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Semmelink, CJ

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The report deals with the site investigations in connection with the compaction standards, that is a comparison between actual in situ dry densities achieved compared to specification requirements, for road layer work for the periods 91/92, 92...

  3. Incorporation of nano-clay saponite layers in the organo-clay hybrid films using anionic amphiphile stearic acid by Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Syed Arshad, E-mail: sa_h153@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar-799022 (India); Chakraborty, S.; Bhattacharjee, D. [Department of Physics, Tripura University, Suryamaninagar-799022 (India); Schoonheydt, R.A. [Centres for Surface Chemistry and Catalysis, K.U. Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 23, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-06-01

    In general cationic amphiphiles are used to prepare organo-clay hybrid film in Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) technique. In this present communication we demonstrated a unique technique to prepare the organo–clay hybrid films using an anionic amphiphile. The T–O–T type clay saponite was incorporated onto a floating stearic acid monolayer via a divalent cation Mg{sup 2+}. Salt MgCl{sub 2} was mixed along with the clay dispersion in the LB trough and amphiphile solution was spread onto the subphase in order to make the organo-clay hybrid films. It was observed that salt (MgCl{sub 2}) concentration on the subphase affects the organization of nano-dimensional clay platelet (saponite) in organo-clay hybrid films at air–water interface as well as in LB films. Noticeable changes in area per molecule and shape of the isotherms were observed and measured at subphases with different salt concentrations. Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies reveal that only an in-plane (996 cm{sup −1}) vibration of ν (Si-O) band occurred when the salt concentration was 10 mM. However, both in-plane (996 cm{sup −1}) and out-of-plane (1063 cm{sup −1}) vibrations of the ν (Si-O) band of saponite occurred when the subphase salt concentration was 100 mM. Also the out-of-plane vibration of ν (OH) of saponite was prominent at higher salt concentration. This is because at lower salt concentration clay sheets remain flat on the surface whereas; at higher MgCl{sub 2} concentration they aggregated and form stacks of saponite layers. Also they may be slightly tilted with a very small tilt angle at higher salt concentration making a favorable condition for both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations of ν (Si-O) in the hybrid films. Observed decrease in starting area per molecule in the pressure area isotherm measured at higher salt concentration also supports the tilting of clay layers at air–clay dispersion interface. Attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared

  4. Layer-by-layer composite film of nickel phthalocyanine and montmorillonite clay for synergistic effect on electrochemical detection of dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucena, Nathalia C.; Miyazaki, Celina M.; Shimizu, Flávio M.; Constantino, Carlos J. L.; Ferreira, Marystela

    2018-04-01

    Dopamine (DA) abnormal levels are related to diseases which makes important the development of fast, reliable, low-cost and sensitive devices for diagnosis and pharmaceutical controls. Nanostructured film composite of sodium montmorillonite clay (Na+MMT) and nickel phthalocyanine (NiTsPc) was self-assembled by layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and applied as electrochemical sensor for DA in the presence of common natural interferents as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Three different LbL architecture films were investigated: LbL films of clay (PEI/Na+MMT) and phthalocyanine (PEI/NiTsPc) in a bilayer structure with a conventional polyelectrolyte (PEI) and a composite film formed by both materials to verify the synergistic effect in the LbL film in a quadri-layer assembly (PEI/Na+MMT/PEI/NiTsPc). Structural characterization indicated molecular level interactions between the layers forming the LbL films. The ITO/(PEI/Na+MMT/PEI/NiTsPc)10 electrode exhibited a LOD of 1.0 μmol L-1 and linear range 5-150 μmol L-1.

  5. Establishment of characterizing parameters of clay as a filling material and coverage for repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daisy M.M. dos; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    The multiple barriers of a repository should be able to provide adequate containment of radionuclides during all the previewed time for the operation and institutional control. One of these barriers is the backfill layer, located between the waste packages and other barriers. Furthermore, after shutting the disposal units with concrete, various materials are used to compose the final coverage of the deposition area. The backfill and the cover layer can be composed of clay or clay mixed with cement, with soil or with rocks. The last layer is a vegetation cover. The selection of the best clay should take into consideration some physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Bentonite is a clay with high absorption capacity, and large volume change in moistening and drying processes, being also effective in the contaminant retention. Additionally, it presents unique properties, such as high swelling potential. Some bentonite characterization works have been developed in the Laboratory of Cementation at CDTN/CNEN (LABCIM/CDTN). The sequence of experiments was: granulometric analysis, moisture, compaction test, hydraulic conductivity and cation exchange capacity. Some initial characterization results are presented and discussed. The paper summarizes these previous studies in order to have the basis for creating a protocol for characterization of a bentonite as a reference material. (author)

  6. Establishment of characterizing parameters of clay as a filling material and coverage for repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daisy M.M. dos; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: dmms@cdtn.br, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The multiple barriers of a repository should be able to provide adequate containment of radionuclides during all the previewed time for the operation and institutional control. One of these barriers is the backfill layer, located between the waste packages and other barriers. Furthermore, after shutting the disposal units with concrete, various materials are used to compose the final coverage of the deposition area. The backfill and the cover layer can be composed of clay or clay mixed with cement, with soil or with rocks. The last layer is a vegetation cover. The selection of the best clay should take into consideration some physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Bentonite is a clay with high absorption capacity, and large volume change in moistening and drying processes, being also effective in the contaminant retention. Additionally, it presents unique properties, such as high swelling potential. Some bentonite characterization works have been developed in the Laboratory of Cementation at CDTN/CNEN (LABCIM/CDTN). The sequence of experiments was: granulometric analysis, moisture, compaction test, hydraulic conductivity and cation exchange capacity. Some initial characterization results are presented and discussed. The paper summarizes these previous studies in order to have the basis for creating a protocol for characterization of a bentonite as a reference material. (author)

  7. Processes of cation migration in clay-rocks: Final Scientific Report of the CatClay European Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmann, S.; Aertsens, M.; Appelo, T.; Bruggeman, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Glaus, M.; Jacquier, P.; Kupcik, T.; Maes, N.; Montoya, V.; Rabung, T.; Robinet, J.-C.; Savoye, S.; Schaefer, T.; Tournassat, C.; Van Laer, L.; Van Loon, L.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the feasibility studies on the radioactive waste disposal in deep argillaceous formations, it is now well established that the transport properties of solutes in clay rocks, i.e. parameter values for Fick's law, are mainly governed by the negatively charged clay mineral surface. While a good understanding of the diffusive behaviour of non-reactive anionic and neutral species is now achieved, much effort has to be placed on improving understanding of coupled sorption/diffusion phenomena for sorbing cations. Indeed, several cations known to form highly stable surface complexes with sites on mineral surfaces migrate more deeply into clay rock than expected. Therefore, the overall objective of the EC CatClay project is to address this issue, using a 'bottom-up' approach, in which simpler, analogous systems (here a compacted clay, 'pure' illite) are experimentally studied and modelled, and then the transferability of these results to more complex materials, i.e. the clay rocks under consideration in France, Switzerland and Belgium for hosting radioactive waste disposal facilities, is verified. The cations of interest were chosen for covering a representative range of cations families: from a moderately sorbing cation, the strontium, to three strongly sorbing cations, Co(II), Zn(II) and Eu(III). For the 4 years of this project, much effort was devoted to developing and applying specific experimental methods needed for acquiring the high precision, reliable data needed to test the alternative hypotheses represented by different conceptual-numerical models. The enhanced diffusion of the sorbing cations of interest was confirmed both in the simpler analogous illite system for Sr 2+ , Co(II) and Zn(II), but also in the natural clay rocks, except for Eu(III). First modelling approach including diffusion in the diffuse double layer (DDL) promisingly succeeded in reproducing the experimental data under the various conditions both in

  8. Study of the Boom clay layer as a geochemical barrier for long-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetsle, L.H.; Henrion, P.; Put, M.; Cremers, A.

    1985-01-01

    The Boom clay layer below the nuclear site of Mol, Belgium has been thoroughly investigated on its geohydrologic and physicochemical characteristics as well as by laboratory experiments and in situ tests in the underground laboratory. Hydraulic permeabilities have been measured in situ; the chemical composition of the interstitial clay water is related to the mineralogical composition. Radionuclide sorption data and sorption mechanisms are given for Cs, Sr, Eu, Tc, Am, Pu and Np; experimental diffusion coefficients were determined by clay plug migration tests in representative conditions. Results of model calculations for the migration of radionuclides in dense porous media are given for Cs, Sr, Pu and Np

  9. Investigations of excavated clay-stone as backfill/seal material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Crushed clay-stone produced by excavation activities of repository drifts has been investigated as backfill/seal material at the GRS laboratory. The raw aggregate with coarse grains is considered to be used for backfilling the repository openings and, in mixture with bentonite, for sealing the boreholes, drifts and shafts. The GRS research programme focused on characterizing the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the excavated Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone (COX) and the clay-stone-bentonite mixtures, including mechanical compaction, gas and water permeability as function of porosity, water retention and saturation, swelling capacity, and thermal properties of the materials. The most important results are presented in this paper. Figure 1 shows the compaction and permeability behaviour of the excavated clay-stone with grains up to a size of 32 mm. The results were obtained on large samples of 280 mm diameter and 680 mm height under quasi-hydrostatic compression. The porosity and permeability decrease with increasing load. The porosity-mean stress relation is non-linear and may be expressed by an exponential function. The backfill becomes stiffer at low porosities and can sustain certain deviatoric loads. At porosity of ∼21 %, the strength is characterized by an inherent cohesion of 3.7 MPa and an internal friction angle of 12 deg.. Additionally, the compaction is also dependent on time or loading rate, water content, and temperature. The compaction of the porous backfill material leads to a reduction in permeability. The measured gas permeability decreases much faster at low porosities below ∼25 %. The gas permeability at porosity of ∼20 % becomes as low as that of 10 -20 - 10 -21 m 2 for the intact clay rock. This is probably due to disconnection of the pore network during the compaction. As sealing material, powdered COX clay-stone was mixed with MX80 bentonite powder in different ratios and compacted to

  10. Low temperature fabrication of ZnO compact layer for high performance plastic dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Fangyi; Xia Yujing; Guan Zisheng; Yin Xiong; He Tao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ZnO compact layer is prepared via simple electrochemical method at low temperature. ► Compact layer can effectively block electron transfer from TCO to electrolyte. ► DSC PCE is improved by 17% when ZnO compact layer is introduced. ► Plastic DSCs with ZnO compact layer show a PCE of 3.29% under AM1.5 100 mW cm −2 . ► The above efficiency is comparable to that with high temperature sintering step. - Abstract: ZnO compact layer has been fabricated on transparent conducting oxide glass and plastic polymer substrates at low temperature via electrodeposition. The results of dark current and cyclic voltammetric measurements demonstrate that the compact layer can effectively reduce the short circuit from transparent conducting oxide to electrolyte in dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells, leading to an increase of open-circuit photovoltage and fill factor of the devices and, thereby, the power conversion efficiency. The resultant plastic dye-sensitized ZnO solar cell presents an efficiency of 3.29% under illumination of 100 mW cm −2 , AM 1.5G. This indicates that electrodeposition is a viable method to fabricate ZnO compact layer for high performance flexible devices.

  11. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of TiO2 compact layers for flexible mesostructured perovskite solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardetto, V.; Di Giacomo, F.; Lucarelli, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Brown, T.M.; Creatore, M.

    2017-01-01

    In mesostructured perovskite solar cell devices, charge recombination processes at the interface between the transparent conductive oxide, perovskite and hole transport layer are suppressed by depositing an efficient compact TiO2 blocking layer. In this contribution we investigate the role of the

  12. Characterization of LPD-TiO2 compact layer in ZnO nano-rods photoelectrode for dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jung-Jie; Wu, Chih-Kan; Hsu, Chun-Fa

    2017-12-01

    A titanium oxide (TiO2) compact layer was used to enhance the performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) by reducing the electrical loss from recombination at the indium tin oxide (ITO)/electrolyte interface and by improving the electrical contact between ITO and the zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-rod photoelectrode. The TiO2 compact layer was deposited on ITO glass using the liquid phase deposition (LPD) method. DSSCs fabricated with and without the LPD-TiO2 compact layer were compared. In addition, various thicknesses of the LPD-TiO2 compact layer were evaluated. The light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of the DSSC increased from 0.43 to 0.75% by incorporating the LPD-TiO2 compact layer. Experimental results demonstrated that the LPD method is a promising alternative to the conventional TiO2 compact layer technology for the production of high-performance DSSCs.

  13. Placement of pre-compacted and in situ compacted dense backfill materials in shaft seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, J.; Dixon, D.; Kim, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In 2003, a decision was made to discontinue operation of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) and ultimately to decommission and permanently close the underground portion of this facility. As part of the Nuclear Legacy Liability Program (NLLP) being funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), an ongoing program of work is being undertaken to decommission and deal with facilities that are no longer part of AECL's mandate or operations. The URL is included in these facilities. Part of this work is the installation of seals at the intersection of the access and ventilation shafts and an ancient thrust fault, Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2), approximately 275 m below surface. These seals are being installed in order to limit the potential for mixing of deeper saline and shallower, less saline groundwater. The seal design in each shaft is similar with a heavily reinforced lower concrete component, a central bentonite clay-sand component and an upper un-reinforced concrete component. The main shaft at the URL at the location of the seal is circular (∼5-m diameter), and was excavated using careful drill and blast techniques. The seal itself consists of two keyed, conical sectioned, 3-m-thick by 5 to 6-m diameter concrete segments that confine a 6-m-thick swelling clay section. The ventilation shaft at the URL is 1.8 m in diameter and was excavated using raise-boring. The ventilation shaft will consist of two keyed, conical sectioned, 2-m-thick concrete by 1.8 to 2.8 m diameter concrete segments confining a 5-m-thick assembly of pre-compacted clay-sand blocks. The concrete is a low pH concrete designed for repository use, which can develop a 70 MPa unconfined compressive strength after 28 days. It has a pH of less than 11 achieved by substitution of 75% of the cement powder with silica fume and ground silica so the likelihood of free calcium and an alkaline plume is

  14. Shear Strength of Remoulding Clay Samples Using Different Methods of Moulding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaliza, W.; Ismail, B.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurul, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    Shear strength for clay soil was required to determine the soil stability. Clay was known as a soil with complex natural formations and very difficult to obtain undisturbed samples at the site. The aim of this paper was to determine the unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay on different methods in moulding samples which were proctor compaction, hand operated soil compacter and miniature mould methods. All the samples were remoulded with the same optimum moisture content (OMC) and density that were 18% and 1880 kg/m3 respectively. The unconfined shear strength results of remoulding clay soils for proctor compaction method was 289.56kPa with the strain 4.8%, hand operated method was 261.66kPa with the strain 4.4% and miniature mould method was 247.52kPa with the strain 3.9%. Based on the proctor compaction method, the reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength of remoulded clay soil of hand operated method was 9.66%, and for miniature mould method was 14.52%. Thus, because there was no significant difference of reduction percentage of unconfined shear strength between three different methods, so it can be concluded that remoulding clay by hand operated method and miniature mould method were accepted and suggested to perform remoulding clay samples by other future researcher. However for comparison, the hand operated method was more suitable to form remoulded clay sample in term of easiness, saving time and less energy for unconfined shear strength determination purposes.

  15. Effect of TiOx compact layer with varied components on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yanling; Ai, Xianglong; Wang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Qi; Huang, Jianguo; Wu, Tao, E-mail: tao_wu@zju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiOx compact layers with varied components are deposited by sputtering deposition. • TiOx compact layers suppressed the recombination at the FTO glass/ electrolyte interface effectively. • 20 nm-TiOx compact layer with the lowest x value (named T1) gave the highest charge transfer or transport and reduced recombination most. • Lower value of x in TiOx showed slightly better transmittance. • Lower value of x in TiOx reveals higher conductivity and better charge transfer from the porous TiO{sub 2} to the substrate. - Abstract: In this study, approximately 20 nm thick compact layers of TiOx with varied components are deposited by physical vapor deposition. The performance of these layers in solar cells is investigated. The TiOx compact layers consist of T1 (with Ti{sup 0}, Ti{sup 2+}, Ti{sup 3+}, and Ti{sup 4+}), T2 (with Ti{sup 3+} and Ti{sup 4+}), and T3 (with Ti{sup 4+}). Results show that the optimum compact layer is T1, which exhibits an approximately 61% enhancement in energy conversion efficiency compared with the bare cell. Mott–Schottky plots indicate that the carrier concentration decreases and the flatband becomes less negative with decreasing x, which consequently increases the likelihood of charge transfer from the nanoporous TiO{sub 2} to the TiOx compact layers. Furthermore, a decrease in the x value of TiOx results in lower resistance. Voltage decay and electrical impedance spectrum (EIS) show that the electron-carrier lifetime and charge recombination reduction are improved the most by T1. Consequently, TiOx with smaller x works better as a compact layer. However, a solar cell with T2 shows weak enhancement of photovoltaic performance. Cyclic voltammetry and EIS illustrate that the low recombination blocking and high resistance of T2 may be a result of its large pore size and weak adhesion to fluorine-doped tin oxide glass.

  16. Changes in the Expandability, Layer charge, and CEC of Smectitic Clay due to a Illitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Owan; Cho, Won Jin

    2007-01-01

    In a high-level waste(HLW) repository, the major fucntions of the smectitic clay for use as a buffer material are to inhibit the penetration of groundwater and to retard the release of radionuclides from the radioactive wastes to the surrounding environment. However, when the smectite clay is exposed to an elevated temperature due to radioactive decay heat and geochemical conditions for a long time, its physicochemical and mineralogical properties may be degradated and thus lose its barrier functions. It has been known in literature that the degradation of these properties of the smectitic clay occurs by a illitization in which the smectite transforms into illite. Therefore, an understanding of the illitization is essential to evaluate the long-term barrier performance of smectitic clay for the buffer of a HLW repository. This paper will carry out hydrothermal reaction tests with domestic smectitic clay which will be favorably considered for the buffer material of a Korean HLW repository, and investigate changes in the expandibility, layer charge and cation exchange capacity(CEC) of the smectitic clay due to a illitization

  17. Biochar impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soils in the SE USA Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer (E horizon), which is a barrier for water infiltration. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water infiltration through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic...

  18. Differential erosion and the formation of layered yardangs in the Loulan region (Lop Nur), eastern Tarim Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongchong; Xu, Lishuai; Mu, Guijin

    2018-02-01

    Yardangs are a type of wind-sculpted landform which generally form in hyper-arid regions. Several factors affect the development of yardangs, and the relative importance of these factors likely varies with differences in regional environmental factors. In the Loulan region of Lop Nur, wind dynamics are the principal factor affecting the development of yardangs. However, layered yardangs, which have undergone a unique form of differential erosion, are common in the region. These erosional landforms differ from typical yardangs which are eroded solely by abrasion and deflation. We conducted field and laboratory investigations of layered yardangs to determine their origin. The results indicate that there are two types of strata comprising the yardangs: uncompacted sand-silt layers, with a lower carbonate content; and compacted clay-silt layers, with a higher carbonate content. Both types of strata are horizontal and occur in alternating layers. This type of structure enables the wind to more easily erode the less resistant sand-silt layers at different heights, leaving the more resistant compacted clay-silt layers relatively intact. Eventually the undercut remnant clay-silt layers collapse once the weight of the suspended strata exceeds their elastic resistance (more than 90% of the fallen blocks have length/thickness ratios between 1.2 and 2.5). Therefore, in addition to wind dynamics, the lithology and structure of the strata are important factors affecting the development of the layered yardangs. This type of differential erosion accelerates the development of the yardangs in the Loulan region.

  19. An efficient and low-cost TiO2 compact layer for performance improvement of dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hua; Zhang Shanqing; Zhao Huijun; Will, Geoffrey; Liu Porun

    2009-01-01

    A TiO 2 organic sol was synthesised for the preparation of a compact TiO 2 layer on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass by a dip-coating technique. The resultant thin film was used for the fabrication of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The compact layer typically has a thickness of ca. 110 nm as indicated by its SEM, and consists of anatase as confirmed by the XRD pattern. Compared with the traditional DSSCs without this compact layer, the solar energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency, short-circuit current and open-circuit potential of the DSSCs with the compact layer were improved by 33.3%, 20.3%, and 10.2%, respectively. This can be attributed to the merits brought by the compact layer. It can effectively improve adherence of TiO 2 to FTO surface, provide a larger TiO 2 /FTO contact area, and reduce the electron recombination by blocking the direct contact between the redox electrolyte and the conductive FTO surface

  20. Long-term performance of geosynthetic clay liners in cappings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubeuge, K.P. von; Fricke, A.

    1998-01-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) are relatively thin composite materials combining bentonite clay and geosynthesis (usually geotextiles). GCLs have been employed by the waste industry for well over a decade now, and their level of usage is rapidly increasing world-wide. In landfill facilities, GCLs are generally used to replace or augment compacted clay liners. Until recently, the decision to do so has primarily been based on the availability of clay material on site (i.e., economic considerations). However, the advantages in using a GCL over other sealing elements such as compacted clay are not only economic but technically based, and the economic benefits extend beyond the construction phase, as a thin GCL can increase the revenue earning potential of a facility. This paper will highlight the shear behaviour of GCLs and demonstrate the long-term stability. (orig.)

  1. Heterogeneities in illite/smectite mixed/layers clays: some comments and recollections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    A review of some studies of heterogeneities, structure and surface in illite/smectite mixed-layer clays of Vienna Basin using X-ray diffraction, high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, infra-red spectroscopy, laser microprobe mass analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is given. The models of hexyl ammonium ion configuration complexed between silica sheets is discussed. 1 tab., 10 figs., 6 refs

  2. Compaction and Plasticity Comparative Behaviour of Soft Clay Treated with Coarse and Fine Sizes of Ceramic Tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bared, Mohammed Ali Mohammed; Marto, Aminaton; Sati Hamonangan Harahap, Indra; Kasim, Fauziah

    2018-03-01

    Recycled blended ceramic tiles (RBT) is a waste material produced from ceramic tile factories and construction activities. RBT is found to be cost effective, sustainable, environmental-friendly and has the potential to be used as an additive in soft soil stabilization. Recent reports show that massive amounts of RBT are dumped into legal or illegal landfills every year consuming very large spaces and creating major environmental problems. On the other hand, dredged marine clay obtained from Nusajaya, Johor, Malaysia has weak physical and engineering characteristics to be considered as unsuitable soft soil that is usually excavated, dumped into landfills and replaced by stiff soil. Hence, this study investigates the suitability of possible uses of RBT to treat marine clay. Laboratory tests included Standard proctor tests and Atterberg limits tests. The plasticity of marine clay was evaluated by adding 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.3 mm RBT. In addition, the compaction behaviour of treated marine clay was compared by adding two different sizes (0.3 mm and 1.18 mm diameter) of RBT. For both coarse and fine sizes of RBT, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of the dry weight of the soft clay were added. The mixture of each combination was examined in order to evaluate the Maximum Dry Density (MDD) and the optimum moisture content (OMC) for the treated soft clay. MDD and OMC for soft untreated samples were 1.59 Mg/m3 and 22%, respectively. Treated samples with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.30 mm size RBT resulted in a significant reduction of OMC ranged from 19 to 15% while MDD resulted in increment ranged from 1.69 to 1.77 Mg/m3. In addition, samples treated with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 1.18 mm size RBT resulted in major reduction of OMC ranged from 15 to 13.5% while MDD increased effectively from 1.75 to 1.82 Mg/m3. For all mix designs of soft clay-RBT, MDD was gradually increasing and OMC was sharply reducing with further increments of both sizes of RBT.

  3. Compaction and Plasticity Comparative Behaviour of Soft Clay Treated with Coarse and Fine Sizes of Ceramic Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bared Mohammed Ali Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycled blended ceramic tiles (RBT is a waste material produced from ceramic tile factories and construction activities. RBT is found to be cost effective, sustainable, environmental-friendly and has the potential to be used as an additive in soft soil stabilization. Recent reports show that massive amounts of RBT are dumped into legal or illegal landfills every year consuming very large spaces and creating major environmental problems. On the other hand, dredged marine clay obtained from Nusajaya, Johor, Malaysia has weak physical and engineering characteristics to be considered as unsuitable soft soil that is usually excavated, dumped into landfills and replaced by stiff soil. Hence, this study investigates the suitability of possible uses of RBT to treat marine clay. Laboratory tests included Standard proctor tests and Atterberg limits tests. The plasticity of marine clay was evaluated by adding 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.3 mm RBT. In addition, the compaction behaviour of treated marine clay was compared by adding two different sizes (0.3 mm and 1.18 mm diameter of RBT. For both coarse and fine sizes of RBT, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of the dry weight of the soft clay were added. The mixture of each combination was examined in order to evaluate the Maximum Dry Density (MDD and the optimum moisture content (OMC for the treated soft clay. MDD and OMC for soft untreated samples were 1.59 Mg/m3 and 22%, respectively. Treated samples with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 0.30 mm size RBT resulted in a significant reduction of OMC ranged from 19 to 15% while MDD resulted in increment ranged from 1.69 to 1.77 Mg/m3. In addition, samples treated with 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of 1.18 mm size RBT resulted in major reduction of OMC ranged from 15 to 13.5% while MDD increased effectively from 1.75 to 1.82 Mg/m3. For all mix designs of soft clay-RBT, MDD was gradually increasing and OMC was sharply reducing with further increments of both sizes of RBT.

  4. Uniaxial backfill block compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, V.

    2012-05-01

    The main parts of the project were: to make a literature survey of the previous uniaxial compaction experiments; do uniaxial compaction tests in laboratory scale; and do industrial scale production tests. Object of the project was to sort out the different factors affecting the quality assurance chain of the backfill block uniaxial production and solve a material sticking to mould problem which appeared during manufacturing the blocks of bentonite and cruched rock mixture. The effect of mineralogical and chemical composition on the long term functionality of the backfill was excluded from the project. However, the used smectite-rich clays have been tested for mineralogical consistency. These tests were done in B and Tech OY according their SOPs. The objective of the Laboratory scale tests was to find right material- and compaction parameters for the industrial scale tests. Direct comparison between the laboratory scale tests and industrial scale tests is not possible because the mould geometry and compaction speed has a big influence for the compaction process. For this reason the selected material parameters were also affected by the previous compaction experiments. The industrial scale tests were done in summer of 2010 in southern Sweden. Blocks were done with uniaxial compaction. A 40 tons of the mixture of bentonite and crushed rock blocks and almost 50 tons of Friedland-clay blocks were compacted. (orig.)

  5. Performance assessment of the disposal of vitrified high-level waste in a clay layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallants, Dirk; Marivoet, Jan; Sillen, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Deep disposal is considered a safe solution to the management of high-level radioactive waste. The safety is usually demonstrated by means of a performance assessment. This paper discusses the methodological aspects and some of the results obtained for the performance assessment of the disposal of vitrified high-level waste in a clay layer in Belgium. The calculations consider radionuclide migration through the following multi-barrier components, all of which contribute to the overall safety: (1) engineered barriers and the host clay layer, (2) overlying aquifer, and (3) biosphere. The interfaces between aquifers and biosphere are limited to the well and river pathway. Results of the performance assessment calculations are given in terms of the time evolution of the dose rates of the most important fission and activation products and actinides. The role of the glass matrix in the overall performance of the repository is also discussed

  6. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  7. Inter-layered clay stacks in Jurassic shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, K.; Krinsley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron mode is used together with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to show that Lower Jurassic shales from the North Sea Basin contain large numbers of clay mineral stacks up to 150 microns in size. Polished shale sections are examined to determine the size, shape orientation, textural relationships, and internal compositional variations of the clays. Preliminary evidence that the clay stacks are authigenic, and may have formed at shallow burial depths during early diagenesis, is presented.

  8. Behaviour of a clay layer submitted to bending: application to a landfill for storing very low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp Devernay, S.

    2008-12-01

    The sealing cover system of landfills for storing non bio-degradable and dangerous waste is most of the time made up of a layer of clay and/or a geo-membrane. The question of the optimization of the conditions of storage of the radioactive waste envisage a surface storage for very low level radioactive waste (VLLW) and low and intermediate short-lived radioactive waste. This study is applied to a VLLW disposal facility of which the cover is made up of a clay layer over a geo-membrane but can be transposed to landfill for dangerous waste. The cover clay barrier of a landfill must preserve its properties; in particular its permeability must remain inferior to ten to the minus nine meters per second, during the life of the landfill in spite of the various solicitations which can generate cracking. Among these solicitations, the relative settlements of subjacent waste, generating bending solicitation, are one of the most critical solicitations. The current regulation concerning the implementation as a cover of a clay layer presents gaps, in particular with regard to the deformability of clay. This study presents the interest to couple laboratory tests (four points bending tests, splitting test and punching test) with field bending tests carried out at scale one and with their modeling with centrifugal tests. These tests were also numerically modeled by finite elements. A good compatibility of the results, in particular with regard to the definition of the conditions of initiation of the crack by bending, is shown. Numerical modeling and centrifugal tests made it possible to extend the study to unperformed in situ cases (settlement tests, reinforcement of the clay). (author)

  9. Modelling of clay diagenesis using a combined approach of crystalchemistry and thermochemistry: a case study in the smectite illitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geloni, Claudio; Previde Massara, Elisabetta; Di Paola, Eleonora; Ortenzi, Andrea; Gherardi, Fabrizio; Blanc, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    procedure benefits from: (i) (minor) improvements of the I/O structure of the SSP; (ii) the development of a suite of python scripts to automate the steps needed to augment the thermodynamic database by integrating the external information provided by potential users with the XLS tool and the SSP; (iii) the creation of specific outputs to allow for more convenient handling and inspection of computed parameters of the thermodynamic database. A case study focused on non-isothermal smectite-illite transformation is presented to show the capability of our numerical models to account for clay compaction under 1D geometry conditions. This model considers fluid flow driven by the compaction of a clay layer, and chemistry-fluid flow mutual feedback with the underlying sandstone during the advancement of the diagenesis. Due to this complex interaction, as a result of the smectite-illite transformation in the clays, significant quartz cementation affects the sandstone adjacent to the compacting clay.

  10. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  11. Study of materials for using at waste layer in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Andre F.; Tello, Cledola C.O. de

    2009-01-01

    This research has an objective to characterize Brazilian clays and to implant a data base containing the information obtained form tests and suppliers. Such information will allow to buy and and to select optimum material for its utilization in the stuffing layer. Brazilian suppliers were contacted for obtaining information and samples, the various clays were tested and these tests comprehend the following: identification of the mineral constituents, determination of the compaction curve as function of the humidity, hydraulic conductivity, humidity and organic material contents, cationic exchange capacity, specific surface, and etc

  12. Effects of sand compaction pile (SCP) driving on the strength of clay outside the improved area; Sand compaction pile no dasetsu ga jiban kairyo ikigai no nendo jiban no kyodo ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, H. [Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan); Takahashi, S. [Ministry of Transport, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, K. [Penta-Ocean Construction Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kitayama, N. [Fukken Co. Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-06-21

    This paper describes effects of the disturbance by the sand compaction pile (SCP) driving operations on the shear strength of clay outside the improved area and the border of region affected by the SCP driving. About 1,400 soil specimens were taken before and after the SCP driving inside and outside the improved area during the foundation improvement at Tokuyama-Shimomatsu Port in Yamaguchi Prefecture. Soil test data of the specimens and strength characteristics of disturbed clay specimens were investigated through the laboratory experiments. The results obtained are as follows. According to the multi-directional simple shear test results, the shear strength immediately after the cyclic shear decreased in 10 to 30% compared with that before the cyclic shear. When recompaction was conducted before the cyclic shear, however, it increased in 50% compared with that before the cyclic shear. The strength of clay decreased by the SCP driving even outside the improved area. When the internal frictional angle of clay, friction coefficient of the improved boundary and driving depth of SCP were determined, it was possible to estimate an area affected by the SCP driving using a combined sliding plane. 21 refs., 18 figs.

  13. The physical properties and compaction characteristics of swelling soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Ogata, Nobuhide

    1990-01-01

    Expansive soils have recently attracted increasing attention as the back filling material for the repositories of high level nuclear wastes or as the material for improving extremely soft grounds. However, since very little has been known concerning the physical and mechanical properties of such materials, it is necessary to clarify the swelling, compaction and thermal characteristics of expansive soils. For this purpose, various kinds of index tests and a series of static compaction tests were performed using several kinds of swelling soils in order to investigate the relationship between the fundamental physical properties and the compaction characteristics. Since the ordinary testing method stipulated in JIS is difficult to perform for such expansive soils, the new method was proposed to obtained the reliable values of specific gravity, grain size distribution and liquid/plastic limits. By this method, some representative values were presented for various kinds of clay including bentonite. As the results of static compaction tests, the compaction characteristics of clay were strongly dependent on the plastic limit of clay. The maximum dry density and optimum water content were strongly dependent on both plastic limit and compaction pressure. (K.I.)

  14. Investigation of alteration behaviour of compacted bentonite contracted with carbon steel for 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Tadahiro; Ueno, Kenichi; Sasamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate long term behavior of corrosion for carbon steel in compacted bentonite, and to evaluate long term stability of bentonite, corrosion experiments were conducted using synthetic sea water and synthetic groundwater at 50 and 80degC for 10 years under anaerobic atmosphere. In the present study, the samples of compacted bentonite after experiments were investigated to understand the alteration behavior of bentonite by iron-bentonite interactions. Results were summarized below. Iron generated by corrosion of carbon steel was migrated into compacted bentonite further in the synthetic seawater case than in the synthetic groundwater case. Result of TEM observation for the sample of synthetic sea water case at 80degC showed that the original layer structure for clay minerals was maintained and the layer distance was about 12[A] which was similar to the layer distance of normal 2:1 smectite. Thus, it was suggested that there was no change in smectite before and after experiments. Iron generated by corrosion of carbon steel was migrated into compacted bentonite in anaerobic condition case but scarcely migrated in aerobic condition case. Results of EPMA analysis indicated that the maximum migration depth of iron in compacted bentonite was about 0.2 mm for sample in synthetic sea water at 80degC under anaerobic condition. Results of XRD analysis for the sample in which iron migration in compacted bentonite was observed showed that there was no corrosion product in compacted bentonite and the structure of clay mineral in bentonite was di-octahedral. Furthermore, the result of XRD analysis under relative humidity controlled condition suggested that the swelling property of sample after experiment was similar to that of initial Na-type smectite. Therefore, it was supposed that the initial Na-type smectite did not change during the experiment. Batch type experiments with different temperature, solutions and duration have been conducted to understand the alteration

  15. Electrical resistivity tomography determines the spatial distribution of clay layer thickness and aquifer vulnerability, Kandal Province, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Sebastian; Kuras, Oliver; Richards, Laura A.; Naden, Emma; Polya, David A.

    2017-10-01

    Despite being rich in water resources, many areas of South East Asia face difficulties in securing clean water supply. This is particularly problematic in regions with a rapidly growing population. In this study, the spatial variability of the thickness of a clay layer, controlling surface - groundwater interactions that affect aquifer vulnerability, was investigated using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Data were acquired along two transects, showing significant differences in the imaged resistivities. Borehole samples were analyzed regarding particle density and composition, and linked to their resistivity. The obtained relationships were used to translate the field electrical resistivities into lithologies. Those revealed considerable variations in the thickness of the clay layer, ranging from 0 m up to 25 m. Geochemical data, highlighting zones of increased ingress of surface water into the groundwater, confirmed areas of discontinuities in the clay layer, which act as preferential flow paths. The results may guide urban planning of the Phnom Penh city expansion, in order to supply the growing population with safe water. The presented approach of using geophysics to estimate groundwater availability, accessibility, and vulnerability is not only applicable to Kandal Province, Cambodia, but also to many other areas of fast urbanization in South East Asia and beyond.

  16. Compact Layers of Hybrid Halide Perovskites Fabricated via the Aerosol Deposition Process-Uncoupling Material Synthesis and Layer Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Fabian; Hanft, Dominik; Gujar, Tanaji P; Kahle, Frank-Julian; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Köhler, Anna; Moos, Ralf

    2016-04-08

    We present the successful fabrication of CH₃NH₃PbI₃ perovskite layers by the aerosol deposition method (ADM). The layers show high structural purity and compactness, thus making them suitable for application in perovskite-based optoelectronic devices. By using the aerosol deposition method we are able to decouple material synthesis from layer processing. Our results therefore allow for enhanced and easy control over the fabrication of perovskite-based devices, further paving the way for their commercialization.

  17. Improvement of Short-Circuit Current Density in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Sputtered Nanocolumnar TiO2 Compact Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chien Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a nanocolumnar TiO2 compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was examined. Such a compact layer was sputtered on a glass substrate with an indium tin oxide (ITO film using TiO2 powder as the raw material, with a thickness of ~100 nm. The compact layer improved the short-circuit current density and the efficiency of conversion of solar energy to electricity by the DSSC by 53.37% and 59.34%, yielding values of 27.33 mA/cm2 and 9.21%, respectively. The performance was attributed to the effective electron pathways in the TiO2 compact layer, which reduced the back reaction by preventing direct contact between the redox electrolyte and the conductive substrate.

  18. On the seepage voids in the compacted soil observed by the x-ray imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Koichi; Koga, Kiyoshi

    1991-01-01

    The structure of large voids in the soil layer by banking and rolling compaction and the form of the water channel structure seeping through soil layers have important significance in geotechnical engineering, and it was decided to examine them by the heavy liquid infiltration method developed recently by one of the authors. It has been known that the water permeability of soil due to compaction varies remarkably according to the water content in the soil at the time of compaction. However, the factor which determines the water permeability is related to the voids in soil, particularly the form of large voids which become water channel. As for the heavy liquid infiltration method, the sample soil is set similarly to the permeability test of compacted soil, and liquid contrast medium is infiltrated. The stereoscopic photographing is carried out as it is, and the path of the contrast medium infiltrating into soil, namely the form of the voids corresponding to water channel can be observed. Sample soil, the experimental method and the results are reported. The compaction permeability curves have the same tendency in volcanic ash soil and red clay. (K.I.)

  19. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  20. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay frozen and thawed in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.H.; Othman, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    A large specimen of compacted clay (diameter = 298 mm; thickness = 914 mm) was subjected to freeze-thaw in the field for 60 days. Afterward, the hydraulic conductivity was measured. The hydraulic conductivity of the entire specimen remained essentially unchanged, but increases in hydraulic conductivity of 1.5-2 orders of magnitude were observed above the freezing plane. The increase in hydraulic conductivity was highest at the top of the specimen and decreased with depth. Changes in hydraulic conductivity also occurred at depths 150 mm below the freezing plane, where desiccation occurred because of water redistribution. Numerous horizontal and vertical cracks formed in the soil mass. Dissection of the sample after permeation revealed that the cracks were laden with water. Cracking was greatest at the surface and became less frequent with depth. For depths greater than 150 mm below the freezing plane, cracking was absent. The frequency of cracks is consistent with principles of mechanistic models of soil freezing. The results of laboratory tests were used to predict the hydraulic conductivity of the large specimen. Tests were conducted on specimens subjected to various freeze-thaw cycles, temperature gradients, and states of stress. It was found that the predicted hydraulic conductivities were lower than those measured on the large specimen, but they closely resembled the trend in hydraulic conductivity with depth

  1. Photoinduced charge separation in a colloidal system of exfoliated layered semiconductor controlled by coexisting aluminosilicate clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Yamada, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2009-02-05

    We investigated photoinduced charge separation occurring in a multicomponent colloidal system composed of oxide nanosheets of photocatalytically active niobate and photochemically inert clay and electron accepting methylviologen dications (MV2+). The inorganic nanosheets were obtained by exfoliation of layered hexaniobate and hectorite clay. The niobate and clay nanosheets were spatially separated in the colloidally dispersed state, and the MV2+ molecules were selectively adsorbed on the clay platelets. UV irradiation of the colloids led to electron transfer from the niobate nanosheets to the MV2+ molecules adsorbed on clay. The photoinduced electron transfer produced methylviologen radical cations (MV*+), which was characterized by high yield and long lifetime. The yield and stability of the MV*+ species were found to depend strongly on the clay content of the colloid: from a few mol % to approximately 70 mol % of the yield and several tens of minutes to more than 40 h of the lifetime. The contents of the niobate nanosheets and MV2+ molecules and the aging of the colloid also affected the photoinduced charge separation. In the absence of MV2+ molecules in the colloid, UV irradiation induced electron accumulation in the niobate nanosheets. The stability of the electron-accumulated state also depended on the clay content. The variation in the photochemical behavior is discussed in relation to the viscosity of the colloid.

  2. Compact Layers of Hybrid Halide Perovskites Fabricated via the Aerosol Deposition Process—Uncoupling Material Synthesis and Layer Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Panzer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the successful fabrication of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layers by the aerosol deposition method (ADM. The layers show high structural purity and compactness, thus making them suitable for application in perovskite-based optoelectronic devices. By using the aerosol deposition method we are able to decouple material synthesis from layer processing. Our results therefore allow for enhanced and easy control over the fabrication of perovskite-based devices, further paving the way for their commercialization.

  3. Improving the photovoltaic parameters in Quantum dot sensitized solar cells through employment of chemically deposited compact titania blocking layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Prasad, M.B., E-mail: rajendraprasadmb75@gmail.com [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, SavitibaiPhule Pune University, Pune, 411007 (India); National Defence Academy, Khadakwasla, Pune, 411023 (India); Kadam, Vishal [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, SavitibaiPhule Pune University, Pune, 411007 (India); Joo, Oh-Shim [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box No. 131, Chongryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Pathan, Habib M. [Advanced Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, SavitibaiPhule Pune University, Pune, 411007 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Incorporation of compact blocking layer at the Transparent Conducting Oxide (TCO)/Electrolyte interface is an effective method to improve the device performance in QDSSC through mitigation of electron recombinations at this interface. This paper reports the most facile and cost effective method of depositing a rutile titania Compact Layer (CL) over Fluorine doped Tin Oxide (FTO) substrate and its application in titania based CdS QD sensitized solar cells. The deposited compact layers are characterized to study their structural, optical, morphological and electrochemical properties using X-Ray Diffractometry, UV–Visible spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry and Contact Angle measurements. Sandwich solar cells are fabricated using these CL based electrodes and characterized using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Open Circuit Voltage Decay and J-V characteristics. The CL incorporated CdS QDSSC showed more than 100% increase in the photoconversion efficiency (1.68%) as compared to its bare FTO counterpart (0.73%) proving the efficacy of employed strategy. - Highlights: • Deposited titania compact layer by a facile room temperature chemical bath method. • Employed this to mitigate back electron transfer at TCO/Electrolyte interface. • Compact layer incorporation has improved the solar cell performance by 130%.

  4. Lime as an Anti-Plasticizer for Self-Compacting Clay Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanli Landrou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the modification of clay properties with inorganic additives to deflocculate and flocculate inorganic soil for the development of a material that would be as easy to use as the current concrete products, but with a much lower environmental impact. Considering that the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, we first introduce potential determining ions to deflocculate the clay particles and to reduce the yield stress of the earth material. Their efficiency is characterized using zeta potential measurements and rheological tests. We then achieve the flocculation of clay particles by using natural minerals that slowly dissolve in the interstitial liquid and ultimately precipitate calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H. The precipitation products are identified by X-ray diffraction and the consequences of this delayed precipitation are followed by oscillatory rheometric measurements. Finally, it is suggested that in this process, C–S–H precipitation is not used as a binding vector but as an anti-plasticizer that removes the inorganic dispersant additives.

  5. Catsius Clay Project. Calculation and Testing of Behaviour of Unsaturated Clay as Barrier in Radioactive Waste Repositories. Stage 2: Validation Exercises at Laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E E; Alcoverro, J

    1999-07-01

    Stage 2 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at Laboratory Scale includes two Benchmarks, Benchmark 2.1: Oedometer Suction Controlled Tests on Samples of compacted Boom Clay and Benchmark 2.2: Small Scale Weltting-Heating Test on Compacted Bentonite. BM 2.1 had two parts: BM 2.1A (volumetric deformation upon wetting-drying cycles) and BM 2.1 B (swelling pressure test). In BM 2.1A, participants were asked to model the results of a series of five tests on samples of compacted Boom clay. In BM 2.1B, a swelling pressure test in which suction, vertical and horizontal stresses were monitored, was proposed as a blind exercise. Participants were asked to use, without further changes, the models calibrated in BM 2.1A. This exercise provides an evaluation of the capabilities of current mechanical constitutive models for unsaturated clay behaviour. It was found that, even if a calibration exercise on the basis of known experimental data is satisfactory, blind predictions of tests involving different paths may prove difficult. The test set up for BM 2.2 consisted of a stainless stell cell filled with highly expansive compacted bentonite (S2 clay from Almeria, Spain). The clay was subjected to a simultaneous central heating and a progressive water inflow through the botton plate. Temperature at various locations within the sample and the boundary radial stress were monitored throughout the test. Water content distribution was also measured at the end of the experiment. Predictions for this benchmark required the solution of field equations for flow, temperature distribution and mechanical analysis. Model parameters were derived from the extensive set of available experiments on this clay. Comparison between model predictions and measurements revealed the significance of water transport in vapour phase, the difficulties to predict boundary stresses and the general good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures. The report provides a detailed accojnt of the

  6. Catsius Clay Project. Calculation and Testing of Behaviour of Unsaturated Clay as Barrier in Radioactive Waste Repositories. Stage 2: Validation Exercises at Laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stage 2 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at Laboratory Scale includes two Benchmarks, Benchmark 2.1: Oedometer Suction Controlled Tests on Samples of compacted Boom Clay and Benchmark 2.2: Small Scale Weltting-Heating Test on Compacted Bentonite. BM 2.1 had two parts: BM 2.1A (volumetric deformation upon wetting-drying cycles) and BM 2.1 B (swelling pressure test). In BM 2.1A, participants were asked to model the results of a series of five tests on samples of compacted Boom clay. In BM 2.1B, a swelling pressure test in which suction, vertical and horizontal stresses were monitored, was proposed as a blind exercise. Participants were asked to use, without further changes, the models calibrated in BM 2.1A. This exercise provides an evaluation of the capabilities of current mechanical constitutive models for unsaturated clay behaviour. It was found that, even if a calibration exercise on the basis of known experimental data is satisfactory, blind predictions of tests involving different paths may prove difficult. The test set up for BM 2.2 consisted of a stainless stell cell filled with highly expansive compacted bentonite (S2 clay from Almeria, Spain). The clay was subjected to a simultaneous central heating and a progressive water inflow through the botton plate. Temperature at various locations within the sample and the boundary radial stress were monitored throughout the test. Water content distribution was also measured at the end of the experiment. Predictions for this benchmark required the solution of field equations for flow, temperature distribution and mechanical analysis. Model parameters were derived from the extensive set of available experiments on this clay. Comparison between model predictions and measurements revealed the significance of water transport in vapour phase, the difficulties to predict boundary stresses and the general good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures. The report provides a detailed accojnt of the

  7. Effect of chemical retention on anionic species diffusion in compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazer-Bachi, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    Anionic radioisotopes are of particular importance within the framework of the calculated health risk associated with high-level and long-lived intermediate-level underground radioactive waste disposal. Therefore, the objective of this work is the construction of a transport model coupled with chemistry in order to quantify the behaviour of anionic solutes in the Callovo-Oxfordian (CO_x) argillite, the argillaceous host rock of the ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne underground laboratory. An experimental methodology was defined to characterize this migration, several experimental methods being implemented: batch experiments, laboratory columns and through-diffusion cells. The study of the diffusion of the non-sorbing anionic tracer "3"6Cl"- highlighted the fact that, due to anionic exclusion, anions only had access to a part of the porosity. The retention of "3"5SO_4"2"- and "1"2"5I- on CO_x argillite was then characterized, quantified by batch experiments and confirmed by other experimental methods. Nevertheless, their migration was less retarded than expected by a model based on batch experiments and on "3"6Cl"- diffusive data. This difference was explained by anion exclusion which reduced sorption site accessibility. Thus, the intensity of this phenomenon has to be considered to model anion migration in compacted clays. (author) [fr

  8. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  9. A compact multi-wire-layered secondary winding for Tesla transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Su, Jian-Cang; Li, Rui; Wu, Xiao-Long; Xu, Xiu-Dong; Qiu, Xu-Dong; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Peng-Cheng

    2017-05-01

    A compact multi-wire-layered (MWL) secondary winding for a Tesla transformer is put forward. The basic principle of this winding is to wind the metal wire on a polymeric base tube in a multi-layer manner. The tube is tapered and has high electrical strength and high mechanical strength. Concentric-circle grooves perpendicular to the axis of the tube are carved on the surface of the tube to wind the wire. The width of the groove is basically equal to the diameter of the wire so that the metal wire can be fixed in the groove without glue. The depth of the groove is n times of the diameter of the wire to realize the n-layer winding manner. All the concentric-circle grooves are connected via a spiral groove on the surface of the tube to let the wire go through. Compared with the traditional one-wire-layered (OWL) secondary winding for the Tesla transformer, the most conspicuous advantage of the MWL secondary winding is that the latter is compact with only a length of 2/n of the OWL. In addition, the MWL winding has the following advantages: high electrical strength since voids are precluded from the surface of the winding, high mechanical strength because polymer is used as the material of the base tube, and reliable fixation in the Tesla transformer as special mechanical connections are designed. A 2000-turn MWL secondary winding is fabricated with a winding layer of 3 and a total length of 1.0 m. Experiments to test the performance of this winding on a Tesla-type pulse generator are conducted. The results show that this winding can boost the voltage to 1 MV at a repetition rate of 50 Hz reliably for a lifetime longer than 10 4 pulses, which proves the feasibility of the MWL secondary winding.

