WorldWideScience

Sample records for compact torus experiments

  1. Tangential and Vertical Compact Torus Injection Experiments on the STOR-M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Chijin; Liu D.; S. Livingstone; A. K. Singh; E. Zhang; A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the setup and results of compact torus (CT) injection experiments on the STOR-M tokamak. Tangential CT injection into STOR-M induced H-mode-like phenomena including doubling the electron density, reduction in the Ha radiation level, suppression of the floating potential fluctuations, suppression of the m = 2 Mirnov oscillations, and increase in the global energy confinement time. Experimental setup, bench-test results, and some preliminary injection data for vertical CT injection experiments on STOR-M will be shown. In addition, numerical simulations of the CT trajectories in tokamak discharges for both tangential and vertical injection geometries will be discussed.

  2. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  3. Studies of accelerated compact toruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1983-01-04

    In an earlier publication we considered acceleration of plasma rings (Compact Torus). Several possible accelerator configurations were suggested and the possibility of focusing the accelerated rings was discussed. In this paper we consider one scheme, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focusing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force, F/sub a/ = kappaU/sub m//R where (kappa < 1), increases as R/sup -2/, the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case, however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency.

  4. The Bumpy Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobble, James Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-09

    This document summarizes the Bumpy Torus Experiment as a viable fusion reactor concept. Conclusions reached include the following: In 30 years, order-of-magnitude technological advances have occurred in multiple areas of plasma heating and confinement. The ORNL bumpy torus of the 1970s was technology limited. Now that ITER is technology limited, an alternate concept is needed. A device built on such a concept should be current free, CW, modular, have a gentle shutdown, and demonstrable stability. The bumpy torus meets or has the potential to meet all of these criteria. Earlier, stability was not possible due to power limits; it has not been fully tested. It is time to revisit the bumpy-torus concept with a modest new machine.

  5. Compact and multi-view solid state neutral particle analyzer arrays on National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Tritz, K.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hao, G. Z.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2016-11-01

    A compact and multi-view solid state neutral particle analyzer (SSNPA) diagnostic based on silicon photodiode arrays has been successfully tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade. The SSNPA diagnostic provides spatially, temporally, and pitch-angle resolved measurements of fast-ion distribution by detecting fast neutral flux resulting from the charge exchange (CX) reactions. The system consists of three 16-channel subsystems: t-SSNPA viewing the plasma mid-radius and neutral beam (NB) line #2 tangentially, r-SSNPA viewing the plasma core and NB line #1 radially, and p-SSNPA with no intersection with any NB lines. Due to the setup geometry, the active CX signals of t-SSNPA and r-SSNPA are mainly sensitive to passing and trapped particles, respectively. In addition, both t-SSNPA and r-SSNPA utilize three vertically stacked arrays with different filter thicknesses to obtain coarse energy information. The experimental data show that all channels are operational. The signal to noise ratio is typically larger than 10, and the main noise is x-ray induced signal. The active and passive CX signals are clearly observed on t-SSNPA and r-SSNPA during NB modulation. The SSNPA data also indicate significant losses of passing particles during sawteeth, while trapped particles are weakly affected. Fluctuations up to 120 kHz have been observed on SSNPA, and they are strongly correlated with magnetohydrodynamics instabilities.

  6. Development of a repetitive compact torus injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; McColl, David; Dreval, Mykola; Rohollahi, Akbar; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Zushi, Hideki

    2013-10-01

    A system for Repetitive Compact Torus Injection (RCTI) has been developed at the University of Saskatchewan. CTI is a promising fuelling technology to directly fuel the core region of tokamak reactors. In addition to fuelling, CTI has also the potential for (a) optimization of density profile and thus bootstrap current and (b) momentum injection. For steady-state reactor operation, RCTI is necessary. The approach to RCTI is to charge a storage capacitor bank with a large capacitance and quickly charge the CT capacitor bank through a stack of integrated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). When the CT bank is fully charged, the IGBT stack will be turned off to isolate banks, and CT formation/acceleration sequence will start. After formation of each CT, the fast bank will be replenished and a new CT will be formed and accelerated. Circuits for the formation and the acceleration in University of Saskatchewan CT Injector (USCTI) have been modified. Three CT shots at 10 Hz or eight shots at 1.7 Hz have been achieved. This work has been sponsored by the CRC and NSERC, Canada.

  7. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only.

  8. Free compact boson on branched covering of the torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feihu Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the partition function of a free compact boson on a n-sheeted covering of torus gluing along m branch cuts. It is interesting because when the branched cuts are chosen to be real, the partition function is related to the n-th Rényi entanglement entropy of m disjoint intervals in a finite system at finite temperature. After proposing a canonical homology basis and its dual basis of the covering surface, we find that the partition function can be written in terms of theta functions.

  9. Final report on the LLNL compact torus acceleration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.; Hartman, C.; McLean, H.; Molvik, A.

    1995-03-19

    In this report, we summarize recent work at LLNL on the compact torus (CT) acceleration project. The CT accelerator is a novel technique for projecting plasmas to high velocities and reaching high energy density states. The accelerator exploits magnetic confinement in the CT to stably transport plasma over large distances and to directed kinetic energies large in comparison with the CT internal and magnetic energy. Applications range from heating and fueling magnetic fusion devices, generation of intense pulses of x-rays or neutrons for weapons effects and high energy-density fusion concepts.

  10. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  11. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

    2008-08-04

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  12. Compact Torus Accelerator Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Power Plant HYLIFE-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B G; Moir, R W; Tabak, M; Bieri, R L; Hammer, J H; Hartman, C W; Hoffman, M A; Leber, R L; Petzoldt, R W; Tobin, M T

    2005-03-30

    A Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA) is used to accelerate a Compact Torus (CT) to 35 MJ kinetic energy which is focused to a 20 mm diameter where its kinetic energy is converted to a shaped x-ray pulse of 30 MJ. The capsule yield with a prescribed radiation profile is calculated to be (gain 60 times 30 MJ) 1.8 GJ. Schemes for achieving this profile are described. The CT is accelerated in a length of 30 m within an annulus of 150 mm ID and 300 mm OD where the maximum magnetic field is 28 T. A 2.5 m conical taper reduces the mean diameter of the CT from 225 mm to 20 mm. The conical section is made out of solid Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}. The target with its frozen conical guide section is accurately placed at the end of the accelerator about once per second. The reactor called HYLIFE uses liquid jets to attenuate blast effects including shrapnel from the shattered conical guide section and radiation so that the vessel is expected to last 30 years. The calculated cost of electricity is estimated (in constant 1988 dollars) to be about 4.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h compared to the future cost of nuclear and coal of 4.3 to 5.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h. The CT driver contributes 17% to the cost of electricity. Present CT's make 2 x 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}; the goal of experiments in progress is 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} with further modifications to allow 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}, whereas the reactor requires 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} in a shaped pulse.

  13. Initial Diagnostics for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.L. Roquemore; B. McCormack; D. Johnson; H. Kugel; R. Kaita; and the NSTX Team

    1999-06-01

    The spherical torus (ST) approach to magnetic confinement has many attractive features as both a fusion reactor concept and a volume neutron source. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is under construction at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), and it is designed to achieve plasma parameters needed for a proof-of-principle test of the ST concept. Discharges with magnetic fields of 2.3 kG on axis and plasma currents of 1 MA will be heated with 6 MW of radio frequency (RF) power and 5 MW of neutral beams, and pulse lengths up to 5 seconds are planned. Central electron temperatures of about 4 keV are expected with RF heating, and theoretical studies show that high values of b and b{sub n} can be achieved.

  14. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  15. Engineering design of the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; J. Spitzer, J. Chrzanowski; et al

    2000-05-11

    NSTX is a proof-of-principle experiment aimed at exploring the physics of the ``spherical torus'' (ST) configuration, which is predicted to exhibit more efficient magnetic confinement than conventional large aspect ratio tokamaks, amongst other advantages. The low aspect ratio (R/a, typically 1.2--2 in ST designs compared to 4--5 in conventional tokamaks) decreases the available cross sectional area through the center of the torus for toroidal and poloidal field coil conductors, vacuum vessel wall, plasma facing components, etc., thus increasing the need to deploy all components within the so-called ``center stack'' in the most efficient manner possible. Several unique design features have been developed for the NSTX center stack, and careful engineering of this region of the machine, utilizing materials up to their engineering allowables, has been key to meeting the desired objectives. The design and construction of the machine has been accomplished in a rapid and cost effective manner thanks to the availability of extensive facilities, a strong experience base from the TFTR era, and good cooperation between institutions.

  16. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  17. Strike Point Control for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolemen, E.; Gates, D. A.; Rowley, C. W.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kallman, J.; Gerhardt, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mueller, D.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents the first control algorithm for the inner and outer strike point position for a Spherical Torus (ST) fusion experiment and the performance analysis of the controller. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD) will be installed on NSTX which is believed to provide better pumping than lithium coatings on carbon PFCs. The shape of the plasma dictates the pumping rate of the lithium by channeling the plasma to LLD, where strike point location is the most important shape parameter. Simulations show that the density reduction depends on the proximity of strike point to LLD. Experiments were performed to study the dynamics of the strike point, design a new controller to change the location of the strike point to desired location and stabilize it. The most effective PF coils in changing inner and outer strike points were identified using equilibrium code. The PF coil inputs were changed in a step fashion between various set points and the step response of the strike point position was obtained. From the analysis of the step responses, PID controllers for the strike points were obtained and the controller was tuned experimentally for better performance. The strike controller was extended to include the outer-strike point on the inner plate to accommodate the desired low outer-strike points for the experiment with the aim of achieving "snowflake" divertor configuration in NSTX.

  18. Free compact boson on branched covering of $\\mathbb{CP}^1$ and on branched covering of the torus

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Feihu

    2016-01-01

    We have studied free compact boson on two special kinds of Riemann surfaces: One is branched covering of $\\mathbb{CP}^1$, and the other one is branched covering of the torus. We obtain the partition function for arbitrary higher genus by directly constructing the period matrix, which can be expressed in terms of simple contour integrals. The partition function is interesting because it is related to the \\emph{product} of correlation functions of twist fields in different sectors. Also, when the branched cuts are chosen to be real, it is related to the R\\'enyi entanglement entropy of multiple intervals in a infinite (finite) system at zero (finite) temperature.

  19. Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, D; Ahn, J; Allain, J; Andre, R; Bastasz, R; Bell, M; Bell, R; Belova, E; Berkery, J; Betti, R; Bialek, J; Biewer, T; Bigelow, T; Bitter, M; Boedo, J; Bonoli, P; Bozzer, A; Brennan, D; Breslau, J; Brower, D; Bush, C; Canik, J; Caravelli, G; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Chang, C; Choe, W; Crocker, N; Darrow, D; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Diem, S; D' Ippolito, D; Domier, C; Dorland, W; Efthimion, P; Ejiri, A; Ershov, N; Evans, T; Feibush, E; Fenstermacher, M; Ferron, J; Finkenthal, M; Foley, J; Frazin, R; Fredrickson, E; Fu, G; Funaba, H; Gerhardt, S; Glasser, A; Gorelenkov, N; Grisham, L; Hahm, T; Harvey, R; Hassanein, A; Heidbrink, W; Hill, K; Hillesheim, J; Hillis, D; Hirooka, Y; Hosea, J; Hu, B; Humphreys, D; Idehara, T; Indireshkumar, K; Ishida, A; Jaeger, F; Jarboe, T; Jardin, S; Jaworski, M; Ji, H; Jung, H; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Katsuro-Hopkins, O; Kawahata, K; Kawamori, E; Kaye, S; Kessel, C; Kim, J; Kimura, H; Kolemen, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Krstic, P; Ku, S; Kubota, S; Kugel, H; La Haye, R; Lao, L; LeBlanc, B; Lee, W; Lee, K; Leuer, J; Levinton, F; Liang, Y; Liu, D; Luhmann, N; Maingi, R; Majeski, R; Manickam, J; Mansfield, D; Maqueda, R; Mazzucato, E; McCune, D; McGeehan, B; McKee, G; Medley, S; Menard, J; Menon, M; Meyer, H; Mikkelsen, D; Miloshevsky, G; Mitarai, O; Mueller, D; Mueller, S; Munsat, T; Myra, J; Nagayama, Y; Nelson, B; Nguyen, X; Nishino, N; Nishiura, M; Nygren, R; Ono, M; Osborne, T; Pacella, D; Park, H; Park, J; Paul, S; Peebles, W; Penaflor, B; Peng, M; Phillips, C; Pigarov, A; Podesta, M; Preinhaelter, J; Ram, A; Raman, R; Rasmussen, D; Redd, A; Reimerdes, H; Rewoldt, G; Ross, P; Rowley, C; Ruskov, E; Russell, D; Ruzic, D; Ryan, P; Sabbagh, S; Schaffer, M; Schuster, E; Scott, S; Shaing, K; Sharpe, P; Shevchenko, V; Shinohara, K; Sizyuk, V; Skinner, C; Smirnov, A; Smith, D; Smith, S; Snyder, P; Soloman, W; Sontag, A; Soukhanovskii, V; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T; Stotler, D; Strait, T; Stratton, B; Stutman, D; Takahashi, R; Takase, Y; Tamura, N; Tang, X; Taylor, G; Taylor, C; Ticos, C; Tritz, K; Tsarouhas, D; Turrnbull, A; Tynan, G; Ulrickson, M; Umansky, M; Urban, J; Utergberg, E; Walker, M; Wampler, W; Wang, J; Wang, W; Weland, A

    2009-01-05

    The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high {beta} operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies confirm the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance l{sub i} {approx} 0.4 with strong shaping ({kappa} {approx} 2.7, {delta} {approx} 0.8) with {beta}{sub N} approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction f{sub NI} {approx} 71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfvenic ions are an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfvenic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n = 3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with {beta} above the no-wall limit. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. Other highlights are

  20. Overview of Results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, D. A.; Ahn, J.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Bastasz, R.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; D’Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Efthimion, P.; Ejiri, A.; Ershov, N.; Evans, T.; Feibush, E.; Fenstermacher, M.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Funaba, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grisham, L.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hillesheim, J.; Hillis, D.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, B.; Humphreys, D.; Idehara, T.; Indireshkumar, K.; Ishida, A.; Jaeger, F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Ji, H.; Jung, H.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kawahata, K.; Kawamori, E.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.; Kimura, H.; Kolemen, E.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Krstic, P.; Ku, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, W.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, Jr., N.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; McCune, D.; McGeehan, B.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mitarai, O.; Mueller, D.; Mueller, S.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nagayama, Y.; Nelson, B.; Nguyen, X.; Nishino, N.; Nishiura, M.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Pacella, D.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, J.; Ram, A.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redd, A.; Reimerdes, H.; Rewo, G.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scott, S.; Shaing, K.; Sharpe, P.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, D.; Smith, S.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Strait, T.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, R.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Ticos, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Turrnbull, A.; Tynan, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Umansky, M.; Urban, J.; Utergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, W.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.; Welander, A.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Xu, X.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zweben, S.

    2009-03-24

    The mission of NSTX is the demonstration of the physics basis required to extrapolate to the next steps for the spherical torus (ST), such as a plasma facing component test facility (NHTX) or an ST based component test facility (ST-CTF), and to support ITER. Key issues for the ST are transport, and steady state high β operation. To better understand electron transport, a new high-k scattering diagnostic was used extensively to investigate electron gyro-scale fluctuations with varying electron temperature gradient scale-length. Results from n = 3 braking studies are consistent with the flow shear dependence of ion transport. New results from electron Bernstein wave emission measurements from plasmas with lithium wall coating applied indicate transmission efficiencies near 70% in H-mode as a result of reduced collisionality. Improved coupling of High Harmonic Fast-Waves has been achieved by reducing the edge density relative to the critical density for surface wave coupling. In order to achieve high bootstrap current fraction, future ST designs envision running at very high elongation. Plasmas have been maintained on NSTX at very low internal inductance li ~0.4 with strong shaping (κ ~ 2.7, δ ~ 0.8) with βN approaching the with-wall beta limit for several energy confinement times. By operating at lower collisionality in this regime, NSTX has achieved record non-inductive current drive fraction fNI ~71%. Instabilities driven by super-Alfv´enic ions will be an important issue for all burning plasmas, including ITER. Fast ions from NBI on NSTX are super-Alfv´enic. Linear TAE thresholds and appreciable fast-ion loss during multi-mode bursts are measured and these results are compared to theory. The impact of n > 1 error fields on stability is a important result for ITER. RWM/RFA feedback combined with n=3 error field control was used on NSTX to maintain plasma rotation with β above the no-wall limit. Other highlights are: results

  1. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  2. Modification Of The Electron Energy Distribution Function During Lithium Experiments On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M A; Gray, T K; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; McLean, A; Sabbagh, S A; Soukanovskii, V; Stotler, D P

    2011-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has recently studied the use of a liquid lithium divertor (LLD). Divertor Langmuir probes have also been installed for making measurements of the local plasma conditions. A non-local probe interpretation method is used to supplement the classical probe interpretation and obtain measurements of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) which show the occurrence of a hot-electron component. Analysis is made of two discharges within a sequence that exhibited changes in plasma fueling efficiency. It is found that the local electron temperature increases and that this increase is most strongly correlated with the energy contained within the hot-electron population. Preliminary interpretative modeling indicates that kinetic effects are likely in the NSTX.

  3. Characterization and parametric dependencies of low wavenumber pedestal turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Thompson, D. S. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The spherical torus edge region is among the most challenging regimes for plasma turbulence simulations. Here, we measure the spatial and temporal properties of ion-scale turbulence in the steep gradient region of H-mode pedestals during edge localized mode-free, MHD quiescent periods in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 ρ{sub i}, and decorrelation times are about 5 a/c{sub s}. Next, we introduce a model aggregation technique to identify parametric dependencies among turbulence quantities and transport-relevant plasma parameters. The parametric dependencies show the most agreement with transport driven by trapped-electron mode, kinetic ballooning mode, and microtearing mode turbulence, and the least agreement with ion temperature gradient turbulence. In addition, the parametric dependencies are consistent with turbulence regulation by flow shear and the empirical relationship between wider pedestals and larger turbulent structures.

  4. Diagnostics for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.C. Stratton; D. Johnson; R. Feder; E. Fredrickson; H. Neilson; H. Takahashi; M. Zarnstorf; M. Cole; P. Goranson; E. Lazarus; B. Nelson

    2003-09-16

    The status of planning of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) diagnostics is presented, with the emphasis on resolution of diagnostics access issues and on diagnostics required for the early phases of operation.

  5. Snowflake divertor configuration studies in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; McLean, A. G.; Rognlien, T. D.; Ryutov, D. D.; Umansky, M. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; Kaye, S.; Kolemen, E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Menard, J. E.; Paul, S. F.; Podesta, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Scotti, F.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, M. G.; Gates, D. A.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); and others

    2012-08-15

    Experimental results from NSTX indicate that the snowflake divertor (D. Ryutov, Phys. Plasmas 14, 064502 (2007)) may be a viable solution for outstanding tokamak plasma-material interface issues. Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux and divertor plate erosion remains to be critical issues for ITER and future concept devices based on conventional and spherical tokamak geometry with high power density divertors. Experiments conducted in 4-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in NSTX demonstrated that the snowflake divertor is compatible with high-confinement core plasma operation, while being very effective in steady-state divertor heat flux mitigation and impurity reduction. A steady-state snowflake divertor was obtained in recent NSTX experiments for up to 600 ms using three divertor magnetic coils. The high magnetic flux expansion region of the scrape-off layer (SOL) spanning up to 50% of the SOL width {lambda}{sub q} was partially detached in the snowflake divertor. In the detached zone, the heat flux profile flattened and decreased to 0.5-1 MW/m{sup 2} (from 4-7 MW/m{sup 2} in the standard divertor) indicative of radiative heating. An up to 50% increase in divertor, P{sub rad} in the snowflake divertor was accompanied by broadening of the intrinsic C III and C IV radiation zones, and a nearly order of magnitude increase in divertor high-n Balmer line emission indicative of volumetric recombination onset. Magnetic reconstructions showed that the x-point connection length, divertor plasma-wetted area and divertor volume, all critical parameters for geometric reduction of deposited heat flux, and increased volumetric divertor losses were significantly increased in the snowflake divertor, as expected from theory.

  6. A Collective Scattering System for Measuring Electron Gyroscale Fluctuations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D. R.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.

    2009-02-13

    A collective scattering system has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure electron gyroscale fluctuations in NSTX plasmas. Up to five distinct wavenumbers are measured simultaneously, and the large toroidal curvature of NSTX plasmas provides enhanced spatial localization. Steerable optics can position the scattering volume throughout the plasma from the magnetic axis to the outboard edge. Initial measurements indicate rich turbulent dynamics on the electron gyroscale. The system will be a valuable tool for investigating the connection between electron temperature gradient turbulence and electron thermal transport in NSTX plasmas.

  7. Progress towards Steady State at Low Aspect Ratio on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Gates, J. Menard, R. Maingi, S. Kaye, S.A. Sabbagh, S. Diem, J.R.Wilson, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, J. Ferron, E.D. Fredrickson, C.E. Kessel, B.P. LeBlanc, F. Levinton, J. Manickam, D. Mueller, R. Raman, T. Stevenson, D. Stutman, G. Taylor, K. Tritz, H. Yu, and the NSTX Research Team

    2007-11-08

    Modifications to the plasma control capabilities and poloidal field coils of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have enabled a significant enhancement in shaping capability which has led to the transient achievement of a record shape factor (S ≡ q95 (Iρ/αΒτ)) of ~41 (MA m-1 Τ-1) simultaneous with a record plasma elongation of κ ≡ β /α ~ 3. This result was obtained using isoflux control and real-time equilibrium reconstruction. Achieving high shape factor together with tolerable divertor loading is an important result for future ST burning plasma experiments as exemplified by studies for future ST reactor concepts, as well as neutron producing devices, which rely on achieving high shape factors in order to achieve steady state operation while maintaining MHD stability. Statistical evidence is presented which demonstrates the expected correlation between increased shaping and improved plasma performance.

  8. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  9. Reducing the Spikes of Avalanche Photodiode Measurements at the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Z. E.; Foley, E. L.

    2011-10-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes (APD) used at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) make important measurements for the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic. However, they are very sensitive, and if radiation consistently reaches these detectors they are damaged over time. Furthermore, they also display spikes in their readings, which greatly complicates the data analysis for MSE. Due to our Collisionally-Induced Fluorescence Motional Stark Effect diagnostic observing significant radiation despite being shielded by a 3 foot concrete wall, we must devise a plan for shielding our new Laser-Induced Fluorescence Motional Stark Effect diagnostic, as well as determining the best possible location for them. In order to reduce the amount of spikes seen in our readings and to preserve our detectors, I investigated the type of radiation responsible, the locations most affected, and tested various materials for shielding. Results will be presented.

  10. Experiments and simulations of particle flows in a magnetized dust torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenstein, T.; Wilms, J.; Greiner, F.; Piel, A. [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Melzer, A. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    An overview is given of the confinement and dynamical phenomena observed in experiments and simulations of magnetized dust tori. Due to the presence of gravity, a strongly inhomogeneous velocity field is found along the circumference of the torus. The simulations show that the dust flow, which is unsheared and nearly incompressible, exhibits a distinct shell structure, which can be understood by rapid frictional cooling and strong Coulomb coupling. At lower frictional damping, the symmetry of the flow can be spontaneously broken, leading to a region of strong velocity shear and excitation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. New experimental evidence of counterflows is found (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Scintillator based energetic ion loss diagnostic for the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, D S

    2008-02-01

    A scintillator based energetic ion loss detector has been built and installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Synakowski et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1653 (2000)] to measure the loss of neutral beam ions. The detector is able to resolve the pitch angle and gyroradius of the lost energetic ions. It has a wide acceptance range in pitch angle and energy, and is able to resolve the full, one-half, and one-third energy components of the 80 keV D neutral beams up to the maximum toroidal magnetic field of NSTX. Multiple Faraday cups have been embedded behind the scintillator to allow easy absolute calibration of the diagnostic and to measure the energetic ion loss in several ranges of pitch angle with good time resolution. Several small, vacuum compatible lamps allow simple calibration of the scintillator position within the field of view of the diagnostic's video camera.

  12. Progress towards high performance plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S. M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bush, C.; Carter, M. D.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Davis, W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; Ferron, J.; Field, A.; Foley, J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Gibney, T.; Harvey, R.; Hatcher, R. E.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; Lawson, J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Marsala, R.; Mastrovito, D.; Mau, T. K.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ono, M.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.; Peebles, T.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Pinsker, R.; Ram, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redi, M.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schneider, H.; Skinner, C. H.; Smith, D. R.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Halle, A. von; Wade, M.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Zhu, W.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betti, R.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Chang, C. S.; Chrzanowski, J.; Domier, C.; Dudek, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Finkenthal, M.; Fredd, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Glasser, A.; Goldston, R. J.; Greenough, N. L.; Grisham, L. R.; Gorelenkov, N.; Guazzotto, L.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Hogan, J.; Houlberg, W.; Humphreys, D.; Jaeger, F.; Kalish, M.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Lao, L. L.; Lawrence, J.; Leuer, J.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, N. C.; Mazzucato, E.; Oliaro, G.; Pacella, D.; Parsells, R.; Schaffer, M.; Semenov, I.; Shaing, K. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Shinohara, K.; Sichta, P.; Tang, X.; Vero, R.; Walker, D.; Wampler, W.

    2005-10-01

    The major objective of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to understand basic toroidal confinement physics at low aspect ratio and high βT in order to advance the spherical torus (ST) concept. In order to do this, NSTX utilizes up to 7.5 MW of neutral beam injection, up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast waves (HHFWs), and it operates with plasma currents up to 1.5 MA and elongations of up to 2.6 at a toroidal field up to 0.45 T. New facility, and diagnostic and modeling capabilities developed over the past two years have enabled the NSTX research team to make significant progress towards establishing this physics basis for future ST devices. Improvements in plasma control have led to more routine operation at high elongation and high βT (up to ~40%) lasting for many energy confinement times. βT can be limited by either internal or external modes. The installation of an active error field (EF) correction coil pair has expanded the operating regime at low density and has allowed for initial resonant EF amplification experiments. The determination of the confinement and transport properties of NSTX plasmas has benefited greatly from the implementation of higher spatial resolution kinetic diagnostics. The parametric variation of confinement is similar to that at conventional aspect ratio but with values enhanced relative to those determined from conventional aspect ratio scalings and with a βT dependence. The transport is highly dependent on details of both the flow and magnetic shear. Core turbulence was measured for the first time in an ST through correlation reflectometry. Non-inductive start-up has been explored using PF-only and transient co-axial helicity injection techniques, resulting in up to 140 kA of toroidal current generated by the latter technique. Calculated bootstrap and beam-driven currents have sustained up to 60% of the flat-top plasma current in NBI discharges. Studies of HHFW absorption

  13. Compact Photon Source for Polarized Target Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculescu, Gabriel; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    High energy photon beams are one of the tools of choice in nuclear and particle physics. However, most of the current techniques used for producing such beams have substantial drawbacks that limit their usefulness (low intensity, large beam size, mixed electron-photon beams). In this presentation we will outline the design of a Compact Photon Source (CPS) capable of providing narrow ( 1 mm) untagged photon beams of an intensity suitable for carrying out polarized target experiments. Compared with existing technology the CPS will provide a substantial (10-100) increase in the figure-of-merit. While optimized for a Wide Angle Compton Scattering experiment proposed at JLab, the source described here can be used in a variety of photon-induced physics experiments as well as for industrial applications.

  14. Development of wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.Y., E-mail: brbbebbero@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, J.; Kim, Y.G.; Yang, S.M.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, K.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Y.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.J.; Na, Y.S. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y.S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The baking for partial wall heating and H{sub 2}/He GDC systems are developed in VEST. • The RGA and OES systems for monitoring impurities are constructed in VEST. • The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics. • H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms. • After H{sub 2} GDC, the discharge should be conducted within 3 h from treatment. - Abstract: Wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems are developed in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). As a wall conditioning system, a baking system covering the vacuum vessel wall partially and a glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system using two electrodes with dc and 50 kHz power supplies are installed. The GDC system operates with hydrogen and helium gases for both chemical and physical desorption. The impurity monitoring system with residual gas analyzer (RGA), operating at <10{sup −5} Torr with a differential pumping system, is installed along with the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system to monitor the hydrogen and impurity radiation lines. Effects of these wall conditioning techniques are investigated with the impurity monitoring system for ohmic discharges of VEST. The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics but sufficient H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms within 3 h from the end of treatment.

  15. Intermittent Divertor Filaments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Their Relation to Midplane Blobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Maqueda, D.P. Stotler and the NSTX Team.

    2010-05-19

    While intermittent filamentary structures, also known as blobs, are routinely seen in the low-field-side scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), fine structured filaments are also seen on the lower divertor target plates of NSTX. These filaments, not associated with edge localized modes, correspond to the interaction of the turbulent blobs seen near the midplane with the divertor plasma facing components. The fluctuation level of the neutral lithium light observed at the divertor, and the skewness and kurtosis of its probability distribution function, is similar to that of midplane blobs seen in Dα; e.g. increasing with increasing radii outside the outer strike point (OSP) (separatrix). In addition, their toroidal and radial movement agrees with the typical movement of midplane blobs. Furthermore, with the appropriate magnetic topology, i.e. mapping between the portion of the target plates being observed into the field of view of the midplane gas puff imaging diagnostic, very good correlation is observed between the blobs and the divertor filaments. The correlation between divertor plate filaments and midplane blobs is lost close to the OSP. This latter observation is consistent with the existence of ‘magnetic shear disconnection’ due to the lower X-point, as proposed by Cohen and Ryutov (1997 Nucl. Fusion 37 621).

  16. Progress of the Keda Torus eXperiment Project in China: design and mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wandong; Mao, Wenzhe; Li, Hong; Xie, Jinlin; Lan, Tao; Liu, Ahdi; Wan, Shude; Wang, Hai; Zheng, Jian; Wen, Xiaohui; Zhou, Haiyang; You, Wei; Li, Chenguang; Bai, Wei; Tu, Cui; Tan, Mingsheng; Luo, Bing; Fu, Chenshuo; Huang, Fangcheng; Xiao, Bingjia; Luo, Zhengping; Shen, Biao; Fu, Peng; Yang, Lei; Song, Yuntao; Yang, Qingxi; Zheng, Jinxing; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Ping; Xiao, Chijin; Ding, Weixing

    2014-09-01

    The Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) is a medium-sized reversed field pinch (RFP) device under construction at the University of Science and Technology of China. The KTX has a major radius of 1.4 m and a minor radius of 0.4 m with an Ohmic discharge current up to 1 MA. The expected electron density and temperature are, respectively, 2 × 1019 m-3 and 800 eV. A combination of a stainless steel vacuum chamber and a thin copper shell (with a penetration time of 20 ms) surrounding the plasma provides an opportunity for studying resistive wall mode instabilities. The unique double-C design of the KTX vacuum vessel allows access to the interior of the KTX for easy first-wall modifications and investigations of power and particle handling, a largely unexplored territory in RFP research leading to demonstration of the fusion potential of the RFP concept. An active feedback mode control system is designed and will be implemented in the second phase of the KTX program. The recent progress of this program will be presented, including the design of the vacuum vessel, magnet systems and power supplies.

  17. Characterization of the plasma current quench during disruptions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P., Menard, J.E., and the NSTX Research Team

    2008-12-17

    A detailed analysis of the plasma current quench in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M.Ono, et al Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is presented. The fastest current quenches are fit better by a linear waveform than an exponential one. Area-normalized current quench times down to .4 msec/m2 have been observed, compared to the minimum of 1.7 msec/m2 recommendation based on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks; as noted in previous ITPA studies, the difference can be explained by the reduced self-inductance at low aspect ratio and high-elongation. The maximum instantaneous dIp/dt is often many times larger than the mean quench rate, and the plasma current before the disruption is often substantially less than the flat-top value. The poloidal field time-derivative during the disruption, which is directly responsible for driving eddy currents, has been recorded at various locations around the vessel. The Ip quench rate, plasma motion, and magnetic geometry all play important roles in determining the rate of poloidal field change.

  18. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  19. Fast-ion Energy Loss During TAE Avalanches in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, E D; Darrow, D S; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G J; Kubota, S; Podesta, M; White, R B; Bortolon, A; Gerhardt, S P; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; LeBlanc, B; Levinton, F M

    2012-07-11

    Strong TAE avalanches on NSTX, the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] are typically correlated with drops in the neutron rate in the range of 5% - 15%. In previous studies of avalanches in L-mode plasmas, these neutron drops were found to be consistent with modeled losses of fast ions. Here we expand the study to TAE avalanches in NSTX H-mode plasmas with improved analysis techniques. At the measured TAE mode amplitudes, simulations with the ORBIT code predict that fast ion losses are negligible. However, the simulations predict that the TAE scatter the fast ions in energy, resulting in a small (≈ 6%) drop in fast ion β. The net decrease in energy of the fast ions is sufficient to account for the bulk of the drop in neutron rate, even in the absence of fast ion losses. This loss of energy from the fast ion population is comparable to the estimated energy lost by damping from the Alfven wave during the burst. The previously studied TAE avalanches in L-mode are re-evaluated using an improved calculation of the potential fluctuations in the ORBIT code.

  20. A Megawatt-level 28z GHz Heating System For The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Gary

    2014-04-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) will operate at axial toroidal fields of < 1 T and plasma currents, Ip < 2 MA. The development of non-inductive (NI) plasmas is a major long-term research goal for NSTX-U. Time dependent numerical simulations of 28 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) heating of low density NI start-up plasmas generated by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) in NSTX-U predict a significant and rapid increase of the central electron temperature (Te(0)) before the plasma becomes overdense. The increased Te(0) will significantly reduce the Ip decay rate of CHI plasmas, allowing the coupling of fast wave heating and neutral beam injection. A megawatt-level, 28 GHz electron heating system is planned for heating NI start-up plasmas in NSTX-U. In addition to EC heating of CHI start-up discharges, this system will be used for electron Bernstein wave (EBW) plasma start-up, and eventually for EBW heating and current drive during the Ip flattop.

  1. Design and development of the helicity injection system in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, JongYoon; An, Younghwa; Jung, Bongki; Lee, Jeongwon; Lee, HyunYoung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Na, Yong-Su; Hwang, Y.S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A high current electron gun with single pulse power for both arc and extraction is developed. • The optimal gun operation is confirmed by impedance matching between the PFN and plasma. • The gun injected currents of 0.95 kA with the voltage of ∼410 V for 5 ms with a 1.2 kV PFN. • The helicity injection system using the gun has been developed and tested successfully in VEST. • Toroidal currents of up to 3.8 kA confirm possible relaxation into tokamak-like plasma. - Abstract: A helicity injection system for the Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) has been successfully developed and commissioned. A high current electron gun utilizing hollow cathode and washer stacks has been designed and constructed with a single pulse power system that can provide voltages for both arc discharge and extraction sequentially. Tests for electron gun operation with the single pulse power system have been conducted under various toroidal and poloidal field strengths. The estimated plasma impedance, depending on the injection magnetic field structure, can be utilized for the optimal gun operation by impedance matching between the pulse power system and plasma. With the charging voltage of 1.2 kV, injection current of 0.95 kA has been obtained with the injection voltage of 410 V for about 5 ms. Initial helicity injection experiments have been conducted under various toroidal and poloidal field strengths and a toroidal plasma current of up to 3.8 kA is observed with the current multiplication larger than the geometric stacking ratio, confirming the possibility of relaxation into tokamak-like plasma with closed flux formation.

  2. Dilution jet experiments in compact combustor configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, I.; Zizelman, J.

    1984-01-01

    This project concerns the effects of cooling jets on the velocity and temperature fields in a compact reverse flow combustor. The work is motivated by the need to limit the temperatures of post combustion gases in jet engines to values within the endurance capabilities of turbine blades. The application requires not only that the temperature be kept sufficiently low but also that a suitably tailored temperature profile be provided at the combustor exit, with higher temperatures generally permissible at the blade tip than at the blade root because of higher centrifugal loads at the root. Flows in reverse flow combustor accelerate both longitudinally because of area changes and transversely because of flow turning. The current project started with flow visualization experiments in water, using aqueous solutions of zinc bromide to model the relatively higher density of cooling jets.

  3. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Solomon, W.; Bell, R. E.; Candy, J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Yuh, H.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostatic ballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes in a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. As the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.

  4. Characterization of small, Type V edge-localized modes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Bell, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Fredrickson, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lee, K. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Maqueda, R. J. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ; Snyder, P. [General Atomics, San Diego; Tritz, K. [Johns Hopkins University; Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Bush, Charles E [ORNL; Boedo, J. [University of California, San Diego; Brooks, N. H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Johns Hopkins University; Domier, C. W. [University of California, Davis; Gates, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Johnson, D. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaye, S. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kugel, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LaBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Luhmann, N. C. [University of California, Davis; Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Park, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Raman, R [University of Washington, Seattle; Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Soukhanovskii, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Stevenson, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Stutman, D. [General Atomics, San Diego

    2006-01-01

    There has been a substantial international research effort in the fusion community to identify tokamak operating regimes with either small or no periodic bursts of particles and power from the edge plasma, known as edge-localized modes (ELMs). While several candidate regimes have been presented in the literature, very little has been published on the characteristics of the small ELMs themselves. One such small ELM regime, also known as the Type V ELM regime, was recently identified in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. In this paper, the spatial and temporal structure of the Type V ELMs is presented, as measured by several different diagnostics. The composite picture of the Type V ELM is of an instability with one or two filaments that rotate toroidally at ~5-10 km/s, in the direction opposite to the plasma current and neutral beam injection. The toroidal extent of Type V ELMs is typically ~5 m, whereas the cross-field (radial) extent is typically 10 cm (3cm), yielding a portrait of an electromagnetic, ribbon-like perturbation aligned with the total magnetic field. The filaments comprising the Type V ELM appear to be destabilized near the top of the H-mode pedestal and drift radially outward as they rotate toroidally. After the filaments come in contact with the open field lines, the divertor plasma perturbations are qualitatively similar to other ELM types, albeit with only one or two filaments in the Type V ELM versus more filaments for Type I and Type III ELMs. Preliminary stability calculations eliminate pressure driven modes as the underlying instability for Type V ELMs, but more work is required to determine if current driven modes are responsible for destabilization.

  5. Momentum-transport studies in high E x B shear plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, W M; Kaye, S M; Bell, R E; Leblanc, B P; Menard, J E; Rewoldt, G; Wang, W; Levinton, F M; Yuh, H; Sabbagh, S A

    2008-08-08

    Experiments have been conducted at the National Sperical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study both steady state and perturbative momentum transport. These studies are unique in their parameter space under investigation, where the low aspect ratio of NSTX results in rapid plasma rotation with ExB shearing rates high enough to suppress low-k turbulence. In some cases, the ratio of momentum to energy confinement time is found to exceed five. Momentum pinch velocities of order 10-40 m/s are inferred from the measured angular momentum flux evolution after nonresonant magnetic perturbations are applied to brake the plasma.

  6. Vibrating reed experiments on compacted vitreous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, G.; Daum, A.; Sohn, M.; Arndt, J.

    1996-02-01

    We have studied the acoustic properties of irreversibly compacted vitreous silica (Suprasil I) at frequencies around 12 kHz between 10 mK and room temperature. At low temperatures up to a few K the compacted glass exhibits acoustic properties similar to those of normal vitreous silica, however, with considerably smaller values of the damping and of the temperature coefficient of the sound velocity. Around 30 K the internal friction is reduced by factor of 6.

  7. Large compact dimensions and high energy experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sreerup Raychaudhuri

    2000-07-01

    Models of spacetime with extra compact dimensions and having the Standard Model fields confined to a narrow slice of 4-dimensional spacetime can have strong gravitational effects at the TeV scale as well as electroweak-strength interactions at present-day colliders. Phenomenological consequences of such models are reviewed, with special emphasis on collider signatures.

  8. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Masayuki [PPPL; Kaita, Robert [PPPL

    2014-01-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  9. Heating and current drive by fast wave in lower hybrid range of frequency on Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun-Ho, E-mail: shkim95@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyunwoo; Lee, Byungje [KwangWoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jong-Gab; Lee, Hyun-Young; Hwang, Yong-Seok [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    An efficient heating and current drive scheme in central or off-axis region is required to realize steady state operation of tokamak fusion reactor. And the fast wave in lower hybrid resonance range of frequency could be a candidate for such an efficient scheme in high density and high temperature plasmas. Its propagation and absorption characteristics including current drive and coupling efficiency are analyzed for Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus and it is shown that it is possible to drive current with considerable current drive efficiency in central region. The RF system for the fast wave experiment including klystron, transmission systems, inter-digital antenna, and RF diagnostics are given as well in this paper.

  10. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  11. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  12. Demonstration of Tokamak ohmic flux saving by transient coaxial helicity injection in the national spherical torus experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R; Mueller, D; Nelson, B A; Jarboe, T R; Gerhardt, S; Kugel, H W; Leblanc, B; Maingi, R; Menard, J; Ono, M; Paul, S; Roquemore, L; Sabbagh, S; Soukhanovskii, V

    2010-03-05

    Transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) started discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have attained peak currents up to 300 kA and when coupled to induction, it has produced up to 200 kA additional current over inductive-only operation. CHI in NSTX has shown to be energetically quite efficient, producing a plasma current of about 10 A/J of capacitor bank energy. In addition, for the first time, the CHI-produced toroidal current that couples to induction continues to increase with the energy supplied by the CHI power supply at otherwise similar values of the injector flux, indicating the potential for substantial current generation capability by CHI in NSTX and in future toroidal devices.

  13. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Smith, D. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. Y. [Nova Photonics Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  14. Structure and motion of edge turbulence in the National Spherical Torus Experiment and Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, S. J.; Maqueda, R. J.; Terry, J. L.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D.; Russell, D. A.; Krommes, J. A.; LeBlanc, B.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D. P.; Williams, K. M.; Bush, C. E.; Maingi, R.; Grulke, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; White, A. E.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper we compare the structure and motion of edge turbulence observed in L-mode vs. H-mode plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, M. G. Bell, R. E. Bell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 45, A335 (2003)]. The radial and poloidal correlation lengths are not significantly different between the L-mode and the H-mode in the cases examined. The poloidal velocity fluctuations are lower and the radial profiles of the poloidal turbulence velocity are somewhat flatter in the H-mode compared with the L-mode plasmas. These results are compared with similar measurements Alcator C-Mod [E. Marmar, B. Bai, R. L. Boivin et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1610 (2003)], and with theoretical models.

  15. [Torus mandibularis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, A; Schirren, C G

    1997-06-01

    Solitary or bilateral, symptomless exostoses on the lingual surface of the mandibule are called mandibular torus. It is mainly seen in young males and has a benign clinical course. The etiopathology is not known. Both genetic and environmental factors such as the anatomy of the lower jaw are considered. Syndromes associated with facial exostoses such as Proteus syndrome or Gardner's syndrome should be clinically excluded. A 40-year-old man with exostoses of the jaw is reported. With this case report we would like to draw attention to a disease which has rarely been described in the German dermatological literature.