  10. Accurate control testing for clay liner permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R J

    1991-08-01

    Two series of centrifuge tests were carried out to evaluate the use of centrifuge modelling as a method of accurate control testing of clay liner permeability. The first series used a large 3 m radius geotechnical centrifuge and the second series a small 0.5 m radius machine built specifically for research on clay liners. Two permeability cells were fabricated in order to provide direct data comparisons between the two methods of permeability testing. In both cases, the centrifuge method proved to be effective and efficient, and was found to be free of both the technical difficulties and leakage risks normally associated with laboratory permeability testing of fine grained soils. Two materials were tested, a consolidated kaolin clay having an average permeability coefficient of 1.2{times}10{sup -9} m/s and a compacted illite clay having a permeability coefficient of 2.0{times}10{sup -11} m/s. Four additional tests were carried out to demonstrate that the 0.5 m radius centrifuge could be used for linear performance modelling to evaluate factors such as volumetric water content, compaction method and density, leachate compatibility and other construction effects on liner leakage. The main advantages of centrifuge testing of clay liners are rapid and accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties and realistic stress modelling for performance evaluations. 8 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Effect of temperature on compact layer of Pt electrode in PEMFCs by first-principles molecular dynamics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Chen, Changfeng, E-mail: chen_c_f@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Yu, Haobo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Failure, Corrosion and Protection of Oil/gas Facilities, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China); Lu, Guiwu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum (Beijing), Beijing 102249 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The structures of water compact layer on Pt(111) at different temperature were calculated. • The feature of chemical bond between water molecules and Pt (111) surface was discussed with temperature increased. • Temperature dependence of electrical strengths and capacitances of compact layer on Pt (111) surface was calculated. - Abstract: Formation of the double-layer electric field and capacitance of the water-metal interface is of significant interest in physicochemical processes. In this study, we perform first- principles molecular dynamics simulations on the water/Pt(111) interface to investigate the temperature dependence of the compact layer electric field and capacitance based on the calculated charge densities. On the Pt (111) surface, water molecules form ice-like structures that exhibit more disorder along the height direction with increasing temperature. The O−H bonds of more water molecules point toward the Pt surface to form Pt−H covalent bonds with increasing temperature, which weaken the corresponding O−H bonds. In addition, our calculated capacitance at 300 K is 15.2 mF/cm{sup 2}, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. As the temperature increases from 10 to 450 K, the field strength and capacitance of the compact layer on Pt (111) first increase and then decrease slightly, which is significant for understanding the water/Pt interface from atomic level.

  12. A three-scale model for ionic solute transport in swelling clays incorporating ion-ion correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien Dung; Moyne, Christian; Murad, Marcio A.

    2015-01-01

    A new three-scale model is proposed to describe the movement of ionic species of different valences in swelling clays characterized by three separate length scales (nano, micro, and macro) and two levels of porosity (nano- and micropores). At the finest (nano) scale the medium is treated as charged clay particles saturated by aqueous electrolyte solution containing monovalent and divalent ions forming the electrical double layer. A new constitutive law is constructed for the disjoining pressure based on the numerical resolution of non-local problem at the nanoscale which, in contrast to the Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point charge ions, is capable of capturing the short-range interactions between the ions due to their finite size. At the intermediate scale (microscale), the two-phase homogenized particle/electrolyte solution system is represented by swollen clay clusters (or aggregates) with the nanoscale disjoining pressure incorporated in a modified form of Terzaghi's effective principle. At the macroscale, the electro-chemical-mechanical couplings within clay clusters is homogenized with the ion transport in the bulk fluid lying in the micro pores. The resultant macroscopic picture is governed by a three-scale model wherein ion transport takes place in the bulk solution strongly coupled with the mechanics of the clay clusters which play the role of sources/sinks of mass to the bulk fluid associated with ion adsorption/desorption in the electrical double layer at the nanoscale. Within the context of the quasi-steady version of the multiscale model, wherein the electrolyte solution in the nanopores is assumed at instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium with the bulk fluid in the micropores, we build-up numerically the ion-adsorption isotherms along with the constitutive law of the retardation coefficients of monovalent and divalent ions. In addition, the constitutive law for the macroscopic swelling pressure is reconstructed numerically showing patterns of

  13. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    to be the case for high plasticity clays that are uncemented, and with a high content of clay minerals, especially smectite. Oedometer tests on samples from the Paleogene period show that 80% or more of the compaction will recover when unloaded, and if unloaded to a stress lower than in situ stress level...

  14. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  15. Nanostructural drug-inorganic clay composites: Structure, thermal property and in vitro release of captopril-intercalated Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Zou Kang; Guo Shaohuan; Duan Xue

    2006-01-01

    A nanostructural drug-inorganic clay composite involving a pharmaceutically active compound captopril (Cpl) intercalated Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides (Cpl-LDHs) with Mg/Al molar ratio of 2.06 has been assembled by coprecipitation method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and Raman spectra analysis indicate a successful intercalation of Cpl between the layers with a vertical orientation of Cpl disulphide-containing S-S linkage. SEM photo indicates that as-synthesized Cpl-LDHs possess compact and non-porous structure with approximately and linked elliptical shape particles of ca. 50 nm. TG-DTA analyses suggest that the thermal stability of intercalated organic species is largely enhanced due to host-guest interaction involving the hydrogen bond compared to pure form before intercalation. The in vitro release studies show that both the release rate and release percentages markedly decrease with increasing pH from 4.60 to 7.45 due to possible change of release mechanism during the release process. The kinetic simulation for the release data, and XRD and FT-IR analyses for samples recovered from release media indicate that the dissolution mechanism is mainly responsible for the release behaviour of Cpl-LDHs at pH 4.60, while the ion-exchange one is responsible for that at pH 7.45. - Graphical abstract: Based on XRD, FT-IR and Raman spectra analyses, it is suggested that captopril (Cpl) exists as its disulphide metabolites in the interlayer of Mg-Al-LDHs via hydrogen bonding between guest carboxylate function and hydroxyl group of the host layers. A schematic supramolecular structure of Cpl intercalates involving a vertical orientation of Cpl disulphide-containing S-S bond between the layers with carboxylate anions pointing to both hydroxide layers is presented

  16. Use of clays as buffers in radioactive repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1983-05-01

    For use as canister overpack, highly compacted bentonite is superior to illite and any reasonably montmorillonite-rich bentonite will do which is not too rich in sulphur. The organic content should be low and heat treatment may be required to bring this content down to an acceptable level. Heating to slightly more than 400degreeC does not affect the physical properties of neither montmorillonite, nor illite to a significant extent. Bentonite is also very suitable for use as sealing plugs in the form of highly compacted blocks. For use as backfill in tunnels and shafts, illitic clay is a candidate material which can be compacted on site to the rather high density that is required. Where a swelling capacity is needed, such as in the top part of tunnels, bentonite-based backfills are suitable and if Na saturated clay is used the bentoite fraction can be kept low. Thus, a 10 percent content of Na bentonite by weight should generally be sufficient for a well compacted mixture with respect to the required hydraulic conductivity, while a 20-30 percent content may be needed to arrive at a sufficient swelling power. The choice of a suitable clay material requires that the substance be properly characterized and tested. It is concluded that rather rigorous analyses are necessary as concerns overpacks, including mineralogical and granulometrical tests and the determination of the swelling characteristics as well as of certain chemical features. For backfills and for the current checking of all sorts of clay for use as buffer materials, the natural water content, the liquid limit and the swelling ability have to be determined, since they are the fingerprints of this type of soil. (author)

  17. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange ...

  18. The Photocatalytic Activity and Compact Layer Characteristics of TiO2 Films Prepared Using Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 compact layers are used in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs to prevent charge recombination between the electrolyte and the transparent conductive substrate (indium tin oxide, ITO; fluorine-doped tin oxide, FTO. Thin TiO2 compact layers are deposited onto ITO/glass by means of radio frequency (rf magnetron sputtering, using deposition parameters that ensure greater photocatalytic activity and increased DSSC conversion efficiency. The photoinduced decomposition of methylene blue (MB and the photoinduced hydrophilicity of the TiO2 thin films are also investigated. The photocatalytic performance characteristics for the deposition of TiO2 films are improved by using the Grey-Taguchi method. The average transmittance in the visible region exceeds 85% for all samples. The XRD patterns of the TiO2 films, for sol-gel with spin coating of porous TiO2/TiO2 compact/ITO/glass, show a good crystalline structure. In contrast, without the TiO2 compact layer (only porous TiO2, the peak intensity of the anatase (101 plane in the XRD patterns for the TiO2 film has a lower value, which demonstrates inferior crystalline quality. With a TiO2 compact layer to prevent charge recombination, a higher short-circuit current density is obtained. The DSSC with the FTO/glass and Pt counter electrode demonstrates the energy conversion efficiency increased.

  19. Large scale laboratory diffusion experiments in clay rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T.; Mingarro, M.; Martin, P.L.; Cormenzana, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Clay formations are potential host rocks for high-level radioactive waste repositories. In clay materials the radionuclide diffusion is the main transport mechanism. Thus, the understanding of the diffusion processes and the determination of diffusion parameters in conditions as similar as possible to the real ones, are critical for the performance assessment of deep geological repository. Diffusion coefficients are mainly measured in the laboratory using small samples, after a preparation to fit into the diffusion cell. In addition, a few field tests are usually performed for confirming laboratory results, and analyse scale effects. In field or 'in situ' tests the experimental set-up usually includes the injection of a tracer diluted in reconstituted formation water into a packed off section of a borehole. Both experimental systems may produce artefacts in the determination of diffusion coefficients. In laboratory the preparation of the sample can generate structural change mainly if the consolidated clay have a layered fabric, and in field test the introduction of water could modify the properties of the saturated clay in the first few centimeters, just where radionuclide diffusion is expected to take place. In this work, a large scale laboratory diffusion experiment is proposed, using a large cylindrical sample of consolidated clay that can overcome the above mentioned problems. The tracers used were mixed with clay obtained by drilling a central hole, re-compacted into the hole at approximately the same density as the consolidated block and finally sealed. Neither additional treatment of the sample nor external monitoring are needed. After the experimental time needed for diffusion to take place (estimated by scoping calculations) the block was sampled to obtain a 3D distribution of the tracer concentration and the results were modelled. An additional advantage of the proposed configuration is that it could be used in 'in situ

  20. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trieves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  1. A brilliant sandwich type fluorescent nanostructure incorporating a compact quantum dot layer and versatile silica substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jing; Foda, Mohamed; Liu, Jiawei; Cai, Kai; Han, Heyou

    2014-03-18

    A "hydrophobic layer in silica" structure was designed to integrate a compact quantum dot (QD) layer with high quantum yield into scalable silica hosts containing desired functionality. This was based on metal affinity driven assembly of hydrophobic QDs with versatile silica substrates and homogeneous encapsulation of organosilica/silica layers.

  2. Determination of membrane behaviour during transport of pollutants n clay barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musso, M.; Pejon, O.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in clay barriers had a extensive development in environmental geotechnics. The most studied transport processes are solutes by advection - dispersion and diffusion generated by hydraulic and chemical gradients respectively. Greater attention should be given to the chemical - osmotic flow and behavior membrane clay barriers, since in one case the water molecules move through the existence of a chemical gradient and on the other the means totally or partially inhibits the passage of solutes. The team developed to measure these processes was constructed based on items international literature and performance was verified using two types of materials KCl solution . One material is a bentonite geocomposite (Geosynthetic Clay Liner GCL ) similar to that used by other researchers. The other material is a soil barrier compacted clay (Compacted Clay Liner CCL) Fm. Corumbataí (Permian), belonging to the Paraná basin in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil . The results show the proper performance of the equipment built . Osmotic pressure generation and membrane performance was verified for both samples. Further corroborated influence of the type of clay mineral in the osmotic pressure generated value and membrane behavior

  3. Characterization of groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Spek, J.E.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater dynamics may play a significant role in landslides. A detailed model is developed of the groundwater dynamics in landslides in varved clays in the Trièves area in the French Alps. The varved clays consist of a sequence of alternating silt and clay layers, covered by a colluvium layer and

  4. Protocol for characterization of clay as a backfill and coverage layers for surface repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daisy M.M.; Tello, Clédola C.O.

    2017-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management includes the operations since generation of the waste until its storage in repository, ensuring the protection of human beings and the environment from the possible negative impacts. The radioactive waste is segregated, treated, conditioned in suitable packages for posterior storage or disposal in repository. The 'RBMN Project' objective is to implement the repository for the disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities in Brazil, proposing a definitive solution for their storage. Engineered and natural barriers as the backfill and coverage layers will compose the disposal system of a near surface repository, concept proposed by the 'RBMN Project'. The use of these barriers aims to avoid or restrict the release of radionuclides from the waste to the human beings and environment. The waterproofing barriers are composed of clays. Certainly, for the national repository, will be used those clays existing in the place where it will be constructed. Them some basic tests will have to be carried out to verify the suitability of these clays as barriers. These tests were determined and performed with reference clay, a Brazilian bentonite constituted of 67.2% montmorillonite. The results were compared with national and international literature of materials with similar mineralogical features. The values found with 95% of confidence interval were 9.73±0,35 μm for granulometric size; 13,3±0,6% for the moisture content and 816±9 mmol.kg -1 for the capacity of cationic exchange. A protocol for characterization of clay was elaborated presenting these tests for it future use. (author)

  5. Protocol for characterization of clay as a backfill and coverage layers for surface repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daisy M.M.; Tello, Clédola C.O., E-mail: marymarchezini@gmail.com, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management includes the operations since generation of the waste until its storage in repository, ensuring the protection of human beings and the environment from the possible negative impacts. The radioactive waste is segregated, treated, conditioned in suitable packages for posterior storage or disposal in repository. The 'RBMN Project' objective is to implement the repository for the disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities in Brazil, proposing a definitive solution for their storage. Engineered and natural barriers as the backfill and coverage layers will compose the disposal system of a near surface repository, concept proposed by the 'RBMN Project'. The use of these barriers aims to avoid or restrict the release of radionuclides from the waste to the human beings and environment. The waterproofing barriers are composed of clays. Certainly, for the national repository, will be used those clays existing in the place where it will be constructed. Them some basic tests will have to be carried out to verify the suitability of these clays as barriers. These tests were determined and performed with reference clay, a Brazilian bentonite constituted of 67.2% montmorillonite. The results were compared with national and international literature of materials with similar mineralogical features. The values found with 95% of confidence interval were 9.73±0,35 μm for granulometric size; 13,3±0,6% for the moisture content and 816±9 mmol.kg{sup -1} for the capacity of cationic exchange. A protocol for characterization of clay was elaborated presenting these tests for it future use. (author)

  6. Multifunctional graded index TiO{sub 2} compact layer for performance enhancement in dye sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, M.H., E-mail: abuhanifahabllh@yahoo.com [NANO-Electronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M. [NANO-Electronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-01

    A specially tailored index TiO{sub 2} compact layer (arc-TiO{sub 2}) has been successfully deposited to serve as photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The employment of the TiO{sub 2} compact layer in the DSSC was systematically investigated by means of UV-absorption spectra, incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE), open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The higher and red-shifted transmittance spectra of the ITO/arc-TiO{sub 2} electrode mimic the IPCE spectra of the DSSC, in a specific wavelength region. Furthermore, the blue-shift of the UV-absorption spectra and lower R{sub 1} value obtained from EIS measurements implied the decrease of the charge interfacial resistance, and this consequently facilitates the charge transport from the nanocrystalline-TiO{sub 2} to the ITO. The integrated effects of the arc-TiO{sub 2} compact layer originate the remarkable improvement in this type of DSSC applications. As a result, the arc-TiO{sub 2}-based DSSC showed higher conversion efficiency of about 4.38%, representing almost 53% increment compared to bare ITO cell. This work also discuss the fundamental insight of the compact layer that determines the origin of such improvement in the DSSC performance.

  7. Research on swelling clays and bitumen as sealing materials for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.A.; Wilson, J.; Mawditt, J.M.; Hurt, J.C.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a programme of research to investigate the performance of composite seals comprising juxtaposed blocks of highly compacted bentonite clay and bitumen. It is shown that interaction of the materials can promote a self-sealing mechanism which prevents weather penetration, even when defects are present in the bitumen layer. Factors affecting seal performance are examined by means of laboratory experiments, and implications for the design of repository backfilling and sealing systems are discussed. It is concluded that design principles and material specifications should be further developed on the basis of large scale experiments. (author)

  8. Phosphonium modified clay/polyimide nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Hatice; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, octyltriphenylphosphonium bromide [OTPP-Br] was prepared from the reaction of triphenylphosphine and 1 -bromooctane. The modification of clay was done by ion exchange reaction using OTPP-Br in water medium. Poly(amic acid) was prepared from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-Oxydianiline (ODA). Polyimide(PI)/clay hybrids were prepared by blending of poly(amic acid) and organically modified clay as a type of layered clays. The morphology of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structures of polyimide and Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  9. High-stability Ti{sup 4+} precursor for the TiO{sub 2} compact layer of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Qinghua; Cong, Shan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Yinghui; Lou, Yanhui; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed an aqueous polymer-assisted deposition method to improve the chemical stability of the TiCl{sub 4} aqueous solution. • The Ti{sup 4+} is encapsulated by the polymer can maintain their initial performances for several months. • The film is dense, smooth and uniform, preparing by this method. • The power conversion efficiency of the DSSC based on P-TiO{sub 2} compact film is about 12.5% higher than that based on H-TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: A compact layer (blocking layer) can effectively block the direct contact between the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrate and electrolyte in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The TiCl{sub 4} hydrolysis has been widely adopted for preparing the TiO{sub 2} compact layer (H-TiO{sub 2}). However, the TiCl{sub 4} aqueous solution is unstable for its high reactivity. To improve the chemical stability of TiCl{sub 4} aqueous solution, the Ti{sup 4+} is encapsulated by the polymer, polyethyleneimine (PEI). Experimentals show that the Ti-PEI precursor solution can maintain their initial performances for several months. The resulting TiO{sub 2} film (P-TiO{sub 2}) grown by the Ti-PEI precursor is dense, smooth and uniform without any visible and detectable cracks or voids. The P-TiO{sub 2} compact layer is even denser than the H-TiO{sub 2} compact layer, suggesting reducing the electron recombination and prolonging the electron lifetime in dye-sensitized solar cells. Indeed, the electron lifetime of the DSSC based on the P-TiO{sub 2} is 13.15 ms, which is longer than the 10.83 ms based on H-TiO{sub 2}. Meanwhile, the power conversion efficiency of the DSSC based on P-TiO{sub 2} compact film is about 12.5% higher than that based on H-TiO{sub 2}. Therefore, this encapsulation technology can not only improve the stability of the metal ions solution but also meet a large-scale fabrication demand of the TiO{sub 2} compact layer in future DSSCs.

  10. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Indraneel S; Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-08-11

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition.

  11. Preparation of intercalated polyaniline/clay nanocomposite and its

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intercalated composite of polyaniline and clay has been reported. The composite was prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline within the layers of `illite' clay. The composite was characterized for its structural, spectral, and microscopic properties. At higher level of loading the layered structure of composite breaks ...

  12. Compaction of porous rock by dissolution on discrete stylolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angheluta, Luiza; Mathiesen, Joachim; Aharonov, Einat

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of sedimentary porous rock by dissolution and precipitation is a complex deformation mechanism, that is often localized on stylolites and pressure solution seams. We consider a one-dimensional model of compaction near a thin clay-rich stylolite embedded in a porous rock. Under...

  13. Adjustment of Conduction Band Edge of Compact TiO2 Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells Through TiCl4 Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takurou N; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Funaki, Takashi; Cojocaru, Ludmila; Kazaoui, Said; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2017-10-25

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) without a mesoporous TiO 2 layer, that is, planar-type PSCs exhibit poorer cell performance as compared to PSCs with a porous TiO 2 layer, owing to inefficient electron transfer from the perovskite layer to the compact TiO 2 layer in the former case. The matching of the conduction band levels of perovskite and the compact TiO 2 layer is thus essential for enhancing PSC performance. In this study, we demonstrate the shifting of the conduction band edge (CBE) of the compact TiO 2 layer through a TiCl 4 treatment, with the aim of improving PSC performance. The CBE of the compact TiO 2 layer was shifted to a higher level through the TiCl 4 treatment and then shifted in the opposite direction, that is, to a lower level, through a subsequent heat treatment. These shifts in the CBE were reflected in the PSC performance. The TiCl 4 -treated PSC showed an increase in the open-circuit voltage of more than 150 mV, as well as a decrease of 100 mV after being heated at 450 °C. On the other hand, the short-circuit current decreased after the treatment but increased after heating at temperatures higher than 300 °C. The treated PSC subjected to subsequent heating at 300 °C exhibited the best performance, with the power conversion efficiency of the PSC being 17% under optimized conditions.

  14. Can urban tree roots improve infiltration through compacted subsoils for stormwater management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartens, Julia; Day, Susan D; Harris, J Roger; Dove, Joseph E; Wynn, Theresa M

    2008-01-01

    Global land use patterns and increasing pressures on water resources demand creative urban stormwater management. Strategies encouraging infiltration can enhance groundwater recharge and water quality. Urban subsoils are often relatively impermeable, and the construction of many stormwater detention best management practices (D-BMPs) exacerbates this condition. Root paths can act as conduits for water, but this function has not been demonstrated for stormwater BMPs where standing water and dense subsoils create a unique environment. We examined whether tree roots can penetrate compacted subsoils and increase infiltration rates in the context of a novel infiltration BMP (I-BMP). Black oak (Quercus velutina Lam.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) trees, and an unplanted control, were installed in cylindrical planting sleeves surrounded by clay loam soil at two compaction levels (bulk density = 1.3 or 1.6 g cm(-3)) in irrigated containers. Roots of both species penetrated the more compacted soil, increasing infiltration rates by an average of 153%. Similarly, green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) trees were grown in CUSoil (Amereq Corp., New York) separated from compacted clay loam subsoil (1.6 g cm(-3)) by a geotextile. A drain hole at mid depth in the CUSoil layer mimicked the overflow drain in a stormwater I-BMP thus allowing water to pool above the subsoil. Roots penetrated the geotextile and subsoil and increased average infiltration rate 27-fold compared to unplanted controls. Although high water tables may limit tree rooting depth, some species may be effective tools for increasing water infiltration and enhancing groundwater recharge in this and other I-BMPs (e.g., raingardens and bioswales).

  15. Inhibition of Ion Transfer Reactions by Compact Layers at a Liquid/liquid Interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maeda, K.; Jänchenová, Hana; Lhotský, Alexandr; Stibor, I.; Budka, J.; Mareček, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 17, Supplement (2002), s. 325-327 ISSN 0910-6340 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : immiscible electrolytes * compact layer * polymerisation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.844, year: 2002

  16. Thermo-hydro-mechanical characterization of the Spanish reference clay material for engineered barrier for granite and clay HLW repository: laboratory and small mock up testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, M.V.

    1995-01-01

    This report refers to the work carried out by Technic Geologic Division of CIEMAT (CIEMAT.DT.TG) coordinated by SCK/CEN (Belgium), participating besides UPC-DIT and University of Wales on the framework of CEC Contract F12W-CT91-0102 (DOEO). It presents the results obtained. The total results on the project will be published by CE in the EUR series. The role of CIEMAT in this project was to carry out tests in which the conditions of the clay barrier in the repository were simulated. The interaction of heat coming from the wastes and of water coming from the geological medium has been reproduced on compacted clay blocks. For the performance of tests on high density compacted clay blocks (Task 2.1) and for the cementation and chemical-mineralogical transformation studies two different cells were designed and constructed in stainless steel: a thermohydraulic cell and an alteration cell. The experiments performed in these cells have provided us with a better knowledge of the heat source, hydration system and sensors, as well as interesting data on heat and water diffusion. A revision of the experiments performed on the thermohydraulic cell was presented at the ''International Workshop on Thermomechanics of Clays and Clay Barriers'' held in Bergamo in October'93 (Villar et al. 1993)

  17. Clay modified crushed salt for shaft sealing elements. Material optimization and evaluation in field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaubach, Uwe; Hofmann, Martin; Gruner, Matthias; Kudla, Wolfram [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. of Mining and Special Civil Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Salt-based materials are intended to use for backfill and sealing systems in geotechnical barriers in underground HLW-repositories. Due to the creep of the saliniferous host rock, the salt backfill will be compacted during several hundreds or thousands years of operation to a minimum of porosity resp. permeability. To raise the sealing potential of a salt-based backfill, the porosity after construction should be minimized by optimal material performance and compaction performance. A procedure to optimize the grain size distribution of crushed salt and its water and clay content is described. The optimized salt fraction gets a better compaction behavior than straight mine-run salt. The addition of a filler-like material (e.g. Friedland Clay Powder) reduces the total porosity and permeability. Backfill columns made from crushed salt and clay probably include an instant sealing function.

  18. Backfilling with mixtures of bentonite/ballast materials or natural smectitic clay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1998-10-01

    Comparison of the performance of backfills of mixed MX-80 and crushed rock ballast, and a natural smectitic clay, represented by the German Friedland clay, shows that the latter performs better than mixtures with up to 30 % MX-80. Considering cost, Friedland clay prepared to yield air-dry powder grains is cheaper than mixtures of 30 % MX-80 and crushed ballast. Both technically and economically it appears that the Friedland clay is a competitive alternative to mixtures of 30 % MX-80 and crushed ballast. However, it remains to be demonstrated on a full scale that Friedland clay ground to a suitable grain size distribution can be acceptably compacted on site

  19. Choice of french clays as engineered barrier components for waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, H.; Lajudie, A.; Debrabant, P.; Atabek, R.; Jorda, M.; Andre-Jehan, R.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented of physical measurements on candidate buffer materials for use in nuclear fuel waste disposal. The materials being considered as constituent elements of engineered barriers are essentially calcium smectite clays, in other terms swelling clays, coming from fourteen french deposits. The criteria for good candidates are mainly: smectite content in the clay materials, carbonate and organic material content and bulk density of the material, compacted under a pressure of 100 MPa. 14 references, 4 figures, 6 tables

  20. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  1. Factors that influence the design of modified clays - or how knowing your clay can save your day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, W.P.; Slade, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Smectites vary greatly in their permanent layer charge characteristics, including total charge, distribution of charge between tetrahedral and octahedral sheets and heterogeneity of charge from flake to flake. Smectites and vermiculites are different from the micaceous layer silicates in their ability to swell by the uptake of cations and polar and non polar solvents. Vermiculites differ from the smectites predominantly in the large contribution of tetrahedrally located charge relative to their total layer charge density. Understanding of the complex relations between layer charge and interlayer space of clay mineral surfaces can be applied toward the design of optimal organically modified clays suitable for environmental and industrial uses. In general, it is known that smectite charge density dictates the total amount of modifying organic cation that can be added to a particular clay, the orientation that the organic cation adopts within the interlayer spaces with respect to the siloxane surfaces of the clay and ultimately, the capacity of specific, organically modified clay to imbibe contaminants or other compounds. These same properties are dependent on the size and configuration of the modifying organic cation(s) as well as the percentage of the exchange capacity utilised, and thus, the amount of specific surface of the clay that is covered by the modifying organic cation. All these factors must be kept in mind in the design of inexpensive and useful modified clays. This paper reports on the application of polarised FT-IR and X-ray diffraction methods to the observation that layer charge density governs the orientation of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) cations in the interlayer space of smectites and vermiculites. The TMPA exchanged forms of several smectites and vermiculites were studied, whose layer charges ranged between X=0.37 and X=0.95 e - per formula unit and in which the location of charge varied with respect to the octahedral and

  2. Hydration Phase Diagram of Clay Particles from Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorio, Tulio; Brochard, Laurent; Vandamme, Matthieu

    2017-11-07

    Adsorption plays a fundamental role in the behavior of clays. Because of the confinement between solid clay layers on the nanoscale, adsorbed water is structured in layers, which can occupy a specific volume. The transition between these states is intimately related to key features of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. In this article, we consider the hydration states of clays as phases and the transition between these states as phase changes. The thermodynamic formulation supporting this idea is presented. Then, the results from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of sodium montmorillonite are used to derive hydration phase diagrams. The stability analysis presented here explains the coexistence of different hydration states at clay particle scale and improves our understanding of the irreversibilities of clay thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior. Our results provide insights into the mechanics of the elementary constituents of clays, which is crucial for a better understanding of the macroscopic behavior of clay-rich rocks and soils.

  3. Hydraulic performance of Compacted Clay Liners (CCLs) under combined temperature and leachate exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaeef, A A; Rayhani, M T

    2014-12-01

    Experimental investigations were carried out to investigate the effect of thermo-chemical exposures on the hydraulic performance of Compacted Clay Liners (CCLs) in landfills. Hydraulic conductivity of most CCL specimens was increased by two to three times their initial values when exposed to 55 °C for 75 days. CCL specimens also experienced increases in their hydraulic conductivities when exposed to leachate at room temperature. This behaviour could be due to the decrease in viscosity when the permeant was changed from tap water to leachate. However, as the leachate exposure time exceeded the first 15 days, hydraulic conductivity readings decreased to as much as one order of magnitude after 75 days of leachate permeation at room temperature. The gradual decrease in the CCLs hydraulic conductivities was most likely due to chemical precipitation and clogging of pore voids within the soils which seemed to reduce the effective pore volume. The rate of hydraulic conductivity reduction due to leachate permeation was slower at higher temperatures, which was attributed to the lower permeant viscosity and lower clogging occurrence. The observed hydraulic behaviours were correlated to the physical, mineral, and chemical properties of the CCLs and described below. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Heterogeneous reactions of dioctahedral smectites in illite-smectite and kaolinite-smectite mixed-layers: applications to clay materials for engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, A.; Proust, D.; Beaufort, D.; Lajudie, A.; Petit, J.-C.

    1992-01-01

    The clay materials selected for use in the engineered barriers of the French nuclear waste isolation programme are mainly composed of dioctahedral smectite, either bentonite of Wyoming type or kaolinite-smectites most often consist of randomly stacked layers with low and high charges. In the case of the Wyoming-type bentonite, these two differently charged layers do not react in the same way when subjected to hydrothermal alteration. Overall, the low-charge smectite layers react to form high-charge smectite layers + quartz + kaolinite. Then, fixing K ions, the high-charge smectite layers are transformed into illite-smectite mixed-layers (I/S) when the temperature conditions increase. A symmetrical process is observed in natural or experimental hydrothermal conditions when the high-charge smectite layers of I/S minerals react with quartz and/or kaolinite to produce low-charge smectite layers. The chemical properties of the bentonite-engineered barriers clearly depend on the low charge/high charge smectite layer proportion, which is in turn controlled by the temperature-dependent reactions in the vicinity of the waste disposal. Although there are fewer published data on the kaolinite-smectite mixed-layered minerals (K/S), a similar low charge-high charge reaction appears to affect their smectite component. The experimental alteration of K/S leads to the formation of a low-charge beidellite with an increase in the cation-exchange capacity and in the expandability of the clay material. Thus, the properties of the engineered barrier seems to be improved after hydrothermal alteration. (Author)

  5. Thermal properties of clay-based buffer materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishna, H.S.

    1984-06-01

    The thermal properties of three types of bentonite clay, one illite-rich shale and one kaolin mixed with crushed granite were investigated. Thermal conductivity measurements were made over a range of mix proportions, moisture content, density and ambient temperature using the transient heat-probe method. The effects of thermal drying in the buffer zone prior to water uptake were investigated by means of laboratory-scale heater experiments. Illite-rich shale (Sealbond) and kaolin exhibited better compactability and thermal conductivity than the bentonite clays. The thermal conductivity of all types of clay buffers showed a high degree of moisture dependency and relatively no effect due to elevated temperature under high fluid pressure conditions. Bentonite buffers compacted to a dry density of 1200 to 1400 kg/m 3 showed extensive cracking due to differential shrinkage. Addition of crushed granite, and/or compaction to a higher density, reduced the thermal cracking of the buffer material

  6. Characterisation of the wall-slip during extrusion of heavy-clay products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocserha, I.; Gömze, A. L.; Kulkov, S.; Kalatur, E.; Buyakova, S. P.; Géber, R.; Buzimov, A. Y.

    2017-01-01

    During extrusion through the extrusion die, heavy-clay compounds are usually show plug flow with extensive slip at the wall of the die. In this study, the viscosity and the thickness of the slip layer were investigated. For the examination a brick-clay from Malyi (Hungary) deposit was applied as a raw material. The clay was characterised by XRPD, BET, SEM and granulometry. As the slip layer consists of suspension of the fine clay fraction so the clay minerals content of the clay (dviscosity of suspension with different water content was measured by means of rotational viscosimeter. The thickness of the slip layer was calculated from the measured viscosity and other data obtained from an earlier study with capillary rheometer. The calculated thickness value showed a tendency to reach a limit value by increasing the extrusion speed.

  7. Quantifying the thickness of the electrical double layer neutralizing a planar electrode: the capacitive compactness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; González-Tovar, Enrique; Chávez-Páez, Martín; Kłos, Jacek; Lamperski, Stanisław

    2017-12-20

    The spatial extension of the ionic cloud neutralizing a charged colloid or an electrode is usually characterized by the Debye length associated with the supporting charged fluid in the bulk. This spatial length arises naturally in the linear Poisson-Boltzmann theory of point charges, which is the cornerstone of the widely used Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek formalism describing the colloidal stability of electrified macroparticles. By definition, the Debye length is independent of important physical features of charged solutions such as the colloidal charge, electrostatic ion correlations, ionic excluded volume effects, or specific short-range interactions, just to mention a few. In order to include consistently these features to describe more accurately the thickness of the electrical double layer of an inhomogeneous charged fluid in planar geometry, we propose here the use of the capacitive compactness concept as a generalization of the compactness of the spherical electrical double layer around a small macroion (González-Tovar et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 120, 9782). To exemplify the usefulness of the capacitive compactness to characterize strongly coupled charged fluids in external electric fields, we use integral equations theory and Monte Carlo simulations to analyze the electrical properties of a model molten salt near a planar electrode. In particular, we study the electrode's charge neutralization, and the maximum inversion of the net charge per unit area of the electrode-molten salt system as a function of the ionic concentration, and the electrode's charge. The behaviour of the associated capacitive compactness is interpreted in terms of the charge neutralization capacity of the highly correlated charged fluid, which evidences a shrinking/expansion of the electrical double layer at a microscopic level. The capacitive compactness and its first two derivatives are expressed in terms of experimentally measurable macroscopic properties such as the

  8. Layer-by-layer assembly of thin film oxygen barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Woo-Sik; Rawson, Ian; Grunlan, Jaime C.

    2008-01-01

    Thin films of sodium montmorillonite clay and cationic polyacrylamide were grown on a polyethylene terephthalate film using layer-by-layer assembly. After 30 clay-polymer layers are deposited, with a thickness of 571 nm, the resulting transparent film has an oxygen transmission rate (OTR) below the detection limit of commercial instrumentation ( 2 /day/atm). This low OTR, which is unprecedented for a clay-filled polymer composite, is believed to be due to a brick wall nanostructure comprised of completely exfoliated clay in polymeric mortar. With an optical transparency greater than 90% and potential for microwaveability, this thin composite is a good candidate for foil replacement in food packaging and may also be useful for flexible electronics packaging

  9. Study of Diffusion Bonding of 45 Steel through the Compacted Nickel Powder Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeer, G. M.; Zelenkova, E. G.; Temnykh, V. I.; Tokmin, A. M.; Shubin, A. A.; Koroleva, Yu. P.; Mikheev, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    The microstructure of the transition zone and powder spacer, the concentration distribution of chemical elements over the width of the diffusion-bonded joint, and microhardness of 45 steel-compacted Ni powder spacer-45 steel layered composites formed by diffusion bonding have been investigated. It has been shown that the relative spacer thickness χ compacting pressure of 500 MPa. The solid-state diffusion bonding is accompanied by sintering the nickel powder spacer and the formation of the transition zone between the spacer and steel. The transition zone consists of solid solution of nickel in the α-Fe phase and ordered solid solution of iron in nickel (FeNi3).

  10. Backfilling with mixtures of bentonite/ballast materials or natural smectitic clay?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, (Sweden)

    1998-10-01

    Comparison of the performance of backfills of mixed MX-80 and crushed rock ballast, and a natural smectitic clay, represented by the German Friedland clay, shows that the latter performs better than mixtures with up to 30 % MX-80. Considering cost, Friedland clay prepared to yield air-dry powder grains is cheaper than mixtures of 30 % MX-80 and crushed ballast. Both technically and economically it appears that the Friedland clay is a competitive alternative to mixtures of 30 % MX-80 and crushed ballast. However, it remains to be demonstrated on a full scale that Friedland clay ground to a suitable grain size distribution can be acceptably compacted on site 14 refs, 32 figs, 6 tabs

  11. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  12. Hydration of swelling clay and bacteria interaction. An experimental in situ reaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the physical-chemical behaviour of swelling di-octahedral clays (smectites) and their interaction with aqueous solutions and bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens). Experimental results are presented for compacted clays, hydrated under confined volume conditions, using a new type of reaction-cell (the 'wet-cell' of Warr and Hoffman, 2004) that was designed for in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. For comparison, dispersed clay systems were studied using standard batch solutions subjected to varying degrees of agitation. The combination of time-dependent in situ XRD measurements with gravimetric measurements and calculated diffraction patterns using the CALCMIX software (Plancon and Drits, 1999) allowed to successful quantification of the dynamics of water uptake and storage. This analytical procedure combined with published water vapour adsorption data enabled determination of the abundance of structured water layers, developed in the interlayer space, and the amount of water contained in different storage sites (interlayers, surfaces and pore spaces). Qualitative information on surface area and textural organization was also estimated based on calculated changes in the average particle thickness and the organization of water layer structures (ordering). Abiotic smectite hydration experiments, using a range of natural and industrial bentonites (SWy-2, IBECO, MX80, TIXOTON), focused on defining the role of the interlayer cation, variable clay packing densities and the ionic strength of the infiltrating solution. The rate of smectite hydration, as expected, was seen to be highly dependent on the type of interlayer cation (enhanced for Ca as opposed to Na) and the ionic strength of solution (enhanced uptake rates with saline solutions, particularly as they infiltrate Na-smectite). A range of dynamic changes in micro textural state occurred as a function of packing density. These changes explain the differences in hydration behaviour observed

  13. Corrosion of iron and low alloyed steel within a water saturated brick of clay under anaerobic deep geological disposal conditions: An integrated experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.A.; Bataillon, C.; Schlegel, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behaviour of iron and low alloyed steels under simulated geological disposal conditions, related to long-term disposal of nuclear wastes in the site of Bure (Meuse-Haute Marne, Champagne, France). The dedicated experiment was a fully integrated set-up: three different bars of material (iron, steel or nickel) have been introduced inside a solid block of clay, which has been saturated with synthetic Bure water and maintained at 90 deg. C during 8 months. Two types of clay have been tested: first, a compacted MX80 (Wyoming, USA) and second, argilite directly taken from the Bure site (Callovo-Oxfordian). In situ electrochemistry has been performed: impedance spectra, chronopotentiometry... The samples have been analysed using a combination of techniques, such as SEM, XRD, EDS, μXAS, μRaman, gravimetry after desquamation. In both cases, the steel or the iron seemed to passivate in contact with the clay. Post-processing of the EIS determined the corrosion rates and the changes in the kinetics have been noticed. The post mortem analysis of the corrosion products showed in both cases the presence of an internal layer made of magnetite (Raman, EDX). The external layer was made of partially Ca-substituted siderite (Fe 1-x Ca x CO 3 ), which could play an extra role in the passivation. Moreover, the samples embedded in the Bure argilite presented an intermediate unique layer containing Fe, O, Na and Si. This study suggests the corrosion products started to react with the silica issued from the dissolution of the Bure clay minerals, resulting in clay minerals neo-formation and in corrosion kinetic changes

  14. Stabilization Of Marine Clay Using Biomass Silica-Rubber Chips Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, Aminaton; Ridzuan Jahidin, Mohammed; Aziz, Norazirah Abdul; Kasim, Fauziah; Zurairahetty Mohd. Yunus, Nor

    2016-11-01

    Marine clay is found widely along the coastal area and had caused expensive solutions in the construction of coastal highways. Hence, soil stabilization was suggested by some consultant to increase the strength of this soil in order to meet the highway construction requirement and also to achieve the specification for the development. Biomass Silica (BS), particularly the SH85 as a non-traditional stabilisation method, has been gaining more interest from the engineers recently. Rubber chips (RC), derived from waste rubber tyres, are considered ‘green’ element and had been used previously in some geotechnical engineering works. This paper presents the effect of using BS and RC as a mixture (BS-RC mixture), to increase the strength of marine clay for highway construction. Samples of marine clay, obtained from the West Coast Expressway project at Teluk Intan, Perak, were oven dried and grind to fine-grained sized. The marine clay was mixed with 9 % by weight proportion of BS- RC; that were 8%-l% and 7%-2%, respectively. For comparison purposes the result of BS-RC was compared to the result of stabilization by using 9% BS only. Laboratory tests were then carried out to determine the Atterberg limits and compaction characteristics of the untreated and treated marine clay. The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) of the untreated and treated marine clays, compacted at the optimum moisture content was later obtained. The treated marine clay was tested at 0, 3 and 7 days curing periods. The results show that the Plasticity Index of BS-RC treated marine clay was lower than the untreated marine clay. From the UCS test results, it is shown that BS-RC mixtures had significantly improved the strength of marine clay. With the same percentage of 9% BS-RC, the increased of BS from 7% to 8% increased the UCS further to about six times more than untreated marine clay soils in 7 days curing period. The strength gained by using BS-RC at 8%-1% is slightly below the strength by

  15. Application of "The Water Layer Model" to self-compacting mortar with different size distributions of fine aggregate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Midorikawa, T.; Pelova, G.I.; Walraven, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Self-Compacting Concrete is a relatively new type of concrete. Up to now only a few models have been developed to explain its physical behaviour, like the Water Layer Model and the Excess Paste Model. In this paper, the difference between the Water Layer Model and the Excess Paste Model is

  16. Study of materials for using at waste layer in repositories; Estudo de materiais para uso em camada de recheio em repositorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Andre F., E-mail: marau666@hotmail.co [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Tello, Cledola C.O. de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Gerencia de Rejeitos

    2009-07-01

    This research has an objective to characterize Brazilian clays and to implant a data base containing the information obtained form tests and suppliers. Such information will allow to buy and and to select optimum material for its utilization in the stuffing layer. Brazilian suppliers were contacted for obtaining information and samples, the various clays were tested and these tests comprehend the following: identification of the mineral constituents, determination of the compaction curve as function of the humidity, hydraulic conductivity, humidity and organic material contents, cationic exchange capacity, specific surface, and etc

  17. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  18. Gas diffusion, non-Darcy air permeability, and computed tomography images of a clay subsoil affected by compaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2013-01-01

    Soil productivity and other soil functions are dependent on processes in the untilled subsoil. Undisturbed soil cores were collected at the 0.3- to 0.4-m depth from a heavy clay soil in Finland subjected to a single heavy traffic event by agricultural machinery three decades before sampling....... Untrafficked control plots were used as a reference. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was performed on soil cores at a field-sampled field capacity water content. Gas diffusion and air permeability were measured when the soil cores were drained to −1000 hPa matric potential (air permeability also at −100...... and −300 hPa). The air-filled pore space was measured with an air pycnometer and also calculated from mass balance and CT data. Gas diffusion and air permeability were also measured on a straight model tube and on autoclaved aerated concrete. The compaction treatment had not influenced soil total porosity...

  19. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregar, Kathleen C.; Winans, Randall E.; Botto, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of surfactant immobilised layered hydrotalcite clays for the adsorption of thorium (IV) from aqueous phase: kinetics and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijith, S.; Renju, K.; Sumi, V.S.; Shibli, S.M.A.; Anirudhan, T.S.

    2014-01-01

    Thorium is a naturally occurring radioactive element widely distributed over the earth's crust with nuclear significance. The toxic nature of this radionuclide, even at trace levels, has been a public health problem for many years. Removal of thorium (IV) from aqueous solutions with surfactant immobilised calcined hydrotalcite clays (HTS) was investigated using batch adsorption technique. Based on cost effectiveness, availability, adsorptive and regenerative properties, layered clays are reported to be excellent materials for heavy metal ions adsorption

  1. Effect of material parameters on the compactibility of backfill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, P.; Kuula-Vaeisaenen, P.; Ruuskanen, J.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of different parameters on compactibility of mixture of bentonite and ballast as well as Friedland-clay was studied in laboratory with two different types of compaction tests. The material parameters varied were grain size distribution of the ballast material, grain shape, water ratio and bentonite content (15/30%). The other parameters varied were salinity of the mixing water, mixing process and compaction method and energy. Ballast materials with varying grain size distributions were produced from Olkiluoto mica-gneiss with different type of crushing processes. In addition, sand was chosen for ballast material due to its uniform grain size distribution and rounded grain shape. The maximum grain size of the ballast materials was between 5-10 mm. When comparing the compactibility of ballast materials, the highest dry densities were gained for ballast materials with graded grain size distribution. The compaction behaviour of the tested bentonite ballast mixtures is dominated by the bentonite content. The other parameters varied did not have significant effect on the compactibility of the mixtures with bentonite content of 30%. This can be explained with the amount of bentonite that is higher than what is needed to fill up the volume between the ballast grains. The results gained with the two different compaction tests are comparable. Both the bentonite/ballast mixtures and the Friedland clay behaved similarly when compacted with three different compaction pressures (180, 540 and 980 kPa). (orig.)

  2. Diffusion in Clay Layers and Groundwater Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a collaborative SERDP-funded study, researchers from the Air Force Institute of Technology, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Michigan developed a numerical model that simulates the enhanced transport of CAHs into and out of low permeability clay ...

  3. Structural Characterization of Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Co-Precipitation Using EPR Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Kielmann

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNCs containing either a rubber or an acrylate polymer were prepared by drying or co-precipitating polymer latex and nanolayered clay (synthetic and natural suspensions. The interface between the polymer and the clay nanoparticles was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR techniques by selectively addressing spin probes either to the surfactant layer (labeled stearic acid or the clay surface (labeled catamine. Continuous-wave (CW EPR studies of the surfactant dynamics allow to define a transition temperature T* which was tentatively assigned to the order-disorder transition of the surfactant layer. CW EPR studies of PCNC showed that completely exfoliated nanoparticles coexist with agglomerates. HYSCORE spectroscopy in PCNCs showed couplings within the probe −assigned with DFT computations− and couplings with nuclei of the environment, 1H and 23Na for the surfactant layer probe, and 29Si, 7Li, 19F and 23Na for the clay surface probe. Analysis of these couplings indicates that the integrity of the surfactant layer is conserved and that there are sizeable ionic regions containing sodium ions directly beyond the surfactant layer. Simulations of the very weak couplings demonstrated that the HYSCORE spectra are sensitive to the composition of the clay and whether or not clay platelets stack.

  4. Research on swelling clays and bitumen as sealing materials for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.A.; Wilson, J.; Mawditt, J.M.; Hurt, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a programme of research to investigate the performance of composite seals incorporating adjacent blocks of swelling clay and bitumen. It is shown that the interaction of the materials can promote a self-sealing mechanism which prevents water penetration, even when defects are present in the bitumen layer. A review of the swelling properties of highly compacted bentonite and magnesium oxide is presented, and the characteristic sealing properties of bituminous materials are described. On the basis of this review, it is concluded that bentonite is the preferred candidate material for use in composite clay/bitumen seals for intermediate-level radioactive waste repositories. However, it is thought that magnesium oxide may have other sealing applications for high-level waste repositories. A programme of laboratory experiments is described in which relevant swelling and intrusion properties of highly compacted bentonite blocks and the annealing characteristics of oxidised and hard-grade industrial bitumens are examined. The results of composite sealing experiments involving different water penetration routes are reported, and factors governing the mechanism of self-sealing are described. The validation of the sealing concept at a laboratory scale indicates that composite bentonite/bitumen seals could form highly effective barriers for the containment of radioactive wastes. Accordingly, recommendations are made concerning the development of the research, including the implementation of full-scale demonstration experiments to simulate conditions in an underground repository. 13 tabs., 41 figs., 62 refs

  5. Linking the Diffusion of Water in Compacted Clays at Two Different Time Scales: Tracer Through-Diffusion and QENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juranyi, Fanni; Gonzalez Sanchez, Fatima; Gimmi, Thomas; Bestel, Martina; Van Loon, Luc; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2013-01-01

    Observable water diffusion processes in clays and their parameters depend on the spatial- and time-scale of the measurement. Comparing the diffusion coefficients of quasielastic neutron scattering and tracer through-diffusion, 'chemical' and 'geometrical' effects can be distinguished and quantified. Results for montmorillonite and illite in the Na- and Ca- form illustrate this very well. Swelling clays such as montmorillonite are especially interesting because of the interlayer water. This water is confined in form of few layers such that the diffusion occurs essentially in 2D. Furthermore the ratio of interlayer- and external- (macro-pore) water changes as a function of bulk dry density and degree of water saturation. Therefore it is of interest to describe the diffusion process using these parameters. Finally, the activation energy of the diffusion should be equal for both methods assuming that the geometrical factor does not depend on temperature. For the montmorillonites this was not the case, which might also indicate that the main processes on the two scales are different. We conclude that the geometrical factor and the electrostatic constraint can be determined from a comparison of the diffusion coefficients measured by the two different techniques: quasielastic neutron scattering and tracer through diffusion. Furthermore, activation energies obtained at the two scales are similar for clays having no interlayer water. For montmorillonite the activation energy values are different. Further investigations are required to clarify the reason. (authors)

  6. Biochars impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Jeff; Sigua, Gilbert; Watts, Don; Cantrell, Keri; Shumaker, Paul; Szogi, Ariel; Johnson, Mark G; Spokas, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Soils in the SE USA Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer (E horizon), which is a barrier for water infiltration. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water infiltration through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic, Typic Kandiudult). In addition, we also evaluated biochars effect on water quality. Biochars were produced by pyrolysis at 500 °C from pine chips (Pinus taeda), poultry litter (Gallus domesticus) feedstocks, and as blends (50:50 and 80:20) of pine chip:poultry litter. Prior to pyrolysis, the feedstocks were pelletized and sieved to >2-mm pellets. Each biochar was mixed with the subsoil at 20 g/kg (w/w) and the mixture was placed in columns. The columns were leached four times with Milli-Q water over 128 d of incubation. Except for the biochar produced from poultry litter, all other applied biochars resulted in significant water infiltration increases (0.157-0.219 mL min(-1); pwater infiltration in each treatment were influenced by additional water leaching. Leachates were enriched in PO4, SO4, Cl, Na, and K after addition of poultry litter biochar, however, their concentrations declined in pine chip blended biochar treatments and after multiple leaching. Adding biochars (except 100% poultry litter biochar) to a compacted subsoil layer can initially improve water infiltration, but, additional leaching revealed that the effect remained only for the 50:50 pine chip:poultry litter blended biochar while it declined in other biochar treatments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in clays

    KAUST Repository

    Loch, J. P. Gustav

    2010-02-13

    Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in bentonite clay are studied in the laboratory, where a 6 mm thick bentonite layer is subjected to direct current. Acidification and alkalization near anode and cathode are expected, possibly causing mineral deterioration, ion mobilization and precipitation of new solids. Afterwards the clay is analysed by XRF and anolyte and catholyte are analysed by ICP-MS. In addition, as a preliminary experiment treated bentonite is analysed by high resolution μ-XRF. Electro-osmotic flow is observed. Due to its carbonate content the bentonite is pH-buffering. Alkalization in the catholyte is substantial. Ca, Na and Sr are significantly removed from the clay and accumulate in the catholyte. Recovery in the catholyte accounts for a small fraction of the element-loss from the clay. The rest will have precipitated in undetected solid phases. μ-XRF indicates the loss of Ca-content throughout the bentonite layer. © The Author(s) 2010.

  8. Retention of contaminants Cd and Hg adsorbed and intercalated in aluminosilicate clays: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto de Lima, F. D.; Miwa, R. H.; Miranda, Caetano R.

    2017-11-01

    Layered clay materials have been used to incorporate transition metal (TM) contaminants. Based on first-principles calculations, we have examined the energetic stability and the electronic properties due to the incorporation of Cd and Hg in layered clay materials, kaolinite (KAO) and pyrophyllite (PYR). The TM can be (i) adsorbed on the clay surface as well as (ii) intercalated between the clay layers. For the intercalated case, the contaminant incorporation rate can be optimized by controlling the interlayer spacing of the clay, namely, pillared clays. Our total energy results reveal that the incorporation of the TMs can be maximized through a suitable tuning of vertical distance between the clay layers. Based on the calculated TM/clay binding energies and the Langmuir absorption model, we estimate the concentrations of the TMs. Further kinetic properties have been examined by calculating the activation energies, where we found energy barriers of ˜20 and ˜130 meV for adsorbed and intercalated cases, respectively. The adsorption and intercalation of ionized TM adatoms were also considered within the deprotonated KAO surface. This also leads to an optimal interlayer distance which maximizes the TM incorporation rate. By mapping the total charge transfers at the TM/clay interface, we identify a net electronic charge transfer from the TM adatoms to the topmost clay surface layer. The effect of such a charge transfer on the electronic structure of the clay (host) has been examined through a set of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) simulations, characterizing the changes of the XANES spectra upon the presence of the contaminants. Finally, for the pillared clays, we quantify the Cd and Hg K-edge energy shifts of the TMs as a function of the interlayer distance between the clay layers and the Al K-edge spectra for the pristine and pillared clays.

  9. Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Polypropylene/Clay Nanocomposites with TiCl4/MgCl2/Clay Compound Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP/clay nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ intercalative polymerization with TiCl4/MgCl2/clay compound catalyst. Microstructure and thermal properties of PP/clay nanocomposites were studied in detail. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra indicated that PP/clay nanocomposites were successfully prepared. Both wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM examination proved that clay layers are homogeneously distributed in PP matrix. XRD patterns also showed that the α phase was the dominate crystal phase of PP in the nanocomposites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA examinations confirmed that thermal stability of PP/clay nanocomposites was markedly superior to pure PP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC scans showed that the melt temperature and the crystallinity of nanocomposites were slightly lower than those of pure PP due to crystals imperfections.

  10. Electrolyte diffusion in compacted montmorillonite engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnke, F.M.; Radke, C.J.

    1985-09-01

    The bentonite-based engineered barrier or packing is a proposed component of several designs conceived to dispose of high-level nuclear waste in geologic repositories. Once radionuclides escape the waste package, they must first diffuse through the highly impermeable clay-rich barrier before they reach the host repository. To determine the effectiveness of the packing as a sorption barrier in the transient release period and as a mass-transfer barrier in the steady release period over the geologic time scales involved in nuclear waste disposal, a fundamental understanding of the diffusion of electrolytes in compacted clays is required. We present, and compare with laboratory data, a model quantifying the diffusion rates of cationic cesium and uncharged tritium in compacted montmorillonite clay. Neutral tritium characterizes the geometry (i.e., tortuosity) of the particulate gel. After accounting for cation exchange, we find that surface diffusion is the dominant mechanism of cation transport, with an approximate surface diffusion coefficient of 2 x 10 -6 cm 2 /s for cesium. This value increases slightly with increasing background ionic strength. The implications of this work for the packing as a migration barrier are twofold. During the transient release period, K/sub d/ values are of little importance in retarding ion migration. This is because sorption also gives rise to a surface diffusion path, and it is surface diffusion which controls the diffusion rate of highly sorbing cations in compacted montmorillonite. During the steady release period, the presence of surface diffusion leads to a flux through the packing which is greatly enhanced. In either case, if surface diffusion is neglected, the appropriate diffusion coefficient of ions in compacted packing will be in considerable error relative to current design recommendations. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Atomistic Structure of Mineral Nano-aggregates from Simulated Compaction and Dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Greathouse, Jeffery A; Wang, Yifeng; Criscenti, Louise J

    2017-11-10

    The porosity of clay aggregates is an important property governing chemical reactions and fluid flow in low-permeability geologic formations and clay-based engineered barrier systems. Pore spaces in clays include interlayer and interparticle pores. Under compaction and dewatering, the size and geometry of such pore spaces may vary significantly (sub-nanometer to microns) depending on ambient physical and chemical conditions. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation method to construct a complex and realistic clay-like nanoparticle aggregate with interparticle pores and grain boundaries. The model structure is then used to investigate the effect of dewatering and water content on micro-porosity of the aggregates. The results suggest that slow dewatering would create more compact aggregates compared to fast dewatering. Furthermore, the amount of water present in the aggregates strongly affects the particle-particle interactions and hence the aggregate structure. Detailed analyses of particle-particle and water-particle interactions provide a molecular-scale view of porosity and texture development of the aggregates. The simulation method developed here may also aid in modeling the synthesis of nanostructured materials through self-assembly of nanoparticles.

  12. Hydro-mechanical properties of the red salt clay (T4) - Natural analogue of a clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkley, W.; Popp, T.; Salzer, K.; Gruner, M.; Boettge, V.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste in deep geologic formations is worldwide the only accepted solution to warranty long term safety. Besides clay and crystalline rocks, salt is one of the potential host-rock candidates, mainly favored in Germany. As salts rocks are highly soluble their barrier integrity against water inflow from the cap rock is questionable. Argillaceous cap rocks or intercalated clay layers may act as protective shield in the hanging wall above a repository, thus providing a multi-barrier system. The aims of our study are twofold: 1) to characterize the mineralogical, hydraulic and rock-mechanical properties of the so-called Red Salt Clay (T4) as natural analogue of a clay barriers represented by different states of induration corresponding to various depth of burial diagenesis; 2) to demonstrate the favoured barrier properties of an argillaceous layer in the top of a salt formation undergoing dynamic processes such as rock bursts. The so-called Red Salt Clay (T4) is deposited as clay rich clastic sediment at the base of the Aller-series forming a persistent lateral layer above the lower Zechstein-series. The thickness of the clay-formation becomes smaller with decreasing distance from the border of the basin, i.e. from ∼15 m at Rossleben, over 7 m at Bernburg to 3.5 m at Zielitz, all in Saxony-Anhalt, D). The mineralogical composition of the Red Salt Clay varies, e.g. average composition for the Teutschenthal area: clay minerals 54% (Chlorite: 8%; Illite/Muscovite: 46%); quartz: 22%; anhydrite: 15%; accessory gypsum; Halite: 6%, Hematite: ∼ 2%). The geochemical and mineralogical composition of the Red Salt Clay represents a final state of natural salt-clay-systems, thus standing as a natural analogue for bentonite-based sealing systems in contact with high-saline solutions (e.g. saturated NaCl-solution, solutions with various Mg 2+ -, K + -, SO 4 2- - concentrations). The

  13. CTAB as a soft template for modified clay as filler in active packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajonpop Rittirong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of modified clay has been employed in many areas of engineering research. Structure of clay was mainly focused on alumino-silicate layer and its form was presented as pillar layer. It composed of many ion exchanges inside. In industry, in order to use clay with higher efficiency, modification on surface and porosity has been developed. CTAB, one of the most effective cationic surfactant, was employed to modify the surface and porosity of clay.

  14. Surface modification of montmorillonite on surface Acid-base characteristics of clay and thermal stability of epoxy/clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Dong-Il; Lee, Jae-Rock

    2002-07-01

    In this work, the effect of surface treatments on smectitic clay was investigated in surface energetics and thermal behaviors of epoxy/clay nanocomposites. The pH values, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to analyze the effect of cation exchange on clay surface and the exfoliation phenomenon of clay interlayer. The surface energetics of clay and thermal properties of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were investigated in contact angles and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. From the experimental results, the surface modification of clay by dodecylammonium chloride led to the increases in both distance between silicate layers of about 8 A and surface acid values, as well as in the electron acceptor component (gamma(+)(s)) of surface free energy, resulting in improved interfacial adhesion between basic (or electron donor) epoxy resins and acidic (electron acceptor) clay interlayers. Also, the thermal stability of nanocomposites was highly superior to pure epoxy resin due to the presence of the well-dispersed clay nanolayer, which has a barrier property in a composite system.

  15. Conditioning of cladding waste by press compaction and encapsulation in low-melting metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broothaerts, J.; Casteels, F.; Daniels, A.; De Regge, P.; Huys, D.; Leurs, A.

    1985-01-01

    The wetting of waste components by lead- and zinc-based alloys has been examined. The lead-based metals, either low or high alloyed, did not achieve acceptable wetting of fresh or oxidized zircaloy surfaces in the temperature range of 350 0 C to 550 0 C for exposure times up to 5 hours. The corrosion resistance of candidate embedment alloys on the basis of lead and zinc has been examined in two synthetic interstitial clay-waters, in direct contact with the clay, in a synthetic Asse brine solution and in contact with wet salt deposits. A unit compaction and embedment of active hulls at the scale of 50 to 100 g has been constructed and installed in a shielded cell. The compaction of irradiated hulls necessitates the use of slightly higher pressures to achieve the densification factor reached for inactive zircaloy. Batches of zircaloy and of stainless steel hulls have been compacted and embedded in lead alloys for leaching experiments using the natural water present in the Boom clay geological formation. A 3 meganewton compaction press has been installed in a mock-up shielded facility and its operation and maintenance by remote handling with telemanipulators has been studied

  16. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  17. Preparation of anionic clay-birnessite manganese oxide composites by interlayer oxidation of oxalate ions by permanganate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arulraj, James [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph' s College, 36 Langford Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India); Rajamathi, Michael, E-mail: mikerajamathi@rediffmail.com [Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry, St. Joseph' s College, 36 Langford Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Oxalate intercalated anionic clay-like nickel zinc hydroxysalt was obtained starting from nickel zinc hydroxyacetate, Ni{sub 3}Zn{sub 2}(OH){sub 8}(OAc){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, by anion exchange. The intercalated oxalate species was reacted with potassium permanganate in such a way that the layered manganese oxide formed was within the interlayer region of the anionic clay resulting in a layered composite in which the negative charges on the birnessite type manganese oxide layers compensate the positive charges on the anionic clay layers. Birnessite to anionic clay ratio could be varied by varying the reaction time or the amount of potassium permanganate used. - Graphical abstract: Nickel zinc hydroxyoxalate was reacted with potassium permanganate to get nickel zinc hydroxide birnessite composites in which the positive charges on the hydroxide layers are neutralized by the negative charges on birnessite layers. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anionic and cationic layered solid composites prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-Zn hydroxyoxalate reacted with KMnO{sub 4} to deposit MnO{sub 2} in the interlayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Birnessite layers coexist with anionic clay layers in the composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Birnessite/anionic clay ratio controlled by amount of KMnO{sub 4} used and reaction time.

  18. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1988-09-01

    The concept of a geological barrier to radionuclide migration from theoretical radioactive waste repositories has drawn attention to the physico-chemical properties of clays, which are traditionally regarded as retarding media. This report addresses the different mechanisms of transport of radionuclides through clay and in particular focuses on the surface diffusion movement of sorbed cations. The relative contributory importance of the different transport mechanisms is governed by the pore size distributions and interconnections within the clay fabric. Surface diffusion data in the literature have been from experiments using compacted montmorillonite and biotite gneiss. A possible programme of laboratory work is outlined, based on diffusion experiments, which describes the way of measuring the effect of surface diffusion more accurately in clays, mudstones and shales. (author)

  19. Influence of Macro-Topography on Damage Tolerance and Fracture Toughness of 0.1 wt % Multi-Layer Graphene/Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheed Atif

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Influence of topographical features on mechanical properties of 0.1 wt % Multi-Layer Graphene (MLG/clay-epoxy nanocomposites has been studied. Three different compositions were made: (1 0.1 wt % MLG-EP; (2 0.1 wt % clay-EP and (3 0.05 wt % MLG-0.05 wt % clay-EP. The objective of making hybrid nanocomposites was to determine whether synergistic effects are prominent at low weight fraction of 0.1 wt % causing an improvement in mechanical properties. The topographical features studied include waviness (Wa, roughness average (Ra, root mean square value (Rq and maximum roughness height (Rmax or Rz. The Rz of as-cast 0.1 wt % MLG-EP, clay-EP and 0.05 wt % MLG-0.05 wt % clay-EP nanocomposites were 43.52, 48.43 and 41.8 µm respectively. A decrease in Rz values was observed by treating the samples with velvet cloth and abrasive paper 1200P while increased by treating with abrasive papers 320P and 60P. A weight loss of up to 16% was observed in samples after the treatment with the abrasive papers. It was observed that MLG is more effective in improving the mechanical properties of epoxy than nanoclay. In addition, no significant improvement in mechanical properties was observed in hybrid nanocomposites indicating that 0.1 wt % is not sufficient to generate conspicuous synergistic effects.

  20. Effects of modified Clay on the morphology and thermal stability of PMMA/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yen; Lin, Mei-Ju; Chuang, Yi-Chen; Chou, Po-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    The potential to improve the mechanical, thermal, and optical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay nanocomposites prepared with clay containing an organic modifier was investigated. Pristine sodium montmorillonite clay was modified using cocoamphodipropionate, which absorbs UVB in the 280–320 nm range, via ion exchange to enhance the compatibility between the clay platelets and the methyl methacrylate polymer matrix. PMMA/clay nanocomposites were synthesized via in situ free-radical polymerization. Three types of clay with various cation-exchange capacities (CEC) were used as inorganic layered materials in these organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposites: CL42, CL120, and CL88 with CEC values of 116, 168, and 200 meq/100 g of clay, respectively. We characterized the effects of the organoclay dispersion on UV resistance, effectiveness as an O 2 gas barrier, thermal stability, and mechanical properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites. Gas permeability analysis demonstrated the excellent gas barrier properties of the nanocomposites, consistent with the intercalated or exfoliated morphologies observed. The optical properties were assessed using UV–Visible spectroscopy, which revealed that these materials have good optical clarity, UV resistance, and scratch resistance. The effect of the dispersion capability of organoclay on the thermal properties of PMMA/clay nanocomposites was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry; these analyses revealed excellent thermal stability of some of the modified clay nanocomposites. - Highlights: ► We control the dispersion morphology by protonation of K2 into the clay. ► The CL120 and CL88, with the higher CEC, are more random intercalated by K2. ► We report these materials have good optical clarity, and UV resistance

  1. Sorption of Pu onto some kinds of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Haihong; Si Gaohua; Liu Wei; Yu Jing

    2010-01-01

    There are rich clay mines holding in one area, so it's necessary to know about these clays' sorption capacity to Pu, for building radioactive waste repository in the area. Distribution coefficients of Pu onto different clays were acquired in static method, with the result about 104. The size of clay is different, but the result of Kds is near. In addition, it's estimated how far Pu moves in the most rapid speed in the clay based on these Kids', disregarding the influence of Pu-colloid. In a word, as a kind of backfilling material clays in the area can effectively prevent Pu from moving to environment, and when designing the backfilling layer, it's not necessary to catch clays through NO.200 sieve, if only considering the influence of Kd. (authors)

  2. Mobility of U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm from spent nuclear fuel into bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Skaalberg, M.; Eklund, U.B.; Kjellberg, L.; Werme, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mobility of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium from spent nuclear fuel (UO 2 ) into compacted bentonite was studied. Pieces of spent BWR UO 2 fuel was embedded in a compacted bentonite clay/low saline synthetic groundwater system. After a contact time of six years the bentonite was sliced into 0.1 mm thick slices and analysed for its content of actinides. Radiometric as well as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used for the analysis. The influence on the mobility by the addition of metallic iron, metallic copper and vivianite (Fe(II)-mineral) to the bentonite clay was investigated. The results show a low mobility of actinides in bentonite clay. Except for uranium the mobility of the other actinides could, after six years of diffusion time, only be detected less than 1 mm from the spent fuel. (orig.)

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the three-layer hydrate of Na-montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmboe, Michael; Bourg, Ian C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many nuclear waste repositories concepts, compacted and smectite-rich bentonite clay is considered as an engineered transport barrier surrounding the canisters holding the nuclear waste. One of the requirements in the safety assessment of these repositories is to predict the transport rate of radionuclides as well as the overall hydraulic conductivity through the bentonite barrier. Kozaki and co-workers have obtained important information from diffusion experiments in bentonite on the mechanisms that control solute transport by studying the temperature-dependence of apparent diffusivity for solutes such as Na + , Cs + and Sr 2+ . Their results showed that the apparent diffusivity follows an Arrhenius relation (ln D a ∝ -E A /RT) with distinct activation energies of diffusion (E A ) for certain montmorillonite compactions, ionic strengths, and types of interlayer cation (Na + vs. Ca 2+ ). Their results suggest that solutes follow different diffusion pathways in compacted montmorillonite at different experimental conditions. In order to identify these transport pathways in compacted montmorillonite one needs independent knowledge of the relative abundance of the different types of interlayer nano-pores, i.e. the different coexisting hydration states (1W-3W), and of the molecular-scale EA for solute diffusion on the external basal surfaces of montmorillonite particles and in the interlayer nano-pores. The latter property can be obtained using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, an important tool in the characterization of clays and clay minerals that yields detailed atomistic insights into the structural, dynamical and thermodynamic properties of many different geochemically relevant systems. In particular, MD simulations yield insight into the behavior of individual atoms, where most experimental methods only would probe the average behavior of large numbers of atoms or molecules. Thus, by simulating systems of

  4. Synthesis and characterization of organophilic clay from Cuban Chiqui Gomez bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, Guillermo R. Martin; Hennies, Wildor T.; Valera, Ticiane S.; Esper, Fabio J.; Diaz, Francisco R. Valenzuela

    2009-01-01

    Smectite are clay minerals with a layered structure and nanometric thickness, high specific area and a huge variety of uses. Consisting on stacked layers of about 1nm thickness, including two silica tetrahedral and one octahedral sheet. Properties of natural Smectite can be enhanced by organic modification, due to the substitution of the exchangeable cations in the interlayer area. In fact, the properties of the modified smectite (organophilic clay) are related to its modified chemical composition and structural parameters. The interaction of smectite clays with surfactants has an important interest in the fields of drilling fluids, paints, cosmetic, ceramic industries and others. Recent applications are: remediation of contaminated areas and polymer/clay nanocomposites. The aim of this paper is to obtain organophilic clays using a bentonite from the Chiqui Gomez deposit in Central Cuba. The raw and organophilic clays were analyzed by DRX, SEM, swelling capacity in organic solvents and others. (author)

  5. Investigation of the overconsolidation and structural behavior of Shanghai clays by element testing and constitutive modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-lin Ye

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and constitutive modeling of Shanghai clays are very important for numerical analysis on geotechnical engineering in Shanghai, where continuous layers of soft clays run 30–40 m deep. The clays are divided into 5 major layers. A series of laboratory tests are carried out to investigate their mechanical properties. The top and bottom layers are overconsolidated hard clays, and the middle layers are normally consolidated or lightly overconsolidated sensitive marine clays. A constitutive model, which can describe the overconsolidation and structure of soils using only 8 parameters, is modified to simulate the test results. A rational procedure to determine the values of the material parameters and initial conditions is also proposed. The model is able to effectively reproduce both one-dimensional (1D consolidation and drained/undrained triaxial test results of Shanghai clays, with one set of parameters for each layer. From element testing and constitutive modeling, two findings are obtained. First, the decay rates of overconsolidation are smaller in overconsolidated layers than in normally consolidated layers. Second, the natural microstructure of layer 4 is relatively stable, that is, a large degree of structure is still maintained in the specimen even after 1D consolidation and drained triaxial tests. The modified model and obtained parameter values can be used for numerical analysis of geotechnical projects in Shanghai.

  6. Single clay sheets inside electrospun polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaohui

    2005-03-01

    Nanofibers were prepared from polymer solution with clay sheets by electrospinning. Plasma etching, as a well controlled process, was used to supply electrically excited gas molecules from a glow discharge. To reveal the structure and arrangement of clay layers in the polymer matrix, plasma etching was used to remove the polymer by controlled gasification to expose the clay sheets due to the difference in reactivity. The shape, flexibility, and orientation of clay sheets were studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Additional quantitative information on size distribution and degree of exfoliation of clay sheets were obtained by analyzing electron micrograph of sample after plasma etching. Samples in various forms including fiber, film and bulk, were thinned by plasma etching. Morphology and dispersion of inorganic fillers were studied by electron microscopy.

  7. Synthesis and study of photovoltaic performance on various photoelectrode materials for DSSCs: Optimization of compact layer on nanometer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya, Subramanian; Thangamuthu, Rangasamy; Senthil Kumar, Sakkarapalayam Murugesan; Murugadoss, Govindhasamy

    2017-02-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have gained widespread attention in recent years because of their low production costs, ease of fabrication process and tuneable optical properties, such as colour and transparency. In this work, we explored a strategy wherein nanoparticles of pure TiO2, TiO2sbnd SnO2 nanocomposite, Sn (10%) doped TiO2 and SnO2 synthesized by the simple chemical precipitation method were employed as photoelectrodes to enhance the photovoltaic conversion efficiency of solar cells. The nanoparticles were characterized by different characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM with EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution electron microscopy (HR-TEM), UV-Visible absorbance (UV-vis), photoluminescence (PL), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. Moreover, we also demonstrated the effect of thin compact layer in DSSCs by architecture with various precursor materials of different concentrations. We found that the optimized compact layer material TDIP (titanium diisopropoxide) with a concentration of 0.3 M % is produced the highest efficiency of 2.25% for Sn (10%) doped TiO2 electron transport material (ETM) and 4.38% was achieved for pure TiO2 ETM using SnCl2 compact layer with 0.1 M concentrations.

  8. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharpenseel, H.W.; Kerpen, W.

    1967-01-01

    55 Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the B t -development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of 55 Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for 55 Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  9. Insightful understanding of the role of clay topology on the stability of biomimetic hybrid chitosan-clay thin films and CO2-dried porous aerogel microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Frindy, Sana; Primo Arnau, Ana Maria; Qaiss, Abou el Kacem; Bouhfid, Rachid; Lahcini, Mohamed; García Gómez, Hermenegildo; Bousmina, Mosto; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Three natural clay-based microstructures, namely layered montmorillonite (MMT), nanotubular halloysite (HNT) and micro-fibrillar sepiolite (SP) were used for the synthesis of hybrid chitosan-clay thin films and porous aerogel microspheres. At a first glance, a decrease in the viscosity of the three gel forming solutions was noticed as a result of breaking the mutual polymeric chains interaction by the clay microstructure. Upon casting, chitosan-clay films displayed enhanced hydrophilicit...

  10. Summary of the 1. Annual Workshop Topical Session on 'Diffusion and Retention in Compacted Clayey Materials'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmann, Scott [Andra - Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Dechets Radioac tifs, F-92298 Chatenary Malabry CEDEX (France)]. e-mail: Scott.altmann@andra.fr

    2007-06-15

    The main objective of this topical session was to provide an overview of the diversity of conceptual and experimental approaches which are being used to further our understanding of a key process for radwaste management: coupled 'diffusion - sorption' transport of radionuclides in compacted clay-rich materials (clayrock, bentonite). The introductory presentation by Eric Giffaut (Andra) entitled 'General conceptual framework for solute transport through compacted clays and frequent observations in diffusion studies' provided a framework for the other talks. The commonly used means for characterizing steady state diffusion (e.g. through diffusion for determining D{sub e}) and 'equilibrium' retention parameters (solid-solution partitioning in batch systems), as a function of key state parameters (aqueous phase composition, compaction density, sorbing element concentration), on relatively small rock volumes/masses were mentioned. It was pointed out that, despite the significant existing databases of results from such measurements, various uncertainties remain which need to be reduced in order to increase confidence in safety cases. The most direct approach to determining the transport parameters needed for performance assessment models (e.g. apparent diffusion coefficient, retardation factor, accessible porosity) is to carry out direct measurements via migration experiments, and then to extract the parameter values by interpreting data with an appropriate model. This approach is the foundation for much of the program carried out by SCK.CEN for characterizing the Boom clay. The talk by Norbert Maes (SCK-CEN) entitled 'Experimental research on diffusion in natural clay samples. An overview of the Belgian experience' illustrated how these type studies were carried out using different techniques applied to a variety of radionuclides in order both to understand migration mechanisms and to determine PA parameters representative of in

  11. The effect of clay on the dissolution of nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K.

    2001-09-01

    In a nuclear waste repository, the waste glass can interact with metals, backfill materials (if present) and natural host rock. Of the various host rocks considered, clays are often reported to delay the onset of the apparent glass saturation, where the glass dissolution rate becomes very small. This effect is ascribed to the sorption of silica or other glass components on the clay. This can have two consequences: (1) the decrease of the silica concentration in solution increases the driving force for further dissolution of glass silica, and (2) the transfer of relatively insoluble glass components (mainly silica) from the glass surface to the clay makes the alteration layer less protective. In recent literature, the latter explanation has gained credibility. The impact of the environmental materials on the glass surface layers is however not well understood. Although the glass dissolution can initially be enhanced by clay, there are arguments to assume that it will decrease to very low values after a long time. Whether this will indeed be the case, depends on the fate of the released glass components in the clay. If they are sorbed on specific sites, it is likely that saturation of the clay will occur. If however the released glass components are removed by precipitation (growth of pre-existing or new secondary phases), saturation of the clay is less likely, and the process can continue until exhaustion of one of the system components. There are indications that the latter mechanism can occur for varying glass compositions in Boom Clay and FoCa clay. If sorption or precipitation prevents the formation of protective surface layers, the glass dissolution can in principle proceed at a high rate. High silica concentrations are assumed to decrease the dissolution rate (by a solution saturation effect or by the impact on the properties of the glass alteration layer). In glass corrosion tests at high clay concentrations, silica concentrations are, however, often higher

  12. The effect of clay on the dissolution of nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmens, K.

    2001-01-01

    In a nuclear waste repository, the waste glass can interact with metals, backfill materials (if present) and natural host rock. Of the various host rocks considered, clays are often reported to delay the onset of the apparent glass saturation, where the glass dissolution rate becomes very small. This effect is ascribed to the sorption of silica or other glass components on the clay. This can have two consequences: (1) the decrease of the silica concentration in solution increases the driving force for further dissolution of glass silica, and (2) the transfer of relatively insoluble glass components (mainly silica) from the glass surface to the clay makes the alteration layer less protective. In recent literature, the latter explanation has gained credibility. The impact of the environmental materials on the glass surface layers is however not well understood. Although the glass dissolution can initially be enhanced by clay, there are arguments to assume that it will decrease to very low values after a long time. Whether this will indeed be the case, depends on the fate of the released glass components in the clay. If they are sorbed on specific sites, it is likely that saturation of the clay will occur. If however the released glass components are removed by precipitation (growth of pre-existing or new secondary phases), saturation of the clay is less likely, and the process can continue until exhaustion of one of the system components. There are indications that the latter mechanism can occur for varying glass compositions in Boom Clay and FoCa clay. If sorption or precipitation prevents the formation of protective surface layers, the glass dissolution can in principle proceed at a high rate. High silica concentrations are assumed to decrease the dissolution rate (by a solution saturation effect or by the impact on the properties of the glass alteration layer). In glass corrosion tests at high clay concentrations, silica concentrations are, however, often higher

  13. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goeun Choi,1 Huiyan Piao,1 Zeid A Alothman,2 Ajayan Vinu,3 Chae-Ok Yun,4 Jin-Ho Choy1 1Center for Intelligent Nano-Bio Materials, Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea; 2Advanced Materials Research Chair, Chemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA, Australia; 4Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Methotrexate (MTX, an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection. Keywords: anionic clay, biodistribution, cervical cancer, colloidal stability, layered double hydroxide, methotrexate 

  14. Discrete particle modeling and micromechanical characterization of bilayer tablet compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, B; Gonzalez, M; Abebe, A; Sprockel, O; Nikfar, F; Kiang, S; Cuitiño, A M

    2017-08-30

    A mechanistic particle scale model is proposed for bilayer tablet compaction. Making bilayer tablets involves the application of first layer compaction pressure on the first layer powder and a second layer compaction pressure on entire powder bed. The bonding formed between the first layer and the second layer particles is crucial for the mechanical strength of the bilayer tablet. The bonding and the contact forces between particles of the first layer and second layer are affected by the deformation and rearrangement of particles due to the compaction pressures. Our model takes into consideration the elastic and plastic deformations of the first layer particles due to the first layer compaction pressure, in addition to the mechanical and physical properties of the particles. Using this model, bilayer tablets with layers of the same material and different materials, which are commonly used pharmaceutical powders, are tested. The simulations show that the strength of the layer interface becomes weaker than the strength of the two layers as the first layer compaction pressure is increased. The reduction of strength at the layer interface is related to reduction of the first layer surface roughness. The reduced roughness decreases the available bonding area and hence reduces the mechanical strength at the interface. In addition, the simulations show that at higher first layer compaction pressure the bonding area is significantly less than the total contact area at the layer interface. At the interface itself, there is a non-monotonic relationship between the bonding area and first layer force. The bonding area at the interface first increases and then decreases as the first layer pressure is increased. These results are in agreement with findings of previous experimental studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Studies on Tagged Clay Migration Due to Water Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharpenseel, H. W. [Institut fuer Bodenkunde der Universitaet Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Kerpen, W. [Arbeitsgruppe, Institut fuer Landwirtschaft der KFA Juelich, Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1967-11-15

    {sup 55}Fe-tagged clay minerals, produced by hydrothermal synthesis, serve to clarify the question whether clay migration or clay formation in situ is the predominating mechanism in the B{sub t}-development of Parabraunerde (sol brun lessive, grey brown podsolic, hapludalf, dernopodsol). They further indicate the possibilities of clay transportation caused by water percolation. Suitable experimental approaches, such as thin-layer chromatography and autoradiography, translocation tests in columns filled with monotypical textural fractions or with undisturbed soil profiles, and synchronous hydrothermal treatment of {sup 55}Fe-con raining material from different horizons of Parabraunerde, to reveal the specific readiness of the different profile zones for {sup 55}Fe-clay production, are described. The possibilities of clay percolation are discussed. (author)

  16. The Ypresian clays as alternative host rock for radioactive waste disposal in Belgium. A transferability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Baelen, Herve; Wouters, Laurent; Brassinnes, Stephane; Van Geet, Maarten; Vandenberghe, Noel

    2012-01-01

    phases, but less kaolinite. The smectites in the Ypresian clays partly originate from weathered volcanic ash layers, re-mobilised and deposited into the basin during the early Eocene, but there are indications as well for the direct sedimentation of ash layers within the basin, which subsequently transformed into authigenic smectite. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal that the compaction fabric of the Ypresian clays is, at least in a number of samples, less pronounced than for Boom Clay. An additional difference is possibly the presence of a bi-modal pore size distribution, the larger pore size population being absent in undisturbed Boom Clay. Nevertheless the total porosity measured in both host rocks is comparable, but decreases with depth in the case of the Ypresian clays. From a mechanical point of view, Ypresian clays seem to behave less stiff and appears to be more sensitive to failure. Concerning the thermal properties, contrasting results have been obtained. In a first research effort, the thermal conductivity was smaller than for Boom Clay; more recently, however, a higher conductivity than for Boom Clay was obtained, illustrating the sensitivity of thermal-conductivity measurements to the experimental conditions. The measured hydraulic conductivity covers a comparable range to Boom Clay, but displays larger vertical variations. The diffusion accessible porosity and apparent diffusion coefficient obtained on clay cores are in the same order, but a decrease with depth has been observed for the Ypresian clays. Analysis of the pore water chemistry indicates that it is of the NaCl-type and can be categorised as brackish to salty. Especially in the upper part of the Ypresian clays, the results show a very high vertical variation, which does probably not reflect the natural variability, but reflects the difficulties of obtaining a representative pore water by squeezing. The same safety concept as the one developed on Boom Clay can be envisaged, but some

  17. Morphologic characterization for XRD and TEM of polyamide 6 and 66 nanocomposites with bentonite regional clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Amanda M.D.; Medeiros, Vanessa da N.; Maia, Larissa F.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Lira, Helio L.

    2009-01-01

    Polyamide 6 and 66 nanocomposites with clay consisting of silicates layer from Paraiba were produced. The clay was modified being used the quaternary salt of ammonium Cetremide, this so there is a better interaction of the clay with polymeric matrix. The clay without treatment (MMT) and treated clay was evaluated by XRD that showed the insertion of the salt molecules into silicates layer. The nanocomposites were obtained from polyamide 6 and 66 were verified that these presented morphological structure composed of exfoliated/partially exfoliated, analyzed by XRD and TEM. (author)

  18. On the origin of mixed-layered clay minerals from the San Andreas Fault at 2.5-3 km vertical depth (SAFOD drillhole at Parkfield, California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, A. M.; Warr, L. N.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-02-01

    A detailed mineralogical study is presented of the matrix of mudrocks sampled from spot coring at three key locations along the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) drill hole. The characteristics of authigenic illite-smectite (I-S) and chlorite-smectite (C-S) mixed-layer mineral clays indicate a deep diagenetic origin. A randomly ordered I-S mineral with ca. 20-25% smectite layers is one of the dominant authigenic clay species across the San Andreas Fault zone (sampled at 3,066 and 3,436 m measured depths/MD), whereas an authigenic illite with ca. 2-5% smectite layers is the dominant phase beneath the fault (sampled at 3,992 m MD). The most smectite-rich mixed-layered assemblage with the highest water content occurs in the actively deforming creep zone at ca. 3,300-3,353 m (true vertical depth of ca. 2.7 km), with I-S (70:30) and C-S (50:50). The matrix of all mudrock samples show extensive quartz and feldspar (both plagioclase and K-feldspar) dissolution associated with the crystallization of pore-filling clay minerals. However, the effect of rock deformation in the matrix appears only minor, with weak flattening fabrics defined largely by kinked and fractured mica grains. Adopting available kinetic models for the crystallization of I-S in burial sedimentary environments and the current borehole depths and thermal structure, the conditions and timing of I-S growth can be evaluated. Assuming a typical K+ concentration of 100-200 ppm for sedimentary brines, a present-day geothermal gradient of 35°C/km and a borehole temperature of ca. 112°C for the sampled depths, most of the I-S minerals can be predicted to have formed over the last 4-11 Ma and are probably still in equilibrium with circulating fluids. The exception to this simple burial pattern is the occurrence of the mixed layered phases with higher smectite content than predicted by the burial model. These minerals, which characterize the actively creeping section of the fault and local thin film

  19. Laboratory testing of closure cap repair techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persoff, P.; Moridis, G.; Tuck, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Landfill design requires a low permeability closure cap as well as a low permeability liner. The Savannah River Site, in South Carolina, has approximately 85 acres of mixed waste landfills covered with compacted kaolin clay. Maintaining low permeability of the clay cap requires both that the permeability of the compacted clay itself remain low and that the integrity of the barrier be maintained. Barrier breaches typically result from penetration by roots or animals, and especially cracks caused by uneven settling or desiccation. In this study, clay layers, 0.81 m in diameter and 7.6 cm thick, were compacted in 7 lysimeters to simulate closure caps. The hydraulic conductivity of each layer was measured, and the compacted clay layers (CCL's) were cracked by drying. Then various repair techniques were applied and the effectiveness of each repair was assessed by remeasuring the hydraulic conductivity. Finally the repaired CCL was again dried and measured to determine how the repair responded to the conditions that caused the original failure. For a full report of this investigation see Persoff et al. Six repair techniques have been tested, four of which involve the use of injectable barrier liquids colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX) described below: (I) covering the crack with a bentonite geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), (ii) recompaction of new kaolinite at STD+3 moisture content joined to existing kaolinite that had dried and shrunk, (iii) direct injection of colloidal silica to a crack, (iv) injection of colloidal silica (CS) to wells in an overlying sand layer, (v) direct injection of polysiloxane to a crack, and (vi), injection of polysiloxane (PSX) to wells in an overlying soil layer

  20. Influence of Clay Platelet Spacing on Oxygen Permeability of Thin Film Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priolo, Morgan; Gamboa, Daniel; Grunlan, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    Thin films of anionic natural montmorrilonite clay and various polyelectrolytes have been produced by alternately dipping a plastic substrate into dilute aqueous mixtures containing each ingredient in an effort to show the influence of clay platelet spacing on thin film permeability. After polymer-clay layers have been sequentially deposited, the resulting transparent films exhibit a brick wall nanostructure comprised of completely exfoliated clay bricks in polymeric mortar. This brick wall forms an extremely tortuous path for a molecule to traverse, creating channels perpendicular to the concentration gradient that increase the molecule's diffusion length and delay its transmission. To a first approximation, greater clay spacing (i.e., reduced clay concentration) produces greater oxygen barrier. Oxygen transmission rates below 0.005 cm^3/m^2.day have been achieved for films with only eight clay layers (total thickness of only 200 nm). With optical transparencies greater than 86% and the ability to be microwaved, these thin film composites are good candidates for flexible electronics packaging and foil replacement for food.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Dridi, W.; Cabrera, J.; Savoye, S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  2. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-01-01

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material

  3. Coupled transport phenomena in a clay from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszkuta, M.

    2005-06-01

    Low permeability materials containing clay play an important role in practical life and natural environment. Indeed, the ability of clay soils to act as semi permeable membranes, that inhibit the passage of electrolytes, is of great interest. The major objective of this thesis is to evaluate the transport properties of natural clays and in particular coupled transports when a pressure gradient, an electrical field, a concentration gradient and a temperature gradient interact. The material is a compact argillite extracted in East France from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation which was supplied to us by ANDRA. NaCl was used as the main solute. Two series of experiments were performed to measure permeability, diffusion, conductivity, the electro-osmotic coefficient and the Soret coefficient. (author)

  4. Simulation of the metallic powders compaction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, J.M.; Riera, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The simulation by means of finite elements of the forming processes of mechanical components is a very useful tool for their design and validation. In this work, the simulation of the compaction of a metal powder is presented. The finite element software ABAQUS is used together with the modified CAM-clay plasticity model in order to represent the elastoplastic behaviour of the material. Density distributions are obtained and therefore the motion of the compaction punches which improve this distribution can be found. Stress distribution in the different parts of the mould can also be determined. (Author) 9 refs

  5. Effects of clay on resistivity index thin bed: case from Western Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Certain clays produce micro-porosities that retain a relatively thick water layer and enhance the path for conductivity of electric currents through capillary forces. Saturation exponent (n) in clay-rich fields is less than the value of 2, usually assumed in well-logging. Accurately determined clay-corrected saturation exponent ...

  6. Materials and proportion's design of self-compacting mortar used for low diffusion layer in sub-surface radioactive waste disposal facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Kazuhito; Sugihashi, Naoyuki; Tsuji, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design procedure for the material selection and mix proportion of the self-compacting mortar used for low diffusion layer cementitious material in the sub-surface radioactive waste disposal facility in Japan. The low diffusion layer is required for reducing transportation by controlling diffusion of a radionuclide. Therefore the low diffusion, cracks control, and low leaching are the important matters in the mix design. The process to select mortar mix design of the low diffusion layer is explained in detail. Of 33 kinds mix proportions used in laboratory comparative testing, the combinations of low heat portland cement, fly ash, lime powder and expansive addition was provisionally set to the mix proportion of the self-compacting mortar used for low diffusion layer. (author)

  7. Modelling desiccation cracking in a homogenous soil clay layer: comparison between different hypotheses on constitutive behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jommi Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Desiccation cracks are usually thought to start from the surface of an evaporating soil layer, and the available simplified models for crack initiation and propagation are based on this hypothesis. On the contrary, experimental results on a Dutch river clay showed that cracks in an evaporating soil layer may start and propagate below the surface, confirming earlier findings by other researchers. A simple one-dimensional model was set up to analyse the consequences of different hypotheses about the material behaviour on the crack onset in a homogenous soil layer undergoing surface drying. The results of the model show that dependence of the material behaviour on the rate of water content change is a necessary requirement for cracks to initiate below the surface. The conclusion suggests that, to properly understand cracking in an evaporating soil layer, an intrinsic time scale for the mechanical response must be accounted for, among all the other factors which were previously highlighted by other researchers. The key factor to predict crack onset below the surface is the dependence of the drying branch of the water retention curve of the compressible soil on the rate of drying, which would be justified by a rate dependent fabric evolution.

  8. Effects of clay mineral type and organic matter on the uptake of radiocesium by pasture plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the influence of interaction of clay minerals and organic matter on the uptake of radiocesium by two pasture plants, namely, ryegrass (Lolium italicum L) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L). The clay minerals used were bentonite (2.1 layer type) and kaolinite (1/1 layer type). Mixtures of clay and sand were prepared with 0.5, 10, 20 and 40 per cent clay and treated with organic matter (forest turf) at 0,5 and 10 per cent of the clay-sand mixtures. Results indicated that 134 Cs uptake by plants grown on the kaolinite-clay medium was greater than that on the bentonite-clay medium at a given organic matter level. Increasing the clay content of mixtures resulted in reduction in 134 Cs uptake by both plant species. The plant uptake of 134 Cs increased with additions of organic matter at a given clay content. (author)

  9. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  10. Spatial analysis of subsoil compaction on cultivated land by means of penetrometry, electrical resistence tomography and X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumr, David; Vláčilová, Markéta; Dostál, Tomáš; Jeřábek, Jakub; Sobotková, Martina; Sněhota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a well recognized phenomena in the agricultural land. Various effects can alter the degree of the compaction in the field. The topsoil is regularly loosened due to agrotechnical operations, but the subsoil remains usually compacted. Various studies show increasing bulk density and decreasing saturated hydraulic conductivity in the plough pan, even though some authors argue that it does not have to be always the case due to presence of bio-macropores. Hence the structural properties of the subsoil and the spatial distribution of the compacted layer depth within the cultivated fields are important factors influencing soil water regime, nutrients regime and runoff generation. The aim of the contribution is to present the results of the monitoring of the plough pan depth spatial distribution at the experimental catchment Nucice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic). The soils are classified as Luvisols and Cambisols with a loamy Ap horizon (0.1 - 0.2 m deep) underlined by a silty and silty-clay B horizon. The content of clay particles in the topsoil is around 8%. The soil has low inner aggregate (soil matrix) hydraulic conductivity, with measured values of approximately 0.1 - 2 cm d-1. The bulk topsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is significantly higher and varies depending on the season. To observe the divide between topsoil and subsoil layers in detail and to be able to compare the soil structure and pore networks of both layers we inspected undisturbed soil samples with X-ray computed tomography. The divide between the conservatively tilled topsoil and the subsoil is clearly observable also on terrain. To identify its exact position we implemented a combination of penetrometry, soil sampling and electrical resistance tomography (ERT). The penetration tests accompanied by soil probing were done in an irregular network across the whole catchment based on the slopes and distance to the stream. Several 2D ERT measurements were done locally on a

  11. Primordial clays on Mars formed beneath a steam or supercritical atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin M; Parman, Stephen W; Mustard, John F

    2017-12-06

    On Mars, clay minerals are widespread in terrains that date back to the Noachian period (4.1 billion to 3.7 billion years ago). It is thought that the Martian basaltic crust reacted with liquid water during this time to form hydrated clay minerals. Here we propose, however, that a substantial proportion of these clays was formed when Mars' primary crust reacted with a dense steam or supercritical atmosphere of water and carbon dioxide that was outgassed during magma ocean cooling. We present experimental evidence that shows rapid clay formation under conditions that would have been present at the base of such an atmosphere and also deeper in the porous crust. Furthermore, we explore the fate of a primordial clay-rich layer with the help of a parameterized crustal evolution model; we find that the primordial clay is locally disrupted by impacts and buried by impact-ejected material and by erupted volcanic material, but that it survives as a mostly coherent layer at depth, with limited surface exposures. These exposures are similar to those observed in remotely sensed orbital data from Mars. Our results can explain the present distribution of many clays on Mars, and the anomalously low density of the Martian crust in comparison with expectations.