  16. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR-94)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messiaen, A. M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; R. Jaspers,; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H. R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P. E.; Van Oost, G.; van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R. R.; Wolf, G. H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; KramerFlecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; PostZwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M. Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [Proceedings of die 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p.

  17. Comparison of Poloidal Velocity Meassurements to Neoclassical Theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R E; Kaye, S M; Kolesnikov, R A; LeBlance, B P; Rewolldt, G; Wang, W X

    2010-04-07

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, Er, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, recent poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus [S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Local profiles are obtained with an inversion. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] and GTC-Neo [W. X. Wang, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)], which has been updated to handle impurities. __________________________________________________

  18. Suppression of Alfvén Modes on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade with Outboard Beam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Belova, E. V.; Battaglia, D. J.; Bell, R. E.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; NSTX-U Team

    2017-06-01

    In this Letter we present data from experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, where it is shown for the first time that small amounts of high pitch-angle beam ions can strongly suppress the counterpropagating global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE). GAE have been implicated in the redistribution of fast ions and modification of the electron power balance in previous experiments on NSTX. The ability to predict the stability of Alfvén modes, and developing methods to control them, is important for fusion reactors like the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, which are heated by a large population of nonthermal, super-Alfvénic ions consisting of fusion generated α 's and beam ions injected for current profile control. We present a qualitative interpretation of these observations using an analytic model of the Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonance drive responsible for GAE instability which has an important dependence on k⊥ρL . A quantitative analysis of this data with the hym stability code predicts both the frequencies and instability of the GAE prior to, and suppression of the GAE after the injection of high pitch-angle beam ions.

  19. Study of the Effect of Compressional Alfvin Modes on Thermal Transport in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.D. Fredrickson; N. Gorelenkov; C.Z. Cheng; R. Bell; D. Darrow, D. Gates; D. Johnson; S. Kaye; B. LeBlanc; D. McCune; J. Menard; L. Roquemore

    2002-02-25

    With the first injection of neutral beams into the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] a broad spectrum of fluctuations consisting of nearly equally spaced peaks in the frequency range from about 0.2 to 1.2 times the ion cyclotron frequency was observed. The frequencies scale with toroidal field and plasma density consistently with Alfvin waves. From these and other observations, the modes have been identified as Compressional Alfvin Eigenmodes (CAE). It has also recently been found that the ratio of the measured ion and electron temperatures in NSTX during neutral-beam heating is anomalously high [Bell, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46 (2001) 206]. To explain the anomaly in the ratio of ion to electron temperature, it has been suggested that the CAE, driven by the beam ions, stochastically heat the thermal ions [Gates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 205003]. In this paper, it is shown through studies of the power balance that stochastic heating of the thermal ions by the observed CAE alone is not solely responsible for the anomaly in the ion to electron temperature ratio.

  20. The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Delepine

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will study protonproton collisions at unprecedented energies and luminosities. In this article we providefi rst a brief general introduction to particle physics. We then explain what CERN is. Thenwe describe the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the most powerful particle acceleratorever built. Finally we describe the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, its physics goals,construction details, and current status.El experimento Compact Muon Solenoid en el Large Hadron Collider del CERN estudiarácolisiones protón protón a energías y luminosidades sin precedente. En este artículo presentamos primero una breve introducción general a la física de partículas. Despuésexplicamos lo que es el CERN. Luego describimos el Large Hadron Collider, el más potente acelerador de partículas construido por el hombre, en el CERN. Finalmente describimos el experimento Compact Muon Solenoid, sus objetivos en física, los detalles de su construcción,y su situación presente.

  1. 2D divertor heat flux distribution using a 3D heat conduction solver in National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, K F; Ahn, J-W; Park, J-W; Maingi, R; McLean, A G; Gray, T K; Gong, X; Zhang, X D

    2013-02-01

    The divertor heat flux footprint in tokamaks is often observed to be non-axisymmetric due to intrinsic error fields, applied 3D magnetic fields or during transients such as edge localized modes. Typically, only 1D radial heat flux profiles are analyzed; however, analysis of the full 2D divertor measurements provides opportunities to study the asymmetric nature of the deposited heat flux. To accomplish this an improved 3D Fourier analysis method has been successfully applied in a heat conduction solver (TACO) to determine the 2D heat flux distribution at the lower divertor surface in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) tokamak. This advance enables study of helical heat deposition onto the divertor. In order to account for heat transmission through poorly adhered surface layers on the divertor plate, a heat transmission coefficient, defined as the surface layer thermal conductivity divided by the thickness of the layer, was introduced to the solution of heat conduction equation. This coefficient is denoted as α and a range of values were tested in the model to ensure a reliable heat flux calculation until a specific value of α led to the constant total deposited energy in the numerical solution after the end of discharge. A comparison between 1D heat flux profiles from TACO and from a 2D heat flux calculation code, THEODOR, shows good agreement. Advantages of 2D heat flux distribution over the conventional 1D heat flux profile are also discussed, and examples of 2D data analysis in the study of striated heat deposition pattern as well as the toroidal degree of asymmetry of peak heat flux and heat flux width are demonstrated.

  2. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J

    2008-12-31

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0 MA and 1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode discharges with a high magnetic flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub t} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the strongly-shaped lower single null configuration with elongation {kappa} = 2.2-2.4 and triangularity {delta} = 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using the inherently high magnetic flux expansion f{sub m} = 16-25 and the partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates. A good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained, while the core carbon concentration and the associated Z{sub eff} were reduced. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by an increase in divertor radiated power, a reduction of ion flux to the plate, and a large neutral compression ratio. Spectroscopic measurements indicated a formation of a high-density, low temperature region adjacent to the outer strike point, where substantial increases in the volume recombination rate and CII, CIII emission rates was measured.

  3. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  4. Parametric Dependence Of Fast-ion Transport Events On The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Erik; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Bortolon, A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Neutral-beam heated tokamak plasmas commonly have more than one third of the plasma kinetic energy in the non-thermal energetic beam ion population. This population of fast ions heats the plasma, provides some of the current drive, and can affect the stability (positively or negatively) of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. This population of energetic ions is not in thermodynamic equilibrium, thus there is free-energy available to drive instabilities, which may lead to redistribution of the fast ion population. Understanding under what conditions beam-driven instabilities arise, and the extent of the resulting perturbation to the fast ion population, is important for predicting and eventually demonstrating non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in NSTX-U, as well as the performance of future fusion plasma experiments such as ITER. This paper presents an empirical approach towards characterizing the stability boundaries for some common energetic-ion-driven instabilities seen on NSTX.

  5. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT-SI) Spheromak Experiment with the NIMROD Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Cihan

    A comparative study of 3-D pressureless resistive (single-fluid) magnetohydrodynamic (rMHD) and 3-D pressureless two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (2fl-MHD) models of the Helicity Injected Torus experiment (HIT-SI) is presented. HIT-SI is a spheromak current-drive experiment that uses two geometrically asymmetric helicity injectors to generate and sustain toroidal plasmas. The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate that steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI) is a viable method for driving and sustaining a magnetized plasma for the eventual purpose of electricity production with magnetic fusion power. The experiment has achieved sustainment of nearly 100 kA of plasma current for ˜1~ms. Fusion power plants are expected to sustain a burning plasma for many minutes to hours with more than 10~MA of plasma current. The purpose of project is to determine the validity of the single-fluid and two-fluid MHD models of HIT-SI. The comparable size of the collisionless ion skin depth to the diameter of the injectors and resistive skin depth predicates the importance of two-fluid effects. The simulations are run with NIMROD (non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics code with rotation-open discussion), an initial-value, 3-D extended MHD code. A constant and uniform plasma density and temperature are assumed. The helicity injectors are modeled as oscillating normal magnetic and parallel electric field boundary conditions. The simulations use parameters that closely match those of the experiment. The simulation output is compared to the formation time, plasma current, and internal and surface magnetic fields. Results of the study indicate 2fl-MHD shows quantitative agreement with the experiment while rMHD only captures the qualitative features. The validity of each model is assessed based on how accurately it reproduces the global quantities as well as the temporal and spatial dependence of the measured magnetic fields. 2fl-MHD produces the current amplification and formation time

  7. The national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) research programme and progress towards high beta, long pulse operating scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Darrow, D. S.; Efthimion, P. C.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Gilmore, M.; Grisham, L. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H. K.; Paul, S. F.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Phillips, C. K.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D. W.; Taylor, G.; Von Halle, A.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J. M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Budny, R.; Carter, M. D.; Chang, C. S.; Chrzanowski, J.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Doyle, E. J.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Goldston, R. J.; Harvey, R.; Hatcher, R. E.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K. W.; Houlberg, W.; Jarboe, T. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lawrance, J.; Lao, L. L.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, N. C.; Majeski, R.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Mau, T. K.; McCormack, B.; Menon, M. M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Nishino, N.; Okabayashi, M.; Oliaro, G.; Pacella, D.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Pinsker, R.; Porter, G. D.; Ram, A. K.; Redi, M.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Schaffer, M.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B. C.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W. R.; Wurden, G. A.; Xu, X. Q.; Yang, J. G.; Zeng, L.; Zhu, W.

    2003-12-01

    A major research goal of the national spherical torus experiment is establishing long-pulse, high beta, high confinement operation and its physics basis. This research has been enabled by facility capabilities developed during 2001 and 2002, including neutral beam (up to 7 MW) and high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating (up to 6 MW), toroidal fields up to 6 kG, plasma currents up to 1.5 MA, flexible shape control, and wall preparation techniques. These capabilities have enabled the generation of plasmas with \\beta _T \\equiv \\langle p \\rangle /(B_{T0}^{2}/2\\mu_{0}) of up to 35%. Normalized beta values often exceed the no-wall limit, and studies suggest that passive wall mode stabilization enables this for H mode plasmas with broad pressure profiles. The viability of long, high bootstrap current fraction operations has been established for ELMing H mode plasmas with toroidal beta values in excess of 15% and sustained for several current relaxation times. Improvements in wall conditioning and fuelling are likely contributing to a reduction in H mode power thresholds. Electron thermal conduction is the dominant thermal loss channel in auxiliary heated plasmas examined thus far. HHFW effectively heats electrons, and its acceleration of fast beam ions has been observed. Evidence for HHFW current drive is obtained by comparision of the loop voltage evolution in plasmas with matched density and temperature profiles but varying phases of launched HHFW waves. Studies of emissions from electron Bernstein waves indicate a density scale length dependence of their transmission across the upper hybrid resonance near the plasma edge that is consistent with theoretical predictions. A peak heat flux to the divertor targets of 10 MW m-2 has been measured in the H mode, with large asymmetries being observed in the power deposition between the inner and outer strike points. Non-inductive plasma startup studies have focused on coaxial helicity injection. With this technique

  8. Generic torus canards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Theodore

    2017-10-01

    Torus canards are special solutions of fast/slow systems that alternate between attracting and repelling manifolds of limit cycles of the fast subsystem. A relatively new dynamic phenomenon, torus canards have been found in neural applications to mediate the transition from tonic spiking to bursting via amplitude-modulated spiking. In R3, torus canards are degenerate: they require one-parameter families of 2-fast/1-slow systems in order to be observed and even then, they only occur on exponentially thin parameter intervals. The addition of a second slow variable unfolds the torus canard phenomenon, making it generic and robust. That is, torus canards in fast/slow systems with (at least) two slow variables occur on open parameter sets. So far, generic torus canards have only been studied numerically, and their behaviour has been inferred based on averaging and canard theory. This approach, however, has not been rigorously justified since the averaging method breaks down near a fold of periodics, which is exactly where torus canards originate. In this work, we combine techniques from Floquet theory, averaging theory, and geometric singular perturbation theory to show that the average of a torus canard is a folded singularity canard. In so doing, we devise an analytic scheme for the identification and topological classification of torus canards in fast/slow systems with two fast variables and k slow variables, for any positive integer k. We demonstrate the predictive power of our results in a model for intracellular calcium dynamics, where we explain the mechanisms underlying a novel class of elliptic bursting rhythms, called amplitude-modulated bursting, by constructing the torus canard analogues of mixed-mode oscillations. We also make explicit the connection between our results here with prior studies of torus canards and torus canard explosion in R3, and discuss how our methods can be extended to fast/slow systems of arbitrary (finite) dimension.

  9. Phase coherence of parametric-decay modes during high-harmonic fast-wave heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, J. A., E-mail: carlsson@pppl.gov [Crow Radio and Plasma Science, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Wilson, J. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Perkins, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Third-order spectral analysis, in particular, the auto bicoherence, was applied to probe signals from high-harmonic fast-wave heating experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Strong evidence was found for parametric decay of the 30 MHz radio-frequency (RF) pump wave, with a low-frequency daughter wave at 2.7 MHz, the local majority-ion cyclotron frequency. The primary decay modes have auto bicoherence values around 0.85, very close to the theoretical value of one, which corresponds to total phase coherence with the pump wave. The threshold RF pump power for onset of parametric decay was found to be between 200 kW and 400 kW.

  10. the LHC Compact Muon Solenoid experiment detector control system

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is a multi-purpose experiment designed to exploit the physics of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider collision energy (14TeV at centre of mass) over the full range of expected luminosities (up to 1034cm-2s-1). CMS detector control system (DCS) responsibility is to ensure a safe, correct and efficient operation of the detector so that high quality physics data can be recorded. The system is also required to make possible that inexperienced shifters can operate the detector and a small crew of experts can take care of the maintenance of its software and hardware infrastructure. The DCS large subsystems size sum up to more than a million parameters that need to be supervised. A cluster of roughly 100 servers is used to provide the required processing resources. A scalable approach has been chosen factorizing the DCS system as much as possible. CMS DCS has made clear division between its computing resources and functionality by creating a comput...

  11. Neutral Particle Analyzer Vertically Scanning Measurements of MHD-induced Energetic Ion Redistribution or Loss in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley, R. Andre, R.E. Bell, D.S. Darrow, C.W. Domier, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, K.C. Lee, F.M. Levinton, D. Liu, N.C. Luhmann, Jr., J.E. Menard, H. Park, D. Stutman, A.L. Roquemore, K. Tritz, H. Yuh and the NSTX Team

    2007-11-15

    Observations of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) induced redistribution or loss of energetic ions measured using the vertically scanning capability of the Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented along with TRANSP and ORBIT code analysis of the results. Although redistribution or loss of energetic ions due to bursting fishbone-like and low-frequency (f ~ 10 kHz) kinktype MHD activity has been reported previously, the primary goal of this work is to study redistribution or loss due to continuous Alfvénic (f ~ 20 – 150 kHz) modes, a topic that heretofore has not been investigated in detail for NSTX plasmas. Initial indications are that the former drive energetic ion loss whereas the continuous Alfvénic modes only cause redistribution and the energetic ions remain confined.

  12. Principal noncommutative torus bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echterhoff, Siegfried; Nest, Ryszard; Oyono-Oyono, Herve

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study continuous bundles of C*-algebras which are non-commutative analogues of principal torus bundles. We show that all such bundles, although in general being very far away from being locally trivial bundles, are at least locally trivial with respect to a suitable bundle version...... of bivariant K-theory (denoted RKK-theory) due to Kasparov. Using earlier results of Echterhoff and Williams, we shall give a complete classification of principal non-commutative torus bundles up to equivariant Morita equivalence. We then study these bundles as topological fibrations (forgetting the group...... action) and give necessary and sufficient conditions for any non-commutative principal torus bundle being RKK-equivalent to a commutative one. As an application of our methods we shall also give a K-theoretic characterization of those principal torus-bundles with H-flux, as studied by Mathai...

  13. Torus palatino, torus mandibular y exostosis maxilares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Alberto Manotas Arevalo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Los huesos maxilares son parte de la estructura esquelética corporal por lo cual no son ajenos a las patologías que se presentan en ella. Algunas guardan semejanza entre sí, otras son muy singulares por sus características patognomónicas, por ejemplo, los torus palatinos, los torus mandibulares y las exostosis de los maxilares. Sin embargo, existen ideas especulativas acerca de su etiopatogenía, de los factores asociados, de su incidencia y prevalencia, de su necesidad de tratamiento, entre otras. El propósito de esta revisión es presentar la información existente sobre estas patologías en textos usados para la formación de profesionales de salud en nuestro medio y en el ámbito universal, y en otras publicaciones que hayan servido de soporte a las ideas concebidas acerca de los torus y las exostosis, haciendo énfasis en los aspectos diagnósticos. Se pretende que esta información sirva de orientación para investigaciones futuras. 

  14. Electron Density Measurements in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Detached Divertor Region Using Stark Broadening of Deuterium Infrared Paschen Emission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Johnson, D W; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L

    2007-04-27

    Spatially resolved measurements of deuterium Balmer and Paschen line emission have been performed in the divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiment using a commercial 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer. While the Balmer emission lines, Balmer and Paschen continua in the ultraviolet and visible regions have been extensively used for tokamak divertor plasma temperature and density measurements, the diagnostic potential of infrared Paschen lines has been largely overlooked. We analyze Stark broadening of the lines corresponding to 2-n and 3-m transitions with principle quantum numbers n = 7-12 and m = 10-12 using recent Model Microfield Method calculations (C. Stehle and R. Hutcheon, Astron. Astrophys. Supl. Ser. 140, 93 (1999)). Densities in the range (5-50) x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} are obtained in the recombining inner divertor plasma in 2-6 MW NBI H-mode discharges. The measured Paschen line profiles show good sensitivity to Stark effects, and low sensitivity to instrumental and Doppler broadening. The lines are situated in the near-infrared wavelength domain, where optical signal extraction schemes for harsh nuclear environments are practically realizable, and where a recombining divertor plasma is optically thin. These properties make them an attractive recombining divertor density diagnostic for a burning plasma experiment.

  15. An Asymmetric Noncommutative Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Ludwik; Sitarz, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a family of spectral triples that describe the curved noncommutative two-torus. The relevant family of new Dirac operators is given by rescaling one of two terms in the flat Dirac operator. We compute the dressed scalar curvature and show that the Gauss-Bonnet theorem holds (which is not covered by the general result of Connes and Moscovici).

  16. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; Jaspers, R.; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H.R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M.Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Ecole Royale Militaire-B-1000 Brussels, Koninklijke Militaire School (Belgium)]|[Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH Association Euratom-KFA, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]|[Fusion Energy Research Program, Mechanical Engineering Division, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)]|[FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen Associatie FOM-EURATOM, Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [{ital Proceedings of the 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering} (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p. 470] is given. This regime is obtained under quasistationary conditions with edge neon seeding in a pumped limiter tokamak with circular cross section. It combines high confinement and high {beta} (up to a normalized beta, {beta}{sub n}=2) with low edge q values (down to q{sub a}=2.8) and high density even above the Greenwald limit together with dominant edge radiative heat exhaust, and therefore shows promise for the future of fusion research. Bulk and edge properties of these discharges are described, and a detailed account is given of the energy and particle confinement and their scaling. Energy confinement scales linearly with density as for the nonsaturated Ohmic Neo-Alcator scaling, but the usual degradation with total power remains. No deleterious effects of the neon seeding on fusion reactivity and plasma stability have been observed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. A compact equipment package for vestibular experiments during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. H.; Teiwes, W.; Scherer, H.

    A compact measurement and stimulus equipment package for vestibular testing is described. The package is designed on a modular concept so that a customized version can be assembled for each experimental situation. Although primarily conceived for space-related research, the equipment has also been introduced successfully into the clinical diagnostic procedure. An essential function of the equipment is the recording and evaluation of eye movements. This is performed by a video-based measurement system which permits evaluation of horizontal, vertical and torsional components of eye movement. Objective testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in all three orthogonal planes is therefore possible. Furthermore evaluation of the otolithic function in weightlessness is made feasible by the possibility of measuring dynamic ocular counterrolling. Some applications of the equipment are described.

  18. Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Peter; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.

    2016-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The system takes a single point measurement at the magnetic axis to both calibrate the two- color soft x-ray Te system and serve as an additional diagnostic for the V3FIT 3D equilibrium reconstruction code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line propagates 8 m to the CTH device mid-plane with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. Thomson scattered light is collected by two adjacent f/2 plano-convex condenser lenses and focused onto a custom fiber bundle. The fiber is then re-bundled and routed to a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 535-565 nm. The system has been designed to measure plasmas with core Te of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. Work supported by USDOE Grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  19. Overview of the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) T4B Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) Program endeavors to quickly develop a compact fusion power plant with favorable commercial economics and military utility. The CFR uses a diamagnetic, high beta, magnetically encapsulated, linear ring cusp plasma confinement scheme. The goal of the T4B experiment is to demonstrate a suitable plasma target for heating experiments and to characterize the behavior of plasma sources in the CFR configuration. The design of the T4B experiment will be presented, including discussion of predicted behavior, plasma sources, heating mechanisms, diagnostics suite and relevant numerical modeling. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  1. Introduction to the special issue on experiences with the impact and prevention of subsoil compaction in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, van den J.J.H.; Arvidsson, J.; Horn, R.

    2003-01-01

    The papers in this special issue present results of the European Union (EU) concerted action ¿Experiences with the impact of subsoil compaction on soil crop growth and environment and ways to prevent subsoil compaction¿. The results and conclusions of earlier research on subsoil compaction are memor

  2. Renormalization on noncommutative torus

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ascanio, D; Vassilevich, D V

    2016-01-01

    We study a self-interacting scalar $\\varphi^4$ theory on the $d$-dimensional noncommutative torus. We determine, for the particular cases $d=2$ and $d=4$, the nonlocal counterterms required by one-loop renormalization. We discuss higher loops in two dimensions and two-loop contributions to the self-energy in four dimensions. Our analysis points towards the absence of any problems related to the UV/IR mixing and thus to renormalizability of the theory. However, we find another potentially troubling phenomenon which is a wild behavior of the two-point amplitude as a function of the noncommutativity matrix $\\theta$.

  3. Torus Bifurcation Under Discretization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹永魁; 黄明游

    2002-01-01

    Parameterized dynamical systems with a simple zero eigenvalue and a couple of purely imaginary eigenvalues are considered. It is proved that this type of eigen-structure leads to torns bifurcation under certain nondegenerate conditions. We show that the discrete systems, obtained by discretizing the ODEs using symmetric, eigen-structure preserving schemes, inherit the similar torus bifurcation properties. Fredholm theory in Banach spaces is applied to obtain the global torns bifurcation. Our results complement those on the study of discretization effects of global bifurcation.

  4. Renormalization on noncommutative torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ascanio, D.; Pisani, P. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Instituto de Fisica La Plata-CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Vassilevich, D.V. [Universidade Federal do ABC, CMCC, Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Tomsk State University, Department of Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    We study a self-interacting scalar φ{sup 4} theory on the d-dimensional noncommutative torus. We determine, for the particular cases d = 2 and d = 4, the counterterms required by one-loop renormalization. We discuss higher loops in two dimensions and two-loop contributions to the self-energy in four dimensions. Our analysis points toward the absence of any problems related to the ultraviolet/infrared mixing and thus to renormalizability of the theory. However, we find another potentially troubling phenomenon which is a wild behavior of the two-point amplitude as a function of the noncommutativity matrix θ. (orig.)

  5. Renormalization on noncommutative torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ascanio, D.; Pisani, P.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    We study a self-interacting scalar \\varphi ^4 theory on the d-dimensional noncommutative torus. We determine, for the particular cases d=2 and d=4, the counterterms required by one-loop renormalization. We discuss higher loops in two dimensions and two-loop contributions to the self-energy in four dimensions. Our analysis points toward the absence of any problems related to the ultraviolet/infrared mixing and thus to renormalizability of the theory. However, we find another potentially troubling phenomenon which is a wild behavior of the two-point amplitude as a function of the noncommutativity matrix θ.

  6. Large Hadron Collider physics program Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, J B

    2000-01-01

    The LHC physics program at CERN addresses some of the fundamental issues in particle physics and CMS experiment would concentrate on them. The CMS detector is designed for the search of Standard Model Higgs boson in the whole possible mass range. Also it will be sensitive to Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric model and well adapted to searches for SUSY particles, new massive vector bosons, CP-violation in the B-system, search for substructure of quarks and leptons, etc. In the LHC heavy ion collisions the energy density would be well above the threshold for the possible formation of quark-gluon plasma. (15 refs).

  7. Large hadron collider physics program: Compact muon solenoid experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J B Singh

    2000-04-01

    The LHC physics program at CERN addresses some of the fundamental issues in particle physics and CMS experiment would concentrate on them. The CMS detector is designed for the search of Standard Model Higgs boson in the whole possible mass range. Also it will be sensitive to Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric model and well adapted to searches for SUSY particles, new massive vector bosons, CP-violation in -system, search for substructure of quarks and leptons, etc. In the LHC heavy ion collisions the energy density would be well above the threshold for the possible formation of quark–gluon plasma.

  8. Design, construction, alignment, and calibration of a compact velocimetry experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, Morris I.; Malone, Robert M.; Frogget, Brent C.; Romero, Vincent T.; Esquibel, David L.; Iverson, Adam; Lare, Gregory A.; Briggs, Bart; DeVore, Douglas; Cata, Brian; McGillivray, Kevin; Palagi, Martin; et al.,

    2007-08-31

    A velocimetry experiment has been designed to measure shock properties for small, cylindrical, metal targets (8 mm diameter × 2 mm thick). A target is accelerated by high explosives, caught, then retrieved for later inspection. The target is expected to move at a velocity of 0.1 to 3 km/sec. The complete experiment canister is ~105 mm in diameter and 380 mm long. Optical velocimetry diagnostics include the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). The packaging of the velocity diagnostics is not allowed to interfere with the foam catchment or an X-ray imaging diagnostic. Using commercial lenses, a single optical relay collects Doppler-shifted light for both VISAR and PDV. The use of fiber optics allows measurement of point velocities on the target surface for accelerations lasting for 3 mm of travel. Operating at 532 nm, the VISAR has separate illumination fibers requiring alignment. The PDV diagnostic operates at 1550 nm but is aligned and calibrated at 670 nm. VISAR and PDV diagnostics are complimentary measurements that image spots in close proximity on the target surface. Because the optical relay uses commercial glass, optical fibers’ axial positions are offset to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The optomechanical design requires careful attention to fiber management, mechanical assembly and disassembly, foam catchment design, and X-ray diagnostic field of view.Calibration and alignment data are archived at each assembly sequence stage. The photon budgets for the VISAR and PDV diagnostics are separately estimated.

  9. Supersymmetry Searches at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS Experiment, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koay S. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery/exclusion of Supersymmetric models for fundamental interactions of particles is one of the milestones targeted by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and in particular comprises of a large part of the physics program of the CMS experiment. Since the initial measurements using the 36 pb−1 of integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2010, presently available results utilize about one fifth of the data delivered in 2011, i.e. in the ballpark of 1 fb−1, significantly extending the world limits placed on gluino and squark production signals. An overview of these analyses is presented, highlighting four that had been newly made public as of the date of this conference. The evidence for Supersymmetry (SUSY is still elusive, and a discussion follows as to where current searches have not yet probed, also pointing out where they might have difficulty ever probing without dedicated arrangements.

  10. Supersymmetry Searches at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment, 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Koay, S A

    2012-01-01

    The discovery/exclusion of Supersymmetric models for fundamental interactions of particles is one of the milestones targeted by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and in particular comprises of a large part of the physics program of the CMS experiment. Since the initial measurements using the 36\\ipb of integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2010, presently available results utilize about one fifth of the data delivered in 2011, i.e. in the ballpark of 1\\ifb, significantly extending the world limits placed on gluino and squark production signals. An overview of these analyses is presented, highlighting four that had been newly made public as of the date of this conference. The evidence for Supersymmetry (SUSY) is still elusive, and a discussion follows as to where current searches have not yet probed, also pointing out where they might have difficulty ever probing without dedicated arrangements.

  11. Electron Microscopic Examination of Irradiated TRISO Coated Particles of Compact 6-3-2 of AGR-1 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rooyen, Isabella Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riesterer, Jessica Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Brandon Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ploger, Scott Arden [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The electron microscopic examination of selected irradiated TRISO coated particles of the AGR-1 experiment of fuel compact 6-3-2 are presented in this report. Compact 6-3-2 refers to the compact in Capsule 6 at level 3 of Stack 2. The fuel used in capsule 6 compacts, are called the “baseline” fuel as it is fabricated with refined coating process conditions used to fabricate historic German fuel, because of its excellent irradiation performance with UO2 kernels. The AGR-1 fuel is however made of low-enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO). Kernel diameters are approximately 350 µm with a U-235 enrichment of approximately 19.7%. Compact 6-3-2 has been irradiated to 11.3% FIMA compact average burn-up with a time average, volume average temperature of 1070.2°C and with a compact average fast fluence of 2.38E21 n/cm

  12. Autophoretic flow on a torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieding, Lasse C.; Lauga, Eric; Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D.

    2017-03-01

    Phoretic swimmers provide new avenues to study nonequilibrium statistical physics and are also hailed as a promising technology for bioengineering at the cellular scale. Exact solutions for the locomotion of such swimmers have been restricted so far to spheroidal shapes. In this paper we solve for the flow induced by the canonical nonsimply connected shape, namely an axisymmetric phoretic torus. The analytical solution takes the form of an infinite series solution, which we validate against boundary element computations. For a torus of uniform chemical activity, confinement effects in the hole allow the torus to act as a pump, which we optimize subject to fixed particle surface area. Under the same constraint, we next characterize the fastest swimming Janus torus for a variety of assumptions on the surface chemistry. Perhaps surprisingly, none of the optimal tori occur in the limit where the central hole vanishes.

  13. Electronic Circuit Experiments and SPICE Simulation of Double Covering Bifurcation of 2-Torus Quasi-Periodic Flow in Phase-Locked Loop Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Kyohei; Endo, Tetsuro; Imai, Isao; Komuro, Motomasa

    2016-06-01

    Double covering (DC) bifurcation of a 2-torus quasi-periodic flow in a phase-locked loop circuit was experimentally investigated using an electronic circuit and via SPICE simulation; in the circuit, the input radio-frequency signal was frequency modulated by the sum of two asynchronous sinusoidal baseband signals. We observed both DC and period-doubling bifurcations of a discrete map on two Poincaré sections, which were realized by changing the sample timing from one baseband sinusoidal signal to the other. The results confirm the DC bifurcation of the original flow.

  14. Experiment and mechanism of vibration liquefaction and compacting of saturated bulk solid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper studies the probability of industrial application of vibration liquefaction of bulk solid from the opposite point of view, and proposing turning its harmful effects into benefits. Utilizing a new device of vibration liquefaction and by compacting saturated bulk solid, a set of additional device for experiment was designed. These experiments examined the problems related to vibration liquefaction of fine-ores and tailings on the basis of DSA-1 type direct shear apparatus, including models of straight tubes, curved tubes and a sandbox. The changing properties of tailings under vibration and the mechanism of vibration liquefaction and compacting of tailings were studied, and future application of the technique to mines has been put forward.

  15. Why a Windy Torus?

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Everett, J E; Keating, S; Deo, R P

    2013-01-01

    Mass ejection in the form of winds or jets appears to be as fundamental to quasar activity as accretion, and can be directly observed in many objects with broadened and blue-shifted UV absorption features. A convincing argument for radiation pressure driving this ionized outflow can be made within the dust sublimation radius. Beyond, radiation pressure is even more important, as high energy photons from the central engine can now push on dust grains. This physics underlies the dusty-wind model for the putative obscuring torus. Specifically, the dusty wind in our model is first launched from the outer accretion disk as a magneto-centrifugal wind and then accelerated and shaped by radiation pressure from the central continuum. Such a wind can plausibly account for both the necessary obscuring medium to explain the ratio of broad-to-narrow-line objects and the mid-infrared emission commonly seen in quasar spectral energy distributions. A convincing demonstration that large-scale, organized magnetic fields are pr...

  16. On the Torus Cobordant Cohomology Spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali Özkurt; Doğan Dönmez

    2009-02-01

    Let be a compact Lie group. In 1960, P A Smith asked the following question: ``Is it true that for any smooth action of on a homotopy sphere with exactly two fixed points, the tangent -modules at these two points are isomorphic?" A result due to Atiyah and Bott proves that the answer is `yes’ for $\\mathbb{Z}_p$ and it is also known to be the same for connected Lie groups. In this work, we prove that two linear torus actions on $S^n$ which are -cobordant (cobordism in which inclusion of each boundary component induces isomorphisms in $\\mathbb{Z}$-cohomology) must be linearly equivalent. As a corollary, for connected case, we prove a variant of Smith’s question.

  17. Sensitivity analysis and numerical experiments on transient test of compact heat exchanger surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hesheng REN; Lingjun LAI; Yongzheng CUI

    2008-01-01

    A single-blow transient testing technique con-sidering the effect of longitudinal heat conduction is sug-gested for determining the average convection heat transfer coefficient of compact heat exchanger surface. By matching the measured outlet fluid temperature vari-ation with similar theoretical curves, the dimensionless longitudinal conduction parameter λ1, the time constant of the inlet fluid temperature τ+, and the number of heat transfer units Ntu can be determined simultaneously using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear parameter estima-tion method. Both sensitivity analysis and numerical experiments with simulated measurements containing random errors show that the method in the present invest-igation provides satisfactory accuracy of the estimated parameter Ntu, which characterizes the heat transfer per-formance of compact heat exchanger surfaces.

  18. Reduction of plasma density in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance experiment by using a helicon pre-ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Aaron C; Firman, Taylor; Jarboe, Thomas R; Prager, James R; Victor, Brian S; Wrobel, Jonathan S; Ziemba, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    A helicon based pre-ionization source has been developed and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance (HIT-SI) spheromak. The source initiates plasma breakdown by injecting impurity-free, unmagnetized plasma into the HIT-SI confinement volume. Typical helium spheromaks have electron density reduced from (2-3) × 10(19) m(-3) to 1 × 10(19) m(-3). Deuterium spheromak formation is possible with density as low as 2 × 10(18) m(-3). The source also enables HIT-SI to be operated with only one helicity injector at injector frequencies above 14.5 kHz. A theory explaining the physical mechanism driving the reduction of breakdown density is presented.

  19. Modeling the Europa plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Ron; Eviatar, Aharon; Vasyliunas, Vytenis M.; Richardson, John D.

    1993-12-01

    The existence of a torus of plasma generated by sputtering from Jupiter's satellite Europa has long been suspected but never yet convincingly demonstrated. Temperature profiles from Voyager plasma observations indicate the presence of hot, possibly freshly picked-up ions in the general vicinity of the orbit of Europa, which may be interpreted as evidence for a local plasma torus. Studies of ion partitioning in the outer regions of the Io torus reveal that the oxygen to sulfur mixing ratio varies with radial distance; this may indicates that oxygen-rich matter is injected from a non-Io source, most probably Europa. We have constructed a quantitative model of a plasma torus near the orbit of Europa which takes into account plasma input from the Io torus, sputtering from the surface of Europa, a great number of ionization and charge exchange processes, and plasma loss by diffusive transport. When the transport time is chosen so that the model's total number density in consistent with the observed total plasma density, the contribution from Europa is found to be significant although not dominant. The model predicts in detail the ion composition, charge states, and the relative fractions of hot Europa-generated and (presumed) cold Io-generated ions. The results are generally consistent with observations from Voyager and can in principle (subject to limitations of data coverage) be confirmed in more detail by Ulysses.

  20. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  1. Anyon Equation on a Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Choon-Lin; Hosotani, Yutaka

    Starting from the quantum field theory of nonrelativistic matter on a torus interacting with Chern-Simons gauge fields, we derive the Schrödinger equation for an anyon system. The nonintegrable phases of the Wilson line integrals on a torus play an essential role. In addition to generating degenerate vacua, they enter in the definition of a many-body Schrödinger wave function in quantum mechanics, which can be defined as a regular function of the coordinates of anyons. It obeys a non-Abelian representation of the braid group algebra, being related to Einarsson’s wave function by a singular gauge transformation.

  2. A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Schioppo, M.; Poli, N.; M. Prevedelli; Falke, St.; Lisdat, Ch.; Sterr, U.; G. M. Tino

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0\\times10^13 s^-1 cm^-2 at the oven temperature of 450 {\\deg}C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina mul...

  3. Fukaya categories of the torus and Dehn surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekili, Yanki; Perutz, Timothy

    2011-05-17

    This paper is a companion to the authors' forthcoming work extending Heegaard Floer theory from closed 3-manifolds to compact 3-manifolds with two boundary components via quilted Floer cohomology. We describe the first interesting case of this theory: the invariants of 3-manifolds bounding S(2) [symbol: see text] T(2), regarded as modules over the Fukaya category of the punctured 2-torus. We extract a short proof of exactness of the Dehn surgery triangle in Heegaard Floer homology. We show that A(∞)-structures on the graded algebra A formed by the cohomology of two basic objects in the Fukaya category of the punctured 2-torus are governed by just two parameters (m(6), m(8)), extracted from the Hochschild cohomology of A. For the Fukaya category itself, m(6) ≠ 0.

  4. Rigidity theorems of Clifford Torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOUSA JR. LUIZ A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Let M be an n-dimensional closed minimally immersed hypersurface in the unit sphere Sn + 1. Assume in addition that M has constant scalar curvature or constant Gauss-Kronecker curvature. In this note we announce that if M has (n - 1 principal curvatures with the same sign everywhere, then M is isometric to a Clifford Torus .

  5. Torus palatinus. Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lorena Re Domínguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The torus is a non-neoplastic slow growing bone protuberance, which is usually manifested before the age of 30; Set in the hard palate is called “Torus Palatinus”, and located in the lower jaw – “Torus mandibularis”. In most cases, the diagnosis is usually incidental, during clinical examination, due to other reasons. The reason is that they are usually asymptomatic and patients are not aware of carrying a torus; hence the conservation treatment, unless it poses problems for the patient. We report two cases of incidental detected palatal torus in women.

  6. Development of a lower extremity wearable exoskeleton with double compact elastic module: preliminary experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Long

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a double compact elastic module is designed and implemented in the lower extremity exoskeleton. The double compact elastic module is composed of two parts, i.e., physical human robot interaction (pHRI measurement and the elastic actuation system (EAS, which are called proximal elastic module (PEM and distal elastic module (DEM respectively. The PEM is used as the pHRI information collection device while the DEM is used as the compliance device. A novel compact parallelogram-like structure based torsional spring is designed and developed. An iterative finite element analysis (FEA based optimization process was conducted to find the optimal parameters in the search space. In the PEM, the designed torsional spring has an outer circle with a diameter of 60 mm and an inner hole with a diameter of 12 mm, while in the DEM, the torsional spring has the outer circle with a diameter of 80 mm and the inner circle with a diameter of 16 mm. The torsional spring in the PEM has a thickness of 5 mm and a weight of 60 g, while that in the DEM has a thickness of 10 mm and a weight of 80 g. The double compact elastic module prototype is embedded in the mechanical joint directly. Calibration experiments were conducted on those two elastic modules to obtain the linear torque versus angle characteristic. The calibration experimental results show that this torsional spring in the PEM has a stiffness of 60.2 Nm rad−1, which is capable of withstanding a maximum torque of 4 Nm, while that in the DEM has a stiffness of 80.2 Nm rad−1, which is capable of withstanding a maximum torque of 30 Nm. The experimental results and the simulation data show that the maximum resultant errors are 6 % for the PEM and 4 % for the DEM respectively. In this paper, an assumed regression algorithm is used to learn the human motion intent (HMI based on the pHRI collection. The HMI is defined as the angular position of the human limb joint. A

  7. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-01-01

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  8. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven; Neuffer, David V. [Fermilab

    2014-11-10

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  9. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Fernández, Ana María

    2010-05-01

    SummaryUnsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl - data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred

  10. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  11. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  12. Modeling physical chemistry of the Io plasma torus in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper, M.; Delamere, P. A.; Overcast-Howe, K.

    2016-07-01

    Periodicities in the Io plasma illustrate the rich complexity of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in space plasmas. The confounding System IV period (slower than the rotation of Jupiter's magnetic field ≡ System III) remains a mystery of the torus. Common to both System III and IV are modulations of the superthermal electron population. The small fraction (<1%) of hot electrons plays a vital role in torus physical and chemical properties, modulating the abundance and temperature of ion species. Building on previous models of torus physical chemistry, we have developed a two-dimensional model that includes azimuthal and radial transport (diffusion equation) while averaging chemical processes in latitude. This paper presents initial results of the model, demonstrating the role of hot electrons in forming a single-peaked torus structure. The effect of azimuthal shear is investigated as plasma is transported radially outward, showing how the torus properties evolve during transport from a chemically dominated regime (inner torus) to a transport dominated regime (outer torus). Surprisingly, we find that hot electron populations influence torus properties at all radial distances. While many of our results are preliminary, suggestions for future modeling experiments are suggested to provide additional insight into the origin of the ubiquitous superthermal electrons.

  13. Analysing the Control Software of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Hwong, Yi-Ling; Willemse, Tim A C

    2011-01-01

    The control software of the CERN Compact Muon Solenoid experiment contains over 30,000 finite state machines. These state machines are organised hierarchically: commands are sent down the hierarchy and state changes are sent upwards. The sheer size of the system makes it virtually impossible to fully understand the details of its behaviour at the macro level. This is fuelled by unclarities that already exist at the micro level. We have solved the latter problem by formally describing the finite state machines in the mCRL2 process algebra. The translation has been implemented using the ASF+SDF meta-environment, and its correctness was assessed by means of simulations and visualisations of individual finite state machines and through formal verification of subsystems of the control software. Based on the formalised semantics of the finite state machines, we have developed dedicated tooling for checking properties that can be verified on finite state machines in isolation.

  14. A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schioppo, M; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Falke, St; Lisdat, Ch; Sterr, U; Tino, G M

    2012-10-01

    Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0 × 10(13) s(-1) cm(-2) at the oven temperature of 450 °C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina multi-bore tube. The oven can be hosted in a standard DN40CF cube and has an estimated continuous operation lifetime of 10 years. This oven can be used for other alkali and alkaline earth metals with essentially no modifications.

  15. A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppo, Marco; Prevedelli, Marco; Falke, Stephan; Lisdat, Christian; Sterr, Uwe; Tino, Guglielmo Maria

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0\\times10^13 s^-1 cm^-2 at the oven temperature of 450 {\\deg}C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina multi-bore tube. The oven can be hosted in a standard DN40CF cube and has an estimated continuous operation lifetime of 10 years. This oven can be used for other alkali and alkaline earth metals with essentially no modifications.

  16. Probing the Active Galactic Nuclei Unified Model Torus Properties in Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Audibert, Anelise; Sales, Dinalva A; Pastoriza, Miriani G; Ruschel-Dutra, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We studied the physical parameters of a sample comprising of all Spitzer/IRS public spectra of Seyfert galaxies in the mid-infrared (5.2-38$\\mu$m range) under the active galactic nuclei (AGN) unified model. We compare the observed spectra with $\\sim10^6$ CLUMPY model spectral energy distributions, which consider a torus composed of dusty clouds. We find a slight difference in the distribution of line-of-sight inclination angle, $i$, requiring larger angles for Seyfert 2 (Sy2) and a broader distribution for Seyfert 1 (Sy1). We found small differences in the torus angular width, $\\sigma$, indicating that Sy1 may host a slightly narrower torus than Sy2. The torus thickness, together with the bolometric luminosities derived, suggest a very compact torus up to $\\sim$6 pc from the central AGN. The number of clouds along the equatorial plane, $N$, as well the index of the radial profile, $q$, are nearly the same for both types. These results imply that the torus cloud distribution is nearly the same for type 1 and t...

  17. p-adic string compactified on a torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekhov, L.; Zinoviev, Yu. (Steklov (V.A.) Inst. of Mathematics, Moscow (USSR))

    1990-10-01

    The open p-adic string world sheet is a coset space F = T/{Gamma}, where T is the Bruhat-Tits tree for the p-adic linear group GL(2,Q{sub p}) and c PGL(2,Q{sub p})is some Schottky group. The string dynamics is governed by the local action on F, with the fields taking values in a compact groupg G. We find the correlation functions and partition functions for the p-adic string surfaces of arbitrary genus and G = U(1){sup xD} (D-dimensional torus). (orig.).

  18. Probing the active galactic nucleus unified model torus properties in Seyfert galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audibert, Anelise; Riffel, Rogério; Sales, Dinalva A.; Pastoriza, Miriani G.; Ruschel-Dutra, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We studied the physical parameters of a sample comprising of all Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph public spectra of Seyfert galaxies in the mid-infrared (5.2-38 μm range) under the active galactic nucleus (AGN) unified model. We compare the observed spectra with ˜106 CLUMPY model spectral energy distributions, which consider a torus composed of dusty clouds. We find a slight difference in the distribution of line-of-sight inclination angle, i, requiring larger angles for Seyfert 2 (Sy 2) and a broader distribution for Seyfert 1 (Sy 1). We found small differences in the torus angular width, σ, indicating that Sy 1 may host a slightly narrower torus than Sy 2. The torus thickness, together with the bolometric luminosities derived, suggests a very compact torus up to ˜6 pc from the central AGN. The number of clouds along the equatorial plane, N, as well the index of the radial profile, q, is nearly the same for both types. These results imply that the torus cloud distribution is nearly the same for type 1 and type 2 objects. The torus mass is almost the same for both types of activity, with values in the range of Mtor ˜ 104-107 M⊙. The main difference appears to be related to the clouds' intrinsic properties: type 2 sources present higher optical depths τV. The results presented here reinforce the suggestion that the classification of a galaxy may also depend on the intrinsic properties of the torus clouds rather than simply on their inclination. This is in contradiction with the simple geometric idea of the unification model.

  19. The Role of Design-of-Experiments in Managing Flow in Compact Air Vehicle Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Miller, Daniel N.; Gridley, Marvin C.; Agrell, Johan

    2003-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate the viability and economy of Design-of-Experiments methodologies to arrive at microscale secondary flow control array designs that maintain optimal inlet performance over a wide range of the mission variables and to explore how these statistical methods provide a better understanding of the management of flow in compact air vehicle inlets. These statistical design concepts were used to investigate the robustness properties of low unit strength micro-effector arrays. Low unit strength micro-effectors are micro-vanes set at very low angles-of-incidence with very long chord lengths. They were designed to influence the near wall inlet flow over an extended streamwise distance, and their advantage lies in low total pressure loss and high effectiveness in managing engine face distortion. The term robustness is used in this paper in the same sense as it is used in the industrial problem solving community. It refers to minimizing the effects of the hard-to-control factors that influence the development of a product or process. In Robustness Engineering, the effects of the hard-to-control factors are often called noise , and the hard-to-control factors themselves are referred to as the environmental variables or sometimes as the Taguchi noise variables. Hence Robust Optimization refers to minimizing the effects of the environmental or noise variables on the development (design) of a product or process. In the management of flow in compact inlets, the environmental or noise variables can be identified with the mission variables. Therefore this paper formulates a statistical design methodology that minimizes the impact of variations in the mission variables on inlet performance and demonstrates that these statistical design concepts can lead to simpler inlet flow management systems.

  20. Experiments and modeling of dynamic powder compaction in the scope of deflagration to detonation transition studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodard, S.; Lapébie, E.; Saurel, R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with dynamic compaction of confined powders and associated wave dynamics. An experimental setup has been designed to generate one-dimensional dynamic compaction waves. Quantitative data such as displacement and velocity fields are obtained. A multiphase compaction model is considered as well and its results are compared to experimental data. Grain/wall friction is also modeled as it appeared to have significant effects when considering confined granular beds.

  1. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X

  2. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Charles A., E-mail: baldwinca@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6295 (United States); Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert N.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Silva, Chinthaka M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6295 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83414 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 °C. Release of {sup 85}Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 × 10{sup −2} for silver, 1.4 × 10{sup −3} for europium, and 1.1 × 10{sup −5} for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 °C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as

  3. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    samples using various methodologies to better interpret the dynamic results. Parameters such as particle size, layer spacing, chemical composition, external and total surfaces and porosity were determined. The fundamental transport processes in compacted clay systems were studied over a broad range of temperatures, combining microscopic diffusion experiments (T {approx} 98 to -23 {sup o}C) with macroscopic measurements (T {approx} 70 to 0 {sup o}C). Moreover, the freezing behaviour of water in compacted clays and its dynamical properties in the supercooled regime were also investigated using microscopic techniques such as neutron scattering, time of flight and backscattering techniques. Such knowledge contributes to develop simplified models for water (and possibly also solute) transport through clays, as they will be used to assess the performance of radioactive waste repositories. From this point of view, it can be beneficial for the safety of radioactive waste repositories and thus the protection of the environment.

  4. Coherence Imaging Measurements of Impurity Flow in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Johnson, C. A.; Maurer, D. A.; Allen, S. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Samuell, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of impurity ion emissivity and velocity in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) experiment are achieved with a new optical coherence imaging diagnostic. The Coherence Imaging Spectroscopy (CIS) technique measures the spectral coherence of an emission line with an imaging interferometer of fixed delay. CIS has a number of advantages when compared to dispersive Doppler spectroscopy, including higher throughput and the capability to provide 2D spectral images, making it ideal for investigating the non-axisymmetric geometry of CTH plasmas. Furthermore, detailed measurements of the ion flow structure provided by CIS combined with predictive computational models could also provide spatially resolved images of complex flow structures, such as those associated with an island divertor. First CIS measurements of CTH plasmas reveal strong signals for C III (465 nm), He II (468 nm) and C II (513 nm) emission. Preliminary analysis of C III interferograms indicate a net toroidal flow on the order of 10 km/s during the time of peak current. Bench tests using Zn and Cd light sources reveal that the temperature of the instrument must be actively controlled to within 0.01°C to limit phase drift of the interferometer resulting in artificially measured flow. Results from this diagnostic will aid in characterizing the ion flow in planned island divertor and MHD mode-locking experiments. Work supported by USDoE Grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  5. Enhancing Student International Awareness and Global Competency through Compact International Experience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schubert, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Short-term, study-abroad, elective engineering courses were developed in order to raise the international awareness and global competency of engineering students. These Compact International Experience (CIE) courses were taught in response to a strong student desire for engineering study abroad courses and an effort by the home institution to internationalize its curriculum. An assessment of repeat offerings of two three-semester-unit courses on Topics in Fluid Mechanics and Advanced Electronic Circuit Design in a three-week time frame in France and Australia was performed. The goals of the two CIE courses are an effective teaching of their respective technical content as well as a student understanding of the cultural environment and the impact of engineering solutions from a global and societal viewpoint. In the repeat offerings, increased interaction with local industry was an additional goal. The CIE courses were assessed through surveys completed at the beginning and end of the courses, weekly student reflection papers, course evaluations, and formalized instructor observations. Based on the assessment performed, the two CIE courses have been found to be a valuable approach in the delivery of engineering technical electives combined with an international experience.

  6. The contribution of radio-frequency rectification to field-aligned losses of high-harmonic fast wave power to the divertor in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, R. J., E-mail: rperkins@pppl.gov; Hosea, J. C.; Jaworski, M. A.; Diallo, A.; Bell, R. E.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S.; Kramer, G. J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, L.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); McLean, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sabbagh, S. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) can exhibit a major loss of high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power along scrape-off layer (SOL) field lines passing in front of the antenna, resulting in bright and hot spirals on both the upper and lower divertor regions. One possible mechanism for this loss is RF sheaths forming at the divertors. Here, we demonstrate that swept-voltage Langmuir probe characteristics for probes under the spiral are shifted relative to those not under the spiral in a manner consistent with RF rectification. We estimate both the magnitude of the RF voltage across the sheath and the sheath heat flux transmission coefficient in the presence of the RF field. Although precise comparison between the computed heat flux and infrared (IR) thermography cannot yet be made, the computed heat deposition compares favorably with the projections from IR camera measurements. The RF sheath losses are significant and contribute substantially to the total SOL losses of HHFW power to the divertor for the cases studied. This work will guide future experimentation on NSTX-U, where a wide-angle IR camera and a dedicated set of coaxial Langmuir probes for measuring the RF sheath voltage directly will quantify the contribution of RF sheath rectification to the heat deposition from the SOL to the divertor.

  7. Design and implementation of a multichannel millimeter wave interferometer for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. C.; Hanson, J. D.; Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Maurer, D. A.; Stevenson, B. A. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A three-channel 1 mm wave interferometer has been designed, assembled, and installed on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid torsatron (CTH). The interferometer design makes novel use of a subharmonic mixer for detection, which simplifies alignment. It employs a single electronically tunable source that is repetitively chirped using a sawtooth waveform of frequency up to 1 MHz. The 15.25 GHz drive oscillator is multiplied in two stages to 122 GHz before a final doubler stage brings it to 244 GHz. Local oscillator (LO) power at 122 GHz is directed through waveguide to the LO input of the subharmonic mixer of each viewing chord, simplifying alignment. Phase detection is performed by directly digitizing the amplified mixer outputs at 50 MHz and processing them with a software algorithm. Initial measurements made with the central chord of the new interferometer agree with those from the existing 4 mm system at low densities. The 1 mm system performs well in current-driven discharges reaching densities over 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, whereas the lower frequency interferometer is found to be less reliable due to loss of fringes. This is a critical improvement for experiments studying the onset, avoidance, and vacuum magnetic transform dependence of disruptions in the CTH device.

  8. Rigid body dynamics on the Poisson torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Peter H.

    2008-11-01

    The theory of rigid body motion with emphasis on the modifications introduced by a Cardan suspension is outlined. The configuration space is no longer SO(3) but a 3-torus; the equivalent of the Poisson sphere, after separation of an angular variable, is a Poisson torus. Iso-energy surfaces and their bifurcations are discussed. A universal Poincaré section method is proposed.

  9. Bifurcation structure of successive torus doubling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekikawa, Munehisa [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Utsunomiya University (Japan)]. E-mail: muse@aihara.jst.go.jp; Inaba, Naohiko [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Utsunomiya University (Japan)]. E-mail: inaba@is.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya [Department of Radiologic Science and Engineering, School of Health Sciences, The University of Tokushima (Japan)]. E-mail: yosinaga@medsci.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Tsubouchi, Takashi [Institute of Engineering Mechanics and Systems, University of Tsukuba (Japan)]. E-mail: tsubo@esys.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-01-02

    The authors discuss the 'embryology' of successive torus doubling via the bifurcation theory, and assert that the coupled map of a logistic map and a circle map has a structure capable of generating infinite number of torus doublings.

  10. The classification of 2-compact groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.K.S.; Grodal, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    -to-one correspondence between compact Lie groups and finite loop spaces admitting a maximal torus. Our proof is a general induction on the dimension of the group, which works for all primes. It refines the Andersen-Grodal-Moeller-Viruel methods to incorporate the theory of root data over the p-adic integers...

  11. Automorphisms of p-compact groups and their root data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.K.S.; Grodal, J.

    2008-01-01

    We construct a model for the space of automorphisms of a connected p–compact group in terms of the space of automorphisms of its maximal torus normalizer and its root datum. As a consequence we show that any homomorphism to the outer automorphism group of a p–compact group can be lifted to a grou...

  12. Transient Enhancement ('Spike-on-Tail') Observed on Neutral-Beam-Injected Energetic Ion Spectra Using the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medley, S. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2010-06-01

    An increase of up to four-fold in the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) charge exchange neutral flux localized at the Neutral Beam (NB) injection full energy is observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Termed the High-Energy Feature (HEF), it appears on the NB-injected energetic ion spectrum only in discharges where tearing or kink-type modes (f < 10 kHz) are absent, TAE activity (f ~ 10-150 kHz) is weak (δBrms < 75 mGauss) and CAE/GAE activity (f ~ 400 – 1200 kHz) is robust. The feature exhibits a growth time of ~ 20 - 80 ms and occasionally develops a slowing down distribution that continues to evolve over periods of 100's of milliseconds, a time scale long compared with the typical ~ 10's ms equilibration time of the NB injected particles. The HEF is observed only in H-mode (not L-mode) discharges with injected NB power of 4 MW or greater and in the field pitch range v||/v ~ 0.7 – 0.9; i.e. only for passing (never trapped) energetic ions. The HEF is suppressed by vessel conditioning using lithium deposition at rates ~ 100 mg/shot, a level sufficient to suppress ELM activity. Increases of ~ 10 - 30 % in the measured neutron yield and total stored energy are observed to coincide with the feature along with broadening of measured Te(r), Ti(r) and ne(r) profiles. However, TRANSP analysis shows that such increases are driven by plasma profile changes and not the HEF phenomenon itself. Though a definitive mechanism has yet to be developed, the HEF appears to be caused by a form of TAE/CAE wave-particle interaction that distorts of the NB fast ion distribution in phase space.

  13. Reactor assessments of advanced bumpy torus configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Owen, L.W.; Spong, D.A.; Miller, R.L.; Ard, W.B.; Pipkins, J.F.; Schmitt, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, several configurational approaches and concept improvement schemes were introduced for enhancing the performance of the basic ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) concept and for improving its reactor potential. These configurations include planar racetrack and square geometries, Andreoletti coil systems, and bumpy torus-stellarator hybrids (which include twisted racetrack and helical axis stellarator-snakey torus). Preliminary evaluations of reactor implications of each of these configurations have been carried out based on magnetics (vacuum) calculations, transport and scaling relationships, and stability properties. Results indicate favorable reactor projections with a significant reduction in reactor physical size as compared to conventional EBT reactor designs carried out in the past.

  14. Compact Muon Solenoid: largest physics experiment to be held in 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    Atkins, William

    2007-01-01

    "over the last fifteen years about 2'300 engineers and scientists from over 150 scientific institutions in 37 countries around the world have worked together to design and build a gigantic general-purpose particle detector, what is called the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS)." (1 page)

  15. Raising Educational Attainment: How Young People's Experiences Speak Back to the "Compact with Young Australians"

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Riele, Kitty

    2011-01-01

    In the context of international consensus that the knowledge economy requires more highly educated people, the Australian federal, state and territory governments agreed on a set of policies and targets for lifting the minimum level of educational attainment of young people, which are analysed in Part 1 of this paper. This "Compact with young…

  16. Performance Evaluation and Analysis of Critical Interface Features of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL; Litherland, P Steve [ORNL; Cole, Michael J [ORNL; Williamson, David E [ORNL; Goranson, Paul L [ORNL; Nelson, Brad E [ORNL; Heitzenroeder, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Myatt, R. [Myatt Consulting, Norfolk, MA

    2009-01-01

    The (18) modular coils for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) are joined at assembly by interfaces to form a toroidal shell which serves as the structural backbone of the device. There are six each of three coil types (A, B, and C); consequently, there are 4 distinct interface designs (A-A, A-B, B-C, C-C). This paper describes the performance evaluations and analyses used in the development of these critical interfaces. Initial analyses indicated that the baseline interface designs did not provide adequate shear capability along the inner (unbolted) legs between the modular coils and did not adequately address assembly tolerance requirements. Consequently a design effort was undertaken to develop interfaces with adequate shear capability and which would facilitate the achievement of assembly tolerances. Analyses indicated that a friction coefficient of 0.3 is necessary for 'no-slip' joints with a preload value of {approx}320 kN in the outboard regions. Two types of compatible segmented friction shims were developed to meet the friction requirement. One type uses alumina coated stainless steel shims and the other uses G-10/ stainless steel/ G-10 'sandwich shims.' Analyses indicated that the time constant requirements for induced currents in the shell could still be achieved with welds along all the inner (unbolted) legs except at the C-C interface. Consequently, welded interfaces utilizing alternating MIG fillet welds on each end of shims between coil castings were developed to react the shear loads. This configuration minimizes distortion since it avoids direct weld shrinkage stress across the interfaces. Analyses indicates that a 12.7 mm fillet weld has adequate shear capability, with average stress through the welds of 90-125 MPa, compared to a static limit of 217 MPa. Custom sized compression pucks located in the middle of the welded shims react the compressive loads and have average stresses less than 137 MPa. Fatigue

  17. Loop Quantum Cosmology on a Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Lamon, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of a torus topology on Loop Quantum Cosmology. We first derive the Teichmueller space parametrizing all possible tori using Thurston's theorem and construct a Hamiltonian describing the dynamics of these torus universes. We then compute the Ashtekar variables for a slightly simplified torus such that the Gauss constraint can be solved easily. We perform a canonical transformation so that the holomies along the edges of the torus reduce to a product between almost and strictly periodic functions of the new variables. The drawback of this transformation is that the components of the densitized triad become complicated functions of these variables. Nevertheless we find two ways of quantizing these components, which in both cases leads surprisingly to a continuous spectrum.

  18. Acoustic propagation in a rigid torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The acoustic propagation in a rigid torus is analyzed using a Green's function method. Three types of surface elements are developed; a flat quadrilateral element used in modeling polygonal cavities, a curved conical element appropriate for surfaces with one curvature, and a toroidal element developed for such doubly curved surfaces as the torus. Curved elements are necessary since the acoustic pressure is sensitive to slope discontinuities between consecutive surface elements especially near cavity resonances. The acoustic characteristics of the torus are compared to those of a bend of square cross section for a frequency range that includes the transverse acoustic resonance. Two equivalences between the different sections are tested; the first conserves curvature and cross-sectional dimension while the second matches transverse resonance and duct volume. The second equivalence accurately matches the acoustic characteristics of the torus up to the cutoff frequency corresponding to a mode with two circumferential waves.

  19. Torus bifurcations in multilevel converter systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai T.; Mosekilde, Erik; Yanochkina, Olga O.

    2011-01-01

    embedded one into the other and with their basins of attraction delineated by intervening repelling tori. The paper illustrates the coexistence of three stable tori with different resonance behaviors and shows how reconstruction of these tori takes place across the borders of different dynamical regimes....... The paper also demonstrates how pairs of attracting and repelling tori emerge through border-collision torus-birth and border-collision torus-fold bifurcations. © 2011 World Scientific Publishing Company....

  20. CHESS upgrade with compact undulator magnets: Operating experience and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temnykh, A., E-mail: abt6@cornell.edu; Dale, D.; Fontes, E.; Lyndaker, A.; Li, Y.; Ruff, J.; Revesz, P.; Woll, A. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (United States)

    2016-07-27

    In November 2014 two in-air 1.5 m CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) magnets built by KYMA S.R.l. were installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) in canted arrangement and after few days of commissioning their regular operation started. CCU magnets are compact, lightweight and cost efficient devices. They have very stable magnetic field integrals independent of deflection parameter value. This feature greatly simplifies the storage ring operation. The CCU concept was developed at Cornell in 2011 and the first 1 m in-vacuum CCU magnet was beam-tested in 2012. The article presents CCU concept and some details of the design. It describes also the layout of CCUs installation in CESR, their performance and characteristics. The current status of operation and future plans are discussed as well. Presently, at CHESS two CCU magnets provide radiation for 5 out of 11 experimental stations.

  1. Characterization of compact accelerator DD neutron source for in situ calibration experiment on neutron measurement at LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Yasunari; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Ogata, Tomohiro; Umemura, Norihiro; Asai, Keisuke; Kawarabayashi, Jun [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sasao, Mamiko [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    A compact Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator DD neutron source has been developed for in situ calibration experiments on neutron measurements at LHD. The equipment mainly consists of three parts; a deuterium (D) reservoir/ion source, a self-loaded deuterium target and a 100 kV high voltage power supply, all of which are contained in a compact cylindrical stainless steel (SUS) tube of 70 mm in diameter and 780 mm in length. About one hour steady operation was performed under the acceleration voltage of 80 keV and the ion beam current of {approx}60 {mu}A, corresponding to the DD neutron yield of around 10{sup 5} n/s. The neutron emission profile and energy spectrum were measured with an NE213 scintillator and a {sup 3}He gas proportional counter. Preliminary neutronic calculations with a Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP' were also executed for simulating the in situ calibration experiment for neutron detectors that will be installed on LHD. Through the experiments and the calculations, it is shown that the present DD neutron source is valid for in situ calibration on threshold type detectors used for neutron emission profile monitoring and neutron spectrometry at DD plasma experiments. (author)

  2. Compact FPGA-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2015-01-01

    We present a compact FPGA-based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 TTL channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube (PMT). There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers (DDS) RF sources with fast (rise-time of ~60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  3. Design and experiment study of compact circular-rectangular waveguide mode converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuhao; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Lishan

    2016-07-01

    A compact mode converter that transforms TM01 circular waveguide mode to TE10 rectangular waveguide mode is investigated. It consists of a circular waveguide with a short circuit terminal and a rectangular waveguide which is perpendicular to the circular waveguide. Simulation results show that conversion efficiency of the mode converter is about 99.8% at central frequency of 1.75 GHz, and the total return loss is approximately -30 dB. The experimental results are well consistent with the computer simulation, which demonstrates the feasibility and high power handling capacity of the mode converter.

  4. Thermionic plasma injection for the Lockheed Martin T4 Compact Fusion Reactor experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2015-11-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept relies on diamagnetic confinement in a magnetically encapsulated linear ring cusp geometry. Plasma injection into cusp field configurations requires careful deliberation. Previous work has shown that axial injection via a plasma gun is capable of achieving high-beta conditions in cusp configurations. We present a pulsed, high power thermionic plasma source and the associated magnetic field topology for plasma injection into the caulked-cusp magnetic field. The resulting plasma fueling and cross-field diffusion is discussed.

  5. Water diffusion through compacted clays analyzed by neutron scattering and tracer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Sanchez, F

    2007-11-15

    Clay minerals are aluminium phyllosilicates, mostly products of the chemical alteration and mechanical breakdown of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Their physical and chemical properties can be directly related to their layered, fine-grained (large surface area) structure. These properties such as large water retention, low hydraulic conductivity, heat resistance and ionic exchange capacities, make clays ideal for many different applications, e.g. as sealing material for the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The long-term disposal of radioactive waste in an underground geological repository is based on a multibarrier concept. In the barrier of highly compacted clay, water is intercalated and confined between the clay layers. The narrow pores are responsible that under natural hydraulic gradients, molecular diffusion through water is the dominant transport mechanism for released radionuclides. The properties of water at the water-clay interface differ from that of bulk water. Therefore, a good and deep understanding of the water structure and dynamics in compacted clay systems is fundamental. This knowledge is the base for the progressing research about transport of pollutants through the compacted clays and argillaceous rock of radioactive waste barriers. This study focusses on four different types of pure clays, two of them charged, namely montmorillonite and illite (both in a Na and Ca form), and two uncharged, namely kaolinite and pyrophyllite. Their structural differences result in a significantly different behaviour in contact with water. In case of montmorillonite, water is located in between particles and in the interlayer space. In illite, water is found only in between particles, because the interlayer surfaces are tightly linked by potassium cations. The layers of kaolinite and pyrophyllite are uncharged and, consequently, water is located only in between particles. The clay powders were compacted to reach a high bulk dry density of about 1.9 g

  6. How to Solve the Torus Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the following sliding puzzle called torus puzzle. In an m by n board, there are mn pieces numbered from 1 to mn. Initially, the pieces are placed in ascending order. Then they are scrambled by rotating the rows and columns without the player’s knowledge. The objective of the torus puzzle is to rearrange the pieces in ascending order by rotating the rows and columns. We provide a solution to this puzzle. In addition, we provide lower and upper bounds on the number of steps for solving the puzzle. Moreover, we consider a variant of the torus puzzle in which each piece is colored either black or white, and we present a hardness result for solving it.

  7. Reactor assessments of advanced bumpy torus configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Owen, L.W.; Spong, D.A.; Miller, R.L.; Ard, W.B.; Pipkins, J.F.; Schmitt, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Recently, several innovative approaches were introduced for enhancing the performance of the basic ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) concept and for improving its reactor potential. These include planar racetrack and square geometries, Andreoletti coil systems, and bumpy torus-stellarator hybrids (which include twisted racetrack and helical axis stellarator - snakey torus). Preliminary evaluations of reactor implications of each approach have been carried out based on magnetics (vacuum) calculations, transport and scaling relationships, and stability properties deduced from provisional configurations that implement the approach but are not necessarily optimized. Further optimization is needed in all cases to evaluate the full potential of each approach. Results of these studies indicate favorable reactor projections with a significant reduction in reactor physical size as compared to conventional EBT reactor designs carried out in the past.

  8. Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment for space plasmas—CoDICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Ogasawara, K.; Ebert, R. W.; Allegrini, F.; McComas, D. J.; Livi, S.; Weidner, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment—CoDICE—simultaneously provides high-quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over six decades in energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) Elemental and charge state composition, and 3-D velocity distributions of 10 MeV energetic ions. CoDICE uses a novel, integrated, common time-of-flight subsystem that provides several advantages over the commonly used separate plasma and energetic ion sensors currently flying on several space missions. These advantages include reduced mass and volume compared to two separate instruments, reduced shielding in high-radiation environments, and simplified spacecraft interface and accommodation requirements. This paper describes the operation principles, electro-optic simulation results and applies the CoDICE concept for measuring plasma and energetic ion populations in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  9. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappellini, G., E-mail: cappellini@lens.unifi.it [LENS European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Lombardi, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INO-CNR Istituto Nazionale di Ottica del CNR, Sezione di Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Mancini, M.; Pagano, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Pizzocaro, M. [INRIM Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Torino 10135 (Italy); Fallani, L. [LENS European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Catani, J. [LENS European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INO-CNR Istituto Nazionale di Ottica del CNR, Sezione di Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic {sup 173}Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  10. Diffusion on the torus for Hamiltonian maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siboni, S. (Istituto di Fisica dell' Universita Bologna (Italy) Centre de Physique Theorique, Marseille (France)); Turchetti, G. (Istituto di Fisica dell' Universita Bologna (Italy)); Vaienti, S. (Centre de Physique Theorique, Marseille (France) Universite de Toulon et du Var (France))

    1994-04-01

    For a mapping of the torus T[sup 2] the authors propose a definition of the diffusion coefficient D suggested by the solution of the diffusion equation on T[sup 2]. The definition of D, based on the limit of moments of the invariant measure, depends on the set [Omega] where an initial uniform distribution is assigned. For the algebraic automorphism of the torus the limit is proved to exist and to have the same value for almost all initial sets [Omega] in the subfamily of parallelograms. Numerical results show that it has the same value for arbitrary polygons [Omega] and for arbitrary moments. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Linear Parabolic Maps on the Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Zyczkowski, K; Zyczkowski, Karol; Nishikawa, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    We investigate linear parabolic maps on the torus. In a generic case these maps are non-invertible and discontinuous. Although the metric entropy of these systems is equal to zero, their dynamics is non-trivial due to folding of the image of the unit square into the torus. We study the structure of the maximal invariant set, and in a generic case we prove the sensitive dependence on the initial conditions. We study the decay of correlations and the diffusion in the corresponding system on the plane. We also demonstrate how the rationality of the real numbers defining the map influences the dynamical properties of the system.

  12. Equilibrium-torus bifurcation in nonsmooth systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubahyev, Z.T.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Considering a set of two coupled nonautonomous differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides describing the behavior of a DC/DC power converter, we discuss a border-collision bifurcation that can lead to the birth of a two-dimensional invariant torus from a stable node equilibrium...... linear approximation to our system in the neighbourhood of the border. We determine the functional relationships between the parameters of the normal form map and the actual system and illustrate how the normal form theory can predict the bifurcation behaviour along the border-collision equilibrium......-torus bifurcation curve....

  13. On Chebyshev polynomials and torus knots

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilik, A. M.; Pavlyuk, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the q-numbers and their two-parameter generalization, the q,p-numbers, can be used to obtain some polynomial invariants for torus knots and links. First, we show that the q-numbers, which are closely connected with the Chebyshev polynomials, can also be related with the Alexander polynomials for the class T(s,2) of torus knots, s being an odd integer, and used for finding the corresponding skein relation. Then, we develop this procedure in order to obtain, wit...

  14. Cirugía de torus mandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ramon Osorio Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLos huesos maxilares no son ajenos a las patologías que se pueden presentar en el sistema esquelético. Algunas de esas condiciones y patologías son singulares por sus características clínicas, su distribución y prevalencia. Los torus palatinos, los torus mandibulares (TM y las exostosis de los maxilares son un claro ejemplo de ellos. Hasta la presente existen ideas especulativas acerca de su etiopatogenia, de los factores asociados, de su incidencia y prevalencia, de su necesidad de tratamiento, lo que puede crear confusión entre los clínicos tanto en diagnóstico como en el manejo.El torus como tumor óseo benigno puede localizarse en el maxilar a nivel del paladar, o en la mandíbula a nivel de las tablas internas; o puede aparecer en cualquier parte del esqueleto. El TM es una exostosis o crecimiento óseo en la superficie lingual de la mandíbula. Este crecimiento ocurre generalmente cerca de la línea milohioidea, opuesto a los premolares, pero se puede extender del canino al primer molar. La mucosa que los recubre tiende a ser fina y no tolera por lo general las fuerzas de las prótesis que se colocan encima de ellos. La incidencia del torus de la mandíbula es baja en el 6% a 12.5% entre caucásicos y en los habitantes de la llanura africana. De manera contraria, algunos autores reportan una prevalencia mucho más elevada en la Costa Atlántica Colombiana.Se presenta el caso de un paciente con torus mandibulares bilaterales, con muchos años de crecimiento, hasta que por situaciones tanto fonéticas como de ulceraciones repetitivas decidió someterse al acto quirúrgico de forma bilateral. Se presentan algunas consideraciones para el manejo de esta. (Duazary 2008; 111-114AbstractThe jawbone is not a strange to the pathologies that can occur in the skeletal system. Some of these terms and conditions are unique for their clinical features, distribution and prevalence. The torus palate, jawbone torus (TM in spanish and

  15. Thomson scattering diagnostic system design for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traverso, P. J., E-mail: pjt0002@auburn.edu; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Pearce, A. J.; Cianciosa, M. R. [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A new Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum PL DLS 2 J Nd:YAG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize the stray laser light that could enter the collection optics. The beam line has been designed with an 8 m propagation distance to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter kept less than 3 mm inside the plasma volume. The beam exits the vacuum system through another Brewster window and enters a beam dump, again to minimize the stray light in the vacuum chamber. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f/#∼ 1 aspheric lens, a commercially available Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. Spectral rejection of stray laser light, if needed, can be performed with the use of an optional interference filter at the spectrometer input. The system has been developed for initial single point measurements of plasmas with core electron temperatures of approximately 20–300 eV and densities of 5 × 10{sup 18} to 5 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} dependent upon operational scenario.

  16. Design and implementation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Goforth, M. M.; Loch, S. D.; Pearce, A. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2014-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system using standard commercially available components has been designed for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH). The initial system takes a single point measurement and will be used to assess options for an upgrade to a multi-point system providing electron temperature and density profiles. This single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both ohmically driven, current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. A principle design goal is to minimize stray laser light, geometrically on the machine side and spectrally on the collection side, to allow measurements of both full and half Thomson scattered spectral profiles. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and an aperturing baffle system to minimize stray light. Light collection, spectral processing, and signal detection are accomplished with an f / # ~ 1 aspheric lens, a Holospec f/1.8 spectrometer, and an Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified camera. The estimated number of scattered photons per channel will be of the order of 5 ×103 with a signal to noise ratio of S / N = 19 This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  17. Surgical management of palatine Torus - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Sumie Nozu Imada

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Torus palatinus is a specific name to identify exostoses developed in the hard palate along the median palatine suture. Despite of not being a pathological condition, its presence requires attention and knowledge regarding its management. Surgical removal of exostoses is indicated when the patient frequently traumatizes the area of palatine torus during mastication and speech or when it is necessary for the rehabilitation of the upper arcade with complete dentures. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this article is to present three cases of Torus palatinus and to discuss the management of them. CASE REPORT: In the first case, a 57-year-old Caucasian man sought oral rehabilitation of his edentulous maxilla but presented a hard nodules in the hard palate; in the second case, a 40-year-old Caucasian woman was referred for frequent trauma of palatal mucosa during mastication, aesthetic complaint, and discomfort caused by the trauma of her tongue in this area; and in the third case, a 45-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a lesion on the palate that caused difficulty swallowing. When the Torus palatinus was impairing the basic physiological functions of the patients, all cases were surgically treated, improving the patients' quality of life. FINAL CONSIDERATION: The dentist should be properly prepared to choose the best from among the existing surgical approaches for each individual lesion in order to improve the results and avoid possible complications.

  18. Resistive Drift Waves in a Bumpy Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-01-12

    A computational study of resistive drift waves in the edge plasma of a bumpy torus is presented. The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is obtained from a three-dimensional local equilibrium model. The use of a local magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium model allows for a computationally efficient systematic study of the impact of the magnetic field structure on drift wave stability.

  19. Refined large N duality for torus knots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawata, Satoshi; Kameyama, Masaya

    We formulate large N duality of U(N) refined Chern-Simons theory with a torus knot/link in S³. By studying refined BPS states in M-theory, we provide the explicit form of low-energy effective actions of Type IIA string theory with D4-branes on the Ω-background. This form enables us to relate...

  20. Large N reduction on a twisted torus

    CERN Document Server

    González-Arroyo, A; Neuberger, H

    2005-01-01

    We consider SU(N) lattice gauge theory at infinite N defined on a torus with a CP invariant twist. Massless fermions are incorporated in an elegant way, while keeping them quenched. We present some numerical results which suggest that twisting can make numerical simulations of planar QCD more efficient.

  1. Magnetostatics of the uniformly polarized torus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; De Graef, Marc; Millev, Yonko

    2009-01-01

    We provide an exhaustive description of the magnetostatics of the uniformly polarized torus and its derivative self-intersecting (spindle) shapes. In the process, two complementary approaches have been implemented, position-space analysis of the Laplace equation with inhomogeneous boundary...

  2. Induction effects of torus knots and unknots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Chiara; Ricca, Renzo L.

    2017-09-01

    Geometric and topological aspects associated with induction effects of field lines in the shape of torus knots/unknots are examined and discussed in detail. Knots are assumed to lie on a mathematical torus of circular cross-section and are parametrized by standard equations. The induced field is computed by direct integration of the Biot-Savart law. Field line patterns of the induced field are obtained and several properties are examined for a large family of knots/unknots up to 51 crossings. The intensity of the induced field at the origin of the reference system (center of the torus) is found to depend linearly on the number of toroidal coils and reaches maximum values near the boundary of the mathematical torus. New analytical estimates and bounds on energy and helicity are established in terms of winding number and minimum crossing number. These results find useful applications in several contexts when the source field is either vorticity, electric current or magnetic field, from vortex dynamics to astrophysics and plasma physics, where highly braided magnetic fields and currents are present.

  3. Non-existence of KAM Torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong Qing CHENG

    2011-01-01

    Given an integrable Hamiltonian ho with n-degrees of freedom and a Diophantine frequency w, then, arbitrarily close to ho in the Cr topology with r < 2n, there exists an analytical Hamiltonian h∈ with no KAM torus of rotation vector w. In contrast with it, KAM tori exist if perturbations are small in Cr topology with r > 2n.

  4. Vertex Algebra Sheaf Structure on Torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yuan-yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we first give a 1-1 corresponds between torus C/Λand cubic curve C in P2C. As complex manifold, they are isomorphic, therefore we can treat C/Λas a variety and construction a vertex algebra sheaf on it.

  5. Electrostatic confinement in a bumpy torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Nadi, A.M.

    1984-11-01

    In a closed-field-line device such as a bumpy torus, the combined E x B and del B drifts lead to charge separation that is balanced by the ion polarization drift. In this work, we determine self-consistent potential and density profiles and the condition for electric island formation.

  6. Refined large N duality for torus knots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawata, Satoshi; Kameyama, Masaya

    We formulate large N duality of U(N) refined Chern-Simons theory with a torus knot/link in S³. By studying refined BPS states in M-theory, we provide the explicit form of low-energy effective actions of Type IIA string theory with D4-branes on the Ω-background. This form enables us to relate...

  7. Stability of small-amplitude torus knot solutions of the localized induction approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calini, Annalisa; Ivey, Thomas, E-mail: calinia@cofc.edu [Department of Mathematics, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States)

    2011-08-19

    We study the linear stability of small-amplitude torus knot solutions of the localized induction approximation equation for the motion of a thin vortex filament in an ideal fluid. Such solutions can be constructed analytically through the connection with the focusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation using the method of isoperiodic deformations. We show that these (p, q) torus knots are generically linearly unstable for p < q, while we provide examples of neutrally stable (p, q) torus knots with p > q, in contrast with an earlier linear stability study by Ricca (1993 Chaos 3 83-95; 1995 Chaos 5 346; 1995 Small-scale Structures in Three-dimensional Hydro and Magneto-dynamics Turbulence (Lecture Notes in Physics vol 462) (Berlin: Springer)). We also provide an interpretation of the original perturbative calculation in Ricca (1995), and an explanation of the numerical experiments performed by Ricca et al (1999 J. Fluid Mech. 391 29-44), in light of our results.

  8. Installation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The initial system takes a single point measurement on the magnetic axis and will be used to assess options for an expansion to a multi-point system to enable better 3D equilibrium reconstructions using the V3FIT code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line is designed to propagate ~ 8 m to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. An Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified CCD camera is used in conjunction with a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 532-580 nm. A single point system will initially measure plasmas with core electron temperatures of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  9. Observational Constraints on a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Smith, H. T.; Bagenal, F.; Brown, L. E.; Elliott, H. A.; Haggerty, D. K.; Horanyi, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; McComas, D. J.; Piquette, M. R.; Sidrow, E. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Zirnstein, E.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto's orbit, and place observational constraints based primarily on comparison of New Horizons (NH) measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, should result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto's exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets closer to the Sun, neutrals escape Pluto readily owing, e.g., to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity. Importantly, escaped neutrals have a long lifetime due to the great distance from the Sun, ~100 years for photoionization of N2 and ~180 years for photoionization of N, which results from disassociated N2. Despite the lengthy 248-year orbit, these long e-folding lifetimes may allow an enhanced neutral population to form an extended gas cloud that modifies the N2 spatial profile near Pluto. These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but once ionized N2+ or N+ are picked up by the solar wind, reaching ~50 keV, making these pickup ions (PUIs) detectable by NH's Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument. PEPSSI observations analyzed to date may constrain the N2 density; the remaining ~95% of the encounter data, scheduled for downlink in August along with similarly anticipated data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) experiment, should help determine the Pluto outgassing rates. Measurements from SWAP include the solar wind speed, a quantity that greatly enhances PUI studies by enabling us to directly account for the PUI distribution's sensitive dependence on plasma speed. Note that anomalous cosmic ray Si observed at Voyager is overabundant by a factor of ~3000 relative to interstellar composition. This might be related to "outer source" PUIs, but the fact that N2 and Si are indistinguishable in many instruments could mean that N2 is actually driving this apparent Si discrepancy.

  10. Design of a Compact Coaxial Magnetized Plasma Gun for Magnetic Bubble Expansion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    COAXIAL MAGNETIZED PLASMA GUN FOR MAGNETIC BUBBLE EXPANSION EXPERIMENTS Y. Zhang1, A. G. Lynn1, S. C. Hsu2, M. Gilmore1, C... coaxial magnetized plasma gun and its associated hardware systems are discussed in detail. The plasma gun is used for experimental studies of...and coaxial plasma guns - which is the method employed in this work. The first coaxial plasma gun experiment was performed five decades ago by

  11. On the Picard group of a compact flat projective variety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelacakis, NJ

    1996-01-01

    In this note, we describe the Picard group of the class of compact, smooth, flat, projective varieties. In view of Charlap's work and Johnson's characterization, we construct line bundles over such manifolds as the holonomy-invariant elements of the Neron-Severi group of a projective flat torus cove

  12. Automorphisms and examples of compact non K\\"ahler manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Magnússon, Gunnar Þór

    2012-01-01

    Let $X$ be a compact K\\"ahler manifold with zero first Chern class and finite fundamental group. Folklore says that if an automorphism $f$ of $X$ fixes a K\\"ahler class, then its order is finite. We apply this result to construct a compact non K\\"ahler manifold $F$ as a fibration $X \\to F \\to B$ over a complex torus $B$.

  13. On Chebyshev polynomials and torus knots

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilik, A M

    2009-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the q-numbers and their two-parameter generalization, the q,p-numbers, can be used to obtain some polynomial invariants for torus knots and links. First, we show that the q-numbers, which are closely connected with the Chebyshev polynomials, can also be related with the Alexander polynomials for the class T(s,2) of torus knots, s being an odd integer, and used for finding the corresponding skein relation. Then, we develop this procedure in order to obtain, with the help of q,p-numbers, the generalized two-variable Alexander polynomials, and prove their direct connection with the HOMFLY polynomials and the skein relation of the latter.

  14. Exploring Torus Universes in Causal Dynamical Triangulations

    CERN Document Server

    Budd, T G

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the search for new observables in nonperturbative quantum gravity, we consider Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) in 2+1 dimensions with the spatial topology of a torus. This system is of particular interest, because one can study not only the global scale factor, but also global shape variables in the presence of arbitrary quantum fluctuations of the geometry. Our initial investigation focusses on the dynamics of the scale factor and uncovers a qualitatively new behaviour, which leads us to investigate a novel type of boundary conditions for the path integral. Comparing large-scale features of the emergent quantum geometry in numerical simulations with a classical minisuperspace formulation, we find partial agreement. By measuring the correlation matrix of volume fluctuations we succeed in reconstructing the effective action for the scale factor directly from the simulation data. Apart from setting the stage for the analysis of shape dynamics on the torus, the new set-up highlights the role o...