  12. α-Pinene conversion by modified-kaolinitic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volzone, C.; Masini, O.; Comelli, N.A.; Grzona, L.M.; Ponzi, E.N.; Ponzi, M.I.

    2005-01-01

    The isomerization of α-pinene using natural kaolinitic clay before and after different treatments was studied in this work. The kaolinite is a clay material constituted by phyllosilicate 1:1 layer (one sheet of tetrahedral silicon and one sheet of octahedral alumina). The clay was treated at different times using 6.0 N solution of sulfuric acid previous heating to 500 or 700 K. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, by chemical analyses and acidity measurements. The catalytic reactions were carried out at 373 K in a reactor batch with condenser and stirrer. Samples were taken at regular intervals, and reactants and products were quantitatively analyzed with a gas chromatograph after separation of the individual compounds. Conversions of alpha pinene between 67 and 94%, and selectivities in camphene and in limonene of 65 and 23%, respectively, were obtained with the clay treated at different conditions. The structural and textural changes of the clay by the treatments influenced on catalytic reactions

  13. {alpha}-Pinene conversion by modified-kaolinitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volzone, C. [CETMIC-Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica-(CONICET-CIC), C.C. 49, Cno. Centenario y 506 (1897) M.B. Gonnet, Prov., Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: volzcris@netverk.com.ar; Masini, O. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Comelli, N.A. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Grzona, L.M. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina); Ponzi, E.N. [CINDECA (CONICET-UNLP) calle 47 No. 257 (1900) La Plata, Prov., Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ponzi, M.I. [INTEQUI (CONICET-UNSL), Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, 25 de Mayo 384, V. Mercedes, Prov., San Luis (Argentina)

    2005-10-15

    The isomerization of {alpha}-pinene using natural kaolinitic clay before and after different treatments was studied in this work. The kaolinite is a clay material constituted by phyllosilicate 1:1 layer (one sheet of tetrahedral silicon and one sheet of octahedral alumina). The clay was treated at different times using 6.0 N solution of sulfuric acid previous heating to 500 or 700 K. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, by chemical analyses and acidity measurements. The catalytic reactions were carried out at 373 K in a reactor batch with condenser and stirrer. Samples were taken at regular intervals, and reactants and products were quantitatively analyzed with a gas chromatograph after separation of the individual compounds. Conversions of alpha pinene between 67 and 94%, and selectivities in camphene and in limonene of 65 and 23%, respectively, were obtained with the clay treated at different conditions. The structural and textural changes of the clay by the treatments influenced on catalytic reactions.

  14. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, Rene Anisio; Araujo, Edcleide Maria; Tomas Jeferson Alves; Amanda Damiao; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega [Federal University of Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Pessan, Luiz Antonio [Federal University of Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Materials Engineering Department

    2012-07-15

    Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that it affects the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a Brazilian bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and that the nanocomposites presented exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By thermogravimetry (TG), the results indicated that the presence of clay increased the thermal stability of polyamide 6. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior values in relation to the pure polyamide, in other words, decrease the toughness. (author)

  15. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Rene Anisio; Araujo, Edcleide Maria; Tomas Jeferson Alves; Amanda Damiao; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Pessan, Luiz Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that it affects the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a Brazilian bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and that the nanocomposites presented exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By thermogravimetry (TG), the results indicated that the presence of clay increased the thermal stability of polyamide 6. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior values in relation to the pure polyamide, in other words, decrease the toughness. (author)

  16. Morphology study of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Rene A.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Medeiros, Vanessa Nobrega; Pessan, Luiz A.; Passador, Fabio R.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have had much attention in recent years, especially those developed with layered silicates, due to the need for engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in the crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and it has been observed that it affects the behavior of crystalline and therefore the mechanical and physical properties. In this study, polyamide 6 nanocomposites were obtained by the melt intercalation technique, using regional bentonite clay modified with a quaternary ammonium salt in an amount of 3% by weight. XRD and TEM tests showed obtaining nanocomposites with exfoliated structures (author)

  17. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Goeun; Piao, Huiyan; Alothman, Zeid A; Vinu, Ajayan; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection.

  18. Purification and characterization of smectite clay taken from Gafsa, Tunisia: Progressive elimination of carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhamdi, M; Gasmi, N; Elaloui, E; Kbir-Ariguib, N; Trabelsi-Ayadi, M

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the results of various analysis on a representative clay sample from southern west of Tunisia, particularly from Oued Tfal near the town of Gafsa. The raw smectite contains some carbonate, quartz, chlorite, and anorthite. During the attack of the carbonate clay with a solution of hydrochloric acid, a change of the chemical composition and physical properties was observed. This change is dependent on several factors: the initial concentration of the acid, the nature of the clay, the ratio acid / clay...). Although treatment to 0.5 M represents a total removal of carbonates, there are probably altered layers of the clay fraction. The result shows that for a treatment with acid solutions of concentrations below 0.5 M there is gradual removal of carbonate without protonation of the clay layers. The characterization of the clay fraction shows that the sodium clay purified (OTNa) consists of a sodium montmorillonite smectite. The cation exchange capacity and the specific surface of OTNa measured using the method of methylene blue are equal to 82 meq/100g and 667 m 2 / g respectively.

  19. Low-temperature processed SnO{sub 2} compact layer for efficient mesostructure perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jinxia; Xiong, Qiu; Feng, Bingjie; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Hao, E-mail: nanoguy@126.com

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Low-temperature processed 70 nm cl-SnO{sub 2} device exhibits maximum PCE. • Champion PSC after SnCl{sub 4} treatment acquires PCE of 15.07%. • Cl-SnO{sub 2} PSC via SnCl{sub 4} treatment exhibits superior stability to cl-TiO{sub 2} based PSC. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} nanoparticle film has been synthesized via low- temperature (∼180 °C) solution-processing and proposed as compact layer in mesostructure perovskite-type solar cell (PSC). Low-temperature processed SnO{sub 2} compact layer (cl-SnO{sub 2}) brings perfect crystal-lattice and band-gap matching between electron selective layer and FTO substrate and close interface-contact between cl-SnO{sub 2} and mesoporous TiO{sub 2} layer (mp-TiO{sub 2}), which contributes to suppressing carrier recombination and optimizing device performance. In varied thickness cells, 70 nm cl-SnO{sub 2} device exhibits maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE). In order to further restrain photoelectron recombination and improve the photovoltaic performance, the surface modification of cl-SnO{sub 2} by SnCl{sub 4} aqueous solution has been carried out. The recombination behavior in the cell interior is greatly retarded via SnCl{sub 4} treatment and champion PSC after SnCl{sub 4} treatment has acquire PCE of 15.07%, which is higher than PCE of cl-TiO{sub 2} based PSC fabricated with same mp-TiO{sub 2} and perovskite procedures (13.3%). The stability of cl-SnO{sub 2} PSC via SnCl{sub 4} treatment has also been measured and its PCE reduces to 13.0% after 2 weeks in air.

  20. Compact hematite buffer layer as a promoter of nanorod photoanode performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, R.; Cattarin, S.; Comisso, N.; Baratto, C.; Kaunisto, K.; Tkachenko, N. V.; Concina, I.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of a thin α-Fe2O3 compact buffer layer (BL) on the photoelectrochemical performances of a bare α-Fe2O3 nanorods photoanode is investigated. The BL is prepared through a simple spray deposition onto a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass substrate before the growth of a α-Fe2O3 nanorods via a hydrothermal process. Insertion of the hematite BL between the FTO and the nanorods markedly enhances the generated photocurrent, by limiting undesired losses of photogenerated charges at the FTO||electrolyte interface. The proposed approach warrants a marked improvement of material performances, with no additional thermal treatment and no use/dispersion of rare or toxic species, in agreement with the principles of green chemistry.

  1. Diazonium cation-exchanged clay: an efficient, unfrequented route for making clay/polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Zakaria; Benzarti, Karim; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2013-11-05

    We describe a simple, off-the-beaten-path strategy for making clay/polymer nanocomposites through tandem diazonium salt interface chemistry and radical photopolymerization. Prior to photopolymerization, sodium montmorillonite (MMT) was ion exchanged with N,N'-dimethylbenzenediazonium cation (DMA) from the tetrafluoroborate salt precursor. DMA acts as a hydrogen donor for benzophenone in solution; this pair of co-initiators permits us to photopolymerize glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) between the lamellae of the diazonium-modified clay, therefore providing intercalated MMT-PGMA nanocomposites with an onset of exfoliation. This work conclusively provides a new approach for bridging reactive and functional polymers to layered nanomaterials via aryl diazonium salts in a simple, fast, efficient cation-exchange approach.

  2. Water-level altitudes 2011 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2010 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.; Kasmarek, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the subsidence in the Houston–Galveston region has occurred as a direct result of groundwater withdrawals for municipal supply, industrial use, and irrigation that depressured and dewatered the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers causing compaction of the clay layers of the aquifer sediments. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Harris–Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports depicting water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston–Galveston region. The report contains maps showing 2011 water-level altitudes for the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers; maps showing 1-year (2010–11) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing 5-year (2006–11) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing long-term (1990–2011 and 1977–2011) water-level-altitude changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers; a map showing long-term (2000–11) water-level-altitude change for the Jasper aquifer; a map showing locations of borehole extensometer sites; and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the extensometers from 1973, or later, through 2010. Tables listing the data used to construct each aquifer-data map and the compaction graphs are included.Water levels in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers were measured during December 2010–February 2011. In 2011, water-level-altitude contours for the Chicot aquifer ranged from 200 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (hereinafter, datum) in a small area in southwestern Harris County to 200 feet above datum in central to southwestern Montgomery County. Water-level-altitude changes in the Chicot aquifer ranged from a 40-foot decline to a 33-foot rise (2010–11), from a 10-foot

  3. Water-level altitudes 2010 and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction 1973-2009 in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, Houston-Galveston region, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Ramage, Jason K.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the subsidence in the Houston-Galveston region has occurred as a direct result of groundwater withdrawals for municipal supply, industrial use, and irrigation that depressured and dewatered the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers causing compaction of the clay layers of the aquifer sediments. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District, is one in an annual series of reports depicting water-level altitudes and water-level changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers and compaction in the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers in the Houston-Galveston region. The report contains maps showing 2010 water-level altitudes for the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers, respectively; maps showing 1-year (2009-10) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing 5-year (2005-10) water-level-altitude changes for each aquifer; maps showing long-term (1990-2010 and 1977-2010) water-level-altitude changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers; a map showing long-term (2000-10) water-level-altitude change for the Jasper aquifer; a map showing locations of borehole extensometer sites; and graphs showing measured compaction of subsurface material at the extensometers from 1973, or later, through 2009. Tables listing the data used to construct each aquifer-data map and the compaction graphs are included. Water levels in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers were measured during December 2009-March 2010. In 2010, water-level-altitude contours for the Chicot aquifer ranged from 200 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 or North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (hereinafter, datum) in a small area in southwestern Harris County to 200 feet above datum in central to southwestern Montgomery County. Water-level-altitude changes in the Chicot aquifer ranged from a 49-foot decline to a 67

  4. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-01-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites

  5. Assessing the environmental impacts of soil compaction in Life Cycle Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessel, Franziska; Sonderegger, Thomas; Bayer, Peter; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2018-07-15

    Maintaining biotic capacity is of key importance with regard to global food and biomass provision. One reason for productivity loss is soil compaction. In this paper, we use a statistical empirical model to assess long-term yield losses through soil compaction in a regionalized manner, with global coverage and for different agricultural production systems. To facilitate the application of the model, we provide an extensive dataset including crop production data (with 81 crops and corresponding production systems), related machinery application, as well as regionalized soil texture and soil moisture data. Yield loss is modeled for different levels of soil depth (0-25cm, 25-40cm and >40cm depth). This is of particular relevance since compaction in topsoil is classified as reversible in the short term (approximately four years), while recovery of subsoil layers takes much longer. We derive characterization factors quantifying the future average annual yield loss as a fraction of the current yield for 100years and applicable in Life Cycle Assessment studies of agricultural production. The results show that crops requiring enhanced machinery inputs, such as potatoes, have a major influence on soil compaction and yield losses, while differences between mechanized production systems (organic and integrated production) are small. The spatial variations of soil moisture and clay content are reflected in the results showing global hotspot regions especially susceptible to soil compaction, e.g. the South of Brazil, the Caribbean Islands, Central Africa, and the Maharashtra district of India. The impacts of soil compaction can be substantial, with highest annual yield losses in the range of 0.5% (95% percentile) due to one year of potato production (cumulated over 100y this corresponds to a one-time loss of 50% of the present yield). These modeling results demonstrate the necessity for including soil compaction effects in Life Cycle Impact Assessment. Copyright © 2018

  6. Analysis of clay particles behaviour during hydration-dehydration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maison, T.; Laouafa, F.; Delalain, P.; Fleureau, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The knowledge of the physico-chemical processes at a local (micro) level during the shrinkage or the swelling processes of clayey materials is an essential step to characterise the ability of such soils to shrink or to swell. In order to better understand these phenomena, we performed research at microscopic levels using mainly an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). This apparatus allows exploring some features of the behaviour and physical properties of clays subjected to controlled hygrometry conditions. The observations were performed on an heterogeneous natural clay, the Romainville clay. This clay, showing a sensitive behavior to shrinkage and swelling, is taken in situ from affected site by the drought. This site is well monitored. This clay was characterised by classical geotechnical laboratory tests (mercury porosimetry, X-Ray diffraction, grain size analysis...). Microstructure observations are done on cubic samples of 1 cm side. Swelling-shrinkage cycles are done on clay powder with grain sizes between 63 μm and 125 μm. The microstructure shows a compact clayey matrix with small calcite and quartz grains. Calcite may be present in veins form, due to sedimentation or pressure-dissolution effect. At high humidity value around 98%, moulds are observed on the totality of sample surface. During swelling-shrinkage cycles, surface sample changes are real time followed. Hydratation-dehydration cycles are imposed with a time of 30 minutes (considered as sufficient to reach steady state). The sample deformation induced by swelling and shrinkage is calculated by analyzing 2D ESEM images and assuming isotropic behaviour for the out of plane strain. The result shows a kinetics of swelling and shrinkage which can be decomposed into two successive phases. At each change of relative humidity, the first step is characterized by a discontinuity (jump) in the deformation, followed by a quite constant strain

  7. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  8. A large-scale laboratory investigation into the movement of gas and water through clay barriers exposed to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a large scale laboratory investigation into the movements of gas and water through clay barriers exposed to the environment. The test beds, each 3m square were constructed and filled with clay to a depth of 400 mm, after compaction. One test bed contained London Clay, the other Glacial Till. The clays were subjected to accelerated environmental cycling and tests carried out on samples of the clays at appropriate intervals. The tests included measurements of the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the clays and their permeability to gas and water. Gas permeability emerged as the more appropriate for the clays being investigated. The report discusses the difficulties of measuring the permeability of partially saturated clays and the need to define the measuring techniques when specifying limiting acceptability values. 55 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs., 27 plates

  9. Halloysite clay nanotubes for resveratrol delivery to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergaro, Viviana; Lvov, Yuri M; Leporatti, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    Halloysite is natural aluminosilicate clay with hollow tubular structure which allows loading with low soluble drugs using their saturated solutions in organic solvents. Resveratrol, a polyphenol known for having antioxidant and antineoplastic properties, is loaded inside these clay nanotubes lumens. Release time of 48 h is demonstrated. Spectroscopic and ζ-potential measurements are used to study the drug loading/release and for monitoring the nanotube layer-by-layer (LbL) coating with polyelectrolytes for further release control. Resveratrol-loaded clay nanotubes are added to breast cell cultures for toxicity tests. Halloysite functionalization with LbL polyelectrolyte multilayers remarkably decrease nanotube self-toxicity. MTT measurements performed with a neoplastic cell lines model system (MCF-7) as function of the resveratrol-loaded nanotubes concentration and incubation time indicate that drug-loaded halloysite strongly increase of cytotoxicity leading to cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Modeling of Cation Binding in Hydrated 2:1 Clay Minerals - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals are high surface area, layered silicates that play a unique role in determining the fate of radionuclides in the environment. This project consisted of developing and implementing computer simulation methods for molecular characterization of the swelling and ion exchange properties of Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals, and the subsequent analysis and theoretical modeling with a view toward improving contaminant transport modeling as well as soil remediation and radionuclide containment strategies. Project results included the (a) development of simulation methods to treat clays under environmentally relevant conditions of variable water vapor pressure; (b) calculation of clay swelling thermodynamics as a function of interlayer ion size and charge (calculated quantities include immersion energies, free energies, and entropies of swelling); and (c) calculation of ion exchange free energies, including contributions from changing interlayer water contents and layer spacing

  11. Effects of leachate concentration on the integrity of solidified clay liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Qian

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of landfill leachate concentration on the degradation behaviour of solidified clay liners and to propose a viable mechanism for the observed degradation. The results indicated that the unconfined compressive strength of the solidified clay decreased significantly, while the hydraulic conductivity increased with the leachate concentration. The large pore proportion in the solidified clay increased and the sum of medium and micro pore proportions decreased, demonstrating that the effect on the solidified clay was evident after the degradation caused by exposure to landfill leachate. The unconfined compressive strength of the solidified clay decreased with increasing leachate concentration as the leachate changed the compact structure of the solidified clay, which are prone to deformation and fracture. The hydraulic conductivity and the large pore proportion of the solidified clay increased with the increase in leachate concentration. In contrast, the sum of medium and micro pore proportions showed an opposite trend in relation to leachate concentration, because the leachate gradually caused the medium and micro pores to form larger pores. Notably, higher leachate concentrations resulted in a much more distinctive variation in pore proportions. The hydraulic conductivity of the solidified clay was closely related to the size, distribution, and connection of pores. The proportion of the large pores showed a positive correlation with the increase of hydraulic conductivity, while the sum of the proportions of medium and micro pores showed a negative correlation.

  12. Improved performance of dye-sensitized solar cell with a specially tailored TiO{sub 2} compact layer prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, M.H., E-mail: hanapiah801@ppinang.uitm.edu.my [NANO-Electronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M. [NANO-Electronic Centre, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-05

    Highlights: • A novel gradient index antireflective TiO{sub 2} compact layer based DSSC was fabricated. • Higher right-shifted transmittance spectra favour the spectral response of N719 dye. • The arc-TiO{sub 2} film on ITO has decreased the charge interfacial resistance, R{sub 1}. • The arc-TiO{sub 2} film prevents electrons recombination at ITO and nc-TiO{sub 2} interfaces. • Almost 42% increment in the overall efficiency compared to the bare ITO cell. - Abstract: We demonstrate that a graded index TiO{sub 2} antireflective compact layer (arc-TiO{sub 2}) employed by RF sputtering can modulate the optical transmittance and reduce the electron recombination in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The spectral response of the DSSC is improved, due to higher and red-shifted transmittance spectra in a specific region that favours the sensitization effect of the dye. The effects of arc-TiO{sub 2} prepared at various RF sputtering powers to the performances of DSSC were investigated by means of the incident photo to current efficiency (IPCE), open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The slow decay of the photo-voltage attributed to the desirable merits of the arc-TiO{sub 2} compact layer has been evidenced by the OCVD measurement. Meanwhile, the improvement of adhesion between an arc-TiO{sub 2} film and porous-TiO{sub 2} has decreased the interfacial-charge resistance, R{sub 1} in the EIS measurement. This lower R{sub 1} then facilitates the charge-transfer process of the electron in the DSSC. At 100 W of RF power, these blended effects improved the overall conversion efficiency of the DSSC by an increase of 42% compared to the cell without the compact layer.

  13. Laboratory and field tests for radionuclide migration and high flow paths in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Jefferies, N.L.; Lineham, T.R.; Nesirky, P.

    1991-01-01

    Two investigations have been undertaken in this programme. The principal investigation was at Culham Laboratory, England, where water flow within the Kimmeridge clay was measured. A subsidiary investigation at SCK/CEN was undertaken at the Underground Research Laboratory SCK/CEN Mol, Belgium, where an in situ measurement of solute transport by diffusion was attempted. The in situ migration experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory at SCK/CEN Mol, Belgium, was unsuccessful, due to problems with the engineering installation. These difficulties caused significant disturbance to the Boom clay which was to be tested. Nevertheless the laboratory test proved the feasibility of the experiment. The field measurements at Culham Laboratory, Oxfordshire, were completed with the flow testing of a very silty clay horizon in the Kimmeridge clay. This layer was proved to be laterally continuous after drilling three exploratory boreholes. The hydraulic conductivity of the layer was ≥ 10 -8 ms -1 and comparative tests in the clay showed the conductivity of the clay to be at least 50 times less. 12 figs

  14. Clay minerals in sandstone uranium deposits: radwaste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Clay minerals play an important role in the genesis of uranium deposits in sandstones. They incorporate the rate earths (REE), U, Sb, Th, Cs, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and even small amounts of chalcophiles. These minerals possess analog elements for many of the radwaste fission products as well as actinides and some actinide daughters. In sandstone uranium deposits, clay minerals are also associated with sulfide minerals, usually pyrite, and organic carbonaceous matter. The primary clay minerals are usually smectites, illites, chlorites and mixed layer varieties. The integrity of these clay minerals is demonstrated by their retention of formational-mineralization ages determined by Rb-Sr geochronologic investigation of the Grants Mineral Belt of the United States. The importance of the clay minerals as analog for parts of the multi-barrier concept in radwaste disposal is their ability to impede water penetration into - and movement of key elements out of uranium rich zones. The clay minerals further sorb and in other ways incorporate into their structures many fission products and actinide analogs from man-made nuclear wastes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  15. Performance evaluation of cement-stabilized pond ash-rice husk ash-clay mixture as a highway construction material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Gupta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of an investigation carried out on clay soil stabilized with pond ash (PA, rice husk ash (RHA and cement. Modified Proctor compaction tests were performed in order to investigate the compaction behavior of clay, and California bearing ratio (CBR tests were performed to determine the strength characteristics of clay. For evaluation purpose, the specimens containing different amounts of admixtures were prepared. Clay was replaced with PA and RHA at a dosage of 30%–45% and 5%–20%, respectively. The influence of stabilizer types and dosages on mechanical properties of clay was evaluated. In order to study the surface morphology and crystallization characteristics of the soil samples, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses were carried out, respectively. The results obtained indicated a decrease in the maximum dry density (MDD and a simultaneous increase in the optimum moisture content (OMC with the addition of PA and RHA. Multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA showed that the predicted values of CBR tests are in good agreement with the experimental values. Developed stabilized soil mixtures showed satisfactory strength and can be used for construction of embankments and stabilization of sub-grade soil. The use of locally available soils, PA, RHA, and cement in the production of stabilized soils for such applications can provide sustainability for the local construction industry.

  16. Prediction for swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, H.; Ogata, N.

    1996-01-01

    Compacted bentonites are attracting greater attention as back-filling (buffer) materials for high-level nuclear waste repositories. For this purpose, it is very important to quantitatively evaluate the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite. New equations for evaluating the relationship between the swelling deformation of compacted bentonite and the distance between two montmorillonite layers are derived. New equations for evaluating the ion concentration of pore water and the specific surface of bentonite, which significantly influence the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite, are proposed. Furthermore, a prediction method for the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite is presented by combining the new equations with the well-known theoretical equations of repulsive and attractive forces between two montmorillonite layers. The applicability of this method was investigated by comparing the predicted results with laboratory test results on the swelling deformation and swelling pressure of compacted bentonites. (author) 31 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs

  17. Lithological and hydrological influences on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous carbonate-clay aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, S.J.; Herman, J.S.; Jones, B.F.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of clay units on ground-water composition was investigated in a heterogeneous carbonate aquifer system of Miocene age in southwest Florida, known as the Intermediate aquifer system. Regionally, the ground water is recharged inland, flows laterally and to greater depths in the aquifer systems, and is discharged vertically upward at the saltwater interface along the coast. A depth profile of water composition was obtained by sampling ground water from discrete intervals within the permeable carbonate units during coring and by squeezing pore water from a core of the less-permeable clay layers. A normative salt analysis of solute compositions in the water indicated a marine origin for both types of water and an evolutionary pathway for the clay water that involves clay diagenesis. The chemical composition of the ground water in the carbonate bedrock is significantly different from that of the pore water in the clay layers. Dissolution of clays and opaline silica results in high silica concentrations relative to water in other parts of the Intermediate aquifer system. Water enriched in chloride relative to the overlying and underlying ground water recharges the aquifer inland where the confining clay layer is absent, and it dissolves carbonate and silicate minerals and reacts with clays along its flow path, eventually reaching this coastal site and resulting in the high chloride and silica concentrations observed in the middle part of the Intermediate aquifer system. Reaction-path modeling suggests that the recharging surficial water mixes with sulfate-rich water upwelling from the Upper Floridan aquifer, and carbonate mineral dissolution and precipitation, weathering and exchange reactions, clay mineral diagenesis, clay and silica dissolution, organic carbon oxidation, and iron and sulfate reduction result in the observed water compositions.A study was conducted to clarify the influence of clay units on ground-water composition in a heterogeneous

  18. Effects of clay-seam behavior on WIPP repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.M.; Krieg, R.D.; Branstetter, L.J.

    1981-07-01

    The geology at the southeastern New Mexico WIPP site consists of bedded layers of rock salt, anhydrite, polyhalite, mixtures of those materials, and thin clay seams. In spite of their very small (0.005 m to 0.05 m) thickness, clay seams are important to structural characterization of the WIPP stratigraphy since slip might possibly take place across them. Results of a study to determine the effects of clay seam frictional slip on the closure of a well-defined drift configuration are described. A Mohr-Coulomb dry friction model was used to model the active clay seams. The main thrust of the study was to determine the effects of friction coefficient variability on drift closure. Results show that the drift closure varies by a factor of 3.0 over the range of friction coefficients studied. The maximum slip observed along any clay seam was 0.12 m. For values of μ > .7, virtually no slip occurs along any clay seam

  19. Fixing of heavy metals by some inflated Tunisian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharsalli, Jamel

    2009-01-01

    At the time of discharge of the water polluted in a natural environment and thanks to the properties of retention, adsorption and exchange of ions, clays constitute a natural barrier which will be able to limit the toxicity and the propagation of the pollutants. To contribute to the development of clays layers of Tunisia in the field of water treatments, we undertook with a mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of some inflating clays. The characteristics of these clays will be exploited for the study of the retention by adsorption of some heavy metals. The isotherms of adsorption, of heavy metals in aqueous solution by these natural clays before and after acid activation, are studied. The influence of several parameters on the fixing of heavy metals on clay such as the factors relating to the medium of adsorption (agitation, pH, time of contact, temperature. etc) and those relating to the adsorbent (mass, granulometry, impurities. etc) was studied in order to optimize the operating conditions of adsorptions.

  20. Solution-Processed Ultrathin TiO2 Compact Layer Hybridized with Mesoporous TiO2 for High-Performance Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Inyoung; Park, Yun Hee; Bae, Seunghwan; Park, Minwoo; Jeong, Hansol; Lee, Phillip; Ko, Min Jae

    2017-10-25

    The electron transport layer (ETL) is a key component of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and must provide efficient electron extraction and collection while minimizing the charge recombination at interfaces in order to ensure high performance. Conventional bilayered TiO 2 ETLs fabricated by depositing compact TiO 2 (c-TiO 2 ) and mesoporous TiO 2 (mp-TiO 2 ) in sequence exhibit resistive losses due to the contact resistance at the c-TiO 2 /mp-TiO 2 interface and the series resistance arising from the intrinsically low conductivity of TiO 2 . Herein, to minimize such resistive losses, we developed a novel ETL consisting of an ultrathin c-TiO 2 layer hybridized with mp-TiO 2 , which is fabricated by performing one-step spin-coating of a mp-TiO 2 solution containing a small amount of titanium diisopropoxide bis(acetylacetonate) (TAA). By using electron microscopies and elemental mapping analysis, we establish that the optimal concentration of TAA produces an ultrathin blocking layer with a thickness of ∼3 nm and ensures that the mp-TiO 2 layer has a suitable porosity for efficient perovskite infiltration. We compare PSCs based on mesoscopic ETLs with and without compact layers to determine the role of the hole-blocking layer in their performances. The hybrid ETLs exhibit enhanced electron extraction and reduced charge recombination, resulting in better photovoltaic performances and reduced hysteresis of PSCs compared to those with conventional bilayered ETLs.

  1. [Analysis of XRD spectral characteristics of soil clay mineral in two typical cultivated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Luo, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hai-Chao; Li, Qiao; Shen, Cong-Ying; Liu, Hang; Zhou, Ya-Juan; Zhao, Lan-Po; Wang, Ji-Hong

    2014-07-01

    The present paper took black soil and chernozem, the typical cultivated soil in major grain producing area of Northeast, as the study object, and determinated the soil particle composition characteristics of two cultivated soils under the same climate and location. Then XRD was used to study the composition and difference of clay mineral in two kinds of soil and the evolutionary mechanism was explored. The results showed that the two kinds of soil particles were composed mainly of the sand, followed by clay and silt. When the particle accumulation rate reached 50%, the central particle size was in the 15-130 microm interval. Except for black soil profile of Shengli Xiang, the content of clay showed converse sequence to the central particle in two soils. Clay accumulated under upper layer (18.82%) in black soil profile while under caliche layer (17.41%) in chernozem profile. Clay content was the least in parent material horizon except in black profile of Quanyanling. Analysis of clay XRD atlas showed that the difference lied in not only the strength of diffraction peak, but also in the mineral composition. The main contents of black soil and chernozem were both 2 : 1 clay, the composition of black soil was smectite/illite mixed layer-illite-vermiculite and that of chernozem was S/I mixture-illite-montmorillonite, and both of them contained little kaolinite, chlorite, quartz and other primary mineral. This paper used XRD to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two kinds of typical cultivated soil comparatively, and it was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  2. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI (aq) ) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  5. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.; Tournassat, C.; Ghorbani, A.; Jougnot, D.; Cosenza, P.; Camerlynck, C.; Cabrera, J.; Florsch, N.; Revil, A.

    2012-01-01

    were performed with a cylindrical four-electrode sample-holder (cylinder made of PVC with 30 cm in length and 19 cm in diameter) associated with a SIP-Fuchs II impedance meter and non-polarizing Cu/CuSO 4 electrodes. These electrodes were installed at 10 cm from the base of the sample holder and regularly spaced (each 90 degree). The results illustrate the strong impact of the Cationic Exchange Capacity (CEC) of the clay minerals upon the complex conductivity. The amplitude of the in-phase conductivity of the kaolinite-clay samples is strongly dependent to saturating fluid salinity for all volumetric clay fractions, whereas the in-phase conductivity of the smectite-clay samples is quite independent on the salinity, except at the low clay content (5% and 1% of clay in volume). This is due to the strong and constant surface conductivity of smectite associated with its very high CEC. The quadrature conductivity increases steadily with the CEC and the clay content. We observe that the dependence on frequency of the quadrature conductivity of sand-kaolinite mixtures is more important than for sand-bentonite mixtures. For both types of clay, the quadrature conductivity seems to be fairly independent on the pore fluid salinity except at very low clay contents (1% in volume of kaolinite-clay). This is due to the constant surface site density of Na counter-ions in the Stern layer of clay materials. At the lowest clay content (1%), the magnitude of the quadrature conductivity increases with the salinity, as expected for silica sands. In this case, the surface site density of Na counter-ions in the Stern layer increases with salinity. The experimental data show good agreement with predicted values given by our Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) model. This complex conductivity model considers the electrochemical polarization of the Stern layer coating the clay particles and the Maxwell-Wagner polarization. We use the differential effective medium theory to calculate the complex

  6. Controlling effective aspect ratio and packing of clay with pH for improved gas barrier in nanobrick wall thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, David A; Saucier, Lauren; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2014-12-24

    Polymer-clay thin films constructed via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly, with a nanobrick wall structure (i.e., clay nanoplatelets as bricks surrounded by a polyelectrolyte mortar), are known to exhibit a high oxygen barrier. Further barrier improvement can be achieved by lowering the pH of the clay suspension in the polyethylenimine (PEI) and montmorillonite (MMT) system. In this case, the charge of the deposited PEI layer is increased in the clay suspension environment, which causes more clay to be deposited. At pH 4, MMT platelets deposit with near perfect ordering, observed with transmission electron microscopy, enabling a 5× improvement in the gas barrier for a 10 PEI/MMT bilayer thin film (85 nm) relative to the same film made with pH 10 MMT. This improved gas barrier approaches that achieved with much higher aspect ratio vermiculite clay. In essence, lower pH is generating a higher effective aspect ratio for MMT due to greater induced surface charge in the PEI layers, which causes heavier clay deposition. These flexible, transparent nanocoatings have a wide range of possible applications, from food and electronics packaging to pressurized bladders.

  7. Effects of simulated clay gouges on the sliding behavior of Tennessee sandston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Logan, John M.

    1981-06-01

    The effects of simulated fault gouge on the sliding behavior of Tennessee sandstone are studied experimentally with special reference to the stabilizing effect of clay minerals mixed into the gouge. About 30 specimens with gouge composed of pure clays, of homogeneously mixed clay and anhydrite, or of layered clay and anhydrite, along a 35° precut are deformed dry in a triaxial apparatus at a confining pressure of 100 MPa, with a shortening rate of about 5 · 10 -4/sec, and at room temperature. Pure clay gouges exhibit only stable sliding, and the ultimate frictional strength is very low for bentonite (mont-morillonite), intermediate for chlorite and illite, and considerably higher for kaolinite. Anhydrite gouge shows violent stick-slip at 100 MPa confining pressure. When this mineral is mixed homogeneously with clays, the frictional coefficient of the mixed gouge, determined at its ultimate frictional strength, decreases monotonically with an increase in the clay content. The sliding mode changes from stick-slip to stable sliding when the frictional coefficient of the mixed clay-anhydrite gouge is lowered down below 90-95% of the coefficient of anhydrite gouge. The stabilizing effect of clay in mixed gouge is closely related to the ultimate frictional strength of pure clays; that is, the effect is conspicuous only for a mineral with low frictional strength. Only 15-20% of bentonite suppresses the violent stick-slip of anhydrite gouge. In contrast, violent stick-slip occurs even if the gouge contains as much as 75% of kaolinite. The behavior of illite and chlorite is intermediate between that of kaolinite and bentonite. Bentonite—anhydrite two-layer gouge exhibits stable sliding even when the bentonite content is only 5%. Thus, the presence of a thin, clay-rich layer in a fault zone stabilizes the behavior much more effectively than do the clay minerals mixed homogeneously with the gouge. This result brings out the mechanical significance of internal structures

  8. Fish DNA-modified clays: Towards highly flame retardant polymer nanocomposite with improved interfacial and mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihi, Omid; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Khayyam, Hamid; Naebe, Minoo

    2016-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) has been recently found to be an efficient renewable and environmentally-friendly flame retardant. In this work, for the first time, we have used waste DNA from fishing industry to modify clay structure in order to increase the clay interactions with epoxy resin and take benefit of its additional thermal property effect on thermo-physical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. Intercalation of DNA within the clay layers was accomplished in a one-step approach confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, and XRD analyses, indicating that d-space of clay layers was expanded from ~1.2 nm for pristine clay to ~1.9 nm for clay modified with DNA (d-clay). Compared to epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt of Nanomer I.28E organoclay (m-clay), it was found that at 2.5%wt d-clay loading, significant enhancements of ~14%, ~6% and ~26% in tensile strength, tensile modulus, and fracture toughness of epoxy nanocomposite can be achieved, respectively. Effect of DNA as clay modifier on thermal performance of epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt d-clay was evaluated using TGA and cone calorimetry analysis, revealing significant decreases of ~4000 kJ/m2 and ~78 kW/m2 in total heat release and peak of heat release rate, respectively, in comparison to that containing 2.5%wt of m-clay.

  9. Diffusion of strongly sorbing cations (60Co and 152Eu) in compacted FEBEX bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Cormenzana, J. L.; Missana, T.; Alonso, U.; Mingarro, M.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion experiments in compacted FEBEX bentonite were performed with strongly sorbing radionuclides, 60 Co and 152 Eu. Diffusion experiments with these radionuclides present several difficulties: first of all these tests are very time consuming because of the high sorption on the clays, secondly these elements not only present high sorption onto clays but also on diffusion cells, tubing, filters and reservoirs, typically used in the classical through-diffusion or in-diffusion methods, which makes difficult the interpretation of the results. In this study, the experiments were performed using the instantaneous planar source method, where a paper filter tagged with a tracer is placed between two tablets of compacted bentonite. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D a ) is obtained analysing the tracer concentration profile in the samples at the end of the experiment, both with an analytical and a numerical approach. The ranges of D a values obtained from these experiments in the FEBEX clay compacted at 1.65 g/cm 3 are (0.5-2.3) x 10 -13 m 2 /s for Co and (0.8-2.5) x 10 -14 m 2 /s for Eu. Results showed that the analytical solution is able to fit reasonably well the Eu concentration profiles, whereas Co concentration profiles show a different behavior, not straightforward to explain, which was also analyzed by numerical methods. (authors)

  10. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Barres, O.; Galmiche, M.; Ghanbaja, J.; Kohler, A.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were

  11. Adsorption of heavy metal ions on different clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, K.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present dissertation is to study the adsorption of heavy metal ions (Cd 2+ , Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ , Zn 2+ ) and their mixtures on clays. Different clays and bentonites (Ca 2+ -bentonite, activated Na + -bentonite, special heavy metal adsorber bentonite, two organophilic bentonites and a mixed layer clay) were used. The adsorbed metal ions were desorbed by appropriate solutions of HCl, EDTA and dioctadecyl dimethylammonium bromide. High concentrations of the heavy metal ions in the solutions can be reached. The desorption guarantees economical recycling. After desorption the clays were used (up to three times) for purification of contaminated water. The best experimental conditions, i.e. the highest adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions was found for the greatest ratio of adsorbent/adsorbate. The adsorption was very fast. Calcium, sodium bentonites and the heavy metal adsorber bentonite attained the highest adsorption and desorption for Cu 2+, Zn 2+ and Pb 2+ ions. Cd 2+ ions were only absorbed by Silitonit, a special heavy metal absorber bentonite. The mixed layer clay (Opalit) ranges in adsorption and desorption properties below the unmodified Ca 2+ -bentonite (Montigel) or the activated Na + -bentonite. Only Tixosorb and Tixogel (organophilic bentonites) reach the lowest value of heavy metal adsorption. Only lead cations which are characterised by good polarizability were adsorbed at higher rates, therefore the organophilic bentonites are not appropriate for adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Mixing of the metal ions generally decreases the adsorption of Pb 2+ and increases the adsorption of Cd 2+ . From mixtures if heavy metal ions adsorption and desorption of Cu 2+ ions reached a maximum for all clays. (author) figs., tabs., 56 refs

  12. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchior, S.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m 2 to 500 m 2 . Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10 -10 m 3 m -2 s -1 to 4 x 10 -8 m 3 m -2 s -1 . Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates

  13. Corrosion of carbon steel under anaerobic conditions in a repository for SF and HLW in Opalinus Clay. Technical report 08-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    2008-10-01

    Nagra is considering carbon steel as one of the canister material options for the disposal of high level waste and spent fuel in a deep geological repository in Opalinus Clay. Following a brief period of aerobic conditions, the canister will be exposed to an anaerobic environment for much of its service life. Knowledge of the rate of anaerobic corrosion is important not only for estimating the canister lifetime but also for determining the rate of hydrogen generation. This report describes a critical review of the anaerobic corrosion behaviour of carbon steel under environmental conditions similar to those expected in the repository. The aims of the report are: 1. to recommend a (range of) long-term anaerobic corrosion rate(s) for carbon steel canisters, and 2. to justify the use of this rate in safety assessments based on a mechanistic understanding of the structure and properties of the protective corrosion product films. The review is based on selected studies from various national nuclear waste management programs, supplemented where appropriate with studies from other applications and with evidence from archaeological analogues. The corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with time because of the formation of a protective surface film. There are differences in behaviour in bulk solution and in the presence of compacted bentonite. In bulk solution, the corrosion rate decreases to an apparent steady-state rate after a period of approximately six months, with a long-term rate of the order of 0.1 μm·.yr -1 . The surface film comprises a duplex structure, with a magnetite outer layer and a spinel-type inner layer. In compacted clay systems the rate of decrease in corrosion rate is slower, with steady state not being reached after several years of exposure. There is a significant body of evidence from apparently well-conducted experiments that indicate an anaerobic corrosion rate of the order of 1-2 μm·yr -1 in systems containing compacted clay and the

  14. Recent advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Zhi; Zhou, Chun Hui; Wang, Jing; Tong, Dong Shen; Yu, Wei Hua; Wang, Hao

    2015-12-28

    Clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels have been proven to have exceptional composition, properties, and applications, and consequently have attracted a significant amount of research effort over the past few years. The objective of this paper is to summarize and evaluate scientific advances in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels in terms of their specific preparation, formation mechanisms, properties, and applications, and to identify the prevailing challenges and future directions in the field. The state-of-the-art of existing technologies and insights into the exfoliation of layered clay minerals, in particular montmorillonite and LAPONITE®, are discussed first. The formation and structural characteristics of polymer/clay nanocomposite hydrogels made from in situ free radical polymerization, supramolecular assembly, and freezing-thawing cycles are then examined. Studies indicate that additional hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interactions, coordination bonds, hydrophobic interaction, and even covalent bonds could occur between the clay mineral nanoplatelets and polymer chains, thereby leading to the formation of unique three-dimensional networks. Accordingly, the hydrogels exhibit exceptional optical and mechanical properties, swelling-deswelling behavior, and stimuli-responsiveness, reflecting the remarkable effects of clay minerals. With the pivotal roles of clay minerals in clay mineral-containing nanocomposite hydrogels, the nanocomposite hydrogels possess great potential as superabsorbents, drug vehicles, tissue scaffolds, wound dressing, and biosensors. Future studies should lay emphasis on the formation mechanisms with in-depth insights into interfacial interactions, the tactical functionalization of clay minerals and polymers for desired properties, and expanding of their applications.

  15. Quantum-chemical modeling of smectite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, S.; Coyne, L.; Lawless, J.; Rishpon, J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent charge extended Hueckel program is used in modeling isomorphic substitution of Al(3+) by Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Fe(3+) in the octahedral layer of a dioctahedral smectite clay, such as montmorillonite. Upon comparison of the energies involved in the isomorphic substitution, it is found that the order for successful substitution is as follows: Al(3+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Na(+), which is equivalent to Ca(2+), and then K(+). This ordering is found to be consistent with experimental observation. The calculations also make it possible to determine the possible penetration of metal ions into the clay's 2:1 crystalline layer. For the cases studied, this type of penetration can occur at elevated temperatures into regions where isomorphic substitution has occurred with metal ions that bear a formal charge of less than 3+. The computed behavior of the electronic structure in the presence of isomorphic substitution is found to be similar to behavior associated with semiconductors.

  16. Modification and characterization of montmorillonite clay for the extraction of zearalenone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Kerri-Ann Alicia

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of organisms belonging to the fungus kingdom. The cost associated with mycotoxin contamination in the USA and Canada is approximately US $5 billion. Zearalenone (ZEN), a resorcylic acid lactone, is produced by various members of the genus Fusarium . These fungi often colonize a variety of foods and feedstuffs including, corn, sorghum, wheat, oats, barley, and other cereal grains. This metabolite has estrogenic effects in farm animals with pigs being the most sensitive. ZEN induces hyperestrogenism and can cause infertility, reduced sex drive, fetal mummification, and abortions. Clays have successfully been used in the animal feed industry as an adsorbent and binders for certain small, water soluble mycotoxins. These mycotoxins are attracted to the electrical imbalance between the layers of the clays caused by isomorphic substitution of structural atoms. The mycotoxins are sequestered in the clay layers and pass harmlessly through the animal. However, ZEN is water insoluble and is not extracted easily with aluminosilicate clays. Therefore the modification of hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate (HSCAS) clays with organic cations has been proposed to render the clays hydrophobic and increase the ZEN binding capacity. The goal of this study was to develop a safe and cost effective organophilic material able to bind and extract zearalenone, to investigate the factors most important to extraction, and to investigate the fundamental properties between the clay-surfactant-mycotoxin systems that lead to extraction. The clay was modified by cation exchange reactions with tricaprylmethylammonium (TCMA) chloride and generic corn oil. The organophilic clays were then characterized using XRD, FTIR, and TGA analytical techniques. These techniques were used to determine the change in fundamental clay properties that would lead to the extraction of ZEN. Desorption studies were performed to determine any increase in toxicity that might be

  17. Stabilization of an expansive overconsolidated clay using hydraulic binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkrim Mahamedi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas of the wilaya of M’sila in Algeria nowadays experience a considerable development because of an unceasingly increasing demography, from where its extension toward virgin zones is often less favorable than those already urbanized. This wilaya is located in a zone classified as semi-arid, whose geology comprises clayey formations characterized by a high variation of volume when the conditions of their equilibrium are modified (natural climatic phenomena due to a prolonged dryness, human activity by modification of the ground water level because of excessive pumping, configuration of constructions in their environment. This paper presents and analyzes the results of a series of laboratory tests (identification, compaction, penetration and direct shear tests performed on an expansive overconsolidated clay obtained from an urban site situated in Sidi-Hadjrès city (wilaya of M’sila, Algeria, where significant damages frequently appear in the road infrastructures and in the light structures. Test results obtained show that the geotechnical parameteric values deduced from these tests are concordant and confirm the bearing capacity improvement of this natural clay treated with hydraulic binders (composed Portland cement and extinct lime and compacted under the optimum Proctor conditions, which is translated by a significant increase in soil strength and its durability.

  18. Assessment of the mechanical properties of sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay using triaxial shear tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yankai; Li, Yanbin; Niu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil's strength and improves the soil's mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  19. Assessment of the Mechanical Properties of Sisal Fiber-Reinforced Silty Clay Using Triaxial Shear Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankai Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforcement is widely used in construction engineering to improve the mechanical properties of soil because it increases the soil’s strength and improves the soil’s mechanical properties. However, the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced soils remain controversial. The present study investigated the mechanical properties of silty clay reinforced with discrete, randomly distributed sisal fibers using triaxial shear tests. The sisal fibers were cut to different lengths, randomly mixed with silty clay in varying percentages, and compacted to the maximum dry density at the optimum moisture content. The results indicate that with a fiber length of 10 mm and content of 1.0%, sisal fiber-reinforced silty clay is 20% stronger than nonreinforced silty clay. The fiber-reinforced silty clay exhibited crack fracture and surface shear fracture failure modes, implying that sisal fiber is a good earth reinforcement material with potential applications in civil engineering, dam foundation, roadbed engineering, and ground treatment.