  15. Phases of planar QCD on the torus

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, R; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    At infinite N, continuum Euclidean SU(N) gauge theory defined on a symmetrical four torus has a rich phase structure with phases where the finite volume system behaves as if it had infinite extent in some or all of the directions. In addition, fermions are automatically quenched, so planar QCD should be cheaper to solve numerically that full QCD. Large N is a relatively unexplored and worthwhile direction of research in lattice field theory.

  16. Energy cascades for NLS on the torus

    CERN Document Server

    Carles, Remi

    2010-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with cubic (focusing or defocusing) nonlinearity on the multidimensional torus. For special small initial data containing only five modes, we exhibit a countable set of time layers in which arbitrarily large modes are created. The proof relies on a reduction to multiphase weakly nonlinear geometric optics, and on the study of a particular two-dimensional discrete dynamical system.

  17. The compact capacitor bank CQ-1.5 employed in magnetically driven isentropic compression and high velocity flyer plate experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiji; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Cangli; Mo, Jianjun; Wang, Ganghua; Wang, Xiaosong

    2008-05-01

    Based on the low inductance capacitor, the parallel-plate transmission line, and the explosive network closing switch, a compact pulsed power generator CQ-1.5 has been developed at the Institute of Fluid Physics and is capable to deliver a current of peak of 1.5 MA within rise time of 500-570 ns into a 2-3 nH inductive load. The work is motivated to do isentropic compression experiments (ICEs) on metals up to 30-50 GPa and to launch flyer plates at velocities over 8 kms. The experiments were conducted with the diagnostics of both Doppler pin system and velocity interferometer system for any reflectors, and the measured free surface velocity histories of ICE samples were treated with a backward integration code. The results show that the isentropes of Cu and Al samples under 35 GPa are close to their Hugoniots within a deviation of 3%. The LY12 aluminum flyer plates were accelerated to a velocity over 8.96 kms.

  18. Torus Knots and the Topological Vertex

    CERN Document Server

    Jockers, Hans; Soroush, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    We propose a class of toric Lagrangian A-branes on the resolved conifold that is suitable to describe torus knots on S^3. The key role is played by the SL(2,Z) transformation, which generates a general torus knot from the unknot. Applying the topological vertex to the proposed A-branes, we rederive the colored HOMFLY polynomials for torus knots, in agreement with the Rosso and Jones formula. We show that our A-model construction is mirror symmetric to the B-model analysis of Brini, Eynard and Marino. Comparing to the recent proposal by Aganagic and Vafa for knots on S^3, we demonstrate that the disk amplitude of the A-brane associated to any knot is sufficient to reconstruct the entire B-model spectral curve. Finally, the construction of toric Lagrangian A-branes is generalized to other local toric Calabi-Yau geometries, which paves the road to study knots in other three-manifolds such as lens spaces.

  19. On the Disappearance of a Cold Molecular Torus around the Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC 1097

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, T.; Kohno, K.; Fathi, K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Davies, R. I.; Martín, S.; Matsushita, S.; Schinnerer, E.; Espada, D.; Aalto, S.; Onishi, K.; Turner, J. L.; Imanishi, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Meier, D. S.; Wada, K.; Kawakatu, N.; Nakajima, T.

    2017-08-01

    We used the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array to map the CO(3-2) and the underlying continuum emissions around the type-1 low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN; bolometric luminosity ≲ {10}42 erg s-1) of NGC 1097 at ˜10 pc resolution. These observations revealed a detailed cold gas distribution within a ˜100 pc of this LLAGN. In contrast to the luminous Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068, where a ˜7 pc cold molecular torus was recently revealed, a distinctively dense and compact torus is missing in our CO(3-2) integrated intensity map of NGC 1097. Based on the CO(3-2) flux, the gas mass of the torus of NGC 1097 would be a factor of ≳2-3 less than that found for NGC 1068 by using the same CO-to-H2 conversion factor, which implies less active nuclear star formation and/or inflows in NGC 1097. Our dynamical modeling of the CO(3-2) velocity field implies that the cold molecular gas is concentrated in a thin layer as compared to the hot gas traced by the 2.12 μm H2 emission in and around the torus. Furthermore, we suggest that NGC 1097 hosts a geometrically thinner torus than NGC 1068. Although the physical origin of the torus thickness remains unclear, our observations support a theoretical prediction that geometrically thick tori with high opacity will become deficient as AGNs evolve from luminous Seyferts to LLAGNs.

  20. A new equilibrium torus solution and GRMHD initial conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Penna, Robert F; Narayan, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    General relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations are providing influential models for black hole spin measurements, gamma ray bursts, and supermassive black hole feedback. Many of these simulations use the same initial condition: a rotating torus of fluid in hydrostatic equilibrium. A persistent concern is that simulation results sometimes depend on arbitrary features of the initial torus. For example, the Bernoulli parameter (which is related to outflows), appears to be controlled by the Bernoulli parameter of the initial torus. In this paper, we give a new equilibrium torus solution and describe two applications for the future. First, it can be used as a more physical initial condition for GRMHD simulations than earlier torus solutions. Second, it can be used in conjunction with earlier torus solutions to isolate the simulation results that depend on initial conditions. We assume axisymmetry, an ideal gas equation of state, constant entropy, and ignore self-gravity. We fix an angular momentum di...

  1. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  2. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  3. Adiabatic Compression of Compact Tori for Current Drive and Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Simon; McNab, Angus; Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Several critical issues stand in the development path for compact tori. An important one is the production of strong magnetic fields, (or large flux amplifications) by use of a low current source. The Pulsed Build-up Experiment is a Phase II SBIR project in which we aim to show a new means for generating strong magnetic fields from a low current source, namely, the repetitive injection of helicity-bearing plasma that also undergoes an acceleration and compression. In the Phase I SBIR, advanced computations were benchmarked against analytic theory and run to determine the best means for the acceleration and compression of a compact torus plasma. The study included detailed simulations of magnetic reconnection. In Phase II, an experiment has been designed and is being built to produce strong magnetic fields in a spheromak by the repetitive injection of magnetic helicity from a low current coaxial plasma source. The plasma will be accelerated and compressed in a similar manner to a traveling wave adiabatic compression scheme that was previously applied to a mirror plasma [1]. [1] P. M. Bellan Scalings for a Traveling Mirror Adiabatic Magnetic Compressor Rev. Sci. Instrum. 53(8) 1214 (1982) Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER84449.

  4. Studying uniform thickness II: Transversely nonsimple iterated torus knots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFountain, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We prove that an iterated torus knot type in the standard contact 3-sphere fails the uniform thickness property (UTP) if and only if it is formed from repeated positive cablings, which is precisely when an iterated torus knot supports the standard contact structure. This is the first complete UTP...... classification for a large class of knots. We also show that all iterated torus knots that fail the UTP support cabling knot types that are transversely non-simple....

  5. Circuit-Switched Gossiping in the 3-Dimensional Torus Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Delmas, Olivier; Pérennes, Stéphane

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe, in the case of short messages, an efficient gossiping algorithm for 3-dimensional torus networks (wrap-around or toroidal meshes) that uses synchronous circuit-switched routing. The algorithm is based on a recursive decomposition of a torus. The algorithm requires an optimal number of rounds and a quasi-optimal number of intermediate switch settings to gossip in an $7^i \\times 7^i \\times 7^i$ torus.

  6. Dispersionless and multicomponent BKP hierarchies with quantum torus symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanzhong

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we will construct the additional perturbative quantum torus symmetry of the dispersionless BKP hierarchy based on the W∞ infinite dimensional Lie symmetry. These results show that the complete quantum torus symmetry is broken from the BKP hierarchy to its dispersionless hierarchies. Further a series of additional flows of the multicomponent BKP hierarchy will be defined and these flows constitute an N-folds direct product of the positive half of the quantum torus symmetries.

  7. Design, implementation and first measurements with the Medipix2-MXR detector at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, A; Bell, A; Hegeman, J; Mueller, S; Macpherson, A; Tsesmelis, E [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Butler, A; Butler, P; Lansley, S; Pfeiffer, D; Silverwood, H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Hall-Wilton, R [European Spallation Source ESS AB, St Algatan 4, Lund (Sweden); Keen, G [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy (NY) (United States); Krofcheck, D [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Pospisil, S; Vykydal, Z, E-mail: Dorothea.Pfeiffer@cern.ch [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics (IEAP), Czech Technical University (CTU), Horska 3a/22, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-08-15

    The Medipix detector is the first device dedicated to measuring mixed-field radiation in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment cavern and able to distinguish between different particle types. Medipix2-MXR chips bump bonded to silicon sensors with various neutron conversion layers developed by the IEAP CTU in Prague were successfully installed for the 2008 LHC start-up in the CMS experimental and services caverns to measure the flux of various particle types, in particular neutrons. They have operated almost continuously during the 2010 run period, and the results shown here are from the proton run between the beginning of July and the end of October 2010. Clear signals are seen and different particle types have been observed during regular LHC luminosity running, and an agreement in the measured flux is found with the simulations. These initial results are promising, and indicate that these devices have the potential for further and future LHC and high energy physics applications as radiation monitoring devices for mixed field environments, including neutron flux monitoring. Further extensions are foreseen in the near future to increase the performance of the detector and its coverage for monitoring in CMS.

  8. Design, implementation and first measurements with the Medipix2-MXR detector at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A.; Bell, A.; Butler, A.; Butler, P.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hegeman, J.; Lansley, S.; Keen, G.; Krofcheck, D.; Mueller, S.; Macpherson, A.; Pfeiffer, D.; Pospisil, S.; Silverwood, H.; Tsesmelis, E.; Vykydal, Z.

    2011-08-01

    The Medipix detector is the first device dedicated to measuring mixed-field radiation in the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiment cavern and able to distinguish between different particle types. Medipix2-MXR chips bump bonded to silicon sensors with various neutron conversion layers developed by the IEAP CTU in Prague were successfully installed for the 2008 LHC start-up in the CMS experimental and services caverns to measure the flux of various particle types, in particular neutrons. They have operated almost continuously during the 2010 run period, and the results shown here are from the proton run between the beginning of July and the end of October 2010. Clear signals are seen and different particle types have been observed during regular LHC luminosity running, and an agreement in the measured flux is found with the simulations. These initial results are promising, and indicate that these devices have the potential for further and future LHC and high energy physics applications as radiation monitoring devices for mixed field environments, including neutron flux monitoring. Further extensions are foreseen in the near future to increase the performance of the detector and its coverage for monitoring in CMS.

  9. A Compact Codimension Two Braneworld with Precisely One Brane

    CERN Document Server

    Akerblom, Nikolas

    2010-01-01

    Building on earlier work on football shaped extra dimensions, we construct a compact codimension two braneworld with precisely one brane. The two extra dimensions topologically represent a 2-torus which is stabilized by a bulk cosmological constant and magnetic flux. The torus has positive constant curvature almost everywhere, except for a single conical singularity at the location of the brane. In contradistinction to the football shaped case, there is no fine-tuning required for the brane tension. We also present some plausibility arguments why the model should not suffer from serious stability issues.

  10. Drift tube based pseudorapidity assignment of the level-1 muon trigger for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Markus E-mail: markus.brugger@cern.ch; Fierro, Massimiliano; Wulz, C.-E.Claudia-Elisabeth

    2002-04-11

    The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) under construction at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will explore new physics at high energies. Proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV and heavy-ion collisions will be studied. Muons with large transverse momenta are expected to be among the decay products of many new particles. Their identification and selection is the task of the trigger system. Specifically, the level-1 muon trigger has to search for muon candidates and to determine their parameters at a rate of 40 MHz, corresponding to a beam-crossing interval of 25 ns. The precise knowledge of the spatial parameters of a track enables to make full use of the possibility to select topological trigger conditions already at level-1 in the CMS experiment. Track segments measured in orthogonal layers of drift tube chambers are combined to form a muon candidate. Its transverse momentum is calculated from the track curvature in the r/phi (cursive,open) Greek-projection caused by a magnetic field along the beam direction z. The azimuthal angle phi (cursive,open) Greek in the plane transverse to the beam is also determined. The pseudorapidity {eta} is a function of the track angle {theta} relative to the beam axis. Using the information from the bending plane projection only enables a coarse assignment of {eta} in the central region of CMS by determining which chambers were crossed by the track. A method to assign {eta}-values of much greater precision is presented. It relies on track finding performed in the non-bending plane r/z and on matching the found tracks with those of the r/phi (cursive,open) Greek-projection. The requirements, the chosen algorithm, its simulated performance and the feasibility for a hardware implementation are described.

  11. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde Over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Josette Elizabeth; Saint Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  12. Compact Orthoalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Wilce, A

    2004-01-01

    We initiate a study of topological orthoalgebras (TOAs), concentrating on the compact case. Examples of TOAs include topological orthomodular lattices, and also the projection lattice of a Hilbert space. As the latter example illustrates, a lattice-ordered TOA need not be a topological lattice. However, we show that a compact Boolean TOA is a topological Boolean algebra. Using this, we prove that any compact regular TOA is atomistic, and has a compact center. We prove also that any compact TOA with isolated 0 is of finite height. We then focus on stably ordered TOAs: those in which the upper-set generated by an open set is open. These include both topological orthomodular lattices and interval orthoalgebras -- in particular, projection lattices. We show that the topology of a compact stably-ordered TOA with isolated 0 is determined by that of of its space of atoms.

  13. Er:YAG Laser: A New Technical Approach to Remove Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Rocca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of Er:YAG laser to remove by excision torus mandibularis and to smooth torus palatinus exostosis. Materials and Methods. Torus mandibularis (TM and torus palatinus (TP were surgically eliminated via the Er:YAG laser using the following parameters: TM: output power ranging from 500 to 1000 mJ, frequency from 20 to 30 Hz, sapphire tips (diameter 0.8 mm, air-water spray (ratio 5/5, pulse duration 150 μsec, fluence ranging from 99592 J/cm2 to 199044,586 J/cm2. TP: a peeling technique was used to eliminate TP, as excision by slicing being impossible here. Results. TM: excision was obtained after 12730 pulses. TP: smoothing technique took more time compared with excision. Once peeling was considered to be accomplished, the use of a surgical rasp was necessary to eliminate bone spicules that could delay the wound to heal in good conditions. Conclusion. Er:YAG excision (TM or Er:YAG peeling (TP are safe clinical techniques easy to practice even if the time required for excision or surface smoothing is more than the time required with bony burs and high speed instruments.

  14. Er:YAG Laser: A New Technical Approach to Remove Torus Palatinus and Torus Mandibularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J. P.; Raybaud, H.; Merigo, E.; Vescovi, P.; Fornaini, C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of Er:YAG laser to remove by excision torus mandibularis and to smooth torus palatinus exostosis. Materials and Methods. Torus mandibularis (TM) and torus palatinus (TP) were surgically eliminated via the Er:YAG laser using the following parameters: TM: output power ranging from 500 to 1000 mJ, frequency from 20 to 30 Hz, sapphire tips (diameter 0.8 mm), air-water spray (ratio 5/5), pulse duration 150 μsec, fluence ranging from 99592 J/cm2 to 199044,586 J/cm2. TP: a peeling technique was used to eliminate TP, as excision by slicing being impossible here. Results. TM: excision was obtained after 12730 pulses. TP: smoothing technique took more time compared with excision. Once peeling was considered to be accomplished, the use of a surgical rasp was necessary to eliminate bone spicules that could delay the wound to heal in good conditions. Conclusion. Er:YAG excision (TM) or Er:YAG peeling (TP) are safe clinical techniques easy to practice even if the time required for excision or surface smoothing is more than the time required with bony burs and high speed instruments. PMID:22792500

  15. A principle for ideal torus knots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper Wibeck; Bohr, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Using bent-helix embeddings, we investigate simple and knotted torus windings that are made of tubes of finite thickness. Knots which have the shortest rope length are often denoted as ideal structures. Conventionally, the ideal structures are found by rope shortening routines. It is shown...... that alternatively they can be directly determined as maximally twisted structures. In many cases these structures are also structures with zero strain-twist coupling, i.e. structures that neither rotate one or the other way under strain. We use this principle to implement rapid numerical calculations of the ideal...

  16. Torus knots and the rational DAHA

    CERN Document Server

    Gorsky, Eugene; Rasmussen, Jacob; Shende, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    We conjecturally extract the triply graded Khovanov-Rozansky homology of the (m, n) torus knot from the unique finite dimensional simple representation of the rational DAHA of type A, rank n - 1, and central character m/n. The conjectural differentials of Gukov, Dunfield and the third author receive an explicit algebraic expression in this picture, yielding a prescription for the doubly graded Khovanov-Rozansky homologies. We match our conjecture to previous conjectures of the first author relating knot homology to q, t-Catalan numbers, and of the last three authors relating knot homology to Hilbert schemes on singular curves.

  17. A METHOD FOR STIFFNESS MATRIX OF TRIANGULAR TORUS ELEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmuş GÜNAY

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The matrices of constants for the stiffness matrices of triangular torus elements family are generated on computer by using the expression given in literature. After the matrices are generated once, it is easy to obtain the stiffness matrices for all member of family of triangular torus elements without need for numerical integration.

  18. Studying uniform thickness II: Transversely nonsimple iterated torus knots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFountain, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We prove that an iterated torus knot type in the standard contact 3-sphere fails the uniform thickness property (UTP) if and only if it is formed from repeated positive cablings, which is precisely when an iterated torus knot supports the standard contact structure. This is the first complete UTP...

  19. Direct detection of the Enceladus water torus with Herschel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogh, P.; Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Cassidy, T.; Rengel, M.; Jarchow, C.; Cavalie, T.; Crovisier, J.; Helmich, F. P.; Kidger, M.

    Cryovolcanic activity near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus produces plumes of H2O-dominated gases and ice particles, which escape and populate a torus-shaped cloud. Using submillimeter spectroscopy with Herschel, we report the direct detection of the Enceladus water vapor torus in four

  20. Direct detection of the Enceladus water torus with Herschel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogh, P.; Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Cassidy, T.; Rengel, M.; Jarchow, C.; Cavalie, T.; Crovisier, J.; Helmich, F. P.; Kidger, M.

    2011-01-01

    Cryovolcanic activity near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus produces plumes of H2O-dominated gases and ice particles, which escape and populate a torus-shaped cloud. Using submillimeter spectroscopy with Herschel, we report the direct detection of the Enceladus water vapor torus in four rot

  1. On some Closed Magnetic Curves on a 3-torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munteanu, Marian Ioan, E-mail: marian.ioan.munteanu@gmail.com [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, Faculty of Mathematics (Romania); Nistor, Ana Irina, E-mail: ana.irina.nistor@gmail.com [Gh. Asachi Technical University of Iaşi, Department of Mathematics and Informatics (Romania)

    2017-06-15

    We consider two magnetic fields on the 3-torus obtained from two different contact forms on the Euclidean 3-space and we study when their corresponding normal magnetic curves are closed. We obtain periodicity conditions analogues to those for the closed geodesics on the torus.

  2. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M I; Ogasawara, K; Ebert, R W; McComas, D J; Allegrini, F; Weidner, S E; Alexander, N; Livi, S A

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ∼10 eV/q-40 keV/q plasma ions—CoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ∼30 keV-10 MeV energetic ions—CoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs' singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  3. An integrated time-of-flight versus residual energy subsystem for a compact dual ion composition experiment for space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, M. I.; McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Livi, S. A. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249-0697 (United States); Ogasawara, K.; Ebert, R. W.; Weidner, S. E.; Alexander, N. [Space Science and Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238-5166 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We have developed a novel concept for a Compact Dual Ion Composition Experiment (CoDICE) that simultaneously provides high quality plasma and energetic ion composition measurements over 6 decades in ion energy in a wide variety of space plasma environments. CoDICE measures the two critical ion populations in space plasmas: (1) mass and ionic charge state composition and 3D velocity and angular distributions of ∼10 eV/q–40 keV/q plasma ions—CoDICE-Lo and (2) mass composition, energy spectra, and angular distributions of ∼30 keV–10 MeV energetic ions—CoDICE-Hi. CoDICE uses a common, integrated Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus residual energy (E) subsystem for measuring the two distinct ion populations. This paper describes the CoDICE design concept, and presents results of the laboratory tests of the TOF portion of the TOF vs. E subsystem, focusing specifically on (1) investigation of spill-over and contamination rates on the start and stop microchannel plate (MCP) anodes vs. secondary electron steering and focusing voltages, scanned around their corresponding model-optimized values, (2) TOF measurements and resolution and angular resolution, and (3) cross-contamination of the start and stop MCPs’ singles rates from CoDICE-Lo and -Hi, and (4) energy resolution of avalanche photodiodes near the lower end of the CoDICE-Lo energy range. We also discuss physical effects that could impact the performance of the TOF vs. E subsystem in a flight instrument. Finally, we discuss advantages of the CoDICE design concept by comparing with capabilities and resources of existing flight instruments.

  4. Torus hyperplasia of the pyloric antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi-Hun; Han, Hye Seung; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Byung Kook; Sung, In-Kyung; Seong, Moo Kyung; Lee, Kyung Yung

    2010-01-01

    Primary or idiopathic hypertrophy of the pyloric muscle in adult, so called torus hyperplasia, is an infrequent but an established entity. It is caused by a circular muscle hypertrophy affecting the lesser curvature near the pylorus. Since most of the lesions are difficult to differentiate from tumor, distal gastrectomy is usually preformed to rule out most causes of pyloric lesions including neoplastic ones through a pathological study. A 56-yr-old man with a family history of gastric cancer presented with abdominal discomfort of 1 month duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a 1.0 cm sized irregular submucosal lesion proximal to the pylorus to the distal antrum on the lesser curvature. On colonoscopy examination, a 1.5 cm sized protruding mass was noticed on the appendiceal orifice. Gastrectomy and cecectomy were done, and histological section revealed marked hypertrophy of the distal circular pyloric musculature and an appendiceal mucocele. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of torus hyperplasia with appendiceal mucocele which is found incidentally.

  5. Arithmetic functions in torus and tree networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanot, Gyan; Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Vranas, Pavlos M.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and systems for performing arithmetic functions. In accordance with a first aspect of the invention, methods and apparatus are provided, working in conjunction of software algorithms and hardware implementation of class network routing, to achieve a very significant reduction in the time required for global arithmetic operation on the torus. Therefore, it leads to greater scalability of applications running on large parallel machines. The invention involves three steps in improving the efficiency and accuracy of global operations: (1) Ensuring, when necessary, that all the nodes do the global operation on the data in the same order and so obtain a unique answer, independent of roundoff error; (2) Using the topology of the torus to minimize the number of hops and the bidirectional capabilities of the network to reduce the number of time steps in the data transfer operation to an absolute minimum; and (3) Using class function routing to reduce latency in the data transfer. With the method of this invention, every single element is injected into the network only once and it will be stored and forwarded without any further software overhead. In accordance with a second aspect of the invention, methods and systems are provided to efficiently implement global arithmetic operations on a network that supports the global combining operations. The latency of doing such global operations are greatly reduced by using these methods.

  6. Holographic torus entanglement and its RG flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We study the universal contributions to the entanglement entropy (EE) of 2+1d and 3+1d holographic conformal field theories (CFTs) on topologically non-trivial manifolds, focusing on tori. The holographic bulk corresponds to AdS-soliton geometries. We characterize the properties of these regulator-independent EE terms as a function of both the size of the cylindrical entangling region, and the shape of the torus. In 2+1d, in the simple limit where the torus becomes a thin 1d ring, the EE reduces to a shape-independent constant $2\\gamma$. This is twice the EE obtained by bipartitioning an infinite cylinder into equal halves. We study the RG flow of $\\gamma$ by defining a renormalized EE that 1) is applicable to general QFTs, 2) resolves the failure of the area law subtraction, and 3) is inspired by the F-theorem. We find that the renormalized $\\gamma$ decreases monotonically when the holographic CFT is deformed by a relevant operator for all allowed scaling dimensions. We also discuss the question of non-uniqu...

  7. Saturn in hot water: viscous evolution of the Enceladus torus

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, Alison J

    2008-01-01

    The detection of outgassing water vapor from Enceladus is one of the great breakthroughs of the Cassini mission. The fate of this water once ionized has been widely studied; here we investigate the effects of purely neutral-neutral interactions within the Enceladus torus. We find that, thanks in part to the polar nature of the water molecule, a cold (~180 K) neutral torus would undergo rapid viscous heating and spread to the extent of the observed hydroxyl cloud, before plasma effects become important. We investigate the physics behind the spreading of the torus, paying particular attention to the competition between heating and rotational line cooling. A steady-state torus model is constructed, and it is demonstrated that the torus will be observable in the millimeter band with the upcoming Herschel satellite. The relative strength of rotational lines could be used to distinguish between physical models for the neutral cloud.

  8. Complex Dynamics Caused by Torus Bifurcation in Power Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaodan; JIA Hongjie; DONG Cun

    2006-01-01

    Torus bifurcation is a relatively complicated bifurcation caused by a pair of complex conjuployed to reveal the relationship between torus bifurcation and some complex dynamics.Based on theoretical analysis and simulation studies, it is found that torus bifurcation is a typical route to chaos in power system.Some complex dynamics usually occur after a torus bifurcation, such as self-organization, deep bifurcations, exquisite structure, coexistence of chaos and divergence.It is also found that chaos has close relationship with various instability scenarios of power systems.Studies of this paper are helpful to understand the mechanism of torus bifurcation in power system and relationship of chaos and power system instabilities.

  9. Gas kinematics in the inner kiloparsec of NGC 1386: a new clue to the torus-galaxy connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lena, D.

    2015-09-01

    We used the GMOS integral field unit on the Gemini South telescope to investigate the kinematics of the circum-nuclear ionized gas in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1386. We found that the dominant kinematic components can be explained as a combination of rotation in the large-scale galactic disk and a compact bipolar outflow along the axis of the AGN 'radiation cone'. However, there is also compelling evidence for an additional kinematic component which is consistent with outflow and/or rotation in a plane that is approximately perpendicular to the axis of the AGN radiation cone. We speculate that this is a wind which is both outfowing in the equatorial plane of the torus, and rotating about the axis of the radiation cones. From the emission line surface brightness distribution, we infer the torus inclination and opening angle.

  10. Optimal Mapping of Torus Self-Organizing Map for Human Forearm Motions Discrimination on the Basis of Myoelectric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiso, Atsushi; Seki, Hirokazu

    This paper describes an optimal mapping of the torus self-organizing map for a human forearm motion discrimination on the basis of the myoelectric signals. This study uses the torus self-organizing map (Torus-SOM) for the motion discrimination. The normal SOM identify input data into the same feature group by using the all units of map. Then there is a possibility of the misrecognition motion around the boundary lines of the motion groups. Therefore, this study proposes the mapping method of SOM that the learning units of the same motion concentrate on one local range and the learning unit groups of each motion separates enough. As a result, the variance in the same motion group becomes small and the variance between each motion groups becomes big. Some experiments on the myoelectric hand simulator show the effectiveness of the proposed motion discrimination method.

  11. Detecting the Energy Source in the Hottest Tango in the Universe:. a Torus around a Kerr Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.

    2002-09-01

    A Kerr black hole surrounded by a a torus is expected to produce emissions in various channels: bursts in baryon poor outflows along the axis of rotation of the black hole and gravitational radiation from the torus, with additional emissions in winds, thermal radiation and, when sufficiently hot, MeV neutrinos. We recently showed that the energy output as a fraction of rotational energy of the black hole is minor in these outflows and major in the emissions from the torus [van Putten & Levinson, Science, 2002, 295, 1874]. The former is proposed as the input to GRBs, consistent with their recently determined true energies. Detection of the energy output Egw in gravitational waves by gravitational wave experiments provides a method for identifying Kerr black holes in events which satisfy 2πEgwfgw > 0.005, where fgw ≃1kHz × (7M⊙/M) denotes the observed gravitational wave frequency.

  12. Fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete flow simulations in comparison with l-box experiments using carbopol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Olesen, John Forbes

    An evolution of distribution and orientation of fibres in the fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete during the casting process is an important matter as the final orientation and distribution of fibres can significantly influence mechanical properties of the structural elements. A two-way cou...

  13. Compact soft x-ray multichord camera: Design and initial operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, P.; Gadani, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Spizzo, G.; Brunsell, P.; Chapman, B. E.; Paganucci, F.; Rossetti, P.; Xiao, C.

    2003-03-01

    A compact and low cost diagnostic for spatially resolved measurements of soft x-ray or total radiation emission has been designed and realized to be flexibly applied to different plasma physics experiments. Its reduced size (outer diameter=35 mm) makes it suited to a variety of devices. The line integrated emissivity (brightness) has been measured along up to 20 lines of sight, using an array of miniaturized silicon photodiodes. Preliminary prototypes of the diagnostic have been installed in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch (RFP) device at University of Wisconsin and in the EXTRAP T2 RFP device at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. Application of the diagnostic to a gas-fed (argon, helium) magnetoplasma dynamic thruster (MPDT) with an external magnetic field will also be discussed.

  14. Scalar Curvature for the Noncommutative Two Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Fathizadeh, Farzad

    2011-01-01

    We give a local expression for the {\\it scalar curvature} of the noncommutative two torus $ A_{\\theta} = C(\\mathbb{T}_{\\theta}^2)$ equipped with an arbitrary translation invariant complex structure and Weyl factor. This is achieved by evaluating the value of the (analytic continuation of the) {\\it spectral zeta functional} $\\zeta_a(s): = \\text{Trace}(a \\triangle^{-s})$ at $s=0$ as a linear functional in $a \\in C^{\\infty}(\\mathbb{T}_{\\theta}^2)$. A new, purely noncommutative, feature here is the appearance of the {\\it modular automorphism group} from the theory of type III factors and quantum statistical mechanics in the final formula for the curvature. This formula coincides with the formula that was recently obtained independently by Connes and Moscovici in their recent paper.

  15. Torus CLAS12-Superconducting Magnet Quench Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V S; Elouadhiri, L; Ghoshal, P K; Kashy, D; Makarov, A; Pastor, O; Quettier, L; Velev, G; Wiseman, M

    2014-06-01

    The JLAB Torus magnet system consists of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration. These coils are wound with SSC-36 Nb-Ti superconductor and have the peak magnetic field of 3.6 T. The first coil manufacturing based on the JLAB design began at FNAL. The large magnet system dimensions (8 m diameter and 14 MJ of stored energy) dictate the need for quench protection. Each coil is placed in an aluminum case mounted inside a cryostat and cooled by 4.6 K supercritical helium gas flowing through a copper tube attached to the coil ID. The large coil dimensions and small cryostat thickness drove the design to challenging technical solutions, suggesting that Lorentz forces due to transport currents and eddy currents during quench and various failure scenarios are analyzed. The paper covers the magnet system quench analysis using the OPERA3d Quench code.

  16. An FPGA-based Torus Communication Network

    CERN Document Server

    Pivanti, Marcello; Simma, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design and FPGA implementation of a 3D torus network (TNW) to provide nearest-neighbor communications between commodity multi-core processors. The aim of this project is to build up tightly interconnected and scalable parallel systems for scientific computing. The design includes the VHDL code to implement on latest FPGA devices a network processor, which can be accessed by the CPU through a PCIe interface and which controls the external PHYs of the physical links. Moreover, a Linux driver and a library implementing custom communication APIs are provided. The TNW has been successfully integrated in two recent parallel machine projects, QPACE and AuroraScience. We describe some details of the porting of the TNW for the AuroraScience system and report performance results.

  17. An FPGA-based torus communication network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivanti, Marcello; Schifano, Sebastiano Fabio [INFN, Ferrara (Italy); Ferrara Univ. (Italy); Simma, Hubert [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC

    2011-02-15

    We describe the design and FPGA implementation of a 3D torus network (TNW) to provide nearest-neighbor communications between commodity multi-core processors. The aim of this project is to build up tightly interconnected and scalable parallel systems for scientific computing. The design includes the VHDL code to implement on latest FPGA devices a network processor, which can be accessed by the CPU through a PCIe interface and which controls the external PHYs of the physical links. Moreover, a Linux driver and a library implementing custom communication APIs are provided. The TNW has been successfully integrated in two recent parallel machine projects, QPACE and AuroraScience. We describe some details of the porting of the TNW for the AuroraScience system and report performance results. (orig.)

  18. Exploring Torus Universes in Causal Dynamical Triangulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budd, Timothy George; Loll, R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the search for new observables in nonperturbative quantum gravity, we consider Causal Dynamical Triangulations (CDT) in 2+1 dimensions with the spatial topology of a torus. This system is of particular interest, because one can study not only the global scale factor, but also global...... shape variables in the presence of arbitrary quantum fluctuations of the geometry. Our initial investigation focusses on the dynamics of the scale factor and uncovers a qualitatively new behaviour, which leads us to investigate a novel type of boundary conditions for the path integral. Comparing large......-scale features of the emergent quantum geometry in numerical simulations with a classical minisuperspace formulation, we find partial agreement. By measuring the correlation matrix of volume fluctuations we succeed in reconstructing the effective action for the scale factor directly from the simulation data...

  19. Strings in compact cosmological spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Craps, Ben; Konechny, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    We confront the problem of giving a fundamental definition to perturbative string theory in spacetimes with totally compact space (taken to be a torus for simplicity, though the nature of the problem is very general) and non-compact time. Due to backreaction induced by the presence of even a single string quantum, the usual formulation of perturbative string theory in a fixed classical background is infrared-divergent at all subleading orders in the string coupling, and needs to be amended. The problem can be seen as a closed string analogue of D0-brane recoil under an impact by closed strings (a situation displaying extremely similar infrared divergences). Inspired by the collective coordinate treatment of the D0-brane recoil, whereby the translational modes of the D0-brane are introduced as explicit dynamical variables in the path integral, we construct a similar formalism for the case of string-induced gravitational backreaction, in which the spatially uniform modes of the background fields on the compact ...

  20. Acetylation of pea isolate in a torus microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, J; Guéguen, J; Berot, S; Popineau, Y; Nouri, L

    1997-02-20

    Acetylation, which acts on the amino groups of proteins, allows to increase the solubility and the emulsifying properties of pea isolate. Acetylation by acetic anhydride was carried out in a torus microreactor in semibatch and continuous conditions. The mixing characteristics, obtained by a residence time distribution (RTD) method, are the same in batch and continuous processes. The maximum acetylation degree reached by the torus reactor is higher than with the stirred reactor. Torus reactors are more efficient than stirred ones as shown by a conversion efficiency, defined by the quantity of modified lysine groups by consumed acetic anhydride. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 53: 409-414, 1997.

  1. Stability of small-amplitude torus knot solutions of the localized induction approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calini, Annalisa; Ivey, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    We study the linear stability of small-amplitude torus knot solutions of the localized induction approximation equation for the motion of a thin vortex filament in an ideal fluid. Such solutions can be constructed analytically through the connection with the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation using the method of isoperiodic deformations. We show that these (p, q) torus knots are generically linearly unstable for p q, in contrast with an earlier linear stability study by Ricca (1993 Chaos 3 83-95 1995 Chaos 5 346; 1995 Small-scale Structures in Three-dimensional Hydro and Magneto-dynamics Turbulence (Lecture Notes in Physics vol 462) (Berlin: Springer)). We also provide an interpretation of the original perturbative calculation in Ricca (1995), and an explanation of the numerical experiments performed by Ricca et al (1999 J. Fluid Mech. 391 29-44), in light of our results.

  2. A geometric approach to noncommutative principal torus bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    for noncommutative algebras and say that a dynamical system (A, 핋n,α) is called a noncommutative principal 핋n-bundle, if localization leads to a trivial noncommutative principal 핋n-bundle. We prove that this approach extends the classical theory of principal torus bundles and present a bunch of (nontrivial......A (smooth) dynamical system with transformation group 핋n is a triple (A, 핋n,α), consisting of a unital locally convex algebra A, the n-torus 핋n and a group homomorphism α:핋n→Aut(A), which induces a (smooth) continuous action of 핋n on A. In this paper, we present a new, geometrically oriented...... approach to the noncommutative geometry of principal torus bundles based on such dynamical systems. Our approach is inspired by the classical setting: In fact, after recalling the definition of a trivial noncommutative principal torus bundle, we introduce a convenient (smooth) localization method...

  3. Chern-Simons Invariants of Torus Knots and Links

    CERN Document Server

    Stevan, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    We compute the vacuum expectation values of torus knot operators in Chern-Simons theory, and we obtain explicit formulae for all classical gauge groups and for arbitrary representations. We reproduce a known formula for the HOMFLY invariants of torus links and we obtain an analogous formula for Kauffman invariants. We also derive a formula for cable knots. We use our results to test a recently proposed conjecture that relates HOMFLY and Kauffman invariants.

  4. Torus as phase space: Weyl quantization, dequantization, and Wigner formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligabò, Marilena, E-mail: marilena.ligabo@uniba.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    The Weyl quantization of classical observables on the torus (as phase space) without regularity assumptions is explicitly computed. The equivalence class of symbols yielding the same Weyl operator is characterized. The Heisenberg equation for the dynamics of general quantum observables is written through the Moyal brackets on the torus and the support of the Wigner transform is characterized. Finally, a dequantization procedure is introduced that applies, for instance, to the Pauli matrices. As a result we obtain the corresponding classical symbols.

  5. Theoretical analysis of a parabolic torus reflector antenna with multibeam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜彪; 杨可忠; 钟顺时

    1995-01-01

    The parametric equations and the formulas of unit normal vector and surface element for aparabolic torus reflector antenna are derived and the mechanism of producing multibeam is proposed, Based on physical optics, the radiation pattern formulas for the antenna are given, with which the effects of geometric parameters on the antenna are studied. The good agreement between the calculated patterns and the measured ones shows that the theory is helpful for designing parabolic torus antennas.

  6. A torus patch approximation approach for point projection on surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Yang, Lei; Yong, Jun-Hai; Gu, He-Jin; Sun, Jia-Guang

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper proposes a second order geometric iteration algorithm for point projection and inversion on parametric surfaces. The iteration starts from an initial projection estimation. In each iteration, we construct a second order osculating torus patch to the parametric surface at the previous projection. Then we project the test point onto the torus patch to compute the next projection and its parameter. This iterative process is terminated when the parameter satisfi...

  7. Topological order and Berry connection for the Maxwell Vacuum on a four-torus

    CERN Document Server

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    We study novel type of contributions to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold such as torus. These new terms can not be described in terms of the physical propagating photons with two transverse polarizations. Rather, these novel contributions emerge as a result of tunnelling events when transitions occur between topologically different but physically identical vacuum winding states. These new terms give an extra contribution to the Casimir pressure. The infrared physics in the system can be described in terms of the topological auxiliary non-propagating fields $a_i(\\mathbf{k})$ governed by Chern-Simons -like action. The system can be studied in terms of these auxiliary fields precisely in the same way as a topological insulator can be analyzed in terms of Berry's connection ${\\cal{A}}_i(\\mathbf{k})$. We also argue that the Maxwell vacuum defined on a small 4-torus behaves very much in the same way as a topological insulator with $\\theta\

  8. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost.

  9. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  10. Gauge Theory On The Fuzzy Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Bigatti, D

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a formulation of U(1) gauge theory on a fuzzy torus is discussed. The theory is regulated in both the infrared and ultraviolet. It can be thought of as a non-commutative version of lattice gauge theory on a periodic lattice. The construction of Wilson loops is particularly transparent in this formulation. Following Ishibashi, Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we show that certain Fourier modes of open Wilson lines are gauge invariant. We also introduce charged matter fields which can be thought of as fundamentals of the gauge group. These particles behave like charges in a strong magnetic field and are frozen into the lowest Landau levels. The resulting system is a simple matrix quantum mechanics which should reflect much of the physics of charged particles in strong magnetic fields. The present results were first presented as a talk at the Institute for Mathematical Science, Chennai, India; the author wishes to thank Prof. T. R. Govindarajan and the IMS for hospitality and financial support, and the aud...

  11. Mathematical Model for Elliptic Torus of Automotive Torque Converter and Fundamental Analysis of Its Effect on Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Passenger car torque converters have been designed with an increasingly flatter profile in recent years for the purpose of achieving a weight saving and more compact size. However, a flatter design tends to result in the reduced hydrodynamic performance. To improve its performance, a new flat torus of elliptic type method concentrating on the solution to flat TC was put forward, and four torque converters of different flatness ratios were designed to judge the superiority of the flat torus design method. The internal flow characteristics were numerically investigated using CFD codes and resulted in good agreement with experimental data. The results indicate that the main cause of this performance degradation can be attributed to deterioration of the velocity fields of the pump, and a case of flatness ratio 0.8 illustrates the reason that the performance designed by the flat torus design method based on the elliptic shape is more excellent than that of the traditional one. Furthermore, this study proposed a structure of removal of inner ring to improve the performance of torque converter.

  12. From mode I cracking to dilatancy, shear, and compaction banding: Constraints from axisymmetric and poly-axial experiments and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemenda, A. I.; Jorand, C.; Petit, J.; Nguyen, S.

    2011-12-01

    used to explain the formation of shear bands. The initiation of compaction and dilatancy bands can also be viewed as resulting from a similar process. This requires assuming large absolute values of the dilatancy factor β. Finite-difference simulations suggest that |β| should rapidly reduce with inelastic deformation, which is confirmed by the experimental data. The numerical models suggest also that the failure structures observed in the experiments correspond to the unstable post-bifurcation evolution of the deformation bands that is largely defined by the evolution of β and other constitutive parameters with deformation.

  13. Design and Implementation of a 200kW, 28GHz gyrotron system for the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Ennis, D. A.; Maurer, D. A.; Bigelow, T.

    2016-10-01

    The Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) is an l = 2 , m = 5 torsatron/tokamak hybrid (R0 = 0.75 m, ap 0.2 m, and | B | supplement the existing 15 kW klystron system operating at the fundamental frequency; the latter will be used to initially generate the plasma. Ray-tracing calculations that guide the selection of launching position, antenna focal length, and beam-steering characteristics of the ECRH have been performed with the TRAVIS code [ 1 ] . The calculated absorption is up to 95.7% for vertically propagating rays, however, the absorption is more sensitive to magnetic field variations than for a side launch where the field gradient is tokamak-like. The design of the waveguide path and components for the top-launch scenario will be presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  14. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  15. Compact Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; Zafalan, I

    2016-01-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  16. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  17. The Evolution of the Control System for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Oliver; Dissertori, Günther; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the Detector Control System (DCS) designed and implemented for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as well as the operational experience acquired during the LHC physics data taking periods of 2010 and 2011. The current implementation in terms of functionality and planned hardware upgrades are presented. Furthermore, a project for reducing the long-term software maintenance, including a year-long detailed analysis of the existing applications, is put forward and the current outcomes which have informed the design decisions for the next CMS ECAL DCS software generation are described. The main goals for the new version are to minimize external dependencies enabling smooth migration to new hardware and software platforms and to maintain the existing functionality whilst substantially reducing support and maintenance effort through homogenization, simplification and standardization of the contr...