  20. Improvement of a force field to model the edges of clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouvreau, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The CLAYFF force field is widely used to model the interfaces of clay minerals - and related layered materials - with an aqueous phase. In the simulations, clay particles are typically represented by semi-infinite layers, i.e. only surfaces parallel to the layer plane (basal surfaces) are considered. This simplification is acceptable to a certain extent, but clay layers are really nano sized and terminated by lateral surfaces or edges. These surfaces can not only adsorb solvated species but are also subject to proton transfers, and all physico-chemical processes related to the aqueous phase acidity predominantly occur at the edges. By adding to the CLAYFF force field a Metal-O-H angle bending term whose parameters are correctly adjusted, the simulations of edge interfaces become possible.The parameters of Al-O-H and Mg-O-H terms were obtained from DFT calculations on bulk, basal surface and edge structural models of gibbsite Al(OH) 3 and brucite Mg(OH) 2 , whose layers can be considered as the backbones of clay minerals and related materials. In addition, the Si-O-H term was parametrized from an edge model of kaolinite Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 . Molecular dynamics simulations based on DFT and on CLAYFF with and without Metal-O-H term were performed. The modified force field clearly improves the description of hydroxylated surfaces: the orientation and the vibrational dynamics of the hydroxyl groups, the hydrogen bonding, and the coordination of metal atoms belonging to the edge are all closer to reality [fr

  1. Subsoil compaction of a Vertic Cambisol persists three decades after wheel traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    Compaction of the subsoil can only be alleviated by natural processes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of compaction on the pore system at 0.35 m depth of a heavy clay soil naturally subjected to drying and wetting, and to freezing and thawing, and biological...... activity in Finland. The compaction treatment was inflicted 29 years prior to investigation and included four passes with a tractor-trailer combination with wheel loads up to 4.8 Mg and inflation pressures of 700 kPa. Gas diffusion and air permeability measurements were combined with pycnometer...... characteristics was expected to enhance the ability to deduce how the soil pore system was affected. This included advective air flow measurements at a range of pneumatic pressure drops. Compaction at 0.35 m depth was persistent 29 years after the compaction event. Compaction diminished the diameter of vertical...

  2. Adsorption and intercalation of anionic surfactants onto layered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Department of Polymer Technology, Kamaraj College of Engineering and Technology, Virudhunagar 626 ... Layered double hydroxides (LDH) with brucite like structure was modified with various anionic ... Recently the application of layered double hydroxides ..... Yuan Q, Wei M, Wang Z and Duan X 2004 Clays Clay Miner.

  3. Mechanical thermal evaluation of polyamide 6 with bentonite organo clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Rene Anisio da; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas Jeferson Alves de; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Cavalcanti, Shirley Nobrega; Pessan, Luiz Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This work had for objective to obtain polymeric nanocomposites of polyamide 6 and a clay consisting of silicates layer from of Paraiba mines and to evaluate evaluation mechanical thermal in different processing conditions. The clay was organically modified using a quaternary ammonium salt (Cetremide), so that there is a larger interaction of the clay with the polymer. The obtained nanocomposites showed the morphological structure composed exfoliated/partially exfoliated, as shown XRD. The results of HDT it because the clay increases the dimensional stability of PA6 in high temperatures, making possible the use of the nanocomposites for making of pieces with good resistance to the heat distortion. (author)

  4. Stochastic Dynamics of Clay Translocation and Formation of Argillic Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S.; Richter, D. D., Jr.; Porporato, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of argillic horizons in vertical soil profiles is mainly attributed to lessivage, namely the transport of clay from an upper E horizon to a deeper illuviated horizon. Because of the long timescales involved in this phenomenon, quantitative modeling is useful to explore the role of clay lessivage on soil formation and sub-surface clay accumulation. The limitations of detailed models of colloidal transport to short timescales make it necessary to resort to simple models. Here, we present a parsimonious model of clay transport in which lessivage is interpreted stochastically. Clay particles approach the soil surface at a speed equal to the erosion rate and are intermittently transported to deeper soil layers when percolation events occur or removed by erosion. Along with the evolution of clay particles trajectories, the model predicts the vertical clay profile, the depth of the B horizon, and the mean time to erosion. Dimensional analysis reveals the two dimensionless parameters governing the dynamics, leading to a new classification of soil types based on erosion rates and intensity of lessivage.

  5. New magnetic organic-inorganic composites based on hydrotalcite-like anionic clays for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carja, Gabriela [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Industrial Chemistry, Technical University of Iasi, 71 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Chiriac, Horia [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050 Iasi (Romania)]. E-mail: hchiriac@phys-iasi.ro; Lupu, Nicoleta [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, 47 Mangeron Boulevard, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2007-04-15

    The structural 'memory effect' of anionic clays was used to obtain layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with tailored magnetic properties, by loading iron oxides and/or spinel structures on iron partially substituted hydrotalcite-like materials. The obtained magnetic layered structures were further used as precursors for new hybrid nanostructures, such as aspirin-hydrotalcite-like anionic clays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis shows that small iron oxide or spinel nanoparticles coexist with the fibrous drug particles on the surface of partially aggregated typical clay-like particles. The specific saturation magnetization of the loaded LDHs can be increased up to 70 emu/g by using specific post-synthesis treatments.

  6. New magnetic organic-inorganic composites based on hydrotalcite-like anionic clays for drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carja, Gabriela; Chiriac, Horia; Lupu, Nicoleta

    2007-01-01

    The structural 'memory effect' of anionic clays was used to obtain layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with tailored magnetic properties, by loading iron oxides and/or spinel structures on iron partially substituted hydrotalcite-like materials. The obtained magnetic layered structures were further used as precursors for new hybrid nanostructures, such as aspirin-hydrotalcite-like anionic clays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis shows that small iron oxide or spinel nanoparticles coexist with the fibrous drug particles on the surface of partially aggregated typical clay-like particles. The specific saturation magnetization of the loaded LDHs can be increased up to 70 emu/g by using specific post-synthesis treatments

  7. The application of layered double hydroxide clay (LDH)-poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) film composites for the controlled release of antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborti, Michelle; Jackson, John K.; Plackett, David

    2012-01-01

    and quantitation of the unbound fraction by UV/Vis absorbance or HPLC analysis. Drug release from layered double hydroxide clay/drug complexes dispersed in polymeric films was measured by incubation in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) at 37 °C using absorbance or HPLC analysis. Antimicrobial activity of drug......Many sites of bacterial infection such as in-dwelling catheters and orthopedic surgical sites require local rather than systemic antibiotic administration. However, currently used controlled release vehicles, such as polymeric films, release water-soluble antibiotics too quickly, whereas nonporous...... released from film composites was determined using zonal inhibition studies against S. epidermidis. All drugs bound to the clay particles to various degrees. Generally, drugs released with a large burst phase of release (except DOX) with little further drug release after 4 days. Dispersion of drug...

  8. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    -del Hoyo, C. (2007). Applied Clay Science. 36, 103-121.Layered Double Hydroxides and human health: An overview. -Valderrábano, M., Rodríguez-Cruz, S., del Hoyo, C., Sánchez-Martín, M.J. (2006). 4th International Workshop "Bioavalailability of pollutants and soil remediation". 1, 5-6. Physicochemical study of the adsorption of pesticides by lignins. -Volzone, C. (2007). Applied Clay Science. 36, 191-196. Retention of pollutant gases: Comparison between clay minerals and their modified products.

  9. Clays as mineral dust aerosol: An integrated approach to studying climate, atmospheric chemistry, and biogeochemical effects of atmospheric clay minerals in an undergraduate research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C. D.; Crane, C. C.; Harris, K. J.; Thompson, C. E.; Miles, M. K.; Weingold, R. M.; Bucuti, T.

    2011-12-01

    Entrained mineral dust aerosol accounts for 45% of the global annual atmospheric aerosol load and can have a significant influence on important environmental issues, including climate, atmospheric chemistry, cloud formation, biogeochemical processes, visibility, and human health. 70% of all mineral aerosol mass originating from Africa consists of layered aluminosilicates, including illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite clays. Clay minerals are a largely neglected component of mineral aerosol, yet they have unique physiochemical properties, including a high reactive surface area, large cation exchange capacities, small particle sizes, and a relatively large capacity to take up adsorbed water, resulting in expansion of clay layers (and a larger reactive surface area for heterogeneous interactions) in some cases. An integrated laboratory research approach has been implemented at Hendrix College, a Primarily Undergraduate Institution, in which undergraduate students are involved in independent and interdisciplinary research projects that relate the chemical aging processes (heterogeneous chemistry) of clay minerals as a major component of mineral aerosol to their effects on climate (water adsorption), atmospheric chemistry (trace gas uptake), and biogeochemistry (iron dissolution and phytoplankton biomarker studies). Preliminary results and future directions will be reported.

  10. A compact, all-optical, THz wave generator based on self-modulation in a slab photonic crystal waveguide with a single sub-nanometer graphene layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, R; Ouyang, Z; Mohammd, M M

    2015-07-14

    We design a compact, all-optical THz wave generator based on self-modulation in a 1-D slab photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide with a single sub-nanometer graphene layer by using enhanced nonlinearity of graphene. It has been shown that at the bandgap edge of higher bands of a 1-D slab PhC, through only one sub-nanometer graphene layer we can obtain a compact, high modulation factor (about 0.98 percent), self-intensity modulator at a high frequency (about 0.6 THz) and low threshold intensity (about 15 MW per square centimeter), and further a compact, all-optical THz wave generator by integrating the self-modulator with a THz photodiode or photonic mixer. Such a THz source is expected to have a relatively high efficiency compared with conventional sources based on optical methods. The proposed THz source can find wide applications in THz science and technology, e.g., in THz imaging, THz sensors and detectors, THz communication systems, and THz optical integrated logic circuits.

  11. New Strategies for Powder Compaction in Powder-based Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Budding, A.; Vaneker, T.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In powder-based rapid prototyping techniques, powder compaction is used to create thin layers of fine powder that are locally bonded. By stacking these layers of locally bonded material, an object is made. The compaction of thin layers of powder mater ials is of interest for a wide range of applications, but this study solely focuses on the application for powder -based three-dimensional printing (e.g. SLS, 3DP). This research is primarily interested in powder compaction for creating membrane...

  12. Polyurethane/organo clay nano composite materials via in-situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehab, A.; Agag, T; Akelah, A.; Shalaby, N.

    2005-01-01

    Polyurethane/organo clay nano composites have been synthesized via in situ polymerization. The organo clay firstly prepared by intercalation of lyamine or amino lauric acid into montmorillonite-clay (MMT) through ion exchange process. The syntheses of polyurethane/organo clay hybrid films containing different ratio of clay were carried out by swelling the organo clay, into diol and diamine or into different kinds of diols, followed by addition of diisocyanate. The nano composites with dispersed structure of MMT was obtained as evidence by scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. X-ray analysis showed that the d-spacing increased to more than 44A since there is no peaks corresponding to do spacing in organo clay with all the ratios (1, 5, 10, 20%). Also, SEM results confirm the dispersion of nanometer silicate layers in the polyurethane matrix. This indicated that the clay was completely exfoliated and homogeneous dispersion in the polyurethane matrix. Also, it was found that the presence of organo clay leads to improvement the mechanical properties. Since, the tensile strength increased with increasing the organo clay contents to 20% by the ratio 194% in compared to the 1H: with 0% organo clay. Also, the elongation is a decreases with increasing the organo clay contents. The results shown the tensile strength of PU/SMA/ALA-MMT nano composites is high by 6-7 times than the corresponding to PU/Tvr-MMT

  13. New Strategies for Powder Compaction in Powder-based Rapid Prototyping Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budding, A.; Vaneker, Thomas H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In powder-based rapid prototyping techniques, powder compaction is used to create thin layers of fine powder that are locally bonded. By stacking these layers of locally bonded material, an object is made. The compaction of thin layers of powder mater ials is of interest for a wide range of

  14. Temperature effect on the behaviour of engineered clay barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, A.M.

    2005-11-01

    The present work deals with the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted swelling clay used for engineered barriers in high-level radioactive repositories. The MX80 bentonite was chosen for this work. Firstly, an experimental work on the thermal conductivity of the compacted bentonite was performed. The results evidenced the effects of dry density, water content, volumetric fraction of soil components, microstructure, and mineralogy. This experimental work gave rise to the proposition of a theoretical model for estimate the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonites. Secondly, after a calibration of suction generated by saturated saline solution in function of temperature, water retention curves were determined at different temperatures. The experimental results showed a decrease of the water retention capacity of soil after heating. A simple model based on the interfacial tension air-water was formulated to simulate this effect. Thirdly, a new isotropic cell enabling a simultaneous control of suction, temperature and mechanical stress was developed. With this new cell, an experimental work on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the unsaturated compacted bentonite was performed. Finally, a constitutive model was developed for simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviours obtained experimentally. (author)

  15. Possibilities for the storage of radioactive waste in deep clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pochat, G.; Lienhardt, M.J.; Peaudecerf, P.; Platel, J.P.; Simon, J.M.; Berest, P.; Charpentier, J.P.; Andre-Jehan, R.

    1984-02-01

    The possible storage sites in deep clay formations have been studied in parts of large French sedimentary basins which prima facie seem to have suitable characteristics. The most suitable areas were chosen on the basis of earlier oil prospecting data consisting of information on seismic movements, diagraphic well-logging data and old samples that happened to have been preserved. At the same time, the lithology of the clay formations can be determined from mineralogical studies on samples taken from boreholes or from outcrops. Before carrying out in situ experiments concerned with the geotechnical characterization of the deep clays, measurements were made in the laboratory on samples obtained in two ways: from tertiary clay outcrops and from cores taken at 950 m in the clay layers during oil well logging. The results of studies carried out on tertiary clays in Les Landes illustrate this procedure

  16. Effect of seawater on consistency, infiltration rate and swelling characteristics of montmorillonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohie Eldin Elmashad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation performed to quantify the effect of mixing clayey soils with saltwater on consistency and swelling characteristics of clays. Massive natural clay deposits and compacted clay backfills either exist or are used in certain important and sensitive applications such as dams, liners, barriers and buffers in waste disposal facilities. In many cases, the clay deposits in these applications are subjected to saltwater. However, in standard laboratory classification tests, distilled or potable water are usually used in mixing test samples. This may lead to faulty interpretation of the actual in-situ consistency and volume change behaviors. In this research, an attempt is made to quantify the changes in consistency and swelling of clay soils from various locations around the Nile valley and possessing a wide range of consistency, when mixed with natural seawater with different salt concentrations. The results showed that the increase of the salt concentration of the mixing water may result in major decrease in the liquid limit and swelling characteristics of high plasticity montmorillonite clays. The reduction in the swelling of the clay soils is also proportional to the rate of saltwater infiltration. In an attempt to correlate the swelling of clays to the rate of water infiltration, a new simplified laboratory apparatus is proposed where swelling and infiltration are measured in one simple test “the swelling infiltrometer”.

  17. Stabilization of Clay Soil Using Tyre Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Dheyab Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The planning, designing, construction of excavations and foundations in soft to very soft clay soils are always difficult. They are problematic soil that caused trouble for the structures built on them because of the low shear strength, high water content, and high compressibility. This work investigates the geotechnical behavior of soft clay by using tyre ash material burnt in air. The investigation contains the following tests: physical tests, chemical tests, consolidation test, Compaction tests, shear test, California Bearing Ratio test CBR, and model tests. These tests were done on soil samples prepared from soft clay soil; tyre ash was used in four percentages (2, 4, 6, and 8%. The results of the tests were; The soil samples which gave the value of plasticity test were 2% (25, 4% (25.18, 6% (25.3, and 8% (26.7.The soil samples which gave the value of specific gravity were 2% (2.65, 4% (2.61, 6% (2.5, and 8% (2.36.The value of maximum dry density in a compaction test observed with 2% percentage gave the value 15.8 kN/m3, the 4% gave the value 15.4 kN/m 3 34 , 6% gave 15.3 kN/m 3 and 8%with 15.2 kN/m3 .Samples that gave the values of undrained shear strength test were 2% (55 kN/m 2 , 4% (76 kN/m2 , 6% (109 kN/m 2, and 8% (122 kN/m 2. The best of them is 8%. The sample that gave the best value for swelling test was 8%.The best value for compression index Cc was in 8%.The results of CBR test, were improved in all soil samples. The soil samples which gave the value for CBR were 2% (3.507%, 4% (4.308%, 6% (5.586%, and 8% (9.569%. The best value was obtained from 8%.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Cynthia M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Leal, Elvia [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Processos; Cambium, Karina B.; Sobrinho, Ariosvaldo A.B.; Baracho, Marcos A.R. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Pontes, Luiz R.A. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Sea atmosphere present salt rates in order of 3.5%, being sodium chloride (NaCl) found in bigger amounts. The high electrolytic character of NaCl contributes to form corrosion products more energetic. The presence of chloride ions (Cl-) promotes the appearance of ferrous chloride molecules (FeCl{sub 2}), which hydrolysis occurs quickly, leading to the metal deterioration. So, the protection of these surfaces by the use of organic coatings, applied in one or multiple layers, has been a technique strongly spread out to promote the metal mechanical properties conservation. The aim of this work is to study the use of organophilic clay as component in anti corrosive polymeric coatings used in metallic structures of petroliferous industry. It had been formulated acrylic coatings, with and without organophilic clay addition. The samples had been submitted a salt spray fog tests, according to ASTM B-117. The results had showed that the samples addicted with organophilic clay presented anti corrosive properties six times more efficient than the other ones without clay addiction. (author)

  19. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Rene A.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Medeirosa, Vanessa da N.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Pessan, Luiz A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that they affect the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a regional bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt in an amount of 3% by weight. XRD results showed that incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and obtaining exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior in relation to pure polyamide, in other words, lost of toughness. (author)

  20. Studying the degradation of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate during processing with clay-based nanofillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabedo, Luis; Plackett, David; Gimenez, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHBV) is attracting interest as a new material for packaging applications and nanoparticulate layered silicates are being increasingly explored as a way to improve PHBV film properties. In this context, it is essential to understand how different types of nanofill......Polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHBV) is attracting interest as a new material for packaging applications and nanoparticulate layered silicates are being increasingly explored as a way to improve PHBV film properties. In this context, it is essential to understand how different types...... of nanofillers could influence polymer properties. PHBV was processed with three-layered clay types using different mixing methods, and we examined the effect of processing time, clay type, and clay content on polymer molecular weight and composite morphology. PHBV molecular weight (Mw) decreased by 38% after......-ray diffraction studies indicated an intercalated morphology in the presence of modified montmorillonite but good dispersion was also achieved when unmodified kaolinite was blended with PHBV. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2009...

  1. Planar compaction of ceramic powders with mining explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuivinga, M.; Verbeek, H.J.; Carton, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Shock compaction experiments of B 4 C powders have been performed using a planar configuration. The powders were contained between metal plates. On top of the upper plate, having a thickness of about 10 mm, was a layer of mining explosives. For this configuration, computer simulations have been performed with use of the hydrocode Autodyn. In comparison with the cylindrical compaction process the planar compaction process appears to be quite different. The reason is the very low detonation velocity of the used mining explosives (2-4 km/s), which is much lower than the sound and shock speeds of the steel plate, in combination with the relatively large thickness of the metal layer. As a result, the nature of the compaction process of the powder initially more resembles a quasi-static compaction process than a shock compaction process. Due to the quasi-static nature of the compaction, the pressure release in the powder after compression is very gradual. Therefore, no strong rarefaction waves leading to high tensile stresses in the compact arise. Flat plates (10x10 cm, 0.6-0.8 cm thick) of Al (20-30 vol %) infiltrated B 4 C have been fabricated using this configuration

  2. X-ray diffraction analysis of clay stones, Muglad Sedimentary Basin, Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A. E.

    1997-01-01

    This study deals with the theoretical and experimental aspects of X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Moreover the XRD technique has been used to investigate the clay mineral types and their distribution for samples obtained from exploration wells in the Mugald Sedimentary Basin in Western Sudan. The studied samples range in depth from 1524 m to 4572 m. The XRD analysis of samples shows that they consist of kaolinite, smectite, illite, chlorite and the mixed-layer smectite/illite. Kaolinite has higher abundance (15 - 72 %) followed by illite (7 - 34 %), smectite (11 - 76 %) and the less abundance of chlorite and the mixed-layer smectite/illite. Non-clay minerals found include quartz and cristabolite. The clay mineral types and their vertical distribution reflect various controls such as environmental, burial diagenesis, source rocks and climatic influences in the Muglad Sedimentary Basin. (author). 19 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Clay, Water, and Salt: Controls on the Permeability of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, Ian C; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2017-09-19

    The ability to predict the permeability of fine-grained soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks is a fundamental challenge in the geosciences with potentially transformative implications in subsurface hydrology. In particular, fine-grained sedimentary rocks (shale, mudstone) constitute about two-thirds of the sedimentary rock mass and play important roles in three energy technologies: petroleum geology, geologic carbon sequestration, and radioactive waste management. The problem is a challenging one that requires understanding the properties of complex natural porous media on several length scales. One inherent length scale, referred to hereafter as the mesoscale, is associated with the assemblages of large grains of quartz, feldspar, and carbonates over distances of tens of micrometers. Its importance is highlighted by the existence of a threshold in the core scale mechanical properties and regional scale energy uses of shale formations at a clay content X clay ≈ 1/3, as predicted by an ideal packing model where a fine-grained clay matrix fills the gaps between the larger grains. A second important length scale, referred to hereafter as the nanoscale, is associated with the aggregation and swelling of clay particles (in particular, smectite clay minerals) over distances of tens of nanometers. Mesoscale phenomena that influence permeability are primarily mechanical and include, for example, the ability of contacts between large grains to prevent the compaction of the clay matrix. Nanoscale phenomena that influence permeability tend to be chemomechanical in nature, because they involve strong impacts of aqueous chemistry on clay swelling. The second length scale remains much less well characterized than the first, because of the inherent challenges associated with the study of strongly coupled nanoscale phenomena. Advanced models of the nanoscale properties of fine-grained media rely predominantly on the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, a mean field

  4. Study of clays by means of Moessbauer spectoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marticorena, B.

    1982-01-01

    A Moessbauer spectroscopic method has been applied to study layers of clays originating from different places and ceramic from Pachacamac, an archeological site near Lima. We have performed a Moessbauer analysis of the samples mentioned above, submitting them to a thermal treatment in order to determine the influcence on the mineral ferrous compounds of the time and the baking atmoshere. The results obtained do not allow us to conclude that such a method is useful either in the case of clays and/or ceramics which are coming from different places or of archeological

  5. Structure and mechanical properties of polyamide 6/Brazilian clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Melissa Damião Leite

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in polymer/organoclays nanocomposites systems is motivated by the possibility of achieving enhanced properties and added functionality at lower clay loading as compared to conventional micron size fillers. By adding montmorillonite clay to polyamide 6 increases the Young modulus, yield strength and also improves barrier properties. In this work, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 with montmorillonite clay were obtained. The clay was chemically modified with three different quaternary ammonium salts such as: Dodigen, Genamin and Cetremide. In this case, a dispersion of Na-MMT was stirred and a salt equivalent to 1:1 of cation exchange capacity (CEC of Na-MMT was added to the dispersion. The montmorillonite clay (untreated and treated by ammonium salts and nanocomposites were characterized by X ray diffractions. Also the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and mechanical properties. The results indicated that all the quaternary ammonium salts were intercalated between the layers of clay, leading to an expansion of the interlayer spacing. The obtained nanocomposites showed better mechanical properties when compared to polyamide 6. The clay acted as reinforcing filler, increasing the rigidity of nanocomposites and decreasing its ductility.

  6. Heteroaggregation of Silver Nanoparticles with Clay Minerals in Aqueous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Burrow, E.; Hwang, Y.; Lenhart, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being used in industrial processes and consumer products that exploit their beneficial properties and improve our daily lives. Nevertheless, they also attract attention when released into natural environment due to their potential for causing adverse effects. The fate and transport of nanoparticles in aqueous systems have been the focus of intense study. However, their interactions with other natural particles have received only limited attention. Clay minerals are ubiquitous in most aquatic systems and their variably charged surfaces can act as deposition sites that can alter the fate and transport of nanoparticles in natural aqueous environments. In this study, we investigated the homoaggregation of silver nanoparticles with different coating layers and their heteroaggregation behavior with clay minerals (illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite) in neutral pH solutions. Silver nanoparticles with a nominal diameter of 80 nm were synthesized with three different surface coating layers: uncoated, citrate-coated and Tween-coated. Illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), and montmorillonite (SWy-2) were purchased from the Clay Mineral Society (Indiana) and pretreated to obtain monocationic (Na-clay) and dicationic (Ca-clay) suspensions before the experiments. The change in hydrodynamic diameter as a function of time was monitored using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements in order to evaluate early stage aggregation as a function of electrolyte concentration in both the homo- and heteroaggregation scenarios. A shift in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values to lower electrolyte concentrations was observed in binary systems, compared to single silver nanoparticle and clay systems. The results also suggest more rapid aggregation in binary system during the early aggregation stage when compared to the single-particle systems. The behavior of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles was similar to that of the bare particles, while the

  7. Compact Single-Layer Traveling-Wave Antenna DesignUsing Metamaterial Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibakhshikenari, Mohammad; Virdee, Bal Singh; Limiti, Ernesto

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a single-layer traveling-wave antenna (TWA) that is based on composite right/left-handed (CRLH)-metamaterial (MTM) transmission line (TL) structure, which is implemented by using a combination of interdigital capacitors and dual-spiral inductive slots. By embedding dual-spiral inductive slots inside the CRLH MTM-TL results in a compact TWA. Dimensions of the proposed CRLH MTM-TL TWA is 21.5 × 30.0 mm2 or 0.372λ0 × 0.520λ0 at 5.2 GHz (center frequency). The fabricated TWA operates over 1.8-8.6 GHz with a fractional bandwidth greater than 120%, and it exhibits a peak gain and radiation efficiency of 4.2 dBi and 81%, respectively, at 5 GHz. By avoiding the use of lumped components, via-holes or defected ground structures, the proposed TWA design is economic for mass production as well as easy to integrate with wireless communication systems.

  8. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.; Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P.; Johnson, D.O.

    1997-01-01

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10 -8 to 10 -1 cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems

  9. Interaction of polymer with discotic clay particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvray, L.; Lal, J.

    1999-01-01

    Normally synthetic well defined monodisperse discotic laponite clays are known to form a gel phase at mass concentrations as low as a few percent in distilled water. Hydrosoluble polymer polyethylene oxide was added to this intriguing clay system, it was observed that it either prevents gelation or slows it down extremely depending on the polymer weight, concentration or the laponite concentration. Small Angle Neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study these systems because only by isotopic labeling can the structure of the adsorbed polymer layers be determined. The contrast variation technique is specifically used to determine separately the different partial structure factors of the clay and polymer. In this way the signal of the adsorbed chains is separated from the signal of the free chains in the dilute regime. Attempts have also been made to characterize the structure in the concentrated regime of laponite with polymer

  10. Mechanistic examination of pre-exfoliating confinement of surface-active polystyrene nanobeads within pristine clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvan, Svetlana; Kim, Junkyung; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2007-02-01

    Hydrophobic polymer (PS) nanoparticles preformed through an emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization method were successfully incorporated into a gallery of pristine sodium montmorillonite via interfacial cation exchange. The polymer beads confined between clay nanosheets were capable of (1) preventing the silicate layers from restacking and (2) maintaining the exfoliated state of clay. The increase in the abundance of surface groups promoted adsorption of the nanobeads onto the silicate surface and eventually led to the establishment of strong polymer-clay interactions. These findings suggest that, on the basis of the obtained pre-exfoliated clay masterbatch, the presence of strong polymer-clay interactions could improve the mechanical performance of nanocomposites.

  11. Two layer powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  12. Land subsidence and hydrodynamic compaction of sedimentary basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kooi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional model is used to investigate the relationship between land subsidence and compaction of basin sediments in response to sediment loading. Analysis of the model equations and numerical experiments demonstrate quasi-linear systems behaviour and show that rates of land subsidence due to compaction: (i can attain a significant fraction (>40% of the long-term sedimentation rate; (ii are hydrodynamically delayed with respect to sediment loading. The delay is controlled by a compaction response time τc that can reach values of 10-5-107 yr for thick shale sequences. Both the behaviour of single sediment layers and multiple-layer systems are analysed. Subsequently the model is applied to the coastal area of the Netherlands to illustrate that lateral variability in compaction-derived land subsidence in sedimentary basins largely reflects the spatial variability in both sediment loading and compaction response time. Typical rates of compaction-derived subsidence predicted by the model are of the order of 0.1 mm/yr but may reach values in excess of 1 mm/yr under favourable conditions.

  13. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  14. Compaction and sedimentary basin analysis on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabasova, Leila R.; Kite, Edwin S.

    2018-03-01

    Many of the sedimentary basins of Mars show patterns of faults and off-horizontal layers that, if correctly understood, could serve as a key to basin history. Sediment compaction is a possible cause of these patterns. We quantified the possible role of differential sediment compaction for two Martian sedimentary basins: the sediment fill of Gunjur crater (which shows concentric graben), and the sediment fill of Gale crater (which shows outward-dipping layers). We assume that basement topography for these craters is similar to the present-day topography of complex craters that lack sediment infill. For Gunjur, we find that differential compaction produces maximum strains consistent with the locations of observed graben. For Gale, we were able to approximately reproduce the observed layer orientations measured from orbiter image-based digital terrain models, but only with a >3 km-thick donut-shaped past overburden. It is not immediately obvious what geologic processes could produce this shape.

  15. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... the clay layers have negative crystal charge which is balanced by .... located at lower frequencies at 1639cm-1 for both samples are produced by the ... the samples, while in the FTIR spectra and wave bands, only slight ...

  16. Effect of Annealing Process on CH3NH3PbI3-XClX Film Morphology of Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells with Optimal Compact TiO2 Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of compact TiO2 film used as an electron-selective layer and perovskite film used as a light absorption layer in planar perovskite solar cells has a significant influence on the photovoltaic performance of the devices. In this paper, the spin coating speed of the compact TiO2 is investigated in order to get a high-quality film and the compact TiO2 film exhibits pinhole- and crack-free films treated by 2000 rpm for 60 s. Furthermore, the effect of annealing process, including annealing temperature and annealing program, on CH3NH3PbI3-XClX film morphology is studied. At the optimal annealing temperature of 100°C, the CH3NH3PbI3-XClX morphology fabricated by multistep slow annealing method has smaller grain boundaries and holes than that prepared by one-step direct annealing method, which results in the reduction of grain boundary recombination and the increase of Voc. With all optimal procedures, a planar fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO substrate/compact TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3-XClX/Spiro-MeOTAD/Au cell is prepared for an active area of 0.1 cm2. It has achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE of 14.64%, which is 80.3% higher than the reference cell (8.12% PCE without optimal perovskite layer. We anticipate that the annealing process with optimal compact TiO2 layer would possibly become a promising method for future industrialization of planar perovskite solar cells.

  17. Hydration of swelling clay and bacteria interaction. An experimental in situ reaction study; Hydratation des argiles gonflantes et influence des bacteries. Etude experimentale de reaction in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, J

    2008-01-15

    This study reports on the physical-chemical behaviour of swelling di-octahedral clays (smectites) and their interaction with aqueous solutions and bacteria (Shewanella putrefaciens). Experimental results are presented for compacted clays, hydrated under confined volume conditions, using a new type of reaction-cell (the 'wet-cell' of Warr and Hoffman, 2004) that was designed for in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. For comparison, dispersed clay systems were studied using standard batch solutions subjected to varying degrees of agitation. The combination of time-dependent in situ XRD measurements with gravimetric measurements and calculated diffraction patterns using the CALCMIX software (Plancon and Drits, 1999) allowed to successful quantification of the dynamics of water uptake and storage. This analytical procedure combined with published water vapour adsorption data enabled determination of the abundance of structured water layers, developed in the interlayer space, and the amount of water contained in different storage sites (interlayers, surfaces and pore spaces). Qualitative information on surface area and textural organization was also estimated based on calculated changes in the average particle thickness and the organization of water layer structures (ordering). Abiotic smectite hydration experiments, using a range of natural and industrial bentonites (SWy-2, IBECO, MX80, TIXOTON), focused on defining the role of the interlayer cation, variable clay packing densities and the ionic strength of the infiltrating solution. The rate of smectite hydration, as expected, was seen to be highly dependent on the type of interlayer cation (enhanced for Ca as opposed to Na) and the ionic strength of solution (enhanced uptake rates with saline solutions, particularly as they infiltrate Na-smectite). A range of dynamic changes in micro textural state occurred as a function of packing density. These changes explain the differences in hydration behaviour

  18. Faults architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternation. Examples in the S-E Basin alternations (France) and numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The following work has been carried out in the framework of the studies conducted by IRSN in support of its safety evaluation of the geological disposal programme of high and intermediate level, long-lived radioactive waste. Such a disposal is planned to be hosted by the Callovian-Oxfordian indurate clay formation between two limestone formations in eastern Paris basin, France. Hypothetical faults may cross-cut this layered section, decreasing the clay containment ability by creating preferential pathways for radioactive solute towards limestones. This study aims at characterising the fault architecture and the normal fault growth in clay/limestone layered sections. Structural analysis and displacement profiles have been carried out in normal faults crossing several decimetres to metre thick sedimentary alternations in the South-Eastern Basin (France) and petrophysical properties have been determined for each layer. The studied faults are simple fault planes or complex fault zones showing are significantly controlled by the layering. The analysis of the fault characteristics and the results obtained on numerical models enlighten several processes such as fault nucleation, fault restriction, and fault growth through layered section. Some studied faults nucleated in the limestone layers, without using pre-existing fractures such as joints, and according to our numerical analysis, a strong stiffness, a low strength contrast between the limestone and the clay layer, and/or s a greater thickness of the clay layer are conditions which favour nucleation of faults in limestone. The range of mechanical properties leading to the fault nucleation in one layer type or another was investigated using a 3D modelling approach. After its nucleation, the fault propagates within a homogeneous medium with a constant displacement gradient until its vertical propagation is stopped by a restrictor. The evidenced restrictors are limestone-clay interfaces or faults in clays, sub

  19. Computer modeling analysis using compacted soil liner for capping layer at the LLW Radioactive Repository (Landfill) in Bukit Keledang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Jamil Hashim; Mohd Abdul Wahab Yusof; Mohd Raihan Taha

    2007-01-01

    The VHELP 2.2v computer program is a landfill modeling to study the performance of varies layer in the radioactive repository or landfill. The water balance for the whole repository will be presented in hydrologic parameters such as hydraulic conductivity, runoff, rainfall, surcharge, percolation and evapotranspiration . This study includes the selection and laboratory testing of material density, porosity, void ratio and moisture in achieving the required hydraulic conductivity in gaining water balance. Hence the integrity of the layer will be predicted through out its life span limited to 100 years. This modeling allows us to formulate better compaction method deriving suitable Compacted Soil Liner to control cracks, bath-tub effects, leach-ate discharge and repository stability. The lysimeter samplings and double ring infiltrometer were used in obtaining the actual hydraulic conductivity. This parameter gives modeling input better understanding of the water infiltration and provides better repository profile design to gain water balance. These studies are the first attempt to examine the radioactive repository design profile in containing and surcharge outflow to the ground water. Therefore the acquired knowledge will be beneficial for the construction of the up coming national repository and all existing municipal landfill design. (Author)

  20. Geotechnical variability of permafrozen glaciomarine clays in Sdr. Strømfjord in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Belmonte, Louise Josefine

    2014-01-01

    -going in the area at Strømfjordshavn. The C14 datings of marine shells collected on the marine clay terraces at level 300kPa. Clay minerals were weathered causing moderate to high activity and plasticity despite the formation age of only 7000 years. (b) The "River Bank Erosion Cut" 2 km east of the Airport Terminal...... level with Upper Marine Limit (UML) varying from +120 to +140m at the West Coast to +40 at Kangerlussuaq. This retreat is well documented through C14-dating in the local area near to Kangerlussuaq Airport related to Fjord Stages F2 (+60m/8300 y BC) and F3 (+40m/8100 y BC) and Mt. Keglen stage (+40m/7200....... We studied a frozen marine clay deposit at +35 m with stratified ice layers under sandy gravel top layer. During laboratory analysis using fall cone testing a thawed clay sample was found to be quick (St>700) due to dilution of pore water salts. Multidisciplinary approach was necessary for this study....

  1. Influence of processing conditions in PEA/organophilic clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, E.M.; Kojuch, L.R.; Barbosa, R.; Nobrega, K.C.; Melo, T.J.A. de

    2008-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have attracted great interest from the industry as well as from the researches due to the need to obtain materials with desired properties. Nanocomposites with silicates layer represent an alternative for the conventional composites because they use a small amount of nanofiller. In this work, polyethylene/polyethylene grafted anhydride maleic (PE-g-MA)/montmorillonite clay (MMT) nanocomposites were prepared by melt intercalation in a Torque Rheometer. It was used an untreated clay (MMT) and a treated clay with the quaternary ammonium salt (OMMT). The influence of the processing conditions was evaluated, that is: 60 and 120rpm, 7 and 14 min, 190 and 220°C. The obtained systems were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and rheological behavior. The results from XRD and rheological behavior indicated that the system composed of polyethylene/PE-g-MA/OMMT presented intercalated nanocomposite structure, with larger basal distance and high viscosity, in the conditions of 120rpm and 7min, independent of temperature. (author)

  2. Application of a Multi-Scale form of Terzaghi’s Effective Stress Principle for Unsaturated Expansive Clays to Simulate Hydro-Mechanical Behavior During Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainka Julia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recently developed multi-scale form of Terzaghi’s effective stress principle for unsaturated swelling clays that was rigorously derived by periodic homogenization starting from micro- and nano-mechanical analyses is applied to numerically simulate one-dimensional swelling pressure tests of compacted bentonites during hydration. The total macroscopic stress captures the coupling between disjoining forces at the nanoscopic scale of clay platelets and capillary effects at the microscopic scale of clay aggregates over the entire water content range. The numerical results allow to draw conclusions on the water transfer mechanism between inter- and intra-aggregate pores during hydration and consequently on the evolution of the external swelling pressure resulting from the competition between capillary and disjoining forces. In addition, such application highlights the abilities and the limits of the electrical double-layer theory to compute the disjoining pressure in the nano-pores. For large platelet distances, in the range of osmotic swelling, the nature of the disjoining pressure is electro-chemical and can be computed from Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Conversely, at small distances, in the crystalline swelling, a solvation component has to be added to account for the molecular nature of the solvent. As a first improvement of the nano-scale description the solvent is treated as a hard sphere fluid using Density Functional Theory.

  3. Palaeo and present-day fluid flow through Eocene clay layers in Flanders. Hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical evidence for the present-day existence of preferential pathways in the Bartonian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walraevens, K.; Cardenal, J.; De Smet, D.; De Breuck, W.

    1998-01-01

    The semi-confined Ledo-Paniselian (Eocene) aquifer in Flanders is recharged in the areas with a higher topography, where it is covered by the Bartonian clay. Recharge is thus occurring by downward groundwater flow through the Bartonian clay. This is demonstrated by piezometric levels. Flow modeling in the recharge area of Ursel, where many piezometers provide an excellent knowledge of the hydraulic heads, has indicated a vertical hydraulic conductivity for the Bartonian clay of 10 -9 m/s. However, laboratory measurements often provide values which are at least one order of magnitude lower. This discrepancy can be ascribed to the presence of preferential pathways in the clay, through which the flow is preferentially taking place. The geochemical/mixing cell model PHREEOM has been used to simulate the freshening of the Bartonian clay and the subsequent recharge to the underlying aquifer. (author)

  4. Experimental study of the effect of high porewater salinity on the physical properties of a natural smectitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Natural smectitic clays for backfilling tunnels and shafts in deep repositories may be an alternative to mixtures of bentonite and ballast. Very salt groundwater is known to raise the hydraulic conductivity and reduce the expandability of clay materials in general and of bentonite/ballast mixtures in particular and the present study aimed at determining the impact of salt water on the major physical properties of natural smectitic clays, represented by the German Friedland Ton. The investigation showed that the compactability of the investigated clay is not significantly affected by the water content in contrast to bentonite/ballast fills, and that the conductivity and expandability are acceptable even at salt contents of up to 20 % if the bulk density at saturation is slightly higher than 2000 kg/m{sup 3} . For salt contents up to 3. 5 % the corresponding density is around 1900 kg/m{sup 3}. In general, the investigated clay offers better physical properties than mixtures of bentonite/ballast mixtures with up to 30 % bentonite content.

  5. Experimental study of the effect of high porewater salinity on the physical properties of a natural smectitic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2001-03-01

    Natural smectitic clays for backfilling tunnels and shafts in deep repositories may be an alternative to mixtures of bentonite and ballast. Very salt groundwater is known to raise the hydraulic conductivity and reduce the expandability of clay materials in general and of bentonite/ballast mixtures in particular and the present study aimed at determining the impact of salt water on the major physical properties of natural smectitic clays, represented by the German Friedland Ton. The investigation showed that the compactability of the investigated clay is not significantly affected by the water content in contrast to bentonite/ballast fills, and that the conductivity and expandability are acceptable even at salt contents of up to 20 % if the bulk density at saturation is slightly higher than 2000 kg/m 3 . For salt contents up to 3. 5 % the corresponding density is around 1900 kg/m 3 . In general, the investigated clay offers better physical properties than mixtures of bentonite/ballast mixtures with up to 30 % bentonite content

  6. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  7. JOINTS AND SYN-SEDIMENTARY FAULTS NETWORKS IN MARINE CLAYS AND MUDSTONES. Importance for Radwaste storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.

    2009-12-01

    There is a number of marine clays, mudstones, marls, 100 to 200 m thick, showing smectites, mixed layers illite/smectite, with a small percentage of organic matter and sulphides with a variable clay, silt, and carbonate content. I published (Arnould , 2006) examples from Lower Cambrian to Miocene in age and from the Baltic shore to Spain in Europe. Observations were made mostly in quarries and pits down to more than 40 m and in underground research laboratories (URL). Only visible on fresh cuts amongst a variety of fissures there is always a network of joints. Schematically one family is the bedding (horizontal) the two others are normal to the bedding and orthogonal between them. The orientations of vertical joints are different from the orientations of pits and quarries’s walls. The networks are intrinsic. It was first well described by Skempton & al (1969) in Eocene London Clay. Joints are matt in texture, clean, without filling or cement. The order of magnitude of their linear dimensions is decimeter to meter. It is necessary to start from the original sediment: mud. Deposited in flakes mud has a bee’s nest microscopic structure. Each nest is full of water. Hence mud may have a water content up to 300%, reported to its dry weight. Paradoxically mud is impervious. As proposed by Cosgrove (2001) progressive but discontinuous hydraulic fracturing could be the origin of vertical joints, with drainage upwards and compaction of the sediment. Geological observations show that ioints are formed during the sedimentation process. There is also a world literature concluding at the necessary early fracturing of mudstones and marls hosts of sand dykes. Very few faults are identified in field observations and on exploration logs. But it is obvious that drainage and compaction of mud over thousands square kilometers induced differential settlements with many syn-sedimentary non tectonic faults constituting another discontinuity network. These faults inside the same

  8. Investigation of nanoscopic free volume and interfacial interaction in an epoxy resin/modified clay nanocomposite using positron annihilation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pushkar N; Sudarshan, Kathi; Sharma, Sandeep K; Maheshwari, Priya; Rath, Sangram K; Patri, Manoranjan; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2012-12-07

    Epoxy/clay nanocomposites are synthesized using clay modified with the organic modifier N,N-dimethyl benzyl hydrogenated tallow quaternary ammonium salt (Cloisite 10A). The purpose is to investigate the influence of the clay concentration on the nanostructure, mainly on the free-volume properties and the interfacial interactions, of the epoxy/clay nanocomposite. Nanocomposites having 1, 3, 5 and 7.5 wt. % clay concentrations are prepared using the solvent-casting method. The dispersion of clay silicate layers and the morphologies of the fractured surfaces in the nanocomposites are studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The observed XRD patterns reveal an exfoliated clay structure in the nanocomposite with the lowest clay concentration (≤1 wt. %). The ortho-positronium lifetime (τ(3)), a measure of the free-volume size, as well as the fractional free volume (f(v)) are seen to decrease in the nanocomposites as compared to pristine epoxy. The intensity of free positron annihilation (I(2)), an index of the epoxy-clay interaction, decreases with the addition of clay (1 wt. %) but increases linearly at higher clay concentrations. Positron age-momentum correlation measurements are also carried out to elucidate the positron/positronium states in pristine epoxy and in the nanocomposites. The results suggest that in the case of the nanocomposite with the studied lowest clay concentration (1 wt. %), free positrons are primarily localized in the epoxy-clay interfaces, whereas at higher clay concentrations, annihilation takes place from the intercalated clay layers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Microstructural modifications induced by hydraulic and mechanical actions on compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, E.; Suriol, J.; Lloret, A.; Castellanos, E.; Villar, M.V.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The hydration of bentonite generates microstructural changes that modify both its hydraulic and mechanical properties. As a consequence, the evolution of porosity and microstructure influence greatly the hydration transient state. Measurements and observations at this microstructural level are very important, since they help in further understanding higher structural levels and their consequences on material properties and behaviour under various hydro-mechanical stress state conditions. To accomplish the complex issue of microstructural studies, several techniques have to be applied. A very useful technique for the quantitative study at the microscale is mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), since the range of pore diameters that can be examined (from 6 nm to 400 μm) is very wide. The influence of various mechanical (loading) and hydraulic (wetting / drying) stress paths on the pore size distribution of compacted bentonite was analysed. Some of the conclusions reached are: - The pore size distribution is clearly bi-modal. The dominant values are 10 nm, which would correspond to the pores inside clay aggregates that are not affected by the magnitude of the compaction load, and a larger pore size, which depends on compaction degree and ranges from 20 μm (for ρd=1.68 g/cm 3 ) to 30 μm (for ρd = 1.4 g/cm 3 ). These larger voids would correspond to the inter-granular pores. The boundary between the two pore size families is around 150-200 nm. The same pattern is found irrespective of the clay water content. - There exists a significant pore volume into which the mercury cannot penetrate because it corresponds to pores smaller than 6 nm, and it is the same irrespective of the density of the specimens. - The inter-granular pores disappear when a clay slurry is compacted. - After wetting of compacted samples, the hindered and latent inter-aggregate pore size mode emerges (350 and 1100 nm). Simultaneously, and as a

  10. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  11. Influence of Subgrade and Unbound Granular Layers Stiffness on Fatigue Life of Hot Mix Asphalts - HMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Rondón-Quintana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The mainly factors studied to predict fatigue life of hot mix asphalt-HMA in flexible pavements are the loading effect, type of test, compaction methods, design parameters of HMA (e.g., particle size and size distribution curve, fine content, type of bitumen and the variables associated with the environment (mainly moisture, temperature, aging. This study evaluated through a computer simulation, the influence of the granular layers and subgrade on the fatigue life of asphalt layers in flexible pavement structures. Mechanics parameters of granular layers of subgrade, base and subbase were obtained using the mathematical equations currently used for this purpose in the world. The emphasis of the study was the city of Bogotá, where the average annual temperature is 14°C and soils predominantly clay, generally experience CBR magnitudes between 1% and 4%. General conclusion: stiffness of the granular layers and subgrade significantly affect the fatigue resistance of HMA mixtures. Likewise, the use of different equations reported in reference literature in order to characterize granular layers may vary the fatigue life between 4.6 and 48.5 times, varying the thickness of the pavement layers in the design.