  18. The Evolution of the Control System for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Holme, Oliver; Dissertori, Günther; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the Detector Control System (DCS) designed and implemented for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) as well as the operational experience acquired during the LHC physics data taking periods of 2010 and 2011. The current implementation in terms of functionality and planned hardware upgrades are presented. Furthermore, a project for reducing the long-term software maintenance, including a year-long detailed analysis of the existing applications, is put forward and the current outcomes which have informed the design decisions for the next CMS ECAL DCS software generation are described. The main goals for the new version are to minimize external dependencies enabling smooth migration to new hardware and software platforms and to maintain the existing functionality whilst substantially reducing support and maintenance effort through homogenization, simplification and standardization of the contr...

  19. Motion Analysis of Fiber Band in Compact Field of Compact Spinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The technological process of compact spinning and the compact procedure of fiber band in compact field are briefly illustrated. The motions of fiber band in compact field are discussed theoretically from which tilting angle of suction slot in profile tube, additional twists created by fiber band's rotating around its own axis and ultimate twists in compact yarn are deduced accordingly. The existence of additional twists is also verified through experiments.

  20. Steady-State Plasmas in KT5D Magnetized Torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhenhua; LIU Wandong; WAN Baonian; ZHAO Yanping; LI Jiangang; YAN Longwen; YANG Qingwei; DING Xuantong; XU Min; YU Yi; WANG Zhijiang; LU Ronghua; WEN Yizhi; YU Changxuan; MA Jinxiu; WAN Shude

    2007-01-01

    Steady-state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) wave in the KT5D magnetized torus was studied using a fast high-resolution camera and Langmuir probes. It was found that both the discharge patterns taken by the camera and the plasma parameters measured by the probes were very sensitive to the working gas pressure and the magnetic configuration of the torus both without and with vertical fields. There existed fast vertical motion of the plasma. Tentative discussion is presented about the observed phenomena such as the bright resonance layer at a high gas pressure and the wave absorption mechanism at a low pressure. Further explanations should be found.

  1. An approach to renormalization on the n-torus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockmore, Daniel; Siegel, Ralph; Tongring, Nils; Tresser, Charles

    1991-07-01

    The coding theory of rotations (by inspecting closely their relation to flows) and the continued fractions algorithm (by considering even two-coloring of the integers with a given proportion of, say, blue and red) are revisited. Then, even n-coloring of the integers is defined. This allows one to code rotations on the (n-1)-torus by considering linear flows on the n-torus and yields a simple geometric approach to renormalization on tori by first return maps on the coding regions.

  2. The CLAS12 Torus Detector Magnet at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luongo, Cesar [Jefferson Lab; Ballard, Joshua [Jefferson Lab; Biallas, George [Jefferson Lab; Elouadrhiri, Latifa [Jefferson Lab; Fair, Ruben [Jefferson Lab; Ghoshal, Probir [Jefferson Lab; Kashy, Dave [Jefferson Lab; Legg, Robert [Jefferson Lab; Pastor, Orlando [Jefferson Lab; Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka [Jefferson Lab; Rode, Claus [Jefferson Lab; Wiseman, Mark [Jefferson Lab; Young, Glenn [Jefferson Lab; Elementi, Luciano [Fermilab; Krave, Steven [Fermilab; Makarov, Alexander [Fermilab; Nobrega, Fred [Fermilab; Velev, George [Fermilab

    2015-12-17

    The CLAS12 Torus is a toroidal superconducting magnet, which is part of the detector for the 12-GeV accelerator upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The coils were wound/fabricated by Fermilab, with JLab responsible for all other parts of the project scope, including design, integration, cryostating the individual coils, installation, cryogenics, I&C, etc. This paper provides an overview of the CLAS12 Torus magnet features and serves as a status report of its installation in the experimental hall. Completion and commissioning of the magnet is expected in 2016.

  3. Comments on a full quantization of the torus

    CERN Document Server

    Velhinho, J M

    1998-01-01

    Gotay showed that a representation of the whole Poisson algebra of the torus given by geometric quantization is irreducible with respect to the most natural overcomplete set of observables. We study this representation and argue that it cannot be considered as physically acceptable, since classically bounded observables are quantized by operators with unbounded spectrum. This in turn can be traced back to the non implementation of functional relations among observables. Effectively, the latter amounts to lifting the constraints that compactify both directions in the torus.

  4. First observation of ELM pacing with vertical jogs in a spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ahn, Joon-Wook [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Canik, John [ORNL; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bell, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gates, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Goldston, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hawryluk, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Le Blanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Tritz, K. [Johns Hopkins University

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies.

  5. First observation of ELM pacing with vertical jogs in a spherical torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Ahn, J.-W.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R.; Gates, D.; Goldston, R.; Hawryluk, R.; Le Blanc, B. P.; Menard, J.; Sontag, A. C.; Sabbagh, S.; Tritz, K.

    2010-06-01

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies.

  6. First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

    2010-07-15

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

  7. Initial Results from the Lost Alpha Diagnostics on Joint European Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, Doug; Cecil, Ed; Ellis, Bob; Fullard, Keith; Hill, Ken; Horton, Alan; Kiptily, Vasily; Pedrick, Les; Reich, Matthias

    2007-07-25

    Two devices have been installed in the Joint European Torus (JET) vacuum vessel near the plasma boundary to investigate the loss of energetic ions and fusion products in general and alpha particles in particular during the upcoming JET experiments. These devices are (i) a set of multichannel thin foil Faraday collectors, and (ii) a well collimated scintillator which is optically connected to a charge-coupled device. Initial results, including the radial energy and poloidal dependence of lost ions from hydrogen and deuterium plasmas during the 2005–06 JET restart campaign, will be presented.

  8. DYNAMIC COMPACTION OF PURE COPPER POWDER USING PULSED MAGNETIC FORCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The compaction of pure Cu powder was carried out through a series of experiments using dynamic magnetic pulse compaction, and the effects of process parameters, such as discharge energy and compacting direction, on the homogeneity and the compaction density of compacted specimens were presented and discussed. The results indicated that the compaction density of specimens increased with the augment of discharge voltage and time. During unidirectional compaction, there was a density gradient along the loading direction in the compacted specimen, and the minimum compaction density was localized to the center of the bottom of the specimen. The larger the aspect ratio of a powder body, the higher the compaction density of the compacted specimen. And high conductivity drivers were beneficial to the increase of the compaction density. The iterative and the double direction compaction were efficient means to manufacture the homogeneous and high-density powder parts.

  9. Effects of SF$_{6}$ on the avalanche mode operation of a real-sized double-gap resistive plate chamber for the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn Sung Hwan; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Ito, M; Kim, B I; Kim, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S; Kang, T I

    2005-01-01

    We present the design and the test, results for a real-sized prototype resistive plate chamber by using cosmic-ray muons for the forward region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In particular, we investigate the effects of adding SF/sub 6/ to the gas mixture for the avalanche mode operation of a resistive plate chamber. A small fraction of SF/sub 6/ is very effective in suppressing streamer signals in a resistive plate chamber. The shapes of the muon detection efficiency and the muon cluster size remain similar, but are shifted to higher operating voltage by SF/sub 6/. The noise cluster rate and size are not influenced by SF/sub 6/.

  10. Quasiperiodicity and Torus Breakdown in a Power Electronic DC/DC Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai; Soukhoterin, Evgeniy; Mosekilde, Erik

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanisms of torus formation and torus destruction in a dc/dc converter with relay control and hysteresis. We establish a chart of the dynamical modes in the input voltage versus load resistance parameter plane. This chart displays several different torus bifurcations...

  11. Pro-Torus Actions on Poincaré Duality Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ali Özkurt; Doğan Dönmez

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, it is shown that some of the results of torus actions on Poincaré duality spaces, Borel’s dimension formula and topological splitting principle to local weights, hold if `torus’ is replaced by `pro-torus’.

  12. Recursive representation of the torus 1-point conformal block

    CERN Document Server

    Hadasz, Leszek; Suchanek, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    The recursive relation for the 1-point conformal block on a torus is derived and used to prove the identities between conformal blocks recently conjectured by R. Poghossian. As an illustration of the efficiency of the recurrence method the modular invariance of the 1-point Liouville correlation function is numerically analyzed.

  13. Photodisintegration of a Bound State on the Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Harvey B

    2012-01-01

    In this article the cross-section for the photodisintegration of a bound state is expressed, order by order in the multipole expansion, in terms of matrix elements between states living on the three-dimensional torus. The motivation is to make the process amenable to Monte-Carlo simulations. The case of the deuteron is discussed.

  14. On projections in the noncommutative 2-torus algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, Michał

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a set of functional equations defining an arbitrary projection in the noncommutative 2-torus algebra A_{\\theta}. The exact solutions of those provide various generalisations of the Power-Rieffel projection. By identifying the corresponding K_0 classes we get an insight into the general structure of projections in A_{\\theta}.

  15. On Projections in the Noncommutative 2-Torus Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Michał

    2014-03-01

    We investigate a set of functional equations defining a projection in the noncommutative 2-torus algebra A_{θ}. The exact solutions of these provide various generalisations of the Powers-Rieffel projection. By identifying the corresponding K_0(A_{θ}) classes we get an insight into the structure of projections in A_{θ}.

  16. Complete spectral data for analytic Anosov maps of the torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipantschuk, J.; Bandtlow, O. F.; Just, W.

    2017-07-01

    Using analytic properties of Blaschke factors we construct a family of analytic hyperbolic diffeomorphisms of the torus for which the spectra of the associated transfer operator acting on a suitable Hilbert space can be computed explicitly. As a result, we obtain expressions for the decay of correlations of analytic observables without resorting to any kind of perturbation argument.

  17. Atomic force microscopy of torus-bearing pit membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland R. Dute; Thomas Elder

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to compare the structures of dried, torus-bearing pit membranes from four woody species, three angiosperms and one gymnosperm. Tori of Osmanthus armatus are bipartite consisting of a pustular zone overlying parallel sets of microfibrils that form a peripheral corona. Microfibrils of the corona form radial spokes as they traverse the...

  18. Io Plasma Torus Ion Composition: Voyager, Galileo, Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Nerney, Edward; Steffl, Andrew Joseph

    2016-10-01

    With JAXA's Hisaki spacecraft in orbit around Earth gathering information on the Io plasma torus and NASA's Juno mission measuring plasma conditions in the jovian magnetosphere, the time is ripe for a re-evaluation of earlier observations of the plasma torus to assess evidence for temporal variations. In particular, we are interested in exploring the ion composition of the torus and whether there is evidence of the ultimate source – the volcanic gases from Io – have deviated from SO2. We use the latest CHIANTI 8.0 atomic database to analyze UV spectra of the torus from Voyager, Galileo and Cassini as well as with the physical chemistry model of Delamere, Steffl and Bagenal (2005). We find that contrary to earlier analyses of Voyager data (e.g. Shemansky 1987; 1988) that produced a composition requiring a neutral source of O/S~4, we find an ion composition that is consistent with the Cassini UVIS data (Steffl et al. 2004) and a neutral O/S~2, consistent with SO2.

  19. Warm compaction powder metallurgy of Cu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NGAI Tungwai Leo; WANG Shang-lin; LI Yuan-yuan; ZHOU Zho-yao; CHEN Wei-ping

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out using different admixed lubricant contents,different compaction pressures and temperatures in order to study the warm compaction of copper powder.Results show that too much admixed lubricant will lead to the squeeze out of the lubricant from the compact during the warm compaction processing of Cu powder.Results also show that blisters can be found in sintered samples that contain lubricant less than 0.15% (mass fraction).Optimal warm compaction parameters for producing high density powder metallurgy copper material are obtained.Compacts with green density of 8.6 g/cm3 and a sintered density of 8.83 g/cm3 can be produced by warm compacting the Cu powder,which contains 0.2% admixed lubricant,and is compacted at 145 ℃ with a pressure of 700 Mpa.

  20. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P., E-mail: dstotler@pppl.gov; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3}; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%.

  1. Finite element analysis of an inflatable torus considering air mass structural element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, S. C.; Upadhyay, S. H.; Harsha, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Inflatable structures, also known as gossamer structures, are at high boom in the current space technology due to their low mass and compact size comparing to the traditional spacecraft designing. Internal pressure becomes the major source of strength and rigidity, essentially stiffen the structure. However, inflatable space based membrane structure are at high risk to the vibration disturbance due to their low structural stiffness and material damping. Hence, the vibration modes of the structure should be known to a high degree of accuracy in order to provide better control authority. In the past, most of the studies conducted on the vibration analysis of gossamer structures used inaccurate or approximate theories in modeling the internal pressure. The toroidal shaped structure is one of the important key element in space application, helps to support the reflector in space application. This paper discusses the finite-element analysis of an inflated torus. The eigen-frequencies are obtained via three-dimensional small-strain elasticity theory, based on extremum energy principle. The two finite-element model (model-1 and model-2) have cases have been generated using a commercial finite-element package. The structure model-1 with shell element and model-2 with the combination of the mass of enclosed fluid (air) added to the shell elements have been taken for the study. The model-1 is computed with present analytical approach to understand the convergence rate and the accuracy. The convergence study is made available for the symmetric modes and anti-symmetric modes about the centroidal-axis plane, meeting the eigen-frequencies of an inflatable torus with the circular cross section. The structural model-2 is introduced with air mass element and analyzed its eigen-frequency with different aspect ratio and mode shape response using in-plane and out-plane loading condition are studied.

  2. Optimal Bayesian experimental design for priors of compact support with application to shock-tube experiments for combustion kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-12

    The analysis of reactive systems in combustion science and technology relies on detailed models comprising many chemical reactions that describe the conversion of fuel and oxidizer into products and the formation of pollutants. Shock-tube experiments are a convenient setting for measuring the rate parameters of individual reactions. The temperature, pressure, and concentration of reactants are chosen to maximize the sensitivity of the measured quantities to the rate parameter of the target reaction. In this study, we optimize the experimental setup computationally by optimal experimental design (OED) in a Bayesian framework. We approximate the posterior probability density functions (pdf) using truncated Gaussian distributions in order to account for the bounded domain of the uniform prior pdf of the parameters. The underlying Gaussian distribution is obtained in the spirit of the Laplace method, more precisely, the mode is chosen as the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate, and the covariance is chosen as the negative inverse of the Hessian of the misfit function at the MAP estimate. The model related entities are obtained from a polynomial surrogate. The optimality, quantified by the information gain measures, can be estimated efficiently by a rejection sampling algorithm against the underlying Gaussian probability distribution, rather than against the true posterior. This approach offers a significant error reduction when the magnitude of the invariants of the posterior covariance are comparable to the size of the bounded domain of the prior. We demonstrate the accuracy and superior computational efficiency of our method for shock-tube experiments aiming to measure the model parameters of a key reaction which is part of the complex kinetic network describing the hydrocarbon oxidation. In the experiments, the initial temperature and fuel concentration are optimized with respect to the expected information gain in the estimation of the parameters of the target

  3. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Tala, T.; Ferreira, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power or by modu...

  4. THE SPECTRUM OF COMPACT HYPERSURFACE IN SPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Senlin; Deng Qintao; Chen Dongmei

    2004-01-01

    Let M be a compact minimal hypersurface of sphere Sn+1(1). Let (M) be H (r)-torus of sphere Sn+ 1 (1).Assume they have the same constant mean curvature H, the result in [1] is that ifSpec0(M, g) =Spec0((M), g),then for 3≤ n ≤ 6, r2≤n-1/n or n ≥ 6, r2 ≥ n-1, then M is isometric to (M). We improved the result and prove that: if Spec0(M,g) =Spec0((M),g), then M is isometric to (M). Generally, if Specp(M,g) =Specp((M),g), here p is fixed and satisfies that n(n - 1) ≠ 6p(n - p), then M is isometric to (M).

  5. Particle Distribution Of A Moon-Fed Dust Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamrath, E.; Makuch, M.; Spahn, F.

    2008-09-01

    Enceladus' south-polar gey- sers support a huge gas-dust plume towering the south pole of the moon. It is considered to be the main source Saturns E-ring, the largest dust complex of the solar system. Contrary to the spherically sym- metric impactor ejecta dust cre- ation, the dust plume provides a directed particle outflow from the moon. Using a simple probabilistic model, we study the effects of this asymmetric dust ejection on Enceladus' dust torus. Dust con- figurations are described by par- ticle distribution functions and the dynamical properties of the system are adressed through a set of transformations. The re- sulting distribution function of orbital elements describes the unperturbed dust torus. We showcase the differences in the resulting particle distributions between impactor ejecta pro- cesses and dust production by Enceladus plume, modeled by a directed point-sized source. The obtained orbital element distri- bution is compared to the results of numerical simulations of the problem.

  6. The Gauss-Bonnet Theorem for the noncommutative two torus

    CERN Document Server

    Connes, Alain

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we show that the value at zero of the zeta function of the Laplacian on the non-commutative two torus, endowed with its canonical conformal structure, is independent of the choice of the volume element (Weyl factor) given by a (non-unimodular) state. We had obtained, in the late eighties, in an unpublished computation, a general formula for this value at zero involving modified logarithms of the modular operator of the state. We give here the detailed computation and prove that the result is independent of the Weyl factor as in the classical case, thus proving the analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem for the noncommutative two torus.

  7. Combinatorial realizations of crystals via torus actions on quiver varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Sam, Steven V

    2012-01-01

    Consider Kashiwara's crystal associated to a highest weight representation of a symmetric Kac--Moody algebra. There is a geometric realization of this object using Nakajima's quiver varieties. In many particular cases it can also be realized by elementary combinatorial methods. Here we propose a framework for extracting combinatorial realizations from the geometric picture: we construct certain torus actions on the quiver varieties and use Morse theory to index the irreducible components by connected components of the subvariety of torus fixed points. We then discuss the case of affine sl(n). There the fixed point components are just points, and are naturally indexed by multi-partitions. There is some choice in our construction, leading to a family of combinatorial realizations for each highest weight crystal. In the case of the crystal of the fundamental representation we recover a family of realizations which was recently constructed by Fayers. This gives a more conceptual proof of Fayers' result as well as...

  8. Short interval expansion of R\\'enyi entropy on torus

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the short interval expansion of the R\\'enyi entropy for two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) on a torus. We require the length of the interval $\\ell$ to be small with respect to the spatial and temporal sizes of the torus. The operator product expansion of the twist operators allows us to compute the short interval expansion of the R\\'enyi entropy at any temperature. In particular, we pay special attention to the large $c$ CFTs dual to the AdS$_3$ gravity and its cousins. At both low and high temperature limits, we read the R\\'enyi entropies to order $\\ell^6$, and find good agreements with holographic results. Moreover, the expansion allows us to read $1/c$ contribution, which is hard to get by expanding the thermal density matrix. We generalize the study to the case with the chemical potential as well.

  9. A Riemann-Roch theorem for the noncommutative two torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali, Masoud; Moatadelro, Ali

    2014-12-01

    We prove the analogue of the Riemann-Roch formula for the noncommutative two torus Aθ = C(Tθ2)equipped with an arbitrary translation invariant complex structure and a Weyl factor represented by a positive element k ∈C∞(Tθ2). We consider a topologically trivial line bundle equipped with a general holomorphic structure and the corresponding twisted Dolbeault Laplacians. We define a spectral triple (Aθ , H , D) that encodes the twisted Dolbeault complex of Aθ and whose index gives the left hand side of the Riemann-Roch formula. Using Connes' pseudodifferential calculus and heat equation techniques, we explicitly compute the b2 terms of the asymptotic expansion of Tr(e-tD2) . We find that the curvature term on the right hand side of the Riemann-Roch formula coincides with the scalar curvature of the noncommutative torus recently defined and computed in Connes and Moscovici (2014) and independently computed in Fathizadeh and Khalkhali (2014).

  10. An improved billet on billet extrusion process of continuous aluminium alloy shapes for cryogenic applications in the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, S S

    2003-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the experiments being designed in the framework of the Large Hadron Collider accelerator at CERN. CMS will contain the largest and the most powerful superconducting solenoid magnet ever built in terms of stored energy. It will work at 4.2 K, will have a magnetic length of 12.5 m, with a free bore of 6m and will be manufactured as a layered and modular structure of NbTi cables embedded in a high purity (99.998%) Al- stabiliser. Each layer consists of a wound continuous length of 2.55 km. In order to withstand the high electromagnetic forces, two external aluminium alloy reinforcing sections are foreseen. These reinforcements, of 24 mm multiplied by 18 mm cross-section, will be continuously electron beam (EB) welded to the pure Al-stabiliser. The alloy EN AW-6082 has been selected for the reinforcements due to its excellent extrudability, high strength in the precipitation hardened state, high toughness and strength at cryogenic temperatures and ready EB weldability. Ea...

  11. Reconstruction of missing transverse energy and prospect of searching for Higgs boson produced via vector boson fusion in Compact Muon Solenoid experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pi, Haifeng

    2005-01-01

    We performed full detector simulation studies of missing transverse energy (Emiss T ) reconstruction and correction, and the prospects for searching for a low mass Higgs Boson (120 < mH < 250 GeV/c 2 ) produced via the vector boson fusion (VBF) process through the decay of H → W+W− → `νjj at Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment in Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We developed a new jet energy correction algorithm by parameterizing the jet energy distribution around the jet axis. The jet energy resolution is improved by calibrating the jet energy scale and by reducing the variance of the measurement error. Correction functions showed good performance in restoring the jet transverse momentum (pT) spectrum. The methods provide a good framework to study jet quantities and optimize jet reconstruction and correction techniques. We evaluated the performance of the CMS detector for measuring the Emiss T using QCD events. We also studied the contributions from detector resolution, minimum bias pileup, event...

  12. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  13. Fuzzy Torus and q-Deformed Lie Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, R

    2006-01-01

    It will be shown that the defining relations for fuzzy torus and deformed (squashed) sphere proposed by J. Arnlind, et al (hep-th/0602290) can be rewriten as a new algebra which contains q-deformed commutators. The quantum parameter q (|q|=1) is a function of \\hbar. It is shown that the q --> 1 limit of the algebra with the parameter \\mu <0 describes fuzzy S^2 and that the squashed S^2 with q \

  14. Exact solution of an su(n) spin torus

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Kun; Li, Guang-Liang; Yang, Wen-Li; Shi, Kangjie; Wang, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    The trigonometric su(n) spin chain with anti-periodic boundary condition (su(n) spin torus) is demonstrated to be Yang-Baxter integrable. Based on some intrinsic properties of the R-matrix, certain operator product identities of the transfer matrix are derived. These identities and the asymptotic behavior of the transfer matrix together allow us to obtain the exact eigenvalues in terms of an inhomogeneous T-Q relation via the off-diagonal Bethe Ansatz.

  15. Exact solution of an su(n) spin torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kun; Cao, Junpeng; Li, Guang-Liang; Yang, Wen-Li; Shi, Kangjie; Wang, Yupeng

    2016-07-01

    The trigonometric su(n) spin chain with anti-periodic boundary condition (su(n) spin torus) is demonstrated to be Yang-Baxter integrable. Based on some intrinsic properties of the R-matrix, certain operator product identities of the transfer matrix are derived. These identities and the asymptotic behavior of the transfer matrix together allow us to obtain the exact eigenvalues in terms of an inhomogeneous T  -  Q relation via the off-diagonal Bethe Ansatz.

  16. Gastric pseudo-ulcers: membrana angularis and pyloric torus defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peavy, P W; Clements, J L; Weens, H S

    1975-03-01

    The membrana angularis and pyloric torus defects are two physiologic bulges which can simulate ulcerations along the lesser curvature of the stomach. The muscular anatomy of the stomach and the mechanism which produces these pseudo-ulcers are discussed. Both pseudoniches can be seen transiently in normal individuals but occasionally are such prominence as to become diagnostic pitfalls. The features and significance of each pseudo-ulcer are reviewed in an attempt to facilitate recognition on the upper gastrointestinal barium examination.

  17. Gauge Fields on Torus and Partition Function of Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamula, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider the interrelation between compactified string theories on torus and gauge fields on it. We start from open string theories with background gauge fields and derive partition functions by path integral. Since the effects of background fields and compactification correlate only through string zero modes, we investigate these zero modes. From this point of view, we discuss the Wilson loop mechanism at finite temperature. For the closed string, only a few comments are mentioned.

  18. Rotation Sets of Billiards with N Obstacles on a Torus

    OpenAIRE

    Alsheekhhussain, Zainab

    2016-01-01

    For billiards with $N$ obstacles on a torus, we study the behavior of specific kind of its trajectories, \\emph{the so called admissible trajectories}. Using the methods developed in \\cite{1}, we prove that the \\emph{admissible rotation set} is convex, and the periodic trajectories of admissible type are dense in the admissible rotation set. In addition, we show that the admissible rotation set is a proper subset of the general rotation set.

  19. Torsion Points on an Algebraic Subset of an Affine Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Hironaka, E

    1996-01-01

    Work of Laurent and Sarnak, following a conjecture of Lang, shows that the number of torsion points of order n on an algebraic subset of an affine complex torus is polynomial periodic. In this paper, we find bounds on the degree and period of this number as a function of n. Some examples, including the number of n torsion points on Fermat curves, are computed to illustrate the methods.

  20. The torus and the Klein Bottle amplitude of permutation orbifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kadar, Z

    2000-01-01

    The torus and the Klein bottle amplitude coefficients are computed in permutation orbifolds of RCFT-s in terms of the same quantities in the original theory and the twist group. An explicit expression is presented for the number of self conjugate primaries in the orbifold as a polynomial of the total number of primaries and the number of self conjugate ones in the parent theory. The formulae in the $Z_2$ orbifold illustrate the general results.

  1. Io plasma torus ion composition: Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerney, Edward G.; Bagenal, Fran; Steffl, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The Io torus produces ultraviolet emissions diagnostic of plasma conditions. We revisit data sets obtained by the Voyager 1, Galileo, and Cassini missions at Jupiter. With the latest version (8.0) of the CHIANTI atomic database we analyze UV spectra to determine ion composition. We compare ion composition obtained from observations from these three missions with a theoretical model of the physical chemistry of the torus by Delamere et al. (2005). We find ion abundances from the Voyager data similar to the Cassini epoch, consistent with the dissociation and ionization of SO2, but with a slightly higher average ionization state for sulfur, consistent with the higher electron temperature measured by Voyager. This reanalysis of the Voyager data produces a much lower oxygen:sulfur ratio than earlier analysis by Shemansky (1988), which was also reported by Bagenal (1994). We derive fractional ion compositions in the center of the torus to be S+/Ne 5%, S++/Ne 20%, S+++/Ne 5%, O+/Ne 20%, O++/Ne 3%, and Σ(On+)/Σ(Sn+) 0.8, leaving about 10-15% of the charge as protons. The radial profile of ion composition indicates a slightly higher average ionization state, a modest loss of sulfur relative to oxygen, and Σ(On+)/Σ(Sn+) 1.2 at about 8 RJ, beyond which the composition is basically frozen in. The Galileo observations of UV emissions from the torus suggest that the composition in June 1996 may have comprised a lower abundance of oxygen than usual, consistent with observations made at the same time by the EUVE satellite.

  2. Gauge Theory of the Generalized Symmetry on the Torus Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO WeiZhong; WANG Hong; ZHANG Jun

    2001-01-01

    The SDIFF(T2)local-generalized Kac-Moody G(T2) symmetry is an infinite-dimensional group on the torus membrane, whose Lie algebra is the semi-direct sum of the SDIFF(T2)local algebra and the generalized KacMoody algebra g(T2). In this paper, we construct the linearly realized gauge theory of the SDIFF(T2)loc1al-generalized Kac-Moody G(T2) symmetry.``

  3. Mid-infrared microlensing of accretion disc and dusty torus in quasars: effects on flux ratio anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D; Anguita, T; Wucknitz, O; Wambsganss, J

    2013-01-01

    Multiply-imaged quasars and AGNs observed in the mid-infrared (MIR) range are commonly assumed to be unaffected by the microlensing produced by the stars in their lensing galaxy. In this paper, we investigate the validity domain of this assumption. Indeed, that premise disregards microlensing of the accretion disc in the MIR range, and does not account for recent progress in our knowledge of the dusty torus. To simulate microlensing, we first built a simplified image of the quasar composed of an accretion disc, and of a larger ring-like torus. The mock quasars are then microlensed using an inverse ray-shooting code. We simulated the wavelength and size dependence of microlensing for different lensed image types and fraction of compact objects projected in the lens. This allows us to derive magnification probabilities as a function of wavelength, as well as to calculate the microlensing-induced deformation of the spectral energy distribution of the lensed images. We find that microlensing variations as large a...

  4. Spectral stability for compact perturbations of Toeplitz matrices

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Let $f$ be a regular real-valued non-constant symbol defined on the one dimensional torus ${\\mathbb T}$. Denote respectively by $\\kappa$ and $T$, its set of critical points and the associated Toeplitz matrix on $l^2({\\mathbb N})$. If $V$ is a suitable compact perturbation, we prove that the operator $T+V$ has no singular continuous spectrum and only finite point spectrum away from the set of thresholds $f(\\kappa)$. We also obtain some propagation estimates and apply these results to concrete ...

  5. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde over California: One Year of Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, J. E.; St Clair, J. M.; Yates, E. L.; Ryoo, J. M.; Gore, W.; Swanson, A. K.; Iraci, L. T.; Hanisco, T. F.

    2016-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role in multiple atmospheric processes, such as ozone (O3) production in polluted environments. Due to its short lifetime of only a few hours in daytime, HCHO also serves as tracer of recent photochemical activity. While photochemical oxidation of non-methane hydrocarbons is the dominant source, HCHO can also be emitted directly from fuel combustion, vegetation, and biomass burning. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument was built for integration onto the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload, based out of NASA's Ames Research Center (Moffett Field, CA). Using Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF), trace concentrations of HCHO can be detected with a sensitivity of 200 parts per trillion. Since its first research flight in December 2015, COFFEE has successfully flown on more than 20 science missions throughout California and Nevada. Presented here are results from these flights, including boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles throughout the tropospheric column. California's San Joaquin Valley is a primary focus, as this region is known for its elevated levels of HCHO as well as O3. Measurements collected in wildfire plumes, urban centers, agricultural lands, and on and off shore comparisons will be presented. In addition, the correlation of HCHO to other trace gases also measured by AJAX, including O3, methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor will also be shown. Lastly, the implications of these HCHO measurements on calibration and validation of remote sensing data collected by NASA's OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) satellites will be addressed.

  6. Devil's Staircase Phase Diagram of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in the Thin-Torus Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, Pietro; Molinari, Luca Guido; Ratti, Piergiorgio; Gherardi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    After more than three decades, the fractional quantum Hall effect still poses challenges to contemporary physics. Recent experiments point toward a fractal scenario for the Hall resistivity as a function of the magnetic field. Here, we consider the so-called thin-torus limit of the Hamiltonian describing interacting electrons in a strong magnetic field, restricted to the lowest Landau level, and we show that it can be mapped onto a one-dimensional lattice gas with repulsive interactions, with the magnetic field playing the role of the chemical potential. The statistical mechanics of such models leads us to interpret the sequence of Hall plateaux as a fractal phase diagram whose landscape shows a qualitative agreement with experiments.

  7. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force....

  8. Properties of the close binary and circumbinary torus of the Red Rectangle

    CERN Document Server

    Menshikov, A B; Tuthill, P; Weigelt, G; Yungelson, L R; Men'shchikov, Alexander B.; Schertl, Dieter; Tuthill, Peter; Weigelt, Gerd; Yungelson, Lev R.

    2002-01-01

    New diffraction-limited speckle images of the Red Rectangle in the wavelength range 2.1--3.3 microns with angular resolutions of 44--68 mas and previous speckle images at 0.7--2.2 microns revealed well-resolved bright bipolar outflow lobes and long X-shaped spikes originating deep inside the outflow cavities. This set of high-resolution images stimulated us to reanalyze all infrared observations of the Red Rectangle using our two-dimensional radiative transfer code. The new detailed modeling, together with estimates of the interstellar extinction in the direction of the Red Rectangle enabled us to more accurately determine one of the key parameters, the distance D=710 pc with model uncertainties of 70 pc, which is twice as far as the commonly used estimate of 330 pc. The central binary is surrounded by a compact, massive (M=1.2 Msun), very dense dusty torus with hydrogen densities reaching n_H=2.5x10^12 cm^-3 (dust-to-gas mass ratio rho_d/rho~0.01). The bright component of the spectroscopic binary HD 44179 is...

  9. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  10. Initial assessments of ignition spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Borowski, S.K.; Bussell, G.T.; Dalton, G.R.; Gorker, G.E.; Haines, J.R.; Hamilton, W.R.; Kalsi, S.S.; Lee, V.D.; Miller, J.B.

    1985-12-01

    Initial assessments of ignition spherical tori suggest that they can be highly cost effective and exceptionally small in unit size. Assuming advanced methods of current drive to ramp up the plasma current (e.g., via lower hybrid wave at modest plasma densities and temperatures), the inductive solenoid can largely be eliminated. Given the uncertainties in plasma energy confinement times and the effects of strong paramagnetism on plasma pressure, and allowing for the possible use of high-strength copper alloys (e.g., C-17510, Cu-Ni-Be alloy), ignition spherical tori with a 50-s burn are estimated to have major radii ranging from 1.0 to 1.6 m, aspect ratios from 1.4 to 1.7, vacuum toroidal fields from 2 to 3 T, plasma currents from 10 to 19 MA, and fusion power from 50 to 300 MW. Because of its modest field strength and simple poloidal field coil configuration, only conventional engineering approaches are needed in the design. A free-standing toroidal field coil/vacuum vessel structure is assessed to be feasible and relatively independent of the shield structure and the poloidal field coils. This exceptionally simple configuration depends significantly, however, on practical fabrication approaches of the center conductor post, about which there is presently little experience. 19 refs.

  11. Influence of compaction on chloride ingress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlopasa, J.

    2012-01-01

    Experiences from practice show the need for more of an understanding and optimization of the compaction process in order to design a more durable concrete structure. Local variations in compaction are very often the reason for initiation of local damage and initiation of chloride induced corrosion.

  12. A novel experiment to measure ion self-helicity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Setthivoine; von der Linden, Jens; Paritsky, Lenny; Geier, James; Jacobs, Stewart

    2011-10-01

    A novel experiment is designed to test ion self-helicity conservation during plasma relaxation with unique diagnostics for observing plasma jet collisions with compact toroids. A pair of conical theta pinches merge two compact toroids while another pair of planar coaxial guns shoot smaller plasma jets tangentially on to the compact torus to induce net bulk angular rotation. A large vacuum chamber, flexible gas injection arrangements and power supplies are designed to allow for a range of S * β values and ion flow velocities to explore regimes with two-fluid effects on compact toroid configurations. Two sequential ion flow maps in each shot can be reconstructed from 3D vector tomography of multichannel bulk ion Doppler spectroscopy. With an insertable 3D array of B-dot probes, the ion self-helicity can be measured in the entire 3D volume twice in each discharge. A fast ion gauge measures time-resolved neutral gas profiles to optimize gas injection. A novel two-fluid plasma lattice Boltzmann numerical model is being developed to support the interpretation of experimental measurements.

  13. Configuration spaces of an embedding torus and cubical spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jourdan, Jean-Philippe

    2006-01-01

    For a smooth manifold M obtained as an embedding torus, A U Cx[-1,1], we consider the ordered configuration space F_k(M) of k distinct points in M. We show that there is a homotopical cubical resolution of F_k(M) defined from the configuration spaces of A and C. From it, we deduce a universal method for the computation of the pure braid groups of a manifold. We illustrate the method in the case of the Mobius band.

  14. Punctured torus groups and 2-bridge knot groups

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyoshi, Hirotaka; Wada, Masaaki; Yamashita, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    This monograph is Part 1 of a book project intended to give a full account of Jorgensen's theory of punctured torus Kleinian groups and its generalization, with application to knot theory. Although Jorgensen's original work was not published in complete form, it has been a source of inspiration. In particular, it has motivated and guided Thurston's revolutionary study of low-dimensional geometric topology. In this monograph, we give an elementary and self-contained description of Jorgensen's theory with a complete proof. Through various informative illustrations, readers are naturally led to an intuitive, synthetic grasp of the theory, which clarifies how a very simple fuchsian group evolves into complicated Kleinian groups.

  15. Multiple Chern-Simons fields on a torus

    CERN Document Server

    Wesolowski, D J; Ho, C L

    1994-01-01

    Intertwined multiple Chern-Simons gauge fields induce matrix statistics among particles. We analyse this theory on a torus, focusing on the vacuum structure and the Hilbert space. The theory can be mimicked, although not completely, by an effective theory with one Chern-Simons gauge field. The correspondence between the Wilson line integrals, vacuum degeneracy and wave functions for these two theories are discussed. Further, it is obtained in both of these cases that the two total momenta and Hamiltonian commute only in the physical Hilbert space.

  16. General Equilibrium Property of Spherical Torus Configurations with Large Triangularity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2003-01-01

    In magnetic fusion research, two sorts of axi-symmetric toroidal equilibrium configuration are mostly interested. One is the conventional tokamak that has an aspect ratio 2. 8torus (the ST configuration) with A≤1.4.For tokamaks, it is generally observed that equilibrium configurations with large triangular deformation usually has the merit of stabilizing higher beta plasma and better confinement scaling so that higher βN/li value can be attained. This was also verified theoretically in the ballooning mode analysis.

  17. The torus parametrization of quasiperiodic LI-classes

    CERN Document Server

    Baake, M; Pleasants, P A B

    2002-01-01

    The torus parametrization of quasiperiodic local isomorphism classes is introduced and used to determine the number of elements in such a class with special symmetries or inflation properties. The method is explained in an illustrative fashion for some widely used tiling classes with golden mean rescaling, namely for the Fibonacci chain (1D), the triangle and Penrose patterns (2D) and for Kramer's and Danzer's icosahedral tilings (3D). We obtain a rather complete picture of the orbit structure within these classes, but discuss also various general results.

  18. Legendrian and transverse cables of positive torus knots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etnyre, John; LaFountain, Douglas; Tosun, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we classify Legendrian and transverse knots in the knot types obtained from positive torus knots by cabling. This classification allows us to demonstrate several new phenomena. Specifically, we show there are knot types that have non-destabilizable Legendrian representatives whose...... Thurston-Bennequin invariant is arbitrarily far from maximal. We also exhibit Legendrian knots requiring arbitrarily many stabilizations before they become Legendrian isotopic. Similar new phenomena are observed for transverse knots. To achieve these results we define and study "partially thickenable" tori...

  19. Invariant sets for discontinuous parabolic area-preserving torus maps

    CERN Document Server

    Ashwin, P; Nishikawa, T; Zyczkowski, K; Ashwin, Peter; Fu, Xin-Chu; Nishikawa, Takashi; Zyczkowski, Karol

    1999-01-01

    We analyze a class of piecewise linear parabolic maps on the torus, namely those obtained by considering a linear map with double eigenvalue one and taking modulo one in both components. We show that within this two parameter family of maps, the set of noninvertible maps is open and dense. For certain cases (where the entries in the matrix are rational) we show that the maximal invariant set has positive Lebesgue measure and give bounds on the measure. For certain examples we find expressions for the measure of the invariant set.

  20. Intervascular pit membranes with a torus in the wood of Ulmus (Ulmaceae) and related genera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.; Choat, B.; Vinckier, S.; Lens, F.; Schols, P.; Smets, E.

    2004-01-01

    • The distribution of intervascular pit membranes with a torus was investigated in juvenile wood samples of 19 species of Ulmus and seven related genera. • A staining solution of safranin and alcian blue (35 : 65) was recommended to distinguish torus-bearing pit membranes using light microscopy. • I

  1. Down with Physics: giant compact muon solenoid (CMS) magnet goes underground at CERN UCR physicists to participate in the international experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Scientists of the US CMS collaboration, which includes UC riverside physicists, joined colleagues around the world in announcing today that the heaviest piece of the Compact Muon Solenoid particle detector has begun te momentous journey into its experimenta cavern 100 meters underground." (2,5 pages)

  2. Fabricating of full denture acrylic protheses with palatine torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Hariyati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Full denture acrylic protheses can substitute all maxillary or mandibulary teeth naturally. The objective of fabricating full denture protheses is to substitute the tissue lost that was occupied by teeth or connective tissue before ward. This is a case of a 43 year old female with lost of all her upper and lower teeth. At the maxilla there is a palatine torus spreading along the midline with 25 mm length, 10 mm width and 6mm height. She has never worn prothese before. The process of full denture protheses fabrication were carried out in several steps, starting from making anatomical impression  to get study model, making of individual stock tray, making functional impression to get working model, choosing the design, making of midline, making of bite rim, inserting the model on articulator, preparing artificial teeth arrangement, fitting the wax, countoring wax, flasking, boiling out, packing, curing, deflasking, finishing, polishing and inserting the protheses. The process of this full denture protheses fabrication used tin foil as reducer to prevent overpressure of the tissue around the thin torus area so the prothesis will be more comfortable for the patient. The result was the protheses can be used by the patient, nicely and comfortably.

  3. Variation of Inner Radius of Dust Torus in NGC4151

    CERN Document Server

    Koshida, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Minezaki, Takeo; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Enya, Keigo; Suganuma, Masahiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    The long-term optical and near infrared monitoring observations for a type 1 act ive galactic nucleus NGC 4151 were carried out for six years from 2001 to 2006 b y using the MAGNUM telescope, and delayed response of flux variations in the $K(2.2\\mu m)$ band to those in the $V(0.55\\mu m)$ band was clearly detected. Based on cross correlation analysis, we precisely measured a lag time $\\Delta t$ for eight separate periods, and we found that $\\Delta t$ is not constant changing be tween 30 and 70 days during the monitoring period. Since $\\Delta t$ is the ligh t travel time from the central energy source out to the surrounding dust torus, this is the first convincing evidence that the inner radius of dust torus did ch ange in an individual AGN. In order to relate such a change of $\\Delta t$ with a change of AGN luminosity $L$, we presented a method of taking an average of th e observed $V$-band fluxes that corresponds to the measured value of $\\Delta t$, and we found that the time-changing track of NGC 4151 in the...

  4. Solitons on Noncommutative Torus as Elliptic Algebras and Elliptic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, B Y; Shi, K J; Yue, R H; Hou, Bo-Yu; Peng, Dan-tao; Shi, Kang-Jie; Yue, Rui-Hong

    2001-01-01

    For the noncommutative torus ${\\cal T}$, in case of the N.C. parameter $\\theta = \\frac{Z}{n}$ and the area of ${\\cal T}$ is an integer, we construct the basis of Hilbert space ${\\cal H}_n$ in terms of $\\theta$ functions of the positions of $n$ solitons. The Wilson loop wrapping the solitons around the torus generates the algebra ${\\cal A}_n$. We find that ${\\cal A}_n$ is isomorphic to the $Z_n \\times Z_n$ Heisenberg group on $\\theta$ functions. We find the explicit form for the solitons local translation operators, show that it is the generators $g$ of an elliptic $su(n)$, which transform covariantly by the global gauge transformation of the Wilson loop in ${\\cal A}_n$. Then by acting on ${\\cal H}_n$ we establish the isomorphism of ${\\cal A}_n$ and $g$. Then it is easy to give the projection operators corresponding to the solitons and the ABS construction for generating solitons. We embed this $g$ into elliptic Gaudin and C.M. models to give the dynamics. For $\\theta$ generic case, we introduce the crossing p...