  12. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  13. Influence of chemicals on clays. Pt. 2. Structure and solidity tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komodromos, A; Goettner, J J

    1988-12-01

    Continuing an earlier contribution, this article describes tests carried through to verify in how far chemicals in dumped wastes are capable of impairing clay as sealing of the bottom of sanitary landfills. The following was found: Non-polar organic solvents should not be deposited in sanitary landfills with clay as a sealing layer at the bottom, and mineral sealings should be thicker than 60 cms if reactions cannot be excluded with certainty.

  14. Cross flow microfiltration of oil-water emulsions using clay based ceramic membrane support and TiO2 composite membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchapogu Suresh; G. Pugazhenthi

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to study the effect of cross flow filtration conditions on the separation of oily wastewater using ceramic support and TiO2 membrane. Firstly, the low cost clay based ceramic membrane support was prepared by uniaxial compaction method using combination of pyrophyllite, quartz, feldspar, kaolin, ball clay and calcium carbonate along with PVA as a binder. Subsequently, TiO2 composite membrane was fabricated via hydrothermal route employing TiO2 sol derived fro...

  15. Evaluation of the behavior of Brazilian bentonite clays with different quantity of quaternary ammonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Renata; Souza, Dayanne Diniz; Araujo, Edcleide Maria; Nobrega, Karine Castro; Melo, Tomas Jeferson Alves

    2009-01-01

    Paraiba is the main natural bentonite producing state of Brazil. Besides the advantage of abundance of bentonite clays, its transformation in organoclay is a simple method and there is only little study about the commercialization of Brazilian organoclays. In this work, Brazilian bentonite clay was organophilized with different quantity of a quaternary ammonium salt, such as 100, 125 and 150 wt.% in relation to Cationic Exchange Capacity (CEC) of the clay. The clays were characterized by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). It was observed that with increasing amount of salt the degree of dispersion of the clay increased, leading in some cases to the delamination of the clay layers and its loss of thermal stability. (author)

  16. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossadeghi-Björklund, M; Arvidsson, J.; Keller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    in saturated hydraulic conductivity, air permeability and number of macropores at the second site. At this site, the traffic also significantly reduced the strength of preferential flow, presumably due to compaction-induced disruption of macropore continuity. In apparent contrast, some previous studies have shown......Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow, which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties...... transport derived from non-reactive tracer breakthrough curves and measurements of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and air permeability at the field moisture content (Ka). Although the traffic treatment did not cause any compaction effects at one of the two sites, it did result in significant reductions...

  17. Retention of redox sensitive waste elements in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torstenfelt, B.; Allard, B.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion of technetium, iodine, uranium and neptunium in compacted bentonite has been studied. The possible reduction of the transport rate of these elements (i.e. redoxsensitive elements) by mixing the clay with metallic iron (for technetium, uranium and neptunium) or by adding a chemisorbent (for iodine) to the clay is reported. Technetium has an apparent diffusivity about 5 times higher in the heptavalent state (TcO 4 - ) than in the tetravalent state (TcO(OH) 2 or TcO 2 ), uranium and neptunium in their higher oxidation state (VI and V) have apparent diffusivities about 6 and 50 times higher, respectively, than in the tetravalent state. Iodine, as I - (or IO 3 - ), has a transport rate more than one order of magnitude lower than TcO 4 - . 10 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  18. Comparative study of illite clay and illite-based geopolymer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperberga, I; Sedmale, G; Zeila, K; Ulme, D; Stinkulis, G

    2011-01-01

    Quaternary (Q-clay) clayey deposits are one of the dominating parts of mineral raw materials of the sedimentary cover at present area of Latvia. These clays can be characterised by illite content up to 75-80 %. Two ways for use of illite clays were studied: conventional and geopolymers method. Purpose of the second mentioned method was showing the influence of alkali (KOH) on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure. Obtained products were investigated by IR-spectroscopy, DTA and XRD, pore size distribution was determined as well. Some ceramic properties and compressive strength were determined and compared. IR-spectrum showed the effect of alkali on the transformation of Q-clay/illite structure in three main absorption bands: 3620-3415 cm -1 which is related to the vibrational modes of adsorbed water between SiO 4 and AlO 6 layers; new stronger absorption bands at 1635 cm -1 and 1435 cm -1 indicate on the appearance of vibrations in Q-KOH and are related to the K-O-Si bonds; the most essential changes are vibrations at 850 cm -1 showing the changes in the coordination number of Al from 6 to 4 for Q-KOH. Investigations of the bulk density in dependence on temperature showed the small increase of bulk density for Q-clay while - the relatively remarkable decrease for Q-clay/KOH. Mentioned values correlate with the compressive strength of Q-clay and Q-KOH products.

  19. Liquid clay emulsion--alternate daily cover and erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martell, L. [L/M Chemical Service, Ancona, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Formula 480 Biodegradable Clay Based Product, developed in 1985, is a non-toxic liquid bentonite clay product that comes in concentrate form for dilution with water and/or leachate. The concentrate allows this product y to be used for erosion and dust control, grass seeding, as well as a daily or intermediate cover for landfills. It inhibits the activities of birds and vectors, while controlling dust, erosion, odor, and blowing debris. By varying the dilution of Formula 480, the product can be set up from porous and flexible, to durable and waterproof. Having a clay base, high cation exchange capacity offers nutrient stabilization for grass seeding. When using leachate for product dilution, it will percolate, waterproof, and be recycled back into the surface as a solid. The product is economical at $.03 to $.08/sq.ft., depending on thickness of application, smoothness of surface or compaction ratio. Application is done with a self-contained sprayer developed specifically for Formula 480. It can be sprayed with a high volume handgun or an economical and efficient spray boom. This product is cleared for use in over 15 states and is currently being used on hazardous and non-hazardous fills throughout the U.S. and Germany. Ease of application, economy, and effectiveness warrants people to look at this product for many uses.

  20. Preparation of PEO/Clay Nanocomposites Using Organoclay Produced via Micellar Adsorption of CTAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Ejder-Korucu, Mehtap; Doğar, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of polyethylene oxide (PEO)/clay nanocomposites using organoclay produced via micellar adsorption of cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and their characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, and the investigation of certain mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that the basal distance between the layers increased with the increasing CTAB/clay ratio as parallel with the zeta potential values of particles. By considering the aggregation number of CTAB micelles and interlayer distances of organo-clay, it could be suggested that the predominant micelle geometry at lower CTAB/clay ratios is an ellipsoidal oblate, whereas, at higher CTAB/clay ratios, sphere-ellipsoid transition occurs. The increasing tendency of the exfoliation degree with an increase in clay content may be attributed to easier diffusion of PEO chains to interlayer regions. FT-IR spectra show that the intensity of Si-O stretching vibrations of the organoclays (1050 cm−1) increased, especially in the ratios of 1.0 g/g clay and 1.5 g/g clay with the increasing CTAB content. It was observed that the mechanical properties of the composites are dependent on both the CTAB/clay ratios and clay content of the composites. PMID:23365515

  1. A biomimetic approach to enhancing interfacial interactions: polydopamine-coated clay as reinforcement for epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Phua, Si Lei; Teo, Jun Kai Herman; Toh, Cher Ling; Lau, Soo Khim; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong

    2011-08-01

    A facile biomimetic method was developed to enhance the interfacial interaction in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was constructed on clay surface by a controllable coating method. The modified clay (D-clay) was incorporated into an epoxy resin, it is found that the strong interfacial interactions brought by the polydopamine benefits not only the dispersion of the D-clay in the epoxy but also the effective interfacial stress transfer, leading to greatly improved thermomechanical properties at very low inorganic loadings. Rheological and infrared spectroscopic studies show that the interfacial interactions between the D-clay and epoxy are dominated by the hydrogen bonds between the catechol-enriched polydopamine and the epoxy.

  2. Insightful understanding of the role of clay topology on the stability of biomimetic hybrid chitosan-clay thin films and CO2-dried porous aerogel microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frindy, Sana; Primo, Ana; Qaiss, Abou El Kacem; Bouhfid, Rachid; Lahcini, Mohamed; Garcia, Hermenegildo; Bousmina, Mosto; El Kadib, Abdelkrim

    2016-08-01

    Three natural clay-based microstructures, namely layered montmorillonite (MMT), nanotubular halloysite (HNT) and micro-fibrillar sepiolite (SP) were used for the synthesis of hybrid chitosan-clay thin films and porous aerogel microspheres. At a first glance, a decrease in the viscosity of the three gel-forming solutions was noticed as a result of breaking the mutual polymeric chains interaction by the clay microstructure. Upon casting, chitosan-clay films displayed enhanced hydrophilicity in the order CSclay microstructure, an improvement in the mechanical properties of the chitosan-clay films has been substantiated with CS-SP reaching the highest value at 5% clay loading. While clay addition provides a way to resist the shrinkage occurring for native chitosan, the enhanced hydrophilicity associated to the water content affects the efficacy of the CO2 super-critical drying as the most hydrophilic CS-SP microspheres face the highest shrinkage, resulting in a lowest specific surface area compared to CS-HNT and CS-MMT. Chitosan-clay exhibits enhanced thermal properties with the degradation delayed in the order CSclay compared to native chitosan, evidencing the beneficial protective effect of the clay particulates for the biopolymer. However, under hydrothermal treatment, the presence of clay was found to be detrimental to the material stability as a significant shrinkage occurs in hybrid CS-clay microspheres, which is attributed again to their increased hydrophilicity compared to the native polymeric microspheres. In this framework, a peculiar behavior was observed for CS-MMT, with the microspheres standing both against contraction during CO2 gel drying and under hydrothermal conditions. The knowledge gained from this rational design will constitute a guideline toward the preparation of ultra-stable, practically-optimized food-packaging films and commercially scalable porous bio-based adsorbents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transmission X-ray Microscopy—A New Tool in Clay Mineral Floccules Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray L. Frost

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective flocculation and dewatering of mineral processing streams containing clays are microstructure dependent in clay-water systems. Initial clay flocculation is crucial in the design and for the development of a new methodology of gas exploitation. Microstructural engineering of clay aggregates using covalent cations and Keggin macromolecules have been monitored using the new state of the art Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM with 60 nm tomography resolution installed in a Taiwanese synchrotron. The 3-D reconstructions from TXM images show complex aggregation structures in montmorillonite aqueous suspensions after treatment with Na+, Ca2+ and Al13 Keggin macromolecules. Na-montmorillonite displays elongated, parallel, well-orientated and closed-void cellular networks, 0.5–3 µm in diameter. After treatment by covalent cations, the coagulated structure displays much smaller, randomly orientated and openly connected cells, 300–600 nm in diameter. The average distances measured between montmorillonite sheets was around 450 nm, which is less than half of the cell dimension measured in Na-montmorillonite. The most dramatic structural changes were observed after treatment by Al13 Keggin; aggregates then became arranged in compacted domains of a 300 nm average diameter composed of thick face-to-face oriented sheets, which forms porous aggregates with larger intra-aggregate open and connected voids.

  4. Origin of enhanced Brønsted acidity of NiF-modified synthetic mica-montmorillonite clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Chong; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Emiel J.M.

    2018-01-01

    The Brønsted acidity of synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMM) clay was studied by periodic DFT calculations. Different structural models were compared to determine the Brønsted acidity of protons of the SMM clay based on (i) isomorphous substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the tetrahedral silicate layer

  5. Study of Adsorption of Phenanthrene on Different Types of Clay Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, M. L.; Escolano, O.; Rodriguez, V.; Diaz, F. J.; Perez, R.; Garcia, S.; Garcia Frutos, F. J.

    2003-01-01

    The fate and behaviour of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds in deep soil is mainly controlled by the mineral fraction present in the soil due to the very low organic carbon content of the deep soil. The mineral fraction that may greatly influence the fate and transport of these compounds due to its presence and properties are the clay minerals. Clay minerals also become increasingly important in low organic matter content soils. There tree, studies of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compounds adsorption on clay minerals without organic matter are necessary lo better understand the fate and transport of these compounds. In this work we used phenanthrene as model compound of non-ionic hydrophobic organic compound and four pure clay minerals: kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and vermiculite including muscovite mica. These clays minerals are selected due to its abundance in represents ve Spanish soils and different properties as its structural layers and expanding capacity. Batch experiments were performed using phenanthrene aqueous solutions and the clays selected. Phenanthrene sorption isotherms for all clays, except muscovite mica, were best described by the Freundlich model. Physical sorption on the external surfaces is the most probable adsorption mechanisms. In this sense, the presence of non-polar nano-sites on clay surfaces could determine the adsorption of phenanthrene by hydrophobic interaction on these sites. (Author) 22 refs

  6. Fault architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternations: insights from field observations in the SE Basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocher, M.; Roche, V.; Homberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Callovo-Oxfordian (COX) clayey formation is currently studied by Andra in 'Meuse/Haute- Marne' (MHM), eastern Paris basin (France), for hosting a disposal of high level and intermediate, long-lived radioactive waste. As an independent organisation performing safety reviews for the Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN conducts studies in support of the review of this disposal project. This nearly 130 m-thick clayey formation is surrounded by two 250 m-thick limestone formations. In such limestone/clay alternations, tectonic fracturing is often observed within limestones and propagates in some cases to clay layers. Such a propagation through the COX within or close to the disposal area could diminish its containment ability by creating preferential pathways of radioactive solute towards limestones. Nevertheless, minor to moderate fracturing is difficult to investigate in hectometre scale multilayer systems such as COX: seismic reflexion surveys only provide data on major faults, drilling data are too localised and clays have a 'bad-land' aspect at surface. The aim of this study is to provide a model of fracturing across clay-limestone alternations so as to strengthen the assessment of their possible development. We thus investigated fracturing within decametre-sized clay-limestone alternations, located in the South-Eastern Basin (France), to determine the evolution of fault architecture during its growth. After analysis of the possible scale effects using data from other analogous fields, an application to the COX in MHM is presented. We studied minor normal faults that reflect various stages of development, from simple fault planes restricted to limestones to complex fault zones propagated across several clay-limestone layers. The analysis of the fault characteristics, the construction of displacement profiles and the results obtained using numerical models enlighten fault growth processes, i.e. nucleation

  7. Use of clays as liners in solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gerardo [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac Mexico Norte, Huixquilucan, Edo. de Mexico 52786 (Mexico); Almanza, Rafael [Instituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2009-06-15

    An alternative to synthetic materials for use in solar pond liners is to select clayey soils as hydraulic barriers. This option reduces the cost of construction and the risk of contamination of subsoil and groundwater by hot brines. This paper deals with the physical, chemical and hydraulic properties of different soils tested mainly as compacted clay liners. The underdeveloped nations have the option to use this type of liner, but before doing so several tests are recommended, including those for soil and water composition, permeability, plasticity and X-ray diffraction analysis. In this investigation the following samples are analyzed: native clayey soils with illite, montmorillonite and halloysite, treated and non-treated bentonites in powder and granulated form, a mixture of zeolite and sodium bentonite, and industrial minerals composed largely of halloysite, kaolinite and attapulgite selected clays. Neutral salt aqueous solutions (NaCl and KCl) at different concentrations and under temperature gradients were used for compatibility testing conducted on these specimens. Experiment setup and particular testing procedures are also discussed. (author)

  8. The effect of organo-clay on the dielectric properties of silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razzaghi-Kashani, M; Gharavi, N; Javadi, S

    2008-01-01

    Dielectric elastomers are highly deformable and fast response smart materials capable of actuation under electric fields. Among commercially available dielectric elastomers, silicone rubber can be compounded with different fillers in order to modify its electrical and mechanical properties. To study the effect of organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) on the dielectric properties of silicone rubber, OMMT was added to this rubber at two levels, 2% and 5%, using two methods, low-shear and high-shear mixing. Composites were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The XRD patterns showed different crystallite structures for silicate platelets in the rubber matrix as a result of the two different mixing methods. In low-shear mixing, the ordered crystallite structure of the clay remains almost unchanged, whereas in high-shear mixing it loses its ordered structure, leading to the disappearance of the diffraction peaks. SEM and AFM micrographs depicted better dispersion and more uniform distribution of the organo-clay under high-shear mixing compared to those obtained by low-shear mixing. The tensile properties also confirmed the different degree of dispersion of the nano-clay resulting from the two different methods of mixing. The dielectric properties of the composites were measured under AC electric fields, and the results were compared with reference silicone rubbers with no OMMT. It was shown that the order of organo-clay layers in the less dispersed structure of the clay imparts an additional ionic polarization and higher dielectric permittivity compared to the case where the clay layers are more dispersed and lost their order. The storage and loss dielectric constants of base silicone rubber increase when it is compounded with OMMT

  9. Can the water content of highly compacted bentonite be increased by applying a high water pressure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Kasbohm, J.

    2001-10-01

    A great many laboratory investigations have shown that the water uptake in highly compacted MX-80 clay takes place by diffusion at low external pressure. It means that wetting of the clay buffer in the deposition holes of a KBS-3 repository is very slow if the water pressure is low and that complete water saturation can take several tens of years if the initial degree of water saturation of the buffer clay and the ability of the rock to give off water are low. It has therefore been asked whether injection of water can raise the degree of water saturation and if a high water pressure in the nearfield can have the same effect. The present report describes attempts to moisten highly compacted blocks of MX-80 clay with a dry density of 1510 kg/m 3 by injecting water under a pressure of 650 kPa through a perforated injection pipe for 3 and 20 minutes, respectively. The interpretation was made by determining the water content of a number of samples located at different distances from the pipe. An attempt to interpret the pattern of distribution of injected uranium acetate solution showed that the channels into which the solution went became closed in a few minutes and that dispersion in the homogenized clay gave low U-concentrations. The result was that the water content increased from about 9 to about 11-12 % within a distance of about 1 centimeter from the injection pipe and to slightly more than 9 % at a distance of about 4-5 cm almost independently of the injection time. Complete water saturation corresponds to a water content of about 30 % and the wetting effect was hence small from a practical point of view. By use of microstructural models it can be shown that injected water enters only the widest channels that remain after the compaction and that these channels are quickly closed by expansion of the hydrating surrounding clay. Part of the particles that are thereby released become transported by the flowing water and cause clogging of the channels, which is

  10. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding

  11. Organosilane grafted acid-activated beidellite clay for the removal of non-ionic alachlor and anionic imazaquin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Blain; Martens, Wayde N.; Frost, Ray L.

    2011-01-01

    Clay adsorbents were prepared via two-step method to remove nonionic alachlor and anionic imazaquin herbicides from water. Firstly, layered beidellite clay, a member of smectite family, was treated with acid in hydrothermal process; secondly, common silane coupling agents, 3-chloro-propyl trimethoxysilane or triethoxy silane, were grafted on the acid treated samples to prepare adsorbent materials. The organically modified clay samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, N 2 gas adsorption, and FTIR spectroscopy. It was found that the selective modification of clay samples displayed higher adsorption capacity for herbicides compared with acid activated clay. And the amount of adsorption is increased with increasing the grafting amount of silane groups. Clay grafted with 3-chloro-propyl trimethoxysilane is an excellent adsorbent for both alachlor and imazaquin but triethoxy (octyl) silane grafted clay is more efficient only for alachlor removal.

  12. Effects of leachate on geotechnical characteristics of sandy clay soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, N. S.; Ali, Z. Rahman; Rahim, A. S.; Lihan, T.; Idris, R. M. W.

    2013-11-01

    Leachate is a hazardous liquid that poses negative impacts if leaks out into environments such as soil and ground water systems. The impact of leachate on the downgraded quality in terms of chemical characteristic is more concern rather than the physical or mechanical aspect. The effect of leachate on mechanical behaviour of contaminated soil is not well established and should be investigated. This paper presents the preliminary results of the effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit, compaction and shear strength of leachate-contaminated soil. The contaminated soil samples were prepared by mixing the leachate at ratiosbetween 0% and 20% leachate contents with soil samples. Base soil used was residual soil originated from granitic rock and classified as sandy clay soil (CS). Its specific gravity ranged between 2.5 and 2.64 with clay minerals of kaolinite, muscovite and quartz. The field strength of the studied soil ranged between 156 and 207 kN/m2. The effects of leachate on the Atterberg limit clearly indicated by the decrease in liquid and plastic limit values with the increase in the leachate content. Compaction tests on leachate-contaminated soil caused the dropped in maximum dry density, ρdry and increased in optimum moisture content, wopt when the amount of leachate was increased between 0% and 20%. The results suggested that leachate contamination capable to modify some geotechnical properties of the studied residual soils.

  13. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  14. Characterization of Heat-treated Clay Minerals in the Context of Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, E. N.; Wang, Y.; Kruichak, J. N.; Mills, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Establishing the thermal limit for clay minerals in a nuclear waste repository is a potentially important component of repository design, as flexibility of the heat load within the repository can have a major impact on the selection of repository design. For example, the thermal limit plays a critical role in the time that waste packages would need to cool before being transferred to the repository. Understanding the chemical and physical changes, if any, that occur in clay minerals at various temperatures above the current thermal limit (of 100 °C) can enable decision-makers with information critical to evaluating the potential trade-offs of increasing the thermal limit within the repository. Most critical is gaining understanding of how varying thermal conditions in the repository will impact radionuclide sorption and transport in clay materials either as engineered barriers or as disposal media. A variety of repository-relevant clay minerals (illite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and montmorillonite), were heated for a range of temperatures between 100-1000 °C. These samples were characterized to determine surface area, mineralogical alteration, and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Our results show that for conditions up to 500 °C, no significant change occurs, so long as the clay mineral remains mineralogically intact. At temperatures above 500 °C, transformation of the layered silicates into silica phases leads to alteration that impacts important clay characteristics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Nation Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND Number: SAND2015-6524 A

  15. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  16. DETERMINATION OF ADHESIVE STRENGTH LAYER’S ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE THE METHOD AXIAL EXTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Van Lam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Roller compacted concrete for the construction of hydraulic and hydroelectric buildings is a composite material, which consists of a binder, fine aggregate (sand, coarse aggregate (gravel or crushed stone, water and special additives that provide the desired concrete workability and impart the required concrete performance properties. Concrete mixture is prepared at from concrete mixing plants strictly metered quantities of cement, water, additives and graded aggregates, whereupon they are delivered to the site laying Mixer Truck and sealing layers with each stack layer. The advantages of roller compaction technology should include the reduction of construction time, which allows fast commissioning construction projects, as well as reduce the amount of investment required. One of the main problems encountered in the process of roller compaction of the concrete mix is the need to provide the required adhesion strength between layers of concrete. This paper presents a method for determining the strength of adhesion between the concrete layers of different ages roller compacted concrete using axial tension. This method makes it possible to obtain objective and accurate results with a total thickness of layers of compacted concrete of up to 300…400 mm. Results from this method, studies have shown that the value of strength between the concrete layers in addition to the composition of the concrete and adhesion depends on the quality and the parallel end surfaces of the cylinder-models, which are mounted steel plates for axial tension, as well as the state of the contact surfaces of the concrete layer. The method can be used to determine the strength of interlayer adhesion in roller compacted concrete, which are used in the construction of dams and other hydraulic structures.

  17. Factors affecting microbial activity in compacted clay-based sealing materials proposed for use in a deep geologic repository for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hamon, C.J.; Dixon, D.A.; Kjartanson, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial activity in clay-based barriers immediately adjacent to metal used-fuel containers in a repository could affect the longevity of such containers. The current emphasis is, therefore, on reducing or minimizing microbial activity in such clay-based barriers through material composition design. Factors affecting microbial activity in clay-based materials were studied in large-scale and smaller-scale experiments. Results suggested that keeping water activity (a w ) values below ∼0.95 may minimize microbial activity in clay-based barrier materials. A considerably higher effective montmorillonite dry density (EMDD), which partially controls a w , is achievable for 100% bentonite than for previously proposed reference buffer materials, which contain only 50% bentonite. (author)

  18. AGR-1 Compact 4-1-1 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ploger, Scott A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); van Rooyen, Isabella J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Destructive post-irradiation examination was performed on AGR-1 fuel Compact 4-1-1, which was irradiated to a final compact-average burnup of 19.4% FIMA (fissions per initial metal atom) and a time-average, volume-average temperature of 1072°C. The analysis of this compact focused on characterizing the extent of fission product release from the particles and examining particles to determine the condition of the kernels and coating layers. The work included deconsolidation of the compact and leach-burn-leach analysis, visual inspection and gamma counting of individual particles, metallurgical preparation of selected particles, and examination of particle cross-sections with optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and elemental analysis. Deconsolidation-leach-burn-leach (DLBL) analysis revealed no particles with failed TRISO or failed SiC layers (as indicated by very low uranium inventory in all of the leach solutions). The total fractions of the predicted compact inventories of fission products Ce-144, Cs-134, Cs-137, and Sr-90 that were present in the compact outside of the SiC layers were <2×10-6, based on DLBL data. The Ag-110m fraction in the compact outside the SiC layers was 3.3×10-2, indicating appreciable release of silver through the intact coatings and subsequent retention in the OPyC layers or matrix. The Eu-154 fraction was 2.4×10-4, which is equivalent to the inventory in one average particle, and indicates a small but measurable level of release from the intact coatings. Gamma counting of 61 individual particles indicated no particles with anomalously low fission product retention. The average ratio of measured inventory to calculated inventory was close to a value of 1.0 for several fission product isotopes (Ce-144, Cs-134, and Cs-137), indicating good retention and reasonably good agreement with the predicted inventories. Measured-to-calculated (M/C) activity ratios for fission products Eu-154, Eu-155, Ru-106, Sb

  19. Thermal Analysis: A Complementary Method to Study the Shurijeh Clay Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Jozanikohan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Clay minerals are considered the most important components of clastic reservoir rock evaluation studies. The Shurijeh gas reservoir Formation, represented by shaly sandstones of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous age, is the main reservoir rock in the Eastern Kopet-Dagh sedimentary Basin, NE Iran. In this study, X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF, scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies, and thermal analysis including differential thermal analysis (DTA, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA techniques were utilized in the characterization of the Shurijeh clay minerals in ten representative samples. The XRF studies showed that silica and aluminum oxides are present quantities. The XRD test was then used to determine the mineralogical composition of bulk components, as well as the clay fraction. The XRD patterns indicated the presence of dominant amount of quartz and plagioclase, with moderate to minor amounts of alkali feldspar, anhydrite, carbonates (calcite and dolomite, hematite and clay minerals. The most common clays in the Shurijeh Formation were illite, chlorite, and kaolinite. However, in very few samples, glauconite, smectite, and mixed layer clay minerals of both illite-smectite and chlorite-smectite types were also recognized. The XRD results were quantified, using the elemental information from the XRF test, showing that each Shurijeh exhibited low to moderate amounts of clay minerals, typically up to 21%. The amount of illite, the most dominant clay mineral, reached maximum of 13.5%, while the other clay types were significantly smaller. Based on the use of SEM and thermal data, the results of the identification of clay minerals, corresponded with the powder X-ray diffraction analysis, which can be taken into account as an evidence of the effectiveness of the thermal analysis technique in clay typing, as a complementary method besides the XRD.

  20. Experimental investigation of clay fly ash bricks for gamma-ray shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann Harjinder Singh; Mudahar, Gumel Singh [Dept. of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Brar, Gurdarshan Singh [Dept. of Higher Education, Additional Project Director, Chandigarh (India); Mann, Kulwinder Singh [Dept. of Applied Sciences, I.K. Gujral Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar (India)

    2016-10-15

    This study aims to determine the effect of fly ash with a high replacing ratio of clay on the radiation shielding properties of bricks. Some interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, half value layer, effective atomic number, effective electron density, and absorption efficiency) of clay fly ash bricks were measured with a NaI(Tl) detector at 661.6 keV, 1,173.2 keV, and 1,332.5 keV. For the investigation of their shielding behavior, fly ash bricks were molded using an admixture to clay. A narrow beam transmission geometry condition was used for the measurements. The measured values of these parameters were found in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. The elemental compositions of the clay fly ash bricks were analyzed by using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. At selected energies the values of the effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities showed a very modest variation with the composition of the fly ash. This seems to be due to the similarity of their elemental compositions. The obtained results were also compared with concrete, in order to study the effect of fly ash content on the radiation shielding properties of clay fly ash bricks. The clay fly ash bricks showed good shielding properties for moderate energy gamma rays. Therefore, these bricks are feasible and eco-friendly compared with traditional clay bricks used for construction.

  1. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  2. Role of interlayer hydration in lincomycin sorption by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuiping; Ding, Yunjie; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A; Song, Cunyi; Li, Hui

    2009-08-15

    Lincomycin, an antibiotic widely administered as a veterinary medicine, is frequently detected in water. Little is known about the soil-water distribution of lincomycin despite the fact that this is a major determinant of its environmental fate and potential for exposure. Cation exchange was found to be the primary mechanism responsible for lincomycin sorption by soil clay minerals. This was evidenced by pH-dependent sorption, and competition with inorganic cations for sorptive sites. As solution pH increased, lincomycin sorption decreased. The extent of reduction was consistent with the decrease in cationic lincomycin species in solution. The presence of Ca2+ in solution diminished lincomycin sorption. Clay interlayer hydration status strongly influenced lincomycin adsorption. Smectites with the charge deficit from isomorphic substitution in tetrahedral layers (i.e., saponite) manifest a less hydrated interlayer environment resulting in greater sorption than that by octahedrally substituted clays (i.e., montmorillonite). Strongly hydrated exchangeable cations resulted in a more hydrated clay interlayer environment reducing sorption in the order of Ca- smectite. X-ray diffraction revealed that lincomycin was intercalated in smectite clay interlayers. Sorption capacity was limited by clay surface area rather than by cation exchange capacity. Smectite interlayer hydration was shown to be a major, yet previously unrecognized, factor influencing the cation exchange process of lincomycin on aluminosilicate mineral surfaces.

  3. Diffusion of strongly sorbing cations (60Co and 152Eu) in compacted Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Missana, T.; Alonso, U.; Mingarro, M.; Cormenzana, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite is used as an engineered barrier in high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) repositories because is a swelling clay of very low permeability and high sorption capability for many solutes. The transport of radionuclides through compacted bentonite is a diffusion-controlled process retarded by sorption. Performance assessment calculations of a repository need diffusion coefficients data of relevant radionuclides. Several studies on diffusion behaviour of neutral, anionic and weakly sorbing elements on clay exist while very few studies are available for moderately sorbing elements, and almost no studies for Eu, a highly sorbing element are reported. In this study, diffusion experiments with strongly sorbing radionuclides, as 60 Co and 152 Eu, have been performed through compacted FEBEX bentonite. Diffusion essays with these strongly sorbing radionuclides are not straightforward to carry out because they are very time consuming essays, but also because sorption on the diffusion cells, tubing, filters and reservoirs, typically used in the classical through-diffusion or in-diffusion methods make hard the interpretation of the experimental results and the calculation of the diffusion coefficients. FEBEX bentonite was selected as Spanish reference buffer materials, and used in many national and international projects. The clay comes from the Cortijo de Archidona deposit (Almeria, Spain), and has a smectite content greater than 90% (93 ± 2%), with quartz (2 ± 1%), plagioclase (3 ± 1%), cristobalite (2 ± 1%), potassic feldspar, calcite, and trydimite as accessory minerals. The specific weight of the FEBEX bentonite is 2.7 g/cm 3 . Diffusion experiments were performed using the instantaneous plane source method. In this setup, a paper filter tagged with a tracer is introduced between two compacted tablets, avoiding contact between the tracer and the experimental vessels. The tracer can diffuse into both

  4. Effect of by-product steel slag on the engineering properties of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal I. Shalabi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay soils, mainly if they contain swelling minerals such as smectite or illite, may cause severe damage to structures, especially when these soils are subjected to wetting and drying conditions. High expansion and reduction in shear strength and foundation bearing capacity will take place due to the increase in water content of these soils. The engineering properties of these kinds of soils can be improved by using additives and chemical stabilizers. In this work, by-product steel slag was used to improve the engineering properties of clay soils. Lab and field experimental programs were developed to investigate the effect of adding different percentages of steel slag on plasticity, swelling, compressibility, shear strength, compaction, and California bearing ratio (CBR of the treated materials. The results of tests on the clay soil showed that as steel slag content increased, the soil dry density, plasticity, swelling potential, and cohesion intercept decreased and the angle of internal friction increased. For the CBR, the results of the tests showed an increase in the CBR value with the increase in slag content.

  5. The effect of organic matter in clay sealing materials on the performance of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Cheung, S.C.H.

    1986-12-01

    The potential effect of organic matter in clay sealing materials on the performance of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault was examined. The available data indicate that the engineering properties of clays are not significantly affected by the relatively low levels of organic matter (< 1.2 wt.%) present in the clay sealing materials. Complexing of radionuclides by organic substances that are released from the clay sealing materials or produced by microorganisms will likely inhibit rather than promote radionuclide mobility in the compacted sealing materials because of the relatively large size of organic complexing species. Decreasing the level of organic matter in the clay sealing materials will not eliminate microorganisms, and perhaps not decrease their numbers significantly, because chemolithotrophic microorganisms (microorganisms that utilize inorganic forms of C) will be present in a disposal vault. Furthermore, an examination of the nutrient budget in a disposal vault indicates that N, rather than C, will likely be the limiting nutrient for microbial growth. Finally, there is not suitable, proven method for decreasing the level of organic matter in the large amounts of clay needed to seal a vault. It is concluded that the organic matter present in the clay sealing material will not adversely affect the performance of a disposal vault

  6. Modelling of the physico-chemical behaviour of clay minerals with a thermo-kinetic model taking into account particles morphology in compacted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sali, D.; Fritz, B.; Clément, C.; Michau, N.

    2003-04-01

    Modelling of fluid-mineral interactions is largely used in Earth Sciences studies to better understand the involved physicochemical processes and their long-term effect on the materials behaviour. Numerical models simplify the processes but try to preserve their main characteristics. Therefore the modelling results strongly depend on the data quality describing initial physicochemical conditions for rock materials, fluids and gases, and on the realistic way of processes representations. The current geo-chemical models do not well take into account rock porosity and permeability and the particle morphology of clay minerals. In compacted materials like those considered as barriers in waste repositories, low permeability rocks like mudstones or compacted powders will be used : they contain mainly fine particles and the geochemical models used for predicting their interactions with fluids tend to misjudge their surface areas, which are fundamental parameters in kinetic modelling. The purpose of this study was to improve how to take into account the particles morphology in the thermo-kinetic code KINDIS and the reactive transport code KIRMAT. A new function was integrated in these codes, considering the reaction surface area as a volume depending parameter and the calculated evolution of the mass balance in the system was coupled with the evolution of reactive surface areas. We made application exercises for numerical validation of these new versions of the codes and the results were compared with those of the pre-existing thermo-kinetic code KINDIS. Several points are highlighted. Taking into account reactive surface area evolution during simulation modifies the predicted mass transfers related to fluid-minerals interactions. Different secondary mineral phases are also observed during modelling. The evolution of the reactive surface parameter helps to solve the competition effects between different phases present in the system which are all able to fix the chemical

  7. A dynamic model for smectite clay swelling, expansion and colloid generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Longcheng; Neretnieks, Ivars; Moreno, Luis

    2010-01-01

    clay is highly compacted. In developing the dynamic force balance model for colloidal expansion, it is acknowledged that accurate description of the viscous drag force, or equivalently the permeability, is very important to describe the swelling process of compacted bentonite as it expands and eventually turns from a gel into a sol in low ionic strength waters. For this reason, a Kozeny-Carman-like equation is elaborated in order to satisfactorily predict the permeability of the purified and fully Na-exchanged bentonite in dilute homo-ionic solutions, based on a set of permeability measurements. We present the measured versus predicted values of the permeabilities for Na-bentonites in different NaCl solutions. It is seen that the measured values are aligned in a narrow band along the predicted ones, falling well in the range of 1/2 and 2 times the predicted permeabilities. For usual laboratory results of the permeability test, this is definitely within the expected margin of variations. The force balance model, together with a friction model derived from the permeability, is then validated against accurate observations of the expansion process of the Na-exchanged bentonite in a water filled vertical test tube. The expansion is followed in detail over a month, by use of the magnetic resonance imaging technique with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm, as an initially compacted tablet of Na-bentonite expands in water. The model accurately predicts not only the expansion rate, the general features of the expansion but also the basic behaviour at the expanding gel/sol interface, as exemplified for the case of expansion of a purified and fully Na-exchanged bentonite (WyNa) in an initially 0.5 mM CaCl 2 solution. The agreements demonstrate in turn that the Kozeny-Carman-like equation is successful in predicting the permeability of the Na-bentonite in dilute homo-ionic solutions. The model will be used to quantify the release of colloidal particles from an expanding buffer around

  8. Law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays and radial consolidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It was derived that micro-scale amount level of average pore radius of clay changed from 0.01 to 0.1 micron by an equivalent concept of flow in porous media. There is good agreement between the derived results and test ones. Results of experiments show that flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays follows law of nonlinear flow. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that an interaction of solid-liquid interfaces varies inversely with permeability or porous radius. The interaction is an important reason why nonlinear flow in saturated clays occurs. An exact mathematical model was presented for nonlinear flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays. Dimension and physical meanings of parameters of it are definite. A new law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays was established. It can describe characteristics of flow curve of the whole process of the nonlinear flow from low hydraulic gradient to high one. Darcy law is a special case of the new law. A mathematical model was presented for consolidation of nonlinear flow in radius direction in saturated clays with constant rate based on the new law of nonlinear flow. Equations of average mass conservation and moving boundary, and formula of excess pore pressure distribution and average degree of consolidation for nonlinear flow in saturated clay were derived by using an idea of viscous boundary layer, a method of steady state in stead of transient state and a method of integral of an equation. Laws of excess pore pressure distribution and changes of average degree of consolidation with time were obtained. Results show that velocity of moving boundary decreases because of the nonlinear flow in saturated clay. The results can provide geology engineering and geotechnical engineering of saturated clay with new scientific bases. Calculations of average degree of consolidation of the Darcy flow are a special case of that of the nonlinear flow.

  9. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Migration of bacteria in compacted clay-based material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S; Lucht, L M; Oscarson, D W; Dixon, D A; Hume, H B; Miller, S H

    1997-11-01

    Buffer (a mixture of 50 wt.% Na-bentonite and 50 wt.% silica sand compacted to a dry density of about 1.68 g/cm{sup 3}) would surround waste containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. The initial heat and radiation output from these containers would likely prevent significant microbial activity at or near container surfaces for some time after disposal, thereby limiting effects such as microbially-influenced corrosion. Microbial repopulation of buffer as conditions improve with time may not occur because of its small pores. Experiments with irradiated buffer plugs (2.2 cm in diameter and 5-cm long; at dry densities of 1.68 and 1.80 g/cm{sup 3}) were performed to assess the ability of microbes to migrate in buffer. Viable bacteria (Pseudomonas stutzeri), in a suitable growth medium, were brought in contact with one end of the plugs. After 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 weeks, the plugs were sectioned and tested for moisture content and viable bacteria. Results showed that the plugs were slowly wetting and that moisture levels were sufficient to sustain microbes. No evidence of P. stutzeri was found, however, in all but the first 0.5 cm of the plugs (smallest distance sampled) over a 20-week period. The results suggest that microbial migration in buffer is limited or even completely prevented because of its relatively small pores. (author)

  11. Migration of bacteria in compacted clay-based material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Lucht, L.M.; Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Hume, H.B.; Miller, S.H.

    1997-11-01

    Buffer (a mixture of 50 wt.% Na-bentonite and 50 wt.% silica sand compacted to a dry density of about 1.68 g/cm 3 ) would surround waste containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. The initial heat and radiation output from these containers would likely prevent significant microbial activity at or near container surfaces for some time after disposal, thereby limiting effects such as microbially-influenced corrosion. Microbial repopulation of buffer as conditions improve with time may not occur because of its small pores. Experiments with irradiated buffer plugs (2.2 cm in diameter and 5-cm long; at dry densities of 1.68 and 1.80 g/cm 3 ) were performed to assess the ability of microbes to migrate in buffer. Viable bacteria (Pseudomonas stutzeri), in a suitable growth medium, were brought in contact with one end of the plugs. After 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 weeks, the plugs were sectioned and tested for moisture content and viable bacteria. Results showed that the plugs were slowly wetting and that moisture levels were sufficient to sustain microbes. No evidence of P. stutzeri was found, however, in all but the first 0.5 cm of the plugs (smallest distance sampled) over a 20-week period. The results suggest that microbial migration in buffer is limited or even completely prevented because of its relatively small pores. (author)

  12. A case history on long-term effectiveness of clay sealant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.F.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents a case history in which a cadaver and the associated burial objects were found to be well-preserved after more than 2100 years of burial in Southern China. The preservation was attributed to the presence of a 60-300 cm thick kaolin or white clay layer around the tomb, which acted effectively as a barrier to moisture and air percolation. The degree of preservation in other tombs of similar age in the same area apparently depended on the mineralogy and thickness of the clay sealants used. The implication of this case history to nuclear fuel waste disposal is discussed

  13. Pyramiding tumuli waste disposal site and method of construction thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Martin P.

    1989-01-01

    An improved waste disposal site for the above-ground disposal of low-level nuclear waste as disclosed herein. The disposal site is formed from at least three individual waste-containing tumuli, wherein each tumuli includes a central raised portion bordered by a sloping side portion. Two of the tumuli are constructed at ground level with adjoining side portions, and a third above-ground tumulus is constructed over the mutually adjoining side portions of the ground-level tumuli. Both the floor and the roof of each tumulus includes a layer of water-shedding material such as compacted clay, and the clay layer in the roofs of the two ground-level tumuli form the compacted clay layer of the floor of the third above-ground tumulus. Each tumulus further includes a shield wall, preferably formed from a solid array of low-level handleable nuclear wate packages. The provision of such a shield wall protects workers from potentially harmful radiation when higher-level, non-handleable packages of nuclear waste are stacked in the center of the tumulus.

  14. Near-surface microstructural modification of (Ti,W)(C,N)-based compacts with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucakar, V.; Kral, C.; Lengauer, W.

    2001-01-01

    For developing of functional-gradient hardmetals the interaction of nitrogen with (Ti,W)(C,N)-based compacts was investigated. Hot-pressed (Ti,W)(C,N) compacts as well as sintered compacts of (Ti,W)(C,N)+Co were subjected to sintering and heat treatment at 1200-1500 o C and up to 30 bar N 2 . In (Ti,W)(C,N) compacts four microstructure types were obtained upon reaction with nitrogen. A uniform single-phase (Ti,W)(C,N) forms in samples with a low WC and high TiN content. If medium WC and high TiN/TiC ratio is present a core-rim type structure forms during Ar annealing which remains the same when nitrogen in-diffusion occurs. The third type of microstructure shows sub-micron lamellae of nitrogen-rich fcc phase and WC. This structure forms at increased WC and/or TiC content. If the WC content is increased again a WC layer forms at the outermost surface. Compressive stresses introduced by phase formation/decomposition were obtained for the nitrogen in-diffusion. Sintered (Ti,W)(C,N)+Co compacts were heat treated above and below the eutectic temperature. Above the eutectic temperature compact Ti(C,N) top-layers independent an sample composition were observed. Below the eutectic temperature the microstructure formation is mainly influenced by the sample composition. A Ti(C,N) top-layer forms in materials with a high Ti(C,N) content. Contrary, interaction zones without a layer were obtained in compacts with high WC/Ti(C,N) ratio. Some of these surface modified compacts show surfaces and particle sizes favorable for a cutting tool. (author)

  15. Potential of polyaniline modified clay nanocomposite as a selective decontamination adsorbent for Pb(II) ions from contaminated waters; kinetics and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piri, Somayeh; Zanjani, Zahra Alikhani; Piri, Farideh; Zamani, Abbasali; Yaftian, Mohamadreza; Davari, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays significant attention is to nanocomposite compounds in water cleaning. In this article the synthesis and characterization of conductive polyaniline/clay (PANI/clay) as a hybrid nanocomposite with extended chain conformation and its application for water purification are presented. Clay samples were obtained from the central plain of Abhar region, Abhar, Zanjan Province, Iran. Clay was dried and sieved before used as adsorbent. The conductive polyaniline was inflicted into the layers of clay to fabricate a hybrid material. The structural properties of the fabricated nanocomposite are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The elimination process of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions from synthetics aqueous phase on the surface of PANI/clay as adsorbent were evaluated in batch experiments. Flame atomic absorption instrument spectrophotometer was used for determination of the studied ions concentration. Consequence change of the pH and initial metal amount in aqueous solution, the procedure time and the used adsorbent dose as the effective parameters on the removal efficiency was investigated. Surface characterization was exhibited that the clay layers were flaked in the hybrid nanocomposite. The results show that what happen when a nanocomposite polyaniline chain is inserted between the clay layers. The adsorption of ions confirmed a pH dependency procedure and a maximum removal value was seen at pH 5.0. The adsorption isotherm and the kinetics of the adsorption processes were described by Temkin model and pseudo-second-order equation. Time of procedure, pH and initial ion amount have a severe effect on adsorption efficiency of PANI/clay. By using suggested synthesise method, nano-composite as the adsorbent simply will be prepared. The prepared PANI/clay showed excellent adsorption capability for decontamination of Pb ions from contaminated water. Both of suggested synthesise and

  16. Microbial processes relevant for the long-term performance of radioactive waste repositories in clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meleshyn, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A number of investigations on occurrence and viability of microbes in compacted clays have been aimed at studying possible microbial effects on long-term performance of a deep geological repository (DGR) for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SF). Compacted clays are considered in current DGR designs either as a buffer material or as a host rock. The primary purpose of the present work was to qualitatively evaluate the relevance of microbial activity for the long-term performance of a DGR and to identify which safety-relevant processes and properties can be potentially influenced by this activity. The present analysis identified eight clay properties essential for maintaining safety functions of containment and retardation of the disposal system - swelling pressure, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, anion sorption capacity, porosity, permeability, fluid pressure, plasticity - which can potentially be influenced by microbial processes in clay buffer and Clay-stone within a DGR for HLW/SF. Iron(III)- and sulphate-reducing, fermentative, methane-producing and oxidizing microbes can be considered to be present in any clay formation. Each habitat includes a massive number of microbial niches with perhaps only a small proportion of the species being metabolically active at the habitat's conditions, the remainder becoming not extinct. Moreover, clays contain electron donors and electron acceptors in amounts sufficient for these microbes to remain active during very long periods of time. Additional sources of electron donors or electron acceptors will inevitably be added to the repository system as a result of DGR excavation, placement of radioactive waste as well as backfilling and sealing of the DGR. In no case should the potential impact of microbes be underestimated based on a possible argument of comparably low biomass of the microbes in contact with metal surfaces or dissolved

  17. An Experiment on the Carbonization of Fuel Compact Matrix Graphite for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Cho, Moon Sung

    2012-01-01

    The fuel element for HTGR is manufactured by mixing coated fuel particles with matrix graphite powder and forming into either pebble type or cylindrical type compacts depending on their use in different HTGR cores. The coated fuel particle, the so-called TRISO particle, consists of 500-μm spherical UO 2 particles coated with the low density buffer Pyrolytic Carbon (PyC) layer, the inner and outer high density PyC layer and SiC layer sandwiched between the two inner and outer PyC layers. The coated TRISO particles are mixed with a properly prepared matrix graphite powder, pressed into a spherical shape or a cylindrical compact, and finally heat-treated at about 1800 .deg. C. These fuel elements can have different sizes and forms of compact. The basic steps for manufacturing a fuel element include preparation of graphite matrix powder, over coating the fuel particles, mixing the fuel particles with a matrix powder, carbonizing green compact, and the final high-temperature heat treatment of the carbonized fuel compact. The carbonization is a process step where the binder that is incorporated during the matrix graphite powder preparation step is evaporated and the residue of the binder is carbonized during the heat treatment at about 1073 K, In order to develop a fuel compact fabrication technology, and for fuel matrix graphite to meet the required material properties, it is of extreme importance to investigate the relationship among the process parameters of the matrix graphite powder preparation, fabrication parameters of fuel element green compact and the carbonization condition, which has a strong influence on further steps and the material properties of fuel element. In this work, the carbonization behavior of green compact samples prepared from the matrix graphite powder mixtures with different binder materials was investigated in order to elucidate the behavior of binders during the carbonization heat treatment by analyzing the change in weight, density and its

  18. MULPEX: A compact multi-layered polymer foil collector for micrometeoroids and orbital debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Graham, G. A.; Burchell, M. J.; Taylor, E. A.; Drolshagen, G.; Chater, R. J.; McPhail, D.