  5. Holographic torus entanglement and its renormalization group flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Pablo; Witczak-Krempa, William

    2017-03-01

    We study the universal contributions to the entanglement entropy (EE) of 2 +1 -dimensional and 3 +1 -dimensional holographic conformal field theories (CFTs) on topologically nontrivial manifolds, focusing on tori. The holographic bulk corresponds to anti-de Sitter-soliton geometries. We characterize the properties of these regulator-independent EE terms as a function of both the size of the cylindrical entangling region, and the shape of the torus. In 2 +1 dimensions, in the simple limit where the torus becomes a thin one-dimensional ring, the EE reduces to a shape-independent constant 2 γ . This is twice the EE obtained by bipartitioning an infinite cylinder into equal halves. We study the renormalization group flow of γ by defining a renormalized EE that (1) is applicable to general QFTs, (2) resolves the failure of the area law subtraction, and (3) is inspired by the F-theorem. We find that the renormalized γ decreases monotonically at small coupling when the holographic CFT is deformed by a relevant operator for all allowed scaling dimensions. We also discuss the question of nonuniqueness of such renormalized EEs both in 2 +1 dimensions and 3 +1 dimensions.

  6. Superconformal index and 3d-3d correspondence for mapping cylinder/torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Dongmin; Koh, Eunkyung [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,85 Hoegiro, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangmin [Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University,1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University,1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); College of Liberal Studies, Seoul National University,1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaemo [Department of Physics, POSTECH,77 Cheongam-Ro, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Postech Center for Theoretical Physics (PCTP), Postech,77 Cheongam-Ro, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    We probe the 3d-3d correspondence for mapping cylinder/torus using the superconformal index. We focus on the case when the fiber is a once-punctured torus (Σ{sub 1,1}). The corresponding 3d field theories can be realized using duality domain wall theories in 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory. We show that the superconformal indices of the 3d theories are the SL(2,ℂ) Chern-Simons partition function on the mapping cylinder/torus. For the mapping torus, we also consider another realization of the corresponding 3d theory associated with ideal triangulation. The equality between the indices from the two descriptions for the mapping torus theory is reduced to a simple basis change of the Hilbert space for the SL(2,ℂ) Chern-Simons theory on ℝ×Σ{sub 1,1}.

  7. On Compact Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Jiong Sheng LI

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a finite simple graph with adjacency matrix A, and let P(A) be the convex closure of the set of all permutation matrices commuting with A. G is said to be compact if every doubly stochastic matrix which commutes with A is in P(A). In this paper, we characterize 3-regular compact graphs and prove that if G is a connected regular compact graph, G - v is also compact, and give a family of almost regular compact connected graphs.

  8. Compactness in Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakasho Kazuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we mainly formalize in Mizar [2] the equivalence among a few compactness definitions of metric spaces, norm spaces, and the real line. In the first section, we formalized general topological properties of metric spaces. We discussed openness and closedness of subsets in metric spaces in terms of convergence of element sequences. In the second section, we firstly formalize the definition of sequentially compact, and then discuss the equivalence of compactness, countable compactness, sequential compactness, and totally boundedness with completeness in metric spaces.

  9. Calculations to support JET neutron yield calibration: Modelling of neutron emission from a compact DT neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čufar, Aljaž; Batistoni, Paola; Conroy, Sean; Ghani, Zamir; Lengar, Igor; Milocco, Alberto; Packer, Lee; Pillon, Mario; Popovichev, Sergey; Snoj, Luka

    2017-03-01

    At the Joint European Torus (JET) the ex-vessel fission chambers and in-vessel activation detectors are used as the neutron production rate and neutron yield monitors respectively. In order to ensure that these detectors produce accurate measurements they need to be experimentally calibrated. A new calibration of neutron detectors to 14 MeV neutrons, resulting from deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, is planned at JET using a compact accelerator based neutron generator (NG) in which a D/T beam impinges on a solid target containing T/D, producing neutrons by DT fusion reactions. This paper presents the analysis that was performed to model the neutron source characteristics in terms of energy spectrum, angle-energy distribution and the effect of the neutron generator geometry. Different codes capable of simulating the accelerator based DT neutron sources are compared and sensitivities to uncertainties in the generator's internal structure analysed. The analysis was performed to support preparation to the experimental measurements performed to characterize the NG as a calibration source. Further extensive neutronics analyses, performed with this model of the NG, will be needed to support the neutron calibration experiments and take into account various differences between the calibration experiment and experiments using the plasma as a source of neutrons.

  10. Cassini-plasma interactions in the Enceladus torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Miloch, W. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-04-01

    This study reports the results of the first simulations of spacecraft-plasma interactions within the proposed Enceladus torus, a radially narrow toroidal region surrounding Saturn that contains a high density of water-group neutrals. Charge exchange collisions scatter these neutrals and replace a fraction of the co-rotating ions with a new and slower-moving ion population. The newly-created ions are moving near the local Keplerian speed, slower than the co-rotation speed, and are ''picked-up'' by Saturn's magnetic field. These water-group ions are detected throughout the Enceladus torus including regions far from Enceladus [1,2]. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell self-consistent code is applied to find the potential and plasma distributions around the spherical model of Cassini in a complicated plasma environment of the Enceladus torus. The modeling includes two types of water group ions (co-rotating, and non-thermalized pick-up ions), plasma flows, photoemission due to solar UV radiation, and flyby geometry. As input data the parameters derived from the Cassini plasma spectrometer measurements obtained in 2005 on Oct. 11, and 29, Nov. 27, and Dec. 24 [1] are employed. The numerical simulations show that the pick-up ions significantly modify the spatial structure of the plasma perturbations, arising in the vicinity of the orbiter in comparison to that obtained for only co-rotating ions [3]. The plasma species produce a specific strongly inhomogeneous configuration with a self-consistent charge separation between the different plasma components in the electric field of the orbiter. The highly energetic co-rotating water group ions are mainly responsible for the configuration of the plasma wake. The region extending up to a few electron Debye lengths downstream of the spacecraft reveals negative potentials that are a significant fraction of the thermal electron energy. Arising wake electric fields capture the cold, pick-up ions and lead to a strong enhancement of

  11. Dynamic compaction of boron carbide by a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzyurkin, Andrey E.; Kraus, Eugeny I.; Lukyanov, Yaroslav L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents experiments on explosive compaction of boron carbide powder and modeling of the stress state behind the shock front at shock loading. The aim of this study was to obtain a durable low-porosity compact sample. The explosive compaction technology is used in this problem because the boron carbide is an extremely hard and refractory material. Therefore, its compaction by traditional methods requires special equipment and considerable expenses.

  12. Cassini UVIS observations of the Io plasma torus. II. Radial variations

    CERN Document Server

    Steffl, Andrew J; Stewart, A Ian F; 10.1016/j.icarus.2004.04.016

    2013-01-01

    On January 14, 2001, shortly after the Cassini spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) made a radial scan through the midnight sector of Io plasma torus. The Io torus has not been previously observed at this local time. The UVIS data consist of 2-D spectrally dispersed images of the Io plasma torus in the wavelength range of 561{\\AA}-1912{\\AA}. We developed a spectral emissions model that incorporates the latest atomic physics data contained in the CHIANTI database in order to derive the composition of the torus plasma as a function of radial distance. Electron temperatures derived from the UVIS torus spectra are generally less than those observed during the Voyager era. We find the torus ion composition derived from the UVIS spectra to be significantly different from the composition during the Voyager era. Notably, the torus contains substantially less oxygen, with a total oxygen-to-sulfur ion ratio of 0.9. The average ion charge state has increased to 1.7. We de...

  13. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-09-27

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  14. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kleinebudde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  15. Vector-valued Jack polynomials and wavefunctions on the torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkl, Charles F.

    2017-06-01

    The Hamiltonian of the quantum Calogero-Sutherland model of N identical particles on the circle with 1/r 2 interactions has eigenfunctions consisting of Jack polynomials times the base state. By use of the generalized Jack polynomials taking values in modules of the symmetric group and the matrix solution of a system of linear differential equations one constructs novel eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian. Like the usual wavefunctions each eigenfunction determines a symmetric probability density on the N-torus. The construction applies to any irreducible representation of the symmetric group. The methods depend on the theory of generalized Jack polynomials due to Griffeth, and the Yang-Baxter graph approach of Luque and the author.

  16. High-velocity Bipolar Molecular Emission from an AGN Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Jack F.; Elitzur, Moshe; Maiolino, Roberto; Marconi, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Lutz, Dieter; Baum, Stefi A.; Nikutta, Robert; Impellizzeri, C. M. V.; Davies, Richard; Kimball, Amy E.; Sani, Eleonora

    2016-09-01

    We have detected in ALMA observations CO J=6\\to 5 emission from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. The low-velocity (up to ±70 km s-1 relative to systemic) CO emission resolves into a 12 × 7 pc structure, roughly aligned with the nuclear radio source. Higher-velocity emission (up to ±400 km s-1) is consistent with a bipolar outflow in a direction nearly perpendicular (≃80°) to the nuclear disk. The position-velocity diagram shows that in addition to the outflow, the velocity field may also contain rotation about the disk axis. These observations provide compelling evidence in support of the disk-wind scenario for the active galactic nucleus obscuring torus.

  17. Cornering Gapless Quantum States via Their Torus Entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witczak-Krempa, William; Hayward Sierens, Lauren E.; Melko, Roger G.

    2017-02-01

    The entanglement entropy (EE) has emerged as an important window into the structure of complex quantum states of matter. We analyze the universal part of the EE for gapless systems on tori in 2D and 3D, denoted by χ . Focusing on scale-invariant systems, we derive general nonperturbative properties for the shape dependence of χ and reveal surprising relations to the EE associated with corners in the entangling surface. We obtain closed-form expressions for χ in 2D and 3D within a model that arises in the study of conformal field theories (CFTs), and we use them to obtain Ansätze without fitting parameters for the 2D and 3D free boson CFTs. Our numerical lattice calculations show that the Ansätze are highly accurate. Finally, we discuss how the torus EE can act as a fingerprint of exotic states such as gapless quantum spin liquids, e.g., Kitaev's honeycomb model.

  18. The Picard Group of a Noncommutative Algebraic Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Berest, Yuri; Tang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    We compute the Picard group $ Pic(A_q) $ of the noncommutative algebraic 2-torus $A_q$, describe its action on the space $ R(A_q) $ of isomorphism classes of rk 1 projective modules and classify the algebras Morita equivalent to $ A_q $. Our computations are based on a quantum version of the Calogero-Moser correspondence relating projective $A_q$-modules to irreducible representations of the double affine Hecke algebras (DAHA) $ H_{t, q^{-1/2}}(S_n) $ at $ t = 1 $. We show that, under this correspondence, the action of $ Pic(A_q) $ on $ R(A_q) $ agrees with the action of $ SL_2(Z) $ on $ H_{t, q^{-1/2}}(S_n) $ constructed by I.Cherednik. We compare our results with smooth and analytic cases. In particular, when $ |q| \

  19. High-Velocity Bipolar Molecular Emission from an AGN Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Gallimore, Jack F; Maiolino, Roberto; Marconi, Alessandro; O'Dea, Christopher P; Lutz, Dieter; Baum, Stefi A; Nikutta, Robert; Impellizzeri, C M V; Davies, Richard; Kimball, Amy E; Sani, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    We have detected in ALMA observations CO J = 6 - 5 emission from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068. The low-velocity (up to +/- 70 km/s relative to systemic) CO emission resolves into a 12x7 pc structure, roughly aligned with the nuclear radio source. Higher-velocity emission (up to +/- 400 km/s) is consistent with a bipolar outflow in a direction nearly perpendicular (roughly 80 degrees) to the nuclear disk. The position-velocity diagram shows that in addition to the outflow, the velocity field may also contain rotation about the disk axis. These observations provide compelling evidence in support of the disk-wind scenario for the AGN obscuring torus.

  20. I/O routing in a multidimensional torus network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A.; Heidelberger, Philip

    2017-02-07

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for routing data packet in a computing system comprising a multidimensional torus compute node network including a multitude of compute nodes, and an I/O node network including a plurality of I/O nodes. In one embodiment, the method comprises assigning to each of the data packets a destination address identifying one of the compute nodes; providing each of the data packets with a toio value; routing the data packets through the compute node network to the destination addresses of the data packets; and when each of the data packets reaches the destination address assigned to said each data packet, routing said each data packet to one of the I/O nodes if the toio value of said each data packet is a specified value. In one embodiment, each of the data packets is also provided with an ioreturn value used to route the data packets through the compute node network.

  1. A negative mass theorem for the 2-Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Okikiolu, Kate

    2007-01-01

    For a closed surface M with metric g, the Robin mass m(p) at the point p is the value of the Green function G(p,q) at p=q after the logarithmic singularity has been removed. The Laplacian mass is the average value of the Robin mass, minus the value of the Robin mass for the round sphere of the same area. The Laplacian mass is a spectral invariant which is a natural analog of the ADM mass for asymptotically flat manifolds. We show that if M is a torus, then the minimum value of the Laplacian mass on the conformal class of g is negative. It is attained by a (smooth) metric for which one gets a sharp logarithmic Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequality and Onofri-type inequality.

  2. Physics Basis for a Spherical Torus Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Kessel; J. Menard; S.C. Jardin; T.K. Mau; et al

    1999-11-01

    The spherical torus, or low-aspect-ratio tokamak, is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. A special class of wall-stabilized high-beta high-bootstrap fraction low-aspect-ratio tokamak equilibrium are analyzed with respect to MHD stability, bootstrap current and external current drive, poloidal field system requirements, power and particle exhaust and plasma operating regime. Overall systems optimization leads to a choice of aspect ratio A = 1:6, plasma elongation kappa = 3:4, and triangularity delta = 0:64. The design value for the plasma toroidal beta is 50%, corresponding to beta N = 7:4, which is 10% below the ideal stability limit. The bootstrap fraction of 99% greatly alleviates the current drive requirements, which are met by tangential neutral beam injection. The design is such that 45% of the thermal power is radiated in the plasma by Bremsstrahlung and trace Krypton, with Neon in the scrapeoff layer radiating the remainder.

  3. Quantum entanglement in topological phases on a torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhu-Xi; Hu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Yong-Shi

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of nontrivial spatial topology on quantum entanglement by examining the degenerate ground states of a topologically ordered system on a torus. Using the string-net (fixed-point) wave function, we propose a general formula of the reduced density matrix when the system is partitioned into two cylinders. The cylindrical topology of the subsystems makes a significant difference in regard to entanglement: a global quantum number for the many-body states comes into play, together with a decomposition matrix M which describes how topological charges of the ground states decompose into boundary degrees of freedom. We obtain a general formula for entanglement entropy and generalize the concept of minimally entangled states to minimally entangled sectors. Concrete examples are demonstrated with data from both finite groups and modular tensor categories (i.e., Fibonacci, Ising, etc.), supported by numerical verification.

  4. ALMA Resolves the Torus of NGC 1068: Continuum and Molecular Line Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Burillo, S.; Combes, F.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Usero, A.; Krips, M.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Aalto, S.; Casasola, V.; Hunt, L. K.; Martín, S.; Viti, S.; Colina, L.; Costagliola, F.; Eckart, A.; Fuente, A.; Henkel, C.; Márquez, I.; Neri, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2016-05-01

    We used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of the CO(6-5) molecular line and the 432 μm continuum emission from the 300 pc sized circumnuclear disk (CND) of the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with a spatial resolution of ˜4 pc. These observations spatially resolve the CND and, for the first time, image the dust emission, the molecular gas distribution, and the kinematics from a 7-10 pc diameter disk that represents the submillimeter counterpart of the putative torus of NGC 1068. We fitted the nuclear spectral energy distribution of the torus using ALMA and near- and mid-infrared (NIR/MIR) data with CLUMPY torus models. The mass and radius of the best-fit solution for the torus are both consistent with the values derived from the ALMA data alone: {M}{{gas}}{{torus}}=(1+/- 0.3)× {10}5 {M}⊙ and R torus = 3.5 ± 0.5 pc. The dynamics of the molecular gas in the torus show strong non-circular motions and enhanced turbulence superposed on a surprisingly slow rotation pattern of the disk. By contrast with the nearly edge-on orientation of the H2O megamaser disk, we found evidence suggesting that the molecular torus is less inclined (i = 34°-66°) at larger radii. The lopsided morphology and complex kinematics of the torus could be the signature of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, long predicted to likely drive the dynamical evolution of active galactic nuclei tori.

  5. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  6. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  7. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  8. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  9. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  10. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  11. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  12. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  13. Compact Binary Progenitors of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Perna, Rosalba; Rezzolla, Luciano; Troja, Eleonora; Lazzati, Davide

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, detailed observations and accurate numerical simulations have provided support to the idea that mergers of compact binaries containing either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a black hole (BH) may constitute the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). The merger of such compact binaries is expected to lead to the production of a spinning BH surrounded by an accreting torus. Several mechanisms can extract energy from this system and power the SGRBs. Here we connect observations and numerical simulations of compact binary mergers, and use the current sample of SGRBs with measured energies to constrain the mass of their powering tori. By comparing the masses of the tori with the results of fully general-relativistic simulations, we are able to infer the properties of the binary progenitors that yield SGRBs. By assuming a constant efficiency in converting torus mass into jet energy epsilon(sub jet) = 10%, we find that most of the tori have masses smaller than 0.01 Solar M, favoring "high-mass" binary NSs mergers, i.e., binaries with total masses approx >1.5 the maximum mass of an isolated NS. This has important consequences for the gravitational wave signals that may be detected in association with SGRBs, since "high-mass" systems do not form a long-lived hypermassive NS after the merger. While NS-BH systems cannot be excluded to be the engine of at least some of the SGRBs, the BH would need to have an initial spin of approx. 0.9 or higher.

  14. Level statistics and eigenfunctions of square torus billiards: manifesting the transition from regular to chaotic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, P H; Yu, Y T; Chiang, P Y; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2012-02-01

    We thoroughly analyze the level statistics and eigenfunctions in concentric as well as nonconcentric square torus billiards. We confirm the characteristics of quantum and classical correspondence and the existence of scarred and superscarred modes in concentric square torus billiards. Furthermore, we not only verify that the transition from regular to chaotic behaviors can be manifested in nonconcentric square torus billiards, but also develop an analytical distribution to excellently fit the numerical level statistics. Finally, we intriguingly observe that numerous eigenstates commonly exhibit the wave patterns to be an ensemble of classical diamond trajectories, as the effective wavelengths are considerably shorter than the size of internal hole.

  15. From use cases of the Joint European Torus towards integrated commissioning requirements of the ITER tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, A.C. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Stephen, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sartori, F.; Cavinato, M. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Farthing, J.W. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Ranz, R.; Saibene, G. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Winter, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arnoux, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Blackman, T.; Boboc, A.; Card, P.J.; Dalley, S.; Day, I.E. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); De Tommasi, G. [Consorzio CREATE/Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e delle Tecnologie dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Drewelow, P.; Elsmore, C.; Ivings, E.; Felton, R. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-10-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET) is the largest tokamak currently in operation in the world. One of the greatest challenges of JET is the integrated commissioning of all its major plant systems. This is driven, partially, by the size and complexity of its operational infrastructure and also by the fact that, being an international environment, it has to address the issues of integrating, commissioning and maintaining plant systems developed by third parties. The ITER tokamak, now in construction, is a fusion device twice the size of JET and, being a joint effort between the European Union, China, India, Japan, South Korea, the Russian Federation and the USA, it will share on a wider scale all of the JET challenges regarding integration and integrated commissioning of very large and complex plant systems. With the scope of taking advantage from the history and experience of JET, Fusion for Energy (F4E) has worked together with the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE), the host and operator of JET, for the provision of ITER relevant user experiences related to the integrated commissioning of the tokamak. This work presents and discusses the main results and the methods that were used to extract and translate the commissioning experience information into ITER requirements.

  16. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  17. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    2009-01-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispoma

  18. Compact Information Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    network traffic, information retrieval, and databases are faced with very large, inherently high-dimensional, or naturally streaming datasets. This...proposal aims at developing mathematically rigorous and general- purpose statistical methods based on stable random projections, to achieve compact...detections (e.g., DDoS attacks), machine learning, databases , and search. Fundamentally, compact data representations are highly beneficial because they

  19. Influence of self-gravity on the runaway instability of black-hole-torus systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pedro J; Font, José A; Shibata, Masaru

    2010-05-14

    Results from the first fully general relativistic numerical simulations in axisymmetry of a system formed by a black hole surrounded by a self-gravitating torus in equilibrium are presented, aiming to assess the influence of the torus self-gravity on the onset of the runaway instability. We consider several models with varying torus-to-black-hole mass ratio and angular momentum distribution orbiting in equilibrium around a nonrotating black hole. The tori are perturbed to induce the mass transfer towards the black hole. Our numerical simulations show that all models exhibit a persistent phase of axisymmetric oscillations around their equilibria for several dynamical time scales without the appearance of the runaway instability, indicating that the self-gravity of the torus does not play a critical role favoring the onset of the instability, at least during the first few dynamical time scales.

  20. Cassini UVIS Observations of the Io Plasma Torus. IV. Modeling Temporal and Azimuthal Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Steffl, A J; Bagenal, F

    2007-01-01

    In this fourth paper in a series, we present the results of our efforts to model the remarkable temporal and azimuthal variability of the Io plasma torus during the Cassini encounter with Jupiter. The long-term (months) temporal variation in the average torus composition observed by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) can be modeled by supposing a factor of ~4 increase in the amount of material supplied to the extended neutral clouds that are the source of torus plasma, followed by a gradual decay to more "typical" values. On shorter timescales, the observed 10.07-hour torus periodicity and azimuthal variation in plasma composition, including its surprising modulation with System III longitude, is reproduced by our model using the superposition of two azimuthal variations of suprathermal electrons: a primary hot electron variation that slips 12.5 degrees/day relative to the Jovian magnetic field and a secondary variation that remains fixed in System III longitude.

  1. Torus-invariant prime ideals in quantum matrices, totally nonnegative cells and symplectic leaves

    CERN Document Server

    Goodearl, K R; Lenagan, T H

    2009-01-01

    The algebra of quantum matrices of a given size supports a rational torus action by automorphisms. It follows from work of Letzter and the first named author that to understand the prime and primitive spectra of this algebra, the first step is to understand the prime ideals that are invariant under the torus action. In this paper, we prove that a family of quantum minors is the set of all quantum minors that belong to a given torus-invariant prime ideal of a quantum matrix algebra if and only if the corresponding family of minors defines a non-empty totally nonnegative cell in the space of totally nonnegative real matrices of the appropriate size. As a corollary, we obtain explicit generating sets of quantum minors for the torus-invariant prime ideals of quantum matrices in the case where the quantisation parameter $q$ is transcendental over $\\mathbb{Q}$.

  2. The vertical thickness of Jupiter's Europa gas torus from charged particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Clark, G.; Roussos, E.; Lagg, A.; Krupp, N.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and modeling suggest the presence of a neutral gas torus collocated with the orbit of Jupiter's moon Europa. Here we use data from the CMS instrument that is part of the Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) on board the Galileo spacecraft to characterize the distribution of 130 keV protons. Near the orbit of Europa this distribution has a minimum around 70° in equatorial pitch angle. We reproduce this with a model assuming that the protons are lost via charge exchange with a gas torus. Since the pitch angle characterizes whether the protons remain mostly in the dense center of the torus or continuously bounce through it, we can determine the latitudinal extent of the torus. We find that the full thickness where its density falls to 1/e of its maximum has to be ≲2RJ and is closer to ≈1RJ.

  3. Real Baum-Connes assembly and T-duality for torus orientifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We show that the real Baum-Connes conjecture for abelian groups, possibly twisted by a cocycle, explains the isomorphisms of (twisted) KR-groups that underlie all T-dualities of torus orientifold string theories.

  4. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties.

  5. 10D massive type IIA supergravities as the uplift of parabolic M2-brane torus bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Restuccia, Alvaro [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Dept. de Fisica

    2016-04-15

    We remark that the two 10D massive deformations of the N = 2 maximal type IIA supergravity (Romans and HLW supergravity) are associated to the low energy limit of the uplift to 10D of M2-brane torus bundles with parabolic monodromy linearly and non-linearly realized respectively. Romans supergravity corresponds to M2-brane compactified on a twice-punctured torus bundle. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. SDN Data Center Performance Evaluation of Torus and Hypercube Interconnecting Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrus, Bogdan-Mihai; Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Mehmeri, Victor;

    2015-01-01

    — By measuring throughput, delay, loss-rate and jitter, we present how SDN framework yields a 45% performance increase in highly interconnected topologies like torus and hypercube compared to current Layer2 switching technologies, applied to data center architectures......— By measuring throughput, delay, loss-rate and jitter, we present how SDN framework yields a 45% performance increase in highly interconnected topologies like torus and hypercube compared to current Layer2 switching technologies, applied to data center architectures...

  7. Porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In this study, the porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite, considered as an engineered barrier in the repository of spent fuel, has been studied in interaction experiments. Many parameters, like the composition and density of bentonite, composition of the solution, bentonite-to-water ratio (B/W), surrounding conditions and experimental time have been varied in the experiments. At the end of the interaction the equilibrating solution, the porewaters squeezed out of the bentonite samples, and bentonites themselves were analyzed to give information for the interpretation and modelling of the interaction. Equilibrium modelling was performed with the HYDRAQL/CE computer code 33 refs.

  8. An Analytical Model for Torus Networks in the Presence of Batch Message Arrivals with Hot-spot Destinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulei Wu; Geyong Min; Mohamed Ould-Khaoua; Hao Yin

    2009-01-01

    Interconnection networks are hardware fabrics supporting communications between individual processors in multicomputers.The low-dimensional k-ary n-cubes (or torus) with adaptive wormhole switching have attracted significant research efforts to construct high-performance interconnection networks in contemporary multi-computers.The arrival process and destination distribution of messages have great effects on network performance.With the aim of capturing the characteristics of the realistic traffic pattern and obtaining a deep understanding of the performance behaviour of interconnection networks,this paper presents an analytical model to investigate the message latency in adaptive-routed wormhole-switched torus networks where there exists hot-spot nodes and the message arrivals follow a batch arrival process.Each generated message has a given probability to be directed to the hot-spot node.The average degree of virtual channel multiplexing is computed by the GE/G/1/V queueing system with finite buffer capacity.We compare analytical results of message latency with those obtained through the simulation experiments in order to validate the accuracy of the derived model.

  9. Particle on a torus knot: Constrained dynamics and semi-classical quantization in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Praloy; Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2016-11-01

    Kinematics and dynamics of a particle moving on a torus knot poses an interesting problem as a constrained system. In the first part of the paper we have derived the modified symplectic structure or Dirac brackets of the above model in Dirac's Hamiltonian framework, both in toroidal and Cartesian coordinate systems. This algebra has been used to study the dynamics, in particular small fluctuations in motion around a specific torus. The spatial symmetries of the system have also been studied. In the second part of the paper we have considered the quantum theory of a charge moving in a torus knot in the presence of a uniform magnetic field along the axis of the torus in a semiclassical quantization framework. We exploit the Einstein-Brillouin-Keller (EBK) scheme of quantization that is appropriate for multidimensional systems. Embedding of the knot on a specific torus is inherently two dimensional that gives rise to two quantization conditions. This shows that although the system, after imposing the knot condition reduces to a one dimensional system, even then it has manifested non-planar features which shows up again in the study of fractional angular momentum. Finally we compare the results obtained from EBK (multi-dimensional) and Bohr-Sommerfeld (single dimensional) schemes. The energy levels and fractional spin depend on the torus knot parameters that specifies its non-planar features. Interestingly, we show that there can be non-planar corrections to the planar anyon-like fractional spin.

  10. The massive expanding molecular torus in the planetary nebula NGC 6302

    CERN Document Server

    Peretto, N; Zijlstra, A A; Patel, N A

    2007-01-01

    We measure the mass and kinematics of the massive molecular torus in the planetary nebula NGC 6302. The nebula is the proto-typical butterfly nebula. The origin of the wing-like morphology is disputed: determining the mass-loss history of the confining torus is an important step in understanding the formation of this structure. We performed submillimeter observations with JCMT and the SMA interferometer. The continuum emission as well as the J=2-1 and 3-2 transitions of 12CO and 13CO are analysed at arcsecond resolution. The CO emission indicates a mass of the torus of ~ 2Msun +/- 1Msun. The 12CO and 13CO emission matches the dark lane seen in absorption in the Halpha image of the object. The CO torus is expanding with a velocity of ~ 8 km/s, centred at Vlsr=-31.5 km/s. The size and expansion velocity of the torus indicates that the torus was ejected from ~ 7500 yr to 2900 yr ago, with a mass-loss rate of 5x10^{-4}Msun/yr. We also see a ballistic component in the CO images with a velocity gradient of 140 km/s...

  11. ALMA resolves the torus of NGC 1068: continuum and molecular line emission

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Burillo, S; Almeida, C Ramos; Usero, A; Krips, M; Alonso-Herrero, A; Aalto, S; Casasola, V; Hunt, L K; Martin, S; Viti, S; Colina, L; Costagliola, F; Eckart, A; Fuente, A; Henkel, C; Marquez, I; Neri, R; Schinnerer, E; Tacconi, L J; van der Werf, P P

    2016-01-01

    We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to map the emission of the CO(6-5) molecular line and the 432 {\\mu}m continuum emission from the 300 pc-sized circumnuclear disk (CND) of the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with a spatial resolution of ~4 pc. These observations spatially resolve the CND and image, for the first time, the dust emission and the molecular gas distribution and kinematics from a 7-10 pc-diameter disk that represents the submillimeter counterpart of the putative torus of NGC 1068. We fitted the nuclear spectral energy distribution of the torus using ALMA and near and mid-infrared (NIR/MIR) data with CLUMPY models. The mass and radius of the best-fit solution for the torus are both consistent with the values derived from the ALMA data alone: Mgas_torus=(1+-0.3)x10^5 Msun and Rtorus=3.5+-0.5 pc. The dynamics of the molecular gas in the torus show non-circular motions and enhanced turbulence superposed on the rotating pattern of the disk. The kinematic major axis of the CO torus...

  12. Production Experience of Pure Cotton Superfine Compact Crepe De Chine Fabric%纯棉特细紧密纺双绉织物的生产体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡永东

    2012-01-01

    Production technology key points of pure cotton superfine compact crepe de chine fabric were discussed. According to yarn kinky problems in weaving,hard twist yarn was set in weaving preparatory process. Warping tension was controlled slightly larger. The special processing was adopted, including middle concentration and pressure , lower viscosity,re-soaked,covered and double size box, reducing sizing percentage appropriately, using less with or without PVA. In weaving process, loom tension, shed processing and weft-inserting processing were adjusted properly. Finally defects caused by hard twist yarn can be reduced,loom efficiency can be reached 95% ,2 000 twist per meter pure cotton superfine compact crepe de chine fabric can be produced successfully.%探讨纯棉特细紧密纺双绉织物的生产技术要点.针对织物在织造过程中易退捻扭结的问题,对强捻纱在织前准备工序进行了定形处理,整经张力偏大控制,浆纱采用“中浓低黏、中压力、重浸透、求被覆、双浆槽、适当降低上浆率、少用或不用PVA”的工艺路线,织造时合理调节上机张力、开口工艺、引纬工艺等参数.结果减少了强捻纱易扭结所造成的疵点,使织机效率达到95%,顺利开发出2 000捻/m纯棉特细紧密纺双绉织物.

  13. Small Valdivia compact spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubi's, W; Kubi\\'s, Wieslaw; Michalewski, Henryk

    2005-01-01

    We prove a preservation theorem for the class of Valdivia compact spaces, which involves inverse sequences of ``simple'' retractions. Consequently, a compact space of weight $\\loe\\aleph_1$ is Valdivia compact iff it is the limit of an inverse sequence of metric compacta whose bonding maps are retractions. As a corollary, we show that the class of Valdivia compacta of weight at most $\\aleph_1$ is preserved both under retractions and under open 0-dimensional images. Finally, we characterize the class of all Valdivia compacta in the language of category theory, which implies that this class is preserved under all continuous weight preserving functors.

  14. Design of the new magnetic sensors for Joint European Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccorese, V.; Albanese, R.; Altmann, H.; Cramp, S.; Edlington, T.; Fullard, K.; Gerasimov, S.; Huntley, S.; Lam, N.; Loving, A.; Riccardo, V.; Sartori, F.; Marren, C.; McCarron, E.; Sowden, C.; Tidmarsh, J.; Basso, F.; Cenedese, A.; Chitarin, G.; DegliAgostini, F.; Grando, L.; Marcuzzi, D.; Peruzzo, S.; Pomaro, N.; Solano, E. R.

    2004-10-01

    A new magnetic diagnostics system has been designed for the 2005 Joint European Torus (JET) experimental campaigns onward. The new system, which adds to the existing sensors, aims to improve the JET safety, reliability, and performance, with respect to: (i) equilibrium reconstruction; (ii) plasma shape control; (iii) coil failures; (iv) VDEs; (v) iron modeling; and (vi) magnetohydrodynamics poloidal mode analysis. The system consists of in-vessel and ex-vessel sensors. The former are a set of 38 coil pairs (normal and tangential), located as near as possible to the plasma. Coils are generally grouped in rails, in order to ease remote handling in-vessel installation. The system includes: (i) two outer poloidal limiter arrays (2×7 coil pairs); (ii) two divertor region arrays (2×7 coil pairs); and (iii) two top coil arrays (2×5 coil pairs). Ex-vessel sensors, including discrete coils, Hall probes, and flux loops (26 in total) will be installed on the iron limbs, in order to provide experimental data for the treatment of iron in equilibrium codes. The design is accompanied by a software analysis, aiming to predict the expected improvement.

  15. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium in a non-symmetric topological torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzner, Harold [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    An alternative representation of an ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium is developed. The representation is a variation of one given by A. Salat, Phys. Plasmas 2, 1652 (1995). The system of equations is used to study the possibility of non-symmetric equilibria in a topological torus, here an approximate rectangular parallelopiped, with periodicity in two of the three rectangular coordinates. An expansion is carried out in the deviation of pressure surfaces from planes. Resonances are manifest in the process. Nonetheless, provided the magnetic shear is small, it is shown that it is possible to select the magnetic fields and flux surfaces in such a manner that no singularities appear on resonant surfaces. One boundary surface of the parallelopiped is not arbitrary but is dependent on the equilibrium in question. A comparison of the solution sets of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric equilibria suggests that the latter have a wider class of possible boundary shapes but more restrictive rotational transform profiles. No proof of convergence of the series is given.

  16. On the dynamics of tilted black hole-torus systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mewes, Vassilios; Font, José A; Montero, Pedro J; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional, numerical relativity simulations of a tilted black hole-thick accretion disc system. The simulations are analysed using tracer particles in the disc which are advected with the flow. Such tracers, which we employ in these new simulations for the first time, provide a powerful means to analyse in detail the complex dynamics of tilted black hole-torus systems. We show how its use helps to gain insight in the overall dynamics of the system, discussing the origin of the observed black hole precession and the development of a global non-axisymmetric $m=1$ mode in the disc. Our three-dimensional simulations show the presence of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the instantaneous accretion rate, with frequencies in a range compatible with those observed in low mass X-ray binaries with either a black hole or a neutron star component. The frequency ratio of the dominant low frequency peak and the first overtone is $o_1/f \\sim 1.9$, a frequency ratio not attainable when mo...

  17. Compact DEMO, SlimCS: design progress and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Enoeda, M.; Kawashima, H.; Kurita, G.; Tanigawa, H.; Nakamura, H.; Honda, M.; Saito, A.; Sato, S.; Hayashi, T.; Asakura, N.; Sakurai, S.; Nishitani, T.; Ozeki, T.; Ando, M.; Ezato, K.; Hamamatsu, K.; Hirose, T.; Hoshino, T.; Ide, S.; Inoue, T.; Isono, T.; Liu, C.; Kakudate, S.; Kawamura, Y.; Mori, S.; Nakamichi, M.; Nishi, H.; Nozawa, T.; Ochiai, K.; Ogiwara, H.; Oyama, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Seki, Y.; Shibama, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, K.; Tanigawa, H.; Tsuru, D.; Yamanishi, T.; Yoshida, T.

    2009-07-01

    The design progress in a compact low aspect ratio (low A) DEMO reactor, 'SlimCS', and its design issues are reported. The design study focused mainly on the torus configuration including the blanket, divertor, materials and maintenance scheme. For continuity with the Japanese ITER-TBM, the blanket is based on a water-cooled solid breeder blanket. For vertical stability of the elongated plasma and high beta access, the blanket is segmented into replaceable and permanent blankets and a sector-wide conducting shell is arranged inbetween these blankets. A numerical calculation indicates that fuel self-sufficiency can be satisfied when the blanket interior is ideally fabricated. An allowable heat load to the divertor plate should be 8 MW m-2 or lower, which can be a critical constraint for determining a handling power of DEMO.

  18. Compact microchannel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  19. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  20. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  1. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

    2005-07-27

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

  2. A high time resolution x-ray diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Lee, John David; Almagri, Abdulgadar F.

    2015-07-01

    A new high time resolution x-ray detector has been installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to make measurements around sawtooth events. The detector system is comprised of a silicon avalanche photodiode, a 20 ns Gaussian shaping amplifier, and a 500 MHz digitizer with 14-bit sampling resolution. The fast shaping time diminishes the need to restrict the amount of x-ray flux reaching the detector, limiting the system dead-time. With a much higher time resolution than systems currently in use in high temperature plasma physics experiments, this new detector has the versatility to be used in a variety of discharges with varying flux and the ability to study dynamics on both slow and fast time scales. This paper discusses the new fast x-ray detector recently installed on MST and the improved time resolution capabilities compared to the existing soft and hard x-ray diagnostics. In addition to the detector hardware, improvements to the detector calibration and x-ray pulse identification software, such as additional fitting parameters and a more sophisticated fitting routine are discussed. Finally, initial data taken in both high confinement and standard reversed-field pinch plasma discharges are compared.

  3. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

    2005-07-27

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

  4. Magnetic reconstruction of nonaxisymmetric quasi-single-helicity configurations in the Madison Symmetric Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auriemma, F; Zanca, P; Franz, P; Innocente, P; Lorenzini, R; Momo, B; Terranova, D [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione 35127 Padova (Italy); Bergerson, W F; Ding, W X; Brower, D L [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Chapman, B E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Quasi-single-helicity (QSH) states, characterized by a magnetic spectrum dominated by the innermost resonant tearing mode, are common to all the reversed field pinch (RFP) experiments. The internal magnetic field structure produced by the dominant mode is investigated for the QSH observed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) RFP in discharges with zero toroidal magnetic field at the plasma boundary. The reconstruction is based on an MHD model coupled to edge measurements of the magnetic field. The model discards pressure, which has little effect on the equilibrium magnetic profile of present RFP plasmas, but adopts a realistic toroidal geometry. The technique is the adaptation to the MST configuration of a procedure already applied in RFX-mod, but a more general radial profile for the current density is needed for an adequate reconstruction of the MST case. The emerging features are similar to those found in RFX-mod. The helical flux surfaces of the dominant mode provide, with a good degree of reliability, a basis for mapping kinetic quantities such as electron density and soft-x-ray emissivity.

  5. Compact muon solenoid experiment on the Large Hadron Collider%在大型强子对撞机上的CMS实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国明

    2009-01-01

    LHC(large hadron collider)是目前世界上能量最高的强子对撞机.CMS(compact muon solenoid,中文译名是紧凑型缪子螺线管探测器)是LHC上的主要实验计划之一,其目标就是要寻找Higgs粒子或者超出标准模型的其他新粒子,探清自然界的电弱破缺机制,以及寻找暗物质.CMS实验位于高能量和高亮度的最前沿,是21世纪初人类认识微观世界最重要的物理实验之一.中国参加了这项国际合作,制作了部分μ子探测器、磁铁支架、电子学和地板等,目前转入物理研究工作,争取在物理研究中作出有显示度的贡献.文章简要介绍了CMS探测器以及CMS实验的目标和意义.

  6. Degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack: Experiment investigation on the effect of high volume fly ash content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Sunarmasto; Tyas, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Concrete is susceptible to a variety of chemical attacks. In the sulfuric acid environment, concrete is subjected to a combination of sulfuric and acid attack. This research is aimed to investigate the degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack based on measurement of compressive strength loss and diameter change. Since the proportion of SCC contains higher cement than that of normal concrete, the vulnerability of this concrete to sulfuric acid attack could be reduced by partial replacement of cement with fly ash at high volume level. The effect of high volume fly ash at 50-70% cement replacement levels on the extent of degradation owing to sulfuric acid will be assessed in this study. It can be shown that an increase in the utilization of fly ash to partially replace cement tends to reduce the degradation as confirmed by less compressive strength loss and diameter change. The effect of fly ash to reduce the degradation of SCC is more pronounced at a later age.

  7. Dissolution and time-dependent compaction of albite sand: experiments at 100°C and 160°C in pH-buffered organic acids and distilled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajash, Andrew; Carpenter, Thomas D.; Dewers, Thomas A.

    1998-09-01

    Aqueous fluids are important in the diagenesis and deformation of crustal rocks. Both chemical and physical interactions are involved and often they are strongly coupled. For example, pore waters not only dissolve, transport, and precipitate chemical species, but they also substantially affect the mechanical behavior of the rocks that contain them. Stresses magnified at grain contacts by differences in pore-fluid pressure ( Pp) and confining pressure ( Pc) can, in turn, influence the rate and extent of chemical exchange. To begin investigation of these coupled systems, compaction experiments were conducted using albite sand (250-500 μm) and distilled water (pH 5.8), 0.07 M acetate (pH 4.7), and 0.07 M acetate + 0.005 M citrate (pH 4.4) solutions in a hydrothermal flow-through system at conditions that simulate diagenesis. Pore-fluid chemistry and pore-volume loss were monitored to quantify the effects of organic acids on time-dependent compaction rates. The effects of stress and fluid chemistry on the dissolution kinetics were also examined. Albite dissolution rates, monitored by steady-state fluid chemistry, increased when an effective pressure ( Pe= Pc- Pp) was applied, probably due to increases in total surface area caused by grain breakage at contacts. These effects were transient in distilled water, however, Si and Al concentrations remained elevated in the acetate pore fluid. The average Si-based release rates indicate ≈35% increase in reactive surface area by application of Pe=34.5 MPa. At 100°C with Pe=34.5 MPa, steady-state Si concentrations were ≈2.3 times higher in 0.07 M acetate and 5.8 times higher in 0.07 M acetate + 0.005 M citrate than in distilled water. Al increased by even larger factors (3× in the acetate buffer and 10× in the citrate solution). These changes in fluid chemistry are attributed to both pH and ligand-enhanced reactions. Albite dissolution appears to be controlled by surface complexation reactions at Al sites. Rapid

  8. Time-dependent compaction band formation in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2015-07-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence, background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry and thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  9. Shock compaction of high- Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, S.T.; Nellis, W.J.; McCandless, P.C.; Brocious, W.F. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Seaman, C.L.; Early, E.A.; Maple, M.B. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kramer, M.J. (Ames Lab., IA (USA)); Syono, Y.; Kikuchi, M. (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan))

    1990-09-01

    We present the results of shock compaction experiments on high-{Tc} superconductors and describe the way in which shock consolidation addresses critical problems concerning the fabrication of high J{sub c} bulk superconductors. In particular, shock compaction experiments on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} show that shock-induced defects can greatly increase intragranular critical current densities. The fabrication of crystallographically aligned Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} samples by shock-compaction is also described. These experiments demonstrate the potential of the shock consolidation method as a means for fabricating bulk high-{Tc} superconductors having high critical current densities.

  10. Connecting Io's volcanic activity to the Io plasma torus: comparison of Galileo/NIMS volcanic and ground-based torus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, F. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Rathbun, J. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Echer, E.; Echer, M. P. D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Io, the innermost of the Jupiter's four Galilean moons, is a remarkable object in the Solar System, due to its intense and energetic volcanic activity. The volcanic sulfur and oxygen in Io's tenuous atmosphere escapes forming an extended neutral cloud around Io and Jupiter. Subsequently, by ionization and pickup ions, a ring of charged particles encircling Jupiter is created, forming the Io plasma torus. Considering this scenario, it is reasonable to expect that the Io plasma torus should be affected by changes in Io's volcanism. Interactions between Io and the Jovian environment is unique and yet not very well understood. Here we present two sets of observations. One from the Galileo Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (NIMS) instrument, which obtained spectral image cubes between 0.7 and 5.2 microns. The other dataset is from ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines from the Io plasma torus, obtained at McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak. Our dataset from the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines cover more years than the one from the NIMS data. The years presented in this work for a comparative study are from 1998 through 2001. Using the NIMS instrument we were able to identify which volcanoes were active and measure their level of activity. From the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines we were able to trace the densest part of the torus and also the brightness of both ansa. By comparing the results from the Galileo instrument and the ground-based observations, we are exploring how the Io plasma torus responds to large eruptions from Io. We aim with this study to help improve our understanding of this complex coupled system, Jupiter-Io.

  11. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  12. Thermoluminescence measurements of neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obryk, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.obryk@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Batistoni, Paola [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); EURATOM–CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, Sean [EURATOM-VR Association, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); EURATOM–CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Syme, Brian D.; Popovichev, Sergey [EURATOM–CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Stamatelatos, Ion E.; Vasilopoulou, Theodora [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences, Energy, Technology and Safety, NCSR “Demokritos”, Athens (Greece); Bilski, Paweł [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) were used for dose measurements at JET. •Pairs of {sup 6}LiF/{sup 7}LiF TLDs allow to measure thermal neutron component of a radiation field. •For detection of neutrons of higher energy, polyethylene (PE-300) moderators were used. •TLDs were installed at eleven positions in the JET hall and the hall labyrinth. •The experimental results are compared with calculations using the MCNP code. -- Abstract: Thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) were used for dose measurements at JET. Several hundreds of LiF detectors of various types, standard LiF:Mg,Ti and highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P were produced. LiF detectors consisting of natural lithium are sensitive to slow neutrons, their response to neutrons being enhanced by {sup 6}Li-enriched lithium or suppressed by using lithium consisting entirely of {sup 7}Li. Pairs of {sup 6}LiF/{sup 7}LiF detectors allow distinguishing between neutron/non-neutron components of a radiation field. For detection of neutrons of higher energy, polyethylene (PE-300) moderators were used. TLDs, located in the centre of cylindrical moderators, were installed at eleven positions in the JET hall and the hall labyrinth in July 2012, and exposure took place during the last two weeks of the experimental campaign. Measurements of the gamma dose were obtained for all positions over a range of about five orders of magnitude variation. As the TLDs were also calibrated in a thermal neutron field, the neutron fluence at the experimental position could be derived. The experimental results are compared with calculations using the MCNP code. The results confirm that the TLD technology can be usefully applied to measurements of neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall ducts.

  13. Maintaining an effective and efficient control system for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment during Long-Term Operations of CERN�??s Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) multi-purpose particle detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have been collecting physics data from particle collisions for almost three years. During this period, the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) Detector Control System (DCS) has contributed to the high level of availability of the experiment. This paper presents the current architecture of this distributed and heterogeneous control system alongside plans and developments for future improvements. To ensure that the system can efficiently operate and adapt to changes throughout the required operation lifetime of more than a decade, the potential legacy aspects of this kind of control system must be carefully managed. Such issues include evolving system requirements, turnover of staff members, potential benefits from new technologies and the need to follow release schedules of external software dependencies. The techniques and results of the work to continually maintain, improve and stre...

  14. Cassini capturing of freshly-produced water-group ions in the Enceladus torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Miloch, W. J.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2012-09-01

    The water vapor plume on the geological-active south-polar region of the moon Enceladus is recognized as the main source of Saturn's neutral torus centered on the Enceladus orbit. The composition of the torus is dominated by water group species. Recent in situ Cassini plasma spectrometer measurements indicate the existence of freshly produced, slow and non-thermalized water group ions throughout the Enceladus torus including regions far from the moon. We report the results of modeling spacecraft-plasma interactions in the environment relevant for the Enceladus torus to show that new-born non-thermalized ions will inevitably be captured by the electric fields arising around the charged spacecraft. The associated plasma configuration can directly impact the plasma measurements and thus is important for reliable interpretation of data obtained by Cassini instruments in the Enceladus torus. The simulation results appear to be partially supported by Cassini observations and can provide new insights into intricate process of Enceladus-plasma interactions.

  15. Compactness theorems of fuzzy semantics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship among diverse fuzzy semantics vs. the corresponding logic consequence operators has been analyzed systematically. The results that compactness and logical compactness of fuzzy semantics are equivalent to compactness and continuity of the logic consequence operator induced by the semantics respectively have been proved under certain conditions. A general compactness theorem of fuzzy semantics have been established which says that every fuzzy semantics defined on a free algebra with members corresponding to continuous functions is compact.

  16. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  17. Intelligent compaction theory of high roller compacted concrete dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Donghai

    2012-01-01

    The concept and realization process of intelligent compaction for the construction of high roller compacted concrete dam were presented, as well as the theory of monitoring and intelligent feedback control. Based on the real-time analysis of the compaction index, a multiple regression model of the dam compactness was established and a realime estimation method of compaction quality for the entire work area of roller compacted concrete dam was proposed finally. The adaptive adjustment of the roiling process parameters was achieved, with the speed, the exciting force, the roller pass and the compaction thickness meeting the standards during the whole construction process. As a result, the compaction quality and construction efficiency can be improved. The research provides a new way for the construction quality control of roller compacted concrete dam.

  18. Magnetic Compression Experiment at General Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, Carl; Howard, Stephen; Epp, Kelly; Zawalski, Wade; Kim, Charlson; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic compression experiment at General Fusion was designed as a repetitive non-destructive test to study plasma physics applicable to Magnetic Target Fusion compression. A spheromak compact torus (CT) is formed with a co-axial gun into a containment region with an hour-glass shaped inner flux conserver, and an insulating outer wall. The experiment has external coils to keep the CT off the outer wall (levitation) and then rapidly compress it inwards. Experiments used a variety of levitation/compression field profiles. The optimal configuration was seen to improve levitated CT lifetime by around 50% over that with the original design field. Suppression of impurity influx to the plasma is thought to be a significant factor in the improvement, as supported by spectrometer data. Improved levitation field may reduce the amount of edge plasma and current that intersects the insulating outer wall during the formation process. Higher formation current and stuffing field, and correspondingly higher CT flux, was possible with the improved configuration. Significant field and density compression factors were routinely observed. The level of MHD activity was reduced, and lifetime was increased further by matching the decay rate of the levitation field to that of the CT fields. Details of experimental results and comparisons to equilibrium models and MHD simulations will be presented.

  19. On the nature of S II emission from Jupiter's hot plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. A.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    An effective electron temperature T(e) of 80,000 K is indicated by the Voyager 1 encounter Jupiter hot torus emission rates in the 6731, 1256, 911 and reclassified 765 A transitions of S II. A set of 53 measurements of the S II red line doublet obtained at 5.9 Jupiter radii shows strong, irregular fluctuations in intensity, but no variation in the line ratio. At this distance from Jupiter, the torus is found to be longitudinally uniform in density; this is consonant with Voyager UVS findings, but contrary to magnetic anomaly model predictions. It is suggested that presently unidentified ion-ion and/or iron-atom reactions are responsible for the S II component irregular variations, in view of the fact that electron properties are regular and variable only over a small range in the hot torus at 5.9 Jupiter radii.

  20. Classical torus conformal block, N=2* twisted superpotential and the accessory parameter of Lame equation

    CERN Document Server

    Piatek, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    In this work the correspondence between the semiclassical limit of the DOZZ quantum Liouville theory on the torus and the Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit of the N=2* (Omega-deformed) U(2) super-Yang-Mills theory is exploited to propose new formulae for the accessory parameter of the Lame equation. It has been found that the Lame accessory parameter is determined by the classical Liouville action on the one-punctured torus or more concretely by the torus classical block evaluated on the saddle point intermediate classical weight. Moreover, as an implication of the aforementioned correspondence it has been obtained that the accessory parameter is related to the sum of all rescaled column lengths of the so-called "critical" Young diagrams extremizing the instanton "free energy". Finally, it has been pointed out that the sum over the "critical" column lengths can be rewritten in terms of a contour integral in which the integrand is built out of certain special functions.

  1. Effect of enclosed fluid on the dynamic response of inflated torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashish; Mishra, B. K.; Jain, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    Large inflatable structures have been the subject of renewed interest for scientists/engineers in recent years due to their potential space applications such as communication antennas, solar thermal propulsion and space solar power. The major advantages of using inflatable structures in space are their extremely low-weight, on-orbit deployability and inherent low launch volume. An inflated torus is a key component of many inflated space structures such as a thin membrane reflector. In view of their importance, structural static and dynamic behavior of inflated torus need to be investigated. In order to develop a more realistic model, dynamic interaction between the enclosed fluid and the torus has been included in the present work. An appreciable decrease in the modal frequencies is observed when fluid-structure interaction is taken into account. Some additional modes are also obtained. It is concluded that fluid-structure interaction significantly affects the dynamic behavior of inflatable space structures.

  2. Embedding global and collective in a torus network with message class map based tree path selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Eisley, Noel A.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Senger, Robert M; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka; Takken, Todd E.

    2016-06-21

    Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a global barrier and global interrupt network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. The computer system includes a multitude of nodes. In one embodiment, the method comprises taking inputs from a set of receivers of the nodes, dividing the inputs from the receivers into a plurality of classes, combining the inputs of each of the classes to obtain a result, and sending said result to a set of senders of the nodes. Embodiments of the invention provide a method, system and computer program product for embedding a collective network in a parallel computer system organized as a torus network. In one embodiment, the method comprises adding to a torus network a central collective logic to route messages among at least a group of nodes in a tree structure.

  3. Universal Behaviour on the Break-up of the Spiral Mean Torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周济林; 胡斑比; 孙义燧

    2001-01-01

    We study numerically the critical behaviour during the break-up of the spiral mean torus in a four-dimensional symplectic map. At each point of the parameter space, the stability indices of a serial of periodic orbits are calculated with their winding numbers approaching the spiral mean torus. The critical values of the parameters when the torus breaks are determined by the criterion that the variance of the distribution on the indices reaches a minimum. Some evidence is revealed about the possible existence of a universal distribution on the stability indices of the periodic orbits at the critical This confirms the picture given by the approximate renormalization theory of the Hamiltonian systems with three degrees of freedom.

  4. Persistent subsoil compaction and its effects on preferential flow patterns in a loamy till soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etana, A; Larsbo, M; Keller, T;

    2013-01-01

    Persistence of subsoil compaction was investigated in a field experiment in southern Sweden. The investigation compared two treatments (control and compaction by four passes track-by-track), 14 years after the experimental traffic. The compaction experiment was carried out in 1995 with a 6-row su...

  5. Modeling the Infrared Reverberation Response of the Circumnuclear Dusty Torus in AGNs: The Effects of Cloud Orientation and Anisotropic Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeyda, Triana; Robinson, Andrew; Richmond, Michael; Vazquez, Billy; Nikutta, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The obscuring circumnuclear torus of dusty molecular gas is one of the major components of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The torus can be studied by analyzing the time response of its infrared (IR) dust emission to variations in the AGN continuum luminosity, a technique known as reverberation mapping. The IR response is the convolution of the AGN ultraviolet/optical light curve with a transfer function that contains information about the size, geometry, and structure of the torus. Here, we describe a new computer model that simulates the reverberation response of a clumpy torus. Given an input optical light curve, the code computes the emission of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds as a function of time at selected IR wavelengths, taking into account light travel delays. We present simulated dust emission responses at 3.6, 4.5, and 30 μm that explore the effects of various geometrical and structural properties, dust cloud orientation, and anisotropy of the illuminating radiation field. We also briefly explore the effects of cloud shadowing (clouds are shielded from the AGN continuum source). Example synthetic light curves have also been generated, using the observed optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 6418 as input. The torus response is strongly wavelength-dependent, due to the gradient in cloud surface temperature within the torus, and because the cloud emission is strongly anisotropic at shorter wavelengths. Anisotropic illumination of the torus also significantly modifies the torus response, reducing the lag between the IR and optical variations.

  6. THE DIFFERENCES IN THE TORUS GEOMETRY BETWEEN HIDDEN AND NON-HIDDEN BROAD LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Packham, Christopher; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Alsip, Crystal D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Almeida, Cristina Ramos; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; González-Martín, Omaira [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Física de Cantabria, CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Díaz-Santos, Tanio [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Elitzur, Moshe [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Hönig, Sebastian F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levenson, Nancy A. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c/o AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Mason, Rachel E. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Perlman, Eric S., E-mail: ichikawa@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, 150 W. University Blvd., Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2015-04-20

    We present results from the fitting of infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions of 21 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with clumpy torus models. We compiled high spatial resolution (∼0.3–0.7 arcsec) mid-IR (MIR) N-band spectroscopy, Q-band imaging, and nuclear near- and MIR photometry from the literature. Combining these nuclear near- and MIR observations, far-IR photometry, and clumpy torus models enables us to put constraints on the torus properties and geometry. We divide the sample into three types according to the broad line region (BLR) properties: type-1s, type-2s with scattered or hidden broad line region (HBLR) previously observed, and type-2s without any published HBLR signature (NHBLR). Comparing the torus model parameters gives us the first quantitative torus geometrical view for each subgroup. We find that NHBLR AGNs have smaller torus opening angles and larger covering factors than HBLR AGNs. This suggests that the chance to observe scattered (polarized) flux from the BLR in NHBLR could be reduced by the dual effects of (a) less scattering medium due to the reduced scattering volume given the small torus opening angle and (b) the increased torus obscuration between the observer and the scattering region. These effects give a reasonable explanation for the lack of observed HBLR in some type-2 AGNs.

  7. A communication model based on n-dimensional Torus Architecture using dead-lock-free wormhole routing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzenspies, P.K.F.; Schepers, Erik; Bach, Wouter; Jonker, Mischa; Sikkes, Bart; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Routing on a two-dimensional torus architecture by means of the wormhole routing algorithm is introduced and extended to an n-dimensional torus model. To prevent blocking deadlocks caused by this algorithm, a multiple virtual channel solution is introduced. An implementation of virtual channels is

  8. Zeros of the Jones Polynomial for Torus Knots and 2-bridge Knots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN You-fa; ZHANG Rong-wei; WANG Lin-lin; MA Xiao-sha

    2014-01-01

    We study zeros of the Jones polynomial and their distributions for torus knots and 2-bridge knots. We prove that e(2m+1)πi/2 and e(2m+1)πi/4(m is a positive integer) can not be the zeros of Jones polynomial for torus knots Tp,q by the knowledge of the trigonometric function. We elicit the normal form of Jones polynomials of the 2-bridge knot C (−2, 2, · · · , (−1)r 2) by the recursive form and discuss the distribution of their zeros.

  9. From Canards of Folded Singularities to Torus Canards in a Forced van der Pol Equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, John; Desroches, Mathieu; Granados, Albert;

    2016-01-01

    to the intermediate- and high-frequency forcing regimes and show that the forced van der Pol possesses torus canards instead. These torus canards consist of long segments near families of attracting and repelling limit cycles of the fast system, in alternation. We also derive explicit formulas for the parameter......-frequency periodically driven slow/fast systems with two fast variables and one slow variable which possess a non-degenerate fold of limit cycles. The analytic techniques used herein rely on geometric desingularisation, invariant manifold theory, Melnikov theory, and normal form methods. The numerical methods used...

  10. Torus Quotients of Homogeneous Spaces - Minimal Dimensional Schubert Varieties Admitting Semi-Stable Points

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Kannan; S K Pattanayak

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, for any simple, simply connected algebraic group of type , or and for any maximal parabolic subgroup of , we describe all minimal dimensional Schubert varieties in $G/P$ admitting semistable points for the action of a maximal torus with respect to an ample line bundle on $G/P$. We also describe, for any semi-simple simply connected algebraic group and for any Borel subgroup of , all Coxeter elements for which the Schubert variety () admits a semistable point for the action of the torus with respect to a non-trivial line bundle on / .

  11. The Coulomb gas representation of critical RSOS models on the sphere and the torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O. (Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica); Nienhuis, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Inst. Lorentz voor Theoretische Natuurkunde)

    1989-10-02

    We derive the Coulomb gas formulation of the c<1 discrete unitary series, on the sphere and the torus, starting from the corresponding regime-III RSOS models on a square lattice with appropriate topology. We clarify the origin of the background charge, the screening charges, and the choice of operator representations in a correlation function. In the scaling limit, we obtain a bosonic action coupled to the background curvature in addition to topological terms that vanish on the Riemann sphere. Its Virasoro algebra has the central charge expected on the basis of comparing conformal dimensions. As an application, we derive general expressions for the correlation functions on the torus. (orig.).

  12. Influence of globalmagnetic perturbations on plasma behavior in Elmo Bumpy Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, B.H.; Dandl, R.A.; Colestock, P.L.; :Bieniosek, F.M.; Ikegami, H.

    1979-02-01

    The sensitivity of plasma confinement to magnetic field error effects has been tested experimentally using externally introduced global field errors on the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT). Below a critical error field (deltaB/sub r//B)/sub cr/ of approx. = to 0.6-1 x 10/sup -3/ the plasma was observed to be essentially free from convective cells, toroidal currents, and instabilities. This observed critical value is comparable to a neoclassical critical field error (deltaB/sub r//B)/sub cr/ approx. = rho/R, the ratio of the ion Larmor radius to the major radius of the torus.

  13. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  14. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  15. Warm Compaction Process of P/M Steels by Orthogonal Testing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Tuming; YI Jianhong; PENG Yuandong; XIA Qinglin; WANG Hongzhong

    2008-01-01

    In order to achieve higher density of P/M steels using the die wall lubrication compacting method or powder lubricant in warm compaction process,the influence of different process parameters on the green density of warm compacted samples was studied.According to the orthogonal test method,the authors systematically study the influence of the different compaction pressure,condition of lubrication and compaction temperature on the green density of the sample in the warm compaction process,and put forward the optimal process parameter of warm compaction experiment.It is found that,a high compaction pressure(≥700 MPa),die wall lubrication combined with a small amount of internal lubricants,and fitting compaction temperature by different condition of lubrication,are the optimal parameters in warm compaction process.

  16. Improving the compaction properties of roller compacted calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, C; Olsen, P M; Bertelsen, P; Kristensen, J; Sonnergaard, J M

    2007-09-05

    The effects of roller compaction process parameters, morphological forms of calcium carbonate and particle size of sorbitol on flow, compaction and compression properties were investigated. The morphology of the calcium carbonate and the sorbitol particle size were more influential on the compaction properties than the settings of the roller compactor. The roller compaction process was demonstrated to be robust and stable in regard to flowability and compactibility. The flowability of the granules was improved adequately to facilitate compression in a production scale rotary tablet press. By adding sorbitol to the calcium carbonate, the compressibility - characterized by the Walker coefficient W(ID) - and the compactibility C(P) were improved considerably. A correlation between the consolidation characteristics was demonstrated. Compactibility data from the compaction simulator correlated with the tablet press for two of the calcium carbonates, the cubic form and the ground quality.

  17. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李道武; 刘军辉; 章志明; 王宝义; 张天保; 魏龙

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800 (a fast photomultiplier) to form the small size γ-ray detectors, a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments. The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the co

  18. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  19. Mechanical compaction in Bleurswiller sandstone: effective pressure law and compaction localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Ji, Yuntao; Wong, Teng-fong

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic investigation of mechanical compaction and strain localization in Bleurswiller sandstone of 24% porosity. 70 conventional triaxial compression experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore pressures ranging from 5 to 100 MPa. Our new data show that the effective pressure principle can be applied in both the brittle faulting and cataclastic flow regimes, with an effective pressure coefficient close to but somewhat less than 1. Under relatively high confinement, the samples typically fail by development of compaction bands. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to resolve preexisting porosity clusters, as well as the initiation and propagation of the compaction bands in deformed samples. Synthesis of the CT and microstructural data indicates that there is no casual relation between collapse of the porosity clusters in Bleurswiller sandstone and nucleation of the compaction bands. Instead, the collapsed porosity clusters may represent barriers for the propagation of compaction localization, rendering the compaction bands to propagate along relatively tortuous paths so as to avoid the porosity clusters. The diffuse and tortuous geometry of compaction bands results in permeability reduction that is significantly lower than that associated with compaction band formation in other porous sandstones. Our data confirm that Bleurswiller sandstone stands out as the only porous sandstone associated with a compactive cap that is linear, and our CT and microstructural observation show that it is intimately related to collapse of the porosity clusters. We demonstrate that the anomalous linear caps and their slopes are in agreement with a micromechanical model based on the collapse of a spherical pore embedded in an elastic-plastic matrix that obeys the Coulomb failure criterion.

  20. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  1. Unitary evolution and uniqueness of the Fock quantization in flat cosmologies with compact spatial sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gomar, Laura Castelló; Blas, Daniel Martín-de; Marugán, Guillermo A Mena; Velhinho, José M

    2012-01-01

    We study the Fock quantization of scalar fields with a time dependent mass in cosmological scenarios with flat compact spatial sections. This framework describes physically interesting situations like, e.g., cosmological perturbations in flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes, generally including a suitable scaling of them by a background function. We prove that the requirements of vacuum invariance under the spatial isometries and of a unitary quantum dynamics select (a) a unique canonical pair of field variables among all those related by time dependent canonical transformations which scale the field configurations, and (b) a unique Fock representation for the canonical commutation relations of this pair of variables. Though the proof is generalizable to other compact spatial topologies in three or less dimensions, we focus on the case of the three-torus owing to its relevance in cosmology, paying a especial attention to the role played by the spatial isometries in the determination of the representatio...

  2. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  3. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations...

  4. The bounded isometry conjecture for the Kodaira-Thurston manifold and 4-Torus

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to study the bounded isometry conjecture proposed by Lalonde and Polterovich. In particular, we show that the conjecture holds for the Kodaira-Thurston manifold with the standard symplectic form and for the 4-torus with all linear symplectic forms.

  5. Phases of three dimensional large N QCD on a continuum torus

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, R; Reynoso, F

    2007-01-01

    It is established by numerical means that continuum large N QCD defined on a three dimensional torus can exist in four different phases. They are (i) confined phase; (ii) deconfined phase; (iii) small box at zero temperature and (iv) small box at high temperatures.

  6. THE FUNDAMENTAL GROUP OF THE AUTOMORPHISM GROUP OF A NONCOMMUTATIVE TORUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Assume that each completely irrational noncommutative torus is realized as an inductive limit of circle algebras, and that for a completely irrational noncommutative torus Aω of rank m there are a completely irrational noncommutative torus Aρ of rank m and a positive integer d such that tr(Aω) = 1/d. tr(Aρ). It is proved that the set of all C*-algebras of sections of locally trivial C*-algebra bundles over S2 with fibres Aω has a group structure, denoted by πs1(Aut(Aω)), which is isomorphic to Z. if d > 1 and {0} if d > 1. Let Bcd be a cd-homogeneous C*-algebra over S2 × T2 of which no non-trivial matrix algebra can be factored out. The spherical noncommutative torus Scdρ is defined by twisting C*(T2 × Zm-2) in Bcd C*(Zm-2) by a totally skew multiplier ρ on T2 × Zm-2. It is shown that Scdρ Mp∞ is isomorphic to C(S2) C*(T2 × Zm-2,ρ) Mcd(C) Mp∞ if and only if the set of prime factors of cd is a subset of the set of prime factors of p.

  7. Design and simulation of a Torus topology for network on chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Chang; Li Yubai; Chai Song

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at the applications of NOC(network on chip)technology in rising scale and complexity on chip systems,a Torus structure and corresponding route algorithm for NOC is proposed.This Torus structure improves traditional Torus topology and redefines the denotations of the routers.Through redefining the router denotations and changing the origihal router locations,the Torns structure for NOC application is reconstructed.On the basis of this structure.a dead-lock and live-lock free route algorithm is designed according to dimension increase.System C is used to implement this structure and the route algorithm is simulated.In the four different traffic patterns.average,hotspot 13%,hotspot 67% and transpose,the average delay and normalization throughput of this Torus structure are evaluated.Then,the performance of delay and throughput between this Torns and Mesh structure is compared.The results indicate that this Torns structure is more suitable for NOC applications.

  8. Condensates and instanton - torus knot duality. Hidden Physics at UV scale

    CERN Document Server

    Gorsky, A

    2014-01-01

    We establish the duality between the torus knot superpolynomials or the Poincare polynomials of the Khovanov homology and particular condensates in Omega-deformed 5D supersymmetric QED compactified on a circle with 5d Chern-Simons(CS) term. This is the generalization of the Witten's recipe of the evaluation of the knot polynomials via Wilson loops in 3d CS theory for case of the torus knots. It is explicitly shown that $n$-instanton contribution to the condensate of the massless flavor in the background of four-observable, which can be associated with some composite defect, exactly coincides with the superpolynomial of the T(n,nk+1) torus knot where k - is the level of CS term. In contrast to the previously known results, the particular torus knot corresponds not to the partition function of the gauge theory but to the particular instanton contribution and summation over the knots has to be performed in order to obtain the complete answer. The instantons are sitting almost at the top of each other and the phy...

  9. Effect of plasma torus density variations on the morphology and brightness of the Io footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, A. P.; Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Crary, F.

    2014-05-01

    We develop a 2-D-layered model of the Io plasma torus to study the apparent "shutoff" of the Io footprint in 2007, when it disappeared beneath a region of diffuse emissions, roughly coincident with a massive eruption of Tvashtar Paterae. First, we investigate the effects of Io's location in the plasma torus and validate our model results against Hubble UV observations of the Io footprint. We are able to qualitatively reproduce variations in the morphology of the footprint due to Io's changing latitudinal location with respect to the center of the plasma torus, capturing the bright leading spot and the dimmer tail. Then, we consider the effects of an increase in the local plasma density on the brightness and morphology of the Io footprint. Our results show a correlation between a local density increase in the plasma torus and the dimming of the Io footprint as observed in 2007. In particular, we find that a local density enhancement at Io of fivefold compared to the nominal value is sufficient to produce the observed shutoff of the footprint.

  10. On the hyperbolic automorphisms of the 2-torus and their Markov partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Anosov, Dmitry V.; Alexey V. Klimenko; Kolutsky, Grisha

    2008-01-01

    In the paper we give an introduction to Anosov diffeomorphisms, ways to represent their chaotic properties and some historical remarks on this subject. A complete classification of hyperbolic linear automorphisms of 2-torus is presented. We introduce a notion of pre-Markov partition for such automorphisms and give their classification and an algorithm for their construction.

  11. Reverberation Response Models of the Infrared Dust Emission from a Clumpy Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeyda, Triana

    2016-08-01

    The obscuring circum-nuclear dusty torus is a major component of AGN and yet, thus far, its shape, composition, and structure have not been well constrained by observations. However, using indirect methods such as reverberation mapping, the size and structure of the torus can be estimated through the time variability of the dusty torus emission in response to changes in the AGN luminosity. I will discuss the computer simulation that I have developed in order to extract structural information from the infrared light curves of 12 Type 1 AGN, obtained during a 2.5 year monitoring campaign using the Spitzer Space Telescope and several ground-based optical telescopes. Given an input optical light curve, the code computes the temporal response of the infrared emission spectrum of a 3D ensemble of dust clouds as a function of time. I will present simulations exploring the effects of various geometrical and structural properties, dust cloud orientation, and anisotropy of the illuminating radiation field on the dusty torus response at selected infrared wavelengths. I will also compare model infrared light curves to those observed for the recently discovered changing-look AGN, NGC 6418.

  12. On the existence of star products on quotient spaces of linear Hamiltonian torus actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbig, Hans-Christian; Iyengar, Srikanth B.; Pflaum, Markus J.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss BFV deformation quantization (Bordemann et al. in A homological approach to singular reduction in deformation quantization, singularity theory, pp. 443–461. World Scientific, Hackensack, 2007) in the special case of a linear Hamiltonian torus action. In particular, we show that the Kos...

  13. Computation-free presentation of the fundamental group of generic $(p,q)$-torus curves

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Enrique Artal; Ortigas-Galindo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    In this note, we present a new method for computing fundamental groups of curve complements using a variation of the Zariski-Van Kampen method on general ruled surfaces. As an application we give an alternative (computation-free) proof for the fundamental group of generic $(p,q)$-torus curves.

  14. Investigating the dusty torus of Seyfert galaxies using SOFIA/FORCAST photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Lindsay; Packham, Chris; Ramos-Almeida, Cristina; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Levenson, Nancy; Radomski, James; Ichikawa, Kohei; Garcia-Bernete, Ismael; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Martinez-Parades, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    We present 31.5 micron imaging photometry of 11 nearby Seyfert galaxies observed from the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) using the Faint Object infraRed CAmera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST). We tentatively detect extended 31 micron emission for the first time in our sample. In combination with this new data set, subarcsecond resolution 1-18 micron imaging and 7.5-13 micron spectroscopic observations were used to compute the nuclear spectral energy distribution (SED) of each galaxy. We found that the turnover of the torus emission does not occur at wavelengths <31.5 micron, which we interpret as a lower-limit for the wavelength of peak emission. We used CLUMPY torus models to fit the nuclear infrared (IR) SED and infer trends in the physical parameters of the AGN torus for the galaxies in the sample. Including the 31.5 micron nuclear flux in the SED 1) reduces the number of clumpy torus models compatible with the data, and 2) modifies the model output for the outer radial exten...

  15. Topological Representations of $U_q(sl_2)$ on the Torus and the Mapping Class Group

    CERN Document Server

    Crivelli, M; Wieczerkowski, C; Felder, Giovanni

    1993-01-01

    We compute the mapping class group action on cycles on the configuration space of the torus with one puncture, with coefficients in a local system arising in conformal field theory. This action commutes with the topological action of the quantum group $U_q(sl_2)$, and is given in vertex form.

  16. The spectrum of the torus profile to a geometric variational problem with long range interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaofeng; Wei, Juncheng

    2017-08-01

    The profile problem for the Ohta-Kawasaki diblock copolymer theory is a geometric variational problem. The energy functional is defined on sets in R3 of prescribed volume and the energy of an admissible set is its perimeter plus a long range interaction term related to the Newtonian potential of the set. This problem admits a solution, called a torus profile, that is a set enclosed by an approximate torus of the major radius 1 and the minor radius q. The torus profile is both axially symmetric about the z axis and reflexively symmetric about the xy-plane. There is a way to set up the profile problem in a function space as a partial differential-integro equation. The linearized operator L of the problem at the torus profile is decomposed into a family of linear ordinary differential-integro operators Lm where the index m = 0 , 1 , 2 , … is called a mode. The spectrum of L is the union of the spectra of the Lm's. It is proved that for each m, when q is sufficiently small, Lm is positive definite. (0 is an eigenvalue for both L0 and L1, due to the translation and rotation invariance.) As q tends to 0, more and more Lm's become positive definite. However no matter how small q is, there is always a mode m of which Lm has a negative eigenvalue. This mode grows to infinity like q - 3 / 4 as q → 0.

  17. Observations of the He+ pickup ion torus velocity distribution function with SOHO/CELIAS/CTOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taut, Andreas; Berger, Lars; Bochsler, Peter; Drews, Christian; Klecker, Berndt; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    Interstellar PickUp Ions (PUIs) are created from neutrals coming from the interstellar medium that get ionized inside the heliosphere. Once ionized, the freshly created ions are injected into the magnetized solar wind plasma with a highly anisotropic torus-shaped Velocity Distribution Function (VDF). It has been commonly assumed that wave-particle interactions rapidly destroy this torus by isotropizing the distribution in one hemisphere of velocity space. However, recent observations of a He+ torus distribution using PLASTIC on STEREO showed that the assumption of a rapid isotropization is oversimplified. The aim of this work is to complement these studies. Using He+ data from the Charge Time-Of-Flight (CTOF) sensor of the Charge, ELement, and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on-board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and magnetic field data from the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) magnetometer of the WIND spacecraft, we derive the projected 1-D VDF of He+ for different magnetic field configurations. Depending on the magnetic field direction, the initial torus VDF lies inside CTOF's aperture or not. By comparing the VDFs derived under different magnetic field directions with each other we reveal an anisotropic signature of the He+ VDF.

  18. REPRESENTATIONS OF A CLASS OF ASSOCIATIVE ALGEBRAS ON THE QUANTUM TORUS OF RANK n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Shangyuan; You Zhefeng

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we present three types of representations over Anq defined based on the quantum torus of rank n,which are closely related to modules over some vertex algebras. The isomorphism classes among these modules are also determined.

  19. One-to-one embedding between honeycomb mesh and Petersen-Torus networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung-Hyun; Sim, Hyun; Park, Dae-Heon; Park, Jang-Woo; Lee, Yang-Sun

    2011-01-01

    As wireless mobile telecommunication bases organize their structure using a honeycomb-mesh algorithm, there are many studies about parallel processing algorithms like the honeycomb mesh in Wireless Sensor Networks. This paper aims to study the Peterson-Torus graph algorithm in regard to the continuity with honeycomb-mesh algorithm in order to apply the algorithm to sensor networks. Once a new interconnection network is designed, parallel algorithms are developed with huge research costs to use such networks. If the old network is embedded in a newly designed network, a developed algorithm in the old network is reusable in a newly designed network. Petersen-Torus has been designed recently, and the honeycomb mesh has already been designed as a well-known interconnection network. In this paper, we propose a one-to-one embedding algorithm for the honeycomb mesh (HMn) in the Petersen-Torus PT(n,n), and prove that dilation of the algorithm is 5, congestion is 2, and expansion is 5/3. The proposed one-to-one embedding is applied so that processor throughput can be minimized when the honeycomb mesh algorithm runs in the Petersen-Torus.

  20. Degree-Regular Triangulations of Torus and Klein Bottle-Erratum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudeb Datta; Ashish Kumar Upadhyay

    2005-08-01

    A triangulation of a connected closed surface is called weakly regular if the action of its automorphism group on its vertices is transitive. A triangulation of a connected closed surface is called degree-regular if each of its vertices have the same degree. Clearly, a weakly regular triangulation is degree-regular. In [8], Lutz has classified all the weakly regular triangulations on at most 15 vertices. In [5], Datta and Nilakantan have classified all the degree-regular triangulations of closed surfaces on at most 11 vertices. In this article, we have proved that any degree-regular triangulation of the torus is weakly regular. We have shown that there exists an -vertex degree-regular triangulation of the Klein bottle if and only if is a composite number ≥ 9. We have constructed two distinct -vertex weakly regular triangulations of the torus for each ≥ 12 and a (4+2)-vertex weakly regular triangulation of the Klein bottle for each ≥ 2. For 12 ≤ ≤ 15, we have classified all the -vertex degree-regular triangulations of the torus and the Klein bottle. There are exactly 19 such triangulations, 12 of which are triangulations of the torus and remaining 7 are triangulations of the Klein bottle. Among the last 7, only one is weakly regular.

  1. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  2. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  3. Compact fiber optic accelerometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Peng; Jun Yang; Bing Wu; Yonggui Yuan; Xingliang Li; Ai Zhou; Libo Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A compact fiber optic accelerometer based on a Michelson interferometer is proposed and demonstrated.In the proposed system,the sensing element consists of two single-mode fibers glued together by epoxy,which then act as a simple supported beam.By demodulating the optical phase shift,the acceleration is determined as proportional to the force applied on the central position of the two single-mode fibers.This simple model is able to calculate the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the compact accelerometer.The experimental results show that the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the accelerometer are 0.42 rad/g and 600 Hz,respectively.

  4. Search for new physics in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the response of the CMS calorimeters to particles and jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumus, Kazim Ziya [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2008-08-01

    A Monte Carlo study of a generic search for new resonances beyond the Standard Model (SM) in the CMS experiment is presented. The resonances are axigluon, coloron, E6 diquark, excited quark, W', Z', and the Randall-Sundrum graviton which decay to dijets. The dijet resonance cross section that the CMS can expect to discover at a 5σ significance or to exclude at 95% confidence level for integrated luminosities of 100 pb-1, 1 fb-1, and 10 fb-1 is evaluated. It is shown that a 5σ discovery of a multi-TeV dijet resonance is possible for an axigluon, excited quark, and E6 diquark. However, a 5σ discovery can not be projected with confidence for a W', Z' and the Randall-Sundrum graviton. On the other hand, 95% CL exclusion mass regions can be measured for all resonances at high luminosities. In the second part of this dissertation, the analyses of the 2006 test beam data from the combined electromagnetic and hadronic barrel calorimeters are presented. The CMS barrel calorimeters response to a variety of beam particles in a wide momenta range (1 to 350 GeV/c) is measured. Furthermore, using these beam data, the expected performance of the barrel calorimeters to jets is predicted.

  5. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  6. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  7. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  8. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Zushi, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2{sup 3}S–2{sup 3}P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  9. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  10. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  11. Compact Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; da Rocha, R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  12. ITER ECRH upper launcher torus diamond window – Prototyping, testing and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.schreck@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Aiello, Gaetano; Meier, Andreas; Strauss, Dirk [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ikeda, Ryosuke; Oda, Yasuhisa; Sakamoto, Keishi; Takahashi, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Plasma Heating Technology Group, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Scherer, Theo [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Association KIT-EURATOM, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The diamond window prototype shows a very good transmission capability during high power RF experiments. • An ad-hoc qualification programme for the diamond torus window is being developed (contract between KIT and F4E). • The window design has been updated focused on its mechanical integrity and manufacturing aspects. - Abstract: The diamond window assembly is part of the ITER primary vacuum boundary and acts as the first tritium barrier and therefore it is classified as Safety/Protection Important Component (SIC/PIC). It consists of an ultra-low loss CVD diamond disk mounted in a system of metallic parts (copper/steel) and has to fulfil adequate transmission capability for high power mm-waves. High power RF experiments with a 1st window prototype had shown parasitic heating due to small gaps in the housing. After a design optimization directed to the mm-wave properties, the parasitic excitations of oscillations have been avoided in a 2nd prototype. This one is equipped with inserted waveguide structures, which cover gaps in the metallic structure of the window housing. From high power RF-measurements with a 0.86 MW/100 s pulse a loss tangent of 7.1 × 10{sup −6} could be estimated, corresponding to an increase of temperature of only 120 mK between inlet and outlet of the cooling system. The diamond window assemblies cannot be entirely covered by codes and standards. To comply with the French safety regulations, instead an ad-hoc qualification programme is required, being developed in the framework of a contract between KIT and F4E. A new prototype (3rd) will be built, which is designed to fit to the single HELICOFLEX sealed waveguide structures of the ex-vessel mm-system of the EC upper launcher (UL). The testing programme ranges from mechanical to vacuum tests up to dielectric loss measurements at low and high power. A clear definition of the testing requirements and of the acceptance criteria is necessary as well as a complete

  13. Lacunarity for compact groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R E; Hewitt, E; Ross, K A

    1971-01-01

    Let G be a compact Abelian group with character group X. A subset Delta of X is called a [unk](q) set (1 < q < infinity) if for all trigonometric polynomials f = [unk](k=1) (n) alpha(k)chi(k) (chi(1),...,chi(n) [unk] Delta) an inequality parallelf parallel(q) [unk] [unk] parallelf parallel(1) obtains, where [unk] is a positive constant depending only on Delta. The subset Delta is called a Sidon set if every bounded function on Delta can be matched by a Fourier-Stieltjes transform. It is known that every Sidon set is a [unk](q) set for all q. For G = T, X = Z, Rudin (J. Math. Mech., 9, 203 (1960)) has found a set that is [unk](q) for all q but not Sidon. We extend this result to all infinite compact Abelian groups G: the character group X contains a subset Delta that is [unk](q) for all q, 1 < q < infinity, but Delta is not a Sidon set.

  14. A compact SADM family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  15. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  16. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  17. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  18. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  19. Linear Shrinkage Behaviour of Compacted Loam Masonry Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAWAB ALI LAKHO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Walls of wet loam, used in earthen houses, generally experience more shrinkage which results in cracks and less compressive strength. This paper presents a technique of producing loam masonry blocks that are compacted in drained state during casting process in order to minimize shrinkage. For this purpose, loam masonry blocks were cast and compacted at a pressure of 6 MPa and then dried in shade by covering them in plastic sheet. The results show that linear shrinkage of 2% occurred which is smaller when compared to un-compacted wet loam walls. This implies that the loam masonry blocks compacted in drained state is expected to perform better than un-compacted wet loam walls.

  20. Hydrodynamic modeling and explosive compaction of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenig, C.; Holt, A.; Finger, M.; Kuhl, W.