    Detailed studies of preserved hypervelocity impact residues on spacecraft multi-layer insulation foils have yielded important information about the flux of small particles from different sources in low-Earth orbit (LEO). We have extended our earlier research on impacts occurring in LEO to design and testing of a compact capture device. MUlti- Layer Polymer EXperiment (MULPEX) is simple, cheap to build, lightweight, of no power demand, easy to deploy, and optimised for the efficient collection of impact residue for analysis on return to Earth. The capture medium is a stack of very thin (8 and 40 μm) polyimide foils, supported on poly-tetrafluoroethylene sheet frames, surrounded by a protective aluminium casing. The uppermost foil has a very thin metallic coating for thermal protection and resistance to atomic oxygen and ultra-violet exposure. The casing provides a simple detachable interface for deployment on the spacecraft, facing into the desired direction for particle collection. On return to the laboratory, the stacked foils are separated for examination in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope, without need for surface coating. Analysis of impact residue is performed using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers. Our laboratory experiments, utilising buck-shot firings of analogues to micrometeoroids (35-38 μm olivine) and space debris (4 μm alumina and 1 mm stainless steel) in a light gas gun, have shown that impact residue is abundant within the foil layers, and preserves a record of the impacting particle, whether of micrometer or millimetre dimensions. Penetrations of the top foil are easily recognised, and act as a proxy for dimensions of the penetrating particle. Impact may cause disruption and melting, but some residue retains sufficient crystallographic structure to show clear Raman lines, diagnostic of the original mineral.

  19. Vegetable Oil-Based Hyperbranched Thermosetting Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Harekrishna; Karak, Niranjan

    2009-04-25

    The highly branched polyurethanes and vegetable oil-based polymer nanocomposites have been showing fruitful advantages across a spectrum of potential field of applications. Mesua ferrea L. seed oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane (HBPU)/clay nanocomposites were prepared at different dose levels by in situ polymerization technique. The performances of epoxy-cured thermosetting nanocomposites are reported for the first time. The partially exfoliated structure of clay layers was confirmed by XRD and TEM. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of H bonding between nanoclay and the polymer matrix. The present investigation outlines the significant improvement of tensile strength, scratch hardness, thermostability, water vapor permeability, and adhesive strength without much influencing impact resistance, bending, and elongation at break of the nanocomposites compared to pristine HBPU thermoset. An increment of two times the tensile strength, 6 degrees C of melting point, and 111 degrees C of thermo-stability were achieved by the formation of nanocomposites. An excellent shape recovery of about 96-99% was observed for the nanocomposites. Thus, the formation of partially exfoliated clay/vegetable oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane nanocomposites significantly improved the performance.

  20. Effects of magnesium minerals representative of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stone on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.

    2012-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses dissolution has been studied in presence of magnesium minerals. Those minerals (dolomite, illite, smectite...) belong to the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone layer, studied in France as a potential site for nuclear waste disposal. Such minerals contain magnesium, an element able to sustain glass alteration when it is available in solution. In the confined media of the wastes disposal, the solids reactivity controls the solution composition and can be the driving force of nuclear glass alteration. Experiments show that magnesium carbonates (hydro-magnesite and dolomite) increase in the glass alteration: the precipitation of magnesium silicates consumes silicon which slows down the formation of the glass passivating layer. The lower the magnesium mineral solubility, the lower the glass alteration. The purified clay phases (illite, smectite...) from the COx layer increase the glass alteration. Half the magnesium was replaced by sodium during the purification process. In such conditions, the effect of clay phases on glass alteration is in part due to the acidic pH-buffering effect of the clay fraction. The GRAAL model implemented in the geochemical transport code HYTEC has confirmed and quantified the mechanisms put in evidence in the experiments. Cells diffusion experiments where the two solids were separated by an inert diffusion barrier allow to valid reactive transport modelling. Such experiments are more representative of the glass package which will be separated from the COx by corrosion products. They show that glass alteration rate is reduced when solids are not close. (author) [fr

  1. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Demkowicz; Scott Ploger; John Hunn

    2012-05-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  2. Ceramographic Examinations of Irradiated AGR-1 Fuel Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demkowicz, Paul; Ploger, Scott; Hunn, John

    2012-01-01

    The AGR 1 experiment involved irradiating 72 cylindrical fuel compacts containing tri-structural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particles to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures observed out of almost 300,000 particles. Five irradiated AGR 1 fuel compacts were selected for microscopy that span a range of irradiation conditions (temperature, burnup, and fast fluence). These five compacts also included all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR experiment. The five compacts were cross-sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, mounted, ground, and polished after development of careful techniques for preserving particle structures against preparation damage. Approximately 40 to 80 particles within each cross section were exposed near enough to mid-plane for optical microscopy of kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. The microstructural analysis focused on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracture, debonding between the buffer and inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layers, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Three basic particle morphologies were established according to the extent of bonding between the buffer and IPyC layers: complete debonding along the interface (Type A), no debonding along the interface (Type B), and partial debonding (Type AB). These basic morphologies were subdivided according to whether the buffer stayed intact or fractured. The resulting six characteristic morphologies were used to classify particles within each cross section, but no spatial patterns were clearly observed in any of the cross-sectional morphology maps. Although positions of particle types appeared random within compacts, examining a total of 830 classified particles allowed other relationships among morphological types to be established.

  3. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Research into the properties of clays as barrier materials for nuclear waste disposal has led to the realization that they have important transport properties which are relatively insignificant in most other geological materials. Sorption has always been regarded as a purely retarding mechanism, but laboratory experiments over the past decade have indicated that surface diffusion of sorbed cations is a potentially significant transport mechanism in both compacted montmorillonite, and biotite gneiss. The present desk study about these issues was part of the CEC coordinated project Mirage-Second phase, research area Natural analogues

  4. Improvement of the Heat Resistance of Prussian Blue Nanoparticles in a Clay Film Composed of Smectite Clay and ε-Caprolactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kenta; Nakamura, Takashi; Ebina, Takeo; Ishizaki, Manabu; Kurihara, Masato

    2018-06-04

    Prussian blue (PB) is limited in its application by its breakdown at elevated temperatures. To improve the heat resistance of PB, we prepared a composite film comprising PB nanoparticles (NPs), smectite clay, and an organic compound. The composite film had a microstructure in which PB NPs were intercalated between smectite/organic compound layers. The predominant oxidation temperature of the PB NPs in the composite film was around 500 °C in air, higher than the oxidation temperature of bulk PB in air (250 °C). This improvement in the oxidation temperature may be due to the composite film acting as a barrier to oxygen gas. These results indicate the effectiveness of clay materials for the improvement of heat resistance for low-temperature decomposition compounds, not only PB but also other porous coordination polymers.

  5. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  6. Synthesis and characterization of intercalated polyaniline-clay nanocomposite using supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelraheem, A.; El-Shazly, A. H.; Elkady, M. F.

    2018-05-01

    Lately, supercritical CO2 (SCCO2) have been getting great interest. It can be used in numerous applications because it is environmentally friendly, safe, comparatively low cost, and nonflammable. One of its applications is being a solvent in the synthesis of polymeric-clay nanocomposite. In this paper, intercalated polyaniline-clay nanocomposite (PANC) was prepared using SCCO2. The intercalation structure of polyaniline chains between clay layers was verified by various characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope (SEM-TEM) were used to show the morphology of the synthesized nanocomposite. The molecular structure of PANC nanocomposite was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The BET surface area and the conductivity of the nanocomposite were determined.

  7. Coupled transport phenomena in a clay from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation; Phenomenes de transport couples dans les argiles du Callovo-Oxfordien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszkuta, M

    2005-06-15

    Low permeability materials containing clay play an important role in practical life and natural environment. Indeed, the ability of clay soils to act as semi permeable membranes, that inhibit the passage of electrolytes, is of great interest. The major objective of this thesis is to evaluate the transport properties of natural clays and in particular coupled transports when a pressure gradient, an electrical field, a concentration gradient and a temperature gradient interact. The material is a compact argillite extracted in East France from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation which was supplied to us by ANDRA. NaCl was used as the main solute. Two series of experiments were performed to measure permeability, diffusion, conductivity, the electro-osmotic coefficient and the Soret coefficient. (author)

  8. Development of nanocomposites polyamide66/ bentonite clay membranes obtained by solution for water-oil separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Keila Machado de

    2010-01-01

    Microporous membranes were obtained from nanocomposites polyamide66 and regional bentonite clay, through the technique of immersion precipitation. The nanocomposites were obtained by solution with a pre-established reaction time. The clay was treated with quaternary ammonium salt (Cetremide®) in order to make it organophilic. Untreated and treated clay were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG), which confirmed the insertion of the Cetremide® salt in the layers of clay and their thermal stability. While the membranes were characterized by XRD, TG, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and flow measurements. The results of XRD, TG and DSC confirmed the thermal stability and morphological structure with intercalated/partially exfoliated lamellae of clay in the polymer matrix. By SEM, it was revealed an asymmetric morphology consisting of a skin layer and a porous sublayer. The higher clay content in the membrane give the lower film thickness. This influencing directly the flow measurements of the membranes produced from the nanocomposites. In general, the initial flow with distilled water through the membranes decrease and stabilise after 60 min, this due to a compression or swelling occurred in the membranes. In tests of water-oil separation it was found that the relationship J/J0 tends to be greater when using emulsions with lower concentration. The water-oil separation tests at concentrations of 300 and 500 ppm for all membranes showed a significant reduction in oil concentration in the permeate, thus showing that these membranes have potential for this application. (author)

  9. Electrical properties of the potassium polytitanate compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffman, V.G.; Gorokhovsky, A.V.; Kompan, M.M.; Tretyachenko, E.V.; Telegina, O.S.; Kovnev, A.V.; Fedorov, F.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Quasi-static permittivity of potassium polytitanates compacts achieves 10 4 –10 5 . • Observed Maxwell–Wagner polarization attributes to layered structure of polytitanates. • The conductivity varies from 5 × 10 −2 to 10 −6 –10 −7 Sm/m in a wide range of temperatures. - Abstract: Titanates of alkali metals are widely applied materials as they are relatively low in cost and might be easily synthesized. They are utilized as adsorbents, catalysts, solid state electrolytes, superconductors. Here we report our results on electrical properties of the compacted amorphous potassium polytitanates powders. The electrical properties of the compacts were studied by means of complex impedance spectroscopy in a wide range of frequencies at different temperatures using two-electrode configuration. The frequency dependences of conductivity for the investigated potassium polytitanates compacts varies in the range from 5 × 10 −2 Sm/m (high frequencies, ion conductivity) up to 10 −6 –10 −7 Sm/m (low frequencies, electron conductivity) for a wide range of temperatures (19–150 °C). According to the results, at low frequencies quasi-static permittivity of the stabilized PPT compacts achieves high values of 10 4 –10 5 . This might be explained by Maxwell–Wagner polarization attributed to the layered structure of the potassium polytitanates particles containing potassium and hydronium ions together with crystallization water in the interlayer and is very promising for solid state electrolyte applications for moderate temperatures

  10. Computed tomography scanner applied to soil compaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, C.M.P.

    1989-11-01

    The soil compaction problem was studied using a first generation computed tomography scanner (CT). This apparatus gets images of soil cross sections samples, with resolution of a few millimeters. We performed the following laboratory and field experiments: basic experiments of equipment calibrations and resolutions studies; measurements of compacted soil thin layers; measurements of soil compaction caused by agricultural tools; stress-strain modelling in confined soil sample, with several moisture degree; characterizations of soil bulk density profile with samples collected in a hole (trench), comparing with a cone penetrometer technique. (author)

  11. New research on the origin of mottled clay in Quaternary basins in the coastal area of south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhen; Gao, Quanzhou; Chen, Guoneng

    2018-06-01

    Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) mottled clay occurs widely in Late Quaternary basins in south China coastal areas. Current research attributes its origin to exposure weathering of Late Pleistocene marine/fluvial deposits during the LGM. However, field data suggest that this is not the case as there is no gradual transition in lithology, grain size, structure and material composition among these layers. Instead, the mottled clay possesses sedimentary characteristics of exotic dust. In this study, three typical drill cores in the Pearl River Delta were studied using grain size analysis, diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and geochemical analysis to ascertain the clay's sedimentary characteristics and origin. Grain size distribution patterns and parameters of the mottled clay were similar to those of a typical loess, indicating aeolian origin. In DRS curves, the peak height of hematite > goethite, indicating that the mottled clay had not experienced strong hydration and constitutes a continental product. This conforms to a typical loess but differs from the underlying marine/fluvial deposits. The chemical composition of the mottled clay was homogeneous in the vertical and planar directions. Upper continental crust (UCC) normalized curves of major and trace elements of the mottled clay were close to the average UCC and were consistent with typical aeolian deposits. The spatial and temporal distribution characteristics and relationship with the underlying layer suggest that the mottled clay was a loess-like deposit during the LGM and its mottled structure originated from strong modification of oxidation during the postglacial period after homogeneous dust had accumulated.

  12. Improvements in or relating to the manufacture of compact bodies from particulate material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, R.L.R.; Barbier, Y.M.J.; Thomas, J.P.; Sturge, D.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that a problem arises in the manufacture of compact bodies of nuclear fuel from fuel particles. The particles may comprise spheroidal kernels of sintered UO 2 coated with layers of pyrocarbon and SiC and overcoated with layers of soft graphite. These particles are compressed in dies to form compact bodies, the layers of overcoating deforming to fill the spaces between the fuel particles. When the compact bodies are to be of elongated form pressure is applied axially through rams entering the ends of the die cavity, but this unfortunately leads to a variation in volume loading and matrix density of the particles, so that those particles and associated matrix at the ends of the elongated body are compacted to a higher degree than those at the center. Attempts to rectify this by increasing the pressure of compaction often results in breakage of the particles subjected to the greatest pressure. The method of manufacture described seeks to overcome this difficulty. The material is placed in a shaped die cavity, that partly defines the shape of the body, and is compacted between oppositely acting pairs of rams that extend over the full length of the cavity. Forces are then applied normal to the longitudinal axis of the cavity. The rams are shaped to combine with the cavity to define the shape of the compacted body. The addition of some end-compaction is advantageous, and for this purpose additional forces may be applied in the direction of the longitudinal axis. The die cavity may contain a mandrel arranged so that a hollow compact body is formed by compaction. (U.K.)

  13. Synthesis of polymer gel electrolyte with high molecular weight poly(methyl methacrylate)-clay nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, Paulo; Qutubuddin, Syed; Webber, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposite gel electrolytes consisting of high molecular weight poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA-clay nanocomposite, ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC) as plasticizer, and LiClO 4 electrolyte are reported. Montmorillonite clay was ion exchanged with a zwitterionic surfactant (octadecyl dimethyl betaine) and dispersed in methyl methacrylate, which was then polymerized to synthesize PMMA-clay nanocomposites. The nanocomposite was dissolved in a mixture of EC/PC with LiClO 4 , heated and pressed to obtain polymer gel electrolyte. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the gels indicated intercalated clay structure with d-spacings of 2.85 and 1.40 nm. In the gel containing plasticizer, the clay galleries shrink suggesting intercalation rather than partial exfoliation observed in the PMMA-clay nanocomposite. Ionic conductivity varied slightly and exhibited a maximum value of 8 x 10 -4 S/cm at clay content of 1.5 wt.%. The activation energy was determined by modeling the conductivity with a Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher expression. The clay layers are primarily trapped inside the polymer matrix. Consequently, the polymer does not interact significantly with LiClO 4 electrolyte as shown by FTIR. The presence of the clay increased the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the gel as determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The PMMA nanocomposite gel electrolyte shows a stable lithium interfacial resistance over time, which is a key factor for use in electrochemical applications

  14. Tunable Gas Permeability of Polymer-Clay Nano Brick Wall Thin Film Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Daniel; Priolo, Morgan; Grunlan, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    Thin films of anionic natural montmorrilonite (MMT) clay and cationic polyethylenimine (PEI) have been produced by alternately dipping a plastic substrate into dilute aqueous mixtures containing each ingredient. After 40 polymer-clay layers have been deposited, the resulting transparent film exhibits an oxygen transmission rate (OTR) below 0.35 cm^3/m^2 . day when the pH of PEI solution is 10. This low permeability is due to a brick wall nanostructure comprised of completely exfoliated clay bricks in polymeric mortar. This brick wall creates an extremely tortuous path at thicknesses below 250 nm and clay concentration above 80 wt%. A 70-bilayer PEI-MMT assembly has an undetectable OTR (< 0.005 cm^3/m^2 . day), which equates to a permeability below SiOx when multiplied by its film thickness of 231 nm. With optical transparency greater than 86% and the ability to be microwaved, these thin film composites are good candidates for flexible electronics packaging and foil replacement for food.

  15. PHB/bentonite compounds: Effect of clay modification and thermal aging on properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Tatiara G.; Costa, Anna Raffaela M.; Canedo, Eduardo L.; Carvalho, Laura H. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Wellen, Renate M.R., E-mail: tatiaraalmeida@gmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraíba (UFPB), João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) was compounded with three different Bentonite clays: natural, purified by ultrasound/sonicated and organically modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. PHB/Bentonite masterbatches with 30% clay were prepared in a laboratory internal mixer and letdown with pure matrix to 1% and 3% w/w clay. Test samples were injection molded and characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increase in Bentonite hydrophobic character was evinced by FTIR for organoclays. XRD of composites showed increase in clay interlayer distance and peak broadening, suggesting formation of intercalated nanocomposites. DSC showed increase in crystallinity and crystallization rate for compounds, especially for PHB/organoclay formulations. Thermal aging was conducted by exposing specimens at 115 deg C for up to 120 hours, and mechanical properties were measured according to ASTM standards. Elastic modulus increased and impact strength decreased with time and clay content; clay purification had little effect on the tensile properties. Tensile strength of thermal aged samples showed little variation, except for the organoclay nanocomposites, for which it significantly decreased with exposure time. SEM images displayed a whitened honeycomb structure and detachment of PHB/Bentonite layers which may be connected to cold crystallization and degradation processes taking place during thermal aging. (author)

  16. PHB/bentonite compounds: Effect of clay modification and thermal aging on properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Tatiara G.; Costa, Anna Raffaela M.; Canedo, Eduardo L.; Carvalho, Laura H.; Wellen, Renate M.R.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) was compounded with three different Bentonite clays: natural, purified by ultrasound/sonicated and organically modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. PHB/Bentonite masterbatches with 30% clay were prepared in a laboratory internal mixer and letdown with pure matrix to 1% and 3% w/w clay. Test samples were injection molded and characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increase in Bentonite hydrophobic character was evinced by FTIR for organoclays. XRD of composites showed increase in clay interlayer distance and peak broadening, suggesting formation of intercalated nanocomposites. DSC showed increase in crystallinity and crystallization rate for compounds, especially for PHB/organoclay formulations. Thermal aging was conducted by exposing specimens at 115 deg C for up to 120 hours, and mechanical properties were measured according to ASTM standards. Elastic modulus increased and impact strength decreased with time and clay content; clay purification had little effect on the tensile properties. Tensile strength of thermal aged samples showed little variation, except for the organoclay nanocomposites, for which it significantly decreased with exposure time. SEM images displayed a whitened honeycomb structure and detachment of PHB/Bentonite layers which may be connected to cold crystallization and degradation processes taking place during thermal aging. (author)

  17. Swelling and sedimentation of bentonite clays in bulk and in slits: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, S.V.; Furo, I.; Neretnieks, I.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising 'self-sealing' buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. Evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted bentonite are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. The major goal of our studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. To characterize the state of colloids that form after/during clay swelling the water self-diffusion coefficient was measured on a spatially resolved manner. The distribution and displacement within the bentonite systems of foreign particles, either natural ones (sand or quartz) or artificially admixed model particles of controlled size were also monitored. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were

  18. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia.

  19. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia

  20. Clay mineral facies and lateritization in basalts of the southeastern Parana Basin, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.T.G. de; Formoso, M.L.L.; Trescases, J.J.; Meunier, A.

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen samples from two lateritic profiles, each with five facies, were studied. These profiles occur on the old planation surface of the plateau basalts of the southern part of ParanáBasin, Brazil. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Mössbauer spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra were used to obtain information about the nature and chemical composition of each weathering facies. In addition, scanning electron microscopy and analyses of clay minerals were performed to detect microcrystalline environmental changes. Both profiles have two major parts: a loose red-clay latosol separated from an underlying mottled clay and an alterite facies; a stone line may or may not be present between the latosol and the underlying units. In both profiles the latosol consists principally of kaolinite, hematite and goethite. Two alterite facies, shaped by differential weathering, are also present in the lower profile: a halloysite–nontronite clayey matrix with a well developed fissure system occurs in the argillaceous alterite and a network of Al–goethite aggregates is typical of the highly porous cortex of the boulder alterite that is found in the stone line and below it. Gibbsite has crystallized in the large pores of porphyritic boulder alterite but is absent in the small pores of the subaphyric boulder alterite. Clay minerals observed in fissures include halloysite associated with goethite and manganese oxides. The basalt has hydrothermal green-clays (mixed layers and trioctahedral smectites) that formed between primary plagioclase, pyroxene and Ti–magnetite crystals while fresh corestones of the boulder alterite have cryptocrystalline iron-rich material. The study of these profiles shows one principal evolutionary trend for clay minerals. This trend is from smectite and mixed layers that form green clays in altered bedrock at the base of the profile to an intermediate association of nontronite and halloysite in the argillaceous

  1. Consistency in the description of diffusion in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, J.; Muurinen, A.

    2009-01-01

    A macro-level diffusion model, which aims to provide a unifying framework for explaining the experimentally observed co-ion exclusion and greatly controversial counter-ion surface diffusion in a consistent fashion, is presented. It is explained in detail why a term accounting for the non-zero mobility of the counter-ion surface excess is required in the mathematical form of the macroscopic diffusion flux. The prerequisites for the consistency of the model and the problems associated with the interpretation of diffusion in such complex pore geometries as in compacted smectite clays are discussed. (author)

  2. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian

    1993-01-01

    Large scale practical use of bulk amorphous alloys requires the capability of molding the material to a desired design, for instance by compaction of an amorphous powder. This is a difficult task because the sintering temperature is limited by the crystallization temperature of the alloy.1 Here we......, should facilitate a compaction. The passivation layer, however, impedes a compaction. Isostatic pressing at 540 K at a pressure of 200 MPa clearly illustrated this; pellets pressed from passivated powder were much more brittle than pellets pressed from unpassivated powder. The density of the pellets...... was very low ([approximately-equal-to]25% of the density of bulk FeB). We have designed a die for uniaxial pressing in which the compaction can be performed without exposing the powder to air and have obtained densities larger than 60% of that of bulk FeB. We have reported studies of the dependence...

  3. Defoliation and Soil Compaction Jointly Drive Large-Herbivore Grazing Effects on Plants and Soil Arthropods on Clay Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klink, R.; Schrama, M.; Nolte, S.; Bakker, J. P.; WallisDeVries, M. F.; Berg, M. P.

    In addition to the well-studied impacts of defecation and defoliation, large herbivores also affect plant and arthropod communities through trampling, and the associated soil compaction. Soil compaction can be expected to be particularly important on wet, fine-textured soils. Therefore, we

  4. Defoliation and Soil Compaction Jointly Drive Large-Herbivore Grazing Effects on Plants and Soil Arthropods on Clay Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klink, R.; Schrama, M.; Nolte, S.; Bakker, Jan P.; WallisDeVries, M.F.; Berg, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the well-studied impacts of defecation and defoliation, large herbivores also affect plant and arthropod communities through trampling, and the associated soil compaction. Soil compaction can be expected to be particularly important on wet, fine-textured soils. Therefore, we

  5. Complex resistivity signatures of ethanol in sand-clay mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personna, Yves Robert; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Werkema, Dale D.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    We performed complex resistivity (CR) measurements on laboratory columns to investigate changes in electrical properties as a result of varying ethanol (EtOH) concentration (0% to 30% v/v) in a sand–clay (bentonite) matrix. We applied Debye decomposition, a phenomenological model commonly used to fit CR data, to determine model parameters (time constant: τ, chargeability: m, and normalized chargeability: mn). The CR data showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) time-dependent variation in the clay driven polarization response (~ 12 mrad) for 0% EtOH concentration. This temporal variation probably results from the clay–water reaction kinetics trending towards equilibrium in the sand–clay–water system. The clay polarization is significantly suppressed (P ≤ 0.001) for both measured phase (ϕ) and imaginary conductivity (σ″) with increasing EtOH concentration. Normalized chargeability consistently decreases (by up to a factor of ~ 2) as EtOH concentration increases from 0% to 10% and 10 to 20%, respectively. We propose that such suppression effects are associated with alterations in the electrical double layer (EDL) at the clay–fluid interface due to (a) strong EtOH adsorption on clay, and (b) complex intermolecular EtOH–water interactions and subsequent changes in ionic mobility on the surface in the EDL. Changes in the CR data following a change of the saturating fluid from EtOH 20% to plain water indicate strong hysteresis effects in the electrical response, which we attribute to persistent EtOH adsorption on clay. Our results demonstrate high sensitivity of CR measurements to clay–EtOH interactions in porous media, indicating the potential application of this technique for characterization and monitoring of ethanol contamination in sediments containing clays.

  6. Mineral potential of clays that cover the gypsum deposits in Araripina-PE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lira, B.B.; Anjos, I.F. dos; Rego, S.A.B.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work the applicability of the clays that cover the deposits of Gypsum Plaster in the region of Araripina - PE for use as the ceramic pigments and for bricks production in the red ceramic industry was analyzed. The clay minerals contained the illite, kaolinite and smectite, with high proportion of the last one. The possibility of industrial application of this mineral clay is considerable; however, the mining industries that mine and process the gypsum in the region do not take the clays into account as the potential mineral. In general, industries use the clay minerals in manufacturing processes or as key raw materials, or as the alternatives for some kinds of the chemical processing industries. This paper aims to highlight the potential of materials that cover the deposits of gypsum in reference. The material sampled from different deposit layers was characterized and the physical treatment of ore was applied. The results showed that the material analyzed can be used in various kinds of industry, such as the production of natural ceramic pigments. (author)

  7. Use of x-ray radiographic methods in the study of clay liners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, P.G.; May, J.H.; Brown, K.W.; Thomas, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray radiography has been widely used in soil investigation to study the distribution of layers in soil cores and the effects of changing conditions (loading or impact) on soil structure. X-ray radiographic techniques also can be useful in studying clays or clay soils used in liners. Laboratory investigations were undertaken to demonstrate that X-ray radiographic techniques could be used to detect density and soil structure changes that usually accompany variations in hydraulic conductivity of clay liners. An example of a real-time test of a simulated bentonite and sand, liner attacked with acid lead nitrate and examples of radiographic examination of clay soil (non-calcareous smectite) samples that have been permeated by lead acetate or lead nitrate are presented. The changes in density and structure can be related to changes observed in hydraulic conductivity during permeation. X-ray radiography easily can be applied to field samples of soil or clay liner materials to detect density and structural changes that occur as the liner and permeating fluid interact. X-ray techniques have applications in both understanding failure mechanisms and forecasting liner performance

  8. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folsom, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50-30 W m -1 K -1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  9. Sepiolite needle-like clay for PA6 nanocomposites: an alternative to layered silicates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilotti, E.; Zhang, R.; Deng, H.; Quero, F.; Fischer, H.R.; Peijs, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of polyamide 6/sepiolite clay nanocomposite, obtained by melt compounding in a mini twin-screw extruder, and characterised in terms of morphology (SEM and TEM analysis) and mechanical properties of the composite, along with their crystallinity and crystal structure of the

  10. Modelling gas migration in compacted bentonite: gambit club phase 3. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, A.R.; Cliffe, K.A.; Swift, B.T.; Rodwell, W.R.

    2004-04-01

    This report describes the third phase of a programme of work to develop a computational model of gas migration through highly compacted water-saturated bentonite. One difficulty with this endeavour is the definitive determination of the mechanism of the gas migration from the available experimental data. The report contains a brief review of the experimental data and their interpretation. The model development work reported involves the investigation of two ways of enhancing a model proposed in the previous phase of the programme. This model was based on the concept that gas migration pathways were created by consolidating the clay fabric by application of gas pressure to create porosity through which the gas could flow. The two developments of this model that are separately explored in this work are: (a) The incorporation of a proper treatment of the stress-strain behaviour of the clay in (b) response to gas migration. The previous model had only considered stress effects through simple volume changes to the clay fabric. The inclusion of a dual-porosity feature into the model in an attempt to address the role that the clay fabric might play in gas migration through the clay, in particular the role that pre-existing interstack voids might have in gas migration. The consideration of hysteresis effects was also included in this study. As in previous GAMBIT Club work, the models are tested against the results of laboratory experiments. (orig.)

  11. Considering clay rock heterogeneity in radionuclide retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Montavon, G.; Tournassat, C.; Giffaut, E.; Altmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    considering the measured mass fraction of illite, I/S, and kaolinite. Five values were fitted simultaneous in the overall fit: the CECs of the kaolinite, the smectite and illite components as well as the illite fraction in both R0 and R1 I/S. For transport calculations of radionuclides it is important to know which part of the overall porosity belongs to the micropores and which to the interlayers of the smectite layers in the inter-stratified I/S. Making the hypothesis that, at the given degree of compaction, these interlayers are hydrated by two water layers one could calculate the fraction of micropores in total porosity from the measured I/S content and the fitted I/S ratio given for either R0 or R1. For high smectite contents there is about twice as much water in interlayers than in the micropores, while there is much more water in the micropores in case of low smectite contents. The retention and porosity models for Bentonite have been adapted successfully to argillite samples for various drill cores assuming additivity of the various mineralogical contributions, in particular illite and I/S and of the illite to smectite ratio in I/S. The approach leads to a reasonable quantitative representation of the CEC as well as of surface complexation site densities as a function of depth and mineralogical composition. Ratios of micropores to interlayer pore space were obtained as well. The good correlation of calculated and measured retention data for Cs and for Ni gave reasonable justification to apply the model for the prediction of K d variations of Cs all along a drill core. Predicted values vary by about a factor of 10. (authors)

  12. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L.W.; Munkholm, L.J.; Moldrup, P.; Christensen, B.T.; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  13. Vegetable Oil-Based Hyperbranched Thermosetting Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deka Harekrishna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The highly branched polyurethanes and vegetable oil-based polymer nanocomposites have been showing fruitful advantages across a spectrum of potential field of applications.Mesua ferreaL. seed oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane (HBPU/clay nanocomposites were prepared at different dose levels by in situ polymerization technique. The performances of epoxy-cured thermosetting nanocomposites are reported for the first time. The partially exfoliated structure of clay layers was confirmed by XRD and TEM. FTIR spectra indicate the presence of H bonding between nanoclay and the polymer matrix. The present investigation outlines the significant improvement of tensile strength, scratch hardness, thermostability, water vapor permeability, and adhesive strength without much influencing impact resistance, bending, and elongation at break of the nanocomposites compared to pristine HBPU thermoset. An increment of two times the tensile strength, 6 °C of melting point, and 111 °C of thermo-stability were achieved by the formation of nanocomposites. An excellent shape recovery of about 96–99% was observed for the nanocomposites. Thus, the formation of partially exfoliated clay/vegetable oil-based hyperbranched polyurethane nanocomposites significantly improved the performance.

  14. Influence of Clay Content, Mineralogy and Fabric On Radar Frequency Response of Aquifer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    High frequency electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) are widely employed to measure water saturation in the vadose zone and water filled porosity in the saturated zone. However, previous work has shown that radar frequency dielectric properties are strongly influenced by clay as well as by water content. They have also shown that that the dielectric response of clay minerals is strongly frequency dependent, and that even a small proportion of clay such as that present in many sandstone aquifers can have a large effect at typi- cal GPR frequencies (around 100MHz). Hence accurate water content/porosity deter- mination requires clay type and content to be taken into account. Reported here are dielectric measurements on clay-sand mixtures, aimed at investigating the influence of clay mineralogy, particle shape, and the geometrical arrangement of the mixture constituents on GPR and TDR response. Dielectric permittivity (at 50-1000MHz) was measured for mixtures of Ottawa Sand and various clay minerals or clay size quartz rock flour, using a specially constructed dielectric cell. Both homogeneous and layered mixtures were tested. The influence of pore water salinity, clay type, and particle arrangement on the dielectric response is interpreted in terms of dielectric dispersion mechanisms. The appropriateness of var- ious dielectric mixing rules such as the Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) for determination of water content or porosity from field GPR and TDR data are dis- cussed.

  15. Electrical properties of the potassium polytitanate compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffman, V.G.; Gorokhovsky, A.V. [NanoTechProm Ltd., Saratov (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Saratov (Russian Federation); Kompan, M.M. [Physico-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tretyachenko, E.V.; Telegina, O.S.; Kovnev, A.V. [NanoTechProm Ltd., Saratov (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Saratov (Russian Federation); Fedorov, F.S., E-mail: fedorov_fs@daad-alumni.de [NanoTechProm Ltd., Saratov (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Quasi-static permittivity of potassium polytitanates compacts achieves 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5}. • Observed Maxwell–Wagner polarization attributes to layered structure of polytitanates. • The conductivity varies from 5 × 10{sup −2} to 10{sup −6}–10{sup −7} Sm/m in a wide range of temperatures. - Abstract: Titanates of alkali metals are widely applied materials as they are relatively low in cost and might be easily synthesized. They are utilized as adsorbents, catalysts, solid state electrolytes, superconductors. Here we report our results on electrical properties of the compacted amorphous potassium polytitanates powders. The electrical properties of the compacts were studied by means of complex impedance spectroscopy in a wide range of frequencies at different temperatures using two-electrode configuration. The frequency dependences of conductivity for the investigated potassium polytitanates compacts varies in the range from 5 × 10{sup −2} Sm/m (high frequencies, ion conductivity) up to 10{sup −6}–10{sup −7} Sm/m (low frequencies, electron conductivity) for a wide range of temperatures (19–150 °C). According to the results, at low frequencies quasi-static permittivity of the stabilized PPT compacts achieves high values of 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5}. This might be explained by Maxwell–Wagner polarization attributed to the layered structure of the potassium polytitanates particles containing potassium and hydronium ions together with crystallization water in the interlayer and is very promising for solid state electrolyte applications for moderate temperatures.

  16. Tracer diffusion in compacted, water-saturated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Compacted Na-bentonite clay barriers, widely used in the isolation of solid-waste landfills and other contaminated sites, have been proposed for a similar use in the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Molecular diffusion through the pore space in these barriers plays a key role in their performance, thus motivating recent measurements of the apparent diffusion coefficient tensor of water tracers in compacted, water-saturated Na-bentonites. In the present study, we introduce a conceptual model in which the pore space of water-saturated bentonite is divided into 'macropore' and 'interlayer nanopore' compartments. With this model we determine quantitatively the relative contributions of pore-network geometry (expressed as a geometric factor) and of the diffusive behavior of water molecules near montmorillonite basal surfaces(expressed as a contrastivity factor) to the apparent diffusion coefficient tensor. Our model predicts, in agreement with experiment, that the mean principal value of the apparent diffusion coefficient tensor follows a single relationship when plotted against the partial montmorillonite dry density (mass of montmorillonite per combined volume of montmorillonite and pore space). Using a single fitted parameter, the mean principal geometric factor, our model successfully describes this relationship for a broad range of bentonite-water system, from dilute gel to highly-compacted bentonite with 80 percent of its pore water in interlayer nanopores

  17. Jupiter's Great Red Spot: compactness condition and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ichi Yano

    Full Text Available Linear Rossby wave dispersion relationships suggest that Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS is a baroclinic structure embedded in a barotropic shearing zonal flow. Quasi-geostrophic (QG two-layer simulations support the theory, as long as an infinitely deep zonal flow is assumed. However, once a finite depth of the lower layer is assumed, a self-interaction of the baroclinic eddy component produces a barotropic radiating field, so that the GRS-like eddy can no longer remain compact. Compactness is recovered by explicitly introducing a deep dynamics of the interior for the lower layer, instead of the shallow QG formulation. An implication of the result is a strong coupling of the GRS to a convectively active interior.

  18. Exploration of ceramic clays in the countryside of Cordoba (Spain); Prospeccion de arcillas ceramicas en la campina de Cordoba (Espana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Sanchez, A.; Ayuso Munoz, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with some aspects of the mining prospection of clays in the South of Cordoba (Spain). That studied clays are used as raw materials in a processing plant of ceramic products. In this ground characterisation for future mining operations, low proportion of carbonated materials was searched. To carry out the study, three seek areas were defined, each one of them of about 4 Km{sup 2}, where two geophysical methods were applied (Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Vertical Electrical Sounding). X-ray diffraction, EDAX, direct cut, compaction, swelling and bearing capacity tests, among others, were carried out in samples picked up in each seek area. Using the information provided by all these tests the most interesting areas for the exploitation defined. These studies resulted in the selection of new interesting deposits for the clay industry. (Author)

  19. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  20. Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites and the Effective Clay Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nuo; Boyce, Mary C.; Parks, David M.; Manovitch, Oleg; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Lee, Hojun; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-03-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced mechanical properties at low weight fractions (Wp) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly dependent on particular features of the second-phase ¡°particles¡+/-; in particular, the particle volume fraction (fp), the particle aspect ratio (L/t), and the ratio of particle mechanical properties to those of the matrix. However, these important aspects of as-processed nanoclay composites have yet to be consistently and accurately defined. A multiscale modeling strategy was developed to account for the hierarchical morphology of the nanocomposite: at a lengthscale of thousands of microns, the structure is one of high aspect ratio particles within a matrix; at the lengthscale of microns, the clay particle structure is either (a) exfoliated clay sheets of nanometer level thickness or (b) stacks of parallel clay sheets separated from one another by interlayer galleries of nanometer level height. Here, quantitative structural parameters extracted from XRD patterns and TEM micrographs are used to determine geometric features of the as-processed clay ¡°particles¡+/-, including L/t and the ratio of fp to Wp. These geometric features, together with estimates of silicate lamina stiffness obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, provide a basis for modeling effective mechanical properties of the clay particle. The structure-based predictions of the macroscopic elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of clay weight fraction are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The adopted methodology offers promise for study of related properties in polymer/clay nanocomposites.

  1. Wave-induced ripple development in mixed clay-sand substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuxu; Parsons, Daniel; Baas, Jaco H.; Mouazé, Dominique; McLelland, Stuart; Amoudry, Laurent; Eggenhuisen, Jorris; Cartigny, Matthieu; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments that aim to provide a fuller understanding of ripple development within clay-sand mixture substrates under oscillatory flow conditions. The work was conducted in the Total Environment Simulator at the University of Hull and constituted 6 separate runs, in which 5 runs were conducted under identical sets of regular waves (an additional run was conducted under irregular waves, but is not discussed in present paper). The bed content was systematically varied in its composition ranging from a pure sand bed through to a bed comprising 7.4% clay. A series of state-of-the-art measurements were employed to quantify interactions of near-bed hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and turbulence over rippled beds formed by wave action, during and after, each run. The experimental results demonstrate the significant influence of the amount of cohesive clay materials in the substrate on ripple evolution under waves. Most importantly, addition of clay in the bed dramatically slowed down the rate of ripple development and evolution. The equilibrium time of each run increased exponentially from 30 minutes under the control conditions of a pure sand bed, rising to ~350 minutes for the bed with the highest fraction of clay. The paper discusses the slower ripple growth rates with higher cohesive fractions, via an influence on critical shear, but highlights that the end equilibrium size of ripples is found to be independent of increasing substrate clay fraction. The suspended particles mass (SPM) concentration indicates that clay particles were suspended and winnowed by wave action. Additionally, laser granulometry of the final substrates verified that ripple crests were composed of pure sand layers that were absent at ripple troughs, reflecting a relatively higher winnowing efficiency at wave ripples crest. The winnowing process and its efficiency is inexorably linked to wave ripple development and evolution. The implications of the results

  2. Clay intercalation and influence on crystallinity of EVA-based clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, D.S.; Prasad, R.; Gupta, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Various polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) were prepared from ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) with 9, 18 and 28% vinyl acetate (VA) content filled with different wt.% (2.5, 5 and 7.5) of a Montmorillonite-based organo-modified clay (Cloisite[reg] C15A and C30B). The PCNs were prepared using melt blending techniques. Morphological information regarding intercalation and exfoliation were determined by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). WAXS and TEM confirmed that increasing the VA content was necessary to achieve greater clay-polymer interaction as seen from the comparatively higher intercalation of clay platelets with 28% VA. The effect of addition of clay on the development and the modification of crystalline morphology in EVA matrix was also studied using WAXS and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). Results are presented showing that the addition of clay platelets does not increase the matrix crystallinity but the morphology was significantly modified such that there was an increase in the 'rigid' amorphous phase. Mechanical properties were also evaluated against the respective morphological information for each specimen and there are indications that the level of clay-polymer interaction plays a significant role in such morphological modification, and in such a way that affects the final PCN mechanical properties which has wide and significant applications in the packaging industries

  3. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  4. Chemical bath deposited rutile TiO{sub 2} compact layer toward efficient planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chao, E-mail: lc401997413@qq.com [State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-Carbon and Environmental Material (SCICDLCEM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wu, Zhenhua, E-mail: 80116243@qq.com [Henan Information Engineering School, Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Li, Pengwei, E-mail: pengweili001@126.com [State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-Carbon and Environmental Material (SCICDLCEM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Fan, Jiajie, E-mail: fanjiajie@zzu.edu.cn [State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-Carbon and Environmental Material (SCICDLCEM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang, Yiqiang, E-mail: yqzhang@zzu.edu.cn [State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-Carbon and Environmental Material (SCICDLCEM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Shao, Guosheng, E-mail: gsshao@zzu.edu.cn [State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-Carbon and Environmental Material (SCICDLCEM), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Rutile TiO{sub 2} thin film can be grown on FTO substrate below 100 °C. • 200 mM TiCl{sub 4} precursor solution results in the best PSC performance. • UV/O{sub 3} treatment can reduce the carrier recombination effectively. • Over 12% power conversion efficiency can be achieved for PSCs. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} is a best choice of electron transport layers in perovskite solar cells, due to its high electron mobility and stability. However, traditional TiO{sub 2} processing method requires rather high annealing temperature (>500 °C), preventing it from application to flexible devices. Here, we show that TiO{sub 2} thin films can be synthesized via chemical bath deposition below 100 °C. Typically, a compact layer of rutile TiO{sub 2} is deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated substrates, in an aqueous TiCl{sub 4} solution at 70 °C. Through the optimization of precursor concentration and ultraviolet-ozone surface modification, over 12% power conversion efficiency can be achieved for CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} based perovskite solar cells. These findings offer a potential low-temperature technical solution in using TiO{sub 2} thin film as an effective transport layer for flexible perovskite solar cells.

  5. Dynamic Strength and Accumulated Plastic Strain Development Laws and Models of the Remolded Red Clay under Long-Term Cyclic Loads: Laboratory Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic strength and accumulated plastic strain are two important parameters for evaluating the dynamic response of soil. As a special clay, the remolded red clay is often used as the high speed railway subgrade filling, but studies on its dynamic characteristics are few. For a thorough analysis of the suitability of the remolded red clay as the subgrade filling, a series of long-term cyclic load triaxial test under different load histories are carried out. Considering the influence of compactness, confining pressure, consolidation ratio, vibration frequency and dynamic load to the remolded red clay dynamic property, the tests obtain the development curves of the dynamic strength and accumulated plastic strain under different test conditions. Then, through curve fitting method, two different hyperbolic models respectively for the dynamic strength and accumulated plastic strain are built, which can match the test datum well. By applying the dynamic strength model, the critical dynamic strength of the remolded red clay are gained. Meanwhile, for providing basic datum and reference for relevant projects, all key parameters for the dynamic strength and accumulated plastic strain of the remolded red clay are given in the paper.

  6. SBR Brazilian organophilic/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Thiago R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, Francisco R.; Morales, Ana Rita; Paiva, Lucilene B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is the obtaining of SBR composites using a Brazilian raw bentonite and the same bentonite treated with an organic salt. The clays were characterized by XRD. The clay addition in the composites was 10 pcr. The composites were characterized by XRD and had measured theirs tension strength (TS). The composite with Brazilian treated clay showed TS 233% higher than a composite with no clay, 133% higher than a composite with Cloisite 30B organophilic clay and 17% lower than a composite with Cloisite 20 A organophilic clay. XRD and TS data evidence that the composite with Brazilian treated clay is an intercalated nanocomposite. (author)

  7. Geological evolution of clay sediments: the petroleum exploration vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, F.

    2004-01-01

    The radioactive waste isolation capacity assessment for a clay sediment host rock is link: (1) to the understanding of their present state properties and 3-D repartition (from basin evolution, including sedimentary and diagenetic process); and (2) to the prediction of their future evolution during the next million years. For petroleum exploration, basin modelling aims at reconstructing the accumulation of hydrocarbons at basin scale, and at geological timescale, taking into account the effects of kinematics displacements, sedimentation, erosion, compaction, temperatures history, overpressures and fluids flows (water and hydrocarbons). Furthermore, explorationists wish to address overpressure reconstruction in order to estimate the risks of drilling. Clay sediments are of interest for petroleum exploration because source rocks and seal are generally composed of them. Nevertheless, in spite of their occurrence in nature their evolution at geological timescale is not well understood. And, most of the knowledge has been achieved by those working in the realms of soils mechanics and civil engineering until the present geological investigations for long term radioactive waste repositories. Application of this knowledge to clay sediment is considered to be valid within the first hundreds of meters at the top of the sedimentary pile, according to a repository depth. This paper is dedicated to the sedimentary rocks behaviour at geological timescale. This behaviour is characterised by: (1) the deposition of the sediment; (2) the loading path at geological timescale; (3) the constitutive law which includes the consolidation process and the rupture criteria; and (4) the parameters evolution related to consolidation. (author)

  8. Is montmorillonite-rich clay of MX-80 type the ideal buffer for isolation of HLW?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1999-12-01

    Four commercial clays, saponite, mixed-layer smectite-mica, kaolinite, and palygorskite, have been examined as possible alternatives to MX-80 buffer. General estimates based on the microstructural constitution and hydration potential as well as actual laboratory testing show that except for normally graded kaolinite, they would all serve acceptably in a repository. MX-80 is, however, superior with respect to hydraulic conductivity and retardation of diffusive transport of relevant cations and, like saponite and palygorskite, it has a high swelling pressure, that may in fact be too high. The mixed-layer clay is less but sufficiently expandable and is concluded to have better thermal and rheological properties as well as gas release capacity. It is hence the number one competitor to MX-80

  9. Is montmorillonite-rich clay of MX-80 type the ideal buffer for isolation of HLW?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    Four commercial clays, saponite, mixed-layer smectite-mica, kaolinite, and palygorskite, have been examined as possible alternatives to MX-80 buffer. General estimates based on the microstructural constitution and hydration potential as well as actual laboratory testing show that except for normally graded kaolinite, they would all serve acceptably in a repository. MX-80 is, however, superior with respect to hydraulic conductivity and retardation of diffusive transport of relevant cations and, like saponite and palygorskite, it has a high swelling pressure, that may in fact be too high. The mixed-layer clay is less but sufficiently expandable and is concluded to have better thermal and rheological properties as well as gas release capacity. It is hence the number one competitor to MX-80.