    1977-09-01

    High-density ceramics with high-strength microstructure were achieved by explosive compaction. Well-characterized Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, and boron powders were explosively compacted in both cylindrical and flat plate geometries. In cylindrical geometries compacted densities between 91 and 98 percent of theoretical were achieved. Microhardness measurements indicated that the strength and integrity of the microstructure were comparable to conventionally fabricated ceramics, even though all samples with densities greater than 90 percent theoretical contained macrocracks. Fractured surfaces evaluated by SEM showed evidence of boundary melting. Equation of state data for porous Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were used to calculate the irreversible work done on the sample as a function of pressure. This was expressed as a percentage of the total sample which could be melted. Calculations show that very little melting can be expected in samples shocked to less than 3 GPa. Significant melting and grain boundary fusion can be expected in samples shocked to pressures greater than 8 GPa. Hydrodynamic modeling of right cylinder compaction with detonation at one end was attempted by using a two-dimensional computer code. The complications of this analysis led to experiments using plane shock waves. Flat-plate compaction assemblies were designed and analyzed by 2-D hydrodynamic codes. The use of porous shock attenuators was evaluated. Experiments were performed on aluminum oxide powders in plane wave geometry. Microstructure evaluations were made as a function of location in the flat plate samples. 11 figures, 1 table.

  1. On stable compact minimal submanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Torralbo, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of a sphere and any Riemannian manifold are classified whenever the dimension of the sphere is at least three. The complete classification of the stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of two spheres is obtained. Also, it is proved that the only stable compact minimal surfaces of the product of a 2-sphere and any Riemann surface are the complex ones.

  2. Borehole plugging by compaction process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, R.; MacGowan, C.; Nolan, E.; Morey, R.; Palty, A.

    1976-08-01

    The requirements of an overall program to preserve the integrity of a repository formation are documented. The repository is intended to be in stable earth stratum used as a safe and permanent storage area for nuclear waste material. These wastes represent an environmental hazard for a period of up to 200,000 years. An engineering analysis, a reliability and quality-assurance program, and a development program for borehole plugging by compaction process, using natural earthen materials, are presented. Part 1 provides the engineering analysis of downhole compaction methods and related instrumentation along with a recommended development plan from concept through a pilot in-situ experiment. Part 2 provides a reliability and quality-assurance program from laboratory testing of materials through an in-situ experiment.

  3. Quadratic independence of coordinate functions of certain homogeneous spaces and action of compact quantum groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashish Goswami

    2015-02-01

    Let be one of the classical compact, simple, centre-less, connected Lie groups of rank with a maximal torus , the Lie algebra $\\mathcal{G}$ and let $\\{E_{i},F_{i},H_{i},i=1,\\ldots,n\\}$ be tha standard set of generators corresponding to a basis of the root system. Consider the adjoint-orbit space $M=\\{\\text{Ad}_{g}(H_{1}), g\\in G\\}$, identified with the homogeneous space / where $L=\\{g\\in G : \\text{Ad}_{g}(H_{1})=H_{1}\\}$. We prove that the coordinate functions $f_{i}(g):=_{i}(\\text{Ad}_{g}(H_{1}))$, $i=1,\\ldots,n$, where $\\{_{1},\\ldots,_{n}\\}$ is basis of $\\mathcal{G}'$ are `quadratically independent' in the sense that they do not satisfy any nontrivial homogeneous quadratic relations among them. Using this, it is proved that there is no genuine compact quantum group which can act faithfully on $C(M)$ such that the action leaves invariant the linear span of the above coordinate functions. As a corollary, it is also shown that any compact quantum group having a faithful action on the noncommutative manifold obtained by Rieffel deformation of satisfying a similar `linearity' condition must be a Rieffel-Wang type deformation of some compact group.

  4. Novel routes to chaos through torus breakdown in non-invertible maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhusubaliyev, Zhanybai; Mosekilde, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a number of new scenarios for the transition to chaos through the formation and destruction of multilayered tori in non-invertible maps. By means of detailed, numerically calculated phase portraits we first describe how three- and five-layered tori arise through period......-doubling and/or pitchfork bifurcations of the saddle cycle on an ordinary resonance torus. We then describe several different mechanisms for the destruction of five-layered tori in a system of two linearly coupled logistic maps. One of these scenarios involves the destruction of the two intermediate layers...... of the five-layered torus through the transformation of two unstable node cycles into unstable focus cycles, followed by a saddle-node bifurcation that destroys the middle layer and a pair of simultaneous homoclinic bifurcations that produce two invariant closed curves with quasiperiodic dynamics along...

  5. Torus breakdown in the symmetry-reduced state space of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky system

    CERN Document Server

    Budanur, Nazmi Burak

    2015-01-01

    Systems such as fluid flows in channels and pipes or the complex Ginzburg-Landau system, defined over periodic domains, exhibit both continuous symmetries, translational and rotational, as well as discrete symmetries under spatial reflections or complex conjugation. The simplest, and very common symmetry of this type is the equivariance of the defining equations under the orthogonal group O(2). We formulate a novel symmetry-reduction scheme for such systems by combining the method of slices with invariant polynomial methods, and show how it works by applying it to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky system in one spatial dimension. As an example, we track a relative periodic orbit through a sequence of bifurcation to the onset of chaos. Within the symmetry-reduced state space we are able to compute and visualize the unstable manifolds of relative periodic orbits, their torus bifurcations, a transition to chaos via torus breakdown, and heteroclinic connections between various relative periodic orbits. It would be very ha...

  6. Research on Next-Generation Scalable Routers Implemented with H-Torus Topology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Jian Zhao; Zu-Hui Yue; Jian-Ping Wu

    2008-01-01

    The exponential growth of user traffic has been driving routers to run at higher capacity. In a traditional router, the centralized switching fabric is becoming the bottleneck for its limited number of ports and complicated scheduling algorithms. Direct networks, such as 3-D Torus topology, have been successfully applied to the design of scalable routers.They show good scalability and fault tolerance. Unfortunately, its scalability is limited in practice. In this paper, we introduce another type of direct network, called H-Torus. This network shows excellent topological properties. On its basis,the designs of line card and routing algorithms are introduced. Extensive simulations show that the routing algorithm is very important in such a system and results in low latency with high throughpnt.

  7. Bilateral Mandibular Torus and an Ankylosed Third Molar: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Onur Şimşek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors, genetic heritage, increased biting function and nutrition are some of the reason for intraoral exostosis to get developed. Torus mandibularis is one of the types of exostosis in the oral region, which is unilaterally or bilaterally located in the lingual aspect of the body of the mandible above the mylohyoid line. There is usually no need for biopsy for the diagnosis of tori. In symptomatic cases, excision is the treatment of choice. In this paper, a 65-year-old man with a wide bilateral mandibular torus and an ankylosed mandibular right third molar tooth with mucosal retention is presented and general information was given about tori. In relation with this case, it was thought that dental ankylosis and tori may occur together because of similar etiological factors.

  8. Superpolynomials for torus knots from evolution induced by cut-and-join operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunin-Barkowski, P.; Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.; Sleptsov, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2013-03-01

    The colored HOMFLY polynomials, which describe Wilson loop averages in Chern-Simons theory, possess an especially simple representation for torus knots, which begins from quantum R-matrix and ends up with a trivially-looking split W representation familiar from character calculus applications to matrix models and Hurwitz theory. Substitution of MacDonald polynomials for characters in these formulas provides a very simple description of "superpolynomials", much simpler than the recently studied alternative which deforms relation to the WZNW theory and explicitly involves the Littlewood-Richardson coefficients. A lot of explicit expressions are presented for different representations (Young diagrams), many of them new. In particular, we provide the superpolynomial {P}_{{[ 1 ]}}^{{[ {m,km± 1} ]}} for arbitrary m and k. The procedure is not restricted to the fundamental (all antisymmetric) representations and the torus knots.

  9. Spectrum in the presence of brane-localized mass on torus extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The lightest mass eigenvalue of a six-dimensional theory compactified on a torus is numerically evaluated in the presence of the brane-localized mass term. The dependence on the cutoff scale $\\Lambda$ is non-negligible even when $\\Lambda$ is two orders of magnitude above the compactification scale, which indicates that the mass eigenvalue is sensitive to the size of the brane, in contrast to five-dimensional theories. We obtain an approximate expression of the lightest mass in the thin brane limit, which well fits the numerical calculations, and clarifies its dependence on the torus moduli parameter $\\tau$. We found that the lightest mass is typically much lighter than the compactification scale by an order of magnitude even in the limit of a large brane mass.

  10. Theoretical Emission-Line Profiles of Active Galactic Nuclei and the Unified Model. I. The Face-on Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintilio, R.; Viegas, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Theoretical emission-line profiles are obtained for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taking into account the presence of an obscuring torus around the central energy source. For the sake of simplicity, the torus is represented by a cylindrical shell characterized by the inner and outer radius and the opening angle. In this paper we discuss the results with angle of sight equal to 0, i.e., for a face-on torus. Different line profiles are obtained following the torus parameters. The line profiles may show more than one peak and bumps, depending on the torus dimensions. The main parameter determining the number of peaks or bumps is the opening angle. Thus, the observed line shape may be a good indicator of the torus characteristics. As an example, the fit to the observed [O III] λ5007 emission line of NGC 4151 is presented. The model reproduces the FWHM and the asymmetrical bumps observed. Partially supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) under Grant 92/4335-9.

  11. Hierarchical Cantor set in the large scale structure with torus geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdzek, R. [Physics Department, ' Al. I. Cuza' University, Blvd. Carol I, Nr. 11, Iassy 700506 (Romania)], E-mail: rmurdzek@yahoo.com

    2008-12-15

    The formation of large scale structures is considered within a model with string on toroidal space-time. Firstly, the space-time geometry is presented. In this geometry, the Universe is represented by a string describing a torus surface. Thereafter, the large scale structure of the Universe is derived from the string oscillations. The results are in agreement with the cellular structure of the large scale distribution and with the theory of a Cantorian space-time.

  12. The impact of the dusty torus on obscured quasar halo mass measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Hickox, R. C.; Myers, A. D.; Geach, J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have found that obscured quasars cluster more strongly and are thus hosted by dark matter haloes of larger mass than their unobscured counterparts. These results pose a challenge for the simplest unification models, in which obscured objects are intrinsically the same as unobscured sources but seen through a dusty line of sight. There is general consensus that a structure like a `dusty torus' exists, meaning that this intrinsic similarity is likely the case for at least some subset of obscured quasars. However, the larger host halo masses of obscured quasars imply that there is a second obscured population that has an even higher clustering amplitude and typical halo mass. Here, we use simple assumptions about the host halo mass distributions of quasars, along with analytical methods and cosmological N-body simulations to isolate the signal from this population. We provide values for the bias and halo mass as a function of the fraction of the `non-torus-obscured' population. Adopting a reasonable value for this fraction of ˜25 per cent implies a non-torus-obscured-quasar bias that is much higher than the observed obscured quasar bias, because a large fraction of the obscured population shares the same clustering strength as the unobscured objects. For this non-torus-obscured population, we derive a bias of ˜3, and typical halo masses of ˜3 × 1013 M⊙ h-1 at z = 1. These massive haloes are likely the descendants of high-mass unobscured quasars at high redshift, and will evolve into members of galaxy groups at z = 0.

  13. THE SCENERY FLOW FOR GEOMETRIC STRUCTURES ON THE TORUS: THE LINEAR SETTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The authors define the scenery flow of the torus. The flow space is the union of all flat 2- dimensional tori of area 1 with a marked direction (or equivalently, the union of all tori with a quadratic differential of norm 1). This is a 5-dimensional space, and the flow acts by following individual points under an extremal deformation of the quadratic differential. The authors define associated horocycle and translation flows; the latter preserve each torus and are the horizontal and vertical flows of the corresponding quadratic differential. The scenery flow projects to the geodesic flow on the modular surface, and admits, for each orientation preserving hyperbolic toral automorphism, an invariant 3-dimensional subset on which it is the suspension flow of that map. The authors first give a simple algebraic definition in terms of the group of affine maps of the plane, and prove that the flow is Anosov. They give an explicit formula for the first-return map of the flow on convenient cross-sections. Then, in the main part of the paper, the authors give several different models for the flow and its cross-sections, in terms of: ● stacking and rescaling periodic tilings of the plane; ● symbolic dynamics: the natural extension of the recoding of Sturmian sequences, or the S-adic system generated by two substitutions; ● zooming and subdividing quasi-periodic tilings of the real line, or aperiodic quasicrystals of minimal complexity; ● the natural extension of two-dimensional continued fractions; ● induction on exchanges of three intervals; ● rescaling on pairs of transverse measure foliations on the torus, or the Teichmiiller flow on the twice-punctured torus.

  14. Quantum-Mechanical Particle Confined to Surfaces of Revolution - Truncated Cone and Elliptic Torus Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Willatzen, Morten; Voon, L.C. Lew Yan

    2005-01-01

    The theory of a quantum-mechanical particle confined to a surface of revolution is described using differential geometry methods including the derivation of a general set of three ordinary differential equations in curved coordinates. The problem is shown to be completely separable with the prese...... hard-wall boundary conditions. Two case studies of recent experimental interest. the nanocone and torus-shaped nanoring structures. are analyzed in terms of eigenstates, energies. and symmetry characteristics based on the theory presented....

  15. Algebraic K-theory and derived equivalences suggested by T-duality for torus orientifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We show that certain isomorphisms of (twisted) KR-groups that underlie T-dualities of torus orientifold string theories have purely algebraic analogues in terms of algebraic K-theory of real varieties and equivalences of derived categories of (twisted) coherent sheaves. The most interesting conclusion is a kind of Mukai duality in which the "dual abelian variety" to a smooth projective genus-1 curve over R with no real points is (mildly) noncommutative.

  16. Indecomposable representations of the Lie algebra of derivations for d-torus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Let DerA be the Lie algebra of derivations of the d-torus A = C[t1± 1, . . . , td±1]. By applying Shen-Larsson’s functors we get a class of indecomposable DerA-modules from finite-dimensional indecomposable gld-modules. We also give a complete description of the submodules of these indecomposable DerA-modules. Our results generalize those obtained by Rao.

  17. Quantization of a class of piecewise affine transformations on the torus

    CERN Document Server

    De Bièvre, S; De Bievre, S; Giachetti, R

    1995-01-01

    We present a unified framework for the quantization of a family of discrete dynamical systems of varying degrees of ``chaoticity". The systems to be quantized are piecewise affine maps on the two-torus, viewed as phase space, and include the automorphisms, translations and skew translations. We then treat some discontinuous transformations such as the Baker map and the sawtooth-like maps. Our approach extends some ideas from geometric quantization and it is both conceptually and calculationally simple.

  18. Creation of a dense torus in the coalescence of a black hole with a neutron star

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    We used a newtonian SPH (smooth-particle hydrodynamics) code to follow the final stages of evolution of a coalescing binary system of a neutron star and a black hole. We find that the outcome of the "merger" is very sensitive to the equation of state describing the neutron star. A neutron star with a soft equation of state (polytrope with index Gamma=5/3) is completely disrupted, and a fairly large and long-lived accretion torus is formed.

  19. Quantum revivals in two degrees of freedom integrable systems : the torus case

    CERN Document Server

    Lablée, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the semi-classical behaviour of quantum dynamics for a semi-classical completely integrable system with two degrees of freedom near Liouville regular torus. The phenomomenon of wave packet revivals is demonstrated in this article. The framework of this paper is semi-classical analysis (limit :). For the proofs we use standard tools of real analysis, Fourier analysis and basic analytic number theory.

  20. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  1. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  2. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Perseo, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “Piero Caldirola,” Milano (Italy); Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I. [Narodowe Centrum Badan Jadrowych (NCBJ), Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kiptily, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham (United Kingdom); Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  3. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M; Rigamonti, D; Perseo, V; Tardocchi, M; Boltruczyk, G; Broslawski, A; Cremona, A; Croci, G; Gosk, M; Kiptily, V; Korolczuk, S; Mazzocco, M; Muraro, A; Strano, E; Zychor, I; Gorini, G

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  4. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocente, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Perseo, V.; Tardocchi, M.; Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Cremona, A.; Croci, G.; Gosk, M.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Muraro, A.; Strano, E.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  5. Determining the torus covering factors for a sample of type 1 AGN in the local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ezhikode, Savithri H; Done, Chris; Ward, Martin; Dewangan, Gulab C; Misra, Ranjeev; Philip, Ninan Sajeeth

    2016-01-01

    The unification scheme of active galactic nuclei (AGN) proposes the presence of a dusty torus around the central source, governing the differences between AGN spectral properties. A fraction of the AGN luminosity is absorbed by the dusty torus and is re-radiated in the infrared (IR) band. Thus the fraction of the sky covered by the torus as seen from the central source, known as the covering factor f_c, can be obtained from the ratio of the IR to the bolometric luminosities of the source. However, because of the uncertainty in determining bolometric luminosities, the estimation of covering factors has proven difficult, especially in the local Universe where the peak of the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) lie in the ultraviolet. In this work, we determine the covering factors of an X-ray/optically selected sample of 51 type 1 AGN analysed by Jin et al. The bolometric luminosities of these sources can be derived using a self-consistent, energy-conserving model that estimates the contribution in th...

  6. A mid-infrared statistical investigation of clumpy torus model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, J.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Hönig, S. F.; Hernán-Caballero, A.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Levenson, N. A.; Roche, P. F.; González-Martín, O.; Packham, C.; Kishimoto, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present new calculations of the Clumpy AGN Tori in a 3D geometry (CAT3D) clumpy torus models, which now include a more physical dust sublimation model as well as active galactic nucleus (AGN) anisotropic emission. These new models allow graphite grains to persist at temperatures higher than the silicate dust sublimation temperature. This produces stronger near-infrared emission and bluer mid-infrared (MIR) spectral slopes. We make a statistical comparison of the CAT3D model MIR predictions with a compilation of sub-arcsecond resolution ground-based MIR spectroscopy of 52 nearby Seyfert galaxies (median distance of 36 Mpc) and 10 quasars. We focus on the AGN MIR spectral index αMIR and the strength of the 9.7 μm silicate feature SSil. As with other clumpy torus models, the new CAT3D models do not reproduce the Seyfert galaxies with deep silicate absorption (SSil low photon escape probabilities, while the quasars and the Seyfert 1-1.5 require generally models with higher photon escape probabilities. Quasars and Seyfert 1-1.5 tend to show steeper radial cloud distributions and fewer clouds along an equatorial line of sight than Seyfert 2. Introducing AGN anisotropic emission besides the more physical dust sublimation models alleviates the problem of requiring inverted radial cloud distributions (i.e. more clouds towards the outer parts of the torus) to explain the MIR spectral indices of type 2 Seyferts.

  7. Condensates and instanton – torus knot duality. Hidden Physics at UV scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gorsky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We establish the duality between the torus knot superpolynomials or the Poincaré polynomials of the Khovanov homology and particular condensates in Ω-deformed 5D supersymmetric QED compactified on a circle with 5d Chern–Simons (CS term. It is explicitly shown that n-instanton contribution to the condensate of the massless flavor in the background of four-observable exactly coincides with the superpolynomial of the T(n,nk+1 torus knot where k is the level of CS term. In contrast to the previously known results, the particular torus knot corresponds not to the partition function of the gauge theory but to the particular instanton contribution and summation over the knots has to be performed in order to obtain the complete answer. The instantons are sitting almost at the top of each other and the physics of the “fat point” where the UV degrees of freedom are slaved with point-like instantons turns out to be quite rich. Also we see knot polynomials in the quantum mechanics on the instanton moduli space. We consider the different limits of this correspondence focusing at their physical interpretation and compare the algebraic structures at the both sides of the correspondence. Using the AGT correspondence, we establish a connection between superpolynomials for unknots and q-deformed DOZZ factors.

  8. Calculation of Eddy currents in the ETE spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto

    2002-07-01

    A circuit model based on a Green's function method was developed to evaluate the currents induced during startup in the vessel of ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The eddy currents distribution is calculated using a thin shell approximation for the vacuum vessel and local curvilinear coordinates. The results are compared with values of the eddy currents measured in ETE. (author)

  9. The Finslerian compact star model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); De, S.S. [University of Calcutta, Department of Applied Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Jafry, M.A.K. [Shibpur Dinobundhoo Institution, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2015-11-15

    We construct a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian structure of spacetime. By assuming a particular mass function, we find an exact solution of the Finsler-Einstein field equations with an anisotropic matter distribution. The solutions are revealed to be physically interesting and pertinent for the explanation of compact stars. (orig.)

  10. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  11. Manufacturing Challenges and Benefits when Scaling the HIAD Stacked-Torus Aeroshell to a 15m Class System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Swanson, Gregory T.; Johnson, R. Keith; Hughes, Stephen; Calomino, Anthony; Gilles, Brian; Anderson, Paul; Bond, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Over a decade of work has been conducted in the development of NASA's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) deployable aeroshell technology. This effort has included multiple ground test campaigns and flight tests culminating in the HIAD project's second generation (Gen-2) aeroshell system. The HIAD project team has developed, fabricated, and tested stacked-torus inflatable structures (IS) with flexible thermal protection systems (F-TPS) ranging in diameters from 3-6m, with cone angles of 60 and 70 deg. To meet NASA and commercial near term objectives, the HIAD team must scale the current technology up to 12-15m in diameter. The HIAD project's experience in scaling the technology has reached a critical juncture. Growing from a 6m to a 15m class system will introduce many new structural and logistical challenges to an already complicated manufacturing process. Although the general architecture and key aspects of the HIAD design scale well to larger vehicles, details of the technology will need to be reevaluated and possibly redesigned for use in a 15m-class HIAD system. These include: layout and size of the structural webbing that transfers load throughout the IS, inflatable gas barrier design, torus diameter and braid construction, internal pressure and inflation line routing, adhesives used for coating and bonding, and F-TPS gore design and seam fabrication. The logistics of fabricating and testing the IS and the F-TPS also become more challenging with increased scale. Compared to the 6m aeroshell (the largest HIAD built to date), a 12m aeroshell has four times the cross-sectional area, and a 15m one has over six times the area. This means that fabrication and test procedures will need to be reexamined to account for the sheer size and weight of the aeroshell components. This will affect a variety of steps in the manufacturing process, such as: stacking the tori during assembly, stitching the structural webbing, initial inflation of tori, and

  12. Io's volcanic influence on the Io plasma torus: HISAKI observation in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Yoneda, M.; Koga, R.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2015-12-01

    The satellite Io which has many active volcanos supplies volcanic gases to the Jovian magnetosphere with typical rate of 1 ton/sec and has been known be a primary source of plasmas in the magnetosphere. Change in the volcanic activity on Io should cause change of the supply rate and could affect structure of the magnetosphere and dynamics occurs in it. However, responses of the magnetosphere to the volcanic activity is still not fully understood; one of the reasons is lack of continuous and long term observations of Io' volcanic gas extended around Io, plasmas in the Io torus, and activity of the magnetosphere. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscope, EXCEED, onboard the HISAKI satellite has capability to measure ion and atomic emission lines in EUV range (55-145nm) and is dedicated to observing solar system planets. The satellite has been successfully launched on Sep. 2013 and 2nd campaign of Io plasma torus and Jovian northern EUV aurora observation has been done from the end of Nov. 2014 to middle of May 2015. On middle of Jan. 2015, HISAKI detected gradual increase in intensity of S+ emission lines and decrease of S3+ ones in the plasma torus. The S+ intensity showed a maximum around the end of Feb. and S++ and S3+ intensities also showed maxima subsequently. Simultaneous ground based observation of the sodium nebula showed increase of the emission intensity from the middle of Jan. to the beginning of Mar. These observations suggest that the volcanic activity began at the middle of Jan. and increase neutral atom and ion densities in the Io torus. The intensities of S+ and S2+ ions returned to the pre-increase level by the middle of May 2015. S3+ had still been in the decay phase at the end of the observation. Change in radial structure of the plasma torus was also found during the volcanic event. The intensity of S+ ion began to increase around the orbit of Io (6 Jovian radii). The brightened region propagated outward and reached at 8.5 Jovian radii from

  13. From Canards of Folded Singularities to Torus Canards in a Forced van der Pol Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John; Desroches, Mathieu; Granados, Albert; Kaper, Tasso J.; Krupa, Martin; Vo, Theodore

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study canard solutions of the forced van der Pol equation in the relaxation limit for low-, intermediate-, and high-frequency periodic forcing. A central numerical observation made herein is that there are two branches of canards in parameter space which extend across all positive forcing frequencies. In the low-frequency forcing regime, we demonstrate the existence of primary maximal canards induced by folded saddle nodes of type I and establish explicit formulas for the parameter values at which the primary maximal canards and their folds exist. Then, we turn to the intermediate- and high-frequency forcing regimes and show that the forced van der Pol possesses torus canards instead. These torus canards consist of long segments near families of attracting and repelling limit cycles of the fast system, in alternation. We also derive explicit formulas for the parameter values at which the maximal torus canards and their folds exist. Primary maximal canards and maximal torus canards correspond geometrically to the situation in which the persistent manifolds near the family of attracting limit cycles coincide to all orders with the persistent manifolds that lie near the family of repelling limit cycles. The formulas derived for the folds of maximal canards in all three frequency regimes turn out to be representations of a single formula in the appropriate parameter regimes, and this unification confirms the central numerical observation that the folds of the maximal canards created in the low-frequency regime continue directly into the folds of the maximal torus canards that exist in the intermediate- and high-frequency regimes. In addition, we study the secondary canards induced by the folded singularities in the low-frequency regime and find that the fold curves of the secondary canards turn around in the intermediate-frequency regime, instead of continuing into the high-frequency regime. Also, we identify the mechanism responsible for this

  14. Compaction of an Oxisol and chemical composition of palisadegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurico Lucas de Sousa Neto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Compaction is an important problem in soils under pastoral land use, and can make livestock systems unsustainable. The objective of this research was to study the impact of soil compaction on yield and quality of palisade (UROCHLOA BRIZANTHA cv. Marandu. The experiment was conducted on an Oxisol in the State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Treatments consisted of four levels of soil compaction: no compaction (NC, slight compaction (SC, medium compaction (MC and high compaction (HC. The following soil properties were evaluated (layers 0-0.05 and 0.05-0.10 m: aggregate size distribution, bulk density (BD, macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity (TP, relative compaction (RC, and the characteristics of crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF and dry matter yield (DMY of the forage. Highly compacted soil had high BD and RC, and low TP (0-0.05 m. Both DMY and CP were affected by HC, and both were strongly related to BD. Higher DMY (6.96 Mg ha-1 and CP (7.8 % were observed in the MC treatment (BD 1.57 Mg m-3 and RC 0.91 Mg m-3, in 0-0.05 m. A high BD of 1.57 Mg m-3 (0-0.05 m did not inhibit plant growth. The N concentration in the palisade biomass differed significantly among compaction treatments, and was 8.72, 11.20, 12.48 and 10.98 g kg-1 in NC, SC, MC and HC treatments, respectively. Increase in DMY and CP at the MC level may be attributed to more absorption of N in this coarse-textured soil.

  15. Constraints on the Geometry of the Obscuring Torus from the NuSTAR Survey of the Local Seyfert II Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona; Brightman, Murray

    2017-08-01

    The obscuring torus is one of the main components of the basic unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGN), needed to create anisotropy in obscuration as a function of the viewing angle. We present the first study of the geometrical properties of the AGN torus in a large and representative sample of type II Seyfert nuclei. The sample consists of 124 AGN selected in the hard X-ray band from the Swift/BAT 70-month catalog and observed simultaneously with NuSTAR and Swift/XRT. These data enable us to explore the constraints that observed spectra place on the properties of the obscuring torus in individual AGN and in the local population of Seyfert II nuclei. We make use of empirically motivated spectral models for X-ray reprocessing in approximately toroidal geometry for constraining the distribution of the average column density of the torus, and the distribution of the torus covering factor within this sample. We find that the torus-averaged column density is independent of the line-of-sight column density, with typical column density that is borderline Compton-thick, i.e., around the unity optical depth for Compton scattering. The distribution of torus covering factors is broad but shows a preference for high covering, peaking around the covering factor of 90%, with the median at 70%, in agreement with recent sample studies in the infrared band. We also examine the dependence of the covering factor on intrinsic luminosity, finding that the median covering factor peaks around the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of 10^42.5 erg/s and decreases toward both lower and higher luminosities.

  16. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  17. Vacuum vessel system design for the compact ignition tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddan, W. (Ebasco Services Inc., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The compact ignition tokamak (CIT) is envisioned to be the test bed for the study of self- sustained, or ignited, fusion plasmas. The design basis for CIT is a 11-T toroidal field, 12-MA plasma current and peak fusion power of 500 MW. A major portion of this project is the vacuum vessel system, which includes the vacuum chamber, the divertor, first wall, and the robotics systems necessary to maintain the in-vessel components. The vacuum chamber is 2.1 m major radius torus with a D-shaped cross section. For hydrogenic species the base pressure is 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, with a total pumping speed of 5000 l/s. It is designed to withstand the forces resulting from plasma disruptions and be bakeable to approximately 350 {degree}C. A swept divertor and fixed limiters are provided. Both are carbon based structures designed to accommodate heat fluxes as large as 40 MW/m{sup 2} during the 5 s pulse. Articulated booms and manipulators will be deployed for in-vessel maintenance tasks, such as first wall removal/replacement and leak checking. This paper summarizes the engineering considerations and design status. In addition, the unique organization of the project's national design team, led by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the integration into this organization of the industrial consortium responsible for the design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel system is described.

  18. Investigation of HMA compactability using GPR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    . Actually, the prediction is not regulated by any standards or specifications, although the practice is considered to be workable. In view of the above, an extensive experiment was carried out in both the laboratory and the field based on a trial asphalt pavement section under construction. In the laboratory, the study focused on the estimation of the density of HMA specimens achieved through three different roller compaction modes (static, vibratory and a combination of both) targeted to simulate field compaction and assess the asphalt mix compactability. In the field, the different compaction modes were successively implemented on three subsections of the trial pavement section. Along each subsection, GPR data was collected in order to determine the new material's dielectric properties and based on that, to predict its density using proper algorithm. Thus, cores were extracted to be used as ground truth data. The comparison of the new asphalt material compactability as obtained from the laboratory specimens, the predictions based on GPR data and the field cores provided useful information that facilitated the selection of the most effective compaction mode yielding the proper compaction degree in the field. This work benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar."

  19. Compact difference approximation with consistent boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dexun; MA Yanwen; LI Xinliang; LIU Mingyu

    2003-01-01

    For simulating multi-scale complex flow fields it should be noted that all the physical quantities we are interested in must be simulated well. With limitation of the computer resources it is preferred to use high order accurate difference schemes. Because of their high accuracy and small stencil of grid points computational fluid dynamics (CFD) workers pay more attention to compact schemes recently. For simulating the complex flow fields the treatment of boundary conditions at the far field boundary points and near far field boundary points is very important. According to authors' experience and published results some aspects of boundary condition treatment for far field boundary are presented, and the emphasis is on treatment of boundary conditions for the upwind compact schemes. The consistent treatment of boundary conditions at the near boundary points is also discussed. At the end of the paper are given some numerical examples. The computed results with presented method are satisfactory.

  20. Visual soil evaluation and soil compaction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M.L. Guimarães, Rachel; Keller, Thomas; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    to organize a joint workshop. The present special issue is an outcome from the workshop on “Soil structural quality of tropical soils: Visual evaluation methods and soil compaction prevention strategies” that was held 26–29 May 2014 in Maringá, Paraná, Brazil. There has been a long-lasting interest in Visual...... and climatic conditions, as well as in utilizing VSE methods together with qualitative methods to evaluate the impact of soil management (Munkholm et al., 2013). Soil compaction due to agricultural operations is a serious threat to soil productivity and soil ecological functions and has been a key research...... Soil Evaluation (VSE). An ISTRO working group was established more than 30 years ago with the objectives to exchange knowledge and experiences on field methods of visual-tactile soil assessment and to foster international cooperation on new or refined methods. The three previous meeting of the group...

  1. COMPACT SUPPORT THIN PLATE SPLINE ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jing; Yang Xuan; Yu Jianping

    2007-01-01

    Common tools based on landmarks in medical image elastic registration are Thin Plate Spline (TPS) and Compact Support Radial Basis Function (CSRBF). TPS forces the corresponding landmarks to exactly match each other and minimizes the bending energy of the whole image. However,in real application, such scheme would deform the image globally when deformation is only local.CSRBF needs manually determine the support size, although its deformation is limited local. Therefore,to limit the effect of the deformation, new Compact Support Thin Plate Spline algorithm (CSTPS) is approached, analyzed and applied. Such new approach gains optimal mutual information, which shows its registration result satisfactory. The experiments also show it can apply in both local and global elastic registration.

  2. 纯棉细号高密紧密纱织物无PVA上浆体会%Experience of Sizing Pure Cotton Fine Count High Density Compact Yarn Fabric without PVA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周祥

    2012-01-01

    Sizing processing of pure cotton fine count high density compact yarn fabric without PVA was discussed. Compact yarn sizing key points were analyzed. Sizing and size film properties were contrasted in condition of adopting PVA and no PVA. Sizing test was done on compact yarn. Test test shows that sizing of pure cotton fine count high density compact yarn fabric without PVA can be realized through setting sizing processing rationally, ensuring sizing hairiness, strength and elongation in better state.%探讨纯棉细号高密紧密纱织物无PVA上浆工艺.分析了紧密纱上浆的要点,对比了含PVA浆料配方与无PVA浆料配方的浆液与浆膜性能,对紧密纱进行了上浆试验.试验证明,通过合理设置上浆工艺,保证浆纱毛羽、强力及伸长处于较佳状态,可以实现纯棉细号高密紧密纱织物的无PVA上浆.

  3. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B. [Euratom / CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Belli, F. [Associazione Euratom -ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, Frascati (Italy); Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, BOX 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Craciunescu, T. [Association Euratom -MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (Romania); Garcia-Munoz, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association IPP, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Curuia, M.; Soare, S. [Association Euratom -MEdC, National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technology (Romania); Darrow, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton, NJ (United States); Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J. [Euratom/IST Fusion Association, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Giacomelli, L.; Voitsekhovitch, I. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Gorini,; Nocente, M. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy and Associazione Euratom -ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  4. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the CO and CO2 net reaction rates from the FGM. This, in turn, provides another benefit . That is, the source term in YC is not just now dependent on...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion...information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. *Disseminated

  5. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  6. Radial variation of sulfur and oxygen ions in the Io plasma torus as deduced from remote observations by Hisaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kimura, T.; Kagitani, M.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Kuwabara, M.; Suzuki, F.; Hikida, R.; Yoshikawa, I.; Bagenal, F.; Fujimoto, M.

    2017-03-01

    The Io plasma torus, situated in the Jovian inner magnetosphere (6-8 Jovian radii from the planet) is filled with heavy ions and electrons, a large part of which are derived from Io's volcanos. The torus is the key area connecting the primary source of plasma (Io) with the midmagnetosphere (>10 Jovian radii), where highly dynamic phenomena are taking place. Revealing the plasma behavior of the torus is a key factor in elucidating Jovian magnetospheric dynamics. A global picture of the Io plasma torus can be obtained via spectral diagnosis of remotely sensed ion emissions generated via electron impact excitation. Hisaki, an Earth-orbiting spacecraft equipped with an extreme ultraviolet spectrograph Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics, has observed the torus at moderate spectral resolution. The data have been submitted to spectral analysis and physical chemistry modeling under the assumption of axial symmetry. Results from the investigation are radial profiles of several important parameters including electron density and temperature as well as ion abundances. The inward transport timescale of midmagnetospheric plasma is obtained to be 2-40 h from the derived radial profile for the abundance of suprathermal electrons. The physical chemistry modeling results in a timescale for the outward transport of Io-derived plasma of around 30 days. The ratio between inward and outward plasma speed ( 1%) is consistent with the occurrence rate of depleted flux tubes determined using in situ observations by instruments on the Galileo spacecraft.

  7. Topological Strings, Two-Dimensional Yang-Mills Theory and Chern-Simons Theory on Torus Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Caporaso, N; Griguolo, L; Pasquetti, S; Seminara, D; Szabó, R J

    2006-01-01

    We study the relations between two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory on the torus, topological string theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold whose local geometry is the sum of two line bundles over the torus, and Chern-Simons theory on torus bundles. The chiral partition function of the Yang-Mills gauge theory in the large N limit is shown to coincide with the topological string amplitude computed by topological vertex techniques. We use Yang-Mills theory as an efficient tool for the computation of Gromov-Witten invariants and derive explicitly their relation with Hurwitz numbers of the torus. We calculate the Gopakumar-Vafa invariants, whose integrality gives a non-trivial confirmation of the conjectured nonperturbative relation between two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory and topological string theory. We also demonstrate how the gauge theory leads to a simple combinatorial solution for the Donaldson-Thomas theory of the Calabi-Yau background. We match the instanton representation of Yang-Mills theory on the torus with ...

  8. Tailoring of the flip effect in the orientation of a magnet levitating over a superconducting torus: Geometrical dependencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez-Jimenez, Efren, E-mail: ediez@ing.uc3m.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque, 15, E28911 Leganes (Spain); Sander, Berit; Timm, Lauri; Perez-Diaz, Jose-Luis [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Butarque, 15, E28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A local model is used to demonstrate a flip effect in the orientation of a magnet over a superconductor. {yields} A superconducting torus shape is studied. {yields} Increasing the inner radius of the torus elevates the flip effect point. {yields} There are linear piecewises in the geometrical dependency functions that help to fit the flip effect point. - Abstract: In a previous study, a general local model was used in order to demonstrate the apparition of a flip effect in the equilibrium orientation of a magnet when it is over a superconducting torus. This effect can be easily used in devices such as binary position detectors for magneto-microscopy, contactless sieves or magnetic levels amongst others. We present an initial study useful to design devices based on the flip effect between magnets and torus superconductors. It demonstrates that varying different geometrical parameters the flip effect point can be fixed. Also, it can be observed that increasing the inner radius of the torus elevates the flip effect point. A magneto-mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is exposed. For an increment of cross-section diameter occurs the same behavior. There are linear piecewises in the geometrical dependency functions that can be used for a more accurate fitting of the flip effect point.

  9. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a compact UV laser ?based sensor for Earth science and planetary atmosphere exploration....

  10. Countably determined compact abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dikranjan, Dikran

    2008-01-01

    For an abelian topological group G let G^* be the dual group of all continuous characters endowed with the compact open topology. A subgroup D of G determines G if the restriction homomorphism G^* --> D^* of the dual groups is a topological isomorphism. Given a scattered compact subset X of an infinite compact abelian group G such that |X|compact abelian group determined by its countable subgroup must be metrizable. This gives a negative answer to questions of Comfort, Hernandez, Macario, Raczkowski and Trigos-Arrieta, as well as provides short proofs of main results established in three manuscripts by these authors.

  11. Compact energy conversion module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  12. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  13. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  14. Compact, Airborne Multispecies Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a compact mid-infrared laser spectrometer to benefit Earth science research activities. To...

  15. Active galactic nucleus torus models and the puzzling infrared spectrum of IRAS F10214+4724

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, A.; Christopher, N.; Verma, A.; Siebenmorgen, R.

    2013-12-01

    We present a revised model for the infrared emission of the hyperluminous infrared galaxy IRAS F10214+4724 which takes into account recent photometric data from Spitzer and Herschel that sample the peak of its spectral energy distribution. We first present and discuss a grid of smooth active galactic nucleus (AGN) torus models computed with the method of Efstathiou & Rowan-Robinson and demonstrate that the combination of these models and the starburst models of Efstathiou and coworkers, while able to give an excellent fit to the average spectrum of Seyfert 2s and spectra of individual type 2 quasars measured by Spitzer, fails to match the spectral energy distribution of IRAS F10214+4724. This is mainly due to the fact that the νSν distribution of the galaxy falls very steeply with increasing frequency (a characteristic that is usually indicative of heavy absorption by dust) but shows a silicate feature in emission. Such emission features are not expected in sources with optical/near-infrared type 2 AGN spectral signatures. The Herschel data show that there is more power emitted in the rest-frame 20-50 μm wavelength range compared with the model presented by Efstathiou which assumes three components of emission: an edge-on torus, clouds (at a temperature of 610 and 200 K) that are associated with the narrow-line region (NLR) and a highly obscured starburst that dominates in the submillimetre. We present a revised version of that model that assumes an additional component of emission which we associate with NLR clouds at a temperature of 100 K. The 100 K dust component could also be explained by a highly obscured hot starburst. The model suggests that the NLR of IRAS F10214+4724 has an unusually high covering factor (≥17 per cent) or more likely the magnification of the emission from the NLR clouds is significantly higher than that of the emission from the torus.

  16. Análise da máquina Torus sob frenagem eletrodinâmica

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas Obert Martins Osório

    2011-01-01

    Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de estudar a aplicação, para sistema de frenagem veicular, de uma máquina elétrica sem escovas, de armadura toroidal, e fluxo magnético axial produzido por ímãs permanentes de terras raras, a chamada máquina Torus. A máquina foi construída no LMEAE e estudada inicialmente como motor em outro trabalho. Mas, para que se possa avaliar seu funcionamento em sistema de frenagem, o foco é do ponto de vista da máquina como gerador. São realizados testes d...

  17. The non-Maxwellian energy distribution of ions in the warm Io torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J. D.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of Io's torus indicate that the majority of ions have energies of 55-75 eV, with a high-energy tail extending up to the corotation energy. It was found that such a distribution can be established via the Coulomb cooling of ions heated at the corotation energy onto the cold 5-eV electrons. The energy E(asterisk) of the main body of the ions and the shape of the energy distribution are functions of the transport loss time. Matching E(asterisk) with the data (E/asterisk/ = 55-75 eV) requires transport loss times in the range 25-1000 days.

  18. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma generated with high positive or negative applied potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Gerdin, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus superconducting magnet facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kilovolts by applying direct-current voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer of the midplane electrode rings. The electric fields which are responsible for heating the ions by E/B drift then point radially outward or inward. The low-frequency fluctuations below the ion cyclotron frequency appeared to be dominated by rotating spokes.

  19. Ordinary-mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance absorption and emission in the Princeton Large Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Hosea, J.C.

    1979-11-01

    Fundamental electron cyclotron resonance damping for 4 mm waves with ordinary polarization is measured for propagation along the major radius traversing the midplane of the plasma in the Princeton Large Torus (PLT). Optical depths obtained from the data are in good agreement with those predicted by the relativistic hot plasma theory. Near blackbody emission over much of the plasma midplane is obtained and, in conjunction with the damping measurements, indicates that the vessel reflectivity is high. The practical use of ordinary mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in existing and future toroidal devices is supported by these results.

  20. Position-dependent mass approach and quantization for a torus Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşiltaş, Özlem

    2016-09-01

    We have shown that a Lagrangian for a torus surface can yield second-order nonlinear differential equations using the Euler-Lagrange formulation. It is seen that these second-order nonlinear differential equations can be transformed into the nonlinear quadratic and Mathews-Lakshmanan equations using the position-dependent mass approach developed by Mustafa (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48, 225206 (2015)) for the classical systems. Then, we have applied the quantization procedure to the nonlinear quadratic and Mathews-Lakshmanan equations and found their exact solutions.