  10. Compaction of bentonite blocks. Development of technique for industrial production of blocks which are manageable by man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, L E; Boergesson, L; Sanden, T [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-04-01

    In this report a useful technique for producing compacted blocks of bentonite is described. The report only deals with the technique to produce uniaxially compacted blocks (weight of the blocks: 10-15 kg) which are manageable by man. Tests for producing blocks with a weight of approximately 10 kg were carried out at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB in Bjuf. This industry is normally producing refractory bricks and other refractory products. The plant has facilities for handling large volumes of clay. Furthermore there are machines suitable for producing uniaxially compacted blocks. Performed tests at the plant show that it is possible to compact blocks with good quality. Best quality was reached with a coarsely ground bentonite at a water ratio of 20 %. The compaction was performed with lubricated form and stepwise loading. The tests at Hoeganaes Bjuf AB were preceded by tests in the laboratory. In these tests smaller samples were compacted for studying how different factors affect the quality of the samples (density, water ratio, homogeneity et cetera). The influence of following factors was studied: water ratio of bentonite; bentonite type and granulometry; compaction pressure; compaction rate; form geometry; form lubrication; form heating. The results from these tests were used to modify and optimize the technique in the factory.

  11. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Layered materials play an important role in nuclear waste management and environmental cleanup. Better understanding of radionuclide interactions with those materials is critical for engineering high-performance materials for various applications. This presentation will provide an overview on radionuclide interactions with two general categories of layered materials - cationic clays and anionic clays - from a perspective of nanopore confinement. Nanopores are widely present in layered materials, either as the interlayers or as inter-particle space. Nanopore confinement can significantly modify chemical reactions in those materials. This effect may cause the preferential enrichment of radionuclides in nanopores and therefore directly impact the mobility of the radionuclides. This effect also implies that conventional sorption measurements using disaggregated samples may not represent chemical conditions in actual systems. The control of material structures on ion exchange, surface complexation, and diffusion in layered materials will be systematically examined, and the related modeling approaches will be discussed. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, which is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the DOE under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  12. Compacted dimensions and singular plasmonic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendry, J. B.; Huidobro, Paloma Arroyo; Luo, Yu; Galiffi, Emanuele

    2017-11-01

    In advanced field theories, there can be more than four dimensions to space, the excess dimensions described as compacted and unobservable on everyday length scales. We report a simple model, unconnected to field theory, for a compacted dimension realized in a metallic metasurface periodically structured in the form of a grating comprising a series of singularities. An extra dimension of the grating is hidden, and the surface plasmon excitations, though localized at the surface, are characterized by three wave vectors rather than the two of typical two-dimensional metal grating. We propose an experimental realization in a doped graphene layer.

  13. Clay-mineral assemblages from some levels of K-118 drill core of Maha Sarakham evaporites, northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanich, Parkorn

    Clay-mineral assemblages in Middle Clastic, Middle Salt, Lower Clastic, Potash Zone, and Lower Salt, totalling 13 samples from K-118 drill core, in the Maha Sarakham Formation, Khorat Basin, northeastern Thailand were studied. The clay-size particles were separated from the water-soluble salt by water leaching. Then the samples were leached again in the EDTA solution and separated into clay-size particles by using the timing sedimentation. The EDTA-clay residues were divided and analyzed by using the XRD and XRF method. The XRD peaks show that the major-clay minerals are chlorite, illite, and mixed-layer corrensite including traces of rectorite? and paragonite? The other clay-size particles are quartz and potassium feldspar. The XRF results indicate Mg-rich values and moderate MgAl atom ratio values in those clay minerals. The variable Fe, Na, and K contents in the clay-mineral assemblages can explain the environment of deposition compared to the positions of the samples from the core. Hypothetically, mineralogy and the chemistry of the residual assemblages strongly indicate that severe alteration and Mg-enrichment of normal clay detritus occurred in the evaporite environment through brine-sediment interaction. The various Mg-enrichment varies along the various members reflecting whether sedimentation is near or far from the hypersaline brine.

  14. Orientation and the extent of exfoliation of clay on scratch damage in polyamide 6 nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, Aravind; Yu Zhongzhen; Mai Yiuwing; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2008-01-01

    The major objectives of this work are to understand the effects of organoclay, its extent of exfoliation and orientation, and indenter geometry on the scratch characteristics of polyamide 6/organoclay nanocomposites. Two different organically treated clays are used for this purpose and their structural parameters in a polyamide 6 matrix quantified. It is shown that, while the material properties are important for scratching resistance, they are not the only determinants of the scratch performance of materials. Further, despite proving beneficial to scratch resistance, in terms of residual depth, the presence (and exfoliation) of organoclay promotes the formation of brittle cracks during scratching. But with no organoclay layers, plastic flow controls the scratch damage in neat polyamide 6 with large residual depths. Factors such as orientation of clay layers and variations of indenter tip geometry also exert dominant effects on scratch penetration resistance and damage. Additionally, significant plastic flow and rotation of organoclay layers from the original configuration are observed underneath the sliding indenter

  15. Characterization of natural and modified clay for development of polymers nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarek, Flavia; Reis, Dayane M.; Kloss, Juliana R.; Mauler, Raquel S.; Barbosa, Ronilson V.

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite is a technologic terminology applied to clays of very thin granulation basically composed by mineral of the esmectites group where the montmorilonite is the most common, meaning that it is a filossilicate with layers as thick as 1 nm. Because it is polar, the clay is not compatible with most of polymers that are less polars or apolars, reason why it has to be modified to improve compatibility between the inorganic (polar) and the organic phase (apolar). Aiming to show the potential for the development of nanocomposites, the purpose of this work was to verify the chemical and physical characteristics of the various bentonites by comparing the technical files and performing the water Foster swelling and change chemically the samples, evaluating them by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The different analyzed samples of bentonite showed an effective intercalation of the modifying agent on the surface of the structure. This evidence will allow the use of this material in the clay-polymer nanocomposites synthesis. (author)

  16. The Capacity for Compaction Weakening in Fault Gouge in Nature and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, D.; Boulton, C. J.; Sanchez Roa, C.; Den Hartog, S. A. M.; Bedford, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    As faults form in low permeability rocks, the compaction of fault gouge can lead to significant pore-fluid pressure increases. The pore pressure increase results from the collapse of the porosity through shear-enhanced compaction and the low hydraulic diffusivity of the gouge that inhibits fluid flow. In experiments, the frictional properties of clay-bearing fault gouges are significantly affected by the development of locally high pore-fluid pressures when compaction rates are high due to fast displacement rates or slip in underconsolidated materials. We show how the coefficient of friction of fault gouges sheared at different slip velocities can be explained with a numerical model that is constrained by laboratory measurements of contemporaneous changes in permeability and porosity. In nature, for compaction weakening to play an important role in earthquake nucleation (and rupture propagation), a mechanism is required to reset the porosity, i.e., maintain underconsolidated gouge along the fault plane. We use the observations of structures within the principal slip zone of the Alpine Fault in New Zealand to suggest that cyclic fluidization of the gouge occurs during coseismic slip, thereby resetting the gouge porosity prior to the next seismic event. Results from confined laboratory rotary shear measurements at elevated slip rates appear to support the hypothesis that fluidization leads to underconsolidation and, thus, to potential weakening by shear-enhanced compaction-induced pore-fluid pressurization.

  17. Final construction quality assurance report for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V, Area 2, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessom, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) has finished construction of Area 2 of the Y-12 Plant Industrial Landfill (ILF-V), classified as a Class 2 Landfill. This final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report provides documentation that Area 2 was constructed in substantial compliance with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved design, as indicated and specified in the permit drawings, approved changes, and specifications. This report applies specifically to the Area 2 excavation, compacted clay soil liner, geomembrane liner, granular leachate collection layer, protective soil cover, and the leachate collection system. An ''As-Built'' survey was performed and is included. The drawings provide horizontal and vertical information for Area 2, the anchor trench, the leachate collection pipe, the temporary access road, and cross-sections of Area 2. This report provides documentation of the following items: the excavation activities of Area 2; the maximum recompacted coefficient of hydraulic conductivity or permeability of the soil is less than 1 x 10 -7 centimeters per second (cm/sec); the total thickness of the compacted clay soil liner equals a minimum of 2 feet; a 40 mil impermeable geomembrane (polypropylene) flexible membrane liner (FML) and 16 oz. geotextile fabric was placed in direct contact with the compacted clay soil liner; a 12 inch granular leachate collection layer was installed and covered with a 8 oz. geotextile separation fabric; the installation of the leachate collection piping; and the two foot protective clay soil cover

  18. Stabilisation of Clay Soil with Lime and Melon Husk Ash for use in Farm Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Mohammed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The rising cost of traditional stabilising agents and the need for economical utilisation of industrial and agricultural waste for beneficial engineering purposes has encouraged an investigation into the stabilization of clay soil with lime and melon husk ash. The chemical composition of the melon husk ash that was used in stabilising clay soil was determined. The clay soil was divided into two parts, one part was used to determine the index properties while the other part was treated at British Standard Light (BSL compaction energy with 0 %, 2 %, 4 %, 6 % and 8 % melon husk ash by dry weight of the soil and each was admixed with 2 %, 4 %, 6 % and 8 % lime. The stabilised clay soil was cured for 7, 14 and 28 days before the unconfined compressive strength were determined while the coefficients of permeability of the stabilised clay soil were also determined at 28 days of curing. The data obtained from the experiment was subjected to analysis of variance to examine the significance at 5% level. Results showed that the natural clay soil belong to A-7-6 or CH (clay of high plasticity in the American Association of State Highway Transportation Official (AASHTO and Unified Soil Classification System (1986. The chemical composition of the ash had aluminum oxide, iron oxide and silicon dioxide values of 18.5%, 2.82% and 51.24% respectively. The unconfined compressive strength and coefficient of permeability of the natural clay soil was determined to be 285 kN/m2 and 1.45 x 10-5 cm/s, respectively. Increase in melon husk ash and lime percent increases the unconfined compressive strength (UCS of the stabilised clay soil significantly (p < 0.05 and decrease the coefficient of permeability when compared with the natural clay soil. The peak values of unconfined compressive strength for 7, 14 and 28 days of curing are 1200 kN/m2, 1598 kN/m2 and 1695 kN/m2 respectively at 6% MHA and 8% lime content while the lowest value for coefficient of permeability was 0

  19. A new and improved methodology for qualitative and quantitative mineralogical analysis of Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeelmaekers, E.; Vandenberghe, N.; Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Derkowski, A.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A good knowledge of the mineralogy of any host formation studied for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, is a prerequisite for understanding the geochemical environment which will determine the migration and retention behaviour of radionuclides. In this respect, the Boom Clay mineralogical composition has been extensively studied last decades as reference host formation (e.g. ARCHIMEDEARGILE project, OECD-NEA clay catalogue report) with the aim to provide reliable data for a safety assessment. However, a comparison of the available literature data clearly showed a serious discrepancy among studies, not only in the quantitative, but also in the qualitative mineralogical composition of the Boom Clay (SAFIR II). The reason for such a huge disagreement could be related, among others, to variable grain size distributions of the studied samples (sample heterogeneity) and differences in the methodological approaches. In particular, the unambiguous characterisation of clay minerals and the quantification of mixed-layer phases appeared as an everlasting problem. This study is aimed at achieving a consensus on the qualitative and quantitative mineralogical data of the Boom Clay using the most advanced techniques currently available in the clay science. A new sampling campaign was performed in such a way that samples are (20 in total) more or less regularly distributed over Boom Clay Formation, ensuring that variations in the grain size distributions due to silty clay-clayey silt layers alternations are accounted for. The novel concept based on an analysis at two levels was applied: (1) bulk rock and (2) clay fraction analysis. (1) A bulk rock analysis consists of conventional XRD analysis with the identification of the principal mineral phases. As a next step, the bulk rock was mixed with a ZnO internal standard and experimental diffraction patterns of randomly oriented powders were analyzed using &apos

  20. Clarification of olive mill and winery wastewater by means of clay-polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytwo, Giora; Lavi, Roy; Rytwo, Yuval; Monchase, Hila; Dultz, Stefan; König, Tom N

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted effluents from olive mills and wineries, among others, are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants due to the large amounts of organic and suspended matter. Efficiency of all management practices for such effluents depends on an effective pretreatment that lowers the amount of suspended solids. Such pretreatments are usually based on three separate stages, taking a total of 2 to 6h: coagulation-neutralizing the colloids, flocculation-aggregating the colloids into larger particles, and separation via filtration or decanting. Previous studies have presented the concept of coagoflocculation based on the use of clay-polymer nanocomposites. This process adds a higher density clay particle to the flocs, accelerating the process to between 15 and 60 min. This study examined suitable nanocomposites based on different clays and polymers. The charge of the compounds increased proportionally to the polymer-to-clay ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that in sepiolite-based nanocomposites there is no change in the structure of the mineral, whereas in smectite-based nanocomposites, the polymer intercalates between the clay layers and increases the spacing depending on the polymer-to-clay ratio. Efficiency of the coagoflocculation process was studied with a dispersion analyzer. Sequential addition of olive mill or winery effluents with a boosting dose of nanocomposites may yield a very efficient and rapid clarification pretreatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of mesopores and characterization of clays of the State of Puebla, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, M.A.; Velasco, J.A.; Rojas, F.; Lara, V.H.; Salgado, M.A.; Tamariz, V.

    2003-01-01

    The crystalline properties of natural clays are related to the different crystallographic phases that are present in the structure of these substrates. Clays from the zone of Tehuacan, in the state of Puebla, Mexico, have been studied by means of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Absorption (AA), and N 2 Adsorption at 76 K. XRD analysis indicates the presence in the clay adsorbents of montmorillonite, quartz and, in some cases, of calcium carbonate. The textural properties of these porous materials of natural origin have been evaluated through the BET equation, the Langmuir equation, the single point BET method and the Gurvitsch Rule. The meso porosity that is present in each substrate has been measured via the methods of Kelvin, Barret, Jovner, and Halenda (BJH), and Kruk, Jaroniec, and Sayari as well as by the so-called differential curves of t-plots. The N 2 adsorption isotherms at 76 K that were measured on our clay adsorbents indicate that the adsorption process is carried out through a multilayer formation mechanism. The sorption hysteresis loops confirm characteristic aspects of this type of clay materials. Plots of the adsorbed volume versus the statistical thickness (t-plots) of N 2 layers adsorbed on the clay surface were also evaluated. The latter curves comprise three zones of behavior; each zone representing a different filling mechanism of the pore space. (Author)

  2. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  3. Clay nanoparticles for regenerative medicine and biomaterial design: A review of clay bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Mohamed; Evans, Nicholas D; Oreffo, Richard O C; Dawson, Jonathan I

    2018-03-01

    Clay nanoparticles, composites and hydrogels are emerging as a new class of biomaterial with exciting potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Clay particles have been extensively explored in polymeric nanocomposites for self-assembly and enhanced mechanical properties as well as for their potential as drug delivery modifiers. In recent years, a cluster of studies have explored cellular interactions with clay nanoparticles alone or in combination with polymeric matrices. These pioneering studies have suggested new and unforeseen utility for certain clays as bioactive additives able to enhance cellular functions including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation, most notably for osteogenesis. This review examines the recent literature describing the potential effects of clay-based nanomaterials on cell function and examines the potential role of key clay physicochemical properties in influencing such interactions and their exciting possibilities for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In situ determination of anisotropic permeability of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.; Soennke, J.; Morel, J.; Krug, S.

    2011-01-01

    Argillaceous formations are being considered as potential host rocks for repositories of radioactive waste in many countries. For this purpose, the thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical properties of the clay stone are being widely investigated in the laboratories and in situ. However, clay stone behaves, due to its tectonic evolution of the formation, hydraulically and mechanically transversal isotropic. Argillite bedding or layering structure has been observed in the underground laboratories Mont Terri in the Switzerland and Meuse/Haute-Marne at Bure site in France. Conventional packer systems used for the borehole hydraulic characterisation cannot distinguish the difference between the properties parallel and perpendicular to the bedding. For this purpose, a new 'slot packer' system has been developed by the BGR. This type of new packer system is intensively tested in the BGR laboratory and the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory to judge the feasibility. The anisotropic ratio of the Opalinus clay defined by permeability value parallel to the bedding/permeability value perpendicular to the bedding is evaluated up to eight times to one order of magnitude within the HG-B experiment in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Within the cooperation between BGR and ANDRA, the 'slot packer' will be used for the measurement of anisotropic permeability of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation at the Bure site. (authors)

  5. Synthesis of Highly Reactive Subnano-sized Zero-valent Iron using Smectite Clay Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhang; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J.; Boyd, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH4, resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of discrete regions of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of ~ 5 Å. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the XRD results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 Å. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene:non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnano-scale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, e.g. as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments. PMID:20446730

  6. Synthesis of highly reactive subnano-sized zero-valent iron using smectite clay templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH(4), resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of approximately 5 A. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 A. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene/non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnanoscale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, for example, as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments.

  7. Removal of nitrogen by a layered soil infiltration system during intermittent storm events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kang Woo; Song, Kyung Guen; Cho, Jin Woo; Kim, Tae Gyun; Ahn, Kyu Hong

    2009-07-01

    The fates of various nitrogen species were investigated in a layered biological infiltration system under an intermittently wetting regime. The layered system consisted of a mulch layer, coarse soil layer (CSL), and fine soil layer (FSL). The effects of soil texture were assessed focusing on the infiltration rate and the removal of inorganic nitrogen species. The infiltration rate drastically decreased when the uniformity coefficient was larger than four. The ammonium in the synthetic runoff was shown to be removed via adsorption during the stormwater dosing and nitrification during subsequent dry days. Stable ammonium adsorption was observed when the silt and clay content of CSL was greater than 3%. This study revealed that the nitrate leaching was caused by nitrification during dry days. Various patterns of nitrate flushing were observed depending on the soil configuration. The washout of nitrate was more severe as the silt/clay content of the CSL was greater. However, proper layering of soil proved to enhance the nitrate removal. Consequently, a strictly sandy CSL over FSL with a silt and clay content of 10% was the best configuration for the removal of ammonium and nitrate.

  8. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    This research studies Latvia originated Devon (Tūja, Skaņkalne), quaternary (Ceplīši), Jurassic, (Strēļi) and Triassic (Vadakste) deposit clays as well as Lithuania originated Triassic (Akmene) deposit clays. Thixotropic properties of clay were researched by measuring relative viscosity of clay in water suspensions. Relative viscosity is measured with a hopper method. It was detected that, when concentration of suspension is increased, clay suspension’s viscosity also increases. It happens un...

  9. Near Field sorption Data Bases for Compacted MX-80 Bentonite for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    Bentonites of various types and compacted forms are being investigated in many countries as backfill materials in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. Nagra is currently considering an Opalinus clay (OPA) formation in the Zuercher Weinland as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. A compacted MX-80 bentonite is foreseen as a potential backfill material. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and one of the requirements for such an assessment are sorption data bases (SDB) for the bentonite near-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop the SDB. One of the pre-requisites for developing a SDB is a water chemistry for the compacted bentonite porewater. For a number of reasons mentioned in the report, and discussed in more detail elsewhere, this is not a straightforward task. There are considerable uncertainties associated with the major ion concentrations and in particular with the system pH and Eh. The MX-80 SDB was developed for a reference bentonite porewater (pH = 7.25) which was calculated using the reference OPA porewater. In addition, two further SDBs are presented for porewaters calculated at pH values of 6.9 and 7.9 corresponding to lower and upper bound values calculated for the range of groundwater compositions anticipated for the OPA host rock. 'In house' sorption isotherm data were measured for Cs(I), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV), Se(IV) and 1(-1) on the 'as received' MX-80 material equilibrated with a simulated porewater composition. Complementary 'in house' sorption edge and isotherm measurements on conditioned Na/Ca montmorillonites were also available for many of these radionuclides. These data formed the core of the SDB. Nevertheless, some of the required sorption data still had to be obtained from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing selection procedures and the modifications

  10. Planning the asphalt construction process : Towards more consistent paving and compaction operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbeider, C.G.; Miller, Seirgei Rosario; Doree, Andre; Oosterveld, M.

    2017-01-01

    This research addresses the challenge of linking paving and compaction given that they are mostly treated as detached activities, leading to a decrease in the quality of the compacted asphalt layer. The objective was to develop a support tool that can assist decision-making related to equipment

  11. Study of Dronino Iron Meteorite Weathering in Clay Sand Using Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy A. Yakovlev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Weathering products of two fragments of Dronino iron ungrouped meteorite found in the wet and drier clay sand were studied using X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The products of metal oxidation in the internal and external surface layers were different for both fragments. The weathering products in fragment found in the wet clay sand contain magnetite (Fe3O4, maghemite (γ-Fe2O3, goethite (α-FeOOH and probably ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3∙9H2O while those in fragment found in drier clay sand contained ferric hydrous oxides (FeOOH and siderite (FeCO3 mainly. Concretions found near the first fragment contain ferric hydrous oxides (FeOOH mainly. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  12. Clay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurelia; Lamair, Laura; Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing relationships between the flow characteristics and their deposits. In particular, flume experiments emphasize that the presence of clay plays a key role in turbidity current dynamics. Clay fraction, in small amount, provides cohesive strength to sediment mixtures and can damp turbulence. However, the degree of flocculation is dependent on factors such as the amount and size of clay particles, the surface of clay particles, chemistry and pH conditions in which the clay particles are dispersed. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in stacked thin beds. Depositional processes and sources have been previously studied and three types were deciphered, including laminar flows dominated by cohesion, transitional, and turbulence flow regimes (Hage et al., in revision). For the purpose of determine the clay behavior in the three flow regimes, clay mineralogical, geochemical measurements on the cores allow characterising the turbidites. SEM observations provide further information regarding the morphology of clay minerals and other clasts. The study is particularly relevant given the highly alkaline and saline water of the Hazar Lake. Clay minerals in Hazar Lake sediments include kaolinite (1:1-type), illite and chlorite (2:1-type). Hazar lake water is alkaline having pH around 9.3, in such alkaline environment, a cation-exchange reaction takes place. Furthermore, in saline water (16‰), salts can act as a shield and decrease the repulsive forces between clay particle surfaces. So, pH and salt content jointly impact the behaviour of clays differently. Since the Al-faces of clay structures have a negative charge in basic solutions. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negative-charged, and then kaolinite

  13. Water uptake, migration and swelling characteristics of unsaturated and saturated, highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1980-09-01

    The report presents the results of a number of laboratory tests and field observations to form the basis of a physical and mathematical model that can be used for predicting water uptake and swelling in highly compacted bentonite components of an actual deposition plant. The clay buffer masses have been suggested as barriers in the Swedish KBS concepts. Two commercially available bentonites were used for the production of samples. The rate of water uptake suggests a mathematical model based on a simple diffusion equation. The rate is determined by the access of water and thousands of years may pass before saturation is obtained. The rate of swelling is governed by the negative pore pressure and the permeability. There is reasonable agreement with field observations. The observed swelling potential of old smectite-rich clays has offered the evidence. (G.B.)

  14. Compaction of an inceptisol caused by forest extraction with Skidder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pezzoni Filho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The compaction due to machinery traffic causes damage to the soil that can interfere with the development of the root system of plants, resulting in decreased crop yields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the Inceptisol compaction caused by Skidder traffic in extraction of Pinus elliottii var. elliottii in secondary extension logging in tire tracks and stems, varying the frequency of tractor traffic. The tire tracks and stems were in the same line of traffic passage earlier, each located in their respective tracks. The study area was located in the municipality of Capão Bonito-SP, in cultivation of Pinus elliottii var. elliottii and samples were obtained from an area without traffic (control and applications with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Skidder passes in two layers, 0.00 to 0.05 and 0.10 - 0.15 m depth. The results showed that there was additional compaction by each passage of the Skidder, being higher in the layer of 0.00 to 0.05 m depth. Soil compaction was more pronounced under lower water content in the soil, being contrary to the expected.

  15. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, A; Grobet, P; Keung, M; Leeman, H; Schoonheydt, R; Toufar, H [eds.

    1995-08-20

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY `95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately.

  16. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, A.; Grobet, P.; Keung, M.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.; Toufar, H.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  17. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyouri N.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO32, Cu(NO32, Zn(NO32,. In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Microbiologically mediated processes in a repository sited in a clay host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwyn, B.; Leupin, O. X.; Bagnoud, A.; Bernier-Latmani, R.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because of their favourable retention properties for radionuclides, clay-rich sediments are being considered in Switzerland as host rocks for the geological disposal of high, intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste. Compacted bentonite is foreseen as backfill material in the high level waste repository whereas for intermediate- and low-level waste the near field will mainly consist of cementitious material. The evolution of both types of repositories, which includes re-saturation, heat generation (only high level waste), near field degradation, gas production and radionuclide release may be impacted by microbial activity and vice versa. In this respect questions arise such as: - Are microorganisms present in a repository and its host rock? - Under which condition are microorganisms active in and around a repository? - In which processes are microorganisms involved? Various in situ experiments in a wide range of geological environments have evidenced the presence of microorganisms. Whether the microorganisms found in these in situ experiments are indigenous or introduced by drilling or/and excavation activities is still controversial. However, recent findings suggest the presence of indigenous microorganisms in Opalinus Clay. To conclusively answer the question about the origin of microorganisms, an international investigation programme has been launched to probe rock samples from the Underground Rock Laboratory at Mont Terri. So far, no metabolic activity has been observed in undisturbed clay rocks. Such activity may have ceased during diagenetic compaction of the sediment as suggested by the pore water composition measured in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation of Bure (France). For the safety case of a repository the origin of microorganisms is of minor importance compared to the understanding of the conditions under which they might be metabolically active. Pore size distribution and connectivity can

  19. Cesium diffusion in Bure mud-rock: effect of cesium sorption and of the surface structure of the clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkior, T.; Motellier, S.; Yahiaoui, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This work is devoted to cesium diffusion through mud-rock samples from Bure (Meuse/Haute- Marne, France). This rock is mainly composed of interstratified illite/smectite, quartz and calcite. According to published data, positively charged solutes exhibit high diffusion coefficients in argillaceous media compared to neutral species. This effect was actually observed for cesium in Bure mud-rock samples: the effective diffusion coefficients (De) of tritiated water and cesium were found to be ca. 2 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 and 2.5 x 10 -10 m 2 s -1 , respectively. Some authors assign this 'enhanced diffusion' of cations to the particular migration of ions within the electrical double layer, next to mineral surfaces (surface diffusion mechanism). To assess the role of sorbed ions in the diffusive transfer, cesium diffusion coefficients in Bure mud-rock were measured at different cesium concentrations. The distribution coefficient of cesium onto Bure mud-rock was measured in batch: it significantly varies over the concentration range investigated in the diffusion tests (between 2 x 10 -6 M and 2 x 10 -2 M). If sorbed ions contribute to the transfer, the effective diffusion coefficients deduced from these different tests should depend on cesium concentration. Nevertheless, the measured effective diffusion coefficients are found to be relatively unaffected by cesium concentration. It is thus concluded that ions at the sorbed state play a minor role in the diffusion. Following the assumption of an 'accelerated' transfer due to ions located in the diffuse double layer, the charge of the clay particles should affect the 'enhanced diffusion' of cesium. Therefore, a mud-rock sample was first crushed and contacted with a cationic surfactant at different solid/liquid ratios. The conditions were adjusted to obtain suspensions having positive, neutral and negative zeta potentials respectively. Three compact samples were then made with these different

  20. Fabric and Geotechnical behavior of the volcanic clays of Xalapa, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, O.

    2009-01-01

    The City of Xalapa is nailed in the Eastern part of the Axis Mexican Neovolcanico and is laid the foundations, in its majority, clays of volcanic origin of the Quaternary. These ashes have a peculiar behavior when the micro climate around them varies, as shown in previous slides of the slope and embankments. On the other hand, these clays problems for their identification, as these soils are rich in halloysite and to a lesser extent by allophones. To understand the microstructure in natural state of the clay one studies the characteristics physical-chemistries of his components by the method of ionic chromatography and the chemical isolated particle composition is analysed with an transmission electron microscope (TEM) with a connected detector of dispersion of X-ray energy. On the other hand, the mineralogical composition is obtained from X-ray diffractometer of dust in argillaceous fraction. The morphology of particles is identified by means of the TEM. Limits liquid associated with the specific surface of particles, this last one determined by adsorption of N 2 . The fabric of the clay in natural and artificial state (with different methods from compaction) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is compared. In accordance with the above-mentioned, it is studied the levels of the fabric, the morphology of the pores and the type of connections of the particles. In order to verify the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of the soil depend on the fabric of this artificial and natural samples prepared and geotechnical behavior is characterized to observe its answer and to compare it. Also it is observed as it influences the fabric in the deformation of this one under constant suction. The residual strength is investigated carefully and it is compared with that of the peak. (Author) 35 refs

  1. Shear creep characteristics of weak carbonaceous shale in thick ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    26

    alternating layers of soft and hard rock, which controls the stability of massive ... microstructure changed from compact to loose, and the clay mineral content .... applicable to analysis of the creep of rock and soil. Xiao et al. (1987) carried out ...

  2. Report of a study on the characteristics of the 'Clay of Boom' that are relevant in considering this clay layer package for the storage of nuclear waste; Rapportage van onderzoek aan eigenschappen van de Klei van Boom die relevant zijn bij de beschouwing van dit laagpakket voor opslag van kernafval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugge, J.V.M.; Vrouwe, B.J. [T and A Survey, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    The Dutch government aims to store nuclear waste in the Dutch soil. Geological research organization T and A Survey mapped the areas that match with the demands of the Dutch government regarding underground storage of nuclear waste. These are areas in which the Clay layer of Boom has a minimal thickness of 100 meters and the depth of the top of the clay formation is at least 500 meters. [Dutch] De Nederlandse overheid wil kernafval ondergronds opslaan in de Nederlandse bodem. Geologisch onderzoeksbureau T and A Survey brengt de gebieden in kaart, die voldoen aan de door de overheid gestelde eisen voor mogelijke ondergrondse opslag van kernafval. Het gaat om gebieden waar de Boomse kleilaag een minimale dikte van 100 meter heeft en de diepte van de top van de kleiformatie minimaal 500 meter bedraagt.

  3. Evaluation of phenomena affecting diffusion of cations in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1995-04-01

    In a number of diffusion studies, contradictions between the apparent diffusivities of cations and their distribution coefficients in bentonite have been found. Two principal reasons have been offered as explanations for this discrepancy; diffusion of the sorbed cations, often called surface diffusion, and the decrease of sorption in compacted clay compared to a sorption value obtained from a batch experiment. In the study the information available from the literature on sorption-diffusion mechanisms of cations in bentonite has been compiled and re-interpreted in order to improve the understanding of the diffusion process. (103 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.)

  4. Modelling the evolution of compacted bentonite clays in engineered barrier systems: process model development of the bentonite-water-air system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.E.; Wilson, J.C.; Maul, P.R.; Robinson, P.C.; Savage, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An adequate understanding of the short- and long-term evolution of compacted bentonite clays in engineered barrier systems (EBS) for radioactive waste based on the KBS-3 disposal concept is an essential requirement for demonstrating the safe performance of the system. Uncertainties in the way that the re-saturation process occurs are intrinsically tied to the thermal and mechanical evolution of the bentonite buffer and its interaction with the disposal canister and host-rock. Furthermore, the evolution of bentonite in the presence of changing ambient saturation states, groundwater chemistry and stress states could cause the bentonite re-saturation and long-term stability (including the so-called 'buffer erosion scenario') to deviate from the behaviour required by the safety case; this has emphasised the need to consider adequately coupled thermal (T), hydraulic(H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. Historically, there have been fundamental differences in the representation of porosity and water disposition between geochemical modelling and coupled THM modelling studies. In this paper, a model for the porosity and water disposition in bentonite is presented that is more detailed than models used to date in most THM modelling studies under variably saturated conditions. The new model moves away from the conventional THM soils approach which treats bentonite as an elasto-plastic porous medium with water or air occupying a notional porosity with the inclusion of additional process models to take into account the very high observed water suctions, intrinsic permeability variation and macroscopic swelling of partially saturated compacted bentonite. It replaces the empirical parameterisation usually employed in THM models with a direct representation of the water disposition, pore structure and relevant processes, albeit at an abstracted level. The new model differentiates between water which can be

  5. Analysis of a intra-Carixian clay horizon into carbonate platform of the Ouarsenis (Algeria): composition, dynamic and paleo-climatic implication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamou, M.; Salhi, A. [Oran Univ., Faculte des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Amenagement du Territoire, Dpt. de Geologie (Algeria)

    2005-07-01

    During the Late Sinemurian a carbonate platform has developed on the Ouarsenis area (external Tell o f the Algerian Alpine belt) with setting deposits of the Kef Sidi Amar Carbonate Formation. A first maximum flooding materialized by a brachiopods (Zeilleriids) layer, is occurring during the Late Carixian. The Late Carixian deepening has been followed by a sea-level fall documented by several meters incisions filled by transgressive breccia and conglomerates. After this episode, this material was sealed by a pedogenic bed (0,05 to 0,20 m) which corresponds to a yellow clay deposit containing well rounded particles interpreted as pedo-genetic globules. These corpuscles are composed of reddish and hardened clay, corroded quartz grains, rhombic and zoned dolomite crystals and ankerite, monocrystalline and xeno-morphous detrital quartz grains (1-2 mm). The observed characteristics allow to recognize a typical calcrete. They are the result of pedo-genetic diagenesis developed inside the phreatic water-table near the surface: this is an alteration profile. The mineralogic fraction has been analyzed by X-Ray which show results of association clay mineral as a predominance of illite (85%) and mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite (I-M, 10%) associated with a low ration of chlorite (5%) and kaolinite trace (1%). This mineralogic clay association indicates a shallow water (hydro-morphic zone). Among these clay minerals, the illite reveals the precious indications in a source area. In this case, it comes from the decomposition of the schist paleo-relief located in the internal domain. This rock was transformed by acid leaching (action of the sour humus) into kaolinite with the presence of the quartzification. The origin of the mixed-layer clay I-M (10%) is the result of the active pedogenesis. The simultaneous presence of the illite, chlorite, kaolinite and the mixed-layer clay I-M seems to be result from the erosion exercised on the alteration product or arenitisation of the

  6. FINAL REPORT FOR MOISTURE EFFECTS ON COMPACTION OF FIBERBOARD IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Estochen, E.

    2013-09-17

    Compaction of lower layers in the fiberboard assembly has been observed in 9975 packages that contain elevated moisture. Lab testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the lower fiberboard assembly, and the behavior of the fiberboard during transport. In laboratory tests of cane fiberboard, higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction, greater rate of compaction, and continued compaction over a longer period of time. In addition, laboratory tests have shown that the application of a dynamic load results in higher fiberboard compaction compared to a static load. The test conditions and sample geometric/loading configurations were chosen to simulate the regulatory requirements for 9975 package input dynamic loading. Dynamic testing was conducted to acquire immediate and cumulative changes in geometric data for various moisture levels. Two sample sets have undergone a complete dynamic test regimen, one set for 27 weeks, and the second set for 47 weeks. The dynamic input, data acquisition, test effects on sample dynamic parameters, and results from this test program are summarized and compared to regulatory specifications for dynamic loading. Compaction of the bottom fiberboard layers due to the accumulation of moisture is one possible cause of an increase in the axial gap at the top of the package. The net compaction of the bottom layers will directly add to the axial gap. The moisture which caused this compaction migrated from the middle region of the fiberboard assembly (which is typically the hottest). This will cause the middle region to shrink axially, which will also contribute directly to the axial gap. Measurement of the axial gap provides a screening tool for identifying significant change in the fiberboard condition. The data in this report provide a basis to evaluate the impact of moisture and fiberboard compaction on 9975 package performance

  7. Polyamide 6/clay membranes: effect of precipitation bath in morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rodholfo da S.B.; Pereira, Caio H. do O; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Lira, Helio L.

    2015-01-01

    Polyamide 6 membranes and their nanocomposites with 5% clay were obtained by the phase inversion method and the precipitation was made in distilled water bath and also in the mixture of solvent and distilled water. The nanocomposites were characterized by XRD and membranes by SEM. By XRD analysis, it was found that the obtained nanocomposite presents a structure probably exfoliated and / or partially exfoliated, it was also possible to observe the presence of two characteristic peaks (α and γ) of the polyamide 6 phases. In the SEM micrographs it was seen that the presence of clay promote alterations in morphology, size and distribution of pores. The presence of acid in the precipitation bath leads to a significant decrease in the filter layer, but also an increase in the quantity of pore size. (author)

  8. Characterization of clay (bentonite)/crushed granite mixtures to build barriers against the migration of radionuclides: diffusion studies and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingarro, E.; Rivas, P.; Villar, L.P. del; Cruz, B. de la; Gomez, P.; Hernandez, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Villar, M.V.; Campos, R.; Cozar, J.

    1991-01-01

    In Spain, the possibility is being considered of storage of radioactive waste in granitic rocks, using Spanish clays as backfill and sealing materials. The study and selection of these materials is the objective of the project, accomplished with Community financial support under CEC contract No Fl1W-0191-E (TT). With the aim of minimizing the chemical-mineralogical disequilibrium between the granitic rock and the artificial barrier, the possibility has been studied of using molten granite as an additive and illite as clayish material, instead of the normal use of smectite (montmorillonite). The studies have been carried out on 30 commercial Spanish clays and two kinds of granite and have been orientated to the selection of materials and the optimization of the clay-granite mixtures, chemical characterization, mechanics and physics of the mixtures and compacted blocks, determination of their behaviour in the gradient fields of temperature, pressure and chemical potentials and to the determination of the migration parameters. 59 Figs.; 6 Micrograph; 52 Tabs.; 30 Refs

  9. Metal organoclays with compacted structure for truly physical capture of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, M. Nazir; Sennour, Radia [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Arus, Vasilica Alisa [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Catalysis and Microporous Materials Laboratory, Vasile-Alecsandri University of Bacau, 600115 (Romania); Sallam, Lamyaa M. [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Roy, René, E-mail: roy.rene@uqam.ca [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada); Azzouz, Abdelkrim, E-mail: azzouz.a@uqam.ca [Nanoqam, Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec at Montreal, H3C 3P8 QC (Canada)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Functionalization of thio-dendrons onto montmorillonite clay. • Incorporation and stabilization of PdNP in to the functionalized clays. • Role of −S:Pd and −O:Pd interactions in NP dispersion and stabilization. • Applications of PdNP incorporated modified clays for physical adsorption of H{sub 2}. - Abstract: Truly reversible capture of hydrogen was achieved at ambient conditions on Pd-loaded organo-montmorillonites obtained by photo-addition of different thiols on propargylated-TRIS cations already grafted on the clay surface. TEM insights showed that more than 90% of Pd{sup 0} incorporated occur as 0.3–0.5 nm subnanoparticles (PdSNPs). XPS and NMR analyses revealed simultaneous strong S:Pd{sup 0} and O:Pd{sup 0} interactions that ”cement” the organic moiety around PdSNPs. The significant decrease in porosity suggests a compacted structure that impedes not only metal aggregation, but also hydrogen diffusion in the metal bulk. Thus, hydrogen appears to adsorb mainly via physical condensation around PdSNPs. These thiol-clay matrices showed hydrogen surface affinity factors of up to 0.51 mmol m{sup −2} at ambient temperature and pressure. This is higher than those reported for much more sophisticated materials. DSC measurements showed very low desorption heat between 20 and 80 °C. Hydrogen release was achieved merely under vacuum or slight heating starting from 40 °C and was almost completed up to 85 °C. This provides a proof of concept of truly reversible capture of hydrogen for concentration and/or storage purposes. Such a performance has never been achieved at ambient temperature and pressure. These findings open new prospects to develop low-cost materials for reversible hydrogen storage without energy and safety constraints.

  10. Metal organoclays with compacted structure for truly physical capture of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M. Nazir; Sennour, Radia; Arus, Vasilica Alisa; Sallam, Lamyaa M.; Roy, René; Azzouz, Abdelkrim

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Functionalization of thio-dendrons onto montmorillonite clay. • Incorporation and stabilization of PdNP in to the functionalized clays. • Role of −S:Pd and −O:Pd interactions in NP dispersion and stabilization. • Applications of PdNP incorporated modified clays for physical adsorption of H_2. - Abstract: Truly reversible capture of hydrogen was achieved at ambient conditions on Pd-loaded organo-montmorillonites obtained by photo-addition of different thiols on propargylated-TRIS cations already grafted on the clay surface. TEM insights showed that more than 90% of Pd"0 incorporated occur as 0.3–0.5 nm subnanoparticles (PdSNPs). XPS and NMR analyses revealed simultaneous strong S:Pd"0 and O:Pd"0 interactions that ”cement” the organic moiety around PdSNPs. The significant decrease in porosity suggests a compacted structure that impedes not only metal aggregation, but also hydrogen diffusion in the metal bulk. Thus, hydrogen appears to adsorb mainly via physical condensation around PdSNPs. These thiol-clay matrices showed hydrogen surface affinity factors of up to 0.51 mmol m"−"2 at ambient temperature and pressure. This is higher than those reported for much more sophisticated materials. DSC measurements showed very low desorption heat between 20 and 80 °C. Hydrogen release was achieved merely under vacuum or slight heating starting from 40 °C and was almost completed up to 85 °C. This provides a proof of concept of truly reversible capture of hydrogen for concentration and/or storage purposes. Such a performance has never been achieved at ambient temperature and pressure. These findings open new prospects to develop low-cost materials for reversible hydrogen storage without energy and safety constraints.

  11. Mobility and survival of sulphate-reducing bacteria in compacted and fully water saturated bentonite - microstructural aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria will not be able to enter MX-80 buffer clay with the intended bulk density, i.e. 1900-2100 kg/m{sup 3}. Nor will they be able to survive and migrate in such environment. The only circumstances under which sulphate-reducing bacteria can enter, survive and migrate in engineered soil barriers in a KBS-3-type repository are those prevailing in backfills with lower MX-80 contents than about 10 % or in more smectite-rich, poorly compacted backfills saturated with electrolyte-rich pore water with Ca as dominating cation. In the phase of hydration and expansion of canister-embedding buffer, bacteria can enter the initially very soft clay gel at the rock/buffer contact to a depth of about a centimeter.

  12. Mobility and survival of sulphate-reducing bacteria in compacted and fully water saturated bentonite - microstructural aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1999-12-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria will not be able to enter MX-80 buffer clay with the intended bulk density, i.e. 1900-2100 kg/m 3 . Nor will they be able to survive and migrate in such environment. The only circumstances under which sulphate-reducing bacteria can enter, survive and migrate in engineered soil barriers in a KBS-3-type repository are those prevailing in backfills with lower MX-80 contents than about 10 % or in more smectite-rich, poorly compacted backfills saturated with electrolyte-rich pore water with Ca as dominating cation. In the phase of hydration and expansion of canister-embedding buffer, bacteria can enter the initially very soft clay gel at the rock/buffer contact to a depth of about a centimeter

  13. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 57 58 59 60 For Peer Review 1 Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications N. M. Musyoka1*, J. Ren1, H. W. Langmi1, D. E. C. Rogers1, B. C. North1, M. Mathe1 and D. Bessarabov2... clear (filtered) extract of cloisite clay, SNC for zeolite from unfiltered cloisite clay extract and SBC for zeolite from unfiltered South African bentonite clay extract. Furfuryl alcohol (Sigma Aldrich, C5H6O2, 98%) and Ethylene gas were used...

  14. Towards a numerical run-out model for quick-clay slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issler, Dieter; L'Heureux, Jean-Sébastien; Cepeda, José M.; Luna, Byron Quan; Gebreslassie, Tesfahunegn A.

    2015-04-01

    quasi-three-dimensional codes with a choice of bed-friction laws. The findings of the simulations point strongly towards the need for a different modeling approach that incorporates the essential physical features of quick-clay slides. The major requirement is a realistic description of remolding. A two-layer model is needed to describe the non-sensitive topsoil that often is passively advected by the slide. In many cases, the topography is rather complex so that 3D or quasi-3D (depth-averaged) models are required for realistic modeling of flow heights and velocities. Finally, since many Norwegian quick-clay slides run-out in a fjord (and may generate a tsunami), it is also desirable to explicitly account for buoyancy and hydrodynamic drag.

  15. Power ultrasound effects for in situ compatibilization of polymer-clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Joung Gul; Park, Sang Wan; Kim, Hyungsu; Lee, Jae Wook

    2004-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites of various concentrations were prepared by ultrasonically assisted polymerization and melt mixing processes. The sonication process using power ultrasonic wave was employed to enhance nano-scale dispersion during melt mixing of monomer, polymer and organically modified clay. According to the unique mode of power ultrasound wave, we expected enhanced breakup of layered silicate bundle and further reduction in the size of dispersed phase with better homogeneity compared to the in situ polymerization. The optimum conditions to perform stable exfoliated nanocomposites were studied by various compositions and conditions. Dispersion characteristics and morphology of the nanocomposites were verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rheological behaviors were measured under dynamic frequency sweep mode using Rheometric science ARES

  16. MATERIALS FOR THE FINAL COVER OF SANITARY LANDFILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Kovačić

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the selection of materials for the sea¬ling layer in the final cover of sanitary landfills. The sealing la¬yer is the most critical component of the final cover. Its role is to minimize percolation of water through the final cover. Ma¬terials used for the construction of the sealing layer are either of mineral origin (compacted clay or geosynthetic (geomem¬brane. They are most often used in combination creating com¬posite liners. Recently alternative materials are also used like paper mill sludge or discarded swelling clay.

  17. Hysteresis in clay swelling induced by hydrogen bonding: accurate prediction of swelling states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambach, T.J.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Smit, B.

    2006-01-01

    We perform grand-canonical molecular simulations to study the molecular mechanism of clay swelling hysteresis as a function of the relative humidity. In particular, we focus on the transition from the one- to the two-layer hydrate and the influence of three types of counterions (Li+, Na+, and K+).

  18. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  19. Modeling selenate adsorption behavior on oxides, clay minerals, and soils using the triple layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenate adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous aluminum oxide, amorphous iron oxide, goethite, clay minerals: kaolinites, montmorillonites, illite, and 18 soil samples from Hawaii, and the Southwestern and the Midwestern regions of the US as a function of solution pH. Selenate adsorpti...

  20. Strengthening and stress relaxation of Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, Otto

    2010-01-01

    undisturbed far-field for the long lasting periods of geological times. Consequently, demands on concepts for backfilling and closure of a repository in a clay-stone formation as well as model calculations for safety analyses generally do not take into account convergence by viscous deformation, which would result from stress re-distribution at underground openings. Although there is some doubt, whether Opalinus Clay is creeping at all, some very long lasting laboratory tests were performed on this item in the author's laboratory. A nearly linear dependence of the long-term creep rate on the deviatoric stress was found. In recent work, the technique of stress-relaxation was used. For this, strengthening by strain rate controlled deformation was stopped, i.e. the strain was kept constant for a long time, and the relaxation of the stress was measured. In course of this technique, the deformability which may result from artefacts is ruled out as far as possible by compaction and strengthening. Then, the stress relaxation - if any - will be maintained by true long-term deformation processes which should be active and responsible for any convergence in an at least only partly backfilled mine. In this contribution, the results of the laboratory work and their discussion will be presented. (authors)

  1. Improved Concrete Cutting and Excavation Capabilities for Crater Repair, Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    8 Table 5. Nuclear density gauge test results on the clay gravel subbase. ............................................... 8 Table 6. Nuclear...subbase of the 24-in.-thick PCC section. Each layer was compacted to a target of 95 percent modified Proctor density or to the point that in-place...Maximum dry density (pcf) Optimum moisture (%) subgrade (CL) 117.3 13.5 clay gravel subbase (SC) 130.6 7.6 limestone base (GP-GM) 145.0 5.3 2.3

  2. Study of the chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of stiff clays in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Xuan Phu

    2013-01-01

    The present research aims to understand the chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of stiff clays through two geological formations, the Boom Clay and the Ypresian clays which are considered as possible host formations for the radioactive wastes disposal in Belgium. The volume change behavior was studied in both intact and reconstituted states, and under different conditions: under K0 and isotropic loading, under loading/unloading loops. The results show that the volume change behavior is governed by the competition between the physico-chemical effect and the mechanical ef